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Sample records for circumstellar disc envelope

  1. The circumstellar disc in the Bok globule CB 26. Multi-wavelength observations and modelling of the dust disc and envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, J.; Wolf, S.; Launhardt, R.; Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Pinte, C.; Duchêne, G.; Ménard, F.; McCabe, C.-E.; Pontoppidan, K.; Dunham, M.; Bourke, T. L.; Chen, J.-H.

    2009-10-01

    Context: Circumstellar discs are expected to be the nursery of planets. Grain growth within such discs is the first step in the planet formation process. The Bok globule CB 26 harbours such a young disc. Aims: We present a detailed model of the edge-on circumstellar disc and its envelope in the Bok globule CB 26. Methods: The model is based on HST near-infrared maps in the I, J, H, and K bands, OVRO and SMA radio maps at 1.1 mm, 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 0.9 {μ m} to 3 mm. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Caltech Submilimeter Observatory are also part of our analysis. Using the self-consistent radiative transfer code MC3D, the model we construct is able to discriminate between parameter sets and dust properties of both envelope and disc. Results: We find that the data are fit by a disc that has an inner hole with a radius of 45±5 AU. Based on a dust model including silicate and graphite, the maximum grain size needed to reproduce the spectral millimetre index is 2.5 {μ m}. Features seen in the near-infrared images, dominated by scattered light, can be described as a result of a rotating envelope. Conclusions: Successful employment of ISM dust in both the disc and envelope hint that grain growth may not yet play a significant role for the appearance of this system. A large inner hole implies that CB 26 is a circumbinary disc.

  2. Polarimetric microlensing of circumstellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We study the benefits of polarimetry observations of microlensing events to detect and characterize circumstellar discs around the microlensed stars located at the Galactic bulge. These discs which are unresolvable from their host stars make a net polarization effect due to their projected elliptical shapes. Gravitational microlensing can magnify these signals and make them be resolved. The main aim of this work is to determine what extra information about these discs can be extracted from polarimetry observations of microlensing events in addition to those given by photometry ones. Hot discs which are closer to their host stars are more likely to be detected by microlensing, owing to more contributions in the total flux. By considering this kind of discs, we show that although the polarimetric efficiency for detecting discs is similar to the photometric observation, but polarimetry observations can help to constraint the disc geometrical parameters e.g. the disc inner radius and the lens trajectory with respect to the disc semimajor axis. On the other hand, the time-scale of polarimetric curves of these microlensing events generally increases while their photometric time-scale does not change. By performing a Monte Carlo simulation, we show that almost four optically thin discs around the Galactic bulge sources are detected (or even characterized) through photometry (or polarimetry) observations of high-magnification microlensing events during 10-yr monitoring of 150 million objects.

  3. The photodissociation of CO in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO photodissociation rate for the unshielded ISM is calculated using recent laboratory results which confirm that photodissociation occurs by way of line absorption. A value of 2.0 x 10 to the -10th/s, an order of magnitude higher than the rate used in the past, is obtained. The new rate and a treatment of the radiative transfer and shielding are used to develop a theory for the CO abundance in the circumstellar envelopes of cool, evolved stars, and results are presented on the spatial variation of CO, C, and C(+). It is shown that these distributions play important roles in determining the observational properties of circumstellar envelopes.

  4. Small carbon chains in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, R. J.; Hinkle, K.; Bernath, P. F.

    2014-11-01

    Observations of carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes were made using the Phoenix spectrograph on the Gemini South telescope to determine the abundance of small carbon chain molecules. Vibration-rotation lines of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch of C3 near 2040 cm-1 (4.902 μm) have been used to determine the column density for four carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes: CRL 865, CRL 1922, CRL 2023 and IRC +10216. We additionally calculate the column density of C5 for IRC +10216, and provide an upper limit for five more objects. An upper limit estimate for the C7 column density is also provided for IRC+10216. A comparison of these column densities suggests a revision to current circumstellar chemical models may be needed.

  5. Carbon chemistry of circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieging, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical composition of envelopes surrounding cool evolved stars, as determined from microwave spectroscopic observations, is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on recent observations with the new large mm-wavelength telescopes and interferometer arrays, and on new theoretical work, especially concerning ion-molecule chemistry of carbon-bearing in these envelopes. Thermal (as opposed to maser) emission lines are discussed. Much progress has been made in the past few years in the theoretical understanding of these objects. It is already clear, however, that observations with the new generation of mm-telescopes will require substantial improvements in the theoretical models to achieve a thorough understanding of the data now becoming available.

  6. Fullerenes and fulleranes in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun; Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza

    2016-07-01

    Three decades of search have recently led to convincing discoveries of cosmic fullerenes. The presence of C60 and C+ 60 in both circumstellar and interstellar environments suggests that these molecules and their derivatives can be efficiently formed in circumstellar envelopes and survive in harsh conditions. Detailed analysis of the infrared bands from fullerenes and their connections with the local properties can provide valuable information on the physical conditions and chemical processes that occurred in the late stages of stellar evolution. The identification of C+ 60 as the carrier of four diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) suggests that fullerene- related compounds are abundant in interstellar space and are essential for resolving the DIB mystery. Experiments have revealed a high hydrogenation rate when C60 is exposed to atomic hydrogen, motivating the attempt to search for cosmic fulleranes. In this paper, we present a short review of current knowledge of cosmic fullerenes and fulleranes and briefly discuss the implications on circumstellar chemistry.

  7. The Circumstellar Envelope of IRC +10216.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keady, John Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Using recently obtained spatial and spectral line data on the circumstellar envelope of IRC +10216, we have attempted to semi-empirically probe the conditions in this envelope. The computational techniques utilized in our analysis accurately incorporate the effects of geometrical extension and velocity fields on the radiative transfer. We have also attempted to account for the non-equilibrium expected in the vibrational level populations of the gas phase species. Our modelling of the spatial distribution of the dust-produced circumstellar radiation field at 5 (mu)m and 11 (mu)m indicates that dust may be condensing in the circumstellar envelope. The dominant opacity source in our calculations, amorphous carbon, also seems to provide sufficient far-infrared flux. Modelling of the SiC emission feature confirms previous results that suggest a nonuniform particle-shape distribution for the SiC. We can produce multi-component absorption lines, very similar to the 2 (mu)m CO first overtone lines seen in IRC +10216, with continuous distributions of material. The requirement is regions of relatively low acceleration. Modelling of our high resolution, high signal-to-noise observations of the CO fundamental and first overtone indicates a mass -loss rate of 1.5(10('-4)) M(,(CIRCLE))/yr. Our calculations to date indicate that the gas reaches terminal velocity between 10 and 20 R(,*). The envelope mass within 100 R(,*) is 3(10('-2)) M(,(CIRCLE)), with the ratio (by mass) of dust to gas being 10('-3). The assumption of a constant mass-loss rate implies an envelope mass of (TURN)1 M(,(CIRCLE)) within 5000 R(,*). The computational techniques utilized are sufficiently adaptable and economical so that considerable future refinement of the modelling is possible.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide in a circumstellar envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukita, N.; Morris, M.

    1983-01-01

    A search for hydrogen sulfide in the cool circumstellar envelopes of 25 stars was made using the 1(10)-1(01) rotational line at 1.8 mm. It was detected in the bipolar nebula/OH maser OH231.8+4.2, an object having a high rate of mass loss. An approximate analysis indicates that 1/60 of the sulfur in this outflowing envelope is in the form of H2S, a fraction which may be similar to that in the atmosphere of the central star. In addition, the shape of the observed line profile is discussed in terms of a possible variation of the outflow velocity with latitude above the system's equatorial plane.

  9. CO line emission from circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, D.; Hernandez, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Yoshida, H.; Phillips, T. G.

    2006-04-01

    Aims.We present the results of a multi-transition CO observational program conducted on a sample of AGB and post-AGB stars envelopes. We have collected maps and single pointing observations of these envelopes in 5 rotational transitions ranging from J = 1-0 to J = 6-5, including in particular new observations of the CO line at 691 GHz at the CSO. The use of such a set of mm and submm CO line on stellar envelopes is rare and limited to the work of some authors on IRC+10216. Methods: .Using a model for the CO emission of an AGB circumstellar envelope, in combination with a standard LVG approach, we have conducted a systematic modelling analysis using the whole set of CO data collected for a sample of 12 sources. We simultaneously fit all five transitions, taking into account the spatial information provided by the maps. Results: .We find mass-loss rates in the range 1 × 10-7 to 4 × 10-4 M_⊙/yr, and envelope temperatures ranging from 20 K to 1000 K at a radius of 1016 cm. There seem to be a general anti-correlation between mass loss rates and temperature, the high mass loss rate AGBs having low temperatures, and vice versa. We show that most AGB data can be fitted using a constant mass loss rate, at least within the calibration uncertainties associated with the data collected at different frequencies. For some cases though (e.g. CIT 6, R Hya, χ Cyg), a change in the mass loss rate history needs to be invoked to reconcile data at low- and high-J, a scenario already mentioned by several authors to explain observations of WX Psc.

  10. The theoretical polarization of pure scattering axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    The Sobolev approach to the scattering of starlight through a pure scattering circumstellar envelope is developed. The theoretical polarization due to electron scattering in Be star envelopes is calculated for two geometries (an equatorially enhanced envelope and a spheroidal envelope). Only the disk-type envelope is found to yield a maximum polarization consistent with the observed range for Be stars. A lower limit, analytical approximation to the theoretical polarization from a pure scattering envelope is obtained.

  11. Conditions for circumstellar disc formation - II. Effects of initial cloud stability and mass accretion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate on to the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brakes the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with non-uniform densities.

  12. Photochemistry and molecular ions in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Omont, A.; Lucas, R.

    1987-01-01

    An earlier theory of ionization of C-rich circumstellar envelopes based on the photochemical model is extended to include the temperature dependence of ion-molecule reactions with polar molecules, particularly HCN, and line self-shielding of CO dissociating radiation. The results are applied to the abundances of HCO(+) and HNC in C-rich circumstellar envelopes. With standard parameters for IRC + 10216, the model is found to be consistent with the new upper limit to the antenna temperature of the J = 1-0 line of HCO(+) obtained with the IRAM 30-m telescope. The photochemical model provides a natural explanation of the relatively large ratio of HCN to HNC observed for C-rich circumstellar envelopes, and good agreement is obtained for the H(C-13)N/HNC antenna temperature ratio measured for IRC + 10216.

  13. Photochemistry and molecular ions in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Omont, A.; Lucas, R.

    1987-01-01

    An earlier theory of ionization of C-rich circumstellar envelopes based on the photochemical model is extended to include the temperature dependence of ion-molecule reactions with polar molecules, particularly HCN, and line self-shielding of CO dissociating radiation. The results are applied to the abundances of HCO(+) and HNC in C-rich circumstellar envelopes. With standard parameters for IRC + 10216, the model is found to be consistent with the new upper limit to the antenna temperature of the J = 1-0 line of HCO(+) obtained with the IRAM 30-m telescope. The photochemical model provides a natural explanation of the relatively large ratio of HCN to HNC observed for C-rich circumstellar envelopes, and good agreement is obtained for the H(C-13)N/HNC antenna temperature ratio measured for IRC + 10216.

  14. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  15. Circumstellar envelopes and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habing, H. J.

    Red giants are sometimes surrounded by envelopes, the result of the ejection of stellar matter at a large rate (dot M> 10^{-7}M_odot/yr) and at a low velocity (10 km/s). In this review the envelopes are discussed and the relation between stars and envelope: what stars combine with what envelopes? The envelope emits radiation by various processes and has been detected at all wavelengths between the visual and the microwave range. I review the observations of continuum radiation emitted by dust particles and of rotational transitions of molecules, where these molecules have been excited by thermal or by non thermal (“maser”) processes. I discuss mainly the oxygen rich stars, those of spectral type M, and only briefly the closely related carbon rich stars. By and large the density in the envelope is well described by spherically symmetric outflow at a constant velocity; on the time scale needed to flow from stellar surface to the outermost layers, i.e. 10^5 yr, the loss of mass is sometimes interrupted suddenly after which the envelope becomes “detached” from the star. The temperature decreases when moving outward; heat input is by friction between dust particles and gas and cooling occurs by line radiation by various molecules, especially by H_2O. The molecular composition is determined by formation in an equilibrium process deep in the atmosphere and by destruction in the outer parts of the outflow by interstellar UV radiation (H_2, CO, H_2O) or by depletion due to condensation on dust grains (SiO); dust particles of silicate material solidify where the radiation temperature is decreased to about 1000 K, and this is at a few stellar radii. The various continuum spectra produced by the dust particles in different stars are well modelled by a simple model of the density and dust temperature distribution plus the assumption that the particles consist of “dirty silicate”, i.e. silicate with Fe and Al ions added. A large range of optical depths,tau_{9.7

  16. Photochemistry and molecular ions in oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Omont, A.

    1987-01-01

    A theory for the ionization of the circumstellar envelopes around O-rich red giants is developed from the photochemical model. The main source of ionization is photoionization of H2O, OH, and C by the interstellar UV radiation field, supplemented by cosmic-ray ionization of hydrogen. Significant amounts of H3O(+) and HCO(+) are produced, with peak abundances of about 10 to the -7th at intermediate distances from the star. Although H3O(+) may be difficult to detect with current instrumentation, HCO(+) is probably detectable in nearby O-rich envelopes with large millimeter-wave telescopes.

  17. Photochemistry and molecular ions in oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Omont, A.

    1987-01-01

    A theory for the ionization of the circumstellar envelopes around O-rich red giants is developed from the photochemical model. The main source of ionization is photoionization of H2O, OH, and C by the interstellar UV radiation field, supplemented by cosmic-ray ionization of hydrogen. Significant amounts of H3O(+) and HCO(+) are produced, with peak abundances of about 10 to the -7th at intermediate distances from the star. Although H3O(+) may be difficult to detect with current instrumentation, HCO(+) is probably detectable in nearby O-rich envelopes with large millimeter-wave telescopes.

  18. PAH formation in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Frenklach, Michael

    1989-01-01

    While there is growing observational evidence that some fraction of interstellar carbon is in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), the mechanisms by which these molecules might be formed have not been extensively studied. A detailed investigation of PAH production in the outflowing molecular envelopes of carbon-rich red giant star is presented. The gasphase kinetics of a chemical reaction mechanism developed to study soot production in hydrocarbon flames is modified to apply in circumstellar environments. It was found that astrophysically significant quantities of PAH's can be formed in carbon star envelopes provided the gas is sufficiently dense and resides for a long time in the temperature range of 900 to 1100 k. The precise yield of PAH's is very sensitive to astronomical parameters of the envelope (e.g., mass loss rate, outflow velocity, and acetylene abundance) and certain poorly determined chemical reaction rates.

  19. Dust mineralogy in the circumstellar envelope of SVS13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyoshi, T.; Wright, C.; Moore, T.

    It is of great interest to study the mineralogy of circumstellar dust around young stars as it represents the original constituents of planetesimals, hence of the rocky planets like our own Earth. To this end, we have obtained an N-band (8-13 µm) spectrum of a pre-main-sequence star SVS13, using the facility mid-infrared imaging spectrometer COMICS on the Japanese 8.2-m Subaru Telescope atop the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We have fitted various emissivities/absorption coefficients of dust species to the spectrum to examine dust mineralogy in the circumstellar envelope of this remarkable young star. In this presentation, we outline the modelling and highlight some of our findings.

  20. A Bagel-shaped Envelope To Model Circumstellar Material Around Rapidly Rotating Be-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhami, Yamina; Gies, D.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Schaefer, G.

    2009-01-01

    The circumstellar material around Be stars have essentially been studied spectroscopically and interferometrically with disc-shaped models (Waters et al. 1987, Hummel 1994, Gies et al. 2007), where the physical properties are still not very well defined. Schmitz et al. 1983 and Rohrmann et al. 1997, have applied the kinetic theory of gases to steady-state isothermal gaseous masses with differential rotation, and predict bagel-shaped circumstellar envelopes. The theory of a circumstellar torus could very well explain the short and long lived photometric outbursts that have been reported by Mennickent et al.2002, Hubert et al. 1998, and other irregular behaviors such as the spectroscopic transition from a standard B-type star to a Be-type star (Pavlovski et al. 1997). The purpose of this study is to show results on how to model a low-density circumstellar torus around the Be star and to generate visibility curves that could be comparable to observational data obtained with the CHARA long baseline infrared interferometer.

  1. BF Orionis - Evidence for an infalling circumstellar envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Barden, Samuel C.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the optical magnitudes and Balmer lines of the Herbig Ae/Be star BF Orionis confirm that the object is an early to mid A-type star, but appears to be below the zero-age main sequence. Enhanced metal-line strengths (once thought to link BF Ori with the Am stars), line asymmetries, and radial velocities are shown to be signatures of an infalling circumstellar envelope. The possibility that BF Ori has a late-type companion is examined, and it is concluded that it does not.

  2. The ionization structure of the circumstellar envelope of Alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The physical processes which affect the ionization of the outer circumstellar envelope of Alpha Ori are analyzed and evaluated. The ultraviolet radiation fields of the chromosphere and the interstellar medium dominate the envelope, and the most common forms of all species are neutral atoms and first ions. Hydrogen recombines just outside the chromosphere, where atoms with smaller ionization potential are essentially fully ionized. The heavier ions gradually recombine with increasing distance from the star, until the interstellar radiation field reverses this trend. The electron fraction in the outer envelope is approximately equal to the abundance of all such heavy atoms, i.e., of the order of 0.0001. The analysis is applied to the case of neutral K, whose density in the envelope has been determined by scattering experiments. The theory predicts that the slope of the K I density distribution should decrease from -1.5 to -3.5 in the outer envelope. The mass loss rate of Alpha Ori implied by the K I scattering experiments is 4 x 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr.

  3. 1612 MHz OH maser emission from axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes - Miras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collison, Alan J.; Fix, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations are performed using a modified form of the Sobolev approximation to determine the inversion of the 1612 MHz line of OH in axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes around Miras. The mass loss is assumed to be occurring in the form of a smooth wind. Line profiles and maps are presented for three models of varying degrees of asymmetry and for various orientations of the envelopes. It is concluded that the axisymmetric models can reproduce many of the features of observed profiles and maps which both the standard, spherically symmetric model and the discrete emission model cannot easily explain. The model profiles reproduce all of the general features seen in the line profiles of real sources.

  4. Polarimetric Models of Circumstellar Discs Including Aggregate Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Mahesh

    The work conducted in this thesis examines the nature of circumstellar discs by investigating irradiance and polarization of scattered light. Two circumstellar discs are investigated. Firstly, H-band high contrast imaging data on the transitional disc of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD169142 are presented. The images were obtained through the polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) technique on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the adaptive optics system NACO. Our observations use longer exposure times, allowing us to examine the edges of the disc. Analysis of the observations shows distinct signs of polarization due to circumstellar material, but due to excessive saturation and adaptive optics errors further information on the disc could not be inferred. The HD169142 disc is then modelled using the 3D radiative transfer code Hyperion. Initial models were constructed using a two disc structure, however recent PDI has shown the existence of an annular gap. In addition to this the annular gap is found not to be devoid of dust. This then led to the construction of a four-component disc structure. Estimates of the mass of dust in the gap (2.10E-6 Msun) are made as well as for the planet (1.53E-5 Msun (0.016 Mjupiter)) suspected to be responsible for causing the gap. The predicted polarization was also estimated for the disc, peaking at ~14 percent. The use of realistic dust grains (ballistic aggregate particles) in Monte Carlo code is also examined. The fortran code DDSCAT is used to calculate the scattering properties for aggregates which are used to replace the spherical grain models used by the radiative transfer code Hyperion. Currently, Hyperion uses four independent elements to define the scattering matrix, therefore the use of rotational averaging and a 50/50 percent population of grains and their enantiomers were explored to reduce the number of contributing scattering elements from DDSCAT. A python script was created to extract the scattering data from the DDSCAT

  5. The Circumstellar Envelope of ζ Tauri through Optical Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycner, Christopher; Hajian, Arsen R.; Armstrong, J. T.; Benson, J. A.; Gilbreath, G. C.; Hutter, D. J.; Lester, John B.; Mozurkewich, D.; Pauls, T. A.

    2004-02-01

    We present optical interferometric observations of the Be star ζ Tauri obtained using the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI). The multichannel capability of the NPOI allows a high-quality internal calibration of the squared visibilities corresponding to the Hα emission from the circumstellar environment. The observations suggest a strong departure from circular symmetry and thus are described by an elliptical Gaussian model. We use a nonlinear least-squares fit to the data to obtain the likeliest parameters, and the corresponding uncertainties are determined using a Monte Carlo simulation. We obtain 3.14+/-0.21 mas for the angular size of the major axis, -62.3d+/-4.4d for the position angle, and 0.310+/-0.072 for the axial ratio. By comparing our results with those already in the literature, we conclude that the model parameters describing the general characteristics of the circumstellar envelope of ζ Tau appear to be stable on timescales of years. We also compare our results with the known parameters describing the binary nature of ζ Tau, and we conclude that the envelope surrounds only the primary component and is well within its Roche lobe.

  6. The circumstellar envelope of S 106 - IRS 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felli, M.; Simon, M.; Fischer, J.; Hamann, F.

    1985-04-01

    The authors present new observations that help set the parameters of the ionized circumstellar envelope of S 106-IRS 4. The part of the envelope that is optically thick at 1.35 cm wavelength is smaller than 0arcsec.15 diameter which corresponds to 90 AU at 600 pc distance. The profiles of the Brackett-α and -γ lines are somewhat different with half power widths of 121±10 and 181±15 km s-1, respectively. The He I (21P-21S) line is detected at the S 106 nebula but not at IRS 4. The He I line emission of the nebula indicates that the central star of IRS 4 must have an effective temperature of about 35,000K. Comparison of the wind model scenario presented by Felli et al. (1984) with the present data and the Paschen line and Paschen edge data of McGregor et al. (1984) shows that the model encounters difficulties when observables that require details of the velocity field and of the innermost regions of the flow are considered.

  7. Shocks throughout the circumstellar envelope of yellow hypergiant IRC+10420

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ka-Tat; Lim, Jeremy; Dinh-V-Trung

    2013-06-01

    . For comparison, the typical SiO abundance around AGB stars is 10^-6 at radii of a few hundreds AU, and decreases steeply beyond. We attribute the enhanced SiO abundance in the shell relative to regions within and beyond to shocks between two mass-ejection episodes. As for the lower but still enhanced SiO abundance further out, we appeal to observations with the Hubble Space Telescope that show a multitude of knots distributed throughout (out to a projected distance of at least 10000 AU) and moving at relatively high velocities (~100 km/s) through the circumstellar envelope (expanding at a bulk velocity of ~40 km/s of IRC+10420. We speculate that shocks created by the motion of these knots relative to the gaseous envelope releases SiO, and that the enhanced density of these knots and/or gas compressed by the shocks excites SiO to produce the strong emission observed.

  8. Search for Hydrogenated C60 (Fulleranes) in Circumstellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Kwok, Sun

    2017-08-01

    The recent detection of fullerene (C60) in space and the positive assignment of five diffuse interstellar bands to {{{C}}}60+ reinforce the notion that fullerene-related compounds can be efficiently formed in circumstellar envelopes and be present in significant quantities in the interstellar medium. Experimental studies have shown that C60 can be readily hydrogenated, raising the possibility that hydrogenated fullerenes (or fulleranes, C60H m , m = 1-60) may be abundant in space. In this paper, we present theoretical studies of the vibrational modes of isomers of C60H m . Our results show that the four mid-infrared bands from the C60 skeletal vibrations remain prominent in slightly hydrogenated C60, but their strengths diminish in different degrees with increasing hydrogenation. It is therefore possible that the observed infrared bands assigned to C60 could be due to a mixture of fullerenes and fulleranes. This provides a potential explanation for the observed scatter of the C60 band ratios. Our calculations suggest that a feature around 15 μm due to the breathing mode of heavily hydrogenated C60 may be detectable astronomically. A preliminary search for this feature in 35 C60 sources is reported.

  9. Direct thermal imaging of circumstellar discs and exo-planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantin, Eric; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Cavarroc, Celine; Sterzik, Michael F.

    2008-07-01

    The phase A study of a mid infrared imager and spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), called METIS, was endorsed in May 2008. Two key science drivers of METIS are: a) direct thermal imaging of exo-planets and b) characterization of circumstellar discs from the early proto-planetary to the late debris phase. Observations in the 10μm atmospheric window (N band) require a contrast ratio between stellar light and emitted photons from the exo-planet or the disc of ~ 105. At shorter wavelengths the contrast between star and reflected light from the planet-disc system exceeds >~ 107 posing technical challenges. By means of end-to-end detailed simulations we demonstrate that the superb spatial resolution of a 42m telescope in combination with stellar light rejection methods such as coronagraphic or differential imaging will allow detections at 10μm for a solar type system down to a star-planet separation of 0.1" and a mass limit for irradiated planets of 1 Jupiter (MJ) mass. In case of self-luminous planets observations are possible further out e.g. at the separation limit of JWST of ~ 0.7", METIS will detect planets >~5MJ. This allows to derive a census of all such exo-planets by means of thermal imaging in a volume limited sample of up to 6pc. In addition, METIS will provide the possibility to study the chemical composition of atmospheres of exo-planets using spectroscopy at moderate spectral resolution (λ/Δλ ~ 100) for the brightest targets. Based on detailed performance and sensitivity estimates, we demonstrate that a mid-infrared instrument on an ELT is perfectly suited to observe gravitationally created structures such as gaps in proto- and post- planetary discs, in a complementary way to space missions (e.g. JWST, SOFIA) and ALMA which can only probe the cold dust emission further out.

  10. Trace Element Condensation in Circumstellar Envelopes of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1992-07-01

    It is now well established that meteorites contain reduced presolar grains, such as graphite and silicon carbide (SiC), which are probably formed by condensation of dust in the circumstellar envelopes of carbon-rich AGB stars. Here we model condensation in envelopes of carbon stars, with an emphasis on trace elements. Since absolute elemental abundances in stellar atmospheres are generally not known, we assume solar abundances (Anders and Grevesse 1989), except for carbon. A C/O ratio of 2, consistent with the mean and median values of 2.1 and 1.8 respectively, for 61 carbon stars (Gow 1977) was used. The C/O ratio was increased by adding carbon because astrophysicists believe that carbon produced in helium-burning zones may be mixed to the surfaces of C stars (e.g. Lucy 1976). We used physical parameters for the circumstellar shell of the high mass-loss rate, prototypical carbon star IRC +10216 (e.g. Keady et al. 1988, Dominik et al. 1990) and theoretical considerations by Salpeter (1974a,b) to construct a P-T-model of the envelope (see Fig. 1). Thermodynamic equilibrium condensation calculations for a reduced gas include ~600 gaseous and solid compounds of the elements H, C, N, O, S, P, F, Cl, Fe, Mg, Al, Ti, Si, Ca, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and REE. Refractory oxides, sulfides, nitrides, and carbides were considered as condensates. The calculations were done from T = 800 to 2500 K, and P= 10^-5 to 10^-13 bars. The effects of nucleation on condensation temperatures were calculated using the nucleation model discussed by Salpeter (1974a,b) and Cameron and Fegley (1982). The temperature drop required for condensation depends on (P,T, density) in the expanding envelope and also on the abundance, density, and surface energy (Es) of the nucleating compound. The range of E(sub)s values for NaCl-type carbides are about 800-1700 erg/cm^2 (Livey & Murray 1956); however, these data are generally poorly known. Another important variable is the sticking coefficient (s

  11. Direct UV observations of the circumstellar envelope of alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Carpenter, K. G.; Pesce, J. E.; Skinner, S.; Brown, A.; Judge, P.

    1988-01-01

    Observations were made in the IUE LWP camera, low dispersion mode, with alpha Ori being offset various distances from the center of the Long Wavelength Large Aperture along its major axis. Signal was acquired at all offset positions and is comprised of unequal components of background/dark counts, telescope-scattered light, and scattered light emanating from the extended circumstellar shell. The star is known from optical and infrared observations to possess an extended, arc-minute sized, shell of cool material. Attempts to observe this shell with the IUE are described, although the deconvolution of the stellar signal from the telescope scattered light requires further calibration effort.

  12. Inhomogeneities in the circumstellar envelope of the A0E herbig star AB aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, Nina; Pogodin, Mikhail; Najdenov, Ivan; Romanyuk, Iosiff

    1995-02-01

    Simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy in Hα andUBVRI polarimetric observations are proposed as an effective method for the search for circumstellar inhomogeneities in A0-type Herbig stars. The new results for AB Aur are presented as a successful example of the use of this method. The analysis of about 100 CCD Hα profiles (R = 30 000) and more than 150 polarimetric measurements obtained in January, 1994 allowed to discover a long-lived stream-like inhomogeneity in the circumstellar gaseous envelope.

  13. Anisotropic inverse Compton scattering of photons from the circumstellar disc in PSR B1259-63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soelen, B.; Meintjes, P. J.; Odendaal, A.; Townsend, L. J.

    2012-11-01

    The gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 consists of a 48 ms pulsar orbiting a Be star. The system is particularly interesting because it is the only gamma-ray binary system where the nature of the compact object is known. The non-thermal radiation from the system is powered by the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar and the unpulsed radiation originates from the stand-off shock front which forms between the pulsar and stellar wind. The Be star/optical companion in the system produces an excess infrared (IR) flux from the associated circumstellar disc. This IR excess provides an additional photon source for inverse Compton scattering. We discuss the effects of the IR excess near periastron, for anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and associated gamma-ray production. We determine the IR excess from the circumstellar disc using a modified version of a curve of growth method, which takes into account the changing optical depth through the circumstellar disc during the orbit. The model is constrained using archive data and additional mid-IR observations obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) during 2011 January. The inverse Compton scattering rate was calculated for three orientations of the circumstellar disc. The predicted gamma-ray light curves show that the disc contribution is a maximum around periastron and not around the disc crossing epoch. This is a result of the disc being brightest near the stellar surface. Additional spectroscopic and near-IR observations were obtained of the system and these are discussed in relation to the possibility of shock heating during the disc crossing epoch. Based, in part, on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programme ID 086.D-0136(B), and on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) under programme 2012-1-RSA-003.

  14. A Spiral Goes Viral: Observations and Modeling of the Circumstellar Envelope around R Sculptoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, M.; Maercker, M.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Mečina, M.; Kerschbaum, F.; Mayer, A.; Humphreys, E.

    2015-08-01

    The complex circumstellar envelope (CSE) around the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star R Sculptoris has been observed with ALMA, revealing a remarkable and up to now unique geometry, consisting of a thin, spherically symmetric detached shell enclosing a spiral structure. By comparing ALMA data in three different spectral bands - covering different excitation states of the CO molecule - the gas structure and mass-loss evolution of this object can be analyzed. A morphological comparison between molecular line data (ALMA) and dust images (Herschel/PACS) gives hints to the spatial distribution of both constituents of the circumstellar envelope, as well as interaction processes between the different media. Dust continuum radiative transfer modeling of the detached shell around R Scl allows us to constrain the dust parameters and delivers spectral energy distributions comparable to observations.

  15. Probing the IRC+10 ° 216 circumstellar envelope using spectroscopic observations of background stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Tim; Mauron, Nicolas; McCombie, June; Sarre, Peter

    2004-02-01

    A unique and novel set of observations has been undertaken to study the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the nearby (130 pc) carbon star IRC +10° 216 using optical absorption spectroscopy towards twobackground stars lying beyond the envelope.The primary aim of the observations is to search for diffuse band (DIB)carriers in the CSE. The circumstellar H+2H2column density expected along the line of sight towards the targets islarge compared to that derived from the small interstellar reddening inthis region, E B-V< 0.03 mag. We summarise our mainfindings, already reported in Kendall et al. (2002): The 6284Å DIB is detected in the VLT/UVES spectrum of one target, but clearly arises inthe foreground ISM. No other DIB is seen. Hence the DIB carriers, if present in the CSE, have a low abundance relative to H in the C-rich envelope of IRC +10°216, in comparison with this ratio in theISM. An important new result, previously unreported, concerns the detectionof circumstellar C2 via absorption of the Phillips bandnear 8760Å.

  16. Atomic and molecular hydrogen in the circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of atomic and molecular hydrogen in the expanding circumstellar envelopes of cool evolved stars is discussed. The main concern is to evaluate the effects of photodestruction of H2 by galactic UV radiation, including shielding of the radiation by H2 itself and by dust in the envelope. One of the most important parameters is the H/H2 ratio which is frozen out in the upper atmosphere of the star. For stars with photospheric temperatures greater than about 2500 K, atmospheric models suggest that the outflowing hydrogen is mainly atomic, whereas cooler stars should be substantially molecular. In the latter case, photodissociation of H2 and heavy molecules contribute to the atomic hydrogen content of the outer envelope. The presented estimates indicate that atomic hydrogen is almost at the limit of detection in the C-rich star IRC + 10216, and may be detectable in warmer stars. Failure to detect it would have important implications for the general understanding of circumstellar envelopes.

  17. Chemistry and distribution of daughter species in the circumstellar envelopes of O-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Millar, Tom J.; Heays, Alan N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Context. Thanks to the advent of Herschel and ALMA, new high-quality observations of molecules present in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are being reported that reveal large differences from the existing chemical models. New molecular data and more comprehensive models of the chemistry in circumstellar envelopes are now available. Aims: The aims are to determine and study the important formation and destruction pathways in the envelopes of O-rich AGB stars and to provide more reliable predictions of abundances, column densities, and radial distributions for potentially detectable species with physical conditions applicable to the envelope surrounding IK Tau. Methods: We use a large gas-phase chemical model of an AGB envelope including the effects of CO and N2 self-shielding in a spherical geometry and a newly compiled list of inner-circumstellar envelope parent species derived from detailed modeling and observations. We trace the dominant chemistry in the expanding envelope and investigate the chemistry as a probe for the physics of the AGB phase by studying variations of abundances with mass-loss rates and expansion velocities. Results: We find a pattern of daughter molecules forming from the photodissociation products of parent species with contributions from ion-neutral abstraction and dissociative recombination. The chemistry in the outer zones differs from that in traditional PDRs in that photoionization of daughter species plays a significant role. With the proper treatment of self-shielding, the N → N2 and C+→ CO transitions are shifted outward by factors of 7 and 2, respectively, compared with earlier models. An upper limit on the abundance of CH4 as a parent species of (≲2.5 × 10-6 with respect to H2) is found for IK Tau, and several potentially observable molecules with relatively simple chemical links to other parent species are determined. The assumed stellar mass-loss rate, in particular, has an impact on the

  18. Conditions for circumstellar disc formation: effects of initial cloud configuration and sink treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2014-03-01

    The formation of a circumstellar disc in collapsing cloud cores is investigated with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We prepare four types of initial cloud having different density profiles and calculate their evolution with or without a sink. To investigate the effect of magnetic dissipation on disc formation, Ohmic dissipation is considered in some models. Calculations show that disc formation is very sensitive to both the initial cloud configuration and the sink treatment. The disc size considerably differs in clouds with different density profiles even when the initial clouds have almost the same mass-to-flux ratio. Only a very small disc (˜10 au in size) appears in clouds with a uniform density profile, whereas a large disc (˜100 au in size) forms in clouds with a Bonnor-Ebert density profile. In addition, a large sink accretion radius numerically impedes disc formation during the main accretion phase and tends to foster the misleading notion that disc formation is completely suppressed by magnetic braking. The protostellar outflow is also greatly affected by the sink properties. A sink accretion radius of ≲1 au and sink threshold density of ≳1013 cm-3 are necessary for investigating disc formation during the main accretion phase.

  19. Microlensing of circumstellar envelopes. III. Line profiles from stellar winds in homologous expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. A.; Ignace, R.; Bryce, H. M.

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines line profile evolution due to the linear expansion of circumstellar material obsverved during a microlensing event. This work extends our previous papers on emission line profile evolution from radial and azimuthal flow during point mass lens events and fold caustic crossings. Both "flavours" of microlensing were shown to provide effective diagnostics of bulk motion in circumstellar envelopes. In this work a different genre of flow is studied, namely linear homologous expansion, for both point mass lenses and fold caustic crossings. Linear expansion is of particular relevance to the effects of microlensing on supernovae at cosmological distances. We derive line profiles and equivalent widths for the illustrative cases of pure resonance and pure recombination lines, modelled under the Sobolev approximation. The efficacy of microlensing as a diagnostic probe of the stellar environs is demonstrated and discussed.

  20. Emission-line spectra of circumstellar envelopes - Infrared hydrogen line fluxes from Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, S. E.; McGregor, P. J.

    1985-09-01

    Fluxes for eight H I emission lines between 1.28 and 4.67 μm are presented for a sample of seven Be stars. Brα fluxes are given for six additional Be stars. The H I line ratios form the basis for an observational test of models for emission from circumstellar shells that have a range of Brα optical depths well in excess of unity. Enough data on optically thick H I, Ca II, and O I line strengths of circumstellar envelope stars now exist that it should be possible to place detailed radiative-transfer calculations of optically thick envelope emission on a secure observational footing. Comparisons of line ratios with the models by Simon et al. for infrared line emission from stellar winds show promise. The Be star H I line ratios can also be compared with similar data for deeply dust-embedded young stellar objects. These enigmatic objects display stronger H I lines per unit luminosity than the Be stars, but share similar overall envelope physical conditions. Several infrared line ratios are examined to lay the groundwork for extinction determinations and guidelines for radiative-transfer models.

  1. The circumstellar envelopes of F- and G-type supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, W.; Humphreys, R. M.; Stencel, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The outer atmospheres of four F- and G-type supergiants in the LMC are compared with those of their Milky Way counterparts by means of 2.5 and 5.1 A/mm high dispersion Echelle spectra. Na I D line doubling indicates extensive circumstellar envelopes, mass loss rates greater than 0.00001 solar masses/year, and outflow velocities of 10-60 km/sec. The Ca II H and K lines yield new data on extragalactic star chromospheres.

  2. Do water fountain jets really indicate the onset of the morphological metamorphosis of circumstellar envelopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Imai, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale bipolar jets with short dynamical ages from 'water-fountain' (WF) sources are regarded as an indication of the onset of circumstellar envelope morphological metamorphosis of intermediate-mass stars. Such a process usually happens at the end of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. However, recent studies found that WFs could be AGB stars or even early planetary nebulae. This fact prompted the idea that WFs may not necessarily be objects at the beginning of the morphological transition process. In the present work, we show that WFs could have different envelope morphologies by studying their spectral energy distribution profiles. Some WFs have spherical envelopes that resemble usual AGB stars, while others have aspherical envelopes, which are more common to post-AGB stars. The results imply that WFs may not represent the earliest stage of morphological metamorphosis. We argue further that the dynamical age of a WF jet, which can be calculated from maser proper motions, may not be the real age of the jet. The dynamical age cannot be used to justify the moment when the envelope begins to become aspherical, nor to tell the concrete evolutionary status of the object. A WF jet could be the innermost part of a larger well-developed jet, which is not necessarily a young jet.

  3. Line-driven ablation of circumstellar discs - I. Optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe/Be stars.

    PubMed

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan; Owocki, Stanley; Sundqvist, J O

    2016-05-21

    The extreme luminosities of massive, hot OB stars drive strong stellar winds through line-scattering of the star's UV continuum radiation. For OB stars with an orbiting circumstellar disc, we explore here the effect of such line-scattering in driving an ablation of material from the disc's surface layers, with initial focus on the marginally optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe and Be stars. For this we apply a multidimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code that assumes simple optically thin ray tracing for the stellar continuum, but uses a multiray Sobolev treatment of the line transfer; this fully accounts for the efficient driving by non-radial rays, due to desaturation of line-absorption by velocity gradients associated with the Keplerian shear in the disc. Results show a dense, intermediate-speed surface ablation, consistent with the strong, blueshifted absorption of UV wind lines seen in Be shell stars that are observed from near the disc plane. A key overall result is that, after an initial adjustment to the introduction of the disc, the asymptotic disc destruction rate is typically just an order-unity factor times the stellar wind mass-loss rate. For optically thin Be discs, this leads to a disc destruction time of order months to years, consistent with observationally inferred disc decay times. The much stronger radiative forces of O stars reduce this time to order days, making it more difficult for decretion processes to sustain a disc in earlier spectral types, and so providing a natural explanation for the relative rarity of Oe stars in the Galaxy. Moreover, the decrease in line-driving at lower metallicity implies both a reduction in the winds that help spin-down stars from near-critical rotation, and a reduction in the ablation of any decretion disc; together these provide a natural explanation for the higher fraction of classical Be stars, as well as the presence of Oe stars, in the lower metallicity Magellanic Clouds. We conclude with a

  4. Line-driven ablation of circumstellar discs – I. Optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe/Be stars

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan; Owocki, Stanley; Sundqvist, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    The extreme luminosities of massive, hot OB stars drive strong stellar winds through line-scattering of the star's UV continuum radiation. For OB stars with an orbiting circumstellar disc, we explore here the effect of such line-scattering in driving an ablation of material from the disc's surface layers, with initial focus on the marginally optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe and Be stars. For this we apply a multidimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code that assumes simple optically thin ray tracing for the stellar continuum, but uses a multiray Sobolev treatment of the line transfer; this fully accounts for the efficient driving by non-radial rays, due to desaturation of line-absorption by velocity gradients associated with the Keplerian shear in the disc. Results show a dense, intermediate-speed surface ablation, consistent with the strong, blueshifted absorption of UV wind lines seen in Be shell stars that are observed from near the disc plane. A key overall result is that, after an initial adjustment to the introduction of the disc, the asymptotic disc destruction rate is typically just an order-unity factor times the stellar wind mass-loss rate. For optically thin Be discs, this leads to a disc destruction time of order months to years, consistent with observationally inferred disc decay times. The much stronger radiative forces of O stars reduce this time to order days, making it more difficult for decretion processes to sustain a disc in earlier spectral types, and so providing a natural explanation for the relative rarity of Oe stars in the Galaxy. Moreover, the decrease in line-driving at lower metallicity implies both a reduction in the winds that help spin-down stars from near-critical rotation, and a reduction in the ablation of any decretion disc; together these provide a natural explanation for the higher fraction of classical Be stars, as well as the presence of Oe stars, in the lower metallicity Magellanic Clouds. We conclude with a

  5. Stellar occultation of polarized light from circumstellar electrons. I - Flat envelopes viewed edge on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Fox, Geoffrey K.

    1989-01-01

    The depolarizing and occultation effects of a finite spherical light source on the polarization of light Thomson-scattered from a flat circumstellar envelope seen edge-on are analyzed. The analysis shows that neglect of the finite size of the light source leads to a gross overestimate of the polarization for a given disk geometry. By including occultation and depolarization, it is found that B-star envelopes are necessarily highly flattened disk-type structures. For a disk viewed edge-on, the effect of occultation reduces the polarization more than the inclusion of the depolarization factor alone. Analysis of a one-dimensional plume leads to a powerful technique that permits the electron density distribution to be explicitly obtained from the polarimetric data.

  6. Stellar occultation of polarized light from circumstellar electrons. I - Flat envelopes viewed edge on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Fox, Geoffrey K.

    1989-01-01

    The depolarizing and occultation effects of a finite spherical light source on the polarization of light Thomson-scattered from a flat circumstellar envelope seen edge-on are analyzed. The analysis shows that neglect of the finite size of the light source leads to a gross overestimate of the polarization for a given disk geometry. By including occultation and depolarization, it is found that B-star envelopes are necessarily highly flattened disk-type structures. For a disk viewed edge-on, the effect of occultation reduces the polarization more than the inclusion of the depolarization factor alone. Analysis of a one-dimensional plume leads to a powerful technique that permits the electron density distribution to be explicitly obtained from the polarimetric data.

  7. WIDE BINARY EFFECTS ON ASYMMETRIES IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyosun; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu

    2012-11-01

    Observations of increasingly higher spatial resolution reveal the existence of asymmetries in the circumstellar envelopes of a small fraction of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Although there is no general consensus for their origin, a binary companion star may be responsible. Within this framework, we investigate the gravitational effects associated with a sufficiently wide binary system, where Roche lobe overflow is unimportant, on the outflowing envelopes of AGB stars using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The effects due to individual binary components are separately studied, enabling the investigation of the stellar and circumstellar characteristics in detail. The reflex motion of the AGB star alters the wind velocity distribution, thereby determining the overall shape of the outflowing envelope. On the other hand, the interaction of the companion with the envelope produces a gravitational wake, which exhibits a vertically thinner shape. The two patterns overlap and form clumpy structures. To illustrate the diversity of shapes, we present the numerical results as a function of inclination angle. Not only is spiral structure produced by the binary interaction, but arc patterns are also found that represent the former structure when viewed at different inclinations. The arcs reveal a systematic shift of their centers of curvature for cases when the orbital speed of the AGB star is comparable to its wind speed. They take on the shape of a peanut for inclinations nearly edge-on. In the limit of slow orbital motion of the AGB star relative to the wind speed, the arc pattern becomes nearly spherically symmetric. We find that the aspect ratio of the overall oblate shape of the pattern is an important diagnostic probe of the binary as it can be used to constrain the orbital velocity of the AGB star, and moreover, the binary mass ratio.

  8. The warm circumstellar envelope and wind of the G9 IIb star HR 6902

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, T.; Baade, R.; Reimers, D.

    2001-12-01

    IUE observations of the eclipsing binary system HR 6902 obtained at various epochs spread over four years indicate the presence of warm circumstellar material enveloping the G9 IIb primary. The spectra show Si Iv and C Iv absorption up to a distance of 3.3 giant radii (Rg). Line ratio diagnostics yields an electron temperature of ~ 78 000 K which appears to be constant over the observed height range. Applying a least square fit absorption line analysis we derive column densities as a function of height. We find that the inner envelope (< 3;Rg) of the bright giant is consistent with a hydrostatic density distribution. The derived line broadening velocity of ~ 70 km s-1 is sufficient to provide turbulent pressure support for the required scale height. However, an improved agreement with observations over the whole height regime including the emission line region is obtained with an outflow model. We demonstrate that the common β power-law as well as a P ∝ ρ wind yield appropriate fit models. Adopting a continuous mass outflow we obtain a mass-loss rate of M⊙=0.8 - 3.4 × 10-11 Msolar yr-1 depending on the particular wind model. The emission lines observed during total eclipse are attributed mostly to resonance scattering of B star photons in the extended envelope of the giant. By means of a multi-dimensional line formation study we show that the global envelope properties are consistent with the wind models derived from the absorption line analysis. We argue that future high resolution UV spectroscopy will resolve the large-scale velocity structure of the circumstellar shell. As an illustration we present theoretical Si Iv and C Iv emission profiles showing model-dependent line shifts and asymmetries.

  9. The Influence of Forming Companions on the Spectral Energy Distributions of Stars with Circumstellar Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhozhay, Olga V.

    2017-04-01

    We study a possibility to detect signatures of brown dwarf companions in a circumstellar disc based on spectral energy distributions. We present the results of spectral energy distribution simulations for a system with a 0.8 M⊙ central object and a companion with a mass of 30 M J embedded in a typical protoplanetary disc. We use a solution to the one-dimensional radiative transfer equation to calculate the protoplanetary disc flux density and assume, that the companion moves along a circular orbit and clears a gap. The width of the gap is assumed to be the diameter of the brown dwarf Hill sphere. Our modelling shows that the presence of such a gap can initiate an additional minimum in the spectral energy distribution profile of a protoplanetary disc at λ = 10-100 μm. We found that it is possible to detect signatures of the companion when it is located within 10 AU, even when it is as small as 3 M J. The spectral energy distribution of a protostellar disc with a massive fragment (of relatively cold temperature 400 K) might have a similar double peaked profile to the spectral energy distribution of a more evolved disc that contains a gap.

  10. The Influence of Forming Companions on the Spectral Energy Distributions of Stars with Circumstellar Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhozhay, Olga V.

    2017-04-01

    We study a possibility to detect signatures of brown dwarf companions in a circumstellar disc based on spectral energy distributions. We present the results of spectral energy distribution simulations for a system with a 0.8 M⊙ central object and a companion with a mass of 30 M J embedded in a typical protoplanetary disc. We use a solution to the one-dimensional radiative transfer equation to calculate the protoplanetary disc flux density and assume, that the companion moves along a circular orbit and clears a gap. The width of the gap is assumed to be the diameter of the brown dwarf Hill sphere. Our modelling shows that the presence of such a gap can initiate an additional minimum in the spectral energy distribution profile of a protoplanetary disc at λ = 10-100 μm. We found that it is possible to detect signatures of the companion when it is located within 10 AU, even when it is as small as 3 M J. The spectral energy distribution of a protostellar disc with a massive fragment (of relatively cold temperature 400 K) might have a similar double peaked profile to the spectral energy distribution of a more evolved disc that contains a gap.

  11. Far-infrared and sub-millimetre imaging of HD 76582's circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jonathan P.; Booth, Mark; Holland, Wayne; Matthews, Brenda C.; Greaves, Jane S.; Zuckerman, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Debris discs, the tenuous rocky and icy remnants of planet formation, are believed to be evidence for planetary systems around other stars. The JCMT/SCUBA-2 debris disc legacy survey `SCUBA-2 Observations of Nearby Stars' (SONS) observed 100 nearby stars, amongst them HD 76582, for evidence of such material. Here, we present imaging observations by JCMT/SCUBA-2 and Herschel/PACS at sub-millimetre and far-infrared wavelengths, respectively. We simultaneously model the ensemble of photometric and imaging data, spanning optical to sub-millimetre wavelengths, in a self-consistent manner. At far-infrared wavelengths, we find extended emission from the circumstellar disc providing a strong constraint on the dust spatial location in the outer system, although the angular resolution is too poor to constrain the interior of the system. In the sub-millimetre, photometry at 450 and 850 μm reveals a steep fall-off that we interpret as a disc dominated by moderately sized dust grains (amin = 36 μm), perhaps indicative of a non-steady-state collisional cascade within the disc. A disc architecture of three distinct annuli, comprising an unresolved component at 20 au and outer components at 80 and 270 au, along with a very steep particle size distribution (γ = 5), is proposed to match the observations.

  12. Sulphur molecules in the circumstellar envelopes of M-type AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; De Beck, E.; Black, J. H.; Olofsson, H.; Justtanont, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: The sulphur compounds SO and SO2 have not been widely studied in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. By presenting and modelling a large number of SO and SO2 lines in the low mass-loss rate M-type AGB star R Dor, and modelling the available lines of those molecules in a further four M-type AGB stars, we aim to determine their circumstellar abundances and distributions. Methods: We use a detailed radiative transfer analysis based on the accelerated lambda iteration method to model circumstellar SO and SO2 line emission. We use molecular data files for both SO and SO2 that are more extensive than those previously available. Results: Using 17 SO lines and 98 SO2 lines to constrain our models for R Dor, we find an SO abundance of (6.7 ± 0.9) × 10-6 and an SO2 abundance of 5 × 10-6 with both species having high abundances close to the star. We also modelled 34SO and found an abundance of (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10-7, giving an 32SO/34SO ratio of 21.6 ± 8.5. We derive similar results for the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances and their distributions for the low mass-loss rate object W Hya. For the higher mass-loss rate stars, we find shell-like SO distributions with peak abundances that decrease and peak abundance radii that increase with increasing mass-loss rate. The positions of the peak SO abundance agree very well with the photodissociation radii of H2O. We also modelled SO2 in two higher mass-loss rate stars but our models for these were less conclusive. Conclusions: We conclude that for the low mass-loss rate stars, the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances are much higher than predicted by chemical models of the extended stellar atmosphere. These two species may also account for all the available sulphur. For the higher mass-loss rate stars we find evidence that SO is most efficiently formed in the circumstellar envelope, most likely through the photodissociation of H2O and the subsequent reaction between S and OH. The S

  13. Type I Superluminous Supernovae as Explosions inside Non-hydrogen Circumstellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, Elena; Blinnikov, Sergei; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Quimby, Robert; Tolstov, Alexey

    2016-09-01

    A number of Type I (hydrogenless) superluminous supernova (SLSN) events have been discovered recently. However, their nature remains debatable. One of the most promising ideas is the shock interaction mechanism, but only simplified semi-analytical models have been applied so far. We simulate light curves for several Type I SLSN (SLSN-I) models enshrouded by dense, non-hydrogen circumstellar (CS) envelopes, using a multi-group radiation hydrodynamics code that predicts not only bolometric, but also multicolor light curves. We demonstrate that the bulk of SLSNe-I including those with relatively narrow light curves like SN 2010gx or broad ones like PTF09cnd can be explained by the interaction of the SN ejecta with the CS envelope, though the range of parameters for these models is rather wide. Moderate explosion energy (˜(2-4) × 1051 erg) is sufficient to explain both narrow and broad SLSN-I light curves, but ejected mass and envelope mass differ for those two cases. Only 5-10 M ⊙ of non-hydrogen material is needed to reproduce the light curve of SN 2010gx, while the best model for PTF09cnd is very massive: it contains almost 50 M ⊙ in the CS envelope and only 5 M ⊙ in the ejecta. The CS envelope for each case extends from 10 R ⊙ to ˜105 R ⊙ (7 × 1015 cm), which is about an order of magnitude larger than typical photospheric radii of standard SNe near the maximum light. We briefly discuss possible ways to form such unusual envelopes.

  14. Evolution of the circumstellar atomic and molecular envelopes around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, David Ken

    2003-09-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) mass loss history of stars is recorded in the structure of their circumstellar envelope (CSE). For the more evolved protoplanetary nebula (PPN) and planetary nebula (PN) phases, the CSE also chronicles its interaction with fast winds and photodissociating/photoionizing radiation. Most AGB stars lose mass in spherically symmetric outflows, whereas PNe are largely axisymmetric. To investigate the physical properties of these winds and the processes that shape the CSE prior to the PN stage, the neutral atomic and molecular gas are probed. Here we present observations of the atomic and molecular components of the CSE for objects at different epochs of evolution. Far-infrared (FIR) spectra were taken for 24 evolved stars, including the line emission of [O I], [C II], [Si I], [Si II], [S I], [Fe I], [Fe II], and [Ne II]. Atomic emission was found only in those sources where Teff ≥ 10000 K. With higher T eff the number of detectable lines increase as well as the intensity of the emission, which imply that these atomic lines originate from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The line measurements agree reasonably well with intensities predicted by PDR models. Shock models, however, do not compare well with the observed line intensities. The kinematics of the atomic gas are comparable to the molecular expansion velocities, expected for cooling lines associated with circumstellar PDRs. PDR mass estimates ranging from ˜0.01 1.3 M⊙ were derived from the [C II] 158 μm line emission. Half of these objects were selected for a complementary, study of the molecular gas component. In the 12CO J = 1 → 0 imaging survey, high resolution maps of their full molecular envelopes are presented. A variety of different nebular morphologies and kinematic structures were encountered. For the PPNe and PN, the neutral molecular envelopes are compared with images taken at optical, near-IR, and mid-IR wavelengths. These trace the different components of the

  15. Gas phase chemical kinetics at high temperature of carbonaceous molecules: application to circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biennier, L.; Gardez, A.; Saidani, G.; Georges, R.; Rowe, B.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar shells of evolved stars are a theater of extremely rich physical and chemical processes. More than seventy molecules of varied nature have been identified in the envelopes through their spectral fingerprints in the microwave or far infrared regions. Many of them are carbon chain molecules and radicals and a significant number are unique to the circumstellar medium. However, observational data remain scarce and more than half of the detected species have been observed in only one object, the nearby carbon star IRC + 10216. Chemical kinetic models are needed to describe the formation of molecules in evolved circumstellar outflows. Upcoming terrestrial telescopes such as ALMA will increase the spatial resolution by several orders of magnitude and provide a wealth of data. The determination of relevant laboratory kinetics data is critical to keep up with the development of the observations and of the refinement of chemical models. Today, the majority of reactions studied in the laboratory are the ones involved in combustion and concerning light hydrocarbons. Our objective is to provide the scientific community with rate coefficients of reactions between abundant species in these warm environments. Cyanopolyynes from HC_2N to HC_9N have all been detected in carbon rich circumstellar envelopes in up to 10 sources for HC_3N. Neutral-neutral reactions of the CN radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons could be a dominant route in the formation of cyanopolyynes, even at low temperatures. Our approach aims to bridge the temperature gap between resistively heated flow tubes and shock tubes. The present kinetic measurements are obtained using a new reactor combining a high enthalpy source (Moudens et al. 2011) with a flow tube and a pulsed laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence system to probe the undergoing chemical reactions. The high enthalpy flow tube has been used to measure the rate constant of the reaction of the CN radical with propane, propene

  16. High spatial resolution infrared imaging of L1551-IRS 5 - Direct observations of its circumstellar envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moneti, Andrea; Forrest, William J.; Pipher, Judith L.; Woodward, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    Images of L1551-IRS 5 were obtained at 1.65, 2.2, and 3.8 microns using the University of Rochester's Infrared Array Camera. It is found that IRS 5 is spatially resolved, and that it is elongated: the observed FWHM size of IRS 5 is 4.1 x 2.8 arcsec-squared at 2.2 microns. These observations are interpreted in terms of a flattened circumstellar envelope that is viewed from about 18 deg above its equatorial plane, a configuration that has been treated theoretically by Lefevre et al. In this model the central star is not seen directly, but only light scattered toward the observer from the visible polar region, where the envelope is thinnest, is observed. It is deduced that the envelope has a diameter of 1000 AU, a molecular hydrogen density of greater than or approximately equal to 4 x 10 to the 6th/cu cm, and a mass of greater than or approximately equal to 0.02 M solar mass, which results in an extinction of Av greater than about 33 mag to the central source.

  17. The Balmer discontinuity as a test of the density and temperature distributions in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzado, A.; Zorec, J.; Vázquez, A.; Ringuelet, A.

    In this contribution we study both components of the Balmer discontinuity (BD) frequently seen in hot stars with line emission (Divan et al. 1978, Cidale et al. 2001). We pay attention to the effects produced on the photospheric component of the BD induced by the presence of a cricumstellar envelope (CE) and we study the intensity of the circumstellar component of the CE as a function of the density and temperature of the CE. The analysis of the observed BD in Be stars and B[e] stars carried with calculation similar to those presented here may lead us to determine the physical parameters that characterize the CE layers close to the central object and estimate the uncertainties on the fundamental parameter estimations of emission line stars when use is made of the their photospheric component of the BD (Zorec & Briot 1991, Cidale et al.2001).

  18. CO And HI Emission from The Circumstellar Envelopes of Some Evolved Stars*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diep, P. N.; Hoai, D. T.; Nhung, P.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Le Bertre, T.; Winters, J. M.; Matthews, L. D.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the CO and HI radio emission of some evolved stars are presented using data collected by the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and Pico Veleta telescope, the Nançay Radio Telescope and the JVLA and ALMA arrays. Approximate axial symmetry of the physical and kinematic properties of the circumstellar envelope (CSE) are observed in CO emission , in particular, from RS Cnc, EP Aqr and the Red Rectangle. A common feature is the presence of a bipolar outflow causing an enhanced wind velocity in the polar directions. I emission extends to larger radial distances than probed by CO emission and displays features related to the interaction between the stellar outflow and interstellar matter. With its unprecedented sensitivity, FAST will open a new window on such studies. Its potential in this domain is briefly illustrated.

  19. The chemical composition of the circumstellar envelopes around yellow hypergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.

    2007-08-01

    Context: The yellow hypergiant stars (YHGs) are extremely luminous and massive objects whose general properties are poorly known. Only two of this kind of star show massive circumstellar envelopes, IRC +10420 and AFGL 2343. Aims: We aim to study the chemistry of the circumstellar envelopes around these two sources, by comparison with well known AGB stars and protoplanetary nebulae. We also estimate the abundances of the observed molecular species. Methods: We have performed single-dish observations of different transitions for twelve molecular species. We have compared the ratio of the intensities of the molecular transitions and of the estimated abundances in AFGL 2343 and IRC +10420 with those in O-rich and C-rich AGB stars and protoplanetary nebulae. Results: Both YHGs, AFGL 2343, and IRC +10420, have been found to have an O-rich chemistry similar to that in O-rich AGB stars, though for AFGL 2343 the emission of most molecules compared with 13CO lines is relatively weak. Clear differences with the other evolved sources appear when we compare the line intensity corrected for distance and the profile widths which are, respectively, very intense and very wide in YHGs. The abundances obtained for IRC +10420 agree with those found in AGB stars, but in general those found in AFGL 2343, except for 13CO, are too low. This apparently low molecular abundance in AFGL 2343 could be due to the fact that these molecules are present only in an inner region of the shell where the mass is relatively low. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Pico Veleta 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain). Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Asymptotic giant branch stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud: evolution of dust in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Ventura, P.; Schneider, R.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Rossi, C.; Brocato, E.

    2015-03-01

    We calculated theoretical evolutionary sequences of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, including the formation and evolution of dust grains in their circumstellar envelopes. By considering stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we calculate synthetic colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams, which are compared with those obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The comparison between observations and theoretical predictions outlines that extremely obscured carbon stars and oxygen-rich sources experiencing hot bottom burning (HBB) occupy well-defined, distinct regions in the colour-colour ([3.6] - [4.5], [5.8] - [8.0]) diagram. The C-rich stars are distributed along a diagonal strip that we interpret as an evolutionary sequence, becoming progressively more obscured as the stellar surface layers enrich in carbon. Their circumstellar envelopes host solid carbon dust grains with size in the range 0.05 < a < 0.2 μm. The presence of silicon carbide (SiC) particles is expected only in the more metal-rich stars. The reddest sources, with [3.6] - [4.5] > 2, are the descendants of stars with initial mass Min ˜ 2.5-3 M⊙ in the very latest phases of AGB life. The oxygen-rich stars with the reddest colours ([5.8] - [8.0] > 0.6) are those experiencing HBB, the descendants of ˜5 M⊙ objects formed 108 yr ago; alumina and silicate dust starts forming at different distances from the central star. The overall dust production rate in the LMC is ˜4.5 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1, the relative percentages due to C and M stars being 85 and 15 per cent, respectively.

  1. A Search for Phosphine in Circumstellar Envelopes: PH3 in IRC +10216 and CRL 2688?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2008-06-01

    We present the results of a search for the JK = 10→ 00 transition of PH3 (phosphine) at 267 GHz toward several circumstellar envelopes using the Arizona Radio Observatory 10 m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). In the carbon-rich shells of IRC +10216 and CRL 2688, we have detected emission lines exactly at the PH3 frequency. Toward the oxygen-rich supergiant VY Canis Majoris, only an upper limit was obtained, while in the evolved carbon-rich proto-planetary nebula CRL 618, the transition is contaminated by vibrationally excited HC3N (ν7 = 4). The line shape in IRC +10216 appears to consist of two distinct components: a flat-topped profile with a width of ~28 km s-1, as is typical for this source, and a narrower feature approximately 4 km s-1 wide. The narrow component likely arises from the inner envelope (r < 8R*) where the gas has not reached the terminal expansion velocity, or it is nonthermal emission. Based on the broader component, the abundance of PH3 with respect to H2 is estimated to be 5 × 10-8 in a region with a radius of r < 150R*. If the narrower component is thermal, it implies a phosphine abundance of ~5 × 10-7 close to the stellar photosphere (r < 8R*). In CRL 2688, the PH3 abundance is less constrained, with plausible values ranging from 3 × 10-8 to 4 × 10-7, assuming a spherical distribution. Phosphine appears to be present in large concentrations in the inner envelope of C-rich AGB stars, and thus may function as a parent molecule for other phosphorus species.

  2. ARCSECOND RESOLUTION MAPPING OF SULFUR DIOXIDE EMISSION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPE OF VY CANIS MAJORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Roger R.; Moullet, Arielle; Patel, Nimesh A.; Biersteker, John; Derose, Kimberly L.; Young, Kenneth H.

    2012-02-10

    We report Submillimeter Array observations of SO{sub 2} emission in the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris, with an angular resolution of Almost-Equal-To 1''. SO{sub 2} emission appears in three distinct outflow regions surrounding the central continuum peak emission that is spatially unresolved. No bipolar structure is noted in the sources. A fourth source of SO{sub 2} is identified as a spherical wind centered at the systemic velocity. We estimate the SO{sub 2} column density and rotational temperature assuming local thermal equilibrium (LTE) as well as perform non-LTE radiative transfer analysis using RADEX. Column densities of SO{sub 2} are found to be {approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} in the outflows and in the spherical wind. Comparison with existing maps of the two parent species OH and SO shows the SO{sub 2} distribution to be consistent with that of OH. The abundance ratio f{sub SO{sub 2}}/f{sub SO} is greater than unity for all radii larger than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm. SO{sub 2} is distributed in fragmented clumps compared to SO, PN, and SiS molecules. These observations lend support to specific models of circumstellar chemistry that predict f{sub SO{sub 2}}/f{sub SO}>1 and may suggest the role of localized effects such as shocks in the production of SO{sub 2} in the CSE.

  3. Methanol along the path from envelope to protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-11-01

    Interstellar methanol is considered to be a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. A physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disc. An axisymmetric 2D semi-analytic model generates the time-dependent density and velocity distributions, and full continuum radiative transfer is performed to calculate the dust temperature and the UV radiation field at each position as a function of time. A comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is employed to compute the chemical abundances along infall trajectories. Two physical scenarios are studied, one in which the dominant disc growth mechanism is viscous spreading, and another in which continuous infall of matter prevails. The results show that the infall path influences the abundance of methanol entering each type of disc, ranging from complete loss of methanol to an enhancement by a factor of >1 relative to the prestellar phase. Critical chemical processes and parameters for the methanol chemistry under different physical conditions are identified. The exact abundance and distribution of methanol is important for the budget of complex organic molecules in discs, which will be incorporated into forming planetary system objects such as protoplanets and comets. These simulations show that the comet-forming zone contains less methanol than in the precollapse phase, which is dominantly of prestellar origin, but also with additional layers built up in the envelope during infall. Such intriguing links will soon be tested by upcoming data from the Rosetta mission.

  4. Probing the centre of the large circumstellar disc in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielbock, M.; Chini, R.; Hoffmeister, V. H.; Nürnberger, D. E. A.; Scheyda, C. M.; Steinacker, J.

    2008-08-01

    We investigated the nature of the hitherto unresolved elliptical infrared emission in the centre of the ~20000au disc silhouette in M17. We combined high-resolution JHKsL' M'-band imaging carried out with Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System/Coudé Near Infrared Camera (NAOS/CONICA) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) with [FeII] narrow-band imaging using SOFI [Son of ISAAC (Infrared Spectrograph and Array Camera)] at the New Technology Telescope (NTT). The analysis is supported by Spitzer/GLIMPSE archival data and by already published Spectrograph for Integral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI)/VLT Integral Field Spectroscopy data. For the first time, we resolve the elongated central infrared emission into a point source and a jet-like feature that extends to the northeast in the opposite direction of the recently discovered collimated H2 jet. They are both orientated almost perpendicular to the disc plane. In addition, our images reveal a curved southwestern emission nebula whose morphology resembles that of the previously detected northeastern one. Both nebulae are located at a distance of 1500au from the disc centre. We describe the infrared point source in terms of a protostar that is embedded in circumstellar material producing a visual extinction of 60 <= AV <= 82. The observed Ks-band magnitude is equivalent to a stellar mass range of 2.8Msolar <= M* <= 8Msolar adopting conversions for a main-sequence star. Altogether, we suggest that the large M17 accretion disc is forming an intermediate to high-mass protostar. Part of the accreted material is expelled through a symmetric bipolar jet/outflow. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile., project nos. 73.C-0170, 73.C-0183 and 75.C-0852. E-mail: nielbock@mpia.de

  5. ALMA view of the circumstellar environment of the post-common-envelope-evolution binary system HD 101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, H.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Maercker, M.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Lindqvist, M.; Nyman, L.; Ramstedt, S.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We study the circumstellar evolution of the binary HD 101584, consisting of a post-AGB star and a low-mass companion, which is most likely a post-common-envelope-evolution system. Methods: We used ALMA observations of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2-1 lines and the 1.3 mm continuum to determine the morphology, kinematics, masses, and energetics of the circumstellar environment. Results: The circumstellar medium has a bipolar hour-glass structure, seen almost pole-on, formed by an energetic jet, ≈150 km s-1. We conjecture that the circumstellar morphology is related to an event that took place ≈500 yr ago, possibly a capture event where the companion spiraled in towards the AGB star. However, the kinetic energy of the accelerated gas exceeds the released orbital energy, and, taking into account the expected energy transfer efficiency of the process, the observed phenomenon does not match current common-envelope scenarios. This suggests that another process must augment, or even dominate, the ejection process. A significant amount of material resides in an unresolved region, presumably in the equatorial plane of the binary system.

  6. SN2012ca: a stripped envelope core-collapse SN interacting with dense circumstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Scalzo, R.; Fraser, M.; Pastorello, A.; Childress, M.; Pignata, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kotak, R.; Benetti, S.; Della Valle, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Smith, K.; Sullivan, M.; Valenti, S.; Yaron, O.; Young, D.; Reichart, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report optical and near-infrared observations of SN2012ca with the Public ESO Spectroscopy Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO), spread over one year since discovery. The supernova (SN) bears many similarities to SN1997cy and to other events classified as Type IIn but which have been suggested to have a thermonuclear origin with narrow hydrogen lines produced when the ejecta impact a hydrogen-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Our analysis, especially in the nebular phase, reveals the presence of oxygen, magnesium and carbon features. This suggests a core-collapse explanation for SN2012ca, in contrast to the thermonuclear interpretation proposed for some members of this group. We suggest that the data can be explained with a hydrogen- and helium-deficient SN ejecta (Type I) interacting with a hydrogen-rich CSM, but that the explosion was more likely a Type Ic core-collapse explosion than a Type Ia thermonuclear one. This suggests that two channels (both thermonuclear and stripped envelope core-collapse) may be responsible for these SN 1997cy-like events.

  7. Molecular Abundances in the Circumstellar Envelope of Oxygen-Rich Supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Jessica L.; Ziurys, Lucy

    2014-06-01

    A complete set of molecular abundances have been established for the Oxygen-rich circumstellar envelope (CSE) surrounding the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). These data were obtained from The Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 1-mm spectral line survey of this object using the ARO Sub-millimeter Telescope (SMT), as well as complimentary transitions taken with the ARO 12-meter. The non-LTE radiative transfer code ESCAPADE has been used to obtain the molecular abundances and distributions in VY CMa, including modeling of the various asymmetric outflow geometries in this source. For example, SO and SO2 were determined to arise from five distinct outflows, four of which are asymmetric with respect to the central star. Abundances of these two sulfur-bearing molecules range from 3 x 10-8 - 2.5 x 10-7 for the various outflows. Similar results will be presented for molecules like CS, SiS, HCN, and SiO, as well as more exotic species like NS, PO, AlO, and AlOH. The molecular abundances between the various outflows will be compared and implications for supergiant chemistry will be discussed.

  8. The chemistry in circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars: Following the origin of the elements to the origin of life

    PubMed Central

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2006-01-01

    Mass loss from evolved stars results in the formation of unusual chemical laboratories: circumstellar envelopes. Such envelopes are found around carbon- and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants. As the gaseous material of the envelope flows from the star, the resulting temperature and density gradients create a complex chemical environment involving hot, thermodynamically controlled synthesis, molecule “freeze-out,” shock-initiated reactions, and photochemistry governed by radical mechanisms. In the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich star IRC+10216, >50 different chemical compounds have been identified, including such exotic species as C8H, C3S, SiC3, and AlNC. The chemistry here is dominated by molecules containing long carbon chains, silicon, and metals such as magnesium, sodium, and aluminum, which makes it quite distinct from that found in molecular clouds. The molecular composition of the oxygen-rich counterparts is not nearly as well explored, although recent studies of VY Canis Majoris have resulted in the identification of HCO+, SO2, and even NaCl in this object, suggesting chemical complexity here as well. As these envelopes evolve into planetary nebulae with a hot, exposed central star, synthesis of molecular ions becomes important, as indicated by studies of NGC 7027. Numerous species such as HCO+, HCN, and CCH are found in old planetary nebulae such as the Helix. This “survivor” molecular material may be linked to the variety of compounds found recently in diffuse clouds. Organic molecules in dense interstellar clouds may ultimately be traced back to carbon-rich fragments originally formed in circumstellar shells. PMID:16894164

  9. The chemistry in circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars: following the origin of the elements to the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Ziurys, Lucy M

    2006-08-15

    Mass loss from evolved stars results in the formation of unusual chemical laboratories: circumstellar envelopes. Such envelopes are found around carbon- and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants. As the gaseous material of the envelope flows from the star, the resulting temperature and density gradients create a complex chemical environment involving hot, thermodynamically controlled synthesis, molecule "freeze-out," shock-initiated reactions, and photochemistry governed by radical mechanisms. In the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich star IRC+10216, >50 different chemical compounds have been identified, including such exotic species as C(8)H, C(3)S, SiC(3), and AlNC. The chemistry here is dominated by molecules containing long carbon chains, silicon, and metals such as magnesium, sodium, and aluminum, which makes it quite distinct from that found in molecular clouds. The molecular composition of the oxygen-rich counterparts is not nearly as well explored, although recent studies of VY Canis Majoris have resulted in the identification of HCO(+), SO(2), and even NaCl in this object, suggesting chemical complexity here as well. As these envelopes evolve into planetary nebulae with a hot, exposed central star, synthesis of molecular ions becomes important, as indicated by studies of NGC 7027. Numerous species such as HCO(+), HCN, and CCH are found in old planetary nebulae such as the Helix. This "survivor" molecular material may be linked to the variety of compounds found recently in diffuse clouds. Organic molecules in dense interstellar clouds may ultimately be traced back to carbon-rich fragments originally formed in circumstellar shells.

  10. Circumstellar Structure Properties of Young Stellar Objects: Envelopes, Bipolar Outflows, and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woojin

    2009-12-01

    Physical properties of the three main structures in young stellar objects (YSOs), envelopes, bipolar outflows, and circumstellar disks, have been studied using radio interferometers: the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). (1) Envelopes. Three Class 0 YSOs (L1448 IRS 2, L1448 IRS 3, and L1157) have been observed by CARMA at λ = 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm continuum. Through visibility modeling to fit the two wavelength continuum data simultaneously, we found that the dust opacity spectral index (β) of Class 0 YSOs is around unity, which implies that dust grains have significantly grown already at the earliest stage. In addition, we discussed the radial dependence of β detected in L1448 IRS 3B and also estimated the density distribution of the three targets. (2) Bipolar outflows. Polarimetric observations in the λ = 1.3 mm continuum and CO, as well as spectral line observations in 13CO and C18O have been carried out toward L1448 IRS 3, which has three Class 0 YSOs, using BIMA. We clearly identified two interacting bipolar outflows from the "binary system" of IRS 3A and 3B and estimated the velocity, inclination, and opening angle of the 3B bipolar outflow, using Bayesian inference. Also, we showed that the "binary system" can be bound gravitationally and we estimated the specific angular momentum, which is between those of binary stars and molecular cloud cores. In addition, we marginally detected linear polarizations at the center of IRS 3B (implying a toroidal magnetic field) in continuum and at the bipolar outflow region in CO. (3) Circumstellar disks. We present the results of 6 objects (CI Tau, DL Tau, DO Tau, FT Tau, Haro 6-13, and HL Tau) in our T Tauri disk survey using CARMA. The data consist of λ = 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm continuum with an angular resolution up to 0.13". Through visibility modeling of two disk models (power-law disk with a Gaussian edge and viscous accretion

  11. The Abundance of C2H4 in the Circumstellar Envelope of IRC+10216.

    PubMed

    Fonfría, J P; Hinkle, K H; Cernicharo, J; Richter, M J; Agúndez, M; Wallace, L

    2017-02-01

    High spectral resolution mid-IR observations of ethylene (C2H4) towards the AGB star IRC+10216 were obtained using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Eighty ro-vibrational lines from the 10.5 µm vibrational mode ν7 with J ≲ 30 were detected in absorption. The observed lines are divided into two groups with rotational temperatures of 105 and 400 K (warm and hot lines). The warm lines peak at ≃ -14 km s(-1) with respect to the systemic velocity, suggesting that they are mostly formed outwards from ≃ 20R⋆. The hot lines are centered at -10 km s(-1) indicating that they come from a shell between 10 and 20R⋆. 35% of the observed lines are unblended and can be fitted with a code developed to model the emission of a spherically symmetric circumstellar envelope. The analysis of several scenarios reveal that the C2H4 abundance relative to H2 in the range 5 - 20R⋆ is 6.9 × 10(-8) in average and it could be as high as 1.1 × 10(-7). Beyond 20R⋆, it is 8.2 × 10(-8). The total column density is (6.5 ± 3.0) × 10(15) cm(-2). C2H4 is found to be rotationally under local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and vibrationally out of LTE. One of the scenarios that best reproduce the observations suggests that up to 25% of the C2H4 molecules at 20R⋆ could condense onto dust grains. This possible depletion would not influence significantly the gas acceleration although it could play a role in the surface chemistry on the dust grains.

  12. EXPLORATION OF A RELIC CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPE IN THE ''WATER FOUNTAIN'' SOURCE IRAS 18286-0959

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Kwok, Sun; Deguchi, Shuji; Diamond, Philip J. E-mail: junichi@hku.hk E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk E-mail: diamond@skatelescope.org

    2013-07-01

    The water fountain source IRAS 18286-0959 (I18286) was reported as an object exhibiting highly collimated, double-helix stellar jets traced by the H{sub 2}O maser emission. Using the European VLBI Network, we measured the absolute coordinates of the 1612 MHz OH maser emission in I18286, which is very likely associated with a relic of a circumstellar envelope (CSE) developed in the asymptotic giant branch stage of the central star. The location of the OH maser is near the center of the H{sub 2}O maser feature cluster, where one of the originating points of the two jets is located. We also mapped 22.2 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission in this object using the Very Long Baseline Array in the seasons of 2006-2007 as well as 2008-2009. In the first three epochs in 2006-2007, we detected at least 90 maser features per epoch. In six epochs in 2008-2009, when the observation data had already been published and analyzed to identify the double-helix jets, we newly identified 14 proper motions of H{sub 2}O maser features which could not be measured in the previous analysis due to their short lifetimes. In this paper, together with the OH maser emission, we focus on ''outlier'' H{sub 2}O maser features, which exhibit slow expansion velocities (V{sub exp} {approx}< 30 km s{sup -1}) and are likely associated with either the relic CSE or an equatorial flow of I18286. They were marginally distinguishable from the maser features associated with the jets in I18286.

  13. The Abundance of C2H4 in the Circumstellar Envelope of IRC+10216

    PubMed Central

    Fonfría, J. P.; Hinkle, K. H.; Cernicharo, J.; Richter, M. J.; Agúndez, M.

    2017-01-01

    High spectral resolution mid-IR observations of ethylene (C2H4) towards the AGB star IRC+10216 were obtained using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Eighty ro-vibrational lines from the 10.5 µm vibrational mode ν7 with J ≲ 30 were detected in absorption. The observed lines are divided into two groups with rotational temperatures of 105 and 400 K (warm and hot lines). The warm lines peak at ≃ −14 km s−1 with respect to the systemic velocity, suggesting that they are mostly formed outwards from ≃ 20R⋆. The hot lines are centered at −10 km s−1 indicating that they come from a shell between 10 and 20R⋆. 35% of the observed lines are unblended and can be fitted with a code developed to model the emission of a spherically symmetric circumstellar envelope. The analysis of several scenarios reveal that the C2H4 abundance relative to H2 in the range 5 − 20R⋆ is 6.9 × 10−8 in average and it could be as high as 1.1 × 10−7. Beyond 20R⋆, it is 8.2 × 10−8. The total column density is (6.5 ± 3.0) × 1015 cm−2. C2H4 is found to be rotationally under local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and vibrationally out of LTE. One of the scenarios that best reproduce the observations suggests that up to 25% of the C2H4 molecules at 20R⋆ could condense onto dust grains. This possible depletion would not influence significantly the gas acceleration although it could play a role in the surface chemistry on the dust grains. PMID:28184097

  14. The Abundance of C2H4 in the Circumstellar Envelope of IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonfría, J. P.; Hinkle, K. H.; Cernicharo, J.; Richter, M. J.; Agúndez, M.; Wallace, L.

    2017-02-01

    High spectral resolution mid-IR observations of ethylene ({{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4) toward the AGB star IRC+10216 were obtained using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). 80 ro-vibrational lines from the 10.5 μm vibrational mode {ν }7 with J ≲ 30 were detected in absorption. The observed lines are divided into two groups with rotational temperatures of 105 and 400 K (warm and hot lines). The warm lines peak at ≃ -14 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity, suggesting that they are mostly formed outwards from ≃ 20{R}\\star . The hot lines are centered at -10 km s-1 indicating that they come from a shell between 10 and 20{\\text{}}{R}\\star . 35% of the observed lines are unblended and can be fitted with a code developed to model the emission of a spherically symmetric circumstellar envelope. The analysis of several scenarios reveals that the {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4 abundance relative to H2 in the range 5-20R⋆ is 6.9× {10}-8 on average and it could be as high as 1.1 × 10-7. Beyond 20{\\text{}}{R}\\star , it is 8.2 × 10-8. The total column density is (6.5 ± 3.0) × 1015 cm-2. {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4 is found to be rotationally under local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and vibrationally out of LTE. One of the scenarios that best reproduce the observations suggests that up to 25% of the {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4 molecules at 20{\\text{}}{R}\\star could condense onto dust grains. This possible depletion would not significantly influence the gas acceleration although it could play a role in the surface chemistry on the dust grains.

  15. Modelling the dusty circumstellar envelopes of axisymmetric post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Estrada, A. M.; Molina, C. A.; Pérez-Sánchez, A. F.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the dust component of the dense circumstellar envelope (CSE) of two post-AGB sources known as Water Fountain nebulae: IRAS 16342-3814 and IRAS 18113-2503. The goal was to derive some of their physical properties and determine the dust temperature distribution of the sources. It has been proposed that axisymmetric post-AGB stars could be the progenitors of non-spherical planetary nebulae. The study of the structure and physical properties of the dusty CSE of these sources allows the assessment of this hypothesis, and casts light on the processes that occur during the last stages of evolution of low- to intermediate-mass stars. We considered a model with a dust density distribution consisting of a spherical distribution in the external region of the CSE and a component with axial symmetry inside, as well as a set of physical parameters for each source. Then, we performed radiative transfer calculations using the RADMC-3D code, which is a software package that runs thermal Monte Carlo simulations to compute the dust temperature, images and spectra for a model in dust continuum. We compared synthetic infrared spectral energy distributions with those observed by telescopes such as Spitzer and ISO, in order to get the best fit possible. As a result, we found good fits for both sources and axisymmetric dust temperature distributions for each one. Therefore, we concluded that our model is a suitable approximation to describe the dusty CSE of these stars, and it might be proposed to model the other water fountain sources known to date.

  16. HACA's Heritage: A Free-Radical Pathway to Phenanthrene in Circumstellar Envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Kaiser, Ralf I; Troy, Tyler P; Xu, Bo; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Mebel, Alexander M; Zagidullin, Marsel V; Azyazov, Valeriy N

    2017-04-10

    The hydrogen-abstraction/acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism has been central for the last decades in attempting to rationalize the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as detected in carbonaceous meteorites such as in Murchison. Nevertheless, the basic reaction mechanisms leading to the formation of even the simplest tricyclic PAHs like anthracene and phenanthrene are still elusive. Here, by exploring the previously unknown chemistry of the ortho-biphenylyl radical with acetylene, we deliver compelling evidence on the efficient synthesis of phenanthrene in carbon-rich circumstellar environments. However, the lack of formation of the anthracene isomer implies that HACA alone cannot be responsible for the formation of PAHs in extreme environments. Considering the overall picture, alternative pathways such as vinylacetylene-mediated reactions are required to play a crucial role in the synthesis of complex PAHs in circumstellar envelopes of dying carbon-rich stars. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. CARMA CO(J = 2 - 1) Observations of the Circumstellar Envelope of Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Joanna M.; Brown, Alexander; Redfield, Seth; Richter, Matthew J.; Requena-Torres, Miguel A.

    2012-08-01

    We report radio interferometric observations of the 12C16O 1.3 mm J = 2 - 1 emission line in the circumstellar envelope of the M supergiant α Ori and have detected and separated both the S1 and S2 flow components for the first time. Observations were made with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer in the C, D, and E antenna configurations. We obtain good u - v coverage (5-280 kλ) by combining data from all three configurations allowing us to trace spatial scales as small as 0farcs9 over a 32'' field of view. The high spectral and spatial resolution C configuration line profile shows that the inner S1 flow has slightly asymmetric outflow velocities ranging from -9.0 km s-1 to +10.6 km s-1 with respect to the stellar rest frame. We find little evidence for the outer S2 flow in this configuration because the majority of this emission has been spatially filtered (resolved out) by the array. We also report a SOFIA-GREAT CO(J = 12 - 11) emission line profile, which we associate with this inner higher excitation S1 flow. The outer S2 flow appears in the D and E configuration maps and its outflow velocity is found to be in good agreement with high-resolution optical spectroscopy of K I obtained at the McDonald Observatory. We image both S1 and S2 in the multi-configuration maps and see a gradual change in the angular size of the emission in the high absolute velocity maps. We assign an outer radius of 4'' to S1 and propose that S2 extends beyond CARMA's field of view (32'' at 1.3 mm) out to a radius of 17'', which is larger than recent single-dish observations have indicated. When azimuthally averaged, the intensity falloff for both flows is found to be proportional to R -1, where R is the projected radius, indicating optically thin winds with ρvpropR -2.

  18. On the formation of metal cyanides and related compounds in the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Simon

    1996-10-01

    Various pathways to the metal cyanides Na(CN), Mg(CN) and Al(CN) - some of which have been detected in the circumstellar envelope IRC+10216 - are critically assessed. Calculations of rate coefficients for radiative association processes of the types M^++HCN, M^++HNC and M+CN, which are supported by ab initio calculations of the relevant bond strengths, molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies, allow us to conclude that none of these previously proposed pathways to M(CN) can account for the observed abundances of T-Na(CN), MgCN and MgNC within IRC+10216. We propose that the observed sodium and magnesium cyanides are best accounted for by a mechanism involving radiative association of Na^+ and Mg^+ with cyanopolyynes such as HC_5N and HC_7N, and discuss prospects for the formation of Al(CN) by an analogous mechanism. We also estimate the abundance ratios n(NaCN):n(T-Na(CN)) and n(AlCN):n(AlNC), assuming an ion/molecule source for these species and based on calculated themochemical and spectroscopic properties for these isomers; the results suggest that virtually all Na(CN) and Al(CN) should be in the form of T-Na(CN) and linear AlNC respectively, with poor prospects for the detection of the higher energy isomers NaCN and AlCN. Larger homologues of the metal cyanides, such as MNC_2n-1 (M=Na, Mg, Al; n=1,2,3,4...), may also arise in the dissociative recombination of MNC_2n+1H^+ ions. We assess the prospects for formation of the species MgC_2 and MgCCH, and propose also that the metal amides MNH_2 (M=Na, Mg, Al) constitute another class of compound whose formation in IRC+10216 via an ion/molecule mechanism, namely the reaction of M^+ with NH_3, appears highly likely.

  19. Searching for signatures of planet formation in stars with circumstellar debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Eiroa, C.; Villaver, E.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Tentative correlations between the presence of dusty circumstellar debris discs and low-mass planets have recently been presented. In parallel, detailed chemical abundance studies have reported different trends between samples of planet and non-planet hosts. Whether these chemical differences are indeed related to the presence of planets is still strongly debated. Aims: We aim to test whether solar-type stars with debris discs show any chemical peculiarity that could be related to the planet formation process. Methods: We determine in a homogeneous way the metallicity, [Fe/H], and abundances of individual elements of a sample of 251 stars including stars with known debris discs, stars harbouring simultaneously debris discs and planets, stars hosting exclusively planets, and a comparison sample of stars without known discs or planets. High-resolution échelle spectra (R ~ 57 000) from 2-3 m class telescopes are used. Our methodology includes the calculation of the fundamental stellar parameters (Teff, log g, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity) by applying the iron ionisation and equilibrium conditions to several isolated Fe i and Fe ii lines, as well as individual abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn. Results: No significant differences have been found in metallicity, individual abundances or abundance-condensation temperature trends between stars with debris discs and stars with neither debris nor planets. Stars with debris discs and planets have the same metallicity behaviour as stars hosting planets, and they also show a similar ⟨[ X/Fe ] ⟩ - TC trend. Different behaviour in the ⟨[ X/Fe ] ⟩ - TC trends is found between the samples of stars without planets and the samples of planet hosts. In particular, when considering only refractory elements, negative slopes are shown in cool giant planet hosts, whilst positive ones are shown in stars hosting low-mass planets. The statistical significance of the

  20. SO and SO2 in mass-loss envelopes of red giants - Probes of nonequilibrium circumstellar chemistry and mass-loss rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Wannier, Peter G.

    1992-01-01

    SO emission was searched for in one or more of four transitions toward 23 oxygen-rich red giant or supergiant stars and one S star, selected primarily on the basis of their nonmaser SiO emission. SO was detected in a total of 14 circumstellar envelopes, 13 of which are new detections. The circumstellar abundance of SO (and SO2) is significantly enhanced over the equilibrium value achieved in the photospheres of these stars. In general, the SO abundances are significantly larger than predicted by nonequilibrium circumstellar chemistry models. Sulfur cannot be significantly depleted onto circumstellar grains, and probably exists as H2S (and/or SH) in the inner regions of the envelopes. The SO rotational-level population in most circumstellar envelopes observed is characterized by excitation temperatures less than or approximately equal to 50 K. The circumstellar abundance of SO2 is comparable to, or larger than, that of SO, ruling out the 'large' value adopted for the unshielded photodissociation rate for SO2 in recent models.

  1. Connecting the evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars to the chemistry in their circumstellar envelopes - I. Hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Paola; Ripamonti, Emanuele; Nanni, Ambra; Bressan, Alessandro; Girardi, Léo

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the formation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the inner circumstellar envelopes of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars. A dynamic model for periodically shocked atmospheres, which includes an extended chemo-kinetic network, is for the first time coupled to detailed evolutionary tracks for the TP-AGB phase computed with the COLIBRI code. We carried out a calibration of the main shock parameters (the shock formation radius rs,0 and the effective adiabatic index γ _ad^eff) using the circumstellar HCN abundances recently measured for a populous sample of pulsating TP-AGB stars. Our models recover the range of the observed HCN concentrations as a function of the mass-loss rates, and successfully reproduce the systematic increase of HCN moving along the M-S-C chemical sequence of TP-AGB stars, which traces the increase of the surface C/O ratio. The chemical calibration brings along two important implications for the physical properties of the pulsation-induced shocks: (i) the first shock should emerge very close to the photosphere (rs,0 ≃ 1R), and (ii) shocks are expected to have a dominant isothermal character (γ _ad^eff˜eq 1) in the denser region close to the star (within ˜3-4R), implying that radiative processes should be quite efficient. Our analysis also suggests that the HCN concentrations in the inner circumstellar envelopes are critically affected by the H-H2 chemistry during the post-shock relaxation stages. Given the notable sensitiveness of the results to stellar parameters, this paper shows that such chemo-dynamic analyses may indeed provide a significant contribution to the broader goal of attaining a comprehensive calibration of the TP-AGB evolutionary phase.

  2. A chemical route to the formation of water in circumstellar envelopes around carbon-rich asymptotic branch stars: Fischer-Tropsch catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willacy, K.

    2004-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysis has been suggested as a means of driving hydrocarbon chemistry in oxygen rich regions such as the protosolar nebula. In addition to producing hydrocarbons, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also produces water, and it is therefore possible that such processes could account for the recent observations of water in the circumstellar envelope of asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216.

  3. In situ accretion of gaseous envelopes on to planetary cores embedded in evolving protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Gavin A. L.; Papaloizou, John C. B.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2017-09-01

    The core accretion hypothesis posits that planets with significant gaseous envelopes accreted them from their protoplanetary discs after the formation of rocky/icy cores. Observations indicate that such exoplanets exist at a broad range of orbital radii, but it is not known whether they accreted their envelopes in situ, or originated elsewhere and migrated to their current locations. We consider the evolution of solid cores embedded in evolving viscous discs that undergo gaseous envelope accretion in situ with orbital radii in the range 0.1-10 au. Additionally, we determine the long-term evolution of the planets that had no runaway gas accretion phase after disc dispersal. We find the following. (i) Planets with 5 M⊕ cores never undergo runaway accretion. The most massive envelope contained 2.8 M⊕ with the planet orbiting at 10 au. (ii) Accretion is more efficient on to 10 M⊕ and 15 M⊕ cores. For orbital radii ap ≥ 0.5 au, 15 M⊕ cores always experienced runaway gas accretion. For ap ≥ 5 au, all but one of the 10 M⊕ cores experienced runaway gas accretion. No planets experienced runaway growth at ap = 0.1 au. (iii) We find that, after disc dispersal, planets with significant gaseous envelopes cool and contract on Gyr time-scales, the contraction time being sensitive to the opacity assumed. Our results indicate that Hot Jupiters with core masses ≲15 M⊕ at ≲0.1 au likely accreted their gaseous envelopes at larger distances and migrated inwards. Consistently with the known exoplanet population, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes at small radii during the disc lifetime, accrete only modest gaseous envelopes.

  4. The young low-mass star ISO-Oph-50: extreme variability induced by a clumpy, evolving circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Alexander; Mužić, Koraljka; Geers, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    ISO-Oph-50 is a young low-mass object in the ˜1 Myr old Ophiuchus star-forming region undergoing dramatic changes in its optical/near/mid-infrared brightness by 2-4 mag. We present new multi-band photometry and near-infrared spectra, combined with a synopsis of the existing literature data. Based on the spectroscopy, the source is confirmed as a mid-M dwarf, with evidence for ongoing accretion. The near-infrared light curves show large-scale variations, with 2-4 mag amplitude in the bands IJHK, with the object generally being bluer when faint. Near its brightest state, the object shows colour changes consistent with variable extinction of ΔAV ˜ 7 mag. High-cadence monitoring at 3.6 μm reveals quasi-periodic variations with a typical time-scale of 1-2 weeks. The best explanation for these characteristics is a low-mass star seen through circumstellar matter, whose complex variability is caused by changing inhomogeneities in the inner parts of the disc. When faint, the direct stellar emission is blocked; the near-infrared radiation is dominated by scattered light. When bright, the emission is consistent with a photosphere strongly reddened by circumstellar dust. Based on the available constraints, the inhomogeneities have to be located at or beyond ˜0.1 au distance from the star. If this scenario turns out to be correct, a major portion of the inner disc has to be clumpy, structured, and/or in turmoil. In its observational characteristics, this object resembles other types of young stellar objects with variability caused in the inner disc. Compared to other objects, however, ISO-Oph-50 is clearly an extreme case, given the large amplitude of the brightness and colour changes combined with the erratic behaviour. ISO-Oph-50 has been near its brightest state since 2013; further monitoring is highly encouraged.

  5. Circumstellar gas associated with HL Tauri - Evidence for a remnant infalling envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Sloan, Gregory; Stout, Natalie; Strom, Stephen E.; Welty, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular carbon absorption lines in the spectrum of HL Tau has been discovered near 8775 A. These C2 lines have a heliocentric radial velocity of 43 + or - 3 km/s, redshifted by 23 + or - 3 km/s relative to the star and the associated molecular cloud. This velocity difference suggests that the molecular carbon absorption arises in an infalling envelope. Since KI and diffuse interstellar bands are much weaker than expected, the chemical composition and/or excitation conditions in the HL Tau envelope appear to differ substantially from those in the interstellar medium.

  6. Circumstellar gas associated with HL Tauri - Evidence for a remnant infalling envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Sloan, Gregory; Stout, Natalie; Strom, Stephen E.; Welty, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular carbon absorption lines in the spectrum of HL Tau has been discovered near 8775 A. These C2 lines have a heliocentric radial velocity of 43 + or - 3 km/s, redshifted by 23 + or - 3 km/s relative to the star and the associated molecular cloud. This velocity difference suggests that the molecular carbon absorption arises in an infalling envelope. Since KI and diffuse interstellar bands are much weaker than expected, the chemical composition and/or excitation conditions in the HL Tau envelope appear to differ substantially from those in the interstellar medium.

  7. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of circumstellar discs in L 1495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Greaves, J.; Richer, J. S.; Matthews, B. C.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; di Francesco, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present 850 and 450 μm data from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey obtained with Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) and characterize the dust attributes of Class I, Class II and Class III disc sources in L 1495. We detect 23 per cent of the sample at both wavelengths, with the detection rate decreasing through the Classes from I to III. The median disc mask is 1.6 × 10-3 M⊙, and only 7 per cent of Class II sources have disc masses larger than 20 Jupiter masses. We detect a higher proportion of discs towards sources with stellar hosts of spectral type K than spectral type M. Class II discs with single stellar hosts of spectral type K have higher masses than those of spectral type M, supporting the hypothesis that higher mass stars have more massive discs. Variations in disc masses calculated at the two wavelengths suggest that there may be differences in dust opacity and/or dust temperature between discs with hosts of spectral types K to those with spectral type M.

  8. Extremely Low Mass: The Circumstellar Envelope of a Potential Proto-Brown Dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    What is the environment for planet formation around extremely low mass stars? Is the environment around brown dwarfs and extremely low mass stars conducive and sufficiently massive for planet production? The determining conditions may be set very early in the process of the host object's formation. IRAS 16253-2429, the source of the Wasp-Waist Nebula seen in Spitzer IRAC images, is an isolated, very low luminosity ("VeLLO") Class 0 protostar in the nearby rho Ophiuchi cloud. We present VLA ammonia mapping observations of the dense gas envelope feeding the central core accreting system. We find a flattened envelope perpendicular to the outflow axis, and gas cavities that appear to cradle the outflow lobes as though carved out by the flow and associated (apparently precessing) jet, indicating environmental disruption. Based on the NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) emission distribution, we derive the mass, velocity fields and temperature distribution for the envelope. We discuss the combined evidence for this source to be one of the youngest and lowest mass sources in formation yet known, and discuss the ramifications for planet formation potential in this extremely low mass system.

  9. Organic Molecules in Oxygen-Rich Circumstellar Envelopes: Methanol and Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Kress, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    The existence of anomalously high abundances of gaseous CH4 has been invoked to explain the unexpectedly high abundances of the carbon-bearing molecules HCN and H2CO in the outflows from O-rich red giants. We have modelled the chemistry that proceeds in the outer envelope when CH4 is injected from the inner envelope. We find that photolysis by the interstellar radiation field drives an ion-neutral chemistry which produces several organic molecules. The calculated abundances of CH3OH, C2H and C2 can be comparable to those calculated for H2CO and HCN. Species such as C2H4, C2H2 and CH3CN can also be abundant. A search for CH3OH and C2H in several O-rich outflows known to exhibit strong HCN emission is needed. As it derives entirely from the CH4 photochain, is insensitive to the envelope temperature distribution, and has accessible transitions at millimetre wavelengths, the detection of the C2H radical would provide further indirect support for the presence of the hypothesized methane.

  10. Water isotopologues in the circumstellar envelopes of M-type AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; Lombaert, R.; Decin, L.; Karakas, A.; Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: In this study we intend to examine rotational emission lines of two isotopologues of water: H217O and H218O. By determining the abundances of these molecules, we aim to use the derived isotopologue - and hence oxygen isotope - ratios to put constraints on the masses of a sample of M-type AGB stars that have not been classified as OH/IR stars. Methods: We have used detailed radiative transfer analysis based on the accelerated lambda iteration method to model the circumstellar molecular line emission of H217O and H218O for IK Tau, R Dor, W Hya, and R Cas. The emission lines used to constrain our models came from Herschel/HIFI and Herschel/PACS observations and are all optically thick, meaning that full radiative transfer analysis is the only viable method of estimating molecular abundance ratios. Results: We find generally low values of the 17O/18O ratio for our sample, ranging from 0.15 to 0.69. This correlates with relatively low initial masses, in the range 1.0 to 1.5 M⊙ for each source, based on stellar evolutionary models. We also find ortho-to-para ratios close to 3, which are expected from warm formation predictions. Conclusions: The 17O/18O ratios found for this sample are at the lower end of the range predicted by stellar evolutionary models, indicating that the sample chosen had relatively low initial masses. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. CO line emission from circumstellar envelopes: towards higher-J transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, D.; Bujarrabal, V.; Yoshida, H.; Phillips, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a multi-transition CO observational program conducted on a sample of AGB and post-AGB stars envelopes. Using new observations of the CO line at 691 GHz at the CSO, we have collected maps and single pointing observations of these envelope in 5 rotational transitions ranging from J=1-0 to J=6-5. Using a simplified version of the model of Bujarrabal et al. (1989), we have conducted a systematic modelling analysis using the whole set of CO data collected on a sample of 12 sources. Our modelling approach simultaneously fits all five transitions, taking into account the spatial information provided by the maps. We show that most AGBs data can be fitted using a single mass-loss rate, at least within the calibration uncertainties associated to the data collected at high frequencies. For some cases though, a change in the mass-loss rate history needs to be invoked to reconcile data at low and high-J respectively.

  12. The circumstellar envelope around the S-type AGB star W Aql. Effects of an eccentric binary orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstedt, S.; Mohamed, S.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Danilovich, T.; Brunner, M.; De Beck, E.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Lindqvist, M.; Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Kerschbaum, F.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Recent observations at subarcsecond resolution, now possible also at submillimeter wavelengths, have shown intricate circumstellar structures around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, mostly attributed to binary interaction. The results presented here are part of a larger project aimed at investigating the effects of a binary companion on the morphology of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of AGB stars. Aims: AGB stars are characterized by intense stellar winds that build CSEs around the stars. Here, the CO(J = 3 → 2) emission from the CSE of the binary S-type AGB star W Aql has been observed at subarcsecond resolution using ALMA. The aim of this paper is to investigate the wind properties of the AGB star and to analyse how the known companion has shaped the CSE. Methods: The average mass-loss rate during the creation of the detected CSE is estimated through modelling, using the ALMA brightness distribution and previously published single-dish measurements as observational constraints. The ALMA observations are presented and compared to the results from a 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) binary interaction model with the same properties as the W Aql system and with two different orbital eccentricities. Three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling is performed and the response of the interferometer is modelled and discussed. Results: The estimated average mass-loss rate of W Aql is Ṁ = 3.0 × 10-6M⊙ yr-1 and agrees with previous results based on single-dish CO line emission observations. The size of the emitting region is consistent with photodissociation models. The inner 10'' of the CSE is asymmetric with arc-like structures at separations of 2-3'' scattered across the denser sections. Further out, weaker spiral structures at greater separations are found, but this is at the limit of the sensitivity and field of view of the ALMA observations. Conclusions: The CO(J = 3 → 2) emission is dominated by a smooth component overlayed with two

  13. SIMULTANEOUS K- AND L-BAND SPECTROSCOPY OF Be STARS: CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPE PROPERTIES FROM HYDROGEN EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Granada, A.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-05-15

    We present medium-resolution K- and L-band spectra of a sample of eight Be stars, obtained with Gemini/NIRI. The IR K and L bands contain many lines of different hydrogen series that are used as a diagnosis to the physical conditions in the circumstellar environments. We make an analysis on the optical depths of the line-forming regions based on the intensity ratios of Pf{gamma} and Br{alpha} lines, the behavior of Humphreys' series, and the fluxes of Br{alpha} and Br{gamma} lines. All our targets show spectroscopic and photometric long-term variability; thus, time-resolved K- and L-band spectroscopy is an ideal tool for studying the structure and evolution of the innermost regions of the envelope and to test models on the disk-forming mechanism. We note that the instrumental configuration used allowed us to obtain good quality IR observations and to take profit of Gemini band 3 observing time (allocation time for ranked programs in which the observing conditions are relaxed).

  14. Low-mass gas envelopes around accreting cores embedded in radiative 3D discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, Elena; Lambrechts, Michiel

    2016-10-01

    Planets with a core mass larger than few Earth masses and a gaseous envelope not exceeding about 10% of the total mass budget are common. Such planets are present in the Solar System (Uranus, Neptune) and are frequently observed around other stars.Our knowledge about the evolution of gas envelopes is mainly based on 1D models. However, such models cannot investigate the complex interaction between the forming envelope and the surrounding gas disc.In this work we perform 3D hydrodynamics simulations accounting for energy transfer and radiative cooling using the FARGOCA code (Lega et al., MNRAS 440, 2014). In addition to the usually considered heatingsources, namely viscous and compressional heating, we have modeled the energy deposited by the accretion of solids.We show that the thermal evolution of the envelope of a 5 Earth mass core is mainly dominated by compressional heating for accretion rates lower than 5 Earth masses per 105 years.Additionally, we demonstrate efficient gas circulation through the envelope. Under certain conditions, the competition between gas circulation and cooling of the envelope can efficiently delay the onset of runaway accretion. This could help in explaining the population of planets with low-mass gas envelope.

  15. OGLE-BLG182.1.162852: an eclipsing binary with a circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattenbury, N. J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Udalski, A.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Skowron, J.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mróz, P.; Skowron, D.

    2015-02-01

    We present the discovery of a plausible disc-eclipse system OGLE-BLG182.1.162852. The OGLE light curve for OGLE-BLG182.1.162852 shows three episodes of dimming by I ≃ 2-3 mag, separated by 1277 d. The shape of the light curve during dimming events is very similar to that of known disc-eclipse system OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893. The event is presently undergoing a dimming event, predicted to end on 2014 December 30. The next dimming episode for OGLE-BLG182.1.162852 is expected to occur in 2018 March.

  16. Simultaneous K- and L-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars: Circumstellar Envelope Properties from Hydrogen Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, A.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-05-01

    We present medium-resolution K- and L-band spectra of a sample of eight Be stars, obtained with Gemini/NIRI. The IR K and L bands contain many lines of different hydrogen series that are used as a diagnosis to the physical conditions in the circumstellar environments. We make an analysis on the optical depths of the line-forming regions based on the intensity ratios of Pfγ and Brα lines, the behavior of Humphreys' series, and the fluxes of Brα and Brγ lines. All our targets show spectroscopic and photometric long-term variability; thus, time-resolved K- and L-band spectroscopy is an ideal tool for studying the structure and evolution of the innermost regions of the envelope and to test models on the disk-forming mechanism. We note that the instrumental configuration used allowed us to obtain good quality IR observations and to take profit of Gemini band 3 observing time (allocation time for ranked programs in which the observing conditions are relaxed). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  17. Interferometric observations of non-maser SiO emission from circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars - Acceleration regions and SiO depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Bieging, John H.

    1993-01-01

    High- and medium-resolution images of SiO J = 2-1(V = 0) from the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of three oxygen-rich stars, Chi Cyg, RX Boo, and IK Tau, were obtained. The SIO images were found to be roughly circular, implying that the CSEs are spherically symmetric on angular-size scales of about 3-9 arcsec. The observed angular half-maximum intensity source radius is nearly independent of the LSR velocity for all three CSEs. Chi Cyg and RX Boo are argued to be less than 450 pc distant, and have mass-loss rates larger than about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr. In Chi Cyg and RX Boo, the line profiles at the peak of the brightness distribution are rounded, typical of optically-thick emission from a spherical envelope expanding with a constant velocity. In the IK Tau line profiles, an additional narrower central component is present, probably a result of emission from an inner circumstellar shell with a significantly smaller expansion velocity than the extended envelope.

  18. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2005gj: Another TypeIa Supernova in a Massive Circumstellar Envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bauer, A.; Blanc, N.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Gilles, S.; Kessler, R.; Kocevski, D.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigaudier, G.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B.A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.

    2006-06-01

    We report the independent discovery and follow-up observations of supernova 2005gj by the Nearby Supernova Factory. This is the second confirmed case of a ''hybrid'' Type Ia/IIn supernova, which like the prototype SN 2002ic, we interpret as the explosion of a white dwarf interacting with a circumstellar medium. Our early-phase photometry of SN 2005gj shows that the strength of the interaction between the supernova ejecta and circumstellar material is much stronger than for SN 2002ic. Our .rst spectrum shows a hot continuum with broad and narrow H{alpha} emission. Later spectra, spanning over 4 months from outburst, show clear Type Ia features combined with broad and narrow H{gamma}, H{beta},H{alpha} and He I {lambda}{lambda}5876,7065 in emission. At higher resolution, P Cygni profiles are apparent. Surprisingly, we also observe an inverted P Cygni profile for [O III] {lambda}5007. We find that the lightcurve and measured velocity of the unshocked circumstellar material imply mass loss as recently as 8 years ago. This is in contrast to SN 2002ic, for which an inner cavity in the circumstellar material was inferred. Within the context of the thin-shell approximation, the early lightcurve is well-described by a flat radial density profile for the circumstellar material. However, our decomposition of the spectra into Type Ia and shock emission components allows for little obscuration of the supernova, suggesting an aspherical or clumpy distribution for the circumstellar material. We suggest that the emission line velocity profiles arise from electron scattering rather than the kinematics of the shock. This is supported by the inferred high densities, and the lack of evidence for evolution in the line widths. Ground- and space-based photometry, and Keck spectroscopy, of the host galaxy are used to ascertain that the host galaxy has low metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.3; 95% confidence) and that this galaxy is undergoing a significant star formation event that

  19. CIRCUMSTELLAR ION-MOLECULE CHEMISTRY: OBSERVATIONS OF HCO{sup +} IN THE ENVELOPES OF O-RICH STARS AND IRC+10216

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R. L.; Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2011-12-10

    Millimeter-wave observations of HCO{sup +} have been conducted toward oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes, as well as IRC+10216, using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The J = 1 {yields} 0 and 2 {yields} 1 transitions of this molecule were measured with the ARO 12 m antenna, while the J = 3 {yields} 2 and 4 {yields} 3 lines were observed using the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope. HCO{sup +} was detected toward the supergiant NML Cyg and the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars IK Tau, TX Cam, and W Hya in at least two transitions. The J = 2 {yields} 1 and 3 {yields} 2 lines of this ion were also detected toward IRC+10216, confirming the identification of HCO{sup +} in this object. The line profiles measured for HCO{sup +} toward NML Cyg consist of red- and blueshifted components, suggesting a non-spherical shell. Based on a radiative transfer analysis, the abundances in the O-rich envelopes were f(HCO{sup +}/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.15-1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}, with the AGB stars typically exhibiting the higher values. In IRC+10216, f(HCO{sup +}/H{sub 2}) {approx} 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, lower than the O-rich counterparts. The abundances of HCO{sup +} were also found to peak at considerable distances from the star, indicative of an outer envelope molecule. Comparison with H{sub 2}O and CO, the main precursor species, suggests that HCO{sup +} is more prevalent in envelopes that have substantial water, but CO also plays a role in its formation. The abundance of HCO{sup +} appears to increase inversely with mass-loss rate, provided the rate is >10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The common appearance of HCO{sup +} in circumstellar gas indicates that, at some level, ion-molecule reactions influence the chemistry of evolved stellar envelopes.

  20. On the relationship between circumstellar disc size and X-ray outbursts in Be/X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monageng, I. M.; McBride, V. A.; Coe, M. J.; Steele, I. A.; Reig, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present long-term Hα monitoring results of five Be/X-ray binaries to study the Be disc size variations and their influence on type II (giant) X-ray outbursts. The work is done in the context of the viscous decretion disc model which predicts that Be discs in binary systems are truncated by resonant torques induced by the neutron star in its orbit. Our observations show that type II outbursts are not correlated (nor anticorrelated) with the disc size, as they are seen to occur both at relatively small and large Be disc radii. We discuss these observations in context of alternate interpretation of Be disc behaviour, such as precession, elongation and density effects, and with cognisance of the limitations of our disc size estimates.

  1. Considerations on the role of fall-back discs in the final stages of the common envelope binary interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruwita, Rajika L.; Staff, Jan; De Marco, Orsola

    2016-09-01

    The common envelope interaction is thought to be the gateway to all evolved compact binaries and mergers. Hydrodynamic simulations of the common envelope interaction between giant stars and their companions are restricted to the dynamical, fast, in-spiral phase. They find that the giant envelope is lifted during this phase, but remains mostly bound to the system. At the same time, the orbital separation is greatly reduced, but in most simulations it levels off at values larger than measured from observations. We conjectured that during the post-in-spiral phase the bound envelope gas will return to the system. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we generate initial conditions for our simulation that result in a fall-back disc with total mass and angular momentum in line with quantities from the simulations of Passy et al. We find that the simulated fall-back event reduces the orbital separation efficiently, but fails to unbind the gas before the separation levels off once again. We also find that more massive fall-back discs reduce the orbital separation more efficiently, but the efficiency of unbinding remains invariably very low. From these results we deduce that unless a further energy source contributes to unbinding the envelope (such as was recently tested by Nandez et al.), all common envelope interactions would result in mergers. On the other hand, additional energy sources are unlikely to help, on their own, to reduce the orbital separation. We conclude by discussing our dynamical fall-back event in the context of a thermally regulated post-common envelope phase.

  2. The circumstellar dust envelopes of red giant stars. I - M giant stars with the 10-micron silicate emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, O.; Nakada, Y.; Onaka, T.; Kamijo, F.; Tanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    Spherical dust envelope models of red giant stars are constructed by solving the radiative transfer equations of the generalized two-stream Eddington approximation. The IRAS observations of M giant stars which show the 10-micron silicate emission band in IRAS LRS spectra are explained by the models with the dirty silicate grains with K proportional to lambda exp -1.5 for lambda greather than 28 microns. Under the assumption of steady mass flow in the envelope, this model analysis gives the following conclusions: (1) the strength of the silicate emission peak at 10 microns is a good indicator of the mass loss rate of the star, (2) no stars with the 10-microns silicate emission feature are observed in the range of mass loss rate smaller than 7 x 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr, and (3) the characteristic time of the mass loss process of M stars does not exceed a few 10,000 years.

  3. Binary stellar mergers with marginally bound ejecta: excretion discs, inflated envelopes, outflows, and their luminous transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    We study mass-loss from the outer Lagrange point (L2) in binary stellar mergers and their luminous transients by means of radiative hydrodynamical simulations. Previously, we showed that for binary mass ratios 0.06 ≲ q ≲ 0.8, synchronous L2 mass-loss results in a radiatively inefficient, dust-forming unbound equatorial outflow. A similar outflow exists irrespective of q if the ratio of the sound speed to the orbital speed at the injection point is sufficiently large, ε ≡ cT/vorb ≳ 0.15. By contrast, for cold L2 mass-loss (ε ≲ 0.15) from binaries with q ≲ 0.06 or q ≳ 0.8, the equatorial outflow instead remains marginally bound and falls back to the binary over tens to hundreds of binary orbits, where it experiences additional tidal torquing and shocking. As the bound gas becomes virialized with the binary, the luminosity of the system increases slowly at approximately constant photosphere radius, causing the temperature to rise. Subsequent evolution depends on the efficiency of radiative cooling. If the bound atmosphere is able to cool efficiently, as quantified by radiative diffusion time being shorter than the advection time (tdiff/tadv ≪ 1), then the virialized gas collapses to an excretion disc, while for tdiff/tadv ≳ 1 an isotropic wind is formed. Between these two extremes, an inflated envelope transports the heat generated near the binary to the surface by meridional flows. In all cases, the radiated luminosity reaches a fraction ˜10-2 to 10-1 of dot{M}v_orb^2/2, where dot{M} is the mass outflow rate. We discuss the implications of our results for transients in the luminosity gap between classical novae and supernovae, such as V1309 Sco and V838 Mon.

  4. Constraining dust properties in circumstellar envelopes of C-stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: optical constants and grain size of carbon dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Ambra; Marigo, Paola; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Aringer, Bernhard; Girardi, Léo; Pastorelli, Giada; Bressan, Alessandro; Bladh, Sara

    2016-10-01

    We present a new approach aimed at constraining the typical size and optical properties of carbon dust grains in circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of carbon-rich stars (C-stars) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). To achieve this goal, we apply our recent dust growth description, coupled with a radiative transfer code to the CSEs of C-stars evolving along the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch, for which we compute spectra and colours. Then, we compare our modelled colours in the near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) bands with the observed ones, testing different assumptions in our dust scheme and employing several data sets of optical constants for carbon dust available in the literature. Different assumptions adopted in our dust scheme change the typical size of the carbon grains produced. We constrain carbon dust properties by selecting the combination of grain size and optical constants which best reproduce several colours in the NIR and MIR at the same time. The different choices of optical properties and grain size lead to differences in the NIR and MIR colours greater than 2 mag in some cases. We conclude that the complete set of observed NIR and MIR colours are best reproduced by small grains, with sizes between ˜0.035 and ˜0.12 μm, rather than by large grains between ˜0.2 and 0.7 μm. The inability of large grains to reproduce NIR and MIR colours seems independent of the adopted optical data set. We also find a possible trend of the grain size with mass-loss and/or carbon excess in the CSEs of these stars.

  5. The origin and evolution of dust in interstellar and circumstellar environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittet, Douglas C. B.; Leung, Chun M.

    1993-01-01

    This status report covers the period from the commencement of the research program on 1 Jul. 1992 through 30 Apr. 1993. Progress is reported for research in the following areas: (1) grain formation in circumstellar envelopes; (2) photochemistry in circumstellar envelopes; (3) modeling ice features in circumstellar envelopes; (4) episodic dust formation in circumstellar envelopes; (5) grain evolution in the diffuse interstellar medium; and (6) grain evolution in dense molecular clouds.

  6. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  7. Vertical structure of the transition zone from infalling rotating envelope to disc in the Class 0 protostar, IRAS 04368+2557

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; Higuchi, Aya E.; Aikawa, Yuri; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Kahane, Claudine; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    We have resolved for the first time the radial and vertical structures of the almost edge-on envelope/disc system of the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1527. For that, we have used Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA) observations with a spatial resolution of 0.25 × 0.13 arcsec2 and 0.37 × 0.23 arcsec2 at 0.8 and 1.2 mm, respectively. The L1527 dust continuum emission has a deconvolved size of 78 × 21 au2, and shows a flared disc-like structure. A thin infalling-rotating envelope is seen in the CCH emission outward of about 150 au, and its thickness is increased by a factor of 2 inward of it. This radius lies between the centrifugal radius (200 au) and the centrifugal barrier of the infalling-rotating envelope (100 au). The gas stagnates in front of the centrifugal barrier and moves towards vertical directions. SO emission is concentrated around and inside the centrifugal barrier. The rotation speed of the SO emitting gas is found to be decelerated around the centrifugal barrier. A part of the angular momentum could be extracted by the gas that moves away from the mid-plane around the centrifugal barrier. If this is the case, the centrifugal barrier would be related to the launching mechanism of low-velocity outflows, such as disc winds.

  8. Submillimeter observations of circumstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Caroline R.; Leahy, Denis A.; Kwok, Sun

    1992-06-01

    Five late-type stars with circumstellar envelopes were observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on 1988 February 7-8. The stars IK Tauri, Alpha Orionis, VY Canis Majoris, CW Leonis, and RW Leonis Minoris were observed in the 450, 800, and 1100 micron wavebands. These data were combined with existing measurements at shorter wavelengths for each star. The combined data were fitted to a circumstellar-dust-shell model based on the computer code by Leung (1975). Derived parameters, including mass-loss rates, are presented for the observed stars.

  9. Mapping the 12CO J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 emission in AGB and early post-AGB circumstellar envelopes. I. The COSAS program, first sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Carrizo, A.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Neri, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Schöier, F. L.; Winters, J. M.; Olofsson, H.; Lindqvist, M.; Alcolea, J.; Lucas, R.; Grewing, M.

    2010-11-01

    We present COSAS (CO Survey of late AGB Stars), a project to map and analyze the 12CO J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 line emission in a representative sample of circumstellar envelopes around AGB and post-AGB stars. The survey was undertaken with the aim of investigating small- and large-scale morphological and kinematical properties of the molecular environment surrounding stars in the late AGB and early post-AGB phases. For this, COSAS combines the high sensitivity and spatial resolving power of the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer with the better capability of the IRAM 30 m telescope to map extended emission. The global sample encompasses 45 stars selected to span a range in chemical type, variability type, evolutionary state, and initial mass. COSAS provides means to quantify variations in the mass-loss rates, assess morphological and kinematical features, and to investigate the appearance of fast aspherical winds in the early post-AGB phase. This paper, which is the first of a series of COSAS papers, presents the results from the analyses of a first sample of 16 selected sources. The envelopes around late AGB stars are found to be mostly spherical, often mingled with features such as concentric arcs (R Cas and TX Cam), a broken spiral density pattern (TX Cam), molecular patches testifying to aspherical mass-loss (WX Psc, IK Tau, V Cyg, and S Cep), and also with well-defined axisymmetric morphologies and kinematical patterns (X Her and RX Boo). The sources span a wide range of angular sizes, from relatively compact (CRL 2362, OH 104.9+2.4 and CRL 2477) to very large (χ Cyg and TX Cam) envelopes, sometimes partially obscured by self-absorption features, which particularly for IK Tau and χ Cyg testifies to the emergence of aspherical winds in the innermost circumstellar regions. Strong axial structures with more or less complex morphologies are detected in four early post-AGB stars (IRAS 20028+3910, IRAS 23321+6545, IRAS 19475+3119 and IRAS 21282+5050) of the sub

  10. The circumstellar disc of FS Tau B - a self-consistent model based on observations in the mid-infrared with NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian; Madlener, David

    2016-10-01

    Protoplanetary discs are a byproduct of the star formation process. In the dense mid-plane of these discs, planetesimals and planets are expected to form. The first step in planet formation is the growth of dust particles from submicrometre-sized grains to macroscopic mm-sized aggregates. The grain growth is accompanied by radial drift and vertical segregation of the particles within the disc. To understand this essential evolutionary step, spatially resolved multi-wavelength observations as well as photometric data are necessary which reflect the properties of both disc and dust. We present the first spatially resolved image obtained with NACO at the VLT in the Lp band of the near edge-on protoplanetary disc FS Tau B. Based on this new image, a previously published Hubble image in H band and the spectral energy distribution from optical to millimetre wavelengths, we derive constraints on the spatial dust distribution and the progress of grain growth. For this purpose we perform a disc modelling using the radiative transfer code MC3D. Radial drift and vertical sedimentation of the dust are not considered. We find a best-fitting model which features a disc extending from 2 au to several hundreds au with a moderately decreasing surface density and Mdisc = 2.8 × 10-2 M⊙. The inclination amounts to i = 80°. Our findings indicate that substantial dust grain growth has taken place and that grains of a size equal to or larger than 1 mm are present in the disc. In conclusion, the parameters describing the vertical density distribution are better constrained than those describing the radial disc structure.

  11. The COSAS survey I: First results from the IRAM mapping survey of 12CO J=1-0 & J=2-1 emission in AGB and early post-AGB circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcolea Jimanez, J.; Castr-Carrizo, A.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Neri, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Schoeier, F. L.; Winters, J. M.; Olofsson, H.; Lindqvist, M.; Lucas, R.; Grewing, M.

    Here we present the first result from the COSAS (CO Survey of late AGB Stars) program (P.I. A. Castro-Carrizo), a J=1-0 and J=2-1 line emission mapping survey of a statistically representative sample of circumstellar envelopes around AGB and post-AGB stars. This mapping survey has been carried out to investigate the small and large scale morphological and kinematical properties of the molecular environment surrounding stars in the late AGB and early post-AGB phases. For this, COSAS ideally combines the high spatial resolution and sensitivity of the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, with the IRAM Pico de Veleta 30m-MRT capabilities to map more extended emission. The whole program includes of 45 stars, selected to sample a wide variety in mass loss rate, chemical type (M, S and C types), variability type (regular variables like Miras and OH/IRs, semiregulars, irregulars, and non varying post-AGBs), evolutionary state, and initial mass. By no means it is an unbiased sample, so results must be interpreted with care, and in terms of the different population of sources represented in the sample. COSAS products (at first. maps and velocity fields, and after modeling, excitation and density profiles across the envelopes) provides means to quantify variations in the mass-loss rate history, assess on the prevalence of different morphological and kinematical features, and investigate the appearance of fast aspherical winds in the late-AGB and early post-AGB phases. This paper, which is the first of a series of COSAS papers, presents the results from the final mapping of a sample of 16 selected sources (about 1/3 of the whole list), namely: WX Psc, IK Tau, TX Cam, RX Boo, X Her, CRL 2362, x Cyg, V Cyg, S Cep, OH 104.9+2.4, R Cas, IRAS 19475+3119, IRAS 20028+3910, IRAS 21282+5050, IRAS 23321+6545 and CRL 2477. The envelopes around late AGB stars are found to be mostly spherical, but often presenting features like concentric arcs (R Cas and TX Cam), spiral density patterns

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the classical Cepheid ζ Gem: Analysis of the velocity field in the atmosphere and manifestation of the presence of a circumstellar envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    with those for the B component of the Hα line, they are all formed in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The formation and passage of a shock wave due to the κ-mechanism at work can be responsible for the stronger scatter of the B1 and B2 components in their velocities at phases after the Cepheid's minimum radius. The averaged velocities of the R1 components also change with pulsation phase and differ only slightly from the remaining ones. On the other hand, the mean velocity estimate for the R component of the Hα line at all phases is +32.72 ± 2.50 km s-1 and differs significantly from the bulk of the velocities, suggesting the formation of this component in the envelope around the Cepheid. The unusual behavior of the mean velocities for the R2 components of the metal absorption lines can also point to their formation in the envelope and can be yet another indicator of its presence around ζ Gem.

  13. CONFIRMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR PHOSPHINE

    SciTech Connect

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Encrenaz, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2014-08-01

    Phosphine (PH{sub 3}) was tentatively identified a few years ago in the carbon star envelopes IRC +10216 and CRL 2688 from observations of an emission line at 266.9 GHz attributable to the J = 1-0 rotational transition. We report the detection of the J = 2-1 rotational transition of PH{sub 3} in IRC +10216 using the HIFI instrument on board Herschel, which definitively confirms the identification of PH{sub 3}. Radiative transfer calculations indicate that infrared pumping in excited vibrational states plays an important role in the excitation of PH{sub 3} in the envelope of IRC +10216, and that the observed lines are consistent with phosphine being formed anywhere between the star and 100 R {sub *} from the star, with an abundance of 10{sup –8} relative to H{sub 2}. The detection of PH{sub 3} challenges chemical models, none of which offer a satisfactory formation scenario. Although PH{sub 3} holds just 2% of the total available phosphorus in IRC +10216, it is, together with HCP, one of the major gas phase carriers of phosphorus in the inner circumstellar layers, suggesting that it could also be an important phosphorus species in other astronomical environments. This is the first unambiguous detection of PH{sub 3} outside the solar system, and is a further step toward a better understanding of the chemistry of phosphorus in space.

  14. Confirmation of Circumstellar Phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2014-08-01

    Phosphine (PH3) was tentatively identified a few years ago in the carbon star envelopes IRC +10216 and CRL 2688 from observations of an emission line at 266.9 GHz attributable to the J = 1-0 rotational transition. We report the detection of the J = 2-1 rotational transition of PH3 in IRC +10216 using the HIFI instrument on board Herschel, which definitively confirms the identification of PH3. Radiative transfer calculations indicate that infrared pumping in excited vibrational states plays an important role in the excitation of PH3 in the envelope of IRC +10216, and that the observed lines are consistent with phosphine being formed anywhere between the star and 100 R * from the star, with an abundance of 10-8 relative to H2. The detection of PH3 challenges chemical models, none of which offer a satisfactory formation scenario. Although PH3 holds just 2% of the total available phosphorus in IRC +10216, it is, together with HCP, one of the major gas phase carriers of phosphorus in the inner circumstellar layers, suggesting that it could also be an important phosphorus species in other astronomical environments. This is the first unambiguous detection of PH3 outside the solar system, and is a further step toward a better understanding of the chemistry of phosphorus in space.

  15. Chasing discs around O-type (proto)stars: Evidence from ALMA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Beltrán, M. T.; Johnston, K. G.; Maud, L. T.; Moscadelli, L.; Mottram, J. C.; Ahmadi, A.; Allen, V.; Beuther, H.; Csengeri, T.; Etoka, S.; Fuller, G. A.; Galli, D.; Galván-Madrid, R.; Goddi, C.; Henning, T.; Hoare, M. G.; Klaassen, P. D.; Kuiper, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lumsden, S.; Peters, T.; Rivilla, V. M.; Schilke, P.; Testi, L.; van der Tak, F.; Vig, S.; Walmsley, C. M.; Zinnecker, H.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Circumstellar discs around massive stars could mediate the accretion onto the star from the infalling envelope, and could minimize the effects of radiation pressure. Despite such a crucial role, only a few convincing candidates have been provided for discs around deeply embedded O-type (proto)stars. Aims: In order to establish whether disc-mediated accretion is the formation mechanism for the most massive stars, we have searched for circumstellar, rotating discs around a limited sample of six luminous (>105L⊙) young stellar objects. These objects were selected on the basis of their IR and radio properties in order to maximize the likelihood of association with disc+jet systems. Methods: We used ALMA with 0.̋2 resolution to observe a large number of molecular lines typical of hot molecular cores. In this paper we limit our analysis to two disc tracers (methyl cyanide, CH3CN, and its isotopologue, 13CH3CN), and an outflow tracer (silicon monoxide, SiO). Results: We reveal many cores, although their number depends dramatically on the target. We focus on the cores that present prominent molecular line emission. In six of these a velocity gradient is seen across the core,three of which show evidence of Keplerian-like rotation. The SiO data reveal clear but poorly collimated bipolar outflow signatures towards two objects only. This can be explained if real jets are rare (perhaps short-lived) in very massive objects and/or if stellar multiplicity significantly affects the outflow structure.For all cores with velocity gradients, the velocity field is analysed through position-velocity plots to establish whether the gas is undergoing rotation with νrot ∝ R- α, as expected for Keplerian-like discs. Conclusions: Our results suggest that in three objects we are observing rotation in circumstellar discs, with three more tentative cases, and one core where no evidence for rotation is found. In all cases but one, we find that the gas mass is less than the mass of

  16. The enigmatic nature of the circumstellar envelope and bow shock surrounding Betelgeuse as revealed by Herschel. I. Evidence of clumps, multiple arcs, and a linear bar-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decin, L.; Cox, N. L. J.; Royer, P.; Van Marle, A. J.; Vandenbussche, B.; Ladjal, D.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Barlow, M. J.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Gomez, H. L.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lim, T.; Swinyard, B. M.; Waelkens, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The interaction between stellar winds and the interstellar medium (ISM) can create complex bow shocks. The photometers on board the Herschel Space Observatory are ideally suited to studying the morphologies of these bow shocks. Aims: We aim to study the circumstellar environment and wind-ISM interaction of the nearest red supergiant, Betelgeuse. Methods.Herschel PACS images at 70, 100, and 160 μm and SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm were obtained by scanning the region around Betelgeuse. These data were complemented with ultraviolet GALEX data, near-infrared WISE data, and radio 21 cm GALFA-HI data. The observational properties of the bow shock structure were deduced from the data and compared with hydrodynamical simulations. Results: The infrared Herschel images of the environment around Betelgeuse are spectacular, showing the occurrence of multiple arcs at ~6-7' from the central target and the presence of a linear bar at ~9'. Remarkably, no large-scale instabilities are seen in the outer arcs and linear bar. The dust temperature in the outer arcs varies between 40 and 140 K, with the linear bar having the same colour temperature as the arcs. The inner envelope shows clear evidence of a non-homogeneous clumpy structure (beyond 15''), probably related to the giant convection cells of the outer atmosphere. The non-homogeneous distribution of the material even persists until the collision with the ISM. A strong variation in brightness of the inner clumps at a radius of ~2' suggests a drastic change in mean gas and dust density ~32 000 yr ago. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we try to explain the observed morphology of the bow shock around Betelgeuse. Conclusions: Different hypotheses, based on observational and theoretical constraints, are formulated to explain the origin of the multiple arcs and the linear bar and the fact that no large-scale instabilities are visible in the bow shock region. We infer that the two main ingredients for explaining

  17. Circumstellar matter in Herbig AeBe stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Antonella

    1994-03-01

    I briefly summarize the observational evidence for large envelopes in the immediate environment of Herbig AeBe stars, and the results of star + envelope models. Then, I discuss two alternative possibilities to account for the observed mid-infrared fluxes, namely as the emission of very small grains (VSG) and policyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the envelope, or as due to the emission of circumstellar accretion disks, and suggest how MIR high spatial resolution observations can discriminate between these two hypotheses.

  18. A study of the infrared spectrum of ψ Persei. I. A parameter study of the disc model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlborough, J. M.; Zijlstra, J.-W.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    1997-05-01

    We report a parameter study of emission lines arising from a disc surrounding a Be star, using parameters appropriate to the Be star ψ Per. We concentrate on the Hα line and on some IR recombination lines (Brα, Brγ, Pfγ and HI 17-6). The model we use is a simple cone-like disc model, first proposed by Waters (1986A&A...162..121W). This model has been successful in explaining the continuum energy distribution of Be stars, and we now wish to study the emission line spectrum emerging from such a disc. We find that line shapes and ratios of line strengths are strongly dependent on the temperature structure of the disc. Infrared recombination lines will therefore be very useful in determining the physical state of the circumstellar envelopes of Be stars.

  19. Circumstellar grain formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Dust formation around cool giant and supergiant stars is examined in terms of grain formulation. Optical properties of small clusters, molecular physics of cluster nucleation and growth, circumstellar mass flows, and their application to alpha Ori are discussed.

  20. Atomic gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, M. J.; Crawford, I. A.; Casassus, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have conducted a search for optical circumstellar absorption lines in the spectra of 16 debris disc host stars. None of the stars in our sample showed signs of emission line activity in either Hα, Ca II or Na I, confirming their more evolved nature. Four stars were found to exhibit narrow absorption features near the cores of the photospheric Ca II and Na I D lines (when Na I D data were available). We analyse the characteristics of these spectral features to determine whether they are of circumstellar or interstellar origins. The strongest evidence for circumstellar gas is seen in the spectrum of HD 110058, which is known to host a debris disc observed close to edge-on. This is consistent with a recent ALMA detection of molecular gas in this debris disc, which shows many similarities to the β Pictoris system.

  1. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  2. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  3. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy of circumstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.; Mclaren, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ammonia has been detected in the circumstellar envelopes of IRC+10216, VY CMa, VX Sgr, and IRC+10420. A number of absorption lines of (N-14)H3 in the nu sub 2 vibration-rotation band around 28 THz (950 per cm) have been observed at a velocity resolution of 0.2 km/s. Typical linewidths are 1 to 4 km/s, and the details of the line profiles provide additional insights on the process of mass loss in these stars.

  4. Protonated acetylene - An important circumstellar and interstellar ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Omont, A.; Guelin, M.

    1992-01-01

    In a circumstellar envelope, a substantial amount of acetylene is transported in a wind to the outer envelope, where it can be photoionized by interstellar radiation and then converted into C2H3(+) by a low-temperature reaction with H2. New chemical modeling calculations indicate that sufficient C2H3(+) may be produced in the outer envelope of IRC + 10216 to be observable. Similar considerations suggest that C2H3(+) should also be detectable in interstellar clouds, provided its rotational spectrum has been measured accurately in the laboratory.

  5. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  6. The photochemistry of carbon-rich circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ambient ultraviolet photons on the chemical structure of carbon-rich, circumstellar envelopes is investigated with a simple formulation of the time-dependent, photochemical rate equations valid for optically thick shells. Molecules injected into the shielded inner envelope are broken down when they reach the outer regions where ambient ultraviolet photons can penetrate. A quantitative description of the abundance variations is obtained for the case of uniform expansion by detailed consideration of the shielding of the radiation by the dust and molecules of the envelope. Representative results are presented to illustrate the role of shielding in defining the extent of molecular envelopes, the formation of C I and C II shells by photodestruction of carbon-bearing molecules, and the development of layered chemical structures from the photobreakup of polyatomic molecules. Photochemistry makes the outer parts of thick, carbon-rich envelopes into complex regions containing radicals, ions, and atoms which are of considerable observational and theoretical interest.

  7. Impact of Winds on Circumstellar Dust in T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babina, Elena; Artemenko, Svetlana; Petrov, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical winds of Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) are believed to originatefrom the MHD processes at the boundary between the inner disc and the stellar magnetosphere.We explore how the wind affects the circumstellar dusty environment.Long term spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the CTTS RY Tau in 2013-2015has revealed a tight correlation between the wind radial velocity and the circumstellar extinction. The irregular stellar brightness variations are shown to be causedby extinction in a dusty disk wind at a distance of about 0.2 AU from the star.We suggest that cyclic re-adjustments of the stellar magnetosphere and the subsequentmagnetospheric mass ejections can have an impact on the dusty disk wind flowsnear the inner boundary of the circumstellar disk. A role of dusty winds in the long-lasting dimming events in CTTS is discussed.

  8. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use

  9. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This document provides a report on research activities carried out with the support of NASA grant NAG 5-1174, the Structure of Circumstellar Shells, funded under the Astrophysics Data Program. The research carried out with the support of this grant is a study of the properties of circumstellar dust shells for which spectra are available through IRAS low resolution spectrometry (LRS). This research consisted of the development and application of models of axisymmetric circumstellar shells and a preliminary survey of the applicability of neural nets for analysis of the IRAS LRS spectra of circumstellar dust shells.

  10. Study of variable extinction of hot stars with circumstellar dust shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Various projects on the topic of hot stars with circumstellar dust are reported. The surface temperature, wind speed, and interstellar reddening were determined for the variable WC7 star HD 193793. Circumstellar carbon monoxide molecules were detected around a hot star. The dust envelope of the star W90 in the young cluster NGC2264 is discussed, and the spectra of low-redshift and X-ray emitting quasars are mentioned.

  11. Observations of Circumstellar Thermochemical Equilibrium: The Case of Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    We will present observations of phosphorus-bearing species in circumstellar envelopes, including carbon- and oxygen-rich shells 1. New models of thermochemical equilibrium chemistry have been developed to interpret, and constrained by these data. These calculations will also be presented and compared to the numerous P-bearing species already observed in evolved stars. Predictions for other viable species will be made for observations with Herschel and ALMA.

  12. Circumstellar disks and planetary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huélamo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Circumstellar disks are very common around young intermediate-, low-mass stars, and brown dwarfs. They are the cradle of planetary systems, although the mechanism to form planets is still unknown. In this text I review some advances in the field of circumstellar disks and planetary formation coming from observations.

  13. The Circumstellar Environments of NML Cygni and the Cool Hypergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Michael T.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Marengo, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    We present high-resolution HST WFPC2 images of compact nebulosity surrounding the cool M-type hypergiants NML Cyg, VX Sgr, and S Per. The powerful OH/IR source NML Cyg exhibits a peculiar bean-shaped asymmetric nebula that is coincident with the distribution of its H2O vapor masers. We show that NML Cyg's circumstellar envelope is likely shaped by photodissociation from the powerful, nearby association Cyg OB2 inside the Cygnus X superbubble. The OH/IR sources VX Sgr and S Per have marginally resolved envelopes. S Per's circumstellar nebula appears elongated in a northeast/southwest orientation similar to that for its OH and H2O masers, while VX Sgr is embedded in a spheroidal envelope. We find no evidence for circumstellar nebulosity around the intermediate-type hypergiants ρ Cas, HR 8752, and HR 5171a, nor around the normal M-type supergiant μ Cep. We conclude that there is no evidence for high mass loss events prior to 500-1000 years ago for these four stars.

  14. Modeling Protostar Envelopes and Disks Seen With ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Willacy, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Thermal continuum emission from protostars comes from both the envelope and circumstellar disk. The dust emits on a variety of spatial scales, ranging from sub-arcseconds for disks to roughly 10 arcseconds for envelopes for nearby protostars. We present models of what ALMA should detect that incorporate a self-consistent collapse solution, radiative transfer, and realistic dust properties.

  15. Circumstellar radio molecular lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NGUYEN-QUANG-RIEU

    1987-01-01

    Radio molecular lines appear to be useful probes into the stellar environment. Silicon oxide masers provide information on the physical conditions in the immediate vicinity of the stellar photosphere. Valuable information on the physics operating in the envelope of IRC + 10216 was recently obtained by high sensitivity observations and detailed theoretical analyses. Infrared speckle interferometry in the molecular lines and in the continuum is helpful in the investigation of the inner region of the envelope. These techniques are discussed in terms of late-type star mass loss.

  16. Discovering metal-poor circumstellar OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steve; Green, James; van Loon, Jacco; Wood, Peter; Imai, Hiroshi; Groenewegen, Martin; Nanni, Ambra

    2014-10-01

    OH masers are excellent signposts for a variety of phenomenon including winds of highly-evolved stars (1612 MHz). Using the superior angular resolution and sensitivity of the ATCA, high spectral resolution of the CABB backend, and close proximity to the LMC (with half solar metallicity), this observation will allow us to extend an important relation involving the evolution of red giants and supergiants in a lower metallicity (van Loon, 2012). With even fewer detections with clear double-peaked profiles, indicating an expansion velocity of the circumstellar envelope, successful observation is vital for the advancement of our stellar mass-loss models. By refining the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss of highly-evolved red giants and supergiants in their superwind phase, we can better understand the evolution of these stars and their feedback within galaxies.

  17. Generation of inclined protoplanetary discs and misaligned planets through mass accretion - I. Coplanar secondary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Gruess, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) evolution of a viscous protoplanetary disc that accretes gas material from a second protoplanetary disc during a close encounter in an embedded star cluster. The aim is to investigate the capability of the mass accretion scenario to generate strongly inclined gaseous discs that could later form misaligned planets. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics to study mass transfer and disc inclination for passing stars and circumstellar discs with different masses. We explore different orbital configurations to find the parameter space that allows significant disc inclination generation. Thies et al. suggested that significant disc inclination and disc or planetary system shrinkage can generally be produced by the accretion of external gas material with a different angular momentum. We found that this condition can be fulfilled for a large range of gas mass and angular momentum. For all encounters, mass accretion from the secondary disc increases with decreasing mass of the secondary proto-star. Thus, higher disc inclinations can be attained for lower secondary stellar masses. Variations of the secondary disc's orientation relative to the orbital plane can alter the disc evolution significantly. The results taken together show that mass accretion can change the 3D disc orientation significantly resulting in strongly inclined discs. In combination with the gravitational interaction between the two star-disc systems, this scenario is relevant for explaining the formation of highly inclined discs that could later form misaligned planets.

  18. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  19. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  20. Stellar Emission Inhibiting the Study of ``Exo-Chondrules'' in Circumstellar Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Boley, A. C.

    2017-05-01

    The host stars in circumstellar disks can be a confounding parameter in recovering the disc's properties. I'll present examples where we can't study the small grains due to stellar effects and discuss a project designed to solve the issue.

  1. Detection of circumstellar material in a normal type Ia supernova.

    PubMed

    Patat, F; Chandra, P; Chevalier, R; Justham, S; Podsiadlowski, Ph; Wolf, C; Gal-Yam, A; Pasquini, L; Crawford, I A; Mazzali, P A; Pauldrach, A W A; Nomoto, K; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Elias-Rosa, N; Hillebrandt, W; Leonard, D C; Pastorello, A; Renzini, A; Sabbadin, F; Simon, J D; Turatto, M

    2007-08-17

    Type Ia supernovae are important cosmological distance indicators. Each of these bright supernovae supposedly results from the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf star that, after accreting material from a companion star, exceeds some mass limit, but the true nature of the progenitor star system remains controversial. Here we report the spectroscopic detection of circumstellar material in a normal type Ia supernova explosion. The expansion velocities, densities, and dimensions of the circumstellar envelope indicate that this material was ejected from the progenitor system. In particular, the relatively low expansion velocities suggest that the white dwarf was accreting material from a companion star that was in the red-giant phase at the time of the explosion.

  2. Proper Motions of Water Masers in Circumstellar Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.; Diamond, P. J.; Kemball, A. J.

    We present proper motion measurements of circumstellar water masers obtained with the VLBA. The objects observed include S Persei, VX Sagittarii, U Herculis, VY Canis Majoris, NML Cygni, IK Tauri and RX Bootis. Results of the observations and modeling indicate that the water masers exist in a kinematically complex region of the circumstellar envelope, which is not well fit by the standard model of a uniformly expanding spherical wind. Attempts at fitting an ellipsoidal geometric distribution with a variety of kinematic models are presented. Estimates for the distances of the stars are also discussed. A change in position of the maser spots as a function of velocity has been measured. This effect may be used to place limits on accelerations in the masing gas.

  3. Carbon stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, Michael; Hawkins, I.

    1991-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to search for companions to two carbon-rich stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes, EU And and V778 Cyg. Depending upon the amount of interstellar extinction and distances (probably between 1 and 2 kpc from the Sun) to these two stars, upper limits were placed between approx. 1.5 and 6 solar mass to the mass of any main sequence companions. For the 'near' distance of 1 kpc, it seems unlikely that there are white dwarf companions because the detection would be expected of ultraviolet emission from accretion of red giant wind material onto the white dwarf. A new model is proposed to explain the oxygen-rich envelopes. If these stars have a high nitrogen abundance, the carbon that is in excess of the oxygen may be carried in the circumstellar envelopes in HCN rather than C2H2 which is a likely key seed molecule for the formation of carbon grains. Consequently, carbon particles may not form; instead, oxygen-rich silicate dust may nucleate from the SiO present in the outflow.

  4. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.; Cobb, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Speckle-interferometric measurements are reported for the brightness distributions of the OH/IR stars OH 26.5 + 0.6 and IRC + 10420 at wavelengths which are near the center of and just outside the 10-micron absorption/emission feature produced by circumstellar dust. For OH 26.5 + 0.6, the angular size within the absorption feature is 0.50 + or - 0.02 arcsec, while the angular size outside the feature is less than 0.2 arcsec. For IRC + 10420, the angular sizes inside and outside the emission feature are both 0.42 + or - 0.02 arcsec. Simple models of the circumstellar shells are calculated which can account for the measured angular sizes and flux distributions of the objects. The models give the wavelength dependence of the opacity of the circumstellar material, which is quite different for the two objects.

  5. Circumstellar dust: From protostars to planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardhana, Ray

    2000-11-01

    A combination of theoretical work and observational discoveries over the past three decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the star and planet formation process. However, many important questions remain to be addressed, especially regarding the earliest phases of protostellar collapse and the transformation of circumstellar disks into planetary systems. In this thesis, I have undertaken a theoretical study of ``Class 0'' protostars and an observational investigation of the evolution of protoplanetary disks, diversity of planetary debris systems, and the kinship between dusty remnants and planets, using a new generation of infrared and sub- millimeter instruments. I present radiative transfer calculations of infalling envelopes surrounding Class 0 sources, compare them to the observed spectral energy distributions and radial intensity profiles, and derive mass infall rates. The rapid infall, probably inevitable given their dense environments, and the relatively flat inferred density distribution, perhaps due to contributions from external cloud material, lead us to suggest that many Class 0 sources could be the protostars of dense regions. It has been suggested that circumstellar disks evolve from massive, optically thick, actively accreting structures to low-mass, optically thin, passive remnants in about 10 Myr. That transition may mark the assembly of grains into planetesimals, or clearing of the disk by planets. I present mid infrared observation of the TW Hydrate Association, a recently identified nearby group of 10-Myr-old stars. The results suggest rapid evolution of inner disks as does our discovery of a spatially- resolved disk with a central cavity around the young A star HR 4796A. I also present the results of mid-infrared imaging of 11 other Vega-like stars, derive global properties of the dust disks, place constraints on their sizes, and discuss several interesting cases in detail. Finally, I report the detection of dust

  6. Mid-infrared spectroscopy of SVS13: silicates, quartz and SiC in a protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Wright, Christopher M.; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present N-band (8-13 μm) spectroscopic observations of the low-mass, embedded pre-main-sequence close binary system SVS13. Absorption features are clearly detected which are attributable to amorphous silicates, crystalline forsterite, crystalline enstatite and annealed SiO2. Most intriguingly, a major component of the dust in the envelope or disc around SVS13 appears to be SiC, required to model adequately both the total intensity and polarization spectra. Silicon carbide is a species previously detected only in the spectra of C-rich evolved star atmospheres, wherein it is a dust condensate. It has not been unambiguously identified in the interstellar medium, and never before in a molecular cloud, let alone in close proximity to a forming star. Yet pre-solar grains of SiC have been identified in meteorites, possibly suggesting an interesting parallel between SVS13 and our own Solar-system evolution. The uniqueness of the spectrum suggests that we are either catching SVS13 in a short-lived evolutionary phase and/or that there is something special about SVS13 itself that makes it rare amongst young stars. We speculate on the physical origin of the respective dust species and why they are all simultaneously present towards SVS13. Two scenarios are presented: a disc-instability-induced fragmentation, with subsequent localized heating and orbital evolution first annealing initially amorphous silicates and then dispersing their crystalline products throughout a circumstellar disc; and a newly discovered shock-heating mechanism at the interface between the circumstellar and circumbinary discs providing the crystallization process. One or both of these mechanisms acting on carbon-rich grain material can also feasibly produce the SiC signature.

  7. Stellar multiplicity and debris discs: an unbiased sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; Duchêne, Gaspard; Tom, Henry; Kennedy, Grant M.; Matthews, Brenda; Greaves, Jane; Butner, Harold

    2015-05-01

    Circumstellar dust discs have been observed around many nearby stars. However, many stars are part of binary or multiple stellar systems. A natural question arises regarding the presence and properties of such discs in systems with more than one star. To address this, we consider a sample of 449 systems (spectral types A-M) observed with the Herschel Space Observatory as part of the DEBRIS (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) programme. We have examined the stellar multiplicity of this sample by gathering information from the literature and performing an adaptive optics imaging survey at Lick Observatory. Five new companions were revealed with our programme. In total, we identify 188 (42 per cent) binary or multiple star systems. The multiplicity of the sample is examined with regards to the detection of circumstellar discs for stars of spectral types AFGK. In general, discs are less commonly detected around binaries than single stars, though the disc frequency is comparable among A stars regardless of multiplicity. However, this sample reveals the period distribution of disc-bearing binaries is consistent with that of non-disc binaries and with comparison field samples. We find that the properties of discs in binary systems are not statistically different from those around single stars. Although the frequency of disc-bearing FGK binaries may be lower than in single star systems, the processes behind disc formation and the characteristics of these discs are comparable among both populations.

  8. Circumplanetary discs around young giant planets: a comparison between core-accretion and disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Mayer, L.; Quinn, T.

    2017-01-01

    Circumplanetary discs can be found around forming giant planets, regardless of whether core accretion or gravitational instability built the planet. We carried out state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations of the circumplanetary discs for both formation scenarios, using as similar initial conditions as possible to unveil possible intrinsic differences in the circumplanetary disc mass and temperature between the two formation mechanisms. We found that the circumplanetary discs' mass linearly scales with the circumstellar disc mass. Therefore, in an equally massive protoplanetary disc, the circumplanetary discs formed in the disc instability model can be only a factor of 8 more massive than their core-accretion counterparts. On the other hand, the bulk circumplanetary disc temperature differs by more than an order of magnitude between the two cases. The subdiscs around planets formed by gravitational instability have a characteristic temperature below 100 K, while the core-accretion circumplanetary discs are hot, with temperatures even greater than 1000 K when embedded in massive, optically thick protoplanetary discs. We explain how this difference can be understood as the natural result of the different formation mechanisms. We argue that the different temperatures should persist up to the point when a full-fledged gas giant forms via disc instability; hence, our result provides a convenient criterion for observations to distinguish between the two main formation scenarios by measuring the bulk temperature in the planet vicinity.

  9. The complex circumstellar and circumbinary environment of V356 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Fullard, Andrew G.; Malatesta, Michael A.; Babler, Brian; Bednarski, Daniel; Berdis, Jodi R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Carciofi, Alex C.; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Keil, Marcus; Meade, Marilyn R.; Nordsieck, Kenneth; Scheffler, Matt; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse 45 spectropolarimetric observations of the eclipsing, interacting binary star V356 Sgr, obtained over a period of ˜21 yr, to characterize the geometry of the system's circumstellar material. After removing interstellar polarization from these data, we find that the system exhibits a large intrinsic polarization signature arising from electron scattering. In addition, the lack of repeatable eclipses in the polarization phase curves indicates the presence of a substantial pool of scatterers not occulted by either star. We suggest that these scatterers form either a circumbinary disc coplanar with the gainer's accretion disc or an elongated structure perpendicular to the orbital plane of V356 Sgr, possibly formed by bipolar outflows. We also observe small-scale, cycle-to-cycle variations in the magnitude of intrinsic polarization at individual phases, which we interpret as evidence of variability in the amount of scattering material present within and around the system. This may indicate a mass-transfer or mass-loss rate that varies on the time-scale of the system's orbital period. Finally, we compare the basic polarimetric properties of V356 Sgr with those of the well-studied β Lyr system; the significant differences observed between the two systems suggest diversity in the basic circumstellar geometry of Roche lobe overflow systems.

  10. Measurements of Volatile Circumstellar Isotopes: Effects of Fractionation vs. Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Stefanie

    The origin, evolution, and fate of our Universe and/or Galaxy have puzzled humankind for centuries. One approach to answering this question is to gain further understanding of stellar evolution, since stars are fundamental in galaxy development and evolution. A compilation of stellar composition can reveal the age, dynamics, and possibly the evolutionary state of a galaxy. In particular the volatile isotope ratios carry an imprint of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Primitive materials, such as meteorites and IDPs, have revealed a component of ``atypical" isotopic signatures of these fundamental elements denoting a possible stellar origin. Understanding the processes by which these elements derive is essential for astrophysics on cosmochemical, galactic, stellar, and planetary scales. We propose to analyze data obtained from the Herschel Space Observatory of circumstellar envelopes to definitively measure C, N, and O isotope ratios and test current models of photo-selective isotope fractionation vs. nucleosynthetically determined values. This proposal augments data from the Herschel Space Observatory, primarily from the HIFISTARS program and MESS, though the entire Herschel archive will be searched for relevant data. The broader implications for this study include fundamental data necessary for furthering our current understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, circumstellar chemistry, Galactic chemical evolution, and the origin of presolar grains found in primitive materials. We will focus on isotopologues of species formed in thermochemical equilibrium and trace their natal, nucleosynthetic isotope ratios. We will analyze Herschel data obtained for a survey of evolved stars with varying degrees of nuclear processing, evolutionary states, and envelope chemistry (e.g. oxygen-rich vs. carbon-rich). A full circumstellar model will be developed for each source to address specific affects that may influence either the ratios or chemistry. The isotope ratios of 12C

  11. Magnetic Field and Early Evolution of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic field plays a central role in the formation and evolution of circumstellar disks. The magnetic field connects the rapidly rotating central region with the outer envelope and extracts angular momentum from the central region during gravitational collapse of the cloud core. This process is known as magnetic braking. Both analytical and multidimensional simulations have shown that disk formation is strongly suppressed by magnetic braking in moderately magnetised cloud cores in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit. On the other hand, recent observations have provided growing evidence of a relatively large disk several tens of astronomical units in size existing in some Class 0 young stellar objects. This introduces a serious discrepancy between the theoretical study and observations. Various physical mechanisms have been proposed to solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking, such as misalignment between the magnetic field and the rotation axis, turbulence, and non-ideal effect. In this paper, we review the mechanism of magnetic braking, its effect on disk formation and early evolution, and the mechanisms that resolve the magnetic braking problem. In particular, we emphasise the importance of non-ideal effects. The combination of magnetic diffusion and thermal evolution during gravitational collapse provides a robust formation process for the circumstellar disk at the very early phase of protostar formation. The rotation induced by the Hall effect can supply a sufficient amount of angular momentum for typical circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars. By examining the combination of the suggested mechanisms, we conclude that the circumstellar disks commonly form in the very early phase of protostar formation.

  12. Observational constraints on circumstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1986-01-01

    There is an enormous range in the properties of stars that are losing mass. The red giants responsible for injecting roughly half or more of the material into the interstellar medium are reviewed. The physical properties are described for the out flowing gases. Broadband observation constaints on the dust are described by use of spectrum analysis. Circumstellar dust is identified by carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen bonds.

  13. Infalling Envelopes and Pre-Main Sequence Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the observed infrared emission of young stellar objects, and explore the implications of this emission for the evolution of dusty envelopes and circumstellar disks. We are using sophisticated radiative transfer methods to compare models with observations, thereby making critical tests of the standard picture of low-mass star formation.

  14. Dipper discs not inclined towards edge-on orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, M.; Gaidos, E.; Williams, J. P.; Kennedy, G.; Wyatt, M. C.; LaCourse, D. M.; Jacobs, T. L.; Mann, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    The so-called dipper stars host circumstellar discs and have optical and infrared light curves that exhibit quasi-periodic or aperiodic dimming events consistent with extinction by transiting dusty structures orbiting in the inner disc. Most of the proposed mechanisms explaining the dips - i.e. occulting disc warps, vortices, and forming planetesimals - assume nearly edge-on viewing geometries. However, our analysis of the three known dippers with publicly available resolved sub-mm data reveals discs with a range of inclinations, most notably the face-on transition disc J1604-2130 (EPIC 204638512). This suggests that nearly edge-on viewing geometries are not a defining characteristic of the dippers and that additional models should be explored. If confirmed by further observations of more dippers, this would point to inner disc processes that regularly produce dusty structures far above the outer disc mid-plane in regions relevant to planet formation.

  15. Grazing envelope evolution towards Type IIb supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2017-09-01

    I propose a scenario where the majority of the progenitors of Type IIb supernovae (SNe IIb) lose most of their hydrogen-rich envelope during a grazing envelope evolution (GEE). In the GEE, the orbital radius of the binary system is about equal to the radius of the giant star, and the more compact companion accretes mass through an accretion disc. The accretion disc is assumed to launch two opposite jets that efficiently remove gas from the envelope along the orbit of the companion. The efficient envelope removal by jets prevents the binary system from entering a common envelope evolution, at least for part of the time. The GEE might be continuous or intermittent. I crudely estimate the total GEE time period to be in the range of about hundreds of years, for a continuous GEE, and up to few tens of thousands of years for intermittent GEE. The key new point is that the removal of envelope gas by jets during the GEE prevents the system from entering a common envelope evolution, and by that substantially increases the volume of the stellar binary parameter space that leads to SNe IIb, both to lower secondary masses and to closer orbital separations.

  16. THE PROGENITOR OF SN 2011ja: CLUES FROM CIRCUMSTELLAR INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Ray, Alak; Yadav, Naveen; Smith, Randall; Ryder, Stuart; Sutaria, Firoza; Dwarkadas, Vikram V.; Chandra, Poonam; Pooley, David; Roy, Rupak

    2013-09-01

    Massive stars, possibly red supergiants, which retain extended hydrogen envelopes until core collapse, produce Type II plateau (IIP) supernovae. The ejecta from these explosions shocks the circumstellar matter originating from the mass loss of the progenitor during the final phases of its life. This interaction accelerates particles to relativistic energies which then lose energy via synchrotron radiation in the shock-amplified magnetic fields and inverse Compton scattering against optical photons from the supernova. These processes produce different signatures in the radio and X-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Observed together, they allow us to break the degeneracy between shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification. In this work, we use X-rays observations from the Chandra and radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array to study the relative importance of processes which accelerate particles and those which amplify magnetic fields in producing the non-thermal radiation from SN 2011ja. We use radio observations to constrain the explosion date. Multiple Chandra observations allow us to probe the history of variable mass loss from the progenitor. The ejecta expands into a low-density bubble followed by interaction with a higher density wind from a red supergiant consistent with M{sub ZAMS} {approx}> 12 M{sub Sun }. Our results suggest that a fraction of Type IIP supernovae may interact with circumstellar media set up by non-steady winds.

  17. Circumstellar Dust in Symbiotic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, T.; Kotnik-Karuza, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the near-IR photometry, ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code. A compact circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel shows the presence of an equatorially enhanced dust density during minimum obscuration. Obscuration events are explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust. The mass loss rates are significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras but in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.

  18. Infrared observations of circumstellar ammonia in OH/IR supergiants

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, R.A.; Betz, A.L.

    1980-09-15

    Ammonia has been detected in the circumstellar envelopes of VY Canis Majoris, VX Sagittarii, and IRC+10420 by means of several absorption lines in the ..nu../sub 2/ vibration-rotation band near 950 cm/sup -1/. The line profiles are well resolved (0.2 km s/sup -1/ resolution) and show the gas being accelerated to terminal expansion velocities near 30 km s/sup -1/. The observations reveal a method for determining the position of the central star on VLBI maps of OH maser emission to an accuracy of approx.0''.2. A firm lower limit of 2 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ is obtained for the NH/sub 3/ column density in VY Canis Majoris.

  19. Infrared observations of circumstellar ammonia in OH/IR supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, R. A.; Betz, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    Ammonia has been detected in the circumstellar envelopes of VY Canis Majoris, VX Sagittarii, and IRC +10420 by means of several absorption lines in the nu-2 vibration-rotation band near 950 kaysers. The line profiles are well resolved (0.2 km/sec resolution) and show the gas being accelerated to terminal expansion velocities near 30 km/sec. The observations reveal a method for determining the position of the central star on VLBI maps of OH maser emission to an accuracy of approximately 0.2 arcsec. A firm lower limit of 2 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm is obtained for the NH3 column density in VY Canis Majoris.

  20. Bimodality of Circumstellar Disk Evolution Induced by the Hall Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.; Okuzumi, S.; Machida, M. N.; Inutsuka, S.

    2015-09-01

    The formation process of circumstellar disks is still controversial because of the interplay of complex physical processes that occurs during the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In this study, we investigate the effect of the Hall current term on the formation of the circumstellar disk using three-dimensional simulations. In our simulations, all non-ideal effects, as well as the radiation transfer, are considered. The size of the disk is significantly affected by a simple difference in the inherent properties of the prestellar core, namely whether the rotation vector and the magnetic field are parallel or anti-parallel. In the former case, only a very small disk (\\lt 1 {AU}) is formed. On the other hand, in the latter case, a massive and large (\\gt 20 {AU}) disk is formed in the early phase of protostar formation. Since the parallel and anti-parallel properties do not readily change, we expect that the parallel and anti-parallel properties are also important in the subsequent disk evolution and the difference between the two cases is maintained or enhanced. This result suggests that the disk size distribution of the Class 0 young stellar objects is bimodal. Thus, the disk evolution can be categorized into two cases and we may call the parallel and anti-parallel systems Ortho-disk and Para-disk, respectively. We also show that the anti-rotating envelopes against the disk rotation appear with a size of ≳ 200 {AU}. We predict that the anti-rotating envelope will be found in the future observations.

  1. The debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Krivov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES the debris disc around the K2 V star HIP 17439 was observed. In PACS images the disc emission is spatially clearly extended. A simultaneous analysis of photometric observations and radial brightness profiles from the resolved images provides valuable hints for the disc structure. In an analytical model we adopted power laws for the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust and tested two different scenarios: (1) a broad dust ring with a radial extent of about 200AU, (2) two independent dust rings separated by a gap of several tens of AU. Both models fit the spectral energy distribution and the radial profiles quite well. In case (1) the parameters found are consistent with dust stemming from an outer planetesimal belt at ~140AU and strong transport mechanisms that drag the particles inward. Model (2) would imply two planetesimal belts, producing a narrow inner and wider outer distribution of dust.

  2. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Cao; Richard Metcalf

    2010-07-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z-testing. A brief analysis of the impact of the safeguards optimization on the rest of plant efficiency, criticality concerns, and overall requirements is presented.

  3. Circumstellar gas in beta Pic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Majar, A.

    2014-09-01

    From the very early observations completed in 1984, it was clear that some gas was present in the circumstellar environment. In particular the CaII lines were showing very strong absorption signatures never observed in the local ISM toward similarly nearby stars. From the comparison of the two first observations of these lines it became also clear that these lines were time variable. This lead to numerous observational campaigns showing that stable gas as well as infalling gas was present in the system. The concept of falling and evaporating bodies (FEBs) was born: unexpectedly, exocomets were observed before exoplanets ! The lifetime of the continuously produced gas being very short, it lead to a needed additional concept of a stable braking gas at rest relative to the system and able to stop all other species through collisions. The nature of this braking gas is still debated and its location unclear. The distance of the gas is shown to be very extended, some of it being at less than 1 AU, mainly from absorption studies and some at more than 100 AU from the star, mainly from the observation of emissions signatures. The nature, origin and composition of the gas seem to be due to either the evaporation of FEBs for the closer gas or to the evaporation of distant orbiting and evaporating bodies (OEBs) of all sizes including grains, for the more remote gas.

  4. Infrared Interferometry and Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudé du Foresto, Vincent

    2009-08-01

    Exozodiacal dust plays an important role for the feasibility and dimensioning of future space missions dedicated to the spectroscopic analysis of the atmosphere of Earth-like planets. Thus, a survey of dust clouds around potential targets is called for in order to reduce the need for such observations using space-based missions and not waste time on sources where exo-Earths cannot be detected. Aladdin is an infrared (L band) nulling interferometer optimized for this objective. Although relatively modest in size (two 1-meter class telescopes on a maximum baseline of 32 meters), it takes advantage of the favorable atmospheric conditions of the Antarctic plateau to achieve a sensitivity better than what can be obtained with a pair of 8-meter-class telescopes at a more temperate site. Beyond its main mission, the science potential of Aladdin extends to the study of all kinds of faint circumstellar material (dust and/or molecules) around young, old or main-sequence stars.

  5. Evidence of Dissipation of Circumstellar Disks from L-band Spectra of Bright Galactic Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabogal, B. E.; Ubaque, K. Y.; García-Varela, A.; Álvarez, M.; Salas, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present L-band spectra of the Be stars γ Cas, ϕ Per, 28 Tau, θ CrB, 66 Oph, o Her, and 28 Cyg, obtained through use of the CID-InSb spectrograph with the 2.1-m telescope at OAN/UNAM San Pedro Martir Observatory. This is the first report of L-band spectra of o Her and θ CrB, and of the data obtained with this spectrograph. We obtain flux ratios of hydrogen lines for these stars, finding that they have optically thin envelopes, except by 66 Oph and θ CrB, which do not show evidence of a circumstellar disk. γ Cas and ϕ Per have flux ratio values of hydrogen lines closer to the optically thick case than the other stars. We use the line flux ratio diagram and optical spectra reported in the literature to study the life cycles of the disks. We find clear evidence of the dissipating process of the envelopes of 66 Oph and 28 Cyg, i.e., they are decaying stars. 28 Tau seems to have passed by a similar process. γ Cas and ϕ Per are stable stars because their circumstellar disks do not show notorious changes for many years. Finally, the stars in a build-up phase, whose envelopes are generated after a decaying phase or for the first time, have not yet been observed in the L-band. It would be useful to monitor more Be stars to observe this class of stars that probably change from a very tenuous envelope to an optically thick circumstellar disk. The line flux ratio diagram seems to confirm that late Be stars have more tenuous disks than early-type Be stars, as they tend to be separated at the left bottom and the top right parts of the diagram, respectively. Larger samples of Be stars are needed to confirm this hypothesis through a statistical analysis.

  6. Effects of multiquantum transitions on molecular populations in grain-forming circumstellar environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Wiant, M.

    1985-01-01

    Simplification of astrophysical calculations can be achieved by invoking the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium; however, recent investigations suggest that this assumption may not be valid for certain astrophysical regions. To examine the effects of multiquantum translation to vibration transitions in expanding circumstellar envelopes, vibrational populations of the lowest 20 levels of CO have been calculated as a function of pressure and radiation density for H atom-CO collisions. Significant departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium is indicated, which implies lower dissociation rates for molecular components and a subsequent enhancement in the rate of grain formation by many orders of magnitude. Stabilization of intermediate species before they can dissociate may facilitate the formation of refractory grain cores in very hot, dilute outflows. As the present calculations indicate, laboratory measurements of state-to-state translation to vibration rates are needed for a more complete understanding of circumstellar chemistry.

  7. CIRCUMSTELLAR MAGNETITE FROM THE LAP 031117 CO3.0 CHONDRITE

    SciTech Connect

    Zega, Thomas J.; Haenecour, Pierre; Floss, Christine; Stroud, Rhonda M.

    2015-07-20

    We report the first microstructural confirmation of circumstellar magnetite, identified in a petrographic thin section of the LaPaz Icefield 031117 CO3.0 chondrite. The O-isotopic composition of the grain indicates an origin in a low-mass (∼2.2 M{sub ⊙}), approximately solar metallicity red/asymptotic giant branch (RGB/AGB) star undergoing first dredge-up. The magnetite is a single crystal measuring 750 × 670 nm, is free of defects, and is stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. We hypothesize that the magnetite formed via oxidation of previously condensed Fe dust within the circumstellar envelope of its progenitor star. Using an empirically derived rate constant for this reaction, we calculate that such oxidation could have occurred over timescales ranging from approximately ∼9000–500,000 years. This timescale is within the lifetime of estimates for dust condensation within RGB/AGB stars.

  8. Circum-Protostellar Environments II. Envelopes, Activity, and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.; Wannier, P. G.; Keene, J.; Tamura, M.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained 800 and 1100 micrometer photometric observations of a complete, flux-limited, IRAS-selected sample of cold sources in Taurus, whose infrared and molecular properties indicate them to be low-mass protostars younger than T Tauri stars. The data were used to improve understanding of the role of the circumstellar envelope and disk during low-mass star formation and to search for signs of evolution.

  9. Be discs in binary systems - I. Coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, Despina; Carciofi, Alex C.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Cyr, Isabelle H.; Jones, Carol E.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio and eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar binaries. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. We find two limiting cases with respect to the effects of eccentricity: in circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc structure appears smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for small viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. In highly eccentric orbits, the effects are more complex, with the disc structure strongly dependent on the orbital phase. We also studied the effects of binarity in the disc continuum emission. Since the infrared and radio SED are sensitive to the disc size and density slope, the truncation and matter accumulation result in considerable modifications in the emergent spectrum. We conclude that binarity can serve as an explanation for the variability exhibited in observations of Be stars, and that our model can be used to detect invisible companions.

  10. Gas Modelling in the Disc of HD 163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Meeus, G.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Isella, A.; Roberge, A.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Sandell, G.; Vacca, W. D.; Menard, F.; Mendigutia, I.; Duchene, G.; Dent, W. R. F.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed model fits to observations of the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. This well-studied object has an age of approx. 4Myr, with evidence of a circumstellar disc extending out to approx. 540AU. We use the radiation thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo to model the gas and dust in the circumstellar disc of HD 163296, and attempt to determine the disc properties by fitting to observational line and continuum data. These include new Herschel/PACS observations obtained as part of the open-time key program GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems), consisting of a detection of the [Oi] 63 m line and upper limits for several other far infrared lines. We complement this with continuum data and ground-based observations of the CO-12 3-2, 2-1 and CO-13 J=1-0 line transitions, as well as the H2 S(1) transition. We explore the effects of stellar ultraviolet variability and dust settling on the line emission, and on the derived disc properties. Our fitting efforts lead to derived gas/dust ratios in the range 9-100, depending on the assumptions made. We note that the line fluxes are sensitive in general to the degree of dust settling in the disc, with an increase in line flux for settled models. This is most pronounced in lines which are formed in the warm gas in the inner disc, but the low excitation molecular lines are also affected. This has serious implications for attempts to derive the disc gas mass from line observations. We derive fractional PAH abundances between 0.007 and 0.04 relative to ISM levels. Using a stellar and UV excess input spectrum based on a detailed analysis of observations, we find that the all observations are consistent with the previously assumed disc geometry

  11. Interaction of Supernovae with Circumstellar Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippenko, Alex

    1996-07-01

    The interaction of supernova {SN} ejecta with circumstellar material supplied by the wind of the evolved progenitor star can sometimes provide enough energy to sustain the SN luminosity for several decades. Existing observations of certain Type II SNe strongly favor such an interpretation over other possible late-time energy sources. Some peculiar SNe II have such dense circumstellar winds that interaction with the ejecta substantially alters their observed properties even at early times. The UV spectrum is a powerful diagnostic for probing the conditions in the shocked outer ejecta and circumstellar gas. We propose to observe two old SNs {1979C and 1980K} whose optical and radio characteristics reveal them to be especially well suited for an investigation of the interaction between ejecta and circumstellar gas. We will also observe a more recent SN II {1995N} showing strong evidence for early interaction with circumstellar gas. The fluxes and intensity ratios of UV emission lines will be used to test theoretical models of the interaction. In addition, we will obtain UBVRI and HAlpha images of SN 1979C to obtain a precise offset from an offset star {for the subsequent FOS spectroscopy}, to determine background contamination corrections for previous photometry, to measure accurate current magnitudes, to search for light echoes, and to investigate the stellar population and structure of H II regions in its vicinity. The HST observations will shed light on differences among the 3 objects, as well as on the mass-loss histories of their progenitors.

  12. Laboratory simulation of graphite formation in stellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfeld, W. G.; Hudson, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A technique has been developed which permits laboratory simulation of graphite condensation in the envelopes of cool, late sequence stars. Processes in the stellar envelope were simulated by allowing hydrogen-carbon mixtures of typical circumstellar composition and temperature to expand freely into vacuum, cooling and supersaturating the vapor. Expansion products were determined mass spectrometrically through the use of molecular beam techniques. The results of laboratory expansions were scaled to those occurring near M and N stars by comparing the number of collisional events in each case. Kinetic considerations indicate that the important rate process in rarefied envelopes will be C2 formation; consequently scaling by termolecular collisions was employed. Results of this study imply that envelope expansions near M giants contribute at most .01 of the observed interstellar grain density. In the case of pulsating N stars, on the other hand, the results are not inconsistent with previous predictions of essentially complete carbon condensation.

  13. The Circumstellar Environment of Rigel Probed at High Spatial and Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufer, A.; Chesneau, O.; Stahl, O.; Colvinter, C.; Spang, A.; Dessart, L.; Prinja, R.; Chini, R.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of highly structured circumstellar environments in late B- and early A-type supergiants is well established through extensive spectroscopic, photometric, and polarimetric time series observations. The circumstellar structures are located within a few stellar radii in the transition zone from the stellar photosphere to the inner wind region of the expanding envelopes of the stars. The physical mechanisms that generate the observed circumstellar structures remain subject of debate. Coupling of stellar surface structures into the inner wind regions combined with rotational modulation is generally favoured with the surface structure being results of multi-mode non-radial pulsation patterns or complex magnetic fields structures. However, little observational evidence is available to narrow down the underlying mechanisms. Optical and near-IR interferometry at high spectral resolution has high potential to shed new light on the circumstellar environments of massive supergiants. We present first results from spectro-interferometric studies of the prototypical late-B supergiant Rigel (β Orionis, B8 Ia). Rigel has for the first time been monitored over several rotational cycles with the AMBER 3-beam combiner instrument at the VLTI in 2006-2007 and 2009-2010. The observations targeted the photosphere- and wind-sensitive Brγ line at a resolving power of R=12 000. The analysis of the measured interferometric visibilities provides constraints on the extension of the line-forming region in photosphere and wind; the observed variability of the differential phases across the line profile gives indications on the dynamics and the geometry of the circumstellar structures of Rigel. A possible link between high-velocity absorptions (HVA) and the observed S-shaped signals in the differential phases is discussed.

  14. Herniated Cervical Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... center of the disc may start to lose water content, making the disc less effective as a cushion. As a disc deteriorates, the outer layer can also tear. This can allow displacement of the disc's center (called a herniated or ...

  15. First Circumstellar Disk around a Massive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    arrow). Earlier observations with radio telescopes of the object G339.88-1.26 , deeply embedded in an interstellar nebula, had been interpreted in terms of the possible existence of a circumstellar disk around a high-mass star. It was concluded that the star responsible for heating the surrounding gas must be very hot and also that it must be intrinsically very bright. The star, most likely of spectral type O9, would have a luminosity 10,000 times higher than that of the Sun and a mass of about 20 times that of the Sun. From the measured velocity, the likely distance of this object is about 10,000 light-years. The object is associated with several "spots" of very strong radio emission from methanol molecules (methanol masers). Interestingly, they form a chain in the sky and the measured velocities of the individual spots are indicative for orbital motion in a rotating disk around the central star. The circumstellar disk ESO PR Photo 22/98 ESO PR Photo 22b/98 [JPEG, 640k] The TIMMI 10 µm image of the inclined dust disk around a hot O9 star at the G339.88-1.26 radio source. The diameter of the disk is of the order of 5 arcsec, i.e. at the most probable distance to the object (10,000 lightyears) it is 20,000 times larger than the diameter of the Earth's orbit around the Sun. The new TIMMI observations of G339.88-1.26 showed an elliptical object with strong infrared radiation. The peak of this radiation (as seen in the sky) coincides with the peak of the radio emission. Furthermore, the apparent orientation of the disk is well aligned with that of the methanol maser "spots". There is little doubt that this object is indeed the infrared image of a circumstellar disk, viewed at an angle. As far as known, this is the first direct image of a disk around a very massive star. At a wavelength of 10 µm, however, the central star that is responsible for heating the dust disc, cannot be seen in spite of its rather high luminosity. This is because it radiates mostly in the ultra

  16. Spiral-driven accretion in protoplanetary discs . III. Tridimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Lesur, Geoffroy; Fromang, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    Context. Understanding how accretion proceeds in proto-planetary discs, and more generally, understanding their dynamics, is a crucial questions that needs to be answered to explain the conditions in which planets form. Aims: The role that accretion of gas from the surrounding molecular cloud onto the disc may have on its structure needs to be quantified. Methods: We performed tridimensional simulations using the Cartesian AMR code RAMSES of an accretion disc that is subject to infalling material. Results: For the aspect ratio of H/R ≃ 0.15 and disc mass Md ≃ 10-2M⊙ used in our study, we find that for typical accretion rates of the order of a few 10-7M⊙ yr-1, values of the α parameter as high as a few 10-3 are inferred. The mass that is accreted in the inner part of the disc is typically at least 50% of the total mass that has been accreted onto the disc. Conclusions: Our results suggest that external accretion of gas at moderate values onto circumstellar discs may trigger prominent spiral arms that are reminiscent of recent observations made with various instruments, and may lead to significant transport through the disc. If confirmed from observational studies, such accretion may therefore influence disc evolution.

  17. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  18. Debris Discs: Modeling/theory review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébault, P.

    2012-03-01

    An impressive amount of photometric, spectroscopic and imaging observations of circumstellar debris discs has been accumulated over the past 3 decades, revealing that they come in all shapes and flavours, from young post-planet-formation systems like Beta-Pic to much older ones like Vega. What we see in these systems are small grains, which are probably only the tip of the iceberg of a vast population of larger (undetectable) collisionally-eroding bodies, leftover from the planet-formation process. Understanding the spatial structure, physical properties, origin and evolution of this dust is of crucial importance, as it is our only window into what is going on in these systems. Dust can be used as a tracer of the distribution of their collisional progenitors and of possible hidden massive pertubers, but can also allow to derive valuable information about the disc's total mass, size distribution or chemical composition. I will review the state of the art in numerical models of debris disc, and present some important issues that are explored by current modelling efforts: planet-disc interactions, link between cold (i.e. Herschel-observed) and hot discs, effect of binarity, transient versus continuous processes, etc. I will finally present some possible perspectives for the development of future models.

  19. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  20. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  1. Variability of the decretion disc of Be stars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, D.; Faes, D. M.; Carciofi, A. C.

    2017-07-01

    Be stars are highly variable B stars surrounded by an outflowing circumstellar structure, called the decretion disc. It has been suggested in the past and is hereby shown that small-scale variability in the observables can be attributed to the tidal effect on the disc from a binary companion. In particular, V/R variations locked to the orbital phase are presented for coplanar circular Be binaries.

  2. Dissipation of circumstellar disks of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabogal, B. E.; Ubaque, K. Y.; García-Varela, A.; álvarez, M.; Salas, L.

    2017-07-01

    Studies of L-band spectra of Be stars are useful to set constraints to the models of formation and evolution mechanisms of the circumstellar disks around these stars. Because few such studies have been performed, more of them are needed to confirm the characteristics reported about the optical depth and evolution of these disks. In this work, we studied new L-band spectra of 7 bright galactic Be stars that were obtained by using CID-InSb spectrograph at the 2.1-m telescope at OAN/UNAM San Pedro Martir Observatory, Baja California, Mexico. We used these data to locate these stars, and the Be stars previously studied in the IR, on a flux ratio diagram (log Hu14/Pfγ vs log Hu14/Brα). We found that 28 Cyg has moved significantly along this diagram implying strong changes of its disk from optically thick to an optically thin one between 2001 and 2014. On the base of the absence of emission lines in the spectra, the circumstellar disks of θ CrB and 66 Oph have been almost totally dissipated. These three stars have decaying circumstellar disks. The other stars: γ Cas, φ Per, 28 Tau and o Her have optically thin disks, that have been almost stable in time. It will be important monitoring these and other Be stars in the L-band to observe the changes on their circumstellar disks, and to observe also in this band, the building-up stars, i.e. stars that create a new disk, or that change it from a very tenuous one to an optically thick circumstellar disk. Our spectra contribute to enlarge the infrared spectroscopic database of Be stars.

  3. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; Community authors

    2016-10-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent calculation of gas and dust dynamics, radiative transfer, and chemistry. After a short introduction to each of these disciplines in isolation, we identify a series of burning questions and grand challenges associated with their continuing development and integration. We then discuss potential pathways towards solving these challenges, grouped by strategical, technical, and collaborative developments. This paper is not intended to be a review, but rather to motivate and direct future research and collaboration across typically distinct fields based on community-driven input, to encourage further progress in our understanding of circumstellar and protoplanetary discs.

  4. The formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in evolved circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherchneff, I.

    2011-03-01

    The formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the circumstellar outflows of evolved stars is reviewed, with an emphasis on carbon stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch. Evidence for PAHs present in their winds is provided by meteoritic studies and recent observations of the Unidentified Infrared bands. We detail the chemical processes leading to the closure of the first aromatic ring as well as the growth mechanisms leading to amorphous carbon grains. Existing studies on PAH formation in evolved stellar envelopes are reviewed and new results for the modelling of the inner wind of the archetype carbon star IRC+10216 are presented. Benzene, C6H6, forms close to the star, as well as water, H2O, as a result of non-equilibrium chemistry induced by the periodic passage of shocks. The growth process of aromatic rings may thus resemble that active in sooting flames due to the presence of radicals like hydroxyl, OH. Finally, we discuss possible formation processes for PAHs and aromatic compounds in the hydrogen-rich R CrB star, V854 Cen, and their implication for the carriers of the Red Emission and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands.

  5. ALIGNMENT OF PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DURING THE EMBEDDED PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin; Adams, Fred C. E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu

    2014-12-20

    Star formation proceeds via the collapse of a molecular cloud core over multiple dynamical timescales. Turbulence within cores results in a spatially non-uniform angular momentum of the cloud, causing a stochastic variation in the orientation of the disk forming from the collapsing material. In the absence of star-disk angular momentum coupling, such disk-tilting would provide a natural mechanism for the production of primordial spin-orbit misalignments in the resulting planetary systems. However, owing to high accretion rates in the embedded phase of star formation, the inner edge of the circumstellar disk extends down to the stellar surface, resulting in efficient gravitational and accretional angular momentum transfer between the star and the disk. Here, we demonstrate that the resulting gravitational coupling is sufficient to suppress any significant star-disk misalignment, with accretion playing a secondary role. The joint tilting of the star-disk system leads to a stochastic wandering of star-aligned bipolar outflows. Such wandering widens the effective opening angle of stellar outflows, allowing for more efficient clearing of the remainder of the protostar's gaseous envelope. Accordingly, the processes described in this work provide an additional mechanism responsible for sculpting the stellar initial mass function.

  6. The circumstellar environment of pre-SN Ia systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, E.; Redman, M. P.; Boumis, P.; Kopsacheili, M.; Akras, S., Sabin, L.; Jurkic, T.

    2016-06-01

    Here we explore the possible preexisting circumstellar debris of supernova type Ia systems. Classical, symbiotic and recurrent novae all accrete onto roughly solar mass white dwarfs from main sequence or Mira type companions and result in thermonuclear runaways and expulsion of the accreted material at high velocity. The expelled material forms a fast moving shell that eventually slows to planetary nebula expansion velocities within several hundred years. All such systems are recurrent and thousands of shells (each of about 0.001 Mo) snow plough into the environment. As these systems involve common envelope binaries the material is distributed in a non-spherical shell. These systems could be progenitors of some SN Ia and thus explode into environments with large amounts of accumulated gas and dust distributed in thin non-spherical shells. Such shells should be observable around 100 years after a SN Ia event in a radio flash as the SN Ia debris meets that of the ejected material of the systems previous incarnation.

  7. Rapid disappearance of a warm, dusty circumstellar disk.

    PubMed

    Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B; Rhee, Joseph H; Song, Inseok; Murphy, Simon J; Bessell, Michael S

    2012-07-04

    Stars form with gaseous and dusty circumstellar envelopes, which rapidly settle into disks that eventually give rise to planetary systems. Understanding the process by which these disks evolve is paramount in developing an accurate theory of planet formation that can account for the variety of planetary systems discovered so far. The formation of Earth-like planets through collisional accumulation of rocky objects within a disk has mainly been explored in theoretical and computational work in which post-collision ejecta evolution typically is ignored, although recent work has considered the fate of such material. Here we report observations of a young, Sun-like star (TYC 8241 2652 1) where infrared flux from post-collisional ejecta has decreased drastically, by a factor of about 30, over a period of less than two years. The star seems to have gone from hosting substantial quantities of dusty ejecta, in a region analogous to where the rocky planets orbit in the Solar System, to retaining at most a meagre amount of cooler dust. Such a phase of rapid ejecta evolution has not been previously predicted or observed, and no currently available physical model satisfactorily explains the observations.

  8. Unifying Type II Supernova Light Curves with Dense Circumstellar Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Piro, Anthony L.; Valenti, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    A longstanding problem in the study of supernovae (SNe) has been the relationship between the Type IIP and Type IIL subclasses. Whether they come from distinct progenitors or they are from similar stars with some property that smoothly transitions from one class to another has been the subject of much debate. Here, using one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic SN models, we show that the multi-band light curves of SNe IIL are well fit by ordinary red supergiants surrounded by dense circumstellar material (CSM). The inferred extent of this material, coupled with a typical wind velocity of ∼ 10{--}100 {km} {{{s}}}-1, suggests enhanced activity by these stars during the last ~months to ∼years of their lives, which may be connected with advanced stages of nuclear burning. Furthermore, we find that, even for more plateau-like SNe, dense CSM provides a better fit to the first ∼ 20 days of their light curves, indicating that the presence of such material may be more widespread than previously appreciated. Here we choose to model the CSM with a wind-like density profile, but it is unclear whether this just generally represents some other mass distribution, such as a recent mass ejection, thick disk, or even inflated envelope material. Better understanding the exact geometry and density distribution of this material will be an important question for future studies.

  9. Scattering Polarization of Arbitrary Envelopes by Anisotropic Stellar Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, J. C.; Ignace, R.

    2008-05-01

    We model the polarization arising from electron scattering of light by a circumstellar envelope of an arbitrary shape. This is accomplished by describing the scattering function, stellar flux, and envelope density distribution in general terms using spherical harmonics and then applying their orthogonality relationships in integral expressions that describe the net observed polarization. We then take a specific example of a uniform stellar light source surrounded by an ellipsoidal shell. As an example, a polarization of 25 percent is found for the case of a disk-like star that is viewed edge-on and that is surrounded by a a disk-like envelope oriented viewed face-on to the observer.

  10. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat this condition, alternatives to disc replacement include fusion, nonoperative care or no treatment. Typically, surgery is ... operative treatment for disc pain has been spinal fusion. This is a surgical procedure in which disc ...

  11. Herschel Views on Stellar and Circumstellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelkens, Christoffel

    2010-05-01

    We review the first results of Herschel on stellar and circumstellar evolution. - For main-sequence stars, PACS and SPIRE measurements of the debris disks surrounding Vega and Beta Pictoris are presented, revealing the disks with unprecedented spatial resolution at the peaks of their spectral energy distribution. - Through imaging and spectroscopic studies, the mass loss mechanisms and histories during the final stages of stellar evolution are investigated. Imaging of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars enables a detailed discussion of the discontinuous nature of the mass loss processes which induce the final evolution. With their moderately high spectral resolution, PACS and SPIRE reveal spectacularly rich molecular diagnostics on the dynamics of and the chemistry in the environments of objects such as CW Leo and VY CMa.

  12. Modeling sgB[e] Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, P.; Feldmeier, A.; Krtička, J.

    2017-02-01

    During their evolution, massive stars are characterized by a significant loss of mass either via spherically symmetric stellar winds or by aspherical mass-loss mechanisms, namely outflowing equatorial disks. However, the scenario that leads to the formation of a disk or rings of gas and dust around these objects is still under debate. Is it a viscous disk or an ouftlowing disk-forming wind or some other mechanism? It is also unclear how various physical mechanisms that act on the circumstellar environment of the stars affect its shape, density, kinematic, and thermal structure. We assume that the disk-forming mechanism is a viscous transport within an equatorial outflowing disk of a rapidly or even critically rotating star. We study the hydrodynamic and thermal structure of optically thick dense parts of outflowing circumstellar disks that may form around, e.g., Be stars, sgB[e] stars, or Pop III stars. We calculate self-consistent time-dependent models of the inner dense region of the disk that is strongly affected either by irradiation from the central star and by contributions of viscous heating effects. We also simulate the dynamic effects of collision between expanding ejecta of supernovae and circumstellar disks that may be form in sgB[e] stars and, e.g., LBVs or Pop III stars.

  13. Transition-Metal Oxides in Warm Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mirosław R.; Kaminski, Tomasz; Tylenda, Romuald

    2013-06-01

    We report on detections and simulations of electronic bands of transition-metal oxides, i.e. ScO, TiO, VO, CrO, YO, and of AlO, in spectra of two red novae V838 Mon and V4332 Sgr. These objects experienced a stellar merger event in 2002 and 1994, respectively, and have very rich circumstellar environments abundant in dust and molecules. We analyzed optical spectra of V838 Mon which show a presence of outflowing material. In this object, electronic systems of oxides are observed in absorption against a photospheric spectrum which resembles that of a late-type supergiant. We present simulations of the absorption bands which allowed us to derive the excitation temperatures of 300-500 K and constrain column densities, which turned out to be very high. Among many interesting features discovered, we identified forbidden transitions of TiO in the b^1Π-X^3Δ and c^{1}Φ-X^{3}Δ systems, which are seen owing to the high column densities and the relatively low temperatures. In the case of the older red nova V4332 Sgr, the main object is surrounded by a circumstellar disc which is seen almost edge-on and obscures the central star. The molecular spectra are seen in emission in this object, what is very unusual in astrophysical sources observed at optical wavelengths. We show that these emission bands arise owing to the special geometry of the star-disk system and that radiative pumping is responsible for excitation of the molecules. From the shapes of the rotational contours, we derive temperatures of about 120 K in this object. Remarkably, the spectra of V4332 Sgr contain features of CrO, which is the first identified signature of this molecule in an astrophysical object. In addition to the excitation and radiative-transfer analysis of the molecular spectra, we discuss chemical pathways that could lead to the observed variety of metal oxides seen in these enigmatic sources. T. Kaminski, M. Schmidt, R. Tylenda, M. Konacki, and M. Gromadzki ApJSuppl., {182} (33), 2009. T

  14. Circumstellar material around young stars in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The star cluster associated with the Orion nebula is one of the richest known. Lying at the nearside of the Orion Molecular cloud and at a distance of about 500 pc from us, it contains many premain-sequence stars with ages of about 300,000 yr. The nebula itself is a blister type, representing a wall of material ionized by the hottest star in the Trapezium group (member C). Although this is not the closest star formation region, it is probably the easiest place to detect circumstellar, possibly proto-planetary, material around these solar mass stars. This is because the same process of photoionization that creates the nebula also photoionizes these circumstellar clouds, thus rendering them easily visible. Moreover, their dust component is made visible by extinction of light from the background nebula. Young stars with circumstellar material were found in Orion on the second set of HST images and were called proplyds, indicating their special nature as circumstellar clouds caused to be luminous by being in or near a gaseous nebula. The brightest objects in the field had previously been seen in the optical and radio, and although their true nature had been hypothesized it was the HST images that made it clear what they are. The forms vary from cometlike when near the Trapezium to elliptical when further away, with the largest being 1000 AU and the bright portions of the smallest, which are found closest to the Trapezium, being about 100 AU in diameter. We now have a second set of HST observations made immediately after the refurbishment mission that provides even greater detail and reveals even more of these objects. About half of all the low-luminosity stars are proplyds. The poster paper describes quantitative tests about their fundamental structure and addresses the question of whether the circumstellar material is a disk or shell. One object (HST 16) is seen only in silhouette against the nebula and is easily resolved into an elliptical form of optical depth

  15. Redundant disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barack, W. N.; Domas, P. A.; Beekman, S. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A rotatable disc is described that consists of parallel plates tightly joined together for rotation about a hub. Each plate is provided with several angularly projecting spaced lands. The lands of each plate are interposed in alternating relationship between the lands of the next adjacent plate. In this manner, circumferential displacement of adjacent sectors in any one plate is prevented in the event that a crack develops. Each plate is redundantly sized so that, in event of structural failure of one plate, the remaining plates support a proportionate share of the load of the failed plate. The plates are prevented from separating laterally through the inclusion of generally radially extending splines which are inserted to interlock cooperating, circumferentially adjacent lands.

  16. THE EFFECTS ON SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUT AND SWIFT LIGHT CURVES DUE TO THE MASS OF THE HYDROGEN-RICH ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Even, Wesley; Frey, Lucille H.; Fryer, Chris L.; Young, Patrick A.

    2015-06-01

    Mass loss remains one of the primary uncertainties in stellar evolution. In the most massive stars, mass loss dictates the circumstellar medium and can significantly alter the fate of the star. Mass loss is caused by a variety of wind mechanisms and also through binary interactions. Supernovae (SNe) are excellent probes of this mass loss, both the circumstellar material and the reduced mass of the hydrogen-rich envelope. In this paper, we focus on the effects of reducing the hydrogen-envelope mass on the SN light curve, studying both the shock breakout and peak light-curve emission for a wide variety of mass-loss scenarios. Even though the trends of this mass loss will be masked somewhat by variations caused by different progenitors, explosion energies, and circumstellar media, these trends have significant effects on the SN light curves that should be seen in SN surveys. We conclude with a comparison of our results to a few key observations.

  17. A Herschel resolved debris disc around HD 105211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengst, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Horner, J.; Marsden, S. C.

    2017-07-01

    Debris discs are the dusty aftermath of planet formation processes around main-sequence stars. Analysis of these discs is often hampered by the absence of any meaningful constraint on the location and spatial extent of the disc around its host star. Multi-wavelength, resolved imaging ameliorates the degeneracies inherent in the modelling process, making such data indispensable in the interpretation of these systems. The Herschel Space Observatory observed HD 105211 (η Cru, HIP 59072) with its Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instrument in three far-infrared wavebands (70, 100 and 160 μm). Here we combine these data with ancillary photometry spanning optical to far-infrared wavelengths in order to determine the extent of the circumstellar disc. The spectral energy distribution and multi-wavelength resolved emission of the disc are simultaneously modelled using a radiative transfer and imaging codes. Analysis of the Herschel/PACS images reveals the presence of extended structure in all three PACS images. From a radiative transfer model we derive a disc extent of 87.0 ± 2.5 au, with an inclination of 70.7 ± 2.2° to the line of sight and a position angle of 30.1 ± 0.5°. Deconvolution of the Herschel images reveals a potential asymmetry but this remains uncertain as a combined radiative transfer and image analysis replicates both the structure and the emission of the disc using a single axisymmetric annulus.

  18. A photoevaporative gap in the closest planet-forming disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolano, Barbara; Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Picogna, Giovanni; Testi, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    The dispersal of the circum-stellar discs of dust and gas surrounding young low-mass stars has important implications for the formation of planetary systems. Photoevaporation from energetic radiation from the central object is thought to drive the dispersal in the majority of discs, by creating a gap which disconnects the outer from the inner regions of the disc and then disperses the outer disc from the inside-out, while the inner disc keeps draining viscously on to the star. In this Letter, we show that the disc around TW Hya, the closest protoplanetary disc to Earth, may be the first object where a photoevaporative gap has been imaged around the time at which it is being created. Indeed, the detected gap in the Atacama large millimeter/submillimeter array images is consistent with the expectations of X-ray photoevaporation models, thus not requiring the presence of a planet. The photoevaporation model is also consistent with a broad range of properties of the TW Hya system, e.g. accretion rate and the location of the gap at the onset of dispersal. We show that the central, unresolved 870 μm continuum source might be produced by free-free emission from the gas and/or residual dust inside the gap.

  19. Braking down an accreting protostar: disc-locking, disc winds, stellar winds, X-winds and Magnetospheric Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J.

    2013-09-01

    Classical T Tauri stars are low mass young forming stars that are surrounded by a circumstellar accretion disc from which they gain mass. Despite this accretion and their own contraction that should both lead to their spin up, these stars seem to conserve instead an almost constant rotational period as long as the disc is maintained. Several scenarios have been proposed in the literature in order to explain this puzzling "disc-locking" situation: either deposition in the disc of the stellar angular momentum by the stellar magnetosphere or its ejection through winds, providing thereby an explanation of jets from Young Stellar Objects. In this lecture, these various mechanisms will be critically detailed, from the physics of the star-disc interaction to the launching of self-confined jets (disc winds, stellar winds, X-winds, conical winds). It will be shown that no simple model can account alone for the whole bulk of observational data and that "disc locking" requires a combination of some of them.

  20. The plant nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Rose, Annkatrin; Patel, Shalaka; Meier, Iris

    2004-01-01

    This review summarizes our present knowledge about the composition and function of the plant nuclear envelope. Compared with animals or yeast, our molecular understanding of the nuclear envelope in higher plants is in its infancy. However, fundamental differences in the structure and function of the plant and animal nuclear envelope have already been found. Here, we compare and contrast these differences with respect to nuclear pore complexes, targeting of Ran signaling to the nuclear envelope, inner nuclear envelope proteins, and the role and fate of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Further investigation of the emerging fundamental differences as well as the similarities between kingdoms might illuminate why there appears to be more than one blueprint for building a nucleus.

  1. FILAMENTARY STAR FORMATION: OBSERVING THE EVOLUTION TOWARD FLATTENED ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katherine; Looney, Leslie; Johnstone, Doug; Tobin, John E-mail: lwl@illinois.edu E-mail: jtobin@nrao.edu

    2012-12-20

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous from large-scale molecular clouds (a few parsecs) to small-scale circumstellar envelopes around Class 0 sources ({approx}1000 AU to {approx}0.1 pc). In particular, recent observations with the Herschel Space Observatory emphasize the importance of large-scale filaments (a few parsecs) and star formation. The small-scale flattened envelopes around Class 0 sources are reminiscent of the large-scale filaments. We propose an observationally derived scenario for filamentary star formation that describes the evolution of filaments as part of the process for formation of cores and circumstellar envelopes. If such a scenario is correct, small-scale filamentary structures (0.1 pc in length) with higher densities embedded in starless cores should exist, although to date almost all the interferometers have failed to observe such structures. We perform synthetic observations of filaments at the prestellar stage by modeling the known Class 0 flattened envelope in L1157 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We show that with reasonable estimates for the column density through the flattened envelope, the CARMA D array at 3 mm wavelengths is not able to detect such filamentary structure, so previous studies would not have detected them. However, the substructures may be detected with the CARMA D+E array at 3 mm and the CARMA E array at 1 mm as a result of more appropriate resolution and sensitivity. ALMA is also capable of detecting the substructures and showing the structures in detail compared to the CARMA results with its unprecedented sensitivity. Such detection will confirm the new proposed paradigm of non-spherical star formation.

  2. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  3. The impact of SN 1987A with its circumstellar ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Ding; Mccray, Richard; Slavin, Johnathan

    1994-01-01

    The envleope of SN 1987A will strike its circumstellar ring in 12 +/- 3 yr after explosion (A.D. 1999+/-3), the exact time depending weakly on the uncertain density of diffuse gas between the supernova and the ring. The impact will drive a radiative shock into the ring with velocity approximatley 200-400 km s(exp -1). The shocked ring will become a bright optical and ultraviolet emsiison-line source. A bright arc will suddenly appear at the near side of the ring and grow into an entire ring about 11 months later. The luminosities of the brightest lines, H-alpha H-alpha, N v lambda lambda 1238, 1242, and O VI lambda lambda 1032, 1038 will rise rapidly to approxminately 10(exp 36)-10(exp 37) ergs s(exp -1) and remain bright for several years after impact. The emission lines from the shocked ring will have FWHM approximatley 300-600 km s(exp -1) and complex profiles that will depend on position and will be sensitive to the details of the density distribution of gas in the ring. Strong EUV radiation from the shock will photoionize the unshocked ring, causing emission of narrow FWHM equivalent to 15 km s(exp -1) H-alpha, H-beta and (O III) lambda lambda 4959, 5007 lines with luminosities approximatley 10(exp 35) ergs s(exp -1).The EUV radiation will probably cause the nebulosity beyond the ring to become visable again. The EUV radiation may also illuminate the unshocked outer supernova envelope, causing visible emission of broad FWHM equivalent to 10(exp 4) km s(exp -1) H-alpha and H-beta lines.

  4. Dynamics of Supernova Remnants with Ejecta and Circumstellar Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, M. J.; Featherstone, N.; Borkowski, J. K.; Reynolds, P. S.

    2001-09-01

    Progenitors of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) blow bubbles in the ambient medium and sweep it into shells with their powerful stellar winds. After the explosion, SN ejecta initially collide with the stellar wind, then with the wind-blown bubble, and finally with a dense wind-swept shell. This collision is particularly energetic for SNe whose progenitors lost most of their outer envelopes just prior to explosion: the brightest galactic supernova remnant (SNR), Cas A, is a prime example of such an interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). The SN ejecta are far from being smooth for such remnants, because of vigorous turbulence and mixing of heavy-element ejecta immediately after the explosion and subsequent growth of Ni-Fe bubbles powered by the radioactive decay. We study the interaction of ``bubbly'' SN ejecta with a CSM bubble and a swept CSM shell, using hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions with the VH-1 hydrocode. We compare our simulations with analytic self-similar (Chevalier & Liang 1989) solutions and with our previous simulations of interaction of bubbly ejecta with a uniform ambient medium. When compared with these simulations, the impact of bubbly ejecta with the shell results in a more vigorous turbulence and mixing. Dense and cool ejecta at the boundaries of adjacent bubbles may penetrate the shell, leading to plume-like and ring-like features. We examine whether such an interaction is responsible for the observed morphology of Cas A as seen by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope, and for the different expansion rates seen at X-ray and radio wavelengths.

  5. Cometary ices in forming protoplanetary disc midplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Furuya, Kenji; Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Harsono, Daniel; Visser, Ruud

    2016-10-01

    Low-mass protostars are the extrasolar analogues of the natal Solar system. Sophisticated physicochemical models are used to simulate the formation of two protoplanetary discs from the initial prestellar phase, one dominated by viscous spreading and the other by pure infall. The results show that the volatile prestellar fingerprint is modified by the chemistry en route into the disc. This holds relatively independent of initial abundances and chemical parameters: physical conditions are more important. The amount of CO2 increases via the grain-surface reaction of OH with CO, which is enhanced by photodissociation of H2O ice. Complex organic molecules are produced during transport through the envelope at the expense of CH3OH ice. Their abundances can be comparable to that of methanol ice (few per cent of water ice) at large disc radii (R > 30 au). Current Class II disc models may be underestimating the complex organic content. Planet population synthesis models may underestimate the amount of CO2 and overestimate CH3OH ices in planetesimals by disregarding chemical processing between the cloud and disc phases. The overall C/O and C/N ratios differ between the gas and solid phases. The two ice ratios show little variation beyond the inner 10 au and both are nearly solar in the case of pure infall, but both are subsolar when viscous spreading dominates. Chemistry in the protostellar envelope en route to the protoplanetary disc sets the initial volatile and prebiotically significant content of icy planetesimals and cometary bodies. Comets are thus potentially reflecting the provenances of the midplane ices in the solar nebula.

  6. Rapid planetesimal formation in turbulent circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anders; Oishi, Jeffrey S; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Klahr, Hubert; Henning, Thomas; Youdin, Andrew

    2007-08-30

    During the initial stages of planet formation in circumstellar gas disks, dust grains collide and build up larger and larger bodies. How this process continues from metre-sized boulders to kilometre-scale planetesimals is a major unsolved problem: boulders are expected to stick together poorly, and to spiral into the protostar in a few hundred orbits owing to a 'headwind' from the slower rotating gas. Gravitational collapse of the solid component has been suggested to overcome this barrier. But even low levels of turbulence will inhibit sedimentation of solids to a sufficiently dense midplane layer, and turbulence must be present to explain observed gas accretion in protostellar disks. Here we report that boulders can undergo efficient gravitational collapse in locally overdense regions in the midplane of the disk. The boulders concentrate initially in transient high pressure regions in the turbulent gas, and these concentrations are augmented a further order of magnitude by a streaming instability driven by the relative flow of gas and solids. We find that gravitationally bound clusters form with masses comparable to dwarf planets and containing a distribution of boulder sizes. Gravitational collapse happens much faster than radial drift, offering a possible path to planetesimal formation in accreting circumstellar disks.

  7. Photometric and polarimetric clues to the circumstellar environment of RY Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manset, N.; Bastien, P.; Ménard, F.; Bertout, C.; Le van Suu, A.; Boivin, L.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the stellar and circumstellar properties of the bright southern T Tauri star RY Lup, a G-type star showing type III variability. Methods: We report simultaneous BV polarimetric and UBV photometric observations obtained during 12 consecutive nights on the 1.0 m and 50 cm telescopes of the European Southern Observatory at La Silla. We compare these data to models. Results: The polarization is high (≈3.0%) when the star is faint and red (V ≈ 12.0, B-V ≈ 1.3), and it is low (≈0.5%) when it is bright and bluer (V ≈ 11.0, B-V ≈ 1.1). The photometric and polarimetric variations share a common period of 3.75 d. Irregular light variations, larger at shorter wavelengths, are also superposed on the cyclic variations and may be due to processes different than the one producing the periodic variations. The linear polarization is produced by dust scattering in an asymmetric (flat) circumstellar envelope. The photometric and polarimetric variations can be explained with an almost edge-on circumstellar disk that is warped close to the star, where it interacts with the star's magnetosphere. The inhomogeneous disk matter contained in the warp corotates with the star and partially occults it during part of the rotation period, which explains the dips in luminosity and the accompanying increase in polarization. All the information available on RY Lup is consistent with a system comprising a G8 star surrounded by an edge-on disk, and we find that the mass of RY Lup is M_star/M⊙= 1.71 ± 0.43, while its age is (1.2± 0.4) × 107 {yr}. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory in La Silla, Chile.

  8. Balmer line profiles for infalling T Tauri envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that the Balmer emission lines of T Tauri stars arise in infalling envelopes rather than winds is considered. Line profiles for the upper Balmer lines are presented for models with cone geometry, intended to simulate the basic features of magnetospheric accretion from a circumstellar disk. An escape probability treatment is used to determine line source functions in nonspherically symmetric geometry. Thermalization effects are found to produce nearly symmetric H-alpha line profiles at the same time the higher Balmer series lines exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles. The infall models produce centrally peaked emission line wings, in good agreement with observations of many T Tauri stars. It is suggested that the Balmer emission of many T Tauri stars may be produced in an infalling envelope, with blue shifted absorption contributed by an overlying wind. Some of the observed narrow absorption components with small blueshifts may also arise in the accretion column.

  9. HD 172555: Detection of 63 micrometers [OI] Emission in a Debris Disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Barrado, D.; Augereau, J. -C.; Thi, W. F.; Roberge, A.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.; Meeus, G.; Howard, C.; Sandell, G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Context. HD 172555 is a young A7 star belonging to the Beta Pictoris Moving Group that harbours a debris disc. The Spitzer IRS spectrum of the source showed mid-IR features such as silicates and glassy silica species, indicating the presence of a warm dust component with small grains, which places HD 172555 among the small group of debris discs with such properties. The IRS spectrum also shows a possible emission of SiO gas. Aims. We aim to study the dust distribution in the circumstellar disc of HD 172555 and to asses the presence of gas in the debris disc. Methods. As part of the GASPS Open Time Key Programme, we obtained Herschel-PACS photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source. We analysed PACS observations of HD 172555 and modelled the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) with a modified blackbody and the gas emission with a two-level population model with no collisional de-excitation. Results. We report for the first time the detection of [OI] atomic gas emission at 63.18 micrometers in the HD 172555 circumstellar disc.We detect excesses due to circumstellar dust toward HD 172555 in the three photometric bands of PACS (70, 100, and 160 m). We derive a large dust particle mass of (4.8 plus-minus 0.6)x10(exp -4) Mass compared to Earth and an atomic oxygen mass of 2.5x10(exp -2)R(exp 2) Mass compared to Earth, where R in AU is the separation between the star and the inner disc. Thus, most of the detected mass of the disc is in the gaseous phase.

  10. Comparison of the Hα circumstellar disks in Be/X-ray binaries and Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanov, R. K.; Reig, P.; Martí, J.; Coe, M. J.; Fabregat, J.; Tomov, N. A.; Valchev, T.

    2001-03-01

    We present a comparative study of the circumstellar disks in Be/X-ray binaries and isolated Be stars based upon the Hα emission line. From this comparison it follows that the overall structure of the disks in the Be/X-ray binaries is similar to the disks of other Be stars, i.e. they are axisymmetric and rotationally supported. The factors for the line broadening (rotation and temperature) in the disks of the Be stars and the Be/X-ray binaries seem to be identical. However, we do detect some intriguing differences between the envelopes. On average, the circumstellar disks of the Be/X-ray binaries are twice as dense as the disks of the isolated Be stars. The different distribution of the Be/X-ray binaries and the Be stars seen in the full width half maximum versus peak separation diagram indicates that the disks in Be/X-ray binaries have on average a smaller size, probably truncated by the compact object.

  11. Large Scale Analysis of Archival Circumstellar Disk Spectra Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Gerald T., Jr.; Woodward, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a set of tools and techniques for performing detailed comparisons between computational models having high dimensional parameter spaces and large sets of archival data. By combining a principal component analysis on a large sample of model output with an artificial neural network, we create a powerful data visualization tool as well as a way of rapidly and robustly recovering physical parameters from a large set of experimental data. We demonstrate these analysis techniques by analyzing circumstellar disk spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope Cores to Disks Legacy program in the context of the two layer disk model of Chiang et al. (Chiang et al. 2001, ApJ, 547, 1077) and Dullemond & Natta (Dullemond & Natta 2001, ApJ, 560, 957). The analysis reveals two populations of disk sources. The first population is characterized by the lack of a puffed up inner rim while the second population appears to contain an inner rim that casts a shadow across the disk. The first population also exhibits a trend of increasing spectral index while the second population exhibits a decreasing trend in the strength of the 20 micron silicate emission feature. We also present a preliminary analysis of the same data set viewed in the context of the model by Whitney et al. (Whitney et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 1079). The Whitney model suggests that the presence of a circumstellar envelope may explain the second population sources.

  12. The Circumstellar Material of Socket Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, Bruce

    Taking advantage of the IUE's spatial resolution capability, we intend to determine the extent and nature of UV emission associated with socket stars. Socket stars are stars in HII regions surrounded by circumstellar material of an unknown nature. The few good-quality IUE data available suggest that the grains along the line of sight to the socket stars may not be typical interstellar grains. However, it is not clear if the grains suggested by the UV spectra are associated with the socket material or foreground material. Observing time is requested to obtain the UV maps, as well as improved spectra of selected socket stars. New IUE spectra will enable us to determine the presence or absence of UV scattering in the sockets, and to model grain sizes and distributions in the socket material.

  13. The interaction of supernovae with circumstellar bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Liang, Edison P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of a massive star supernova with the shell created by the fast wind from a blue supergiant, either in the main-sequence phase or in a late evolutionary phase. Making a number of idealizations, the general features of shell interaction are described by semianalytical solutions. The expected properties of the supernova and its environment are discussed, and the hydrodynamics of the interaction is described. It is found that, typically, the shock traversal occurs before the energy transfer is significant. Applications of the model to observed objects are considered, with special attention given to the interaction of SN 1987A with its circumstellar shell, which is expected to occur within decades.

  14. HL Tauri and its circumstellar disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.

    1983-01-01

    New far infrared observations of HL Tau which support the identification of an edge-on disk surrounding the star are presented. A bolometric luminosity for the star of 7.2 solar luminosities and a ratio of infrared to optical luminosity of 630 are indicated. A circumstellar A(V) of about 7.0 mag is produced, consistent with the silicate optical depth to the star. Data on HL Tau's effective temperature and radius and its position on the HR diagram suggest that the star has recently completed its accretion phase and is only 100,000 yr old. The column masses of ice and silicates are combined with the disk dimensions to build a simple model of the disk for comparison with the primitive solar nebula. Estimates of the far-infrared emitting mass provide independent probes of the mass in larger grains around HL Tau.

  15. Circumstellar and interstellar synthesis of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Tielens, A G; Charnley, S B

    1997-06-01

    We review the formation and evolution of complex circumstellar and interstellar molecules. A number of promising chemical routes are discussed which may lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules, fullerenes, and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in the outflows from stars. Some of the problems with these chemical schemes are pointed out as well. We also review the role of grains in the formation of complex molecules in interstellar molecular clouds. This starts with the formation of simple molecules in an ice grain mantle. UV photolysis and/or thermal polymerization can convert some of these simple molecules into more complex polymeric structures. Some of these species may be released to the gas phase, particularly in the warm regions around newly formed stars. Methanol and formaldehyde seem to play an important role in this drive towards molecular complexity and their chemistry is traced in some detail.

  16. Spectroscopic Survey of Circumstellar Disks in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Olguin, Lorenzo; Briceno, Cesar

    2013-07-01

    As a second stage of a project focused on characterizing candidate stars bearing a circumstellar disk in Orion, we present a spectroscopic follow-up of a set of about 170 bright stars. The present set of stars was selected by their optical (UBVRI) and infrared behavior in different color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. Observations were carried out at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional located at the Sierra San Pedro Martir in B.C., Mexico and at the Observatorio Guillermo Haro in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. Low-resolution spectra were obtained for all candidates in the sample. Using the SPTCLASS code, we have obtained spectral types and equivalent widths of the Li I 6707 and Halpha lines for each one of the stars. This project is a cornerstone of a large scale survey aimed to obtain stellar parameters in a homogeneous way using spectroscopic data. This work was partially supported by UNAM-PAPIIT grant IN-109311.

  17. CO observations of very cold southern circumstellar shells and pre-planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loup, C.; Forveille, T.; Omont, A.; Nyman, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a CO(1-0) survey for very cold circumstellar envelopes made with the SEST telescope. The sources were selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog and are probably rapidly evolving between the asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebulae. Nine of them were detected as evolved stars, of which four have an early type optical counterpart, including two stars classified as Be. HD 101584, a high latitude F supergiant has a remarkably broad CO spectrum, similar to OH231.8 + 4.2, with a total velocity extent of about 350 km/s. It probably belongs to a binary system, which could provide the mechanism for the observed violent ejection.

  18. The Envelopes of B[e] Supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds as Seen by Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriacopi, D. B.; Carciofi, A. C.; Magalhães, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    B[e] supergiants (sgB[e]) are rare, massive post-main sequence stars. Their evolutionary status with respect to other objects on the H-R diagram is still unknown. These stars are surrounded by a non-spherically symmetric circumstellar envelope, from which arises a net intrinsic polarization. Therefore, spectropolarimetry is a very useful tool in the study of these objects. Since emission, absorption, and scattering processes are imprinted in the polarized flux, this technique can provide useful information about the circumstellar structure. We present a study of the envelope structure of RMC 82, a sgB[e] in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on spectropolarimetric data. Our observations were obtained with the 8.2 m VLT/UT1 telescope at the Paranal Observatory (ESO). We analyzed the Balmer line formation loci, and their corresponding physical conditions. The data was modeled by a bimodal wind model of the circumstellar envelope, consisting of a slow, dense equatorial wind and a fast polar wind. The calculations were done with the radiative transfer code HDUST. Our results suggest that this geometry is indeed consistent with the RMC 82 data. Our best fit parameters are an opening angle of the disk of 15° and a total mass loss rate of 1.0×10-5 M⊙ yr-1 sr-1.

  19. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  20. Evolution in circumstellar envelopes of Be stars: From disks to rings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Baade, D.; Štefl, S.; Maintz, M.

    2001-11-01

    New series of echelle spectra were obtained to study the medium- and long-term evolution of the disks of several Be stars. Subtle variations in the wings of optically thin and thick emission lines suggest that the conventional, static picture of the disk being in quasi-contact with the central star is justified primarily (or perhaps only) after an outburst event. Some weeks to months later, a low-density region seems to develop above the star and slowly grows outwards. A subsequent outburst may later replenish this cavity. In fact, in two stars this more ring-like structure is apparently at times detached far enough from the star to allow for the formation of a secondary inner disk from the ejecta of a later outburst. This behaviour is not necessarily representative of Be stars in general because in the later spectral sub-types, discrete mass loss events have not so far been observed to play a major role. In the light of the apparent life cycle of such disks, a brief discussion is given of the differences in strength and variability between the winds of Be and normal B stars. It seems possible to attribute these differences to matter that was initially in the disk and therefore largely shielded from the stellar radiation, but that during the course of the inner excavation (or even complete distruction) of the disk becomes exposed. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at La Silla, Chile, ESO proposal No. 64.H-0548 and on observations with the Wendelstein 80-cm and the Ondřejov 2-m telescopes, both equipped with the HEROS spectrograph provided by the Landessternwarte Heidelberg.

  1. 1979-1980 eclipse of zeta Aurigae, I. The circumstellar envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.D.

    1981-09-15

    The resonance lines of Mg/sup +/ and C/sup + + +/ have been studied in the spectrum of zeta Aurigae during 1979 and 1980. A model of the K-star wind far from the K star and its interaction with the B star in the system has been derived. The data suggest a mass loss rate from the K star of 2 x 10/sup -8/ M/sub sun/ yr/sup -1/. The rate of accretion by the B star of material from the K supergiant is such that the matter accreted in the course of about 10 years is of the order of the total mass of the photosphere of the B star.

  2. Molecular anions in circumstellar envelopes, interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres: quantum dynamics of formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, Fabio

    2012-09-01

    For decades astronomers and astrophysicists believed that only positively charged ions were worthy of relevance in drawing the networks for possible chemical reactions in the interstellar medium, as well as in modeling the physical conditions in most of astrophysical environments. Thus, molecular negative ions received minor attention until their possible existence was observationally confirmed (discovery of the first interstellar anion, C6H-), about thirty years after the first physically reasonable proposal on their actual detection was theoretically surmised by E.Herbst. In an astrophysical context, their role should be then found in their involvement in the charge balance as well as in the chemical evolution of the considered environment: depending on their amount and on the global gas density, in fact, the possible evolutive scenario could be susceptible of marked variations on the estimated time needed for reaching the steady state, their presence having thus also important repercussions on the final chemical composition of a given environment. The main reasons that originally motivated us to undertake the present work, were at least two. First of all, we intended to demonstrate the importance of resonances in forming molecular anions in different astrophysical environments. Secondly, we were attracted by the possibility of investigating the occurrence of radiationless paths like intramolecular vibrational redistributions to account for the dissipation of the extra energy initially carried by the impinging electron. Accordingly, the present PhD represents a theoretical/computational work which deals with an area placed at the boundary between (molecular) astrophysics, quantum collision thery, and theoretical chemistry. The three molecular species whose behaviour under low-energy electron collisions will be discussed are: the ortho-benzyne, the coronene and the carbon nitride.

  3. The structure of SN 1987A's outer circumstellar envelope as probed by light echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin; Sugerman, Ben; Lawrence, Stephen; Kunkel, William

    2001-05-01

    We present ground-based and HST images processed by image subtraction to highlight transient reflection nebulae or ``light echoes'' of the maximum light pulse of the explosion of SN 1987A from surrounding material. Along with numerous structures already discussed elsewhere, we have found (in multiple epochs of data) a new feature opposite the SN from the mysterious ``Napoleon's Hat'' which indicates a symmetric structure due to shocks internal to the SN's red supergiant wind and probably caused by the pile-up of gas due to differential velocities within the outflow. We also show how echoes betray the ram pressure distribution of the progenitor mass loss flow. .

  4. The Ionized Circumstellar Envelopes of Orion Source I and the Becklin-Neugebauer Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plambeck, R. L.; Bolatto, A. D.; Carpenter, J. M.; Eisner, J. A.; Lamb, J. W.; Leitch, E. M.; Marrone, D. P.; Muchovej, S. J.; Pérez, L. M.; Pound, M. W.; Teuben, P. J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Woody, D. P.; Wright, M. C. H.; Zauderer, B. A.

    2013-03-01

    The 229 GHz (λ1.3 mm) radio emission from Orion-KL was mapped with up to 0.''14 angular resolution with CARMA, allowing measurements of the flux densities of Source I ("SrcI") and the Becklin-Neugebauer Object (BN), the two most massive stars in this region. We find integrated flux densities of 310 ± 45 mJy for SrcI and 240 ± 35 mJy for BN. SrcI is optically thick even at 229 GHz. No trace of the H30α recombination line is seen in its spectrum, although the v 2 = 1, 5(5,0)-6(4,3) transition of H2O, 3450 K above the ground state, is prominent. SrcI is elongated at position angle 140°, as in 43 GHz images. These results are most easily reconciled with models in which the radio emission from SrcI arises via the H- free-free opacity in a T < 4500 K disk, as considered by Reid et al. By contrast, the radio spectrum of BN is consistent with p +/e - free-free emission from a dense (ne ~ 5 × 107 cm-3), but otherwise conventional, hypercompact H II region. The source is becoming optically thin at 229 GHz, and the H30α recombination line, at V LSR = 23.2 ± 0.5 km s-1, is prominent in its spectrum. A Lyman continuum flux of 5 × 1045 photons s-1, consistent with that expected from a B star, is required to maintain the ionization. Supplementary 90 GHz observations were made to measure the H41α and H42α recombination lines toward BN. Published 43 and 86 GHz data suggest that SrcI brightened with respect to BN over the 15 year period from 1994 to 2009.

  5. Cold CO Gas in the Envelopes of FU Orionis-type Young Eruptive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Ábrahám, P.; Csengeri, T.; Henning, Th.; Moór, A.; Güsten, R.

    2017-02-01

    FU Orionis-type objects (FUors) are young stellar objects experiencing large optical outbursts due to highly enhanced accretion from the circumstellar disk onto the star. FUors are often surrounded by massive envelopes, which play a significant role in the outburst mechanism. Conversely, the subsequent eruptions might gradually clear up the obscuring envelope material and drive the protostar on its way to become a disk-only T Tauri star. Here we present an APEX 12CO and 13CO survey of eight southern and equatorial FUors. We measure the mass of the gaseous material surrounding our targets, locate the source of the CO emission, and derive physical parameters for the envelopes and outflows, where detected. Our results support the evolutionary scenario where FUors represent a transition phase from envelope-surrounded protostars to classical T Tauri stars.

  6. The far-infrared behaviour of Herbig Ae/Be discs: Herschel PACS photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, N.; Montesinos, B.; Meeus, G.; Marshall, J. P.; Mendigutía, I.; Sandell, G.

    2016-02-01

    Herbig Ae/Be objects are pre-main sequence stars surrounded by gas- and dust-rich circumstellar discs. These objects are in the throes of star and planet formation, and their characterisation informs us of the processes and outcomes of planet formation processes around intermediate mass stars. Here we analyse the spectral energy distributions of disc host stars observed by the Herschel open time key programme "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems". We present Herschel/PACS far-infrared imaging observations of 22 Herbig Ae/Bes and 5 debris discs, combined with ancillary photometry spanning ultraviolet to sub-millimetre wavelengths. From these measurements we determine the diagnostics of disc evolution, along with the total excess, in three regimes spanning near-, mid-, and far-infrared wavelengths. Using appropriate statistical tests, these diagnostics are examined for correlations. We find that the far-infrared flux, where the disc becomes optically thin, is correlated with the millimetre flux, which provides a measure of the total dust mass. The ratio of far-infrared to sub-millimetre flux is found to be greater for targets with discs that are brighter at millimetre wavelengths and that have steeper sub-millimetre slopes. Furthermore, discs with flared geometry have, on average, larger excesses than flat geometry discs. Finally, we estimate the extents of these discs (or provide upper limits) from the observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  7. COMMON ENVELOPE EVOLUTION LEADING TO SUPERNOVAE WITH DENSE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    2012-06-10

    A variety of supernova events, including Type IIn supernovae and ultraluminous supernovae, appear to have lost up to solar masses of their envelopes in tens to hundreds of years leading up to the explosion. In order to explain the close timing of the mass loss and supernova events, we explore the possibility that the mass loss is driven by common envelope evolution of a compact object (neutron star or black hole) in the envelope of a massive star and the supernova is triggered by the inspiral of the compact object to the central core of the companion star. The expected rate of such events is smaller than the observed rate of Type IIn supernovae but the rates may agree within the uncertainties. The mass loss velocity is related to the escape velocity from the common envelope system and is comparable to the observed velocity of hundreds of kilometers per second in Type IIn events. The mass loss is expected to be denser near the equatorial plane of the binary system and there is good evidence that the circumstellar media in Type IIn supernovae are asymmetric. Some of these supernova types show evidence for energies in excess of the canonical 10{sup 51} erg, which might be the result of explosions from rapid accretion onto a compact object through a disk.

  8. Circumstellar water vapour in M-type AGB stars: constraints from H{2}O(1{10}-1{01}) lines obtained with Odin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Schöier, F. L.; Olofsson, H.; Bergman, P.; Frisk, U.; . Hjalmarson, Å.; Justtanont, K.; Kwok, S.; Larsson, B.; Olberg, M.; Sandqvist, Aa.

    2009-01-01

    Context: A detailed radiative transfer code has been previously used to model circumstellar ortho-{H_2O} line emission towards six M-type asymptotic giant branch stars using Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer data. Collisional and radiative excitation, including the {ν_2=1} state, was considered. Aims: Spectrally resolved circumstellar {H_2O}(1{10}-1{01}) lines have been obtained towards three M-type AGB stars using the Odin satellite. This provides additional strong constraints on the properties of circumstellar {H_2O}, in particular on the chemistry in the stellar atmosphere, and the photodissociation in the outer envelope. Methods: Infrared Space Observatory and Odin satellite {H_2O} line data are used as constraints for radiative transfer models. Special consideration is taken to the spectrally resolved Odin line profiles, and the effect of excitation to the first excited vibrational states of the stretching modes ({ν_1=1} and {ν_3=1}) on the derived abundances is estimated. A non-local, radiative transfer code based on the accelerated lambda iteration formalism is used. A statistical analysis is performed to determine the best-fit models. Results: The {H_2O} abundance estimates are in agreement with previous estimates. The inclusion of the Odin data sets stronger constraints on the size of the {H_2O} envelope. The {H_2O}(1{10}-1{01}) line profiles require a significant reduction in expansion velocity compared to the terminal gas expansion velocity determined in models of CO radio line emission, indicating that the {H_2O} emission lines probe a region where the wind is still being accelerated. Including the {ν_3=1} state significantly lowers the estimated abundances for the low-mass-loss-rate objects. This shows the importance of detailed modelling, in particular the details of the infrared spectrum in the range 3 to 6 μm, to estimate accurate circumstellar {H_2O} abundances. Conclusions: Spectrally resolved circumstellar {H_2O

  9. The photoproduction of circumstellar OH maser shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The structure of OH shells formed from the photodestruction of H2O by ambient UV photons in the thick, expanding envelopes around cool evolved stars is investigated. The properties of the shells are governed mainly by the envelope shielding which in turn is primarily controlled by the mass-loss rate M. The peak OH densities and column densities through the shells are, respectively, slowly decreasing and increasing functions of M. The characteristic radii of the shells also depend on M, increasing from about 4(15) cm for M = 1(-6) solar mass/yr to about 1(17) cm for M = 1(-4) solar mass/yr; this dependence is well matched by recent observational data, and lends support to the OH photoproduction mechanism.

  10. Dynamics and Observational Appearance of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew Frederick

    In my thesis I present a study of the dynamics and observational characteristics of massive circumstellar disks in two dimensions (r, f ) using two complimentary hydro-dynamic codes: a `Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic' (SPH) code and a `Piecewise Parabolic Method' (PPM) code. I also study the detection limits available to radial velocity searches for low mass companions to main sequence stars. This thesis is organized as a series of published or submitted papers, connected by introductory and concluding material. I strongly recommend that readers of this abstract obtain the published versions of each of these papers. I first outline the progress which has been made in the modeling of the structure and origins of the solar system, then in chapter 2 (The Astrophysical Journal v502, p342, with W. Benz, F. Adams and D. Arnett), I proceed with numerical simulations of circumstellar disks using both hydrodynamic codes assuming a `locally isothermal' equation of state. The disks studied range in mass from 0.05M* to 1.0 M* and in initial minimum Toomre Q value from 1.1 to 3.0. Massive disks (MD > 0.2 M*) tend to form grand design spiral structure with 1-3 arms, while low mass disks (MD <= 0.2M*) tend to form filamentary, >4 armed spiral structures. In chapter 4 (submitted to The Astrophysical Journal with W. Benz and T. Ruzmaikina), I relax the assumption the locally isothermal evolution assumption and instead include simple heating and cooling prescriptions for the system. Under these physical conditions, the spiral arm growth is suppressed in the inner 1/3 of the disks relative to the isothermal evolution and in the remainder, changes character to more diffuse spiral structures. I synthesize spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the simulations and compare them to fiducial SEDs derived from observed systems. The size distribution of grains in the inner disk can have marked consequences on the near infrared portion of the SED. After being vaporized in a hot midplane

  11. Porous dust grains in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the impact of porous dust grains on the structure and observable appearance of circumstellar disks (Kirchschlager & Wolf 2013). Our study is motivated by observations and laboratory studies which indicate that dust grains in various astrophysical environments are porous. In addition, the modeling of the spatial structure and grain size distribution of debris disks reveals that under the assumption of spherical compact grains the resulting minimum grain size is often significantly larger than the blowout size, which might be a hint for porosity. Using the discrete dipole approximation, we compute the optical properties of spherical, porous grains (Draine & Flatau 1994, 2010). Subsequently, we calculate the blowout sizes for various debris disk systems and grain porosities. We find that the blowout size increases with particle porosity and stellar temperature. In addition, the lower dust equilibrium temperature of porous particles results in a shift of the maximum of the thermal reemission of debris disks towards longer wavelengths. For our studies of the impact of dust grain porosity in protoplanetary disks we use the radiative transfer software MC3D, which is based on the Monte-Carlo method and solves the radiative transfer problem self-consistently (Wolf et al. 1999, Wolf 2003). We find that the spectral energy distribution of protoplanetary disks shows significant differences between the cases of porous and compact grains. In particular, the flux in the optical wavelength range is increased for porous grains. Furthermore, the silicate peak at ~9.8 microns exhibits a strong dependence on the degree of grain porosity. We also investigate the temperature distribution in the disk. In the midplane no influence of porosity is detectable, but in the vertical direction minor changes of a few Kelvin are found. To complete our study we outline the differences between the two grain types in maps of the linear polarization. We detect a polarization reversal in

  12. Models of Interacting Supernovae: Understanding the Physics and Probing the Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Edward

    "Interacting supernovae" are poorly understood astronomical events with great potential for expanding our understanding of how stars evolve and die, and could provide important clues about the early formation of large-scale structures such as galaxies in the universe. Interacting supernovae occur when a star explodes within a dense cloud of material shed from the star in the course of its evolution. The resulting violent interaction between the expanding supernova explosion and the cloud of circumstellar material can lead to an enormously bright visual display --- indeed, many of the brightest supernovae ever recorded are thought to arise from circumstellar interaction. In order to understand the properties of the progenitor star and the details of the circumstellar interaction, there is a need for theoretical models of interacting supernovae. These simulated computer spectra can be directly compared to the spectra observed by telescopes. These models allow us to probe the physical circumstances that underlie the observations. The spectra of interacting supernovae are dominated by strong, narrow emission lines of light elements such as hydrogen and helium. These narrow lines give Type IIn supernovae their designation. Similarly, objects of Type Ian, Ibn, Icn, and IIn are somewhat distinct, but are all defined by the narrow emission lines that result from the interaction of their expanding envelopes with their surroundings. The photosphere in these supernovae is formed in the material accreted during the coasting phase, and most of the luminosity has its origin from the conversion of kinetic explosion energy into luminosity. Both thermonuclear (Type Ia) and core-collapse (Types Ib/Ic and II) supernovae may be the inner engine. In fact, several Type IIn supernovae at early times have later been classified as Type Ia, Type Ib/c, or Type II as their spectra reveal more details about the nature of the central explosion. As a result of the dominance of the interaction

  13. Diagnostics of circumstellar grains in geometric models - I. Structure and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, J. H. P.; Greaves, J. S.

    2017-05-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of circumstellar dust has been extensively used to diagnose the sizes and compositions of dust grains. We show that variations of SED slope in the long-wavelength (submillimetre to radio) regime can be used to diagnose the gross physical nature (and hence origins) of the dust, using simple geometric models that complement the use of detailed simulations. We consider two dust grain types: (i) clustered aggregates of smaller particles (monomers) and (ii) composite grains comprising ferrous inclusions within a silicate matrix. These types are intended to be analogous to fluffy cometary particles and fragments of compacted asteroids, respectively. Our results indicate that clusters of silicate grains produce a smooth SED, while composite grains with FeS inclusions produce an SED that has a pronounced drop at a wavelength an order of magnitude larger than the grain size, and is flatter at long wavelengths. As a test case, we compare the model predictions to flux measurements of the TW Hydrae disc. This SED shows a drop that only occurs in our models of compacted grains with inclusions. Since the TW Hya discs span approximately 10-40 au in radius, fluffy particles from comets were perhaps expected, as in the Sun's Kuiper belt.

  14. Diagnostics of circumstellar grains in geometric models I: structure and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, J. H. P.; Greaves, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of circumstellar dust has been extensively used to diagnose the sizes and compositions of dust grains. We show that variations of SED slope in the long wavelength (submillimetre to radio) regime can be used to diagnose the gross physical nature (and hence origins) of the dust, using simple geometric models that complement the use of detailed simulations. We consider two dust grain types: (i) clustered aggregates of smaller particles (monomers), and (ii) composite grains comprising ferrous inclusions within a silicate matrix. These types are intended to be analogous to fluffy cometary particles and fragments of compacted asteroids, respectively. Our results indicate that clusters of silicate grains produce a smooth SED, while composite grains with FeS inclusions produce an SED that has a pronounced drop at a wavelength an order of magnitude larger than the grain size, and is flatter at long wavelengths. As a test case, we compare the model predictions to flux measurements of the TW Hydrae disc. This SED shows a drop that only occurs in our models of compacted grains with inclusions. Since the TW Hya discs spans approximately 10-40 AU in radius, fluffy particles from comets were perhaps expected, as in the Sun's Kuiper belt.

  15. Opacities for Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.; Yan, Y.; Mihalas, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1994-02-01

    We define stellar envelopes to be those regions of stellar interiors in which atoms exist and are not markedly perturbed by the plasma environment. Availability of accurate and extensive atomic data is a prime requirement for the calculation of envelope opacities. For envelopes we adopt the criterion of mass density p < 0.01 ρ≥g cm-3. We present radiative Rosseland mean opacities for envelopes obtained using atomic data calculated in an international collaboration referred to as the Opacity Project, or OP. Equations of state are calculated using an occupation-probability formalism. To a good approximation, ionization equilibria and level populations in envelopes depend only on the temperature T and electron density Ne and are insensitive to chemical mixtures. Monochromatic opacities for all abundant chemical elements are therefore calculated on a grid of (T, Ne) values and are archived. Rosseland mean opacities are then readily calculated for any chemical mixture. Tables of Rosseland means, for any required mixtures and as functions of ρ and T, are available on request in computer-readable form. The present, op, results are compared with those from another recent study, referred to as OPAL, by C. A. Iglesias and F. A. Rogers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The agreement between the OP and OPAL calculations is generally good, although there are some differences. Both calculations give results larger than those obtained in earlier work, by factors of up to 3 or more.

  16. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, R. L.

    2014-03-20

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F{sub mm}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 1.5--2.0} to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  17. A database of circumstellar OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, D.; Bunzel, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new database of circumstellar OH masers at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz in the Milky Way galaxy. The database (version 2.4) contains 13 655 observations and 2341 different stars detected in at least one transition. Detections at 1612 MHz are considered to be complete until the end of 2014 as long as they were published in refereed papers. Detections of the main lines (1665 and 1667 MHz) and non-detections in all transitions are included only if published after 1983. The database contains flux densities and velocities of the two strongest maser peaks, the expansion velocity of the shell, and the radial velocity of the star. Links are provided for about 100 stars (<5% of all stars with OH masers) to interferometric observations and monitoring programs of the maser emission published since their beginnings in the 1970s. Access to the database is possible over the Web (http://www.hs.uni-hamburg.de/maserdb), allowing cone searches for individual sources and lists of sources. A general search is possible in selected regions of the sky and by defining ranges of flux densities and/or velocities. Alternative ways to access the data are via the German Virtual Observatory and the CDS. The data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A68

  18. The circumstellar ring of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransson, Claes; Migotto, Katia; Larsson, Josefin; Pesce, Dominic; Challis, Peter; Chevalier, Roger A.; France, Kevin; Kirshner, Robert P.; Leibundgut, Bruno; Lundqvist, Peter; McCray, Richard; Spyromilio, Jason; Taddia, Francesco; Jerkstrand, Anders; Mattila, Seppo; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J. Craig; Crotts, Arlin; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben

    2016-06-01

    The circumstellar ring of supernova 1987A first became visible a few months after the explosion due to photoionisation by the supernova flash. From 1995 hotspots appeared in the ring and their brightness increased nearly exponentially as a result of interaction with the supernova blast wave. Imaging and spectroscopic observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope now show that both the shocked and the unshocked emission components from the ring have been decreasing since ~ 2009. In addition, the most recent images reveal the brightening of new spots outside the ring. These observations indicate that the hotspots are being dissolved by the shocks and that the blast wave is now expanding and interacting with dense clumps beyond the ring. Based on the currently observed decay we predict that the ring will be destroyed by ~ 2025, while the blast wave will reveal the distribution of gas as it expands outside the ring, thus tracing the mass-loss history of the supernova progenitor.

  19. Circumstellar features in hot DA white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, N. P.; Barstow, M. A.; Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.

    2003-05-01

    We present a phenomenological study of highly ionized, non-photospheric absorption features in high spectral resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectra of 23 hot DA white dwarfs. Prior to this study, four of the survey objects (Feige 24, REJ 0457-281, G191-B2B and REJ 1614-085) were known to possess these features. We find four new objects with multiple components in one or more of the principal resonance lines: REJ 1738+665, Ton 021, REJ 0558-373 and WD 2218+706. A fifth object, REJ 2156-546, also shows some evidence of multiple components, though further observations are required to confirm the detection. We discuss possible origins for these features including ionization of the local interstellar environment, the presence of material inside the gravitational well of the white dwarf, mass loss in a stellar wind and the existence of material in an ancient planetary nebula around the star. We propose ionization of the local interstellar medium as the origin of these features in G191-B2B and REJ 1738+665, and demonstrate the need for higher-resolution spectroscopy of the sample, to detect multiple interstellar medium velocity components and to identify circumstellar features that may lie close to the photospheric velocity.

  20. TEM studies of a circumstellar rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1992-01-01

    Reported here is the discovery of crystals of titanium carbide in a grain of silicon carbide which formed as a circumstellar dust particle in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star. Just as in the case of terrestrial rocks, whose assemblage of minerals gives us clues to the composition and conditions of the environment in which they formed, the titanium carbide crystals and their textural relationship to the silicon carbide give us important clues to the nature of the stellar atmosphere in which they formed. From microscopic studies of the relationships between the atomic planes of the silicon carbide and the titanium carbide, we can show that the titanium carbide cannot have existed as already-formed crystals in a gas around which silicon carbide subsequently condensed. An alternative possibility is that both minerals grew quickly and simultaneously from condensing gas in the rapidly cooling and expanding stellar atmosphere. Other microscopic features of the silicon carbide, such as abundant atomic layer disorder and crystal twinning, similarly suggest rapid grain growth. However, another possibility is that the titanium carbide grew inside of the silicon carbide by diffusion of titanium atoms. Our calculations suggest that this scenario is less likely, given the relatively short times (a year or less) for which stellar condensates can be expected to be exposed to temperatures high enough to make diffusion sufficiently rapid.

  1. TEM studies of a circumstellar rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1992-01-01

    Reported here is the discovery of crystals of titanium carbide in a grain of silicon carbide which formed as a circumstellar dust particle in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star. Just as in the case of terrestrial rocks, whose assemblage of minerals gives us clues to the composition and conditions of the environment in which they formed, the titanium carbide crystals and their textural relationship to the silicon carbide give us important clues to the nature of the stellar atmosphere in which they formed. From microscopic studies of the relationships between the atomic planes of the silicon carbide and the titanium carbide, we can show that the titanium carbide cannot have existed as already-formed crystals in a gas around which silicon carbide subsequently condensed. An alternative possibility is that both minerals grew quickly and simultaneously from condensing gas in the rapidly cooling and expanding stellar atmosphere. Other microscopic features of the silicon carbide, such as abundant atomic layer disorder and crystal twinning, similarly suggest rapid grain growth. However, another possibility is that the titanium carbide grew inside of the silicon carbide by diffusion of titanium atoms. Our calculations suggest that this scenario is less likely, given the relatively short times (a year or less) for which stellar condensates can be expected to be exposed to temperatures high enough to make diffusion sufficiently rapid.

  2. Circumstellar Hydrodynamics and Spectral Radiation in ALGOLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Dirk Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Algols are the remnants of binary systems that have undergone large scale mass transfer. This dissertation presents the results of the coupling of a hydrodynamical model and a radiative model of the flow of gas from the inner Lagrangian point. The hydrodynamical model is a fully Lagrangian, three-dimensional scheme with a novel treatment of viscosity and an implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method to compute pressure gradients. Viscosity is implemented by allowing particles within a specified interaction length to share momentum. The hydrodynamical model includes a provision for computing the self-gravity of the disk material, although it is not used in the present application to Algols. Hydrogen line profiles and equivalent widths computed with a code by Drake and Ulrich are compared with observations of both short and long period Algols. More sophisticated radiative transfer computations are done with the escape probability code of Ko and Kallman which includes the spectral lines of thirteen elements. The locations and velocities of the gas particles, and the viscous heating from the hydro program are supplied to the radiative transfer program, which computes the equilibrium temperature of the gas and generates its emission spectrum. Intrinsic line profiles are assumed to be delta functions and are properly Doppler shifted and summed for gas particles that are not eclipsed by either star. Polarization curves are computed by combining the hydro program with the Wilson-Liou polarization program. Although the results are preliminary, they show that polarization observations show great promise for studying circumstellar matter.

  3. An MCMC Circumstellar Disks Modeling Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Schuyler; Perrin, Marshall D.; Mazoyer, Johan; Choquet, Elodie; Soummer, Remi; Ren, Bin; Pueyo, Laurent; Debes, John H.; Duchene, Gaspard; Pinte, Christophe; Menard, Francois

    2016-01-01

    We present an enhanced software framework for the Monte Carlo Markov Chain modeling of circumstellar disk observations, including spectral energy distributions and multi wavelength images from a variety of instruments (e.g. GPI, NICI, HST, WFIRST). The goal is to self-consistently and simultaneously fit a wide variety of observables in order to place constraints on the physical properties of a given disk, while also rigorously assessing the uncertainties in the derived properties. This modular code is designed to work with a collection of existing modeling tools, ranging from simple scripts to define the geometry for optically thin debris disks, to full radiative transfer modeling of complex grain structures in protoplanetary disks (using the MCFOST radiative transfer modeling code). The MCMC chain relies on direct chi squared comparison of model images/spectra to observations. We will include a discussion of how best to weight different observations in the modeling of a single disk and how to incorporate forward modeling from PCA PSF subtraction techniques. The code is open source, python, and available from github. Results for several disks at various evolutionary stages will be discussed.

  4. The close circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse. II. Diffraction-limited spectro-imaging from 7.76 to 19.50 μm with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Ridgway, S. T.; Cami, J.; Haubois, X.; Verhoelst, T.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Mass-loss occurring in red supergiants (RSGs) is a major contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in dust and molecules. The physical mechanism of this mass loss is however relatively poorly known. Betelgeuse is the nearest RSG, and as such a prime object for high angular resolution observations of its surface (by interferometry) and close circumstellar environment. Aims: The goal of our program is to understand how the material expelled from Betelgeuse is transported from its surface to the interstellar medium, and how it evolves chemically in this process. Methods: We obtained diffraction-limited images of Betelgeuse and a calibrator (Aldebaran) in six filters in the N band (7.76 to 12.81 μm) and two filters in the Q band (17.65 and 19.50 μm), using the VLT/VISIR instrument. Results: Our images show a bright, extended and complex circumstellar envelope at all wavelengths. It is particularly prominent longwards of ≈ 9-10 μm, pointing at the presence of O-rich dust, such as silicates or alumina. A partial circular shell is observed between 0.5 and 1.0″ from the star, and could correspond to the inner radius of the dust envelope. Several knots and filamentary structures are identified in the nebula. One of the knots, located at a distance of 0.9″ west of the star, is particularly bright and compact. Conclusions: The circumstellar envelope around Betelgeuse extends at least up to several tens of stellar radii. Its relatively high degree of clumpiness indicates an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the material lost by the star. Its extension corresponds to an important intermediate scale, where most of the dust is probably formed, between the hot and compact gaseous envelope observed previously in the near infrared and the interstellar medium. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory, under ESO DDT program 286.D-5007(A).

  5. Dippers and dusty disc edges: new diagnostics and comparison to model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodman, Eva H. L.; Quillen, Alice C.; Ansdell, Megan; Hippke, Michael; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Blackman, Eric G.; Rizzuto, Aaron; Kastner, Joel H.

    2017-09-01

    We revisit the nature of large dips in flux from extinction by dusty circumstellar material that is observed by Kepler for many young stars in the Upper Sco and ρ Oph star formation regions. These young, low-mass 'dipper' stars are known to have low accretion rates and primarily host moderately evolved dusty circumstellar discs. Young low-mass stars often exhibit rotating starspots that cause quasi-periodic photometric variations. We found no evidence for periods associated with the dips that are different from the starspot rotation period in spectrograms constructed from the light curves. The material causing the dips in most of these light curves must be approximately corotating with the star. We find that disc temperatures computed at the disc corotation radius are cool enough that dust should not sublime. Crude estimates for stellar magnetic field strengths and accretion rates are consistent with magnetospheric truncation near the corotation radius. Magnetospheric truncation models can explain why the dips are associated with material near corotation and how dusty material is lifted out of the mid-plane to obscure the star that would account for the large fraction of young low-mass stars that are dippers. We propose that variations in disc orientation angle, stellar magnetic field dipole tilt axis and disc accretion rate are underlying parameters accounting for differences in the dipper light curves.

  6. The circumstellar matter of supernova 2014J and the core-degenerate scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2015-06-01

    I show that the circumstellar matter (CSM) of the Type Ia supernova 2014J is too massive and its momentum too large to be accounted for by any but the core-degenerate (CD) scenario for Type Ia supernovae. Assuming the absorbing gas is of CSM origin, the several shells responsible of the absorption potassium lines are accounted for by a mass-loss episode from a massive asymptotic giant branch star during a common envelope phase with a white dwarf companion. The time-varying potassium lines can be accounted for by ionization of neutral potassium and the Na-from-dust absorption (NaDA) model. Before explosion, some of the potassium resides in the gas phase and some in dust. Weakening in absorption strength is caused by potassium-ionizing radiation of the supernova, while release of atomic potassium from dust increases the absorption. I conclude that if the absorbing gas originated from the progenitor of SN 2014J, then a common envelope phase took place about 15 000 yr ago, leading to the merging of the core with the white dwarf companion, i.e. the CD scenario. Else, the absorbing material is of interstellar medium origin.

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  8. SiS in Circumstellar Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Wootten, A.; Clegg, R. E. S.

    1985-07-01

    The author has observed the spectrum of SiS toward the Mira variable IRC+10216, and made a detailed model incorporating a radial SiS abundance gradient due to photodissociation by interstellar UV (Sahai, Wootten, and Clegg 1984). The sensitive search for SiS J = 7-6 and J = 6-5 lines in other carbon-rich, oxygen-rich, and S-type envelopes has revealed three new sources, CIT 6, CRL 2688 and IRC+20370, all of which are carbon-rich.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Circumstellar debris discs (Maldonado+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Eiroa, C.; Villaver, E.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.

    2015-09-01

    The high-resolution spectra used in this work come from several spectrographs and telescopes and have already been used in some of our previous works (Maldonado et al., 2010, Cat. J/A+A/521/A12, 2012, Cat. J/A+A/541/A40, 2013, Cat. J/A+A/554/A84; Martinez-Arnaiz et al., 2010, Cat. J/A+A/520/A79), which can be consulted for details concerning the observing runs and the reduction procedure. Summarising, the data were taken with the following instruments: i) FOCES at the 2.2-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA, Almeria, Spain); ii) SARG at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, 3.58m), La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain); iii) FIES at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT, 2.56m), La Palma; and iv) HERMES at the Mercator telescope (1.2m), also in La Palma. We used additional spectra from the public library "S4N" (Allende Prieto et al., 2004, Cat. J/A+A/420/183), which contains spectra taken with the 2d coude spectrograph at McDonald Observatory and the FEROS instrument at the ESO 1.52m telescope in La Silla; from the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility (http://archive.eso.org/cms/); and from the pipeline processed FEROS and HARPS data archive (http://archive.eso.org/wdb/wdb/eso/repro/form). (2 data files).

  10. Signatures of Planets in Circumstellar Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro-Martin, A.; Malhotra, R.

    2004-05-01

    In anticipation of Spitzer Space Telescope observations of unresolved debris disks, we are interested in studying how the structure carved by putative planets in circumstellar dust disks affects the shape of the disk's spectral energy distribution (SED), and consequently whether the disk SED can be used to infer the presence of planets. We use the Solar System Kuiper Belt dust disk as a case study to investigate the effects of giant planets on the dynamics of dust originating in an outer belt of planetesimals. Our main results are the following: (1) The trapping of dust particles in orbital resonances with the giant planets creates density structures in the dust disk. With present computational techniques, the equilibrium radial density distribution of dust can be accurately estimated, but the azimuthal structure is not predictable in detail because it depends sensitively on the times of residence in the various resonances; the latter are highly variable and unpredictable owing to the underlying strong chaotic dynamics. (2) The gravitational scattering of dust grains by massive planets launches a "wind'' of large dust grains that may contribute significantly to the clearing of cirumstellar debris in planetary systems; it may also significantly affect the particle size distribution of the local ISM of a planetary system. (3) The SED of a dust disk with embedded Solar-System-like planets is fundamentally different from that of one without planets, the former showing a significant decrease of the mid IR flux due to the clearing of dust from the inner 10 AU due to gravitational scattering by Jupiter and Saturn. We have calculated model SEDs (from 1 to 340 microns) and expected SPITZER colors, arising from different planetary systems consisting of an outer belt of planetesimals (similar to the Kuiper Belt) and a single planet with a mass of 1, 3 and 10 MJup and a semimajor axis of 1, 5 and 30 AU.

  11. Circumstellar Surroundings of Young Stellar Objectse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien

    1992-12-01

    The close surroundings of young low mass stars hold a multitude of physical phenomena related to star formation. This thesis presents a set of works on theoretical, experimental, and observational issues connected with these phenomena. After a description of the properties of T Tauri, FU Orionis and Ae/Be Herbig stars, with a particular emphasis on their accretion disks, I study the vertical structure of such disks which results from the radiative transfer and the hydrostatic equilibrium. The energy dissipation comes from both the viscous friction of disk particles accreting onto the star and from the absorption of the stellar radiation. A disk ``chromosphere'' is shown to result from the grazing stellar radiation. In the following I study the possibility of detecting directly the circumstellar features (disk, binarity, planets, jets,...) thanks to the high angular resolution techniques (adaptive optics and interferometry). I then present the prototype of a coronagraph at high spatial resolution that I designed, modelized, built and tested for that kind of observations. Finally I describe the observations of the young stellar system Z Canis Majoris, which I obtained at the diffraction limit of the 3.6 meter ESO telescope in the near infrared. This object is shown to be composed of a binary system in addition to an elongated disk-like structure perpendicular to the known jet and illuminated not by the central source but by the infrared companion. [A copy of this thesis (which is mostly in french) can be obtained in binary mode by ftp. There is a file 'these_malbet.tar' in the directory '/pub/publications/' at the FTP node 'gag.observ-gr.fr (IP 130.190.200.11)'. By doing 'tar -xvf these_malbet.tar', you create a directory 'these_malbet/' where there is a 'readme' which gives all information.

  12. The Circumstellar Environments of Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine

    The WFIRST-AFTA mission currently includes the provision for a high contrast imaging instrument with a primary goal of discovering new, low mass exoplanets and characterizing their atmospheres. To date, eight exoplanetary systems have been discovered via direct imaging using the current generation of ground-based high-contrast facilities. Five of those systems, including the iconic beta Pictoris and HR 8799 systems, possess infrared excesses, indicative of the presence of circumstellar dust. Detailed studies of dust and gas morphology in the beta Pictoris disk provided the impetus for searching for, and eventually imaging the planet. These studies further suggest that additional planets orbit the star, but are below current detection thresholds. Such systems will be prime targets for WFIRST-AFTA, which will obtain visual spectroscopy of several spectral features from molecules in the exoplanet atmospheres including CH4, H2O, and CO2. We propose to: (1) model the dust in exoplanetary systems with well characterized planets and infrared excesses to better constrain the dust geometry and particle properties; (2) generate synthetic WFIRST-AFTA images of these disks with embedded known and putative planets using point-spread-functions generated by JPL, and run our simulations though a WFIRST-AFTA pipeline; and (3) evaluate the sensitivity of WFIRST-AFTA to known and putative planets that have a range of masses and distances from their host stars. The proposed simulations will also assist the community in understanding how WFIRST-AFTA will contribute to our knowledge of debris disks and the role that minor bodies play in the delivery of water into the terrestrial planet zone. The proposed project is complementary to the efforts currently being carried out by the Science Definition Team (SDT), which focus on simulating planets embedded in tenuous disks, analogous to the Zodiacal dust system in our Solar System, the Earth s resonant dust ring, and the HR 4796 dust ring

  13. Disc-protoplanet interaction. Influence of circumprimary radiative discs on self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyergyovits, M.; Eggl, S.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Theis, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Context. More than 60 planets have been discovered so far in systems that harbour two stars, some of which have binary semi-major axes as small as 20 au. It is well known that the formation of planets in such systems is strongly influenced by the stellar components, since the protoplanetary disc and the particles within are exposed to the gravitational influence of the binary. However, the question on how self-gravitating protoplanetary bodies affect the evolution of a radiative, circumprimary disc is still open. Aims: We present our 2D hydrodynamical GPU-CPU code and study the interaction of several thousands of self-gravitating particles with a viscous and radiative circumprimary disc within a binary star system. To our knowledge this program is the only one at the moment that is capable to handle this many particles and to calculate their influence on each other and on the disc. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a circumstellar disc assuming the binary system to be coplanar. Our grid-based staggered mesh code relies on ideas from ZEUS-2D, where we implemented the FARGO algorithm and an additional energy equation for the radiative cooling according to opacity tables. To treat particle motion we used a parallelised version of the precise Bulirsch - Stoer algorithm. Four models in total where computed taking into account (i) only N-body interaction; (ii) N-body and disc interaction; (iii) the influence of computational parameters (especially smoothing) on N-body interaction; and (iv) the influence of a quiet low-eccentricity disc while running model (ii). The impact velocities were measured at two different time intervals and were compared. Results: We show that the combination of disc- and N-body self-gravity can have a significant influence on the orbit evolution of roughly Moon sized protoplanets. Conclusions: Not only gas drag can alter the orbit of particles, but the gravitational influence of the disc can accomplish this as well. The results

  14. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    DOEpatents

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  15. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  16. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  17. The highly varying circumstellar debris disk of HD 183324

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Barry; Montgomery, Sharon Lynn

    2017-01-01

    The 140 Myr-old A0IV-type star HD 183324 possesses many of the same physical characteristics as the stars Beta Pictoris and 49 Ceti, whose circumstellar gas and dust disks are the two best-studied debris disk systems. Here, we compare spectral observations of HD 183324 collected (and archived) in 2009 and 2010 to similarly high-resolution spectral observations of HD 183324 that we collected in 2013. An inspection of these spectra (recorded at visible wavelengths) reveals a remarkably high level of variable circumstellar absorption activity around the star. Such behavior is typical of a stellar system in which gas and dust is being sporadically added to a circumstellar disk due to the evaporation of planetesimal-like objects (“exocomets”) as they fall towards the central star. We present spectral data that show levels of absorption variability of greater than 100% in both the circumstellar CaII-K (3933Å) and FeI (3860Å) line profiles as measured throughout the 5-year period of observations. Such high levels of circumstellar absorption variability may be indicative of an as-yet undetected exoplanet, whose gravitational forces are perturbing the planetesimals orbiting HD 183324.

  18. The Interaction of Supernovae with Their Circumstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippenko, Alex

    1995-07-01

    The interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with circumstellar material supplied by the wind of the evolved progenitor star can sometimes provide enough energy to sustain the SN luminosity for several decades. Existing observations of certain Type II SNe strongly favor such an interpretation over other possible late-time energy sources. Some peculiar SNe II have such dense circumstellar winds that interaction with the ejecta substantially alters their observed properties even at early times. The UV spectrum is a powerful diagnostic for probing the conditions in the shocked outer ejecta and circumstellar gas. We propose to observe two old SNe (t = 7- 15 years) which, due to their extensive radio and optical data records, are particularly well suited for an investigation of the interaction between ejecta and circumstellar gas. We will also observe one of the most recent SNe II (SN 1994Y), which shows strong evidence for very early interaction with its circumstellar medium. The fluxes and intensity ratios of UV emission lines measured in FOS spectra will be used to test theoretical models of the interaction. HST observations of these objects will shed light on differences among them and their shocks, as well as on the mass-loss histories of their progenitor stars.

  19. The structure of protoplanetary discs around evolving young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Lambrechts, Michiel; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The formation of planets with gaseous envelopes takes place in protoplanetary accretion discs on time scales of several million years. Small dust particles stick to each other to form pebbles, pebbles concentrate in the turbulent flow to form planetesimals and planetary embryos and grow to planets, which undergo substantial radial migration. All these processes are influenced by the underlying structure of the protoplanetary disc, specifically the profiles of temperature, gas scale height, and density. The commonly used disc structure of the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) is a simple power law in all these quantities. However, protoplanetary disc models with both viscous and stellar heating show several bumps and dips in temperature, scale height, and density caused by transitions in opacity, which are missing in the MMSN model. These play an important role in the formation of planets, since they can act as sweet spots for forming planetesimals via the streaming instability and affect the direction and magnitude of type-I migration. We present 2D simulations of accretion discs that feature radiative cooling and viscous and stellar heating, and they are linked to the observed evolutionary stages of protoplanetary discs and their host stars. These models allow us to identify preferred planetesimal and planet formation regions in the protoplanetary disc as a function of the disc's metallicity, accretion rate, and lifetime. We derive simple fitting formulae that feature all structural characteristics of protoplanetary discs during the evolution of several Myr. These fits are straightforward for applying to modelling any growth stage of planets where detailed knowledge of the underlying disc structure is required. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Modelling the circumstellar medium in RS Ophiuchi and its link to Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Mohamed, S.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interpretations of narrow, variable absorption lines detected in some Type Ia supernovae suggest that their progenitors are surrounded by dense, circumstellar material. Similar variations detected in the symbiotic recurrent nova system RS Oph, which undergoes thermonuclear outbursts every 20 years, making it an ideal candidate to investigate the origin of these lines. To this end, we present simulations of multiple mass transfer-nova cycles in RS Oph. We find that the quiescent mass transfer produces a dense, equatorial outflow, i.e. concentrated towards the binary orbital plane, and an accretion disc forms around the white dwarf. The interaction of a spherical nova outburst with these aspherical circumstellar structures produces a bipolar outflow, similar to that seen in Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the 2006 outburst. In order to produce an ionization structure that is consistent with observations, a mass-loss rate of 5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1 from the red giant is required. The simulations also produce a polar accretion flow, which may explain the broad wings of the quiescent H line and hard X-rays. By comparing simulated absorption line profiles to observations of the 2006 outburst, we are able to determine which components arise in the wind and which are due to the novae. We explore the possible behaviour of absorption line profiles as they may appear should a supernova occur in a system like RS Oph. Our models show similarities to supernovae like SN 2006X, but require a high mass-loss rate, dot{M} ˜ 10^{-6}-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, to explain the variability in SN 2006X.

  1. ALMA Observations of a Young Disc in Corona Australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Brinch, C.; Haugbolle, T.; Bergin, E. A.; Harsono, D.; Persson, M. V.; Visser, R.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present high-resolution ALMA observations towards the deeply embedded young stellar object IRS7B. This protostar is heavily affected by external irradiation from the nearby Herbig Be star R CrA. We identify a young Keplerian disc around IRS7B, and find that the inner envelope shows only faint CH3OH line emission. This can either be explained by the irradiation history of the source, which may affect the chemistry in the region, or it is a result of the very young protoplanetary disc.

  2. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Winds and Circumstellar Environments of Hot and Cool Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2010-06-01

    We present modeling research work of the winds and circumstellar environments of a variety of prototypical hot and cool massive stars using advanced radiative-transfer calculations. This research aims at unraveling the detailed physics of various mass-loss mechanisms of luminous stars in the upper portion of the H-R diagram. Very recent 3D radiative-transfer calculations, combined with hydrodynamic simulations, show that radiatively-driven winds of OB supergiants are structured due to large-scale density and velocity fields caused by rotating bright spots at the stellar equator. The mass-loss rates computed from matching Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) in IUE observations of HD 64760 (B Ib) do not reveal appreciable changes from the rates of unstructured (smooth) wind models. Intermediate yellow supergiants (such as the yellow hypergiant ρ Cas, F-G Ia0), on the other hand, show prominent spectroscopic signatures of strongly increased mass-loss rates during episodic outbursts that cause dramatic changes of the stellar photospheric conditions. Long-term high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring of cool hypergiants near the Yellow Evolutionary Void reveals that their mass-loss rates and wind-structure are dominated by photospheric eruptions and large-amplitude pulsations that impart mechanical momentum to the circumstellar environment by propagating acoustic (shock) waves. In massive red supergiants, however, clear evidence for mechanical wave propagation from the sub-photospheric convection zones is lacking, despite their frequently observed spectroscopic and photometric variability. Recent spatially resolved HST-STIS observations inside Betelgeuse's (M Iab) very extended chromosphere and dust envelope show evidence of warm chromospheric gas far beyond the dust-condensation radius of radiative-transfer models. Models for these long-term spectroscopic observations demonstrate that the chromospheric pulsations are not spherically symmetric. The STIS observations

  3. Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium - IV. Transitional Type Ibn supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Brown, P. J.; Tsvetkov, D. Y.; Inserra, C.; Taubenberger, S.; Tomasella, L.; Fraser, M.; Rich, D. J.; Botticella, M. T.; Bufano, F.; Cappellaro, E.; Ergon, M.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Harutyunyan, A.; Huang, F.; Kotak, R.; Lipunov, V. M.; Magill, L.; Miluzio, M.; Morrell, N.; Ochner, P.; Smartt, S. J.; Sollerman, J.; Spiro, S.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wang, X.; Wright, D. E.; Yurkov, V. V.; Zampieri, L.; Zhang, T.

    2015-05-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared data of the Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) 2010al and 2011hw. SN 2010al reaches an absolute magnitude at peak of MR = -18.86 ± 0.21. Its early light curve shows similarities with normal SNe Ib, with a rise to maximum slower than most SNe Ibn. The spectra are dominated by a blue continuum at early stages, with narrow P-Cygni He I lines indicating the presence of a slow-moving, He-rich circumstellar medium. At later epochs, the spectra well match those of the prototypical SN Ibn 2006jc, although the broader lines suggest that a significant amount of He was still present in the stellar envelope at the time of the explosion. SN 2011hw is somewhat different. It was discovered after the first maximum, but the light curve shows a double peak. The absolute magnitude at discovery is similar to that of the second peak (MR = -18.59 ± 0.25), and slightly fainter than the average of SNe Ibn. Though the spectra of SN 2011hw are similar to those of SN 2006jc, coronal lines and narrow Balmer lines are clearly detected. This indicates substantial interaction of the SN ejecta with He-rich, but not H-free, circumstellar material. The spectra of SN 2011hw suggest that it is a transitional SN Ibn/IIn event similar to SN 2005la. While for SN 2010al the spectrophotometric evolution favours a H-deprived Wolf-Rayet progenitor (of WN-type), we agree with the conclusion of Smith et al. that the precursor of SN 2011hw was likely in transition from a luminous blue variable to an early Wolf-Rayet (Ofpe/WN9) stage.

  4. Signatures of planets in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro-Martin, Maria Amaya

    2004-12-01

    Main sequence stars are commonly surrounded by debris disks, composed of cold dust continuously replenished by a reservoir of undetected dust-producing planetesimals. In the outer Solar System, Kuiper Belt (KB) objects produce dust by mutual or interstellar grain collisions. The orbital evolution of KB dust has been numerically modeled. Its equilibrium radial density distribution can be accurately estimated even though there are inherent uncertainties in the prediction of structure, owing to the chaotic dynamics of dust orbital evolution imposed by resonant gravitational perturbations of the planets. The particle size distribution of dust is greatly changed from the distribution at production, as a result of radiation forces and the perturbations of the planets. The contribution of KB dust to the population of interplanetary dust particles collected at Earth may be as low as a few percent. Gravitational scattering by giant planets creates an outflow of large grains. We quantify the characteristics of this large-particle outflow in different planetary architectures, discuss its implications for exo-planetary debris disks, and for the interpretation of in-situ dust detection experiments in space probes traveling in the outer Solar System. These outflows may contribute to the clearing of circumstellar debris in planetary systems, affecting the particle size distribution of their local ISM. In anticipation of future observations of unresolved debris disks with Spitzer , we are interested in studying how the structure carved by planets affects the shape of the disk's spectral energy distribution (SED), and consequently if the SED can be used to infer the presence of planets. We numerically calculate the equilibrium spatial density distributions and SEDs of dust disks originated by an outer belt of planetesimals (35-50 AU) in the presence of different planetary configurations, and for a representative sample of chemical compositions. The dynamical models are needed to

  5. Shaping the pre-supernova circumstellar environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsberger, Gloria

    2009-07-01

    Recent discoveries of very luminous supernovae associated with luminous blue variable-type objects {LBV's} raise the interesting possibility that an LBV phase may be the prelude to core collapse. Alternatively, the LBV events may be occuring in binary systems where the LBV phase is reached by one of the stars shortly before its more evolved companion becomes a supernova. The Small Magellanic Cloud binary system HD 5980 is believed to consist precisely of such two objects: a massive hydrogen-poor Wolf-Rayet star in orbit around an even more massive variable star that recently underwent an LBV-type eruption. The wind velocity and the mass-loss rate of the LBV-component have changed remarkably over the past ˜40 years, providing a glimpse of the detailed information of how a binary LBV-type star may shape the circumstellar environment into which the eventual supernova ejecta will collide. One process that is shaping the CSM around HD 5980 is the interaction between the slow wind ejected during eruption and the fast wind that was subsequently ``turned on". In order to model the evolution of this interaction region, an accurate determination of the mass-loss rate and the wind velocity of HD 5980 is required. Because the optical emission lines are contaminated by other sources, only the P Cygni profiles observable in the UV spectral region provide unambiguous values for the current wind speed and mass-loss rate. In this proposal we are requesting 2 HST orbits to observe HD 5980 with STIS in order to obtain one FUV MAMA spectrum from which we will determine the current wind velocity and mass-loss rate of the LBV-type star. These data will also allow a more detailed analysis of the atmospheric structure of the LBV-type object in its quiescent state and, combined with ground-based observations, an analysis of the emission arising in the wind-wind collision region may be performed. Although HD5980 may be unique in our Galactic vicinity, it may be typical of massive star

  6. Laboratory Studies Of Circumstellar Carbonaceous Grain Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2014-06-01

    The study of the formation processes of dust is essential to understand the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar (IS) chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation processes of carbonaceous dust. We report the progress that was recently achieved in this domain using NASA Ames’ COSmIC facility (Contreras & Salama 2013, ApJS, 208, 6). PAHs are important chemical building blocks of IS dust. They are detected in IDPs and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs are an important, ubiquitous component of the ISM. The formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, we have performed laboratory experiments to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation, starting from the smallest hydrocarbon molecules into the formation of larger PAH and further into nanograins. Studies of IS dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include the atoms O, N, and S, have recently been performed in our laboratory using the COSmIC facility to provide conditions that simulate IS and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the COSmiC chamber through a pulsed discharge nozzle plasma source are detected and characterized with a cavity ringdown spectrometer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. Analysis of solid soot particles was also conducted using scanning electron microscopy at the UCSC/NASA Ames’ MACS facility. The SEM analysis of the deposition of soot from methane and acetylene precursors seeded in argon plasmas provide examples on the types of nanoparticles and micrograins that are produced in these gas mixtures under our experimental conditions. From these measurements, we derive information on

  7. D/H Fractionation in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, J. E.; Qi, C.; Blake, G. A.

    2000-12-01

    In recent years millimeter-wave interferometers have imaged the gas and dust surrounding over a dozen T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars (see Sargent 1996 in Disks and Outflows from Young Stars, pp. 1-23, for review). These studies demonstrate the potential to improve dramatically our understanding of disk physical and chemical structure, providing unique insights that will ultimately enable a more comprehensive understanding of star and planet formation. In particular, through the comparison of disk properties such as (D/H) fractionation with those of comets and Kuiper belt objects the origin of primitive solar system bodies can be investigated. In this study, 1.3 mm transitions of the deuterated species DCN and HDO were detected toward the T Tauri star LkCa 15 using the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Millimeter Array (for previous observations of various molecules toward LkCa 15 see Qi, PhD thesis, 2000). The resulting DCN abundance was compared to that found for HCN and H13CN. The measured intensity ratios of the (DCN/HCN) transitions lead to (D/H) ratios of <0.5, but are clearly influenced by opacity in the HCN 1-0 transition. Observations of the optically thin isotope H13CN, yield an estimated DCN/HCN ratio of ~ 0.01. This value is much larger than the estimated protosolar D/H of ~ 1.6e-5 (Gautier & Morel 1997 A&A 323, L9) and quite close to that observed in dark molecular clouds, 0.01-0.05 (Wooten 1987 Astrochem 120, 311), indicating that the assignment of cometary origin using D/H fractionation is a complicated endeavor. Through the combination of the observations presented here and chemical models of circumstellar material, the temperature dependence of fractionation and enrichment of deuterium through gas-grain surface reactions can be explored. Further, although H2O cannot be observed and thus HDO/H2O was not measured, differences in the morphology of maps of the observed emission from DCN and HDO may shed light on differences in fractionation seen in the

  8. Measurement of the sizes of circumstellar dust shells around evolved stars with high mass loss rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.; Knapp, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    The research supported by the NASA ADP contract NAG5-1153 has been completed. The attached paper, which will be submitted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal in January 1992, presents the results of this work. Here is a summary of the project and its results. A set of computer programs was developed to process the raw 60 micron and 100 micron IRAS survey data. The programs were designed to detect faint extended emission surrounding a bright unresolved source. Candidate objects were chosen from a list of red giant stars and young planetary nebulae which have been detected in millimeter/submillimeter lines of CO. Of the 279 stars examined, 55 were resolved at 60 microns. The principle results of the study are given. The average age for the shells surrounding the 9 Mira-type stars which are extended is 6 x 10(exp 4) yr. This suggests that the period during which these stars lose mass lasts for approx 10(exp 5) yr. The oldest shell found surrounds U Ori, and the youngest surrounds Mira itself. Some shells appear to be detached from the central star. This phenomenon is more common among older stars, suggesting that the mass loss becomes more episodic as the star sheds its envelope. Although all 8 stars less distant than 200 pc are resolved in the IRAS 60 micron data, 29 stars within 500 pc were not. These stars probably have younger circumstellar shells than those which were resolved. Almost all the carbon stars with distances of 500 pc or less have resolved shells, while only 1/2 of the oxygen-rich stars do. The resolved carbon star shells also are older on average than the oxygen-rich ones. These facts imply that carbon stars have been losing mass for a longer period, on average, than oxygen-rich red giants. Large circumstellar shells tend to be found at large distances from the galactic plane, confirming that the ISM density limits the size to which a dust shell can grow. Surprisingly, even very large shells seem to be nearly spherical, and do not appear to

  9. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants. II. The effects of pulsation and circumstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Höfner, S.; Lederer, M. T.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Red giant stars approaching the end of the evolutionary phase of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are, inter alia, characterised by (i) pulsations of the stellar interiors; and (ii) the development of dusty stellar winds. Therefore, such very evolved objects cannot be adequately described with hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres. Aims: By using self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres which simulate pulsation-enhanced dust-driven winds we studied in detail the influence of the above mentioned two effects on the spectral appearance of long period variables with carbon-rich atmospheric chemistry. While the pulsations lead to large-amplitude photometric variability, the dusty envelopes (resulting from the outflows which contain dust particles composed of amorphous carbon) cause pronounced circumstellar reddening. Methods: Based on one selected dynamical model which is representative of C-type Mira variables with intermediate mass loss rates, we calculated synthetic spectra and photometry for standard broad-band filters (Johnson-Cousins-Glass system) from the visual to the near-infrared. The synthetic photometry was subsequently compared with observational results. Results: Our modelling allows to investigate in detail the substantial effect of circumstellar dust on the resultant photometry. The pronounced absorption of amorphous carbon dust grains (increasing towards shorter wavelengths; Qabs/a ∝ λ - β with β ≈ 1), leads to colour indices which are significantly redder than the corresponding ones based on hydrostatic dust-free models. Only if we account for this circumstellar reddening we get synthetic colours that are comparable to observations of evolved AGB stars. The photometric variations of the dynamical model were compared to observed lightcurves of the C-type Mira RU Vir which appears to be quite similar to the model (although the model is not a dedicated fit). We found good agreement concerning the principal behaviour of the BVRIJHKL

  10. The circumstellar disk response to the motion of the host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regály, Zs.; Vorobyov, E.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Grid-based hydrodynamics simulations of circumstellar disks are often performed in the curvilinear coordinate system, in which the center of the computational domain coincides with the motionless star. However, the center of mass may be shifted from the star due to the presence of any non-axisymmetric mass distribution. As a result, the system exerts a non-zero gravity force on the star, causing the star to move in response, which can in turn affect the evolution of the circumstellar disk. Aims: We aim at studying the effects of stellar motion on the evolution of protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In protostellar disks, a non-axisymmetric distribution of matter in the form of spiral arms and/or massive clumps can form due to gravitational instability. Protoplanetary disks can also feature non-axisymmetric structures caused by an embedded high-mass planet or a large-scale vortex formed at viscosity transitions. Methods: We use 2D grid-based numerical hydrodynamic simulations to explore the effect of stellar motion. We adopt a non-inertial polar coordinate system centered on the star, in which the stellar motion is taken into account by calculating the indirect potential caused by the non-axisymmetric disk, a high-mass planet, or a large-scale vortex. We compare the results of numerical simulations with and without stellar motion. Results: We found that the stellar motion has a moderate effect on the evolution history and the mass accretion rate in protostellar disks, reducing somewhat the disk size and mass, while having a profound effect on the collapsing envelope, changing its inner shape from an initially axisymmetric to a non-axisymmetric configuration. Protoplanetary disk simulations show that the stellar motion slightly reduces the width of the gap opened by a high-mass planet, decreases the planet migration rate, and strengthens the large-scale vortices formed at the viscosity transition. Conclusions: We conclude that the inclusion of the

  11. Erosion of circumstellar particle disks by interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    1989-01-01

    Circumstellar particle disks appear to be a common phenomenon; however, their properties vary greatly. Models of the evolution of such systems focus on internal mechanisms such as interparticle collisions and Poynting-Robertson drag. Herein it is shown that 'sandblasting' by interstellar dust can be an important and even dominant contributor to the evolution of circumstellar particle disks. Stars spend up to about 3 percent of their main-sequence lifetimes within atomic clouds. Among an IRAS sample of 21 nearby main-sequence A stars, beta Pictoris has the brightest disk; it also possesses the smallest random velocity and therefore the slowest predicted erosion rate.

  12. Frozen Hydrocarbon Particles as Component of Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, Irakli

    2012-07-01

    New theoretical model of frozen hydrocarbon particles in the form of diamond core with PAHs ice mantle is presented. Formation process of such particles in the circumstellar environment is described. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence of circumstellar FHPs in fields of electromagnetic and corpuscular radiations of central star are considered. Luminescence emissions of nebula CED 201 are studied. Three emissions are identified as photoluminescence of frozen hydrocarbons and several features are ascribed to extended red emission. It is proposed that the dust component of CED 201 be regarded as a complex of frozen hydrocarbon particles.

  13. Sparse aperture masking interferometry survey of transitional discs. Search for substellar-mass companions and asymmetries in their parent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, M.; Kraus, S.; Kluska, J.; Monnier, J. D.; Ireland, M.; Aarnio, A.; Sitko, M. L.; Calvet, N.; Espaillat, C.; Wilner, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Transitional discs are a class of circumstellar discs around young stars with extensive clearing of dusty material within their inner regions on 10s of au scales. One of the primary candidates for this kind of clearing is the formation of planet(s) within the disc that then accrete or clear their immediate area as they migrate through the disc. Aims: The goal of this survey was to search for asymmetries in the brightness distribution around a selection of transitional disc targets. We then aimed to determine whether these asymmetries trace dynamically-induced structures in the disc or the gap-opening planets themselves. Methods: Our sample included eight transitional discs. Using the Keck/NIRC2 instrument we utilised the Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) interferometry technique to search for asymmetries indicative of ongoing planet formation. We searched for close-in companions using both model fitting and interferometric image reconstruction techniques. Using simulated data, we derived diagnostics that helped us to distinguish between point sources and extended asymmetric disc emission. In addition, we investigated the degeneracy between the contrast and separation that appear for marginally resolved companions. Results: We found FP Tau to contain a previously unseen disc wall, and DM Tau, LkHα330, and TW Hya to contain an asymmetric signal indicative of point source-like emission. We placed upper limits on the contrast of a companion in RXJ 1842.9-3532 and V2246 Oph. We ruled the asymmetry signal in RXJ 1615.3-3255 and V2062 Oph to be false positives. In the cases where our data indicated a potential companion we computed estimates for the value of McṀc and found values in the range of . Conclusions: We found significant asymmetries in four targets. Of these, three were consistent with companions. We resolved a previously unseen gap in the disc of FP Tau extending inwards from approximately 10 au. Based on observations made with the Keck observatory

  14. Holographic optical disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gan; An, Xin; Pu, Allen; Psaltis, Demetri; Mok, Fai H.

    1999-11-01

    The holographic disc is a high capacity, disk-based data storage device that can provide the performance for next generation mass data storage needs. With a projected capacity approaching 1 terabit on a single 12 cm platter, the holographic disc has the potential to become a highly efficient storage hardware for data warehousing applications. The high readout rate of holographic disc makes it especially suitable for generating multiple, high bandwidth data streams such as required for network server computers. Multimedia applications such as interactive video and HDTV can also potentially benefit from the high capacity and fast data access of holographic memory.

  15. Optically thick envelopes around ULXs powered by accreating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Ingram, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized neutron stars power at least some ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The accretion flow in these cases is interrupted at the magnetospheric radius and then reaches the surface of a neutron star following magnetic field lines. Accreting matter moving along magnetic field lines forms the accretion envelope around the central object. We show that, in case of high mass accretion rates ≳ 1019 g s-1 the envelope becomes closed and optically thick, which influences the dynamics of the accretion flow and the observational manifestation of the neutron star hidden behind the envelope. Particularly, the optically thick accretion envelope results in a multi-color black-body spectrum originating from the magnetospheric surface. The spectrum and photon energy flux vary with the viewing angle, which gives rise to pulsations characterized by high pulsed fraction and typically smooth pulse profiles. The reprocessing of radiation due to interaction with the envelope leads to the disappearance of cyclotron scattering features from the spectrum. We speculate that the super-orbital variability of ultra-luminous X-ray sources powered by accreting neutron stars can be attributed to precession of the neutron star due to interaction of magnetic dipole with the accretion disc.

  16. Optically thick envelopes around ULXs powered by accreating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Ingram, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Magnetized neutron stars power at least some ultraluminous X-ray sources. The accretion flow in these cases is interrupted at the magnetospheric radius and then reaches the surface of a neutron star following magnetic field lines. Accreting matter moving along magnetic field lines forms the accretion envelope around the central object. We show that in case of high-mass accretion rates ≳ 1019 g s-1 the envelope becomes closed and optically thick, which influences the dynamics of the accretion flow and the observational manifestation of the neutron star hidden behind the envelope. Particularly, the optically thick accretion envelope results in a multi-colour blackbody spectrum originating from the magnetospheric surface. The spectrum and photon energy flux vary with the viewing angle, which gives rise to pulsations characterized by high pulsed fraction and typically smooth pulse profiles. The reprocessing of radiation due to interaction with the envelope leads to the disappearance of cyclotron scattering features from the spectrum. We speculate that the super-orbital variability of ultraluminous X-ray sources powered by accreting neutron stars can be attributed to precession of the neutron star due to interaction of magnetic dipole with the accretion disc.

  17. Studies of circumstellar shells in AGB stars by multifrequency (sub)mm-VLBI observations of maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, F.; Desmurs, J. F.; Bujarrabal, V.; Baudry, A.; de Vicente, P.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Alcolea, J.; Diaz-Pulido, A.; Gómez, M.

    2017-03-01

    VLBI observations of maser emission are a basic tool to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around evolved stars, mainly around AGB and post-AGB stars. The maser lines of water and silicon monoxide are particularly intense. They provide us with high spatial resolution data on the very inner CSEs around AGB stars, including the pulsating layers previous to grain formation and outer regions where the fast expansion characteristic of such envelopes is already present. The analysis of the pumping mechanism of SiO masers and of the physical conditions in the emitting clumps requires accurate maps of the various lines, which show different excitation requirements. A large observational effort is being done to obtain (quasi-)simultaneous multiline data at the highest spatial resolution, using VLBI techniques, which makes possible to compare the relative distribution of the maser lines. We present the state-of-the-art in the field, and discuss preliminary results of SiO masers observed with the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) which provide a new view into the physics of these AGB envelopes. The participation of ALMA in these VLBI arrays will boost the study of these masers, at higher frequencies.

  18. Supernova spectra below strong circumstellar interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloudas, G.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Johansson, J.; Maeda, K.; Moriya, T. J.; Nordin, J.; Petrushevska, T.; Silverman, J. M.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Taddia, F.; Xu, D.

    2015-02-01

    We construct spectra of supernovae (SNe) interacting strongly with a circumstellar medium (CSM) by adding SN templates, a black-body continuum, and an emission-line spectrum. In a Monte Carlo simulation we vary a large number of parameters, such as the SN type, brightness and phase, the strength of the CSM interaction, the extinction, and the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of the observed spectrum. We generate more than 800 spectra, distribute them to ten different human classifiers, and study how the different simulation parameters affect the appearance of the spectra and their classification. The SNe IIn showing some structure over the continuum were characterized as "SNe IInS" to allow for a better quantification. We demonstrate that the flux ratio of the underlying SN to the continuum fV is the single most important parameter determining whether a spectrum can be classified correctly. Other parameters, such as extinction, S/N, and the width and strength of the emission lines, do not play a significant role. Thermonuclear SNe get progressively classified as Ia-CSM, IInS, and IIn as fV decreases. The transition between Ia-CSM and IInS occurs at fV ~ 0.2-0.3. It is therefore possible to determine that SNe Ia-CSM are found at the (un-extincted) magnitude range -19.5 >M> -21.6, in very good agreement with observations, and that the faintest SN IIn that can hide a SN Ia has M = -20.1. The literature sample of SNe Ia-CSM shows an association with 91T-like SNe Ia. Our experiment does not support that this association can be attributed to a luminosity bias (91T-like being brighter than normal events). We therefore conclude that this association has real physical origins and we propose that 91T-like explosions result from single degenerate progenitors that are responsible for the CSM. Despite the spectroscopic similarities between SNe Ibc and SNe Ia, the number of misclassifications between these types was very small in our simulation and mostly at low S/N. Combined with

  19. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... also disc replacements designed for use in the cervical spine (the neck). These devices have only been used ... of your spine increases the risk of significant injury during this type of spinal surgery. Back pain ...

  20. Chemical evolution of circumstellar matter around young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    van Dishoeck, E F; Blake, G A

    1995-01-01

    Recent observational studies of the chemical composition of circumstellar matter around both high- and low-mass young stellar objects are reviewed. The molecular abundances are found to be a strong function of evolutionary state, but not of system mass or luminosity. The data are discussed with reference to recent theoretical models.

  1. On the Classification of Infrared Spectra from Circumstellar Dust Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, G. C.; Little-Marenin, I. R.; Price, S. D.

    1996-01-01

    We present results from an ongoing effort to classify the infrared spectra produced by circumstellar dust shells. Earlier efforts concentrated on oxygen-rich dust shells from sources associated with the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Here, we describe the expansion of our classification to include S stars, supergiants, and carbon stars.

  2. The excess infrared emission of Herbig Ae/Be stars - Disks or envelopes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Kenyon, Scott J.; Calvet, Nuria

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that the near-IR emission in many Herbig Ae/Be stars arises in surrounding dusty envelopes, rather than circumstellar disks. It is shown that disks around Ae/Be stars are likely to remain optically thick at the required accretion rates. It is proposed that the IR excesses of many Ae/Be stars originate in surrounding dust nebulae instead of circumstellar disks. It is suggested that the near-IR emission of the envelope is enhanced by the same processes that produce anomalous strong continuum emission at temperatures of about 1000 K in reflection nebulae surrounding hot stars. This near-IR emission could be due to small grains transiently heated by UV photons. The dust envelopes could be associated with the primary star or a nearby companion star. Some Ae/Be stars show evidence for the 3.3-6.3-micron emission features seen in reflection nebulae around hot stars, which lends further support to this suggestion.

  3. Bryan total disc arthroplasty: a replacement disc for cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Total disc arthroplasty is a new option in the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Several types of cervical disc prostheses currently challenge the gold-standard discectomy and fusion procedures. This review describes the Bryan Cervical Disc System and presents the Bryan prosthesis, its indications, surgical technique, complications, and outcomes, as given in the literature. PMID:22915917

  4. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    pressure inside the disc from tens to hundred atmospheres. We simulated unsteady processes in massive circumstellar discs around YSO class O and I. In the computational experiments, we have shown that at a certain stage of its evolution the circumstellar discs of gas and solids produces local areas of high pressure. According to the classical heterogeneous catalysis, a wide range of organic and prebiotic compounds could have been synthesized in these areas. Can we capture these areas of high pressure synthesis in observation of circumstellar discs? Due to the small sizes of such areas they can be hardly ever resolved even with the modern telescopes such as ALMA. However, we can try to detect their signatures in the disc, since the gas of the disc keep the set of organic synthesis products. The idea is to define the signature of the process using laboratory experiments. Varying gas temperature and pressure in laboratory setup we can carry out the catalytic high pressure syntheses and specify the set of gaseous products. These sets of organic compounds observed in the discs may serve as indicators of the emergence of high-pressure areas of prebiotic chemistry. Thus, there is a special interest to the study of YSO class 0 and I by means of observational astronomy. For these objects, first data on the presence of individual organic compounds in massive hydrogen-helium component of the discs appear. The origin of the organic compounds that are associated with chemical reactions in the discs should be separated from the set of organic compounds of the initial molecular cloud.

  5. Interaction of Supernova Remnants with a Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.

    1995-12-01

    We are studying the interaction of supernova remnants (SNRs) with circumstellar shells, with an emphasis on Type II supernovae (SNe). These supernovae arise from massive progenitor stars (> 8 Msun), which lose mass during their lifetime, primarily in the form of a stellar wind. Often the stellar wind creates a circumstellar bubble surrounded by a dense shell. When the star explodes as a supernova, the resulting shock wave eventually collides with this dense shell. In a recent paper on SN 1987A (Chevalier & Dwarkadas, ApJL, 452, L45) we have shown that from the radio and X-ray emission, one can infer the presence of a high density region interior to the dense circumstellar shell. This can be explained as an HII region photoionized by the flux from the pre-supernova star. Using the Zeus code and assuming spherical symmetry, we have studied the dynamics of the shock wave interacting first with the HII region and then the circumstellar shell in SN 1987A. Collision with the HII region results in a significant deceleration of the shock wave, forming a high-density shocked region that grows with time, and is primarily responsible for the X-ray emission. X-ray emission from the reflected shock may begin to dominate when the forward shock hits the dense circumstellar shell and is considerably slowed down. Simulations are in progress with parameters suited to other remnants such as Cas A and W44. Radio and X-ray images of Cas A show a shell structure, which may result from interaction with a stellar bubble. W44 also shows a double-shell structure that may have been produced by a SN explosion inside a pre-existing wind bubble. The interaction is subject to instabilities that may give rise to filamentary structure.

  6. Dynamics of jets during the common-envelope phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Méndez, Enrique; López-Cámara, Diego; De Colle, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    Common envelope (CE) is an important phase in the evolution of many binary systems. Giant star/compact object interaction in binaries plays an important role in high-energy phenomena as well as in the evolution of their environment. Material accreted on to the compact object may form a disc and power a jet. We study analytically and through numerical simulations the interaction between the jet and the CE. We determine the conditions under which accreting material quenches the jet or allows it to propagate successfully, in which case even the envelope may be ejected. Close to the stellar core of the companion, the compact object accretes at a larger rate. A jet launched from this region needs a larger accretion-to-ejection efficiency to successfully propagate through the CE compared to a jet launched far from the stellar core, and is strongly deflected by the orbital motion. The energy deposited by the jet may be larger than the binding energy of the envelope. The jet can, thus, play a fundamental role in the CE evolution. We find that the energy dissipation of the jet into the CE may stop accretion on to the disc. We expect the jet to be intermittent, unless the energy deposited is large enough to lead to the unbinding of the outer layers of the CE. Given that the energy and duration of the jet are similar to those of ultralong gamma-ray bursts, we suggest this as a new channel to produce these events.

  7. Refrigerated cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    Loudon, John D.

    1976-11-16

    An elongated cryogenic envelope including an outer tube and an inner tube coaxially spaced within said inner tube so that the space therebetween forms a vacuum chamber for holding a vacuum. The inner and outer tubes are provided with means for expanding or contracting during thermal changes. A shield is located in the vacuum chamber intermediate the inner and outer tubes; and, a refrigeration tube for directing refrigeration to the shield is coiled about at least a portion of the inner tube within the vacuum chamber to permit the refrigeration tube to expand or contract along its length during thermal changes within said vacuum chamber.

  8. Carbonaceous molecules in the oxygen-rich circumstellar environment of binary post-AGB stars. C60 fullerenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, C.; Cami, J.; Bouwman, J.; Peeters, E.; Min, M.

    2011-12-01

    Context. The circumstellar environment of evolved stars is generally rich in molecular gas and dust. Typically, the entire environment is either oxygen-rich or carbon-rich, depending on the evolution of the central star. Aims: In this paper we discuss three evolved disc sources with evidence of atypical emission lines in their infrared spectra. The stars were taken from a larger sample of post-AGB binaries for which we have Spitzer infrared spectra, characterised by the presence of a stable oxygen-rich circumbinary disc. Our previous studies have shown that the infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources are dominated by silicate dust emission, often with an extremely high crystallinity fraction. However, the three sources described here are selected because they show a peculiar molecular chemistry. Methods: Using Spitzer infrared spectroscopy, we study in detail the peculiar mineralogy of the three sample stars. Using the observed emission features, we identify the different observed dust, molecular and gas species. Results: The infrared spectra show emission features due to various oxygen-rich dust components, as well as CO2 gas. All three sources show the strong infrared bands generally ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Furthermore, two sample sources show C60 fullerene bands. Conclusions: Even though the majority of post-AGB disc sources are dominated by silicate dust in their circumstellar environment, we do find evidence that, for some sources at least, additional processing must occur to explain the presence of large carbonaceous molecules. There is evidence that some of these sources are still oxygen-rich, which makes the detection of these molecules even more surprising. This research has made use of the SIMBAD database, operated at CDS, Strasbourg, France. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope (program id 3274, 50092), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract

  9. Setting the stage for circumstellar interaction in core-collapse supernovae. II. Wave-driven mass loss in supernova progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shiode, Joshua H.; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) powered by interaction with circumstellar material provide evidence for intense stellar mass loss during the final years before core collapse. We have argued that during and after core neon burning, internal gravity waves excited by core convection can tap into the core fusion power and transport a super-Eddington energy flux out to the stellar envelope, potentially unbinding ∼1 solar mass of material. In this work, we explore the internal conditions of SN progenitors using the MESA one-dimensional stellar evolution code in search of those most susceptible to wave-driven mass loss. We focus on simple, order of magnitude considerations applicable to a wide range of progenitors. Wave-driven mass loss during core neon and oxygen fusion happens preferentially in either lower mass (∼20 solar mass zero-age main sequence) stars or massive, sub-solar metallicity stars. Roughly 20% of the SN progenitors we survey can excite 10{sup 46-48} erg of energy in waves that can potentially drive mass loss within a few months to a decade of core collapse. This energy can generate circumstellar environments with 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses reaching 100 AU before explosion. We predict a correlation between the energy associated with pre-SN mass ejection and the time to core collapse, with the most intense mass loss preferentially occurring closer to core collapse. During silicon burning, wave energy may inflate 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses of the envelope to 10-100 s of solar radii. This suggests that some nominally compact SN progenitors (Type Ibc progenitors) will have a significantly different SN shock breakout signature than traditionally assumed.

  10. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Ch.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme, the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a previous study, we assumed that the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust are independent power laws. There, several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested after exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, which are the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in the first paper are physically reasonable and can reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120 au in a narrow planetesimal belt and is transported inwards by Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag. Good agreement with the observed radial profiles would require stellar winds by about an order of magnitude stronger than the solar value, which is not confirmed - although not ruled out - by observations. Another model consists of two spatially separated planetesimal belts, a warm inner and a cold outer one. This scenario would probably imply the presence of planets clearing the gap between the two components. Finally, we show qualitatively that the observations can be explained by assuming the dust is produced in a single, but broad planetesimal disc with a surface density of solids rising outwards, as expected for an extended disc that experiences a natural inside-out collisional depletion. Prospects of distinguishing between the competing scenarios by future observations are discussed.

  11. Herschel/HIFI observations of the circumstellar ammonia lines in IRC+10216.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M R; He, J H; Szczerba, R; Bujarrabal, V; Alcolea, J; Cernicharo, J; Decin, L; Justtanont, K; Teyssier, D; Menten, K M; Neufeld, D A; Olofsson, H; Planesas, P; Marston, A P; Sobolev, A M; de Koter, A; Schöier, F L

    2016-08-01

    A discrepancy exists between the abundance of ammonia (NH3) derived previously for the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of IRC+10216 from far-IR submillimeter rotational lines and that inferred from radio inversion or mid-infrared (MIR) absorption transitions. To address the discrepancy described above, new high-resolution far-infrared (FIR) observations of both ortho- and para-NH3 transitions toward IRC+10216 were obtained with Herschel, with the goal of determining the ammonia abundance and constraining the distribution of NH3 in the envelope of IRC+10216. We used the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board Herschel to observe all rotational transitions up to the J = 3 level (three ortho- and six para-NH3 lines). We conducted non-LTE multilevel radiative transfer modelling, including the effects of near-infrared (NIR) radiative pumping through vibrational transitions. The computed emission line profiles are compared with the new HIFI data, the radio inversion transitions, and the MIR absorption lines in the ν2 band taken from the literature. We found that NIR pumping is of key importance for understanding the excitation of rotational levels of NH3. The derived NH3 abundances relative to molecular hydrogen were (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-8) for ortho-NH3 and [Formula: see text] for para-NH3, consistent with an ortho/para ratio of 1. These values are in a rough agreement with abundances derived from the inversion transitions, as well as with the total abundance of NH3 inferred from the MIR absorption lines. To explain the observed rotational transitions, ammonia must be formed near to the central star at a radius close to the end of the wind acceleration region, but no larger than about 20 stellar radii (1σ confidence level).

  12. Herschel/HIFI⋆ observations of the circumstellar ammonia lines in IRC+10216

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. R.; He, J. H.; Szczerba, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Justtanont, K.; Teyssier, D.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Olofsson, H.; Planesas, P.; Marston, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.; de Koter, A.; Schöier, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Context A discrepancy exists between the abundance of ammonia (NH3) derived previously for the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of IRC+10216 from far-IR submillimeter rotational lines and that inferred from radio inversion or mid-infrared (MIR) absorption transitions. Aims To address the discrepancy described above, new high-resolution far-infrared (FIR) observations of both ortho- and para-NH3 transitions toward IRC+10216 were obtained with Herschel, with the goal of determining the ammonia abundance and constraining the distribution of NH3 in the envelope of IRC+10216. Methods We used the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board Herschel to observe all rotational transitions up to the J = 3 level (three ortho- and six para-NH3 lines). We conducted non-LTE multilevel radiative transfer modelling, including the effects of near-infrared (NIR) radiative pumping through vibrational transitions. The computed emission line profiles are compared with the new HIFI data, the radio inversion transitions, and the MIR absorption lines in the ν2 band taken from the literature. Results We found that NIR pumping is of key importance for understanding the excitation of rotational levels of NH3. The derived NH3 abundances relative to molecular hydrogen were (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10−8 for ortho-NH3 and (3.2−0.6+0.7)×10−8 for para-NH3, consistent with an ortho/para ratio of 1. These values are in a rough agreement with abundances derived from the inversion transitions, as well as with the total abundance of NH3 inferred from the MIR absorption lines. To explain the observed rotational transitions, ammonia must be formed near to the central star at a radius close to the end of the wind acceleration region, but no larger than about 20 stellar radii (1σ confidence level). PMID:28065983

  13. Circumstellar Dust Shells: Clues to the Evolution of R Coronae Borealis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.

    2016-06-01

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are an exotic group of extremely hydrogen- deficient, carbon-rich supergiants that are known for their spectacular declines in brightness (up to 8 mags) at irregular intervals. Two scenarios are currently competing to explain the origins of these stars. One suggests that RCB stars are the products after a binary white dwarf (WD) system merges. The other takes a single, evolved star and has it undergo a final, helium-shell flash (FF) and becoming a cool giant. Recently, observations of elemental abundances in RCB stars have strongly swung the argument in favor of the WD merger model. The FF scenario has maintained its relevancy by seemingly being the only model able to offer a suitable explanation for one RCB feature that merger model has historically struggled with explaining: the presence of cold, circumstellar dust envelopes which might be fossil planetary nebulae (PNe). In reality, the shells could actually be fossil PNe, material left over from the WD merger, or mass lost during the RCB phase, itself. I will present the results of my dissertation, which is to try and discern the nature and history of the far-IR dust shells around RCB stars to help understand the origin of these enigmatic stars. I will discuss our efforts to determine the mass, size, temperature, and morphology of these diffuse structures surrounding a sample of RCB stars using multi-wavelength observations ranging from the ultraviolet to the submillimeter. These observations have provided unprecedented wavelength coverage for both the central stars and their CSM. They have been examined by eye for morphology and have been used in the construction of maximum-light spectral energy distributions (SEDs). I will present the results of our Monte Carlo radiative transfer of the maximum-light SEDs. Finally, I will highlight our work investigating the HI abundance of the envelope of R Coronae Borealis, itself, using archival 21—cm observations from the Arecibo

  14. H12CN and H13CN excitation analysis in the circumstellar outflow of R Sculptoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, M.; Maercker, M.; De Beck, E.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Olofsson, H.; Danilovich, T.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The 12CO/13CO isotopologue ratio in the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars has been extensively used as the tracer of the photospheric 12C/13C ratio. However, spatially-resolved ALMA observations of R Scl, a carbon rich AGB star, have shown that the 12CO/13CO ratio is not consistent over the entire CSE. Hence, it can not necessarily be used as a tracer of the 12C/13C ratio. The most likely hypothesis to explain the observed discrepancy between the 12CO/13CO and 12C/13C ratios is CO isotopologue selective photodissociation by UV radiation. Unlike the CO isotopologue ratio, the HCN isotopologue ratio is not affected by UV radiation. Therefore, HCN isotopologue ratios can be used as the tracer of the atomic C ratio in UV irradiated regions. Aims: We aim to present ALMA observations of H13CN(4-3) and APEX observations of H12CN(2-1), H13CN(2-1, 3-2) towards R Scl. These new data, combined with previously published observations, are used to determine abundances, ratio, and the sizes of line-emitting regions of the aforementioned HCN isotopologues. Methods: We have performed a detailed non-LTE excitation analysis of circumstellar H12CN(J = 1-0, 2-1, 3-2, 4-3) and H13CN(J = 2-1, 3-2, 4-3) line emission around R Scl using a radiative transfer code based on the accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method. The spatial extent of the molecular distribution for both isotopologues is constrained based on the spatially resolved H13CN(4-3) ALMA observations. Results: We find fractional abundances of H12CN/H2 = (5.0 ± 2.0) × 10-5 and H13CN/H2 = (1.9 ± 0.4) × 10-6 in the inner wind (r ≤ (2.0 ± 0.25) ×1015 cm) of R Scl. The derived circumstellar isotopologue ratio of H12CN/H13CN = 26.3 ± 11.9 is consistent with the photospheric ratio of 12C/13C 19 ± 6. Conclusions: We show that the circumstellar H12CN/H13CN ratio traces the photospheric 12C/13C ratio. Hence, contrary to the 12CO/13CO ratio, the H12CN/H13CN ratio is not affected by UV

  15. Simulation of random envelope processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    Efficient and practical methods of simulating stationary and nonstationary random envelope processes are presented. The stationary envelope processes are simulated by using the fast Fourier transform while the nonstationary envelope processes are simulated as the square root of the sum of a series of cosine functions and a series of sine functions with random phase angles. Typical applications of the envelope simulation are the simulations of peaks and troughs which play an important role in the analyses of the first excursion probability, fatigue and crack propagation. In particular, applications to the crack propagation under random loadings are demonstrated in detail.

  16. Exploring the multifaceted circumstellar environment of the luminous blue variable HR Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cavallaro, F.; Cerrigone, L.; Agliozzo, C.; Bufano, F.; Riggi, S.; Molinari, S.; Schillirò, F.

    2017-03-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic luminous blue variable HR Carinae, based on new high-resolution mid-infrared (IR) and radio images obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), which have been complemented by far-infrared Herschel-Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations and ATCA archive data. The Herschel images reveal the large-scale distribution of the dusty emitting nebula, which extends mainly to the north-east direction, up to 70 arcsec from the central star, and is oriented along the direction of the space motion of the star. In the mid-infrared images, the brightness distribution is characterized by two arc-shaped structures, tracing an inner envelope surrounding the central star more closely. At radio wavelengths, the ionized gas emission lies on the opposite side of the cold dust with respect to the position of the star, as if the ionized front were confined by the surrounding medium in the north-south direction. Comparison with previous data indicates significant changes in the radio nebula morphology and in the mass-loss rate from the central star, which has increased from 6.1 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 in 1994-1995 to 1.17 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 in 2014. We investigate possible scenarios that could have generated the complex circumstellar environment revealed by our multiwavelength data.

  17. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov

    2013-09-15

    The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

  18. The first velocity space image of a planetary debris disc orbiting a white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manser, Christopher James

    2015-12-01

    Since the first ESS meeting, dusty debris discs at white dwarfs have been firmly established as signposts of evolved planetary systems. We have identified a small number of systems where the circumstellar dust is accompanied by gas. The emission lines from these gaseous components are tracers of dynamic activity in these remnant planetary environments, and provide unparalleled insight into the formation and evolution of the debris discs, and into the properties of the parent planetesimals.Here we present the twelve years of spectroscopy of the prototypical gas disc at SDSS J1228+1040, revealing a spectacular long-term evolution in the morphology of the emission line profiles. Using Doppler tomography, we constructed an image of the gaseous disc in velocity space, and show that the observations are consistent with the precession of a fixed intensity pattern on a period of 27 ± 3 years. We speculate that the underlying cause of this dynamical activity is either a young, not fully circularised disc, or a perturbation of a previously stable and quiescent disc.

  19. The origin of thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    Thick discs are defined to be disc-like components with a scale height larger than that of the classical discs. They are ubiquitous (Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006; Comerón et al. 2011a), they are made of mostly old and metal-poor stars and are most easily detected in close to edge-on galaxies. Their origin has been considered mysterious and several formation theories have been proposed: • The thick disc being formed secularly by thin disc stars heated by disc overdensities such as giant molecular clouds or spiral arms (Villumsen 1985, ApJ, 290, 75) and by stars moved outwards from their original orbits by radial migration mechanisms (Schönrich & Binney 2009). • The thick disc being formed by the heating of the thin disc by satellites (Quinn et al. 1993) and the tidal stripping of them (Abadi et al. 2003). • The thick disc being formed fast and already thick at high redshift in an highly unstable disc. Inside that thick disc, a thin disc would form afterwards as suggested by Elemgreen & Elmegreen (2006). • The thick disc being formed originally thick at high redshift by the merger of gas-rich protogalactic fragments and a thin disc forming afterwards within it (Brook et al. 2007). The first mechanism is a secular evolution mechanism. The time-scale of the second one is dependent on the merger history of the main galaxy. In the two last mechanisms, the thick disc forms already thick in a short time-scale at high redshift. Recent Milky Way studies, (see, e.g., Bovy et al. 2012), have shown indications that there is no discontinuity between the thin and the thick disc chemical and kinematic properties. Instead, those studies indicate the presence of a monotonic distribution of disc thicknesses. This would suggest a secular origin for the Milky Way thick disc. Studies in external galaxies (Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006; Comerón et al. 2011b), have shown that low-mass disc galaxies have thick disc relative masses much larger than those found in large-mass galaxies

  20. Kozai-Lidov disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2017-08-01

    Recent results by Martin et al. showed in 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that tilted discs in binary systems can be unstable to the development of global, damped Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations in which the discs exchange tilt for eccentricity. We investigate the linear stability of KL modes for tilted inviscid discs under the approximations that the disc eccentricity is small and the disc remains flat. By using 1D equations, we are able to probe regimes of large ratios of outer to inner disc edge radii that are realistic for binary systems of hundreds of astronomical unit separations and are not easily probed by multidimensional simulations. For order unity binary mass ratios, KL instability is possible for a window of disc aspect ratios H/r in the outer parts of a disc that roughly scale as (nb/n)2 ≲ H/r ≲ nb/n, for binary orbital frequency nb and orbital frequency n at the disc outer edge. We present a framework for understanding the zones of instability based on the determination of branches of marginally unstable modes. In general, multiple growing eccentric KL modes can be present in a disc. Coplanar apsidal-nodal precession resonances delineate instability branches. We determine the range of tilt angles for unstable modes as a function of disc aspect ratio. Unlike the KL instability for free particles that involves a critical (minimum) tilt angle, disc instability is possible for any non-zero tilt angle depending on the disc aspect ratio.

  1. The Galactic stellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study of the Milky Way stellar discs in the context of galaxy formation is discussed. In particular, we explore the properties of the Milky Way disc using a new sample of about 550 dwarf stars for which we have recently obtained elemental abundances and ages based on high-resolution spectroscopy. For all the stars we also have full kinematic information as well as information about their stellar orbits. We confirm results from previous studies that the thin and the thick discs have distinct abundance patterns. But we also explore a larger range of orbital parameters than what has been possible in our previous studies. Several new results are presented. We find that stars that reach high above the Galactic plane and have eccentric orbits show remarkably tight abundance trends. This implies that these stars formed out of well-mixed gas that had been homogenized over large volumes. We find some evidence that suggest that the event that most likely caused the heating of this stellar population happened a few billion years ago. Through a simple, kinematic exploration of stars with super-solar [Fe/H], we show that the solar neighbourhood contains metal-rich, high velocity stars that are very likely associated with the thick disc. Additionally, the HR1614 moving group and the Hercules and Arcturus stellar streams are discussed and it is concluded that, probably, a large fraction of the groups and streams so far identified in the disc are the result of evolution and interactions within the stellar disc rather than being dissolved stellar clusters or engulfed dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Also based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain, and at the European Southern Observatories on La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Proposals no. 65.L-0019(B), 67.B-0108(B), 69.B-0277.

  2. CIRCUMSTELLAR ABSORPTION IN DOUBLE DETONATION TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ken J.; Guillochon, James; Foley, Ryan J.

    2013-06-20

    Upon formation, degenerate He core white dwarfs are surrounded by a radiative H-rich layer primarily supported by ideal gas pressure. In this Letter, we examine the effect of this H-rich layer on mass transfer in He+C/O double white dwarf binaries that will eventually merge and possibly yield a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in the double detonation scenario. Because its thermal profile and equation of state differ from the underlying He core, the H-rich layer is transferred stably onto the C/O white dwarf prior to the He core's tidal disruption. We find that this material is ejected from the binary system and sweeps up the surrounding interstellar medium hundreds to thousands of years before the SN Ia. The close match between the resulting circumstellar medium profiles and values inferred from recent observations of circumstellar absorption in SNe Ia gives further credence to the resurgent double detonation scenario.

  3. Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Circumstellar Disks of B[e] Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.

    2017-02-01

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are emission-line objects, presumably in a short-lived phase in the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars. Their intense infrared excess emission indicates large amounts of warm circumstellar dust. It has long been assumed that the stars possess an aspherical wind consisting of a classical line-driven wind in the polar direction and a dense, slow equatorial wind dubbed outflowing disk. The general properties obtained for these disks are in line with this scenario, although current theories have considerable difficulties reproducing the observed quantities. Therefore, more sophisticated observational constraints are needed. These follow from combined optical and infrared spectroscopic studies, which delivered the surprising result that the circumstellar material of B[e]SGs is concentrated in multiple rings revolving the stars on stable Keplerian orbits. Such a scenario requires new ideas for the formation mechanism where pulsations might play an important role.

  4. Circumstellar magnetic activity, flares and mass ejections in young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Houdebine, E.

    1990-11-01

    Stellar activity studies are used for information on the early Sun and its environment, and for estimating activity effects on the young solar nebula. Large scale active structures are diagnosed from their rotational modulation signature, and reconstructed in three dimensions, using topographic or Doppler imaging techniques. Young stars undergo violent flares associated with coronal mass ejections leading to mass loss rates that can affect the stellar environment and stellar evolution. Young stars show large coronal condensations, magnetically linked with the stellar surface, that can be destabilized by energetic flares. From a joint ESA/AAT/IUE campaign, masses of such circumstellar clouds around the young star AB Doradus are estimated. These studies allow the problems of the link between circumstellar structures and magnetic activity and the role of mass ejections and flares in the context of mass loss and angular momentum braking in young stars, and early stellar evolution to be addressed.

  5. Observations of chemical processing in the circumstellar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundy, L. G.; McMullin, J. P.; Blake, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution interferometer and single-dish observations of young, deeply embedded stellar systems reveal a complex chemistry in the circumstellar environments of low to intermediate mass stars. Depletions of gas-phase molecules, grain mantle evaporation, and shock interactions actively drive chemical processes in different regions around young stars. We present results for two systems, IRAS 05338-0624 and NCG 1333 IRAS 4, to illustrate the behavior found and to examine the physical processes at work.

  6. Observations of chemical processing in the circumstellar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundy, L. G.; McMullin, J. P.; Blake, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution interferometer and single-dish observations of young, deeply embedded stellar systems reveal a complex chemistry in the circumstellar environments of low to intermediate mass stars. Depletions of gas-phase molecules, grain mantle evaporation, and shock interactions actively drive chemical processes in different regions around young stars. We present results for two systems, IRAS 05338-0624 and NCG 1333 IRAS 4, to illustrate the behavior found and to examine the physical processes at work.

  7. Fast Moreau envelope computation I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, Yves

    2006-11-01

    The present article summarizes the state of the art algorithms to compute the discrete Moreau envelope, and presents a new linear-time algorithm, named NEP for NonExpansive Proximal mapping. Numerical comparisons between the NEP and two existing algorithms: The Linear-time Legendre Transform (LLT) and the Parabolic Envelope (PE) algorithms are performed. Worst-case time complexity, convergence results, and examples are included. The fast Moreau envelope algorithms first factor the Moreau envelope as several one-dimensional transforms and then reduce the brute force quadratic worst-case time complexity to linear time by using either the equivalence with Fast Legendre Transform algorithms, the computation of a lower envelope of parabolas, or, in the convex case, the non expansiveness of the proximal mapping.

  8. Additional constraints on circumstellar disks in the Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Prosser, Charles F.; Hartmann, Lee; Mccaughrean, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss new constraints on the population of compact ionized sources in the Trapezium Cluster thought to arise from the ionization by the central OB stars of circumstellar disks around low-mass pre-main sequence stars. We present new HST Planetary Camera observations of two of these candidate disk sources, resolving extended nebulosity around them. One source shows a small-scale (greater than 100 AU) bow-shock structure, previously seen on larger scales by O'Dell et al. We show that the circumstellar disk model is the most likely one for the majority of sources, although it remains plausible that some of the larger objects could be equilibrium globules. We combine the most complete censuses of compact radio sources and stars in the core region to derive the fraction of the stellar population that may be associated with a circumstellar disk. Our estimate of 25-75 percent is comparable to that found for PMS stars in the Taurus-Auriga dark clouds, indicating that the dense cluster environment of the Trapezium has not drastically reduced the frequency of disks seen around pre-main sequence stars.

  9. Circumstellar Environments of Southern M Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Michele L.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Winters, Jennifer G.; Recons Team

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results from SIRENS, the Search for InfraRed Excesses around Nearby Stars. Our goal is to characterize the circumstellar environments of the most common and closest stars in the Universe, the ubiquitous red dwarfs. In this phase of the study, we search 1404 southern M dwarfs within 25 parsecs of the Sun, as reported in Winters et. al 2014, using (Johnson-Kron-Cousins) optical, (2MASS) near-infrared, and (WISE) mid-infrared photometry for circumstellar disks and low-mass companions. Several studies have recently used WISE photometry to detect circumstellar disks and companions --- searches around members of the nearby young moving groups, objects with parallaxes from Hipparcos, and many northern M stars in the SDSS. However, no work has yet been done that focuses on the nearest red dwarfs, which account for at least 75% of all stars. This study, a volume-limited search around M dwarfs in the southern sky, includes statistical conclusions applicable to a majority of the stars in the universe, and opens potential gateways to a better understanding of star and planet formation.

  10. The EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer (EXCEDE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Schneider, Glenn; Belikov, Ruslan; Tenerelli, Domenick J.

    2012-09-01

    We present an overview of the EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer (EXCEDE), selected by NASA for technology development and maturation. EXCEDE will study the formation, evolution and architectures of exoplanetary systems, and characterize circumstellar environments into stellar habitable zones. EXCEDE provides contrast-limited scattered-light detection sensitivities ~ 1000x greater than HST or JWST coronagraphs at a much smaller effective inner working angle (IWA), thus enabling the exploration and characterization of exoplanetary circumstellar disks in currently inaccessible domains. EXCEDE will utilize a laboratory demonstrated high-performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodized Coronagraph (PIAA-C) integrated with a 70 cm diameter unobscured aperture visible light telescope. The EXCEDE PIAA-C will deliver star-to-disk augmented image contrasts of < 10E-8 and a 1.2 λ/D IWA or 0.14” with a wavefront control system utilizing a 2000-element MEMS DM and fast steering mirror. EXCEDE will provide 0.12” spatial resolution at 0.4 μm with dust detection sensitivity to levels of a few tens of zodis with two-band imaging polarimetry. EXCEDE is a science-driven technology pathfinder that will advance our understanding of the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems, placing our solar system in broader astrophysical context, and will demonstrate the high contrast technologies required for larger-scale follow-on and multi-wavelength investigations on the road to finding and characterizing exo-Earths in the years ahead.

  11. On the Crystallization of Small Silica Particles in Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, M.; Müller, E.; Patzer, B.; Lüttke, M.; Sedlmayr, E.

    Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observations have revealed the presence of crystalline silicate dust in circumstellar environments of some evolved stars (e.g. Waters et al. 1996, A&A 315, L361). Molster et al. (2001, A&A 366, 923), for instance, reported the discovery of a carbon-rich AGB star surrounded by a highly crystalline silicate dust shell as indicated by the high resolution ISO-SWS spectrum. However, it is still a matter of debate, whether the presence of crystalline dust is restricted only to certain phases of the stellar evolution (e.g. Kemper et al. 2000, A&A 369, 132). In order to understand the process, which leads to the formation of crystalline structures in circumstellar environments, the microphysical rearrangement of small silica particles is investigated by means of molecular dynamic calculations. The results indicate a dynamic coexistence of `amorphous'-like and symmetrical, `crystalline' structures. Such rearrangement processes depend on the energy transfer to the grain governed by the physical conditions of the astrophysical environment. Therefore, the effect of the degree of crystallinity on optical properties is additionally exemplified by Mie calculations. Some implications regarding the condensation and the mineralogy of silicate dust particles in the circumstellar environments of AGB and post-AGB objects are discussed.

  12. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  13. The Chemistry of Optical Discs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains the chemistry used in compact discs (CD), digital versatile discs (DVD), and magneto-optical (MO) discs focusing on the steps of initial creation of the mold, the molding of the polycarbonate, the deposition of the reflective layers, the lacquering of the CDs, and the bonding of DVDs. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  14. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  15. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  16. The DISC Quotient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John R.; Baxter, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    D.I.S.C: Decipherment Impact of a Signal's Content. The authors present a numerical method to characterise the significance of the receipt of a complex and potentially decipherable signal from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). The purpose of the scale is to facilitate the public communication of work on any such claimed signal, as such work proceeds, and to assist in its discussion and interpretation. Building on a "position" paper rationale, this paper looks at the DISC quotient proposed and develops the algorithmic steps and comprising measures that form this post detection strategy for information dissemination, based on prior work on message detection, decipherment. As argued, we require a robust and incremental strategy, to disseminate timely, accurate and meaningful information, to the scientific community and the general public, in the event we receive an "alien" signal that displays decipherable information. This post-detection strategy is to serve as a stepwise algorithm for a logical approach to information extraction and a vehicle for sequential information dissemination, to manage societal impact. The "DISC Quotient", which is based on signal analysis processing stages, includes factors based on the signal's data quantity, structure, affinity to known human languages, and likely decipherment times. Comparisons with human and other phenomena are included as a guide to assessing likely societal impact. It is submitted that the development, refinement and implementation of DISC as an integral strategy, during the complex processes involved in post detection and decipherment, is essential if we wish to minimize disruption and optimize dissemination.

  17. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... at and just below the waist. A herniated lumbar disc can press on the nerves in the spine and may cause pain, numbness, ... point injections do not help heal a herniated lumbar ... on and irritating the nerves, causing symptoms of pain and weakness. The most ...

  18. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  19. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  20. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  1. Studies of Young, Star-forming Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan

    2017-08-01

    Disks of gas and dust around forming stars - circumstellar disks - last only a few million years. This is a very small fraction of the entire lifetime of Sun-like stars, several billion years. Nevertheless, by the time circumstellar disks dissipate stars complete building up their masses, giant planets finish accreting gas, and terrestrial bodies are nearly fully grown and ready for their final assembly to become planets. Understanding the evolution of circumstellar disks are thus crucial in many contexts. Using numerical simulations as the primary tool, my thesis has focused on the studies of various physical processes that can occur throughout the lifetime of circumstellar disks, from their formation to dispersal. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 emphasize the importance of early evolution, during which time a forming star-disk system obtains mass from its natal cloud: the infall phase. In Chapter 2 and 3, I have modeled episodic outbursts of accretion in protostellar systems resulting from disk instabilities - gravitational instability and magnetorotational instability. I showed that outbursts occur preferentially during the infall phase, because the mass addition provides more favorable conditions for gravitational instability to initiate the outburst cycle, and that forming stars build up a significant fraction of their masses through repeated short-lived, episodic outbursts. The infall phase can also be important for the formation of planets. Recent ALMA observations revealed sets of bright and dark rings in circumstellar disks of young, forming stars, potentially indicating early formation of planets. In Chapter 4, I showed that infall streams can create radial pressure bumps near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk, from which vortices can form, collecting solid particles very efficiently to make initial seeds of planets. The next three chapters highlight the role of planets in setting the observational appearance and the evolution of circumstellar disks

  2. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, Omari; Griffiths, Dianne

    2015-05-08

    “The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deter program participants, and dissuade them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.” This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group for several California interests emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing—the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities—could easily be six times that, and that’s only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. This research seeks to provide an algorithm for predicting the guarded blower door test result based upon a single, total blower door test.

  3. Masonry building envelope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, Phillip C.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past five years, infrared thermography has proven an effective tool to assist in required inspections on new masonry construction. However, with more thermographers providing this inspection service, establishing a standard for conducting these inspections is imperative. To attempt to standardize these inspections, it is important to understand the nature of the inspection as well as the context in which the inspection is typically conducted. The inspection focuses on evaluating masonry construction for compliance with the design specifications with regard to structural components and thermal performance of the building envelope. The thermal performance of the building includes both the thermal resistance of the material as well as infiltration/exfiltration characteristics. Given that the inspections occur in the 'field' rather than the controlled environment of a laboratory, there are numerous variables to be considered when undertaking this type of inspection. Both weather and site conditions at the time of the inspection can vary greatly. In this paper we will look at the variables encountered during recent inspections. Additionally, the author will present the standard which was employed in collecting this field data. This method is being incorporated into a new standard to be included in the revised version of 'Guidelines for Specifying and Performing Infrared Inspections' developed by the Infraspection Institute.

  4. Envelope glycoprotein of arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2012-10-17

    Arenaviruses include lethal human pathogens which pose serious public health threats. So far, no FDA approved vaccines are available against arenavirus infections, and therapeutic options are limited, making the identification of novel drug targets for the development of efficacious therapeutics an urgent need. Arenaviruses are comprised of two RNA genome segments and four proteins, the polymerase L, the envelope glycoprotein GP, the matrix protein Z, and the nucleoprotein NP. A crucial step in the arenavirus life-cycle is the biosynthesis and maturation of the GP precursor (GPC) by cellular signal peptidases and the cellular enzyme Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P) yielding a tripartite mature GP complex formed by GP1/GP2 and a stable signal peptide (SSP). GPC cleavage by SKI-1/S1P is crucial for fusion competence and incorporation of mature GP into nascent budding virion particles. In a first part of our review, we cover basic aspects and newer developments in the biosynthesis of arenavirus GP and its molecular interaction with SKI-1/S1P. A second part will then highlight the potential of SKI-1/S1P-mediated processing of arenavirus GPC as a novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  5. Planet-disc interaction in laminar and turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Picogna, Giovanni; Kley, Wilhelm

    2017-07-01

    In weakly ionised discs turbulence can be generated through the vertical shear instability (VSI). Embedded planets are affected by a stochastic component in the torques acting on them, which can impact their migration. In this work we study the interplay between a growing planet embedded in a protoplanetary disc and the VSI turbulence. We performed a series of 3D hydrodynamical simulations for locally isothermal discs with embedded planets in the mass range from 5 to 100 Earth masses. We study planets embedded in an inviscid disc that is VSI unstable, becomes turbulent, and generates angular momentum transport with an effective α = 5 × 10-4. This is compared to the corresponding viscous disc using exactly this α-value. In general we find that the planets have only a weak impact on the disc turbulence. Only for the largest planet (100 M⊕) does the turbulent activity become enhanced inside of the planet. The depth and width of a gap created by the more massive planets (30,100 M⊕) in the turbulent disc equal exactly that of the corresponding viscous case, leading to very similar torque strengths acting on the planet, with small stochastic fluctuations for the VSI disc. At the gap edges vortices are generated that are stronger and longer-lived in the VSI disc. Low mass planets (with Mp ≤ 10 M⊕) do not open gaps in the disc in either case, but generate for the turbulent disc an overdensity behind the planet that exerts a significant negative torque. This can boost the inward migration in VSI turbulent discs well above the Type I rate. Owing to the finite turbulence level in realistic 3D discs the gap depth will always be limited and migration will not stall in inviscid discs.

  6. Shadow of a Large Disc Casts New Light on the Formation of High Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    the disc structure and properties, the astronomers then turned to radio astronomy and carried out molecular line spectroscopy at the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer near Grenoble (France) in April 2003. The astronomers have observed the region in the rotational transitions of the 12CO, 13CO and C18O molecules, and in the adjacent continuum at 3 mm. Velocity resolutions of 0.1 and 0.2 km/s, respectively, were achieved. Dieter Nürnberger, member of the team, sees this as a confirmation: "Our 13CO data obtained with IRAM indicate that the disc/envelope system slowly rotates with its north-western part approaching the observer." Over an extent of 30,800 AU a velocity shift of 1.7 km/s is indeed measured (PR Photo 15c/04). From these observations, adopting standard values for the abundance ratio between the different isotopic carbon monoxide molecules (12CO and 13CO) and for the conversion factor to derive molecular hydrogen densities from the mesured CO intensities, the astronomers were also able to derive a conservative lower limit for the disc mass of 110 solar masses. This is by far the most massive and largest accretion disc ever observed directly around a young massive star. The largest silhouette disc so far is known as 114-426 in Orion and has a diameter of about 1,000 AU; however, its central star is likely a low-mass object rather than a massive protostar. Although there are a small number of candidates for massive young stellar objects (YSOs) some of which are associated with outflows, the largest circumstellar disc hitherto detected around these objects has a diameter of only 130 AU. The bipolar nebula ESO PR Photo 15d/04 ESO PR Photo 15d/04 [Preview - JPEG: 450 x 400 pix - 119k] [Normal - JPEG: 913 x 800 pix - 272k] Caption: PR Photo 15d/04 displays a collection of images of the silhouette disc and, perpendicular to that, the bipolar reflection nebula. These images were obtained in different optical and near-infrared wavebands with different instruments

  7. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: low-mass protoplanetary discs from a SCUBA-2 census of NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, P.; Greaves, J. S.; Scholz, A.; Hatchell, J.; Holland, W. S.; JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2015-02-01

    NGC 1333 is a 1-2 Myr old cluster of stars in the Perseus molecular cloud. We used 850 μm data from the Gould Belt Survey with SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to measure or place limits on disc masses for 82 Class II sources in this cluster. Eight disc candidates were detected; one is estimated to have mass of about 9 MJup in dust plus gas, while the others host only 2-4 MJup of circumstellar material. None of these discs exceeds the threshold for the `minimum mass solar nebula' (MMSN). This reinforces previous claims that only a small fraction of Class II sources at an age of 1-2 Myr have discs exceeding the MMSN threshold and thus can form a planetary system like our own. However, other regions with similarly low fractions of MMSN discs (IC 348, UpSco, σ Ori) are thought to be older than NGC 1333. Compared with coeval regions, the exceptionally low fraction of massive discs in NGC 1333 cannot easily be explained by the effects of UV radiation or stellar encounters. Our results indicate that additional environmental factors significantly affect disc evolution and the outcome of planet formation by core accretion.

  8. 26 CFR 1.6011-2 - Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's. 1...., of DISC's and former DISC's. (a) Records and information. Every DISC and former DISC (as defined in..., statements, and special returns. Thus, for example, a DISC is required to maintain the books of account or...

  9. SI-BEARING MOLECULES TOWARD IRC+10216: ALMA UNVEILS THE MOLECULAR ENVELOPE OF CWLEO

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, L. Velilla; Cernicharo, J.; Quintana–Lacaci, G.; Agúndez, M.; Castro–Carrizo, A.; Fonfŕia, J. P.; Marcelino, N.; Zúñiga, J.; Requena, A.; Bastida, A.; Lique, F.; Guélin, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of SiS rotational lines in high-vibrational states as well as SiO and SiC2 lines in their ground vibrational state toward IRC+10216 during the Atacama Large Millimeter Array Cycle 0. The spatial distribution of these molecules shows compact emission for SiS and a more extended emission for SiO and SiC2, and also proves the existence of an increase in the SiC2 emission at the outer shells of the circumstellar envelope. We analyze the excitation conditions of the vibrationally excited SiS using the population diagram technique, and we use a large velocity gradient model to compare with the observations. We found moderate discrepancies between the observations and the models that could be explained if SiS lines detected are optically thick. Additionally, the line profiles of the detected rotational lines in the high energy vibrational states show a decreasing linewidth with increasing energy levels. This may be evidence that these lines could be excited only in the inner shells, i.e., the densest and hottest, of the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216. PMID:26688711

  10. SI-BEARING MOLECULES TOWARD IRC+10216: ALMA UNVEILS THE MOLECULAR ENVELOPE OF CWLEO.

    PubMed

    Prieto, L Velilla; Cernicharo, J; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Agúndez, M; Castro-Carrizo, A; Fonfŕia, J P; Marcelino, N; Zúñiga, J; Requena, A; Bastida, A; Lique, F; Guélin, M

    2015-06-01

    We report the detection of SiS rotational lines in high-vibrational states as well as SiO and SiC2 lines in their ground vibrational state toward IRC+10216 during the Atacama Large Millimeter Array Cycle 0. The spatial distribution of these molecules shows compact emission for SiS and a more extended emission for SiO and SiC2, and also proves the existence of an increase in the SiC2 emission at the outer shells of the circumstellar envelope. We analyze the excitation conditions of the vibrationally excited SiS using the population diagram technique, and we use a large velocity gradient model to compare with the observations. We found moderate discrepancies between the observations and the models that could be explained if SiS lines detected are optically thick. Additionally, the line profiles of the detected rotational lines in the high energy vibrational states show a decreasing linewidth with increasing energy levels. This may be evidence that these lines could be excited only in the inner shells, i.e., the densest and hottest, of the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216.

  11. Thermodynamics of giant planet formation: shocking hot surfaces on circumplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Mordasini, C.

    2017-02-01

    The luminosity of young giant planets can inform about their formation and accretion history. The directly imaged planets detected so far are consistent with the `hot-start' scenario of high entropy and luminosity. If nebular gas passes through a shock front before being accreted into a protoplanet, the entropy can be substantially altered. To investigate this, we present high-resolution, three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulations of accreting giant planets. The accreted gas is found to fall with supersonic speed in the gap from the circumstellar disc's upper layers on to the surface of the circumplanetary disc and polar region of the protoplanet. There it shocks, creating an extended hot supercritical shock surface. This shock front is optically thick; therefore, it can conceal the planet's intrinsic luminosity beneath. The gas in the vertical influx has high entropy which when passing through the shock front decreases significantly while the gas becomes part of the disc and protoplanet. This shows that circumplanetary discs play a key role in regulating a planet's thermodynamic state. Our simulations furthermore indicate that around the shock surface extended regions of atomic - sometimes ionized - hydrogen develop. Therefore, circumplanetary disc shock surfaces could influence significantly the observational appearance of forming gas giants.

  12. Isolation of bacteria envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Quan, Shu; Hiniker, Annie; Collet, Jean-François; Bardwell, James C A

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis on cell envelope proteins from Gram-negative bacteria requires specific isolation techniques. We found that conventional extraction methods such as osmotic shock cause extracts to be heavily contaminated with soluble cytoplasmic proteins. These cytoplasmic protein contaminants constitute the major signal in proteomic analysis and can overwhelm the signals coming from genuine envelope components. After extensive testing of various protocols for the preparation of envelope contents, we found that a modified version of the method of Oliver and Beckwith consistently produces the cleanest extract of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins.We have designated this very simple method TSE extraction because it uses a Tris-sucrose solution supplemented with EDTA.Cytoplasmic and inner membrane protein contaminants are not evident on 1D SDS polyacrylamide gels and contribute to less than 6% of total signal in very sensitive mass spectrometry analysis. This straightforward method is therefore ideal for -analyzing specific proteomic changes in the cell envelope.

  13. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  14. Mechanotransduction in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lai, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a critical role in intracellular functioning—it allows cells to translate external physical forces into internal biochemical activities, thereby affecting processes ranging from proliferation and apoptosis to gene expression and protein synthesis in a complex web of interactions and reactions. Accordingly, aberrant mechanotransduction can either lead to, or be a result of, a variety of diseases or degenerative states. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanotransduction in the context of intervertebral discs, with a focus on the latest methods of investigating mechanotransduction and the most recent findings regarding the means and effects of mechanotransduction in healthy and degenerative discs. We also provide some discussion of potential directions for future research and treatments. PMID:25267492

  15. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  16. Modeling the Dusty Envelope Around AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaume, Alexa; Conroy, C.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar Population Synthesis (SPS) models are used to infer a host of galactic properties including star formation histories, rates, and stellar masses. However, most SPS models neglect the effect of circumstellar dust shells around evolved stars. To overcome this shortcoming we have created a new grid of circumstellar dust models for AGB stars. We couple the dust models to a new generation of isochrones that include TP-AGB stars (Choi et al. in prep). We show that circumstellar dust from AGB stars can make a significant contribution to the mid-IR of star-forming galaxies. Furthermore, we test the circumstellar dust models by fitting observed data for AGB stars and find that the models are in good agreement with the data. This grid was created to be included in the FSPS model described in Conroy and Gunn 2010. We describe the preliminary results from including the improved TP-AGB models in FSPS.

  17. Wave-like warp propagation in circumbinary discs - I. Analytic theory and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Stefano; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we analyse the propagation of warps in protostellar circumbinary discs. We use these systems as a test environment in which to study warp propagation in the bending-wave regime, with the addition of an external torque due to the binary gravitational potential. In particular, we want to test the linear regime, for which an analytic theory has been developed. In order to do so, we first compute analytically the steady-state shape of an inviscid disc subject to the binary torques. The steady-state tilt is a monotonically increasing function of radius, but misalignment is found at the disc inner edge. In the absence of viscosity, the disc does not present any twist. Then, we compare the time-dependent evolution of the warped disc calculated via the known linearized equations both with the analytic solutions and with full 3D numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code using two million particles. We find a good agreement both in the tilt and in the phase evolution for small inclinations, even at very low viscosities. Moreover, we have verified that the linearized equations are able to reproduce the diffusive behaviour when α > H/R, where α is the disc viscosity parameter. Finally, we have used the 3D simulations to explore the non-linear regime. We observe a strongly non-linear behaviour, which leads to the breaking of the disc. Then, the inner disc starts precessing with its own precessional frequency. This behaviour has already been observed with numerical simulations in accretion discs around spinning black holes. The evolution of circumstellar accretion discs strongly depends on the warp evolution. Therefore, the issue explored in this paper could be of fundamental importance in order to understand the evolution of accretion discs in crowded environments, when the gravitational interaction with other stars is highly likely, and in multiple systems. Moreover, the evolution of

  18. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanics of Actuated Disc Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkhoda, Sevda; Detournay, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of an actuated disc cutter with the objective of determining the average forces acting on the disc as a function of the parameters characterizing its motion. The specific problem considered is that of a disc cutter revolving off-centrically at constant angular velocity around a secondary axis rigidly attached to a cartridge, which is moving at constant velocity and undercutting rock at a constant depth. This model represents an idealization of a technology that has been implemented in a number of hard rock mechanical excavators with the goal of reducing the average thrust force to be provided by the excavation equipment. By assuming perfect conformance of the rock with the actuated disc as well as a prescribed motion of the disc (perfectly rigid machine), the evolution of the contact surface between the disc and the rock during one actuation of the disc can be computed. Coupled with simple cutter/rock interaction models that embody either a ductile or a brittle mode of fragmentation, these kinematical considerations lead to an estimate of the average force on the cartridge and of the partitioning of the energy imparted by the disc to the rock between the actuation mechanism of the disc and the translation of the cartridge on which the actuated disc is attached.

  20. Estrogens and the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Calleja-Agius, J; Muscat-Baron, Y; Brincat, M P

    2009-09-01

    Intervertebral discs are an integral part of the vertebral column. It has been shown that menopause has a negative effect on bone and on intervertebral discs. Estrogen has a beneficial effect of preserving the health of collagen-containing tissues, including the intervertebral disc. The intervertebral disc allows for mobility of the spine, and maintains a uniform stress distribution of the area of the vertebral endplates. Also, the disc influences spinal height. The disc tissue is adapted for this biomechanical function. The function of the spine is impaired if there is a loss of disc tissue. Narrowing of the disc space due to degeneration of intervertebral discs is associated with a significantly increased risk of vertebral fractures. Estrogen should be seen as the first-choice therapy for bones and other collagen-rich tissues, such as intervertebral discs, because it maintains homeostasis of the bone-remodelling unit. Unlike bisphosphonates, estrogen is unique in its ability to regenerate bone collagen after its disintegration, apart from suppressing osteoclastic activity. Besides, there is insufficient data on deterioration in bone qualities and micro-cracks in patients on long-term bisphosphonates.

  1. Detection of circumstellar gas associated with GG Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Snell, R. L.; Strom, K. M.; Strom, S. E.; Edwards, S.; Fukui, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Hayashi, M.; Ohashi, N.

    1993-01-01

    Double-peaked (C-12)O (1-0) emission centered on the young T Tauri star GG Tau possesses a line profile which may be modeled on the assumption that CO emission arises in an extended circumstellar disk. While bounds on the observed gas mass can be estimated on this basis, it is suggested that a large amount of mass could lie within a small and optically thick region, escaping detection due to beam-dilution effects. In addition, CO may no longer accurately trace the gas mass due to its dissociation, or freezing into grains, or due to the locking-up of carbon into more complex molecules.

  2. Evidence for dust grain growth in young circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Throop, H B; Bally, J; Esposito, L W; McCaughrean, M J

    2001-06-01

    Hundreds of circumstellar disks in the Orion nebula are being rapidly destroyed by the intense ultraviolet radiation produced by nearby bright stars. These young, million-year-old disks may not survive long enough to form planetary systems. Nevertheless, the first stage of planet formation-the growth of dust grains into larger particles-may have begun in these systems. Observational evidence for these large particles in Orion's disks is presented. A model of grain evolution in externally irradiated protoplanetary disks is developed and predicts rapid particle size evolution and sharp outer disk boundaries. We discuss implications for the formation rates of planetary systems.

  3. The discrete nature of circumstellar OH maser emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Philip J.; Fix, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The Arecibo radio telescope was used to obtain high-resolution, high-SNR 1612-MHz observations of seven circumstellar OH maser sources. Each spectrum displays the double-peaked emission line profile characteristics of an expanding shell. The jaggedness of the spectra, which varies from source to source, is consistent with statistical fluctuations in the number of discrete emitting elements contributing at a given velocity. In particular, it is found that the spectra of WX Psc and OH 53.6-0.2 contain narrow, weak, isolated emission features which may arise from individual emitting elements.

  4. UV chromospheric and circumstellar diagnostic features among F supergiant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Worden, S. P.; Giampapa, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of F supergiant stars to evaluate the extension of chromospheric and circumstellar characteristics commonly observed in the slightly cooler G, K, and M supergiant is discussed. An ultraviolet survey was elected since UV features of Mg II and Fe II might persist in revealing outer atmosphere phenomena even among F supergiants. The encompassed spectral types F0 to G0, and luminosity classes Ib, Ia, and Ia-0. In addition, the usefulness of the emission line width-to-luminosity correlation for the G-M stars in both the Ca II and Mg II lines is examined.

  5. Circumstellar Environments of MYSOs Revealed by IFU Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarete, F.; Damineli, A.; Barbosa, C. L.; Blum, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of massive stars (M > 8 M ⊙) is still not well understood and lacks of observational constraints. We observed 7 MYSO candidates using the NIFS spectrometer at Gemini North Telescope to study the accretion process at high angular resolution (~ 50 mas) and very closer to the central star. Preliminary results for 2 sources have revealed circumstellar structures traced by Brackett-Gamma, CO lines and extended H2 emission. Both sources present kinematics in the CO absorption lines, suggesting rotating structures. The next step will derive the central mass of each source by applying a keplerian model for these CO features.

  6. Herschel observations of the debris disc around HIP 92043

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. P.; Krivov, A. V.; del Burgo, C.; Eiroa, C.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Ertel, S.; Bryden, G.; Liseau, R.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; Löhne, T.; Maldonado, J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thebault, P.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Typical debris discs are composed of particles ranging from several micron sized dust grains to km sized asteroidal bodies, and their infrared emission peaks at wavelengths 60-100 μm. Recent Herschel DUNES observations have identified several debris discs around nearby Sun-like stars (F, G and K spectral type) with significant excess emission only at 160 μm. Aims: We observed HIP 92043 (110 Her, HD 173667) at far-infrared and sub-millimetre wavelengths with Herschel PACS and SPIRE. Identification of the presence of excess emission from HIP 92043 and the origin and physical properties of any excess was undertaken through analysis of its spectral energy distribution (SED) and the PACS images. Methods: The PACS and SPIRE images were produced using the HIPE photProject map maker routine. Fluxes were measured using aperture photometry. A stellar photosphere model was scaled to optical and near infrared photometry and subtracted from the far-infared and sub-mm fluxes to determine the presence of excess emission. Source radial profiles were fitted using a 2D Gaussian and compared to a PSF model based on Herschel observations of α Boo to check for extended emission. Results: Clear excess emission from HIP 92043 was observed at 70 and 100 μm. Marginal excess was observed at 160 and 250 μm. Analysis of the images reveals that the source is extended at 160 μm. A fit to the source SED is inconsistent with a photosphere and single temperature black body. Conclusions: The excess emission from HIP 92043 is consistent with the presence of an unresolved circumstellar debris disc at 70 and 100 μm, with low probability of background contamination. The extended 160 μm emission may be interpreted as an additional cold component to the debris disc or as the result of background contamination along the line of sight. The nature of the 160 μm excess cannot be determined absolutely from the available data, but we favour a debris disc interpretation, drawing parallels with

  7. Models of circumstellar molecular radio line emission. Mass loss rates for a sample of bright carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöier, F. L.; Olofsson, H.

    2001-03-01

    Using a detailed radiative transfer analysis, combined with an energy balance equation for the gas, we have performed extensive modelling of circumstellar CO radio line emission from a large sample of optically bright carbon stars, originally observed by Olofsson et al. (ApJS, 87, 267). Some new observational results are presented here. We determine some of the basic parameters that characterize circumstellar envelopes (CSEs), e.g., the stellar mass loss rate, the gas expansion velocity, and the kinetic temperature structure of the gas. Assuming a spherically symmetric CSE with a smooth gas density distribution, created by a continuous mass loss, which expands with a constant velocity we are able to model reasonably well 61 of our 69 sample stars. The derived mass loss rates depend crucially on the assumptions in the circumstellar model, of which some can be constrained if enough observational data exist. Therefore, a reliable mass loss rate determination for an individual star requires, in addition to a detailed radiative transfer analysis, good observational constraints in the form of multi-line observations and radial brightness distributions. In our analysis we use the results of a model for the photodissociation of circumstellar CO by Mamon et al. (1988). This leads to model fits to observed radial brightness profiles that are, in general, very good, but there are also a few cases with clear deviations, which suggest departures from a simple r-2 density law. The derived mass loss rates span almost four orders of magnitude, from ~ 5 10-9 Msun yr-1 up to ~ 2 10-5 Msun yr-1, with the median mass loss rate being ~ 3 10-7 Msun yr-1. We estimate that the mass loss rates are typically accurate to ~ 50% within the adopted circumstellar model. The physical conditions prevailing in the CSEs vary considerably over such a large range of mass loss rates. Among other things, it appears that the dust-to-gas mass ratio and/or the dust properties change with the mass loss rate

  8. Synthetic Spectra and Light Curves of Interacting Binaries and Exoplanets with Circumstellar Material: SHELLSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaj, Ján

    2012-04-01

    Program SHELLSPEC is designed to calculate light-curves, spectra and images of interacting binaries and extrasolar planets immersed in a moving circumstellar environment which is optically thin. It solves simple radiative transfer along the line of sight in moving media. The assumptions include LTE and optional known state quantities and velocity fields in 3D. Optional (non)transparent objects such as a spot, disc, stream, jet, shell or stars may be defined (embedded) in 3D and their composite synthetic spectrum calculated. The Roche model can be used as a boundary condition for the radiative transfer. Recently, a new model of the reflection effect, dust and Mie scattering were incorporated into the code. ɛ Aurigae is one of the most mysterious objects on the sky. Prior modeling of its light-curve assumed a dark, inclined, disk of dust with a central hole to explain the light-curve with a sharp mid-eclipse brightening. Our model consists of two geometrically thick flared disks: an internal optically thick disk and an external optically thin disk which absorbs and scatters radiation. Shallow mid-eclipse brightening may result from eclipses by nearly edge-on flared (dusty or gaseous) disks. Mid-eclipse brightening may also be due to strong forward scattering and optical properties of the dust which can have an important effect on the light-curves. There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and transiting extrasolar planets. The reflection effect which is briefly reviewed is one of them. The exact Roche shape and temperature distributions over the surface of all currently known transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. In some cases (HAT-P-32b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b), departures from the spherical shape can reach 7-15%.

  9. Disc-mass distribution in star-disc encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, M.; Olczak, C.; Pfalzner, S.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: Investigations of stellar encounters in cluster environments have demonstrated their potential influence on the mass and angular momentum of protoplanetary discs around young stars. We investigated how far the initial surface density in the disc surrounding a young star influences the outcome of an encounter. Methods: The numerical method applied here allows us to determine the mass and angular momentum losses in an encounter for any initial disc-mass distribution. On the basis of a power-law ansatz for the surface density, Σ(r) ∝ r - p, we perform a parameter study of star-disc encounters with different initial disc-mass distributions using N-body simulations. Results: We demonstrate that the shape of the disc-mass distribution has a significant impact on the quantity of the disc-mass and angular momentum losses in star-disc encounters. In particular, the results are most sensitive to how the outer parts of the disc are perturbed by high-mass stars. In contrast, disc-penetrating encounters lead more or less independently of the disc-mass distribution always to large losses. However, maximum losses are generally obtained for initially flat distributed disc material. Based on a parameter study, a fit formula is derived, describing how the relative mass and angular momentum loss depend on the initial disc-mass distribution index p. Encounters generally lead to a steepening of the density profile of the disc. The resulting profiles can have a r-2-dependence or an even steeper one that is independent of the initial distribution of the disc material. Conclusions: From observations, the initial density distribution in discs remains unconstrained, hence the strong dependence on the initial density distribution that we find here might require a revision of the effect of encounters in young stellar clusters. The steep surface density distributions induced by some encounters might be a prerequisite to the formation of planetary systems similar to our own Solar

  10. METAMORPHOSIS OF SN 2014C: DELAYED INTERACTION BETWEEN A HYDROGEN POOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA AND A NEARBY CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kamble, A.; Patnaude, D. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Challis, P.; Drout, M. R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Miller, G. F.; Parrent, J. T.; Sanders, N. E.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fong, W.; Bietenholz, M.; Chornock, R.; Fransson, C.; Fesen, R. A.; Mackey, J.; and others

    2015-12-20

    We present optical observations of supernova SN 2014C, which underwent an unprecedented slow metamorphosis from H-poor type Ib to H-rich type IIn over the course of one year. The observed spectroscopic evolution is consistent with the supernova having exploded in a cavity before encountering a massive shell of the progenitor star’s stripped hydrogen envelope. Possible origins for the circumstellar shell include a brief Wolf–Rayet fast wind phase that overtook a slower red supergiant wind, eruptive ejection, or confinement of circumstellar material by external influences of neighboring stars. An extended high velocity Hα absorption feature seen in near-maximum light spectra implies that the progenitor star was not completely stripped of hydrogen at the time of core collapse. Archival pre-explosion Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of the region obtained in 2009 show a coincident source that is most likely a compact massive star cluster in NGC 7331 that hosted the progenitor system. By comparing the emission properties of the source with stellar population models that incorporate interacting binary stars we estimate the age of the host cluster to be 30–300 Myr, and favor ages closer to 30 Myr in light of relatively strong Hα emission. SN 2014C is the best observed member of a class of core-collapse supernovae that fill the gap between events that interact strongly with dense, nearby environments immediately after explosion and those that never show signs of interaction. Better understanding of the frequency and nature of this intermediate population can contribute valuable information about the poorly understood final stages of stellar evolution.

  11. Metamorphosis of SN 2014C: Delayed Interaction between a Hydrogen Poor Core-collapse Supernova and a Nearby Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kamble, A.; Patnaude, D. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fong, W.; Bietenholz, M.; Challis, P.; Chornock, R.; Drout, M. R.; Fransson, C.; Fesen, R. A.; Grindlay, J. E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Mackey, J.; Miller, G. F.; Parrent, J. T.; Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Zauderer, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical observations of supernova SN 2014C, which underwent an unprecedented slow metamorphosis from H-poor type Ib to H-rich type IIn over the course of one year. The observed spectroscopic evolution is consistent with the supernova having exploded in a cavity before encountering a massive shell of the progenitor star’s stripped hydrogen envelope. Possible origins for the circumstellar shell include a brief Wolf-Rayet fast wind phase that overtook a slower red supergiant wind, eruptive ejection, or confinement of circumstellar material by external influences of neighboring stars. An extended high velocity Hα absorption feature seen in near-maximum light spectra implies that the progenitor star was not completely stripped of hydrogen at the time of core collapse. Archival pre-explosion Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of the region obtained in 2009 show a coincident source that is most likely a compact massive star cluster in NGC 7331 that hosted the progenitor system. By comparing the emission properties of the source with stellar population models that incorporate interacting binary stars we estimate the age of the host cluster to be 30-300 Myr, and favor ages closer to 30 Myr in light of relatively strong Hα emission. SN 2014C is the best observed member of a class of core-collapse supernovae that fill the gap between events that interact strongly with dense, nearby environments immediately after explosion and those that never show signs of interaction. Better understanding of the frequency and nature of this intermediate population can contribute valuable information about the poorly understood final stages of stellar evolution.

  12. Rethinking Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg

    Accretion discs are staples of astrophysics. Tapping into the gravitational potential energy of the accreting material, these discs are highly efficient machines that produce copious radiation and extreme outflows. While interesting in their own right, accretion discs also act as tools to study black holes and directly influence the properties of the Universe. Black hole X-ray binaries are fantastic natural laboratories for studying accretion disc physics and black hole phenomena. Among many of the curious behaviors exhibited by these systems are black hole state transitions -- complicated cycles of dramatic brightening and dimming. Using X-ray observations with high temporal cadence, we show that the evolution of the accretion disc spectrum during black hole state transitions can be described by a variable disc atmospheric structure without invoking a radially truncated disc geometry. The accretion disc spectrum can be a powerful diagnostic for measuring black hole spin if the effects of the disc atmosphere on the emergent spectrum are well-understood; however, properties of the disc atmosphere are largely unconstrained. Using statistical methods, we decompose this black hole spin measurement technique and show that modest uncertainties regarding the disc atmosphere can lead to erroneous spin measurements. The vertical structure of the disc is difficult to constrain due to our ignorance of the contribution to hydrostatic balance by magnetic fields, which are fundamental to the accretion process. Observations of black hole X-ray binaries and the accretion environments near supermassive black holes provide mounting evidence for strong magnetization. Performing numerical simulations of accretion discs in the shearing box approximation, we impose a net vertical magnetic flux that allows us to effectively control the level of disc magnetization. We study how dynamo activity and the properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability depend on the

  13. Herschel observations of the circumstellar environments of the Herbig Be stars R Mon and PDS 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Donaire, M. J.; Meeus, G.; Karska, A.; Montesinos, B.; Bouwman, J.; Eiroa, C.; Henning, T.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The circumstellar environments of Herbig Be stars in the far-infrared are poorly characterised, mainly because they are often embedded and rather distant. The analysis of far-infrared spectroscopy allows us to make a major step forward by covering multiple rotational lines of molecules, e.g. CO, that are useful probes of the physical conditions of the gas. Aims: We characterise the gas and dust in the discs and environments of Herbig Be stars, and we compare the results with those of their lower-mass counterparts, the Herbig Ae stars. Methods: We report and analyse far-infrared observations of two Herbig Be stars, R Mon and PDS 27, obtained with the Herschel instruments PACS and SPIRE. We construct spectral energy distributions and derive the infrared excess. We extract line fluxes from the PACS and SPIRE spectra and construct rotational diagrams in order to estimate the excitation temperature of the gas. We derive CO, [O I] and [C I] luminosities to determine the physical conditions of the gas, and the dominant cooling mechanism. Results: We confirm that the Herbig Be stars are surrounded by remnants from their parental clouds, with an IR excess that mainly originates in a disc. In R Mon we detect [O I], [C I], [C II], CO (26 transitions), water and OH, while in PDS 27 we only detect [C I] and CO (8 transitions). We attribute the absence of OH and water in PDS 27 to UV photo-dissociation and photo-evaporation. From the rotational diagrams, we find several components for CO; we derive Trot949 ± 90 K, 358 ± 20 K and 77 ± 12 K for R Mon; 96 ± 12 K and 31 ± 4 K for PDS 27; and 25 ± 8 K and 27 ± 6 K for their respective compact neighbours. The forsterite feature at 69 μm was not detected in either of the sources, probably due to the lack of (warm) crystalline dust in a flat disc. We find that cooling by molecules is dominant in the Herbig Be stars, while this is not the case in Herbig Ae stars where cooling by [O I] dominates. Moreover, we show that in

  14. Binary star formation and the outflows from their discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruwita, Rajika L.; Federrath, Christoph; Ireland, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We carry out magnetohydrodynamical simulations with flash of the formation of a single, a tight binary (a ∼ 2.5 au) and a wide binary star (a ∼ 45 au). We study the outflows and jets from these systems to understand the contributions the circumstellar and circumbinary discs have on the efficiency and morphology of the outflow. In the single star and tight binary case, we obtain a single pair of jets launched from the system, while in the wide binary case, two pairs of jets are observed. This implies that in the tight binary case, the contribution of the circumbinary disc on the outflow is greater than that in the wide binary case. We also find that the single star case is the most efficient at transporting mass, linear and angular momentum from the system, while the wide binary case is less efficient ( ∼ 50 per cent, ∼ 33 per cent, ∼ 42 per cent of the respective quantities in the single star case). The tight binary's efficiency falls between the other two cases ( ∼ 71 per cent, ∼66 per cent, ∼87 per cent of the respective quantities in the single star case). By studying the magnetic field structure, we deduce that the outflows in the single star and tight binary star case are magnetocentrifugally driven, whereas in the wide binary star case, the outflows are driven by a magnetic pressure gradient.

  15. Enclosed rotary disc air pulser

    DOEpatents

    Olson, A. L.; Batcheller, Tom A.; Rindfleisch, J. A.; Morgan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    An enclosed rotary disc air pulser for use with a solvent extraction pulse olumn includes a housing having inlet, exhaust and pulse leg ports, a shaft mounted in the housing and adapted for axial rotation therein, first and second disc members secured to the shaft within the housing in spaced relation to each other to define a chamber therebetween, the chamber being in communication with the pulse leg port, the first disc member located adjacent the inlet port, the second disc member being located adjacent the exhaust port, each disc member having a milled out portion, the disc members positioned on the shaft so that as the shaft rotates, the milled out portions permit alternative cyclical communication between the inlet port and the chamber and the exhaust port and the chamber.

  16. Heat distribution in disc brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  17. An Optical Study of the Circumstellar Environment Around the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Shull, J. Michael; Hurford, Alan P.

    1997-01-01

    Long-slit spectra of two peripheral regions around the Crab Nebula show no H(alpha) emission down to a flux level of 1.5 x 10(exp -7)erg/sq cm s sr (0.63 Rayleigh), corresponding to an emission measure limit of 4.2 cm(sup - 6) pc (3(sigma)) assuming A(sub V)= 1.6(sup m) and T(sub e)=7000 K. This is below the flux levels reported by Murdin & Clark (Nature, 294, 543 (198 1)) for an H(alpha) halo around the Crab. Narrow H(beta) emission as described by Murdin (MNRAS, 269, 89 (1994)) is detected but appears to be Galactic emission unassociated with the remnant. A review of prior searches indicates no convincing observational evidence to support either a high- or low-velocity envelope around the remnant. Spectral scans confirm a well-organized, N-S expansion asymmetry of the filaments with a approx. 500 km/s central velocity constriction as described by MacAlpine et al. (ApJ, 342, 364 (1989)) and Lawrence et (it. (AJ, 109, 2635 (1995)] but questioned by Hester et al. (ApJ, 448, 240 (1995)). The velocity pinching appears to coincide with an cast-west chain of bright [O III] and helium-rich filaments. This expansion asymmetry might be the result of ejecta interaction with a disk of circumstellar matter, but such a model may be inconsistent with H and He filament abundances in the velocity constriction zone. A re-analysis of the remnant's total mass suggests that the filaments contain 4.6 +/- 1.8 M(solar) in ionized and neutral cas, about twice that of earlier estimates. For a 10M(solar) progenitor, this suggests that approx.equals 4M(solar) remains to be detected in an extended halo or wind.

  18. Transit probability of precessing circumstellar planets in binaries and exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, David. V.

    2017-05-01

    Over two decades of exoplanetology has yielded thousands of discoveries, yet some types of systems are still to be observed. Circumstellar planets around one star in a binary have been found, but not for tight binaries (≲5 au). Additionally, extra-solar moons are yet to be found. This paper motivates finding both types of three-body system by calculating analytic and numerical probabilities for all transit configurations, accounting for any mutual inclination and orbital precession. The precession and relative three-body motion can increase the transit probability to as high as tens of per cent, and make it inherently time-dependent over a precession period as short as 5-10 yr. Circumstellar planets in such tight binaries present a tempting observational challenge: enhanced transit probabilities but with a quasi-periodic signature that may be difficult to identify. This may help explain their present non-detection, or maybe they simply do not exist. Whilst this paper considers binaries of all orientations, it is demonstrated how eclipsing binaries favourably bias the transit probabilities, sometimes to the point of being guaranteed. Transits of exomoons exhibit a similar behaviour under precession, but unfortunately only have one star to transit rather than two.

  19. Circumstellar Material on and off the Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Amy; Debes, John H.; Deming, Drake

    2017-06-01

    There is evidence of circumstellar material around main sequence, giant, and white dwarf stars that originates from the small-body population of planetary systems. These bodies tell us something about the chemistry and evolution of protoplanetary disks and the planetary systems they form. What happens to this material as its host star evolves off the main sequence, and how does that inform our understanding of the typical chemistry of rocky bodies in planetary systems? In this talk, I will discuss the composition(s) of circumstellar material on and off the main sequence to begin to answer the question, “Is Earth normal?” In particular, I look at three types of debris disks to understand the typical chemistry of planetary systems—young debris disks, debris disks around giant stars, and dust around white dwarfs. I will review the current understanding on how to infer dust composition for each class of disk, and present new work on constraining dust composition from infrared excesses around main sequence and giant stars. Finally, dusty and polluted white dwarfs hold a unique key to our understanding of the composition of rocky bodies around other stars. In particular, I will discuss WD1145+017, which has a transiting, disintegrating planetesimal. I will review what we know about this system through high speed photometry and spectroscopy and present new work on understanding the complex interplay of physics that creates white dwarf pollution from the disintegration of rocky bodies.

  20. Far-Infrared Water Line Emissions from Circumstellar Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wesley; Neufeld, David A.

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled the far-infrared water line emission expected from circumstellar outflows from oxygen-rich late-type stars, as a function of the mass-loss rate and the terminal outflow velocity. For each mass-loss rate and terminal outflow velocity considered, we computed self-consistently the gas density, temperature, outflow velocity, and water abundance as a function of distance from the star. We then used an escape probability method to solve for the equilibrium level populations of 80 rotational states of water and thereby obtained predictions for the luminosity of a large number of far-infrared rotational transitions of water. In common with previous models, our model predicts that water will be copiously produced in the warm circumstellar gas and that water rotational emission will dominate the radiative cooling. However, our use of a realistic radiative cooling function for water leads to a lower gas temperature than that predicted in previous models. Our predictions for the far-infrared water line luminosities are consequently significantly smaller than those obtained in previous studies. Observations to be carried out by the Infrared Space Observatory will provide a crucial test of the models presented here.

  1. Extreme Carbon Overabundance in the 49 Ceti Circumstellar Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki; Welsh, Barry; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Grady, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    We present analysis of C and O absorption in high-resolution HST-STIS FUV spectra of the nearby A1V star 49 Ceti. This disk system is one of the few showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but harboring relatively abundant molecular gas more characteristic of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. Since the disk is nearly edge-on, the line-of-sight to the central star passes through the disk, permitting sensitive probes of the circumstellar gas with absorption spectroscopy.Our FUV spectra show many narrow circumstellar gas lines arising from several atomic species, including neutral carbon (a gas not seen in the local ISM) and neutral oxygen. We present an estimate of the total carbon column density in the line-of-sight gas and limits on the oxygen column density. Comparing the carbon abundance to a previous measurement of the line-of-sight iron abundance, we see that the carbon is extremely overabundant relative to the solar abundance. A similar overabundance is seen in the Beta Pic disk gas, where the carbon brakes other gases from being rapidly blown out by radiation pressure. The carbon in the 49 Cet gas may play a similar role.

  2. Attenuation of supersoft X-ray sources by circumstellar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. T. B.; Gilfanov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested the possibility of significantly obscuring supersoft X-ray sources in relatively modest amounts of local matter lost from the binaries themselves. If correct, then this would have explained the paucity of observed supersoft X-ray sources and would have significance for the search for single-degenerate Type Ia supernova progenitors. We point out that earlier studies of circumbinary obscuration ignored photoionizations of the gas by the emission from the supersoft X-ray source. We revisit the problem using a full, self-consistent calculation of the ionization state of the circumbinary material photoionized by the radiation of the central source. Our results show that the circumstellar mass-loss rates required for obscuration of supersoft X-ray sources is about an order of magnitude larger than those reported in earlier studies, for comparable model parameters. While this does not entirely rule out the possibility of circumstellar material obscuring supersoft X-ray sources, it makes it unlikely that this effect alone can account for the majority of the missing supersoft X-ray sources. We discuss the observational appearance of hypothetical obscured nuclear-burning white dwarfs and show that they have signatures making them distinct from photoionized nebulae around supersoft X-ray sources imbedded in the low-density interstellar medium.

  3. The Complex Circumstellar and Circumbinary Environment of V356 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullard, Andrew; Lomax, Jamie R.; Malatesta, Michael A.; Babler, Brian L.; Bednarski, Daniel; Berdis, Jodi; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Carciofi, Alex C.; Davidson, James W.; Keil, Marcus; Meade, Marilyn; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; Scheffler, Matt; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2017-01-01

    The eclipsing, interacting binary star V356 Sgr is a particularly exciting object for analysis due to its probable nonconservative mass loss and the possible progenitor link between Roche-lobe overflow systems and core-collapse supernovae. We present the results of 45 spectropolarimetric observations of V356 Sgr taken over 21 years, which we used to characterize the geometry of the system's circumstellar material. We find that V356 Sgr exhibits a large intrinsic polarization signature arising from electron scattering. The lack of repeatable eclipses in the polarization phase curves indicates the presence of a substantial pool of scatterers not occulted by either star. We suggest that these scatterers form either a circumbinary disk coplanar with the gainer's accretion disk, or an elongated structure perpendicular to the orbital plane of V356 Sgr, possibly formed by bipolar outflows.We also observe small-scale, cycle-to-cycle variations in the magnitude of intrinsic polarization at individual phases. These may indicate a mass transfer or mass loss rate that varies on the time-scale of the system's orbital period. Finally, we present a comparison of V356 Sgr with the well studied beta Lyr system; the significant differences observed between the two systems suggests diversity in the basic circumstellar geometry of Roche-lobe overflow binaries.

  4. Transit probability of precessing circumstellar planets in binaries and exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, David. V.

    2017-01-01

    Over two decades of exoplanetology have yielded thousands of discoveries, yet some types of systems are yet to be observed. Circumstellar planets around one star in a binary have been found, but not for tight binaries (≲ 5 AU). Additionally, extra-solar moons are yet to be found. This paper motivates finding both types of three-body system by calculating analytic and numerical probabilities for all transit configurations, accounting for any mutual inclination and orbital precession. The precession and relative three-body motion can increase the transit probability to as high as tens of per cent, and make it inherently time-dependent over a precession period as short as 5-10 yr. Circumstellar planets in such tight binaries present a tempting observational challenge: enhanced transit probabilities but with a quasi-periodic signature that may be difficult to identify. This may help explain their present non-detection, or maybe they simply do not exist. Whilst this paper considers binaries of all orientations, it is demonstrated how eclipsing binaries favourably bias the transit probabilities, sometimes to the point of being guaranteed. Transits of exomoons exhibit a similar behaviour under precession, but unfortunately only have one star to transit rather than two.

  5. The EXoplanetary Circumstellar Disk Environments and Disk Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Guyon, O.; Science Mission, EXCEDE; Technology Team

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer (EXCEDE), selected by NASA for technology development and maturation. EXCEDE will study the formation, evolution and architectures of exoplanetary systems, and characterize circumstellar environments into stellar habitable zones. EXCEDE provides contrast-limited scattered-light detection sensitivities 1000x greater than HST or JWST coronagraphs at a much smaller effective inner working angle (IWA), thus enabling the exploration and characterization of exoplanetary CS disks in currently inaccessible domains. EXCEDE will utilize a laboratory demonstrated high-performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodized Coronagraph (PIAA-C) integrated with a 70 cm diameter unobscured aperture visible light telescope. The EXCEDE PIAA-C will deliver star-to-disk augmented image contrasts of < 10E-8 and a 1.2 lambda/D IWA of 0.14” with a wavefront control system utilizing a 64x64 element MEMS DM and fast steering mirror. EXCEDE will provide 144 mas spatial resolution at 0.4 microns with dust detection sensitivity to levels of a few tens of zodis with two-band imaging polarimetry. EXCEDE is a science-driven technology pathfinder that will advance our understanding of the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems, placing our solar system in broader astrophysical context, and will demonstrate the high contrast technologies required for larger-scale follow-on and multi-wavelength investigations on the road to finding and characterizing exo-Earths in the years ahead.

  6. Variable Circumstellar Disks of Classical Be Stars in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhartz, C.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Wisniewski, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Circumstellar disks are common among many stars, at most spectral types, and at different stages of their lifetimes. Among the near-main-sequence classical Be stars, there is growing evidence that these disks form, dissipate, and reform on timescales that differ from star to star. Using data obtained with the Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) at the Lowell Observatory Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT), along with additional complementary data obtained at the University of Toledo Ritter Observatory (RO), we have begun a long-term monitoring project of a well-studied set of galactic star clusters that are known to contain Be stars. Our goal is to develop a statistically significant sample of variable circumstellar disk systems over multiple timescales. With a robust multi-epoch study we can determine the relative fraction of Be stars that exhibit disk-loss or disk-renewal phases, and investigate the range of timescales over which these events occur. A larger sample will improve our understanding of the prevalence and nature of the disk variability, and may provide insight about underlying physical mechanisms.

  7. B[e] Supergiants' Circumstellar Environment: Disks or Rings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelias, G.; Kraus, M.; Aret, A.; Cidale, L.; Arias, M. L.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2017-02-01

    B[e] supergiants are a phase in the evolution of some massive stars for which we have observational evidence but no predictions by any stellar evolution model. The mass-loss during this phase creates a complex circumstellar environment with atomic, molecular, and dust regions usually found in rings or disk-like structures. However, the detailed structure and the formation of the circumstellar environment are not well-understood, requiring further investigation. To address that we initiated an observing campaign to obtain a homogeneous set of high-resolution spectra in both the optical and NIR (using MPG-ESO/FEROS, GEMINI /Phoenix and VLT/CRIRES, respectively). We monitor a number of Galactic B[e] supergiants, for which we examined the [O I] and [Ca II] emission lines and the bandheads of the CO and SiO molecules to probe the structure and the kinematics of their formation regions. We find that the emission from each tracer forms either in a single or multiple equatorial rings.

  8. An energetic stellar outburst accompanied by circumstellar light echoes.

    PubMed

    Bond, Howard E; Henden, Arne; Levay, Zoltan G; Panagia, Nino; Sparks, William B; Starrfield, Sumner; Wagner, R Mark; Corradi, R L M; Munari, U

    2003-03-27

    Some classes of stars, including novae and supernovae, undergo explosive outbursts that eject stellar material into space. In 2002, the previously unknown variable star V838 Monocerotis brightened suddenly by a factor of approximately 10(4). Unlike a supernova or nova, it did not explosively eject its outer layers; rather, it simply expanded to become a cool supergiant with a moderate-velocity stellar wind. Superluminal light echoes were discovered as light from the outburst propagated into the surrounding, pre-existing circumstellar dust. Here we report high-resolution imaging and polarimetry of those light echoes, which allow us to set direct geometric distance limits to the object. At a distance of >6 kpc, V838 Mon at its maximum brightness was temporarily the brightest star in the Milky Way. The presence of the circumstellar dust implies that previous eruptions have occurred, and spectra show it to be a binary system. When combined with the high luminosity and unusual outburst behaviour, these characteristics indicate that V838 Mon represents a hitherto unknown type of stellar outburst, for which we have no completely satisfactory physical explanation.

  9. Circumstellar Dust in the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blair, W. P.; Borkowski, K. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Reynolds, S. P.; Sankrit, R.

    2012-01-01

    Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1604, is widely believed to be the result of a Type Ia supernova, and shows IR, optical, and X-ray evidence for an interaction of the blast wave with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM). We present low-resolution 7.5-38 μm IR spectra of selected regions within the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Spectra of those regions where the blast wave is encountering circumstellar material show strong features at 10 and 18 μm. These spectral features are most consistent with various silicate particles, likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution. While it is possible that some features may arise from freshly formed ejecta dust, morphological evidence suggests that it is more likely that they originate from dust in the CSM. We isolate the dust grain absorption efficiencies for several regions in Kepler and compare them to laboratory data for dust particles of various compositions. The hottest dust in the remnant originates in the regions of dense, radiatively shocked clumps of gas, identified in optical images. Models of collisionally heated dust show that such shocks are capable of heating grains to temperatures of > 150 K. We confirm the finding that Kepler's SNR is still interacting with CSM in at least part of the remnant after 400 years. The significant quantities of silicate dust are consistent with a relatively massive progenitor.

  10. Interpreting the extended emission around three nearby debris disc host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. P.; Kirchschlager, F.; Ertel, S.; Augereau, J.-C.; Kennedy, G. M.; Booth, M.; Wolf, S.; Montesinos, B.; Eiroa, C.; Matthews, B.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Cool debris discs are a relic of the planetesimal formation process around their host star, analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. As such, they can be used as a proxy to probe the origin and formation of planetary systems like our own. Aims: The Herschel open time key programmes "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) and "Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre" (DEBRIS) observed many nearby, sun-like stars at far-infrared wavelengths seeking to detect and characterize the emission from their circumstellar dust. Excess emission attributable to the presence of dust was identified from around ~20% of stars. Herschel's high angular resolution (~7'' FWHM at 100 μm) provided the capacity for resolving debris belts around nearby stars with radial extents comparable to the solar system (50-100 au). Methods: As part of the DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, we obtained observations of three debris disc stars, HIP 22263 (HD 30495), HIP 62207 (HD 110897), and HIP 72848 (HD 131511), at far-infrared wavelengths with the Herschel PACS instrument. Combining these new images and photometry with ancilliary data from the literature, we undertook simultaneous multi-wavelength modelling of the discs' radial profiles and spectral energy distributions using three different methodologies: single annulus, modified black body, and a radiative transfer code. Results: We present the first far-infrared spatially resolved images of these discs and new single-component debris disc models. We characterize the capacity of the models to reproduce the disc parameters based on marginally resolved emission through analysis of two sets of simulated systems (based on the HIP 22263 and HIP 62207 data) with the noise levels typical of the Herschel images. We find that the input parameter values are recovered well at noise levels attained in the observations presented here.

  11. Herschel/HIFI observations of the circumstellar ammonia lines in IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. R.; He, J. H.; Szczerba, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Justtanont, K.; Teyssier, D.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Olofsson, H.; Planesas, P.; Marston, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.; de Koter, A.; Schöier, F. L.

    2016-08-01

    Context. A discrepancy exists between the abundance of ammonia (NH3) derived previously for the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of IRC+10216 from far-IR submillimeter rotational lines and that inferred from radio inversion or mid-infrared (MIR) absorption transitions. Aims: To address the discrepancy described above, new high-resolution far-infrared (FIR) observations of both ortho- and para-NH3 transitions toward IRC+10216 were obtained with Herschel, with the goal of determining the ammonia abundance and constraining the distribution of NH3 in the envelope of IRC+10216. Methods: We used the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board Herschel to observe all rotational transitions up to the J = 3 level (three ortho- and six para-NH3 lines). We conducted non-LTE multilevel radiative transfer modelling, including the effects of near-infrared (NIR) radiative pumping through vibrational transitions. The computed emission line profiles are compared with the new HIFI data, the radio inversion transitions, and the MIR absorption lines in the ν2 band taken from the literature. Results: We found that NIR pumping is of key importance for understanding the excitation of rotational levels of NH3. The derived NH3 abundances relative to molecular hydrogen were (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10-8 for ortho-NH3 and for para-NH3, consistent with an ortho/para ratio of 1. These values are in a rough agreement with abundances derived from the inversion transitions, as well as with the total abundance of NH3 inferred from the MIR absorption lines. To explain the observed rotational transitions, ammonia must be formed near to the central star at a radius close to the end of the wind acceleration region, but no larger than about 20 stellar radii (1σ confidence level). Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA. HIFI is the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far

  12. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  13. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  14. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  15. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    PubMed

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Searching for the Expelled Hydrogen Envelope in Type I Supernovae via Late-Time Hα Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Pooley, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Wheeler, J. C.; Szalai, T.; Kelly, P.; MacQueen, P.; Marion, G. H.; Sárneczky, K.

    2017-03-01

    We report the first results from our long-term observational survey aimed at discovering late-time interaction between the ejecta of hydrogen-poor Type I supernovae (SNe I) and the hydrogen-rich envelope expelled from the progenitor star several decades/centuries before explosion. The expelled envelope, moving with a velocity of ∼10–100 km s‑1, is expected to be caught up by the fast-moving SN ejecta several years/decades after explosion, depending on the history of the mass-loss process acting in the progenitor star prior to explosion. The collision between the SN ejecta and the circumstellar envelope results in net emission in the Balmer lines, especially Hα. We look for signs of late-time Hα emission in older SNe Ia/Ibc/IIb with hydrogen-poor ejecta via narrowband imaging. Continuum-subtracted Hα emission has been detected for 13 point sources: 9 SN Ibc, 1 SN IIb, and 3 SN Ia events. Thirty-eight SN sites were observed on at least two epochs, from which three objects (SN 1985F, SN 2005kl, and SN 2012fh) showed significant temporal variation in the strength of their Hα emission in our Direct Imaging Auxiliary Functions Instrument (DIAFI) data. This suggests that the variable emission is probably not due to nearby H ii regions unassociated with the SN and hence is an important additional hint that ejecta–circumstellar medium interaction may take place in these systems. Moreover, we successfully detected the late-time Hα emission from the Type Ib SN 2014C, which was recently discovered as a strongly interacting SN in various (radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray) bands.

  17. 26 CFR 1.6011-2 - Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's. 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax Returns Or Statements § 1.6011-2 Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's. (a) Records and information. Every DISC and former DISC (as defined in section 992...

  18. Preparation of ormetoprim sulfadimethoxine medicated discs for disc diffusion assay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Romet (a blend of ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine) is a typeA medicated article for the manufacture of medicated feed in the catfish industry. Recently, the commercial manufacture of ormetoprim–sulfadimethoxine susceptibility discs was discontinued. Ormetoprim–sulfadimethoxine discs were prepared at...

  19. Sizes of protoplanetary discs after star-disc encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslau, Andreas; Steinhausen, Manuel; Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Most stars do not form in isolation, but as part of a star cluster or association. These young stars are initially surrounded by protoplanetary discs. In these cluster environments tidal interactions with other cluster members can alter the disc properties. Besides the disc frequency, its mass, angular momentum, and energy, the disc's size is particularly prone to being changed by a passing star. So far the change in disc size has only been investigated for a small number of very specific encounters. Several studies investigated the effect of the cluster environment on the sizes of planetary systems like our own solar system, based on a generalisation of information from this limited sample. We performed numerical simulations covering the wide parameter space typical of young star clusters, to test the validity of this approach. Here the sizes of discs after encounters are presented, based on a size definition that is comparable to the one used in observational studies. We find that, except for encounters between equal-mass stars, the usually applied estimates are insufficient. They tend to severely overestimate the remaining disc size. We show that the disc size after an encounter can be described by a relatively simple dependence on the periastron distance and the mass ratio of the encounter partners. This knowledge allows us, for example, to pin down the types of encounter possibly responsible for the structure of today's solar system. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Millimeter-Wave Observations of Circumstellar 14N/15N and 12C/13C Ratios: New Insights into J-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adande, Gilles; Ziurys, Lucy M.; Woolf, Neville

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of 14N/15N and 12C/13C isotopic ratios have been conducted towards circumstellar envelopes of a sample of evolved stars using the J = 3→2 rotational transitions of the isotopologues of HCN, observed with the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Towards the J-type stars Y CVn and RY Dra, where 12C/13C ~ 3, the 14N/15N ratios were found to be 120-180 and 225, respectively. The 14N/15N ratio is thus anomalously low relative to interstellar values and a factor ~100 lower than equilibrium values predicted from the CNO cycle. Combining these results with previous chemical and isotopic prior observations of these stars, we conclude that two anomalous behaviors are likely to have occurred in Y CVn and RY Dra. First, the stellar envelope failed to participate in the normal mixing seen in low mass red giants, in which C and then O are substantially converted to N. Secondly, both the carbon enrichment and anomalous isotopic composition of both 13C and15N could have been caused by a plume of hot gas, hydrogen poor but enriched in 12C, from a helium flash mixing into the envelope.

  1. Disc cell therapies: critical issues.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Marta; Kregar Velikonja, Nevenka; Urban, Jill P G; Fairbank, Jeremy C T

    2014-06-01

    Disc cell therapies, in which cells are injected into the degenerate disc in order to regenerate the matrix and restore function, appear to be an attractive, minimally invasive method of treatment. Interest in this area has stimulated research into disc cell biology in particular. However, other important issues, some of which are discussed here, need to be considered if cell-based therapies are to be brought to the clinic. Firstly, a question which is barely addressed in the literature, is how to identify patients with 'degenerative disc disease' who would benefit from cell therapy. Pain not disc degeneration is the symptom which drives patients to the clinic. Even though there are associations between back pain and disc degeneration, many people with even severely degenerate discs, with herniated discs or with spinal stenosis, are pain-free. It is not possible using currently available techniques to identify whether disc repair or regeneration would remove symptoms or prevent symptoms from occurring in future. Moreover, the repair process in human discs is very slow (years) because of the low cell density which can be supported nutritionally even in healthy human discs. If repair is necessary for relief of symptoms, questions regarding quality of life and rehabilitation during this long process need consideration. Also, some serious technical issues remain. Finding appropriate cell sources and scaffolds have received most attention, but these are not the only issues determining the feasibility of the procedure. There are questions regarding the safety of implanting cells by injection through the annulus whether the nutrient supply to the disc is sufficient to support implanted cells and whether, if cells are able to survive, conditions in a degenerate human disc will allow them to repair the damaged tissue. If cell therapy for treatment of disc-related disorders is to enter the clinic as a routine treatment, investigations must examine the questions related to

  2. Envelope Inflation or Stellar Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, S.; Matzner, C. D.

    We an optically-thick, transonic, steady wind model for a H-free Wolf-Rayet star. A bifurcation is found across a critical mass loss rate Mb. Slower winds M < Mb extend by several hydrostatic stellar radii, reproduce features of envelope in ation from Petrovic et al. (2006) and Gräfener et al. (2012), and are energetically unbound. This work is of particular interest for extended envelopes and winds, radiative hydrodynamic instabilities (eg. wind stagnation, clumping, etc.), and NLTE atmospheric models.

  3. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of nonmetallic or fabric structures for space application is considered. The following structures are suggested: (1) unpressurized space hangars; (2) extendable tunnels for soft docking; and (3) manned habitat for space stations, storage facilities, and work structures. The uses of the tunnel as a passageway: for personnel and equipment, eliminating extravehicular activity, for access to a control cabin on a space crane and between free flyers and the space station are outlined. The personnal occupied woven envelope robot (POWER) device is shown. The woven envelope (tunnel) acts as part of the boom of a crane. Potential applications of POWER are outlined. Several possible deflection mechanisms and design criteria are determined.

  4. The Three-dimensional Circumstellar Environment of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Crotts, Arlin P. S.; Kunkel, William E.; Heathcote, Stephen R.; Lawrence, Stephen S.

    2005-07-01

    Surrounding SN 1987A is a three-ring nebula attributed to interacting stellar winds, yet no model has successfully reproduced this system. Fortunately, the progenitor's mass-loss history can be reconstructed using light echoes, in which scattered light from the supernova traces the three-dimensional morphology of its circumstellar dust. In this paper, we construct and analyze the most complete map to date of the progenitor's circumstellar environment, using ground- and space-based imaging from the past 16 years. PSF-matched difference-imaging analyses of data from 1988 through 1997 reveal material between 1 and 28 lt-yr from the SN. Previously known structures, such as an inner hourglass, Napoleon's Hat, and a contact discontinuity, are probed in greater spatial detail than before. Previously unknown features are also discovered, such as a southern counterpart to Napoleon's Hat. Careful analyses of these echoes allows the reconstruction of the probable circumstellar environment, revealing a richly structured bipolar nebula. An outer, double-lobed ``Peanut,'' which is believed to be the contact discontinuity between red supergiant and main-sequence winds, is a prolate shell extending 28 lt-yr along the poles and 11 lt-yr near the equator. Napoleon's Hat, previously believed to be an independent structure, is the waist of this Peanut, which is pinched to a radius of 6 lt-yr. Interior to this is a cylindrical hourglass, 1 lt-yr in radius and 4 lt-yr long, which connects to the Peanut by a thick equatorial disk. The nebulae are inclined 41° south and 8° east of the line of sight, slightly elliptical in cross section, and marginally offset west of the SN. From the hourglass to the large, bipolar lobes, echo fluxes suggest that the gas density drops from 1-3 to >~0.03 cm-3, while the maximum dust-grain size increases from ~0.2 to 2 μm, and the silicate:carbonaceous dust ratio decreases. The nebulae have a total mass of ~1.7 Msolar. The geometry of the three rings is

  5. The Impact of SN1987A with its Circumstellar Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Following is final report on the study "The Impact of SN1987A with its Circumstellar Ring", which is now complete. In 1994, it was predicted that the blast wave from SN1987A would strike the circumstellar ring in AD1999+/-3, and that the ring would brighten by several hundreds optically as the shock entered the ring. It was also predicted that the emission lines from the shocked ring would have linewidths of a few hundred km/s. Today, we see a "hot spot" on the ring that first appeared in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images in 1995 and has doubled in brightness between August 1997 and February 1998. Moreover, spectra from STIS show that the emission lines from the hot spot have widths and blue shifts of order 200 km/s, just as we predicted in 1994. Our guess of 1999+/-3 for the impact time was lucky, because we assumed that the hot gas in the bubble between the supernova and the ring had a low density (approximately 10 cm(exp -3)). But it was pointed out that the ROSAT observations of soft X-rays from SN 1987A implied that the intervening gas had a higher density, (approximately 100 cm(exp -3)), which would delay the impact until ca. 2007. Others developed hydrodynamic models to fit the ROSAT X-ray emission spectrum and came to the same conclusion. But these models were oversimplified in that they assumed that the ring was perfectly round. Now we see clearly that the hot spot is a peninsula that protrudes inward from the ring -- the first spot on the ring to be struck by the blast wave. No doubt there are other protrusions on the ring, which we may expect to light up in the next few years until they finally merge to set the entire ring ablaze, probably within 5 - 10 years. It was also predicted that the X-ray emission must be accompanied by optical and ultraviolet emission from atoms in the supernova debris and in the circumstellar gas that cross the reverse shock and the blast wave, respectively, and that the Lyman-alpha and NV emission lines should be bright

  6. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  7. Fantastic Disc Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Michael R.; Johnson, Romona; Thomas, Jessica; Spell, Melissa; Popham, John; Croft, Brent; Umpleby, Albert; Verbel, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Disc activities are an excellent elementary content area for both skill and fitness enhancement. They may occur through progressive skill and drill practice, small sided-game examples, modifications of traditional disc activities appropriate to large groups, and with adjustments designed to increase activity and fitness levels. For games in this…

  8. Early UV emission from disc-originated matter (DOM) in Type Ia supernovae in the double-degenerate scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Naveh; Soker, Noam

    2017-09-01

    We show that the blue and UV excess emission in the first few days of some Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can be accounted in the double-degenerate (DD) scenario by the collision of the SN ejecta with circumstellar matter that was blown by the accretion disc formed during the merger process of the two white dwarfs (WDs). We assume that in cases of excess early light, the disc blows the circumstellar matter, that we term disc-originated matter (DOM), hours to days before explosion. To perform our analysis, we first provide a model-based definition for early excess light, replacing the definition of excess light relative to a power-law fit to the rising luminosity. We then examine the light curves of the SNe Ia iPTF14atg and SN 2012cg, and find that the collision of the ejecta with a DOM in the frame of the DD scenario can account for their early excess emission. Thus, early excess light does not necessarily imply the presence of a stellar companion in the frame of the single-degenerate scenario. Our findings further increase the variety of phenomena that the DD scenario can account for, and emphasize the need to consider all different SN Ia scenarios when interpreting observations.

  9. Radiofrequency stimulation of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Steven; Falco, Frank

    2003-10-01

    The etiology of discogenic pain is poorly understood. The most accepted theory has been that nociceptors in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosis are responsible for transmitting pain secondary to internal disc disruptions. The concept of "neoneuralization" after disc injury has been disseminated. It has been noted that disc degeneration and injury are associated with ingrowth of neural fibers into the disc annulus. One mechanism of Intradiscal Electrodothermal Therapy (IDET) has been thought to be lesioning of these nociceptors. Five consecutive patients were studied using an intraannular electrode. The Radionics discTRODE was used. It was found impossible to selectively stimulate axial pain fibers using this system. Radicular stimulation was noted in all patients at all levels studied. The implication of these findings concerning the concept of neoneuralization, mechanism of IDET, and possible strategies to decrease discogenic pain are discussed.

  10. Imaginal disc regeneration takes flight.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Iswar K; Serras, Florenci

    2017-04-01

    Drosophila imaginal discs, the larval precursors of adult structures such as the wing and leg, are capable of regenerating after damage. During the course of regeneration, discs can sometimes generate structures that are appropriate for a different type of disc, a phenomenon termed transdetermination. Until recently, these phenomena were studied by physically fragmenting discs and then transplanting them into the abdomens of adult female flies. This field has experienced a renaissance following the development of genetic ablation systems that can damage precisely defined regions of the disc without the need for surgery. Together with more traditional approaches, these newer methods have generated many novel insights into wound healing, the mechanisms that drive regenerative growth, plasticity during regeneration and systemic effects of tissue damage and regeneration.

  11. Intraoral micro-identification discs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, R W

    1991-12-01

    Intraoral micro-identification discs have recently been utilized to provide a more permanent method of personal identification. A wafer of plastic or metal with a surface area of 2.5 to 5 mm2 and carrying identifying numbers and/or letters (indicia) is bonded to the buccal enamel surface of the posterior teeth. Personal identification can occur after the I.D. disc is identified and the indicia is read. Reading of photoreduced indicia requires the aid of a microscope subsequent to the removal of the microdisc. In situ reading of disc indicia is possible using low power handheld magnifiers if the size of the indicia approximates 0.3 mm. Computerization is an integral part of non-custom alpha/numeric type designs, but a custom disc carries a name, address, and other specific information unique to the manufacturer. The use of a computer improves access to the database and it decreases the amount of data placed on the disc. Microdisc bases may be fabricated using a mylar type plastic or they may be manufactured from a stainless steel blank. Plastic discs are constructed with an internal sandwich containing the photo-reduced indicia. Metal discs are marked with a photochemical etch or engraved with a computer driven YAG laser. Attachment of the disc to the enamel surface is accomplished by conventional etching and bonding techniques and are typically bonded to the buccal surface of the maxillary first permanent molar or the second primary molar. Clear composite bonding material covers the disc so that salivary contamination does not result in degradation of the indicia. Orthodontic style discs with a mesh back carry laser written information that may be cemented with conventional orthodontic bonding cement. Standardization of the indicia and overall design is considered to be an important aspect of patient and professional acceptance.

  12. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Chen, Christine; Perrin, Marshall D.; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Schneider, Glenn; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments. HST/AR-12652), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. We present the results of the overall reduction campaign and discuss the first statistical analysis of the candidate detections. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here an update and overview of the specifications of this standard.

  13. Astrobiological Effects of Stellar Radiation in Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; Guinan, Edward F.; Kurucz, Robert L.

    2006-10-01

    The centerpiece of all life on Earth is carbon-based biochemistry. Previous scientific research has suggested that biochemistry based on carbon may also play a decisive role in extraterrestrial life forms, i.e., alien life outside of Earth, if existent. In the following, we explore if carbon-based macromolecules (such as DNA) in the environments of stars other than the Sun are able to survive the effects of energetic stellar radiation, such as UV-C in the wavelength band between 200 and 290 nm. We focus on main-sequence stars akin to the Sun, but of hotter (F-type stars) and cooler (K- and M-type stars) surface temperature. Emphasis is placed on investigating the radiative environment in stellar habitable zones (HZs). Stellar habitable zones have an important relevance in astrobiology because they constitute circumstellar regions in which a planet of suitable size can have surface temperatures for water to exist in liquid form.

  14. Variable Circumstellar Disks: Prevalence, Timescales, and Physical Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrow, Anthony; Wisniewski, John P.; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Covey, Kevin R.; Gerhartz, Cody; Richardson, Noel; Thao, Pa

    2017-01-01

    Rapidly rotating B-type stars often experience mass ejection that leads to the formation of a circumstellar gas disk, as diagnosed by distinct emission lines present in their spectra. The mass ejection from these stars, known as classical Be stars, sometimes slows or stops, leading to the mass falling back onto the central star and the disk dissipating. The prevalence and time-scale of such disk-loss and disk-replenishment episodes, as well as the underlying physical processes that cause the underlying mass ejection, remain unknown. We are using multi-epoch broad- and narrow-band photometric observations of 12 young open clusters to characterize the prevalence and time-scale of disk-loss and disk-replenishment episodes. We use our observations to gauge which cluster objects exhibit H-alpha emission, which is a primary indicator of Be stars in our clusters. This program is supported by NSF-AST 1411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  15. Molecular catastrophes and the formation of circumstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Interstellar dust grains are presumed in part to have their origins in the outer atmospheres of red giant and supergiant stars because, despite the efficiency of shock destruction of grains in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteoritic samples possess isotopic signatures that are consistent with nucleosynthetic origin in the interior of evolved stars. There is ample evidence to suggest that once dust grains form near red giants and supergiants, radiation pressure is sufficient to drive them to infinity. The molecular catastrophe description for the conversion of chromospheric gas into molecular masers and circumstellar dust holds promise for a coherent explanation of the formation of these entities and the process of mas loss from cool, high luminosity objects.

  16. Short-term spectral and polarimetric variability in the Herbig AE star AB Aurigae as an indicator of the circumstellar inhomogeneity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, N. G.; Pogodin, M. A.; Najdenov, I. D.; Romanyuk, I. I.

    1995-06-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous spectral and polarimetric investigation of AB Aur - the Ae Herbig star from the "PCyg" subclass. About 150 high-resolution CCD spectra in the region of Hα and more than 100 UBVRI measurements of the linear polarization were obtained at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory during two seasons in 1993 and 1994. Additional polarimetric observations in the B-band were carried out at the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Northern Caucasus). A strong variability of the Hα PCyg-type profile is analyzed on a timescale from hours to months. It is shown to be connected with circumstellar inhomogeneities moving in the envelope. The existence of a strong long-lived stream is supposed on the basis of joint spectral and polarimetric data in January 4-10, 1994.

  17. A NEW METHOD OF DETERMINING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EVOLVED BINARY SYSTEMS REVEALED IN THE OBSERVED CIRCUMSTELLAR PATTERNS: APPLICATION TO AFGL 3068

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyosun; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu

    2012-11-01

    The binary characteristics of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are imprinted in the asymmetric patterns of their circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). We develop a simple method for constraining the orbital parameters of such binary stars from the characteristics of a spiral-like pattern observed at large distances from the central stars. We place constraints on the properties of AFGL 3068 (i.e., the masses of binary components, the viewing inclination of the orbital plane, as well as the orbital period, velocity, and separation). In particular, the mass of the companion star of AFGL 3068 is estimated to be greater than 2.6 M{sub Sun }. This method is applicable to other AGB stars, providing a step toward understanding the role binary stars can play in explaining the diverse patterns in observed CSEs.

  18. TIDALLY INDUCED BROWN DWARF AND PLANET FORMATION IN CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, Ingo; Kroupa, Pavel; Goodwin, Simon P.; Stamatellos, Dimitrios; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    2010-07-01

    Most stars are born in clusters and the resulting gravitational interactions between cluster members may significantly affect the evolution of circumstellar disks and therefore the formation of planets and brown dwarfs (BDs). Recent findings suggest that tidal perturbations of typical circumstellar disks due to close encounters may inhibit rather than trigger disk fragmentation and so would seem to rule out planet formation by external tidal stimuli. However, the disk models in these calculations were restricted to disk radii of 40 AU and disk masses below 0.1 M{sub sun}. Here, we show that even modest encounters can trigger fragmentation around 100 AU in the sorts of massive ({approx}0.5 M{sub sun}), extended ({>=}100 AU) disks that are observed around young stars. Tidal perturbation alone can do this; no disk-disk collision is required. We also show that very low mass binary systems can form through the interaction of objects in the disk. In our computations, otherwise non-fragmenting massive disks, once perturbed, fragment into several objects between about 0.01 and 0.1 M{sub sun}, i.e., over the whole BD mass range. Typically, these orbit on highly eccentric orbits or are even ejected. While probably not suitable for the formation of Jupiter- or Neptune-type planets, our scenario provides a possible formation mechanism for BDs and very massive planets which, interestingly, leads to a mass distribution consistent with the canonical substellar initial mass function. As a minor outcome, a possible explanation for the origin of misaligned extrasolar planetary systems is discussed.

  19. Epsilon Aurigae: a Laboratory for Understanding Circumstellar Disk Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, Robert; Ake, Thomas; Backman, Dana; Guinan, Edward

    2005-06-01

    Circumstellar disks are now known to be common around young stellar objects. However, their dimensions and compositions are measured only with difficulty. Models suffer from lack of key constraints. The disk around the secondary in the epsilon Aurigae binary, in contrast, has some well-determined properties. A disk is inferred from eclipse circumstances to be a 20 AU diameter, viewed edge-on & partially covers the F0 supergiant primary star for 2 full years during the 27 year binary period. This disk was discovered to be a strong thermal IR source during the 1982-84 eclipse, in part by IRAS. We seek IRS & MIPS SED data to clarify the nature and evolutionary status of this large protoplanetary-like disk & help to better constrain a class of disk models. This is among the most massive stellar systems with a disk. Its dimensions are well-known from the eclipse light curve. Temperature of the disk facing us during eclipse is known from its IR SED; the composition & velocities of gas from the secondary are known from absorption lines detected in the last eclipse. The mass of the system & proximity of the disk to the luminous primary star let us explore extremes of circumstellar disk physics. The secondary now is near quadrature, the time of most rapidly changing geometric aspect, so that measurements now give best resolution of temperature versus azimuth angle around the disk. Our goals include: More precisely defining temperature & projected size of the disk-shaped IR-emitting secondary object via IRS and MIPS measurements; Searching with IRS for emission and absorption features, against the cool secondary; Determining grain composition & properties via the full range of SST spectroscopy coverage [IRS & MIPS SED]; Seeking evidence for mass-loss history in extended material around the system [MIPS]; Establishing baselines of these & other measures for comparison during forthcoming eclipse campaigns (2009). It is only with SST that these science goals can be accomplished.

  20. Circumstellar grain extinction properties of recently discovered post AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Snow, Theodore P., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstellar grains of two hot evolved post asymptotic giant branch (post AGB) stars, HD 89353 and HD 213985 were examined. From ultraviolet spectra, energy balance of the flux, and Kurucz models, the extinction around 2175 A was derived. With visual spectra, an attempt was made to detect 6614 A diffuse band absorption arising from the circumstellar grains so that we could examine the relationship of these features to the infrared features. For both stars, we did not detect any diffuse band absorption at 6614 A, implying the carrier of this diffuse band is not the carrier of the unidentified infrared features not of the 2175 A bump. The linear ultraviolet extinction of the carbon-rich star HD 89353 was determined to continue across the 2175 A region with no sign of the bump; for HD 213985 it was found to be the reverse: a strong, wide bump in the mid-ultraviolet. The 213985 bump was found to be positioned at 2340 A, longward of its usual position in the interstellar medium. Since HD 213985 was determined to have excess carbon, the bump probably arises from a carbonaceous grain. Thus, in view of the ultraviolet and infrared properties of the two post AGB stars, ubiquitous interstellar infrared emission features do not seem to be associated with the 2175 A bump. Instead, the infrared features seem related to the linear ultraviolet extinction component: hydrocarbon grains of radius less than 300 A are present with the linear HD 89353 extinction; amorphous anhydrous carbonaceous grains of radius less than 50 A might cause the shifted ultraviolet extinction bump of HD 213985.

  1. Beta Pic-like Circumstellar Gas Disk Around 2 And

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    This grant was awarded to support the data analysis and publication of results from our project entitled P Pic-like Circumstellar Gas Disk Around 2 And . We proposed to obtain FUSE observations of 2 And and study the characteristics and origin of its circumstellar gas. We observed 2 Andromedae with FUSE on 3-4 July 2001 in 11 exposures with a total exposure time of 21,289 seconds through the LWRS aperture. Our data were calibrated with Version 1.8.7 of the CALFUSE pipeline processing software. We corrected the wavelength scale for the heliocentric velocity error in this version of the CALFUSE software. The relative accuracy of the calibrated wavelength scale is +/- 9 km/s . We produced a co-added spectrum in the LiF 1B and LiF 2A channels (covering the 1100 to 1180 A region) by cross-correlating the 11 individual exposures and doing an exposure-time weighted average flux. The final co-added spectra have a signal-to-noise ratio in the stellar continuum near 1150 A of about 20. To obtain an absolute wavelength calibration, we cross-correlated our observed spectra with a model spectrum to obtain the best fit for the photospheric C I lines. Because the photospheric lines are very broad, this yields an absolute accuracy for the wavelength scale of approx.+/- 15 km/s. We then rebinned 5 original pixels to yield the optimal sampling of .033 A for each new pixel, because the calibrated spectra oversample the spectral resolution for FUSE+LWRS (R = 20,000 +/- 2,000).

  2. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  3. Oxygen-rich Mass Loss with a Pinch of Salt: NaCl in the Circumstellar Gas of IK Tauri and VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, S. N.; Apponi, A. J.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    The NaCl molecule has been observed in the circumstellar envelopes of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IK Tauri (IK Tau)-the first identifications of a metal refractory in oxygen-rich shells of evolved stars. Five rotational transitions of NaCl at 1 and 2 mm were detected toward VY CMa and three 1 mm lines were observed toward IK Tau, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory. In both objects, the line widths of the NaCl profiles were extremely narrow relative to those of other molecules, indicating that sodium chloride has not reached the terminal outflow velocity in either star, likely a result of early condensation onto grains. Modeling the observed spectra suggests abundances, relative to H2, of f~5×10-9 in VY CMa and f~4×10-9 in IK Tau, with source sizes of 0.5" and 0.3", respectively. The extent of these sources is consistent with the size of the dust acceleration zones in both stars. NaCl therefore appears to be at least as abundant in O-rich shells as compared to C-rich envelopes, where f~(0.2-2)×10-9, although it appears to condense out earlier in the O-rich case. Chemical equilibrium calculations indicate that NaCl is the major carrier of sodium at T~1100 K for oxygen-rich stars, with predicted fractional abundances in good agreement with the observations. These measurements suggest that crystalline salt may be an important condensate for sodium in both C- and O-rich circumstellar shells.

  4. Double-disc gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, Seth J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewtih, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separtion of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve.

  5. Comparison of animal discs used in disc research to human lumbar disc: torsion mechanics and collagen content.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Brent L; Beckstein, Jesse C; Martin, John T; Beattie, Elizabeth E; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Schaer, Thomas P; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2012-07-01

    Experimental measurement and normalization of in vitro disc torsion mechanics and collagen content for several animal species used in intervertebral disc research and comparing these with the human disc. To aid in the selection of appropriate animal models for disc research by measuring torsional mechanical properties and collagen content. There is lack of data and variability in testing protocols for comparing animal and human disc torsion mechanics and collagen content. Intervertebral disc torsion mechanics were measured and normalized by disc height and polar moment of inertia for 11 disc types in 8 mammalian species: the calf, pig, baboon, goat, sheep, rabbit, rat, and mouse lumbar discs, and cow, rat, and mouse caudal discs. Collagen content was measured and normalized by dry weight for the same discs except the rat and the mouse. Collagen fiber stretch in torsion was calculated using an analytical model. Measured torsion parameters varied by several orders of magnitude across the different species. After geometric normalization, only the sheep and pig discs were statistically different from human discs. Fiber stretch was found to be highly dependent on the assumed initial fiber angle. The collagen content of the discs was similar, especially in the outer annulus where only the calf and goat discs were statistically different from human. Disc collagen content did not correlate with torsion mechanics. Disc torsion mechanics are comparable with human lumbar discs in 9 of 11 disc types after normalization by geometry. The normalized torsion mechanics and collagen content of the multiple animal discs presented are useful for selecting and interpreting results for animal disc models. Structural organization of the fiber angle may explain the differences that were noted between species after geometric normalization.

  6. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF CRYSTALLINE SILICATES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Poteet, Charles A.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Watson, Dan M.; Remming, Ian S.; McClure, Melissa K.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Tobin, John J.; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Allen, Lori E.; Ali, Babar

    2011-06-01

    We present the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the Orion A protostar HOPS-68. The mid-infrared spectrum reveals crystalline substructure at 11.1, 16.1, 18.8, 23.6, 27.9, and 33.6 {mu}m superimposed on the broad 9.7 and 18 {mu}m amorphous silicate features; the substructure is well matched by the presence of the olivine end-member forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}). Crystalline silicates are often observed as infrared emission features around the circumstellar disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars. However, this is the first unambiguous detection of crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling, protostellar envelope. We estimate the crystalline mass fraction along the line of sight by first assuming that the crystalline silicates are located in a cold absorbing screen and secondly by utilizing radiative transfer models. The resulting crystalline mass fractions of 0.14 and 0.17, respectively, are significantly greater than the upper limit found in the interstellar medium ({approx}<0.02-0.05). We propose that the amorphous silicates were annealed within the hot inner disk and/or envelope regions and subsequently transported outward into the envelope by entrainment in a protostellar outflow.

  7. Mitral disc-valve variance

    PubMed Central

    Berroya, Renato B.; Escano, Fernando B.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with a rare complication of disc-valve prosthesis in the mitral area. A significant disc poppet and struts destruction of mitral Beall valve prostheses occurred 20 and 17 months after implantation. The resulting valve incompetence in the first case contributed to the death of the patient. The durability of Teflon prosthetic valves appears to be in question and this type of valve probably will be unacceptable if there is an increasing number of disc-valve variance in the future. Images PMID:5017573

  8. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  9. The formation and annealing of circumstellar dust, as gauged by IRAS low-resolution spectra and the microwave maser chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1990-01-01

    By comparing IRAS mean colors and LRS spectral differences in a large sample of Mira variables with the chronological sequence for development of microwave maser emission among such stars, it appears possible to describe a dust grain formation and annealing sequence. The early time spectra are dominated by aluminum oxides, which are then overrun by the emergence of silicates. Rather than the growth of silicate mantles on aluminate cores, this sequence is interpreted as a simple result of the higher electron affinity of aluminum for oxygen, resulting in an initial abundance of AlO bonds in the underoxidized grains. Once all the Al becomes fully oxidized, the relative abundances of Al and Si dictate that the AlO signature will be swamped by the growth of the SiO stretching fundamental. The correlations among the proposed dust chronology, the increasingly thick circumstellar envelopes, and the light curve asymmetries of Mira variables are instructive for understanding the evolutionary changes occurring in such stars.

  10. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: PROPERTIES OF INTERMEDIATE-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS IN OMC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George E.; Henderson, Charles P.; Schoenwald, Justin; Stacey, Gordon; Osorio, Mayra; Macias, Enrique; Thomas Megeath, S.; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; D'Alessio, Paola; De Buizer, James M.; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Keller, Luke D.; Morris, Mark R.; Remming, Ian S.; Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; and others

    2012-04-20

    We examine eight young stellar objects in the OMC-2 star-forming region based on observations from the SOFIA/FORCAST early science phase, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Atacama Pathfinder Experiment, and other results in the literature. We show the spectral energy distributions (SED) of these objects from near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, and compare the SEDs with those of sheet collapse models of protostars and circumstellar disks. Four of the objects can be modeled as protostars with infalling envelopes, two as young stars surrounded by disks, and the remaining two objects have double-peaked SEDs. We model the double-peaked sources as binaries containing a young star with a disk and a protostar. The six most luminous sources are found in a dense group within a 0.15 Multiplication-Sign 0.25 pc region; these sources have luminosities ranging from 300 L{sub Sun} to 20 L{sub Sun }. The most embedded source (OMC-2 FIR 4) can be fit by a class 0 protostar model having a luminosity of {approx}50 L{sub Sun} and mass infall rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  11. The formation and annealing of circumstellar dust, as gauged by IRAS low-resolution spectra and the microwave maser chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, R.E.; Nuth, J.A. III; Little-Marenin, I.R.; Little, S.J. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD Whitin Observatory, Wellesley, MA Bentley College, Waltham, MA )

    1990-02-01

    By comparing IRAS mean colors and LRS spectral differences in a large sample of Mira variables with the chronological sequence for development of microwave maser emission among such stars, it appears possible to describe a dust grain formation and annealing sequence. The early time spectra are dominated by aluminum oxides, which are then overrun by the emergence of silicates. Rather than the growth of silicate mantles on aluminate cores, this sequence is interpreted as a simple result of the higher electron affinity of aluminum for oxygen, resulting in an initial abundance of AlO bonds in the underoxidized grains. Once all the Al becomes fully oxidized, the relative abundances of Al and Si dictate that the AlO signature will be swamped by the growth of the SiO stretching fundamental. The correlations among the proposed dust chronology, the increasingly thick circumstellar envelopes, and the light curve asymmetries of Mira variables are instructive for understanding the evolutionary changes occurring in such stars. 10 refs.

  12. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  13. Enlivening Physics, a Local Video Disc Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how to make and use an inexpensive video disc of physics demonstrations. Discusses the background, production of the disc, subject of the disc including angular momentum, "monkey and the hunter" experiment, Doppler shift, pressure of a constant volume of gas thermometer, and wave effects, and using the disc in classroom. (YP)

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure of...

  15. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  16. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure of...

  17. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  18. Design Issues in Video Disc Map Display.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Tables: disc storage capacities under various conditions. Photos: map frames. Constanzo , D.J. (1984a), "The Potential for Video Disc Technology in...discs. Constanzo , D.J. (1984b), "Requirements and Specifications for Cartographic Video Discs", presented as a poster paper at the 1984 Army Science

  19. Enlivening Physics, a Local Video Disc Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how to make and use an inexpensive video disc of physics demonstrations. Discusses the background, production of the disc, subject of the disc including angular momentum, "monkey and the hunter" experiment, Doppler shift, pressure of a constant volume of gas thermometer, and wave effects, and using the disc in classroom. (YP)

  20. TW HYA ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP AND NEW WISE-DETECTED CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Adam; Song, Inseok; Melis, Carl E-mail: song@physast.uga.edu

    2012-07-20

    We assess the current membership of the nearby, young TW Hydrae association and examine newly proposed members with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to search for infrared excess indicative of circumstellar disks. Newly proposed members TWA 30A, TWA 30B, TWA 31, and TWA 32 all show excess emission at 12 and 22 {mu}m providing clear evidence for substantial dusty circumstellar disks around these low-mass, {approx}8 Myr old stars that were previously shown to likely be accreting circumstellar material. TWA 30B shows large amounts of self-extinction, likely due to an edge-on disk geometry. We also confirm previously reported circumstellar disks with WISE and determine a 22 {mu}m excess fraction of 42{sup +10}{sub -{sub 9}}% based on our results.

  1. 26 CFR 1.246-4 - Dividends from a DISC or former DISC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dividends from a DISC or former DISC. 1.246-4... a DISC or former DISC. The deduction provided in section 243 (relating to dividends received by... distribution or an amount treated as a dividend pursuant to section 995(c)) from a corporation which is a DISC...

  2. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill

    2008-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope Project met its milestones by creating a rudimentary safeguards envelope, proving the value of the approach on a small scale, and determining the most appropriate path forward. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant’s large cache of reprocessing process monitoring data, dubbed UBER Data, was recovered and used in the analysis. A probabilistic Z test was used on a Markov Monte Carlo simulation of expected diversion data when compared with normal operating data. The data regarding a fully transient event in a tank was used to create a simple requirement, representative of a safeguards envelope, whose impact was a decrease in operating efficiency by 1.3% but an increase in material balance period of 26%. This approach is operator, state, and international safeguards friendly and should be applied to future reprocessing plants. Future requirements include tank-to-tank correlations in reprocessing facilities, detailed operations impact studies, simulation inclusion, automated optimization, advanced statistics analysis, and multi-attribute utility analysis.

  3. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-08-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

  4. Models for circumstellar nebulae around red and blue supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chita, S. M.

    2011-10-01

    In this thesis, we model the circumstellar medium of stars with initial masses of 8, 12, 18 and 20 solar masses, over their entire life from the main sequence until their supernova explosion. During the post-main-sequence stages, stars can evolve through several blue and red supergiant stages depending on their initial mass, composition and rotation rate. The models considered in the second Chapter have long-lasting RSG stages starting after the MS. In this phase, they develop shells of RSG wind material at the location where the free streaming RSG wind is stalled by the thermal pressure of the hot MS bubble, close to the central star. The RSG shells develop violent Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Once these start to grow non-linear, the RSG shell becomes highly structured as clumps form, and shell material mixes with material in the hot bubble. Later, the stars evolve to the BSG stage, during which the RSG shells are completely destroyed. These models return to the RSG stage, and build new RSG shells, which are more massive than those formed earlier. RSG shells are essential for our understanding of bipolar emission nebulae around BSGs. In the third Chapter are shown the results of the wind-wind interaction model of single star with 12 solar masses. On a time scale of a few 10000 yr, a BSG hour-glas shaped nebula expands into the sphere defined by the RSG shell. The faster polar parts of the hour glass hit the inner edge of the RSG shell first. The collision creates a pair of hot and dense polar caps. As time passes, the collision zone moves to lower latitudes of the RSG shell and becomes more confined in latitude. At the same time, the interaction of the BSG wind with the equatorial disk defines a second, ring shaped collision zone in the equatorial plane. These structures are reminiscent of the observed nebulae around the blue supergiant Sher 25. In the Chapter 3 we present calculations that predict the properties of the circumstellar medium for rapidly rotating

  5. Tissue engineering: A live disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukins, David W. L.

    2005-12-01

    A material-cell hybrid device that mimics the anatomic shape of the intervertebral disc has been made and successfully implanted into mice to show that tissue engineering may, in the future, benefit sufferers from back pain.

  6. Eclipse Mapping of Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, R.

    The eclipse mapping method is an inversion technique that makes use of the information contained in eclipse light curves to probe the structure, the spectrum and the time evolution of accretion discs. In this review I present the basics of the method and discuss its different implementations. I summarize the most important results obtained to date and discuss how they have helped to improve our understanding of accretion physics, from testing the theoretical radial brightness temperature distribution and measuring mass accretion rates to showing the evolution of the structure of a dwarf novae disc throughout its outburst cycle, from isolating the spectrum of a disc wind to revealing the geometry of disc spiral shocks. I end with an outline of the future prospects.

  7. Disc Golf, a Growing Sport

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joseph T.; Jones, Richard E.; Runstrom, Michael; Hardy, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    Background Disc golf is a sport played much like traditional golf, but rather than using a ball and club, players throw flying discs with various throwing motions. It has been played by an estimated 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Like all sports, injuries sustained while playing disc golf are not uncommon. Although formalized in the 1970s, it has grown at a rapid pace; however, disc golf–related injuries have yet to be described in the medical literature. Purpose To describe the most common injuries incurred by disc golf players while comparing the different types of throwing styles. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods The data in this study were collected from 883 disc golf players who responded to an online survey collected over a 1-month period. Respondents answered 49 questions related to demographics, experience, style of play, and injury details. Using a chi-square analysis, common injuries sustained in players using backhand and forehand throwing styles were compared. Results More than 81% of respondents stated that they had sustained an injury playing disc golf, including injuries to the elbow (n = 325), shoulder (n = 305), back (n = 218), and knee (n = 199). The injuries were most commonly described as a muscle strain (n = 241), sprain (n = 162), and tendinitis (n = 145). The type of throw primarily used by players varied, with 86.2% using backhand, 12.7% using forehand, and 1.1% using an overhead throw. Players using a forehand throw were more likely to sustain an elbow injury (P = .014). Many players (n = 115) stated they had undergone surgery due to a disc golf–related injury, with the most common surgeries including meniscal, shoulder, spine, and foot/ankle surgeries. Conclusion The majority of surveyed disc golfers sustained at least 1 injury while playing disc golf, with many requiring surgery. The types of injuries sustained by players varied by the types of throw primarily used. As the sport of disc golf continues

  8. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  9. Dynamical evolution of an eccentric planet and a less massive debris disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Tim D.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the interaction between an eccentric planet and a less massive external debris disc. This scenario could occur after planet-planet scattering or merging events. We characterize the evolution over a wide range of initial conditions, using a suite of n-body integrations combined with theory. Planets near the disc mid-plane remove the inner debris region, and surviving particles form an eccentric disc apsidally aligned with the planet. The inner disc edge is elliptical and lies just beyond the planet's orbit. Moderately inclined planets (iplt ≳ 20° for eplt = 0.8) may instead sculpt debris into a bell-shaped structure enveloping the planet's orbit. Finally, some highly inclined planets (iplt ˜ 90°) can maintain a disc orthogonal to the planet's plane. In all cases, disc particles undergo rapid evolution, whilst the overall structures evolve more slowly. The shapes of these structures and their density profiles are characterized. The width of the chaotic zone around the planet's orbit is derived in the coplanar case using eccentric Hill radius arguments. This zone is cleared within approximately 10 secular or diffusion times (whichever is longer), and debris assumes its final shape within a few secular times. We quantify the planet's migration and show that it will almost always be small in this mass regime. Our results may be used to characterize unseen eccentric planets using observed debris features.

  10. Comparison of Animal Discs Used in Disc Research to Human Lumbar Disc: Torsion Mechanics and Collagen Content

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Brent L.; Beckstein, Jesse C.; Martin, John T.; Beattie, Elizabeth E.; Orías, Alejandro A. Espinoza; Schaer, Thomas P.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Experimental measurement and normalization of in vitro disc torsion mechanics and collagen content for several animal species used in intervertebral disc research and comparing these to the human disc. Objective To aid in the selection of appropriate animal models for disc research by measuring torsional mechanical properties and collagen content. Summary of Background Data There is lack of data and variability in testing protocols for comparing animal and human disc torsion mechanics and collagen content. Methods Intervertebral disc torsion mechanics were measured and normalized by disc height and polar moment of inertia for 11 disc types in 8 mammalian species: the calf, pig, baboon, goat, sheep, rabbit, rat, and mouse lumbar, and cow, rat, and mouse caudal. Collagen content was measured and normalized by dry weight for the same discs except the rat and mouse. Collagen fiber stretch in torsion was calculated using an analytical model. Results Measured torsion parameters varied by several orders of magnitude across the different species. After geometric normalization, only the sheep and pig discs were statistically different from human. Fiber stretch was found to be highly dependent on the assumed initial fiber angle. The collagen content of the discs was similar, especially in the outer annulus where only the calf and goat discs were statistically different from human. Disc collagen content did not correlate with torsion mechanics. Conclusion Disc torsion mechanics are comparable to human lumbar discs in 9 of 11 disc types after normalization by geometry. The normalized torsion mechanics and collagen content of the multiple animal discs presented is useful for selecting and interpreting results for animal models of the disc. Structural composition of the disc, such as initial fiber angle, may explain the differences that were noted between species after geometric normalization. PMID:22333953

  11. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  12. Evolution of protoplanetary discs with magnetically driven disc winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Ogihara, Masahiro; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Crida, Aurélien; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We investigate the evolution of protoplanetary discs (PPDs) with magnetically driven disc winds and viscous heating. Methods: We considered an initially massive disc with 0.1 M⊙ to track the evolution from the early stage of PPDs. We solved the time evolution of surface density and temperature by taking into account viscous heating and the loss of mass and angular momentum by the disc winds within the framework of a standard α model for accretion discs. Our model parameters, turbulent viscosity, disc wind mass-loss, and disc wind torque, which were adopted from local magnetohydrodynamical simulations and constrained by the global energetics of the gravitational accretion, largely depends on the physical condition of PPDs, particularly on the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux in weakly ionized PPDs. Results: Although there are still uncertainties concerning the evolution of the vertical magnetic flux that remains, the surface densities show a large variety, depending on the combination of these three parameters, some of which are very different from the surface density expected from the standard accretion. When a PPD is in a wind-driven accretion state with the preserved vertical magnetic field, the radial dependence of the surface density can be positive in the inner region <1-10 au. The mass accretion rates are consistent with observations, even in the very low level of magnetohydrodynamical turbulence. Such a positive radial slope of the surface density strongly affects planet formation because it inhibits the inward drift or even causes the outward drift of pebble- to boulder-sized solid bodies, and it also slows down or even reversed the inward type-I migration of protoplanets. Conclusions: The variety of our calculated PPDs should yield a wide variety of exoplanet systems.

  13. Molecules in the atmosphere and circumstellar shell of proto-planetary nebula IRAS22272+5435

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacs, L.; Laure, A.; Sperauskas, J.

    2011-05-01

    IRAS22272+5435 is a typical proto-planetary nebula (PPN) associated in the optical with a carbon-rich star HD235858 which shows a significant s-process enhancement. The star is surrounded by the detached circumstellar envelope (CSE), a result of an earlier mass loss. The best-fit model for the dust shell of IRAS22272+5435 consists of the central star surrounded by two separate sets of dust shells representing a PPN shell and a post-AGB wind shell located in the inner cavity of the PPN shell. A presence of hot dust grains in the inner cavity of the PPN shell and occasional mass ejections driven possibly by pulsations with the period of around 131 days was suspected for this object. The spectrum of IRAS22272+5435 originates at various depths throughout different layers in the atmosphere of HD235858 significantly affected by pulsations and in the CSE. A large number of narrow molecular lines originated in the CSE are present in the optical spectrum of IRAS22272+5435, blueshifted relative to the photospheric lines. The CSE lines of C_2 (1,0), (2,0), (3,0), (4,0) Phillips system and CN (1,0), (2,0), (3,0), (4,0) Red System were identified. Time series of high resolution spectra shows significant changes in the intensity of C_2 and CN photospheric features. The molecular photospheric features are stronger than should be for standard photosphere of G5 supergiant applicable for HD235858, therefore, the temperature of environment where formed the most of molecules is much lower than the effective temperature of 5500 K. The maximal expansion velocity and the maximal C_2 abundance was observed for HD235858 on October 2006 when the photosphere of HD235858 passed the maximal expansion velocity according to the CORAVEL measurements. The lines of CN Red system in general varies in step with C_2, however, the Doppler shift relative to the systemic velocity is lower. Thus, the photospheric molecular features are formed apparently in the cool outflow at different high scale. The

  14. Light echo detection of circumstellar disks around flaring stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaidos, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    Light echoes can be used to detect and characterize disks around flaring stars. Such disks are thought to be a hallmark of planet formation but are very difficult to detect by ordinary means. Dwarf emission-line M stars experience flares with luminosities comparable to their quiescent photospheres on time scales of minutes, less than the light travel time across a disk many astronomical units in extent; they are thus ideal candidates for such a search. Bromley (1992) calculated that the detection of Jupiter-sized companions using light echoes requires photometric accuracies better than 1 part in 10(exp 6). However, a disk consisting of grains or small bodies will scatter a much larger fraction of the light than a planet of similar mass. I estimate the light echo amplitutdes from plausible geometries of circumstellar material and present simulation light curves. The light echo amplitudes are typically 1% of the flare and I conclude that such events will be detected best in cases where the flare is eclipsed by the star. An examination of the time scales associated with internal processes in a protoplanetary disks around dM stars indicates that any primordial disks may become undetectable in 10(exp 4) years and will have completely disappeared by 10(exp 8) years, the estimated age of dMe stars in the solar neighborhood. However, searches for light echoes might constrain the amount of material continuing to fall into these young stellar systems in the form of comet-like objects.

  15. The Circumstellar Environments of Born-Again Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, L. Andrew; Evans, Aneurin; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles; Eyres, Stewart

    2015-08-01

    When a solar-mass star reaches the end of its main sequence life, has shed a planetary nebula or become a proto-planetary nebula, and is heading towards the white dwarf phase of its evolution, the star may reignite residual surface helium and be "reborn". It retraces its path on the HR diagram and once again becomes a giant: it undergoes a Very Late Thermal Pulse (VLTP) and becomes a "Born-Again Giant" (BAG). This alternate scenario for the demise of low mass stars may occur in as many as 20% of cases. During this phase the star may become a prolific dust producer such that the star is completely obscured and the only means of monitoring its evolution is by observing the ejected dust.Over the past 10-20 years we have used ground-based, spaceborne and airborne infrared (IR) facilities to monitor the spectral energy distributions of the dust shells of stars that have recently undergone VLTPs. Covering a time period from ~1996 to the present, and with recent SOFIA observations that extend the spectral coverage from 1 - 38 microns, we have been able to determine mass-loss rates from the stars, and the physical state, nature and extent of their circumstellar dust shells.Our observations throw light on a phase of the evolution of low mass stars that is very rare, poorly observed, and little understood. Understanding these phenomena can potentially give us a glimpse of the ultimate fate of the Sun.

  16. The absence of circumstellar dust debris around G giants

    SciTech Connect

    Jura, M. )

    1990-12-01

    The IRAS data base has been searched for evidence for circumstellar dust around luminosity class III G giants, stars whose progenitors are mostly main-sequence A stars. While 20 percent of all main-sequence A dwarfs have dust which absorbs at least 5 x 10 to the -6th of the light from the star, less than 3 percent of all G giants have such clouds. One possible explanation for the absence of detectable dust debris around the G giants is that the Poynting-Robertson effect leads to the decay of the dust around the main-sequence A stars, and that the supply of these grains is not renewed indefinitely. In this case, the derived upper limit to the grain radius of about 0.2 cm for the bulk of the grains emitting the far-infrared emission is consistent with data derived from ground-based submillimeter observations. Another possible explanation for the lack of grains around at least some G giants is that the dust around the original A dwarf is mainly composed of relatively volatile material like water ice which thermally evaporates in a relatively short time during the giant phase of higher luminosity. 35 refs.

  17. The absence of circumstellar dust debris around G giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1990-01-01

    The IRAS data base has been searched for evidence for circumstellar dust around luminosity class III G giants, stars whose progenitors are mostly main-sequence A stars. While 20 percent of all main-sequence A dwarfs have dust which absorbs at least 5 x 10 to the -6th of the light from the star, less than 3 percent of all G giants have such clouds. One possible explanation for the absence of detectable dust debris around the G giants is that the Poynting-Robertson effect leads to the decay of the dust around the main-sequence A stars, and that the supply of these grains is not renewed indefinitely. In this case, the derived upper limit to the grain radius of about 0.2 cm for the bulk of the grains emitting the far-infrared emission is consistent with data derived from ground-based submillimeter observations. Another possible explanation for the lack of grains around at least some G giants is that the dust around the original A dwarf is mainly composed of relatively volatile material like water ice which thermally evaporates in a relatively short time during the giant phase of higher luminosity.

  18. RESOLVING THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK OF HL TAURI AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2011-11-01

    We present results of high-resolution imaging toward HL Tau by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We have obtained {lambda} = 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm dust continua with an angular resolution down to 0.''13. Through simultaneous model fitting to the two wavelength data sets in Bayesian inference using a flared viscous accretion disk model, we estimate the physical properties of HL Tau, such as density distribution, dust opacity spectral index, disk mass, disk size, inclination angle, position angle, and disk thickness. HL Tau has a circumstellar disk mass of 0.13 M{sub sun}, a characteristic radius of 79 AU, an inclination of 40{sup 0}, and a position angle of 136{sup 0}. Although a thin disk model is preferred by our two wavelength data sets, a thick disk model is needed to explain the high mid- and far-infrared emission of the HL Tau spectral energy distribution. This could imply large dust grains settled down on the midplane with fine dust grains mixed with gas. The HL Tau disk is likely gravitationally unstable and can be fragmented between 50 and 100 AU of radius. However, we did not detect dust thermal continuum supporting the protoplanet candidate claimed by a previous study using observations of the Very Large Array at {lambda} = 1.3 cm.

  19. Confined dense circumstellar material surrounding a regular type II supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, O.; Perley, D. A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Groh, J. H.; Horesh, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sollerman, J.; Fransson, C.; Rubin, A.; Szabo, P.; Sapir, N.; Taddia, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Khazov, D.; Fox, O. D.; Cao, Y.; Gnat, O.; Kelly, P. L.; Nugent, P. E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Laher, R. R.; Wozniak, P. R.; Lee, W. H.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.; Soumagnac, M. T.

    2017-02-01

    With the advent of new wide-field, high-cadence optical transient surveys, our understanding of the diversity of core-collapse supernovae has grown tremendously in the last decade. However, the pre-supernova evolution of massive stars, which sets the physical backdrop to these violent events, is theoretically not well understood and difficult to probe observationally. Here we report the discovery of the supernova iPTF 13dqy = SN 2013fs a mere ~3 h after explosion. Our rapid follow-up observations, which include multiwavelength photometry and extremely early (beginning at ~6 h post-explosion) spectra, map the distribution of material in the immediate environment (<~1015 cm) of the exploding star and establish that it was surrounded by circumstellar material (CSM) that was ejected during the final ~1 yr prior to explosion at a high rate, around 10-3 solar masses per year. The complete disappearance of flash-ionized emission lines within the first several days requires that the dense CSM be confined to within <~1015 cm, consistent with radio non-detections at 70-100 days. The observations indicate that iPTF 13dqy was a regular type II supernova; thus, the finding that the probable red supergiant progenitor of this common explosion ejected material at a highly elevated rate just prior to its demise suggests that pre-supernova instabilities may be common among exploding massive stars.

  20. ON THE EXCITATION AND FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR FULLERENES

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Jones, A. P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2012-09-20

    We compare and analyze the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum of three fullerene-rich planetary nebulae in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds: Tc1, SMP SMC 16, and SMP LMC 56. The three planetary nebulae share many spectroscopic similarities. The strongest circumstellar emission bands correspond to the infrared active vibrational modes of the fullerene species C{sub 60} and little or no emission is present from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The strengths of the fullerene bands in the three planetary nebulae are very similar, while the ratios of the [Ne III]15.5 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.8 {mu}m fine structure lines, an indicator of the strength of the radiation field, are markedly different. This raises questions about their excitation mechanism and we compare the fullerene emission to fluorescent and thermal models. In addition, the spectra show other interesting and common features, most notably in the 6-9 {mu}m region, where a broad plateau with substructure dominates the emission. These features have previously been associated with mixtures of aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon solids. We hypothesize on the origin of this band, which is likely related to the fullerene formation mechanism, and compare it with modeled hydrogenated amorphous carbon that present emission in this region.

  1. On circumstellar disks: Spitzer identifies two possible evolutionary paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.; Marengo, Massimo; Lada, Elizabeth

    Multi-wavelength surveys have vastly improved our understanding of many astrophysical objects, in particular, circumstellar disks. We present our results for the disk population of the young cluster NGC 2264. Our study was based on data obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope combined with previously published optical data. We divide the disk population into 3 classes based on their spectral energy distribution shapes: optically thick disks, homologously depleted anemic disks, and radially depleted transition disks. We find that there are two distinct evolutionary paths for disks: a homologous one, where the disk emission decreases uniformly in NIR and mid-infrared wavelengths (anemic disks) and throughout which most sources pass, and a radially differential one where the emission from the inner region of the disk decreases more rapidly than from the outer region (transition disks). Whether a disk evolves in a homologously or radially depleted fashion is still unknown and may depend on the nature of planet formation in the disk.

  2. Molecular catastrophes and circumstellar SiO masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the complex SiO maser regions of highly evolved stars can be improved through multiwavelength studies of 'premaser' stars, such as M0-M4 giants and semiregular variables, which can be placed on normal H-R diagrams unlike most of the OH-IR stars. I argue that SiO masers are a key part of the transformation of hot stellar plasma into cold circumstellar silicate dust, in the outflows from evolved, oxygen rich stars. Evidence for this statement rests on the following: (1) red giant mass loss originates in a stochastic, amsotropic manner; (2) SiO maser maps of Miras and red supergiants show numerous maser spots within a few stellar radii; (3) molecules and dust naturally form in a cooling outflow; (4) the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer provided evidence for diverse and variable 10 micron silicate features in Miras, and these shapes correlate well with the proposed maser chronology, suggesting a formation and annealing sequence. The theory for the occurrence of SiO masers involving thermal instability, related 'new' physics, recent calculations and a prediction are discussed.

  3. On the Excitation and Formation of Circumstellar Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Jones, A. P.; Micelotta, E. R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2012-09-01

    We compare and analyze the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum of three fullerene-rich planetary nebulae in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds: Tc1, SMP SMC 16, and SMP LMC 56. The three planetary nebulae share many spectroscopic similarities. The strongest circumstellar emission bands correspond to the infrared active vibrational modes of the fullerene species C60 and little or no emission is present from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The strengths of the fullerene bands in the three planetary nebulae are very similar, while the ratios of the [Ne III]15.5 μm/[Ne II]12.8 μm fine structure lines, an indicator of the strength of the radiation field, are markedly different. This raises questions about their excitation mechanism and we compare the fullerene emission to fluorescent and thermal models. In addition, the spectra show other interesting and common features, most notably in the 6-9 μm region, where a broad plateau with substructure dominates the emission. These features have previously been associated with mixtures of aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon solids. We hypothesize on the origin of this band, which is likely related to the fullerene formation mechanism, and compare it with modeled hydrogenated amorphous carbon that present emission in this region.

  4. A Circumstellar Shell Model for the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1996-08-01

    We model the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant in the framework of the circumstellar medium (C SM) interaction picture. In this model, the slow red supergiant wind of the supernova (SN) progenitor was swept into a dense shell by a fast stellar wind in the subsequent blue supergiant stage of the progenitor star. The supernova blast wave propagated quickly (≤ 100 yr) through the tenuous wind-blown bubble located within this shell and then slowed down in the dense (nH ˜15 cm-3) CSM shell. The shell was impulsively accelerated during this interaction stage; during the subsequent interaction with SN ejecta, the shell has been further accelerated to ˜2000 km s-1, the currently observed expansion rate. The comparison of our X-ray emission calculations with the ASCA spectrum suggests that about 8 Msun of X- material is present in Cas A. Most of this mass is located in the CSM shell and in the outlying red supergiant wind. The X-ray continuum and the Fe Kα line are dominated by the shell emission, but prominent Kα complexes of Mg, Si, and S must be produced by SN ejecta with strongly enhanced abundances of these elements. Our hydrodynamical models indicate that about 2 Msun of ejecta have been shocked. An explosion of a stellar He core is consistent with these findings.

  5. The formation and structure of circumstellar and interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroto, H. W.

    1990-01-01

    The intriguing abundance of long linear carbon chain molecules in some dark clouds and in circumstellar shells is still not well understood. Recent laboratory studies which have probed this problem indicate that when carbon vapor nucleates to form particles, linear chains and hollow cage molecules (fullerenes) also form at more-or-less the same time. The results have consequences for the formation, structures and spectroscopic properties of the molecular and dust components ejected from cool carbon-rich stars. A most interesting result of the experimental observations relates to the probability that a third character in addition to the chains and grains, the C(sub 60) molecule probably in the form of the ion C(sub 60)(sup +) in the less shielded regions, is present and perhaps responsible for some of the ubiquitously observed interstellar spectroscopic features such as the Diffuse Interstellar Features, the 2170A UV Absorption or perhaps some of the Unidentified Infrared Bands. Further study of small carbon particles which form in the gas phase has resulted in the discovery that they have quasi-icosahedral spiral shell structures. The role that such species may play in the interstellar medium as well as that played by C(sub 60) (or C sub 60 sup +) should soon be accessible to verification by a combination of laboratory experiment and astronomical spectroscopy.

  6. A WISE survey of circumstellar disks in Taurus

    SciTech Connect

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Mamajek, E. E.

    2014-04-01

    We have compiled photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm from the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for all known members of the Taurus complex of dark clouds. Using these data and photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have identified members with infrared excess emission from circumstellar disks and have estimated the evolutionary stages of the detected disks, which include 31 new full disks and 16 new candidate transitional, evolved, evolved transitional, and debris disks. We have also used the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog to search for new disk-bearing members of Taurus based on their red infrared colors. Through optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we have confirmed 26 new members with spectral types of M1-M7. The census of disk-bearing stars in Taurus should now be largely complete for spectral types earlier than ∼M8 (M ≳ 0.03 M {sub ☉}).

  7. Solute permeation across the apoplastic barrier in the perisperm-endosperm envelope in cucumber seeds.

    PubMed

    Amritphale, Dilip; Ramakrishna, P; Singh, Bharat; Sharma, Santosh K

    2010-05-01

    An apoplastic barrier consisting of callose and lipid layers in the perisperm-endosperm (PE) envelope is known to restrict inward and outward transport of solutes in cucurbit seeds. The present work examines permeability properties of the barrier using cucumber seed as a model system. Osmometrically determined osmotic potential of the apoplastic fluid was used as a basis for osmotic studies aimed at examining solute exclusion from the apoplastic barrier in the PE envelope. The assessment of apoplastic permeability involved measuring the amount of anionic and cationic organic dyes diffused into agarose gel discs through the PE envelope. Ionic/non-ionic solutes including polyethylene glycols having Stokes radii envelope as indicated by greater seed thickness/breadth ratios. Permeances of dyes across the PE envelope were in the order: 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) > 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) approximately methyl orange approximately methylene blue > Eosin Y > Janus green approximately crystal violet approximately Evans Blue. Permeation time(0.5) for DCPIP and TTC was 9.71 and 9.96 h, respectively. Dyes having Stokes radii < 0.5 nm showed significant inward as well as outward diffusion across the PE envelope in contrast to restricted diffusion of dyes having Stokes radii > 0.5 nm. Size exclusion limit for apoplastic barrier in cucumber PE envelope was resolved to be about 0.5 nm by dye permeation and around 0.8 nm by osmotic studies. Dye permeances depended primarily on particle size as described by a quadratic polynomial function rather than on charge or log D.

  8. Collisions and drag in debris discs with eccentric parent belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Kirchschlager, F.; Sende, J. A.; Wolf, S.

    2017-08-01

    Context. High-resolution images of circumstellar debris discs reveal off-centred rings that indicate past or ongoing perturbation, possibly caused by secular gravitational interaction with unseen stellar or substellar companions. The purely dynamical aspects of this departure from radial symmetry are well understood. However, the observed dust is subject to additional forces and effects, most notably collisions and drag. Aims: To complement the studies of dynamics, we therefore aim to understand how the addition of collisional evolution and drag forces creates new asymmetries and strengthens or overrides existing ones. Methods: We augmented our existing numerical code Analysis of Collisional Evolution (ACE) by an azimuthal dimension, the longitude of periapse. A set of fiducial discs with global eccentricities ranging from 0 to 0.4 was evolved over gigayear timescales. Size distribution and spatial variation of dust were analysed and interpreted. We discuss the basic impact of belt eccentricity on spectral energy distributions and images. Results: We find features imposed on characteristic timescales. First, radiation pressure defines size cut-offs that differ between periapse and apoapse, resulting in an asymmetric halo. The differences in size distribution make the observable asymmetry of the halo depend on wavelength. Second, collisional equilibrium prefers smaller grains on the apastron side of the parent belt, reducing the effect of pericentre glow and the overall asymmetry. Third, Poynting-Robertson drag fills the region interior to an eccentric belt such that the apastron side is more tenuous. Interpretation and prediction of the appearance in scattered light is problematic when spatial and size distribution are coupled.

  9. Cortical processing of dynamic sound envelope transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2010-12-08

    Slow envelope fluctuations in the range of 2-20 Hz provide important segmental cues for processing communication sounds. For a successful segmentation, a neural processor must capture envelope features associated with the rise and fall of signal energy, a process that is often challenged by the interference of background noise. This study investigated the neural representations of slowly varying envelopes in quiet and in background noise in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of awake marmoset monkeys. We characterized envelope features based on the local average and rate of change of sound level in envelope waveforms and identified envelope features to which neurons were selective by reverse correlation. Our results showed that envelope feature selectivity of A1 neurons was correlated with the degree of nonmonotonicity in their static rate-level functions. Nonmonotonic neurons exhibited greater feature selectivity than monotonic neurons in quiet and in background noise. The diverse envelope feature selectivity decreased spike-timing correlation among A1 neurons in response to the same envelope waveforms. As a result, the variability, but not the average, of the ensemble responses of A1 neurons represented more faithfully the dynamic transitions in low-frequency sound envelopes both in quiet and in background noise.

  10. A search for passive protoplanetary discs in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchêne, Gaspard; Becker, Adam; Yang, Yizhe; Bouy, Hervé; De Rosa, Robert J.; Patience, Jennifer; Girard, Julien H.

    2017-08-01

    We conducted a 12-month monitoring campaign of 33 T Tauri stars (TTS) in Taurus. Our goal was to monitor objects that possess a disc but have a weak H α line, a common accretion tracer for young stars, in order to determine whether they host a passive circumstellar disc. We used medium-resolution optical spectroscopy to assess the accretion status of the objects and to measure the H α line. We found no convincing examples of passive discs: only transition disc and debris disc systems in our sample are non-accreting. Among accretors, we found no example of flickering accretion, leading to an upper limit of 2.2 per cent on the duty cycle of accretion gaps, assuming that all accreting TTS experience such events. When combining literature results with our observations, we found that the reliability of traditional H α-based criteria to test for accretion is high but imperfect, particularly for low-mass TTS. We found a significant correlation between stellar mass and the full width at 10 per cent of the peak (W10) of the H α line that does not seem to be related to variations in free-fall velocity. Finally, our data revealed a positive correlation between the H α equivalent width and its W10, indicative of a systematic modulation in the line profile whereby the high-velocity wings of the line are proportionally more enhanced than its core when the line luminosity increases. We argue that this supports the hypothesis that the mass accretion rate on the central star is correlated with the H α W10 through a common physical mechanism.

  11. Cell entry of enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Cosset, François-Loic; Lavillette, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Enveloped viruses penetrate their cell targets following the merging of their membrane with that of the cell. This fusion process is catalyzed by one or several viral glycoproteins incorporated on the membrane of the virus. These envelope glycoproteins (EnvGP) evolved in order to combine two features. First, they acquired a domain to bind to a specific cellular protein, named "receptor." Second, they developed, with the help of cellular proteins, a function of finely controlled fusion to optimize the replication and preserve the integrity of the cell, specific to the genus of the virus. Following the activation of the EnvGP either by binding to their receptors and/or sometimes the acid pH of the endosomes, many changes of conformation permit ultimately the action of a specific hydrophobic domain, the fusion peptide, which destabilizes the cell membrane and leads to the opening of the lipidic membrane. The comprehension of these mechanisms is essential to develop medicines of the therapeutic class of entry inhibitor like enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this chapter, we will summarize the different envelope glycoprotein structures that viruses develop to achieve membrane fusion and the entry of the virus. We will describe the different entry pathways and cellular proteins that viruses have subverted to allow infection of the cell and the receptors that are used. Finally, we will illustrate more precisely the recent discoveries that have been made within the field of the entry process, with a focus on the use of pseudoparticles. These pseudoparticles are suitable for high-throughput screenings that help in the development of natural or artificial inhibitors as new therapeutics of the class of entry inhibitors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolating The Building Thermal Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrje, D. T.; Dutt, G. S.; Gadsby, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermal integrity of building envelopes by infrared scanning tech-niques is often hampered in mild weather because temperature differentials across the envelope are small. Combining the infrared scanning with positive or negative building pressures, induced by a "blower door" or the building ventilation system, considerably extends the periods during which meaningful diagnostics can be conducted. Although missing or poorly installed insulation may lead to a substantial energy penalty, it is the search for air leakage sites that often has the largest potential for energy savings. Infrared inspection of the attic floor with air forced from the occupied space through ceiling by-passes, and inspecting the interior of the building when outside air is being sucked through the envelope reveals unexpected leakage sites. Portability of the diagnostic equipment is essential in these surveys which may include access into some tight spaces. A catalog of bypass heat losses that have been detected in residential housing using the combined infrared pressure differential technique is included to point out the wide variety of leakage sites which may compromise the benefits of thermal insulation and allow excessive air infiltration. Detection and suppression of such leaks should be key items in any building energy audit program. Where a calibrated blower door is used to pressurize or evacuate the house, the leakage rate can be quantified and an excessively tight house recognized. Houses that are too tight may be improved with a minimal energy penalty by forced ventilation,preferably with a heat recuperator and/or by providing combustion air directly to the furnace.

  13. Aircraft maneuver envelope warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivens, Courtland C. (Inventor); Rosado, Joel M. (Inventor); Lee, Burnett (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A maneuver envelope warning system for an aircraft having operating limits, operating condition sensors and an indicator driver. The indicator driver has a plurality of visual indicators. The indicator driver determines a relationship between sensed operating conditions and the operating limits; such as, a ratio therebetween. The indicator driver illuminates a number of the indicators in proportion to the determined relationship. The position of the indicators illuminated represents to a pilot in an easily ascertainable manner whether the operational conditions are approaching operational limits of the aircraft, and the degree to which operational conditions lie within or exceed operational limits.

  14. Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoch, David R.; Lavallee, David; Weinstein, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: scheduling application; the motivation for the Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN); characteristics of FERN; types of information needed in requests; where information is stored in requests; FERN structures; generic requests; resource availability for pooled resources; expressive notation; temporal constraints; time formats; changes to FERN; sample FERN requests; the temporal relationship between two steps; maximum activity length to limit step delays; alternative requests; the temporal relationship between two activities; and idle resource usage between steps.

  15. UNVEILING THE EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE FROM INFALLING ENVELOPES TO KEPLERIAN DISKS AROUND LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2013-07-20

    We performed Submillimeter Array observations in the C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission line toward six Class 0 and I protostars to study rotational motions of their surrounding envelopes and circumstellar material on 100-1000 AU scales. C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission with intensity peaks located at the protostellar positions is detected toward all six sources. The rotational velocities of the protostellar envelopes as a function of radius were measured from the position-velocity diagrams perpendicular to the outflow directions passing through the protostellar positions. Two Class 0 sources, B335 and NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, show no detectable rotational motion, while L1527 IRS (Class 0/I) and L1448-mm (Class 0) exhibit rotational motions with radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.2} and {proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.1}, respectively. The other Class I sources, TMC-1A and L1489 IRS, exhibit the fastest rotational motions among the sample, and their rotational motions have flatter radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -0.6{+-}0.1} and {proportional_to}r {sup -0.5{+-}0.1}, respectively. The rotational motions with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -1} can be interpreted as rotation with a conserved angular momentum in a dynamically infalling envelope, while those with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -0.5} can be interpreted as Keplerian rotation. These observational results demonstrate categorization of rotational motions from infalling envelopes to Keplerian-disk formation. Models of the inside-out collapse where the angular momentum is conserved are discussed and compared with our observational results.

  16. Probing Shock Breakout and Progenitors of Stripped-envelope Supernovae through their Early Radio Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of early radio emission from stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe; those of Type IIb/Ib/Ic). We suggest there is a sub-class of stripped-envelope SNe based on their radio properties, including the optically well-studied Type Ic SNe (SNe Ic) 2002ap and 2007gr, showing a rapid rise to a radio peak within ~10 days and reaching a low luminosity (at least an order of magnitude fainter than a majority of SNe IIb/Ib/Ic). They show a decline after the peak that is shallower than that of other stripped-envelope SNe while their spectral index is similar. We show that all these properties are naturally explained if the circumstellar material (CSM) density is low and therefore the forward shock is expanding into the CSM without deceleration. Since the forward shock velocity in this situation, as estimated from the radio properties, still records the maximum velocity of the SN ejecta following the shock breakout, observing these SNe in radio wavelengths provides new diagnostics on the nature of both the breakout and the progenitor which otherwise require a quite rapid follow-up in other wavelengths. The inferred post-shock breakout velocities of SNe Ic 2002ap and 2007gr are sub-relativistic, ~0.3c. These are higher than that inferred for SN II 1987A, in line with suggested compact progenitors. However, these are lower than expected for a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) progenitor. It may reflect an as yet unresolved nature of the progenitors just before the explosion, and we suggest that the W-R progenitor envelopes might have been inflated which could quickly reduce the maximum ejecta velocity from the initial shock breakout velocity.

  17. PROBING SHOCK BREAKOUT AND PROGENITORS OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE THROUGH THEIR EARLY RADIO EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of early radio emission from stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe; those of Type IIb/Ib/Ic). We suggest there is a sub-class of stripped-envelope SNe based on their radio properties, including the optically well-studied Type Ic SNe (SNe Ic) 2002ap and 2007gr, showing a rapid rise to a radio peak within {approx}10 days and reaching a low luminosity (at least an order of magnitude fainter than a majority of SNe IIb/Ib/Ic). They show a decline after the peak that is shallower than that of other stripped-envelope SNe while their spectral index is similar. We show that all these properties are naturally explained if the circumstellar material (CSM) density is low and therefore the forward shock is expanding into the CSM without deceleration. Since the forward shock velocity in this situation, as estimated from the radio properties, still records the maximum velocity of the SN ejecta following the shock breakout, observing these SNe in radio wavelengths provides new diagnostics on the nature of both the breakout and the progenitor which otherwise require a quite rapid follow-up in other wavelengths. The inferred post-shock breakout velocities of SNe Ic 2002ap and 2007gr are sub-relativistic, {approx}0.3c. These are higher than that inferred for SN II 1987A, in line with suggested compact progenitors. However, these are lower than expected for a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) progenitor. It may reflect an as yet unresolved nature of the progenitors just before the explosion, and we suggest that the W-R progenitor envelopes might have been inflated which could quickly reduce the maximum ejecta velocity from the initial shock breakout velocity.

  18. Interstellar medium perturbations on transport-dominated debris discs in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.

    2012-04-01

    I explore the dynamics of small dust particles in transport-dominated circumstellar debris discs in binary star systems. In these tenuous discs the effects of mutual collisions are negligible and their morphology is determined by Poynting-Robertson drag and, possibly, by the strong perturbations induced by the interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) flux of neutral atoms. The force due to the ISM flux can significantly affect the dynamical behaviour of the dust grains, causing a fast inward drift and a large periodic oscillation of both eccentricity and inclination. If the disc is around a star in a binary system, the gravity of the companion star competes with the ISM force and the dynamics is complex. The balance between the two forces depends strongly on the binary semimajor axis aB and eccentricity eB. In a scenario with an ISM flux similar to that observed in the Solar system neighbourhood, the binary secular perturbations, assuming a mass ratio of 0.5, dominate over the ISM force when aB < 600 au and eB= 0.2. This occurs when the dust disc is generated by a parent body ring encompassed between 50 and 60 aufrom the primary star. For a larger binary eccentricity eB= 0.6, the limit moves to aB < 700 au. Within these values of aB, the time-scale of the binary secular perturbations is much shorter than the period of the ISM-induced orbital variations, and the disc shape and density distribution are dominated by the companion gravity. It appears slightly eccentric and, if the binary is coplanar with the disc, only a limited warping due to the ISM perturbations is observed. In this scenario, the strong ISM perturbations, which may significantly affect debris discs around single stars embedded in strong ISM winds, are almost completely silenced. For larger semimajor axes, the scenario is reversed with the ISM perturbations ruling the dynamics of the dust. The disc develops a large clump oriented at 90° with respect to the direction of the ISM flux and it

  19. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  20. Hydrogel discs for digital microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Fiddes, Lindsey K.; Luk, Vivienne N.; Au, Sam H.; Ng, Alphonsus H. C.; Luk, Victoria; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are networks of hydrophilic polymer chains that are swollen with water, and they are useful for a wide range of applications because they provide stable niches for immobilizing proteins and cells. We report here the marriage of hydrogels with digital microfluidic devices. Until recently, digital microfluidics, a fluid handling technique in which discrete droplets are manipulated electromechanically on the surface of an array of electrodes, has been used only for homogeneous systems involving liquid reagents. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cylindrical hydrogel discs can be incorporated into digital microfluidic systems and that these discs can be systematically addressed by droplets of reagents. Droplet movement is observed to be unimpeded by interaction with the gel discs, and gel discs remain stationary when droplets pass through them. Analyte transport into gel discs is observed to be identical to diffusion in cases in which droplets are incubated with gels passively, but transport is enhanced when droplets are continually actuated through the gels. The system is useful for generating integrated enzymatic microreactors and for three-dimensional cell culture. This paper demonstrates a new combination of techniques for lab-on-a-chip systems which we propose will be useful for a wide range of applications. PMID:22662096

  1. Analyses of the temporomandibular disc.

    PubMed

    Jirman, R; Fricová, M; Horák, Z; Krystůfek, J; Konvicková, S; Mazánek, J

    2007-01-01

    This project is the beginning of a large research work with a goal to develop a new total replacement of temporomandibular (TM) joint. First aim of this work was to determine the relative displacement of the TM disc and the mandible during mouth opening. The movement of the TM disc was studied using a magnetic resonance imaging. Sagittal static images in revolved sections of the TM joint were obtained in various positions of jaw opening from 0 to 50 mm. The results provided a description of the TM disc displacements as a function of jaw opening. The displacements of the mandible and TM disc were about 16 mm and 10 mm respectively at mouth opening of 50 mm, maximum rotation of the mandible was 34s. The results of these measurements can be used for clinical diagnostics and also they were used as inputs for the follows finite element analysis (FEA). Second aim of this work was to create stress and strain analysis of TM joint using non-linear FEA. Complex of TM joint consists of mandibular disc, half skull and half mandible during normal jaw opening. The results illustrate the stress distributions in the TMJ during a normal jaw opening.

  2. The JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey: physical structure of the molecular envelope of the high-mass protostar AFGL2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Spaans, M.; Fuller, G. A.; Plume, R.; Roberts, H.; Williams, J. L.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The understanding of the formation process of massive stars ( ≳ 8 M⊙) is limited by a combination of theoretical complications and observational challenges. The high UV luminosities of massive stars give rise to chemical complexity in their natal molecular clouds and affect the dynamical properties of their circumstellar envelopes. Aims: We investigate the physical structure of the large-scale (~104-105 AU) molecular envelope of the high-mass protostar AFGL2591. Methods: Observational constraints are provided by spectral imaging in the 330-373 GHz regime from the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey and its high-frequency extension. While the majority of the ~160 spectral features from the survey cube are spatially unresolved, this paper uses the 35 that are significantly extended in the spatial directions. For these features we present integrated intensity maps and velocity maps. The observed spatial distributions of a selection of six species are compared with radiative transfer models based on (i) a static spherically symmetric structure; (ii) a dynamic spherical structure; and (iii) a static flattened structure. Results: The maps of CO and its isotopic variations exhibit elongated geometries on scales of ~100″, and smaller scale substructure is found in maps of N2H+, o-H2CO, CS, SO2, C2H, and various CH3OH lines. In addition, a line-of-sight velocity gradient is apparent in maps of all molecular lines presented here, except SO, SO2, and H2CO. We find two emission peaks in warm (Eup ~ 200 K) CH3OH separated by 12″ (12 000 AU), indicative of a secondary heating source in the envelope. The spherical models are able to explain the distribution of emission for the optically thin H13CO+ and C34S, but not for the optically thick HCN, HCO+, and CS or for the optically thin C17O. The introduction of velocity structure mitigates the optical depth effects, but does not fully explain the observations, especially in the spectral dimension. A static flattened

  3. Chaotic Expansions of Elements of the Universal Enveloping Superalgebra Associated with a Z2-graded Quantum Stochastic Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyre, T. M. W.

    Given a polynomial function f of classical stochastic integrator processes whose differentials satisfy a closed Ito multiplication table, we can express the stochastic derivative of f asDISC="MATH"> We establish an analogue of this formula in the form of a chaotic decomposition for Z2-graded theories of quantum stochastic calculus based on the natural coalgebra structure of the universal enveloping superalgebra.

  4. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY10

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf

    2010-10-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details the additions to the advanced operating techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Research this year focused on combining disparate pieces of data together to maximize operating time with minimal downtime due to safeguards. A Chi-Square and Croiser's cumulative sum were both included as part of the new analysis. Because of a major issue with the original data, the implementation of the two new tests did not add to the existing set of tests, though limited one-variable optimization made a small increase in detection probability. Additional analysis was performed to determine if prior analysis would have caused a major security or safety operating envelope issue. It was determined that a safety issue would have resulted from the prior research, but that the security may have been increased under certain conditions.

  5. Discovery of a Circumstellar Disk in the Lagoon Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Circumstellar disks of gas and dust play a crucial role in the formation of stars and planets. Until now, high-resolution images of such disks around young stars within the Orion Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) constituted the most direct proof of their existence. Now, another circumstellar disk has been detected around a star in the Lagoon Nebula - also known as Messier 8 (M8) , a giant complex of interstellar gas and dust with many young stars in the southern constellation of Sagittarius and four times more distant than the Orion Nebula. The observations were carried out by an international team of scientists led by Bringfried Stecklum (Thüringer Landessternwarte, Tautenburg, Germany) [1] who used telescopes located at the ESO La Silla observatory and also observations from the HST archive. These new results are paving the road towards exciting research programmes on star formation which will become possible with the ESO Very Large Telescope. The harsh environment of circumstellar disks The existence of circumstellar disks has been inferred from indirect measurements of young stellar objects, such as the spectral energy distribution, the analysis of the profiles of individual spectral lines and measurements of the polarisation of the emitted light [2]. Impressive images of such disks in the Orion Nebula, known as proplyds (PROto-PLanetarY DiskS), have been obtained by the HST during the recent years. They have confirmed the interpretation of previous ground-based emission-line observations and mapping by radio telescopes. Moreover, they demonstrated that those disks which are located close to hot and massive stars are subject to heating caused by the intense radiation from these stars. Subsequently, the disks evaporate releasing neutral gas which streams off. During this process, shock fronts (regions with increased density) with tails of ionised gas result at a certain distance between the disk and the hot star. These objects appear on

  6. STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION OF PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Sargent, Anneila I.

    2009-08-10

    We present new subarcsecond ({approx}0.''7) Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of the 1.3 mm continuum emission from circumstellar disks around 11 low- and intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars. High-resolution observations for three additional sources were obtained from the literature. In all cases the disk emission is spatially resolved. We adopt a self-consistent accretion disk model based on the similarity solution for the disk surface density and constrain the dust radial density distribution on spatial scales of about 40 AU. Disk surface densities appear to be correlated with the stellar ages where the characteristic disk radius increases from {approx}20 AU to {approx}100 AU over about 5 Myr. This disk expansion is accompanied by a decrease in the mass accretion rate, suggesting that our sample disks form an evolutionary sequence. Interpreting our results in terms of the temporal evolution of a viscous {alpha}-disk, we estimate (1) that at the beginning of the disk evolution about 60% of the circumstellar material was located inside radii of 25-40 AU, (2) that disks formed with masses from 0.05 to 0.4 M {sub sun}, and (3) that the viscous timescale at the disk initial radius is about 0.1-0.3 Myr. Viscous disk models tightly link the surface density {sigma}(R) with the radial profile of the disk viscosity {nu}(R) {proportional_to} R {sup {gamma}}. We find values of {gamma} ranging from -0.8 to 0.8, suggesting that the viscosity dependence on the orbital radius can be very different in the observed disks. Adopting the {alpha} parameterization for the viscosity, we argue that {alpha} must decrease with the orbital radius and that it may vary between 0.5 and 10{sup -4}. From the inferred disk initial radii we derive specific angular momenta, j, for parent cores of (0.8 - 4) x 10{sup -4} km s{sup -1} pc. Comparison with the values of j in dense cores suggests that about 10% of core angular momentum and 30% of the core

  7. Investigations of the Formation of Carbon Grains in Circumstellar Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contreras, Cesar; Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    The study of formation and destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. PAHs are important chemical building blocks of interstellar dust. They are detected in interplanetary dust particles and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs, in their neutral and ionized forms, are an important, ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. Also, the formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, it is imperative that laboratory experiments be conducted to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation from PAH precursors. Studies of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include the atoms O, N, and S, have recently been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected and characterized with a high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) coupled to a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS), thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. We report the first set of measurements obtained in these experiments and identify the species present in the experiments and the ions that are formed in the plasma process. From these unique measurements, we derive information on the size and the structure of interstellar dust grain particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules.

  8. Investigations of the Formation of Carbon Grains in Circumstellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Cesar; Salama, F.

    2013-06-01

    The study of formation and destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. PAHs are important chemical building blocks of interstellar dust. They are detected in interplanetary dust particles and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs, in their neutral and ionized forms, are an important, ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. Also, the formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, it is imperative that laboratory experiments be conducted to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation from PAH precursors. Studies of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include the atoms O, N, and S, have recently been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected and characterized with a high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) coupled to a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS), thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. We report the first set of measurements obtained in these experiments and identify the species present in the experiments and the ions that are formed in the plasma process. From these unique measurements, we derive information on the size and the structure of interstellar dust grain particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Acknowledgements: Support from NASA's Laboratory

  9. Circumstellar medium around rotating massive stars at solar metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Walder, Rolf; Folini, Doris; Bykov, Andrei; Marcowith, Alexandre; Favre, Jean M.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: Observations show nebulae around some massive stars but not around others. If observed, their chemical composition is far from homogeneous. Our goal is to put these observational features into the context of the evolution of massive stars and their circumstellar medium (CSM) and, more generally, to quantify the role of massive stars for the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM. Methods: Using the A-MAZE code, we perform 2d-axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of the evolution of the CSM, shaped by stellar winds, for a whole grid of massive stellar models from 15 to 120 M⊙ and following the stellar evolution from the zero-age main-sequence to the time of supernova explosion. In addition to the usual quantities, we also follow five chemical species: H, He, C, N, and O. Results: We show how various quantities evolve as a function of time: size of the bubble, position of the wind termination shock, chemical composition of the bubble, etc. The chemical composition of the bubble changes considerably compared to the initial composition, particularly during the red-supergiant (RSG) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) phases. In some extreme cases, the inner region of the bubble can be completely depleted in hydrogen and nitrogen, and is mainly composed of carbon, helium, and oxygen. We argue why the bubble typically expands at a lower rate than predicted by self-similarity theory. In particular, the size of the bubble is very sensitive to the density of the ISM, decreasing by a factor of ~2.5 for each additional dex in ISM density. The bubble size also decreases with the metallicity of the central star, because low-metallicity stars have weaker winds. Our models qualitatively fit the observations of WR ejecta nebulae.

  10. Evidence of Circumstellar Matter Surrounding the Hercules X-1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, C. S.; Dotani, T.; Nagase, F.; Makino, F.; Deeter, J. E.; Min, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze data from two eclipse ingresses of Her X-1 observed with Ginga on 1989 April 30 and May 19. These observations occur, respectively, during the MAIN HIGH and SHORT HIGH states in the 35 day modulation of Her X-1 intensity. We find significant residual X-ray flux during eclipse, with a gradual decrease in flux following the occultation of the neutron star by the atmosphere of HZ Her. During the central part of the eclipse the count rate becomes nearly constant, at 0.5 mcrab in the energy range 1.7-36.8 keV. From a spec- tral analysis of the residual emission during the total eclipse of the central source in the MAIN MGH state, we determine the energy spectral index, alpha = 0.8, similar to that before eclipse. A remarkable feature of the eclipse spectrum is that it does not show a significant iron line feature in contrast to massive wind-fed pulsars, such as Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. From a timing analysis of the same eclipse data, we show that there are no pulses. These results imply that the emission comes from the scattering of continuum X-rays by material in a region considerably larger than the companion star. An extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona is insufficient to account for the count rates in mid-eclipse, when known parameters of the binary system are used. Based on the present results, we suggest that scattering occurs not only in the accretion disk corona but also in the circumstellar matter surrounding the system of Her X-1/HZ Her.

  11. Evidence of circumstellar matter surrounding the Hercules X-1 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, C. S.; Dotani, T.; Nagase, F.; Makino, F.; Deeter, J. E.; Min, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze data from two eclipse ingresses of Her X-1 observed with Ginga on 1989 April 30 and May 19. These observations occur, respectively, during the MAIN HIGH and SHORT HIGH states in the 35 day modulation of Her X-1 intensity. We find significant residual X-ray flux during eclipse, with a gradual decrease in flux following the occultation of the neutron star by the atmosphere of HZ Her. During the central part of the eclipse the count rate becomes nearly constant, at 0.5 mCrab in the energy range 1.7-36.8 keV. From a spectral analysis of the residual emission during the total eclipse of the central source in the MAIN HIGH state, we determine the energy spectral index, alpha = 0.8, similar to that before eclipse. A remarkable feature of the eclipse spectrum is that it does not show a significant iron line feature in contrast to massive wind-fed pulsars, such as Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. From a timing analysis of the same eclipse data, we show that there are no pulses. These results imply that the emission comes from the scattering of continuum X-rays by material in a region considerably larger than the companion star. An extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona is insufficient to account for the count rates in mid-eclipse, when known parameters of the binary system are used. Based on the present results, we suggest that scattering occurs not only in the accretion disk corona but also in the circumstellar matter surrounding the system of Her X-1/HZ Her.

  12. Evidence of circumstellar matter surrounding the Hercules X-1 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, C. S.; Dotani, T.; Nagase, F.; Makino, F.; Deeter, J. E.; Min, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze data from two eclipse ingresses of Her X-1 observed with Ginga on 1989 April 30 and May 19. These observations occur, respectively, during the MAIN HIGH and SHORT HIGH states in the 35 day modulation of Her X-1 intensity. We find significant residual X-ray flux during eclipse, with a gradual decrease in flux following the occultation of the neutron star by the atmosphere of HZ Her. During the central part of the eclipse the count rate becomes nearly constant, at 0.5 mCrab in the energy range 1.7-36.8 keV. From a spectral analysis of the residual emission during the total eclipse of the central source in the MAIN HIGH state, we determine the energy spectral index, alpha = 0.8, similar to that before eclipse. A remarkable feature of the eclipse spectrum is that it does not show a significant iron line feature in contrast to massive wind-fed pulsars, such as Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. From a timing analysis of the same eclipse data, we show that there are no pulses. These results imply that the emission comes from the scattering of continuum X-rays by material in a region considerably larger than the companion star. An extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona is insufficient to account for the count rates in mid-eclipse, when known parameters of the binary system are used. Based on the present results, we suggest that scattering occurs not only in the accretion disk corona but also in the circumstellar matter surrounding the system of Her X-1/HZ Her.

  13. Evidence of Circumstellar Matter Surrounding the Hercules X-1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, C. S.; Dotani, T.; Nagase, F.; Makino, F.; Deeter, J. E.; Min, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze data from two eclipse ingresses of Her X-1 observed with Ginga on 1989 April 30 and May 19. These observations occur, respectively, during the MAIN HIGH and SHORT HIGH states in the 35 day modulation of Her X-1 intensity. We find significant residual X-ray flux during eclipse, with a gradual decrease in flux following the occultation of the neutron star by the atmosphere of HZ Her. During the central part of the eclipse the count rate becomes nearly constant, at 0.5 mcrab in the energy range 1.7-36.8 keV. From a spec- tral analysis of the residual emission during the total eclipse of the central source in the MAIN MGH state, we determine the energy spectral index, alpha = 0.8, similar to that before eclipse. A remarkable feature of the eclipse spectrum is that it does not show a significant iron line feature in contrast to massive wind-fed pulsars, such as Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. From a timing analysis of the same eclipse data, we show that there are no pulses. These results imply that the emission comes from the scattering of continuum X-rays by material in a region considerably larger than the companion star. An extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona is insufficient to account for the count rates in mid-eclipse, when known parameters of the binary system are used. Based on the present results, we suggest that scattering occurs not only in the accretion disk corona but also in the circumstellar matter surrounding the system of Her X-1/HZ Her.

  14. Spread of the dust temperature distribution in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, S.; Wolf, S.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Accurate temperature calculations for circumstellar disks are particularly important for their chemical evolution. Their temperature distribution is determined by the optical properties of the dust grains, which, among other parameters, depend on their radius. However, in most disk studies, only average optical properties and thus an average temperature is assumed to account for an ensemble of grains with different radii. Aims: We investigate the impact of subdividing the grain radius distribution into multiple sub-intervals on the resulting dust temperature distribution and spectral energy distribution (SED). Methods: The temperature distribution, the relative grain surface below a certain temperature, the freeze-out radius, and the SED were computed for two different scenarios: (1) Radius distribution represented by 16 logarithmically distributed radius intervals, and (2) radius distribution represented by a single grain species with averaged optical properties (reference). Results: Within the considered parameter range, i.e., of grain radii between 5 nm and 1 mm and an optically thin and thick disk with a parameterized density distribution, we obtain the following results: in optically thin disk regions, the temperature spread can be as large as 63% and the relative grain surface below a certain temperature is lower than in the reference disk. With increasing optical depth, the difference in the midplane temperature and the relative grain surface below a certain temperature decreases. Furthermore, below 20 K, this fraction is higher for the reference disk than for the case of multiple grain radii, while it shows the opposite behavior for temperatures above this threshold. The thermal emission in the case of multiple grain radii at short wavelengths is stronger than for the reference disk. The freeze-out radius (snowline) is a function of grain radius, spanning a radial range between the coldest and warmest grain species of 30 AU.

  15. ISOPHOT observations of circumstellar disks around young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Natta, A.; Beckwith, S. V. W.

    1999-03-01

    We observed 97 stars in five young clusters at 25 and 60 μm with ISOPHOT to determine the frequency of infrared emission from circumstellar disks. The clusters have ages between 1 and 300 Myr. Most stars (5/6) that have near-infrared excess emission, thought to be indicative of accretion disks, exhibit far-infrared emission; only one object that has no excess emission in the near-infrared exhibits far-infrared excess emission. No stars older than 10 Myr have evidence for optically-thick disks. These results show that dust in the disks between about 0.3 and 3 AU disappears on timescales of ~ 10 Myr, identical within the uncertainties to the timescale for cessation of accretion as indicated by near-infrared observations of similar samples. Detection of one object whose dust optical depth is intermediate between opaque and transparent suggests that the duration of the transition phase between optically-thick and thin disk emission is less than 300,000 yr. Broad-band photometry between 2.5 and 100 μm, low resolution spectra between 2 and 12 μm, and 200 μm maps of 18 young stars (1-3 Myr old) in the Taurus and Chamaeleon dark clouds suggests that the irradiation dominates over viscous dissipation of mass accretion in the heating of the disk. The spectral energy distributions are consistent with those predicted by models of disks heated centrally by the stellar/accretion photosphere or by scattering from a diffuse halo surrounding the disk. The observations demonstrate that heating by accretion through the disks contributes little or no power to the energy budget at distances more than a few tenths AU from the central star.

  16. SMA Continuum Survey of Circumstellar Disks in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Charles; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Qi, Chunhua

    2017-06-01

    The lifetime of disks surrounding pre-main-sequence stars is closely linked to planet formation and provides information on disk dispersal mechanisms and dissipation timescales. The potential for these optically thick, gas-rich disks to form planets is critically dependent on how much dust is available to be converted into terrestrial planets and rocky cores of giant planets. For this reason, an understanding of how dust mass varies with key properties such as stellar mass, age, and environment is critical for understanding planet formation. Millimeter wavelength observations, in which the dust emission is optically thin, are required to study the colder dust residing in the disk’s outer regions and to measure disk dust masses. Hence, we have obtained SMA 1.3 mm continuum observations of 62 Class II sources with suspected circumstellar disks in the Serpens star-forming region (SFR). Relative to the well-studied Taurus SFR, Serpens allows us to probe the distribution of dust masses for disks in a much denser and more clustered environment. Only 13 disks were detected in the continuum with the SMA. We calculate the total dust masses of these disks and compare their masses to those of disks in Taurus, Lupus, and Upper Scorpius. We do not find evidence of diminished dust masses in Serpens disks relative to those in Taurus despite the fact that disks in denser clusters may be expected to contain less dust mass due to stronger and more frequent tidal interactions that can disrupt the outer regions of disks. However, considering the low detection fraction, we likely detected only bright continuum sources and a more sensitive survey of Serpens would help clarify these results.

  17. The dynamic nature of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Arnone, James T; Walters, Alison D; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosomes are encased by a dynamic nuclear envelope. In contrast to metazoans, where the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, many fungi including budding yeast undergo “closed mitosis,” where the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the cell cycle. Consequently, during closed mitosis the nuclear envelope must expand to accommodate chromosome segregation to the two daughter cells. A recent study by Witkin et al. in budding yeast showed that if progression through mitosis is delayed, for example due to checkpoint activation, the nuclear envelope continues to expand despite the block to chromosome segregation. Moreover, this expansion occurs at a specific region of the nuclear envelope- adjacent to the nucleolus- forming an extension referred to as a “flare.” These observations raise questions regarding the regulation of nuclear envelope expansion both in budding yeast and in higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms confining mitotic nuclear envelope expansion to a particular region and the possible consequences of failing to regulate nuclear envelope expansion during the cell cycle. PMID:23873576

  18. Nonstationary envelope process and first excursion probability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    The definition of stationary random envelope proposed by Cramer and Leadbetter, is extended to the envelope of nonstationary random process possessing evolutionary power spectral densities. The density function, the joint density function, the moment function, and the crossing rate of a level of the nonstationary envelope process are derived. Based on the envelope statistics, approximate solutions to the first excursion probability of nonstationary random processes are obtained. In particular, applications of the first excursion probability to the earthquake engineering problems are demonstrated in detail.

  19. Testing the Definition of the ESC Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    The previous effort, including a successful Change Control Request, addressed shrinking the size of the Earth Science Constellations' (ESC) Envelope by reducing the Margin. Fundamental to the purpose of the Envelope is the case where the argument of perigee of the secondary object circulates from 90 degrees to 270 degrees. This ("outside of the envelope, always outside the envelope") case was tested both numerically in a spreadsheet and analytically. Results showed how it is important to include the fact that a secondary with a different semi-major axis has a different frozen eccentricity value.

  20. Millimeter Detection of AlO (X 2Σ+): Metal Oxide Chemistry in the Envelope of VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2009-03-01

    A new circumstellar molecule, the radical AlO (X 2Σ+), has been detected toward the envelope of the oxygen-rich supergiant star VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The N = 7 → 6 and 6 → 5 rotational transitions of AlO at 268 and 230 GHz were observed at 1 mm using the ARO Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) and the N = 4 → 3 line was detected at 2 mm using the ARO 12 m telescope. Based on the shape of the line profiles, AlO most likely arises from the dust-forming region in the spherical outflow of VY CMa, as opposed to the blue or redshifted winds, with a source size of θ s ~ 0farcs5. Given this source size, the column density of AlO was found to be N tot ~ 2 × 1015 cm-2 for T rot ~ 230 K, with a fractional abundance, relative to H2, of ~10-8. Gas-phase thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry is the likely formation mechanism for AlO in VY CMa, but either shocks disrupt the condensation process into Al2O3, or chemical "freezeout" occurs. The species therefore survives further into the circumstellar envelope to a radius of r ~ 20 R *. The detection of AlO in VY CMa is additional evidence of an active gas-phase refractory chemistry in oxygen-rich envelopes, and suggests such objects may be fruitful sources for other new oxide identifications.

  1. Coevolution of binaries and circumbinary gaseous discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David P.; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by Kepler raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc which drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for 104 binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentric binaries which strongly couple to the disc develop an m = 1 spiral wave launched from the 1:3 eccentric outer Lindblad resonance which corresponds to an alignment of gas particle longitude of periastrons. All systems display binary semimajor axis decay due to dissipation from the viscous disc.

  2. Disc formation in turbulent cloud cores: is magnetic flux loss necessary to stop the magnetic braking catastrophe or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-03-01

    Recent numerical analysis of Keplerian disc formation in turbulent, magnetized cloud cores by Santos-Lima et al. demonstrated that reconnection diffusion is an efficient process to remove the magnetic flux excess during the buildup of a rotationally supported disc. This process is induced by fast reconnection of the magnetic fields in a turbulent flow. In a similar numerical study, Seifried et al. concluded that reconnection diffusion or any other non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects would not be necessary and turbulence shear alone would provide a natural way to build up a rotating disc without requiring magnetic flux loss. Their conclusion was based on the fact that the mean mass-to-flux ratio (μ) evaluated over a spherical region with a radius much larger than the disc is nearly constant in their models. In this paper, we compare the two sets of simulations and show that this averaging over large scales can mask significant real increases of μ in the inner regions where the disc is built up. We demonstrate that turbulence-induced reconnection diffusion of the magnetic field happens in the initial stages of the disc formation in the turbulent envelope material that is accreting. Our analysis is suggestive that reconnection diffusion is present in both sets of simulations and provides a simple solution for the `magnetic braking catastrophe' which is discussed in the literature in relation to the formation of protostellar accretion discs.

  3. Grand-design Spiral Arms in a Young Forming Circumstellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Kengo; Machida, Masahiro N.; Hosokawa, Takashi; Sakurai, Yuya; Lin, Chia Hui

    2017-01-01

    We study formation and long-term evolution of a circumstellar disk in a collapsing molecular cloud core using a resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation. While the formed circumstellar disk is initially small, it grows as accretion continues, and its radius becomes as large as 200 au toward the end of the Class-I phase. A pair of grand-design spiral arms form due to gravitational instability in the disk, and they transfer angular momentum in the highly resistive disk. Although the spiral arms disappear in a few rotations as expected in a classical theory, new spiral arms form recurrently as the disk, soon becoming unstable again by gas accretion. Such recurrent spiral arms persist throughout the Class-0 and I phases. We then perform synthetic observations and compare our model with a recent high-resolution observation of a young stellar object Elias 2–27, whose circumstellar disk has grand-design spiral arms. We find good agreement between our theoretical model and the observation. Our model suggests that the grand-design spiral arms around Elias 2–27 are consistent with material arms formed by gravitational instability. If such spiral arms commonly exist in young circumstellar disks, it implies that young circumstellar disks are considerably massive and gravitational instability is the key process of angular momentum transport.

  4. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of antimicrobic-impregnated paper discs used to measure by a disc-agar diffusion technique or a disc... antimicrobial agents. In the disc-agar diffusion technique, bacterial susceptibility is ascertained by directly...

  5. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of antimicrobic-impregnated paper discs used to measure by a disc-agar diffusion technique or a disc... antimicrobial agents. In the disc-agar diffusion technique, bacterial susceptibility is ascertained by directly...

  6. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of antimicrobic-impregnated paper discs used to measure by a disc-agar diffusion technique or a disc... antimicrobial agents. In the disc-agar diffusion technique, bacterial susceptibility is ascertained by directly...

  7. 21 CFR 866.1620 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of antimicrobic-impregnated paper discs used to measure by a disc-agar diffusion technique or a disc... antimicrobial agents. In the disc-agar diffusion technique, bacterial susceptibility is ascertained by directly...

  8. 26 CFR 1.246-4 - Dividends from a DISC or former DISC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dividends from a DISC or former DISC. 1.246-4... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Deductions for Corporations § 1.246-4 Dividends from a DISC or former DISC. The deduction provided in section 243 (relating to dividends received by corporations) is...

  9. Photoevaporating transitional discs and molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Sui, Ning

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of photoevaporating protoplanetary discs including mass influx from molecular cloud cores. We examine the influence of cloud core properties on the formation and evolution of transitional discs. We use one-dimensional thin disc assumption and calculate the evolution of the protoplanetary disc. The effects of X-ray photoevaporation are also included. Our calculations suggest that most discs should experience the transitional disc phase within 10 Myr. The formation time of a gap and its initial location are functions of the properties of the cloud cores. In some circumstances, discs can open two gaps by photoevaporation alone. The two gaps form when the gas in the disc can expand to large radius and if the mass at large radius is sufficiently small. The surface density profile of the disc determines whether the two gaps can form. Since the structure of a disc is determined by the properties of a molecular cloud core, the core properties determine the formation of two gaps in the disc. We further find that even when the photoevaporation rate is reduced to 10 per cent of the standard value, two gaps can still form in the disc. The only difference is that the formation time is delayed.

  10. Hydrodynamic ablation of protoplanetary discs via supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, J. L.; Pittard, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations of a protoplanetary disc subject to the effect of a nearby (0.3 pc distant) supernova (SN), using a time-dependent flow from a one-dimensional numerical model of the supernova remnant (SNR), in addition to constant peak ram pressure simulations. Simulations are performed for a variety of disc masses and inclination angles. We find disc mass-loss rates that are typically 10-7-10-6 M⊙ yr-1 (but they peak near 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 during the 'instantaneous' stripping phase) and are sustained for around 200 yr. Inclination angle has little effect on the mass-loss unless the disc is close to edge-on. Inclined discs also strip asymmetrically with the trailing edge ablating more easily. Since the interaction lasts less than one outer rotation period, there is not enough time for the disc to restore its symmetry, leaving the disc asymmetrical after the flow has passed. Of the low-mass discs considered, only the edge-on disc is able to survive interaction with the SNR (with 50 per cent of its initial mass remaining). At the end of the simulations, discs that survive contain fractional masses of SN material up to 5 × 10-6. This is too low to explain the abundance of short-lived radionuclides in the early Solar system, but a larger disc and the inclusion of radiative cooling might allow the disc to capture a higher fraction of SN material.

  11. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  12. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  13. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  14. Twin Disc Gear Tooth Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    temperature testing, i.e., aluminum, titanium alloys, or magnesium with Krytox . * Use adequate forced-draft ventilation. * Prior to conducting any...ultrasonic cleaner charged with Stoddard solvent. 2. Prior to installation, wipe all disc surfaces with a lint-free cloth dampened with Stoddard solvent

  15. Plotting max/min data envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furuike, T.; Long, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Study of maximum and minimum load distributions along structural section is aided by visual display of load distribution data. Maximum/minimum envelope plot program plots these envelopes of the stresses and shear loads at selected points in beam modeled by series of finite elements. Digital output for engineers and management is presented for quick analysis and understanding.

  16. Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium - VIII. PSN J07285387+3349106, a highly reddened supernova Ibn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Terreran, G.; Taubenberger, S.; Noebauer, U. M.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Ciabattari, F.; Dennefeld, M.; Dimai, A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Harutyunyan, A.; Leonini, S.; Ochner, P.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric observations for the Type Ibn supernova (SN) dubbed PSN J07285387+3349106. Using data provided by amateur astronomers, we monitored the photometric rise of the SN to maximum light, occurred on 2015 February 18.8 UT (JDmax(V) = 245 7072.0 ± 0.8). PSN J07285387+3349106 exploded in the inner region of an infrared luminous galaxy, and is the most reddened SN Ibn discovered so far. We apply multiple methods to derive the total reddening to the SN, and determine a total colour excess E(B - V)tot = 0.99 ± 0.48 mag. Accounting for the reddening correction, which is affected by a large uncertainty, we estimate a peak absolute magnitude of MV = -20.30 ± 1.50. The spectra are dominated by continuum emission at early phases, and He I lines with narrow P-Cygni profiles are detected. We also identify weak Fe III and N II features. All these lines show an absorption component which is blueshifted by about 900-1000 km s-1. The spectra also show relatively broad He I line wings with low contrast, which extend to above 3000 km s-1. From about two weeks past maximum, broad lines of O I, Mg II and the Ca II near-infrared triplet are identified. The composition and the expansion velocity of the circumstellar material, and the presence of He I and α-elements in the SN ejecta indicate that PSN J07285387+3349106 was produced by the core collapse of a stripped-envelope star. We suggest that the precursor was WNE-type Wolf-Rayet star in its dense, He-rich circumstellar cocoon.

  17. Comparative Spectra of Oxygen-Rich Versus Carbon-Rich Circumstellar Shells: VY Canis Majoris and IRC(plus)10216 at 215-285 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenebaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Milam, S. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive (1sigma rms at 1 MHz resolution approx.3 mK) 1 mm spectral line survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IRC +10216 has been conducted to compare the chemistries of oxygen- and carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. This study was carried out using the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory with a new Atacama Large Millimeter Array type receiver. This survey is the first to chemically characterize an O-rich circumstellar shell at millimeter wavelengths. In VY CMa, 128 emission features were detected arising from 18 different molecules; and in IRC +10216, 720 lines were observed, assigned to 32 different species. The 1 mm spectrum of VY CMa is dominated by SO, and SiS; in IRC +10216, C4H and SiC2 are the most recurrent species. Ten molecules were common to both sources: CO, SiS, SiO, CS, CN, HCN, HNC, NaCl, PN, and HCO(+). Sulfur plays an important role in VY CMa, but saturated/ unsaturated carbon dominates the molecular content of IRC +102.16, producing CH2NH, for example. Although the molecular complexity of IRC +10216 is greater, VY CMa supports a unique "inorganic" chemistry leading to the oxides PO, AlO, and AlOH. Only diatomic and triatomic compounds were observed in VY CMa, while species with four or more atoms are common in IRC +10216, reflecting carbon's ability to form multiple strong bonds, unlike oxygen. In VY CMa, a new water maser (v2 = 2) has been found, as well as vibrationally excited NaCl. Toward IRC +10216, vibrationally excited CCH was detected for the first time.

  18. COMPARATIVE SPECTRA OF OXYGEN-RICH VERSUS CARBON-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELLS: VY CANIS MAJORIS AND IRC +10216 AT 215-285 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.; Milam, S. N. E-mail: jldodd@email.arizona.ed E-mail: lziurys@as.arizona.ed E-mail: Stefanie.N.Milam@nasa.go

    2010-09-01

    A sensitive (1{sigma} rms at 1 MHz resolution {approx}3 mK) 1 mm spectral line survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IRC +10216 has been conducted to compare the chemistries of oxygen- and carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. This study was carried out using the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory w