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Sample records for classical low-mass x-ray

  1. Population synthesis of classical low-mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, L. M.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Toonen, S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We model the present-day population of classical low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron star accretors, which have hydrogen-rich donor stars. Their population is compared with that of hydrogen-deficient LMXBs, known as ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs). We model the observable LMXB population and compare it to observations. We model the Galactic Bulge because it contains a well-observed population and it is the target of the Galactic Bulge Survey. Methods: We combine the binary population synthesis code SeBa with detailed LMXB evolutionary tracks to model the size and properties of the present-day LMXB population in the Galactic Bulge. Whether sources are persistent or transient, and what their instantaneous X-ray luminosities are, is predicted using the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results: We find a population of ~2.1 × 103 LMXBs with neutron star accretors. Of these about 15-40 are expected to be persistent (depending on model assumptions), with luminosities higher than 1035 erg s-1. About 7-20 transient sources are expected to be in outburst at any given time. Within a factor of two these numbers are consistent with the observed population of bright LMXBs in the Bulge. This gives credence to our prediction of the existence of a population of ~1.6 × 103 LMXBs with low donor masses that have gone through the period minimum, and have present-day mass transfer rates below 10-11 M⊙ yr-1. Conclusions: Even though the observed population of hydrogen-rich LMXBs in the Bulge is larger than the observed population of (hydrogen-deficient) UCXBs, the latter have a higher formation rate. While UCXBs may dominate the total LMXB population at the present time, the majority would be very faint or may have become detached and produced millisecond radio pulsars. In that case UCXBs would contribute significantly more to the formation of millisecond radio pulsars than hydrogen-rich LMXBs.

  2. DN Tau - a young low-mass CTTS in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan; Guedel, Manuel; Guenther, Moritz; Schmitt, Juergen

    2013-07-01

    We present a deep XMM-Newton observation of DN Tau, a M0 type classical T Tauri star (CTTS) and extend the sample of young accreting stars studied with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy to lower masses. We detect X-ray emission from magnetic activity and accretion shocks. DN Tau's X-ray properties link it to more massive and older CTTS. The strong hot corona makes DN Tau one of the X-ray brightest CTTS in its mass range, while the low mass and large radius result in a very cool accretion component and thus reduces its imprint in the observed X-ray spectrum and emission line diagnostics.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R.; Shahbaz, T.; Charles, P. A.; van Kerkwijk, M. H.; Naylor, T.

    1997-03-01

    Using CGS4 on UKIRT, we have obtained the first 2.05-2.45 μm infrared spectra of the Galactic bulge low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) GX1+4 and GX13+1. We report the detection of Brackett gamma emission from the accretion disc in both systems, confirming the identification of the IR counterpart to GX13+1. In addition, both spectra show CO molecular bands and metal lines in absorption, representing the first infrared spectroscopic detection of the secondary in a heavily obscured bulge source. We also present a JHK spectrum of the LMXB ScoX-1, which shows strong Hi, Hei and HeII emission.

  4. A Unified Model of Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucinska-Church, M.; Church, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present a unified physical model of Low Mass X-ray Binaries explaining the basic Atoll and Z-track types of source. In all LMXB with luminosity above 1-2.10^{37} erg/s, we have a new fundamental result that the temperature of the Comptonizing ADC corona equals that of the neutron star, i.e. there is thermal equilibrium. This equilibrium explains the properties of the basic Banana State of Atoll sources. Below this luminosity, equilibrium breaks down, T_ADC rising towards 100 keV by an unknown heating mechanism, explaining the Island State. Above 5.10^{37} erg/s flaring begins in the GX-Atolls which we show is unstable nuclear burning. Above 1.10^{38} erg/s, LMXB are seen as Z-track sources. Flaring in these and the GX-Atolls occurs when the mass accretion rate to the neutron star falls to the critical value for unstable nuclear burning on the star. Below 2.10^{37} erg/s, a different unstable burning: X-ray bursting, takes over. We show that the Normal Branch of the Z-track consists simply of increasing mass accretion rate, as is the Banana State in Atolls. In the Horizontal Branch, a measured, strongly increasing radiation pressure of the neutron star disrupts the inner disk launching the relativistic jets seen on this branch.

  5. Infrared Spectroscopy of Low-mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; Shahbaz, T.; Charles, P. A.; Naylor, T.

    1999-04-01

    Using CGS4 on UKIRT, we have obtained 2.00--2.45 mu m infrared spectra of a number of low-mass X-ray binaries including Sco X-1, Sco X-2, and GX13+1. Sco X-1 shows emission lines only, supporting our previous conclusion that the spectral type of the evolved secondary must be earlier than G5. Emission lines are also seen in the spectrum of Sco X-2, confirming the identity of the IR counterpart. We report the detection of CO bands in GX13+1 and estimate the most likely spectral type of the secondary to be K5 sc iii. We also find P Cygni type profiles in the Brackett gamma lines of Sco X-1 and GX13+1, indicating the presence of high velocity outflows in these systems. We present spectra of candidate IR counterparts to several other elusive X-ray binaries. Finally, implications for the nature and classification of these systems are discussed.

  6. Photometry of Two Intense Low Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, S.; Margon, B.; Anderson, S.

    1995-12-01

    The intense galactic X-ray source GX349+2 (Sco X-2) belongs to the class of persistently bright low-mass X-ray binaries called Z-sources. GX349+2 has only recently been optically identified with a 19th mag star. Of the six known Z-sources, only two (Sco X-1 and Cyg X-2) have been studied in the optical. It has been suggested that Z-sources as a group are characterized by evolved companions and correspondingly long orbital periods (Sco X-1, P=0.8d; Cyg X-2, P=9.8d). Recently Southwell et al. have presented spectroscopic observations of GX349+2 suggesting a 14d orbital period. We have obtained broadband photometry of the system on six consecutive nights in May 1995, and find evidence for a 21.7 +/- 0.3hr period of 0.14 mag half-amplitude, superposed on erratic flickering typical of Sco X-1 type objects. As with other Z-sources, caution will be needed to insure that the variations are truly periodic, and not simply due to chaotic variability observed over a relatively short time span. If our period is confirmed, then the nature of the 14d spectroscopic variation found by Southwell et al. is unclear. GX13+1 is a bright X-ray burst source, located in the galactic bulge. Due to heavy obscuration, no optical counterpart brighter than R ~ 22 has been detected, but an infrared counterpart (K=12) has recently been identified by Naylor et al. (1991) based on spatial coincidence with an accurate radio position. GX13+1 is unusual as there is a disagreement over its classification. Studies of the X-ray time variability place it among the Atoll-sources. However, there is some evidence that the system contains a giant companion (Garcia et al. 1992) which would place it among the Z-sources. In an attempt to determine the period of the system, we observed GX13+1 for 9 days in May -- July 1995. Preliminary photometry confirms variability of ~ 0.4 mag on a timescale of several days, as previously discovered by Charles & Naylor (1992). If GX13+1 is found to have a large orbital period

  7. Interstellar medium composition through X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Costantini, E.; de Vries, C.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) is an integral part of the evolution of the entire Galaxy. Metals are produced by stars and their abundances are the direct testimony of the history of stellar evolution. However, the interstellar dust composition is not well known and the total abundances are yet to be accurately determined. Aims: We probe ISM dust composition, total abundances, and abundance gradients through the study of interstellar absorption features in the high-resolution X-ray spectra of Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Methods: We used high-quality grating spectra of nine LMXBs taken with XMM-Newton. We measured the column densities of O, Ne, Mg, and Fe with an empirical model and estimated the Galactic abundance gradients. Results: The column densities of the neutral gas species are in agreement with those found in the literature. Solids are a significant reservoir of metals like oxygen and iron. Respectively, 15-25% and 65-90% of the total amount of O i and Fe i is found in dust. The dust amount and mixture seem to be consistent along all the lines-of-sight (LOS). Our estimates of abundance gradients and predictions of local interstellar abundances are in agreement with those measured at longer wavelengths. Conclusions: Our work shows that X-ray spectroscopy is a very powerful method to probe the ISM. For instance, on a large scale the ISM appears to be chemically homogeneous showing similar gas ionization ratios and dust mixtures. The agreement between the abundances of the ISM and the stellar objects suggests that the local Galaxy is also chemically homogeneous.

  8. Low Mass X-ray Binary 4U1705-44 Exiting an Extended High X-ray State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipson, Rebecca; Boyd, Patricia T.; Smale, Alan P.

    2017-09-01

    The neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U1705-44, which exhibited high amplitude long-term X-ray variability on the order of hundreds of days during the 16-year continuous monitoring by the RXTE ASM (1995-2012), entered an anomalously long high state in July 2012 as observed by MAXI (2009-present).

  9. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  10. Connections between X-ray and optical variability in the low mass X-ray binary 1735-444

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbet, R. H. D.; Smale, A. P.; Charles, P. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Menzies, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a long duration (4 day) simultaneous optical and X-ray observation of the low mass X-ray binary 1735-444 are presented. The observed X-ray and optical fluxes are correlated; the strength of this correlation is increased when allowance is made for the relatively large orbital modulation of the optical light. A simple interpretation of the optical radiation as reprocessed X-rays in a blackbody disk leads to an implausibly low disk temperature if the disk is assumed to have constant geometry. 1735-444 exhibits bimodal behavior having an X-ray spectral hardness ratio versus source intensity which is similar to that previously seen in sources such as Cyg X-2.

  11. Low-mass X-ray Binaries with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Below are the publications which directly and indirectly evolved from this very successful program: 1) 'Search for millisecond periodicities in type I X-ray bursts of the Rapid Burster'; 2) 'High-Frequency QPOs in the 2000 Outburst of the Galactic Microquasar XTE J1550-564'; 3) 'Chandra and RXTE Spectroscopy of Galactic Microquasar XTE 51550-564 in Outburst'; 4) 'GX 339-4: back to life'; 5) 'Evidence for black hole spin in GX 339-4: XMM-Newton EPIC-PN and RXTE spectroscopy of the very high state'.

  12. Low-mass X-ray Binaries with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Below are the publications which directly and indirectly evolved from this very successful program: 1) 'Search for millisecond periodicities in type I X-ray bursts of the Rapid Burster'; 2) 'High-Frequency QPOs in the 2000 Outburst of the Galactic Microquasar XTE J1550-564'; 3) 'Chandra and RXTE Spectroscopy of Galactic Microquasar XTE 51550-564 in Outburst'; 4) 'GX 339-4: back to life'; 5) 'Evidence for black hole spin in GX 339-4: XMM-Newton EPIC-PN and RXTE spectroscopy of the very high state'.

  13. STATE TRANSITIONS IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Charles K.; Frank, Juhan

    2009-10-10

    We investigate the model of disk/coronal accretion into a black hole. We show that the inner regions of an accretion disk in X-ray binaries can transform from a cool standard disk to an advection-dominated flow through the known properties of Coulomb interaction in a two-temperature plasma, viscous heating, radiative processes, and thermal conduction. A hot, diffuse corona covering the disk is powered by accretion, but it exchanges mass with the underlying cold disk. If the accretion rate in the system is low enough, we show that the corona evaporates the disk away, leaving an advective flow to continue toward the hole. In the soft/hard transition commonly seen in X-ray binaries, we show that this advective flow can recondense back onto the underlying disk if the change in the system's accretion rate is slow enough due to thermal conduction. Unabsorbed spectra are produced to test against observations as well as prediction of the location of truncation radii of the accretion disk.

  14. The low-mass X-ray binary LMC X-2

    SciTech Connect

    Crampton, D.; Hutchings, J.B.; Cowley, A.P.; Schmidtke, P.C.; Thompson, I.B. Arizona State Univ., Tempe Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-06-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric observations of LMC X-2 reveal the source to be an X-ray binary with a relatively long orbital period, probably 12.5 days. It appears to be a partially eclipsing system. It is one of a small subclass of low-mass X-ray binaries with longer orbital periods and higher X-ray luminosity than average, which contain a compact object accreting material from an evolving giant companion. 26 refs.

  15. A study of low mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    The entire effort under this contract during the period through January 1992 was devoted to a study of the cost and schedule required to put an upgraded Aries payload on the ASTRO-SPAS carrier provided by the German space agency, DARA. The ASTRO-SPAS is flown on the Space Shuttle, deployed by the crew for 5 to 7 days of free-flying observations and then recovered and returned to Earth. The spectrograph was to be provided by a collaboration involving the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory (LPARL), the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA) at the U. of Colorado and the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) in England. The payload for the ASTRO-SPAS mission included our own spectrograph and an instrument provided by Dr. Joachim Trumper of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Garching, Germany. A meeting was held in late July, 1991 with German scientists, DARA representatives and MBB, the ASTRO-SPAS spacecraft contractor. Sufficient information was exchanged to allow us to complete the study and the name LEXSA (Low Energy X-ray Spectrograph on ASTRO-SPAS) was given to our instrument and HERTA (High Energy x-Ray Telescope on ASTR0-SPAS) to the German instrument. The combination was called SPECTRO-SPAS. On October 1, 1991 CASA and LPARL submitted a cost and brief technical proposal to NASA on results of the study. The total cost over 4 fiscal years was 6.16 M dollars including CASA costs. NASA Headquarters was briefed on 3 October on details of the proposal. They found our costs reasonable, but indicated that the NASA FY '92 budget is extremely tight, they could not readily identify where the -S2.3M for LEXSA could be found and it was not clear that FY '93 would improve.

  16. X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TRANSIENTS OBSERVED IN THE RXTE ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhen; Yu, Wenfei E-mail: wenfei@shao.ac.cn

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a statistical study of the properties of 110 bright X-ray outbursts in 36 low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs) seen with the All-Sky Monitor (2–12 keV) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996–2011. We have measured a number of outburst properties, including peak X-ray luminosity, rate of change of luminosity on a daily timescale, e-folding rise and decay timescales, outburst duration, and total radiated energy. We found that the average properties, such as peak X-ray luminosity, rise and decay timescales, outburst duration, and total radiated energy of black hole LMXBTs, are at least two times larger than those of neutron star LMXBTs, implying that the measurements of these properties may provide preliminary clues to the nature of the compact object of a newly discovered LMXBT. We also found that the outburst peak X-ray luminosity is correlated with the rate of change of X-ray luminosity in both the rise and decay phases, which is consistent with our previous studies. Positive correlations between total radiated energy and peak X-ray luminosity, and between total radiated energy and the e-folding rise or decay timescale, are also found in the outbursts. These correlations suggest that the mass stored in the disk before an outburst is the primary initial condition that sets up the outburst properties seen later. We also found that the outbursts of two transient stellar-mass ultraluminous X-ray sources in M31 also roughly follow the correlations, which indicate that the same outburst mechanism works for the brighter outbursts of these two sources in M31 that reached the Eddington luminosity.

  17. Sigma observations of the low mass X-ray binaries of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Denis, M.; Paul, J.; Faisse, S.; Roques, J. P.; Bouchet, L.; Vedrenne, G.; Mandrou, P.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.

    1995-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope (35-1300 keV) SIGMA aboard the high energy GRANAT space observatory has been monitoring the Galactic Bulge region for more than 2000 h of effective time since March 1990. In the resulting average 35-75 keV image we detected ten sources at a level of greater than 5 standard deviations, 6 of which can be identified with low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). Among them, one is the 1993 X-ray nova in Ophiuchus (GRS 1726-249), one is an X-ray pulsar (GX 1+4), two are associated with X-ray bursters (GX 354-0 and A 1742-294) and two with bursting X-ray binaries in the globular clusters Terzan 2 and Terzan 1. Their spectral and long term variability behavior as measured by SIGMMA are presented and discussed.

  18. Sigma observations of the low mass X-ray binaries of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Denis, M.; Paul, J.; Faisse, S.; Roques, J. P.; Bouchet, L.; Vedrenne, G.; Mandrou, P.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.

    1995-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope (35-1300 keV) SIGMA aboard the high energy GRANAT space observatory has been monitoring the Galactic Bulge region for more than 2000 h of effective time since March 1990. In the resulting average 35-75 keV image we detected ten sources at a level of greater than 5 standard deviations, 6 of which can be identified with low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). Among them, one is the 1993 X-ray nova in Ophiuchus (GRS 1726-249), one is an X-ray pulsar (GX 1+4), two are associated with X-ray bursters (GX 354-0 and A 1742-294) and two with bursting X-ray binaries in the globular clusters Terzan 2 and Terzan 1. Their spectral and long term variability behavior as measured by SIGMMA are presented and discussed.

  19. Hard X-ray Flux from Low-Mass Stars in the Cygnus OB2 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramazza, M.; Drake, J. J.; Micela, G.; Flaccomio, E.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the X-ray emission in the 20-40 keV band expected from the flaring low-mass stellar population in Cygnus OB2 assuming that the observed soft X-ray emission is due to a superposition of flares and that the ratio of hard X-ray to soft X-ray emission is described by a scaling found for solar flares by Isola and co-workers. We estimate a low-mass stellar hard X-ray flux in the 20-40 keV band in the range ~7×1031-7×1033 erg/s and speculate the limit of this values. Hard X-ray emission could lie at a level not much below the current observed flux upper limits for Cygnus OB2. Simbol-X, with its broad energy band (10-100 keV) and its sensitivity should be able to detect this emission and would provide insights into the hard X-ray production of flares on pre-main sequence stars.

  20. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During the five-year period, our study of "Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries" has been focused on the following aspects: observations, data analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations, numerical calculations, and theoretical modeling. Most of the results of our study have been published in refereed journals and conference presentations.

  1. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was observed on September of 2002. Data analysis for both observation has been completed: an investigation of the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure. A study of behavior of the emission features as a function of binary orbit shows modulated behavior in one of the systems. A paper on "High-resolution observations of low-mass X-ray binaries" is near completion. The paper includes observations with the Chandra HETG that are not yet completed.

  2. Theoretical spectra of nonmagnetized low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerny, Bozena; Czerny, Michal; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical X-ray spectra of low-mass X-ray binaries with negligible magnetic fields are presented. The geometry of the X-ray emitting region, the energetic efficiency of the accretion in the disk and in the boundary layer which leads to a relation between the disk and the boundary layer luminosities, and the irradiation of the disk by the boundary layer are studied. The model of the radiation spectrum emerging from the neutron star and the innermost part of the disk is presented. The relativistic and Doppler effects and their influence on the spectrum as a function of inclination angle are discussed. A simple method for comparing the spectrum model with observations by studying the hardness ratio is given, and the results for three X-ray sources in globular clusters observed by the Einstein satellite are presented. The range of applicability of the spectrum models is also discussed.

  3. A unified model of accretion flows and X ray emission in low mass X ray binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work on a unified model of accretion flows and X-ray emission in low mass X-ray binaries is summarized. In this model, a weakly magnetic neutron star accretes gas simultaneously from a Keplerian disk and a corona above the inner part of the disk. Photons are produced and escape through an approximately radial inflow of gas captured from the inner disk corona. Changes in the optical depths of the central corona and the radial flow may explain the Z-shaped hardness-intensity and color-color tracks observed in the most luminous sources. Numerical simulations show that the radial flow oscillates when the luminosity rises to within a few percent of the Eddington critical luminosity L sub E, and that the oscillation frequency is approximately 5 to 10 Hz if the radial flow develops approximately 300 km from the neutron star. The 10 to 20 Hz oscillations observed in Sco X-1 when it is on the flaring branch are discussed.

  4. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. observation of one of the two objects has taken place and the data were received in late November. The second object is yet to be observed. Over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  5. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was not observed until September of 2002. Data analysis for the new observation is underway. over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  6. Hystereses in dwarf nova outbursts and low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameury, J.-M.; Lasota, J.-P.; Knigge, C.; Körding, E. G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The disc instability model (DIM) successfully explains why many accreting compact binary systems exhibit outbursts during which their luminosity increases by orders of magnitude. The DIM correctly predicts which systems should be transient and works regardless of whether the accretor is a black hole, a neutron star, or a white dwarf. However, it has been known for some time that the outbursts of X-ray binaries, which contain neutron-star or black-hole accretors, exhibit hysteresis in the X-ray hardness-intensity diagram (HID). More recently, it has been shown that the outbursts of accreting white dwarfs also show hysteresis, but in a diagram combining optical, EUV, and X-ray fluxes. Aims: We examine the nature of the hysteresis observed in cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binaries. Methods: We used our disc evolution code for modelling dwarf nova outbursts, and constructed the hardness intensity diagram as predicted by the disc instability model. Results: We show explicitly that the standard DIM, modified only to account for disc truncation, can explain the hysteresis observed in accreting white dwarfs, but cannot explain that observed in X-ray binaries. Conclusions: The spectral evidence for the existence of different accretion regimes or components (disc, corona, jets, etc.) should only be based on wavebands that are specific to the innermost parts of the discs, i.e. EUV and X-rays; this task is difficult because of interstellar absorption. The existing data, however, indicate that a hysteresis is in the EUV - X-ray domain is present in SS Cyg.

  7. Estimation of the accuracy of methods for determining component masses for low-mass X-ray binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhina, E. A.; Petrov, V. S.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern modeling of the population of low-mass X-ray binary systems containing black holes applying standard assumptions leads to a lack of agreement between the modeled and observed mass distributions for the optical components, with the observed masses being lower. This makes the task of estimating the systematic errors in the derived component masses due to imperfect models relevant. To estimate the influence of systematic errors in the derived masses of stars in X-ray binary systems, we considered two approximations for the tidally deformed star in a Roche model. Approximating the star as a sphere with a volume equal to that of the Roche lobe leads to slight overestimation of the equatorial rotational velocity V rot sin i, and hence to slight underestimation of the mass ratio q = M x / M v . Approximating the star as a flat, circular disk with constant local line profiles and a linear limb-darkening law (a classical rotational broadeningmodel) is an appreciably cruder approach, and leads to overestimation of V rot sin i by about 20%. In the case of high values of q = M x / M v , this approximation leads to substantial underestimation of the mass ratio q, which can reach several tens of percent. The mass of the optical star is overestimated by a factor of 1.5 in this case, while the mass of the black hole is changed only slightly. Since most estimates of component mass ratios for X-ray binary systems are carried out using a classical rotational broadening model for the lines, this leads to the need for appreciable corrections to (reductions of) previously published masses for the optical stars, which enhances the contradiction with the standard evolutionary scenario for low-mass X-ray binaries containing black holes.

  8. LOW-MASS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH RAPID X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin

    2016-04-10

    We present a detailed study of the optical spectroscopic properties of 12 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with candidate low-mass black holes (BHs) selected by Kamizasa et al. through rapid X-ray variability. The high-quality, echellette Magellan spectra reveal broad Hα emission in all the sources, allowing us to estimate robust virial BH masses and Eddington ratios for this unique sample. We confirm that the sample contains low-mass BHs accreting at high rates: the median M{sub BH} = 1.2 × 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙} and median L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 0.44. The sample follows the M{sub BH}–σ{sub *} relation, within the considerable scatter typical of pseudobulges, the probable hosts of these low-mass AGNs. Various lines of evidence suggest that ongoing star formation is prevalent in these systems. We propose a new strategy to estimate star formation rates in AGNs hosted by low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies, based on modification of an existing method using the strength of [O ii] λ3727, [O iii] λ5007, and X-rays.

  9. A New γ-Ray Loud, Eclipsing Low-mass X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, Jay; Li, Kwan-Lok; Chomiuk, Laura; Heinke, Craig O.; Udalski, Andrzej; Peacock, Mark; Shishkovsky, Laura; Tremou, Evangelia

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery of an eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary at the center of the 3FGL error ellipse of the unassociated Fermi/Large Area Telescope γ-ray source 3FGL J0427.9-6704. Photometry from OGLE and the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope and spectroscopy from the SOAR telescope have allowed us to classify the system as an eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary (P = 8.8 hr) with a main-sequence donor and a neutron-star accretor. Broad double-peaked H and He emission lines suggest the ongoing presence of an accretion disk. Remarkably, the system shows separate sets of absorption lines associated with the accretion disk and the secondary, and we use their radial velocities to find evidence for a massive (˜1.8-1.9 M ⊙) neutron-star primary. In addition to a total X-ray eclipse with a duration of ˜2200 s observed with NuSTAR, the X-ray light curve also shows properties similar to those observed among known transitional millisecond pulsars: short-term variability, a hard power-law spectrum ({{Γ }}˜ 1.7), and a comparable 0.5-10 keV luminosity (˜ 2.4× {10}33 erg s-1). We find tentative evidence for a partial (˜ 60 % ) γ-ray eclipse at the same phase as the X-ray eclipse, suggesting the γ-ray emission may not be confined to the immediate region of the compact object. The favorable inclination of this binary is promising for future efforts to determine the origin of γ-rays among accreting neutron stars.

  10. UNVEILING A POPULATION OF GALAXIES HARBORING LOW-MASS BLACK HOLES WITH X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Greene, J. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mainieri, V.

    2013-08-20

    We report the discovery of three low-mass black hole (BH) candidates residing in the centers of low-mass galaxies at z < 0.3 in the Chandra Deep Field-South Survey. These BHs are initially identified as candidate active galactic nuclei based on their X-ray emission in deep Chandra observations. Multi-wavelength observations are used to strengthen our claim that such emission is powered by an accreting supermassive BH. While the X-ray luminosities are low at L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} (and variable in one case), we argue that they are unlikely to be attributed to star formation based on H{alpha} or UV fluxes. Optical spectroscopy from Keck and the VLT allows us to (1) measure accurate redshifts, (2) confirm their low stellar host mass, (3) investigate the source(s) of photo-ionization, and (4) estimate extinction. With stellar masses of M{sub *} < 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} determined from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging, the host galaxies are among the lowest mass systems known to host actively accreting BHs. We estimate BH masses M{sub BH} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} based on scaling relations between BH mass and host properties for more luminous systems. In one case, a broad component of the H{alpha} emission-line profile is detected, thus providing a virial mass estimate. BHs in such low-mass galaxies are of considerable interest as the low-redshift analogs to the seeds of the most massive BHs at high redshift which have remained largely elusive to date. Our study highlights the power of deep X-ray surveys to uncover such low-mass systems.

  11. FORMATION OF MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM INTERMEDIATE- AND LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Yong; Li Xiangdong

    2012-09-01

    We present a systematic study of the evolution of intermediate- and low-mass X-ray binaries consisting of an accreting neutron star of mass 1.0-1.8 M{sub Sun} and a donor star of mass 1.0-6.0 M{sub Sun }. In our calculations we take into account physical processes such as unstable disk accretion, radio ejection, bump-induced detachment, and outflow from the L{sub 2} point. Comparing the calculated results with the observations of binary radio pulsars, we report the following results. (1) The allowed parameter space for forming binary pulsars in the initial orbital period-donor mass plane increases with increasing neutron star mass. This may help explain why some millisecond pulsars with orbital periods longer than {approx}60 days seem to have less massive white dwarfs than expected. Alternatively, some of these wide binary pulsars may be formed through mass transfer driven by planet/brown-dwarf-involved common envelope evolution. (2) Some of the pulsars in compact binaries might have evolved from intermediate-mass X-ray binaries with anomalous magnetic braking. (3) The equilibrium spin periods of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries are in general shorter than the observed spin periods of binary pulsars by more than one order of magnitude, suggesting that either the simple equilibrium spin model does not apply or there are other mechanisms/processes spinning down the neutron stars.

  12. POTENTIAL GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: guwm@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-06-20

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from the jets of low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, jet dynamics are dominated by magnetic and proton–matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339–4. The results not only can reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339–4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by the Fermi and CTA telescopes. Future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, which could be employed to distinguish the origin of X-ray emissions.

  13. Chandra Observations of the Faintest Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Colleen A.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Jonker, Peter G.; vanderKlis, Michiel; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Belloni, Tomaso

    2003-01-01

    There exists a group of persistently faint galactic X-ray sources that, based on their location in the galaxy, high L(sub X)/L(sub opt), association with X-ray bursts, and absence of low frequency X-ray pulsations, are thought to be low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We present results from Chandra observations for 8 of these systems: 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, KS 1739-304, SLX 1735-269, GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12. Locations for all sources, excluding GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, and KS 1739-304 (which were not detected) were improved to 0.6 sec error circles (90% confidence). Our observations support earlier findings of transient behavior of GRS 1736-297, KS 1739-304, SLX 1746-331, and 2S 1711-339 (which we detect in one of two observations). Energy spectra for 4U 1708-408,2S 1711-339, SLX 1735-269, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12 are hard, with power law indices typically 1.4-2.1, which are consistent with typical faint LMXB spectra.

  14. Chandra Observations of the Faintest Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Colleen A.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Jonker, Peter G.; vanderKlis, Michiel; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Belloni, Tomaso; Mendez, Mariano

    2003-01-01

    A group of persistently faint Galactic X-ray sources exist that, based on their location in the Galaxy, high L(sub X)/L(sub opt), association with X-ray bursts, and absence of low-frequency X-ray pulsations, are thought to be low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We present results from Chandra observations for eight of these systems: 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, KS 1739-304, SLX 1735-269, GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12. Locations for all these sources, excluding GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, and KS 1739-304 (which were not detected), were improved to 0.6 sec error circles (90% confidence). Our observations support earlier findings of transient behavior of GRS 1736-297, KS 1739-304, SLX 1746-331, and 2S 1711-339 (which we detect in one of two observations). Energy spectra for 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, SLX 1735-269, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12 are hard, with power-law indices typically 1.4-2.1, which is consistent with typical faint LMXB spectra.

  15. Chandra Observations of the Faintest Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Colleen A.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Jonker, Peter G.; vanderKlis, Michiel; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Belloni, Tomaso; Mendez, Mariano

    2003-01-01

    A group of persistently faint Galactic X-ray sources exist that, based on their location in the Galaxy, high L(sub X)/L(sub opt), association with X-ray bursts, and absence of low-frequency X-ray pulsations, are thought to be low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We present results from Chandra observations for eight of these systems: 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, KS 1739-304, SLX 1735-269, GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12. Locations for all these sources, excluding GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, and KS 1739-304 (which were not detected), were improved to 0.6 sec error circles (90% confidence). Our observations support earlier findings of transient behavior of GRS 1736-297, KS 1739-304, SLX 1746-331, and 2S 1711-339 (which we detect in one of two observations). Energy spectra for 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, SLX 1735-269, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12 are hard, with power-law indices typically 1.4-2.1, which is consistent with typical faint LMXB spectra.

  16. ORBITAL PERIOD AND OUTBURST LUMINOSITY OF TRANSIENT LOW MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Yu, W.; Li, T. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Li, X. D.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the maximal luminosity of X-ray outburst and the orbital period in transient low mass X-ray binaries (or soft X-ray transients) observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in the past decade. We find that the maximal luminosity (3-200 keV) in Eddington units generally increases with increasing orbital period, which does not show a luminosity saturation but in general agrees with theoretical prediction. The peak luminosities in ultra-compact binaries might be higher than those with an orbital period of 2-4 hr, but more data are needed to make this claim. We also find that there is no significant difference in the 3-200 keV peak outburst luminosity between neutron star (NS) systems and black hole (BH) systems with orbital periods above 4 hr; however, there might be a significant difference at smaller orbital periods where only NS systems are observed and radiatively inefficient accretion flow is expected to work at low luminosities for BH accreters.

  17. A Deep X-Ray Survey of Low Mass PMS Stars in NGC 2264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, Brian M.; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed to make a deep X-ray survey of a rotation- and proper-motion selected sample of young (3-15 Myr old), low-mass, pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the populous star-forming region NGC 2264. These X-ray Multimirror Mission (XMM) data will be combined with an extensive set of rotation data for members of this cluster to allow us, for the first time, to probe the early evolution of magnetic dynamo activity for both fully convective stars and those stars found lower on their Hayashi tracks, which are developing radiative cores. We will use these data to study the interrelationship between rotation, interior structure, and coronal activity as a function of mass and age in the PMS and to define empirical constraints for theoretical models of angular momentum/dynamo evolution.

  18. V404 Cyg - an Interacting Black-Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori; Mauerhan, Jon; Graham, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    This DDT proposal is prompted by the June 15, 2015 outburst of V404 Cyg, a black-hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). This outburst stands out since it is the first black hole system with a measured parallax, lying at a distance of only 2.39+/-0.14 kpc. An extensive and loosely organized multi-wavelength campaign is already underway by the astronomical community. One of the missing pieces of the puzzle is the mid-infrared (IR). Combined with radio, optical, and X-ray data, the mid-IR will help to discriminate discriminate between an accretion disk, jet emission, or circumstellar dust scenarios. Spitzer offers a unique opportunity to observe at these wavelengths. Here we propose 4 very short (5-minutes at 3.6 and 4.5 micron) observations of IRAC hotometry to search for the presence of warm dust and, if present, constrain the heating mechanism.

  19. On the formation of galactic black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there are 24 black hole (BH) X-ray binary systems that have been dynamically confirmed in the Galaxy. Most of them are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) comprised of a stellar-mass BH and a low-mass donor star. Although the formation of these systems has been extensively investigated, some crucial issues remain unresolved. The most noticeable one is that, the low-mass companion has difficulties in ejecting the tightly bound envelope of the massive primary during the spiral-in process. While initially intermediate-mass binaries are more likely to survive the common envelope (CE) evolution, the resultant BH LMXBs mismatch the observations. In this paper, we use both stellar evolution and binary population synthesis to study the evolutionary history of BH LMXBs. We test various assumptions and prescriptions for the supernova mechanisms that produce BHs, the binding energy parameter, the CE efficiency and the initial mass distributions of the companion stars. We obtain the birthrate and the distributions of the donor mass, effective temperature and orbital period for the BH LMXBs in each case. By comparing the calculated results with the observations, we put useful constraints on the aforementioned parameters. In particular, we show that it is possible to form BH LMXBs with the standard CE scenario if most BHs are born through failed supernovae.

  20. Evolution of Low-mass X-Ray Binaries: The Effect of Donor Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are thought to originate from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The discovery of eclipsing radio MSPs, including redbacks and black widows, indicates that evaporation of the donor star by the MSP’s irradiation takes place during the LMXB evolution. In this work, we investigate the effect of donor evaporation on the secular evolution of LMXBs, considering different evaporation efficiencies and related angular momentum loss. We find that for widening LMXBs, the donor star leaves a less massive white dwarf than without evaporation; for contracting systems, evaporation can speed up the evolution, resulting in dynamically unstable mass transfer and possibly the formation of isolated MSPs.

  1. Long-term variability of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, E.; Revnivtsev, M.; Parkin, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    We consider modulations of mass captured by the compact object from the companion star's stellar wind in Low Mass X-ray Binaries with late type giants. Based on 3D simulations with two different hydrodynamic codes used Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches - the SPH code GADGET and the Eulerian code PLUTO, we conclude that a hydrodynamical interaction of the wind matter within a binary system even without eccentricity results in variability of the mass accretion rate with characteristic time-scales close to the orbital period. Observational appearances of this wind might be similar to that of an accretion disc corona/wind.

  2. Selection effects on the orbital period distribution of Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arur, Kavitha; Maccarone, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Observations show a lack of Low Mass Black Hole Binaries with orbital periods below 4 hours. While it is known that Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) tend to have lower peak luminosities in outburst compared to their Neutron Star counterparts, it is unclear if selection effects can account for the difference in the numbers. Studying the effect of these selection biases is important for binary population studies. Here we report on the implications for the inferred orbital period distribution of these BHBs after a simulation that accounts for extinction of the optical counterpart, absorption of X-ray counts and detectability of the outburst.

  3. Evidence for Simultaneous Jets and Disk Winds in Luminous Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; Neilsen, Joseph; Allen, Jessamyn L.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Fender, Rob; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Schulz, Norbert

    2016-10-01

    Recent work on jets and disk winds in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) suggests that they are to a large extent mutually exclusive, with jets observed in spectrally hard states and disk winds observed in spectrally soft states. In this paper we use existing literature on jets and disk winds in the luminous neutron star (NS) LMXB GX 13+1, in combination with archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, to show that this source is likely able to produce jets and disk winds simultaneously. We find that jets and disk winds occur in the same location on the source’s track in its X-ray color-color diagram. A further study of literature on other luminous LMXBs reveals that this behavior is more common, with indications for simultaneous jets and disk winds in the black hole LMXBs V404 Cyg and GRS 1915+105 and the NS LMXBs Sco X-1 and Cir X-1. For the three sources for which we have the necessary spectral information, we find that simultaneous jets/winds all occur in their spectrally hardest states. Our findings indicate that in LMXBs with luminosities above a few tens of percent of the Eddington luminosity, jets and disk winds are not mutually exclusive, and the presence of disk winds does not necessarily result in jet suppression.

  4. Modeling the luminosity function of galactic low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranov, A. G.; Postnov, K. A.; Revnivtsev, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the family of binaries with a low-mass star and a compact neutron star companion (low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron stars) ismodeled by the method of population synthesis. Continuous Roche-lobe filling by the optical star in LMXBs is assumed to be maintained by the removal of orbital angular momentum from the binary by a magnetic stellar wind from the optical star and the radiation of gravitational waves by the binary. The developed model of LMXB evolution has the following significant distinctions: (1) allowance for the effect of the rotational evolution of a magnetized compact remnant on themass transfer scenario in the binary, (2) amore accurate allowance for the response of the donor star to mass loss at the Roche-lobe filling stage. The results of theoretical calculations are shown to be in good agreement with the observed orbital period-X-ray luminosity diagrams for persistent Galactic LMXBs and their X-ray luminosity function. This suggests that the main elements of binary evolution, on the whole, are correctly reflected in the developed code. It is shown that most of the Galactic bulge LMXBs at luminosities L x > 1037 erg s-1 should have a post-main-sequence Roche-lobe-filling secondary component (low-mass giants). Almost all of the models considered predict a deficit of LMXBs at X-ray luminosities near ˜1036.5 erg s-1 due to the transition of the binary from the regime of angular momentum removal by a magnetic stellar wind to the regime of gravitational waves (analogous to the widely known period gap in cataclysmic variables, accreting white dwarfs). At low luminosities, the shape of the model luminosity function for LMXBs is affected significantly by their transient behavior-the accretion rate onto the compact companion is not always equal to the mass transfer rate due to instabilities in the accretion disk around the compact object. The best agreement with observed binaries is achieved in the models suggesting that heavy

  5. Formation of Galactic Black Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Most of the Galactic black hole (BH) X-ray binary systems are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Although the formation of these systems has been extensively investigated, some crucial issues remain unresolved. The most noticeable one is that, the low-mass companion has difficulties in ejecting the tightly bound envelope of the massive primary during the spiral-in process. While initially intermediate-mass binaries are more likely to survive the common envelope (CE) evolution, the resultant BH LMXBs mismatch the observations. Here we use both stellar evolution and binary population synthesis to study the evolutionary history of BH LMXBs. We test various assumptions and prescriptions for the supernova mechanisms that produce BHs, the binding energy parameter, the CE efficiency, and the initial mass distributions of the companion stars. We obtain the birthrate and the distributions of the donor mass, effective temperature and orbital period for the BH LMXBs in each case. By comparing the calculated results with the observations, we put useful constraints on the aforementioned parameters. In particular, we show that it is possible to form BH LMXBs with the standard CE scenario if most BHs are born through failed supernovae.

  6. The evolution of cataclysmic and low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The observational data for the 124 cataclysmic and low-mass X-ray binaries of known orbital period are compiled. It is found that the eruption properties are very well correlated with the orbital periods, in a manner that suggests that the mass transfer is the all-important determinant of evolution and of the eruptive behavior. Transfer rates of 10 to the -11th to 10 to the -7th solar mass/year are found, which are well correlated with orbital period. It is concluded that the mechanism which drives these systems is the magnetic braking of the secondary's rotation by its own stellar wind, coupled with the enforcement of synchronous rotation by tidal friction. This permits CVs to lose sufficient angular momentum to begin mass transfer in a reasonable time and drives the mass transfer at a high rate once it begins. An account of the long-lived phases of CV evolution is given.

  7. Evolution of the Spin Periods of Neutron Stars in Low-mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. T.; Zhu, Z. L.

    2016-11-01

    We present numerical analysis of the spin evolution of the neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, trying to explain the discrepancy in the spin period distribution between observations of millisecond pulsars and theoretical results. In our calculations, we take account of possible effect of radiation pressure, and irradiation-induced instability on the structure of the disk, and the evolution of the mass transfer rate, respectively. We report the following results: (1) Radiation pressure leads to a slight increase of the spin periods, and irradiation-induced mass transfer cycles can shorten the spin-down phase of evolution. (2) The calculated results in the model combining radiation pressure and irradiation-induced mass transfer cycles show that accretion is strongly limited by radiation pressure in high mass transfer phase. (3) The accreted mass and the critical fastness parameter can affect the number of systems in equilibrium state.

  8. Fabrication of large-area and low mass critical-angle x-ray transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alex R.; Guan, Dong; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2014-07-01

    Soft x-ray spectroscopy of celestial sources with high resolving power R = E/ΔE and large collecting area addresses important science listed in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey New Worlds New Horizons, such as the growth of the large scale structure of the universe and its interaction with active galactic nuclei, the kinematics of galactic outflows, as well as coronal emission from stars and other topics. Numerous studies have shown that a transmission grating spectrometer based on lightweight critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings can deliver R = 3000-5000 and large collecting area with high efficiency and minimal resource requirements, providing spectroscopic figures of merit at least an order of magnitude better than grating spectrometers on Chandra and XMM-Newton, as well as future calorimeter-based missions. The recently developed CAT gratings combine the advantages of transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed figure and alignment tolerances) and blazed reflection gratings (high broad band diffraction efficiency, utilization of higher diffraction orders). Their working principle based on blazing through reflection off the smooth, ultra-high aspect ratio grating bar sidewalls has previously been demonstrated on small samples with x rays. For larger gratings (area greater than 1 inch square) we developed a fabrication process for grating membranes with a hierarchy of integrated low-obscuration supports. The fabrication involves a combination of advanced lithography and highly anisotropic dry and wet etching techniques. We report on the latest fabrication results of free-standing, large-area CAT gratings with polished sidewalls and preliminary x-ray tests.

  9. Searches for millisecond pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, B. A.; Van Der Klis, M.; Wood, K. S.; Norris, J. P.; Hertz, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Paradijs, J. Van; Lewin, W. H. G.; Mitsuda, K.; Penninx, W.

    1994-01-01

    Coherent millisecond X-ray pulsations are expected from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but remain undetected. Using the single-parameter Quadratic Coherence Recovery Technique (QCRT) to correct for unknown binary orbit motion, we have performed Fourier transform searches for coherent oscillations in all long, continuous segments of data obtained at 1 ms time resolution during Ginga observations of LMXB. We have searched the six known Z sources (GX 5-1, Cyg X-2, Sco X-1, GX 17+2, GX 340+0, and GX 349+2), seven of the 14 known atoll sources (GX 3+1. GX 9+1, GX 9+9, 1728-33. 1820-30, 1636-53 and 1608-52), the 'peculiar' source Cir X-1, and the high-mass binary Cyg X-3. We find no evidence for coherent pulsations in any of these sources, with 99% confidence limits on the pulsed fraction between 0.3% and 5.0% at frequencies below the Nyquist frequency of 512 Hz. A key assumption made in determining upper limits in previous searches is shown to be incorrect. We provide a recipe for correctly setting upper limits and detection thresholds. Finally we discuss and apply two strategies to improve sensitivity by utilizing multiple, independent, continuous segments of data with comparable count rates.

  10. Orbital period change of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Dotani, Tadayasu; Nagase, Fumiaki; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Shaham, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    The transient low-mass X-ray binary, EXO 0748-676, discovered with EXOSAT, is known to exhibit eclipses of a 492-s duration with a 3.82-hr period, intensity dips at pre-eclipse phases and type-I X-ray bursts. We observed this source with Ginga in 1989 March, 1990 December, 1991 January, and 1991 August and determined nine eclipse center times. Combining these eclipse center times with the previous result of the EXOSAT observations, we find that the orbital period of this source is not decaying monotonically, contrary to the previously reported suggestion. Instead, it shows a more complex behavior. A quadratic fit to the eclipse data yields a positive rate of change in orbital period with an approximate rate of 0.9 x 10 exp 7/yr, although the EXOSAT observations made in 1985 do not fit this trend. A sinusoidal function gives a better fit to the observed orbital period changes with a period of about 12 yr and an amplitude of about 44 lt-s, although the period is much longer than the observation interval of about 6.5 yr. Possible mechanisms for the orbital period change are discussed.

  11. A state change in the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Patruno, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Keane, E. F.; Monard, B.; Mahony, E. K.; Bogdanov, S.; Corbel, S.; Edwards, P. G.; Archibald, A. M.; Janssen, G. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.

    2014-06-01

    Millisecond radio pulsars acquire their rapid rotation rates through mass and angular momentum transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary system. Recent studies of PSR J1824-2452I and PSR J1023+0038 have observationally demonstrated this link, and they have also shown that such systems can repeatedly transition back-and-forth between the radio millisecond pulsar and low-mass X-ray binary states. This also suggests that a fraction of such systems are not newly born radio millisecond pulsars but are rather suspended in a back-and-forth, state-switching phase, perhaps for gigayears. XSS J12270-4859 has been previously suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary, and until recently the only such system to be seen at MeV-GeV energies. We present radio, optical and X-ray observations that offer compelling evidence that XSS J12270-4859 is a low-mass X-ray binary which transitioned to a radio millisecond pulsar state between 2012 November 14 and December 21. We use optical and X-ray photometry/spectroscopy to show that the system has undergone a sudden dimming and no longer shows evidence for an accretion disc. The optical observations constrain the orbital period to 6.913 ± 0.002 h.

  12. Aperiodic variability of low-mass X-ray binaries at very low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Papadakis, I.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2003-02-01

    We have obtained discrete Fourier power spectra of a sample of persistent low-mass neutron-star X-ray binaries using long-term light curves from the All Sky Monitor on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Our aim is to investigate their aperiodic variability at frequencies in the range 1 x 10-7-5 x 10-6 Hz and compare their properties with those of the black-hole source Cyg X-1. We find that the classification scheme that divides LMXBs into Z and atoll sources blurs at very low frequencies. Based on the long-term ( ~ years) pattern of variability and the results of power-law fits (P(nu ) ~ nu -alpha ) to the 1 x 10-7-5 x 10-6 Hz power density spectra, low-mass neutron-star binaries fall into three categories. Type I includes all Z sources, except Cyg X-2, and the atoll sources GX9+1 and GX13+1. They show relatively flat power spectra (alpha <~ 0.9) and low variability (rms <~ 20%). Type II systems comprise 4U 1636-53, 4U 1735-44 and GX3+1. They are more variable (20% larm rms <~ 30%) and display steeper power spectra (0.9 <~ alpha <~ 1.2) than type I sources. Type III systems are the most variable (rms > 30%) and exhibit the steepest power spectra (alpha > 1.2). The sources 4U 1705-44, GX354-0 and 4U 1820-30 belong to this group. GX9+9 and Cyg X-2 appear as intermediate systems in between type I and II and type II and III sources, respectively. We speculate that the differences in these systems may be caused by the presence of different types of mass-donor companions. Other factors, like the size of the accretion disc and/or the presence of weak magnetic fields, are also expected to affect their low-frequency X-ray aperiodic varibility.

  13. Coordinated X-Ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.; Halpern, Jules P.; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Moldón, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge B. P.; Stappers, Ben W.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-06-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent LMXB state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ˜70% of the time in a ≈3 × 1033 erg s-1 X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al., exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ≈ 5× {10}32 erg s-1 and sporadic flares reaching up to ≈1034 erg s-1, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the three X-ray modes, presumably due to complete quenching of the radio emission mechanism by the accretion flow. Radio imaging detects highly variable, flat-spectrum continuum radiation from PSR J1023+0038, consistent with an origin in a weak jet-like outflow. Our concurrent X-ray and radio continuum data sets do not exhibit any correlated behavior. The observational evidence we present bears qualitative resemblance to the behavior predicted by some existing “propeller” and “trapped” disk accretion models although none can account for key aspects of the rich phenomenology of this system.

  14. Dip Spectroscopy of the Low Mass X-Ray Binary XB 1254-690

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.; Church, M. J.; BalucinskaChurch, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We observed the low mass X-ray binary XB 1254-690 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 2001 May and December. During the first observation strong dipping on the 3.9-hr orbital period and a high degree of variability were observed, along with "shoulders" approx. 15% deep during extended intervals on each side of the main dips. The first observation also included pronounced flaring activity. The non-dip spectrum obtained using the PCA instrument was well-described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody with kT = 1.30 +/- 0.10 keV plus a cut-off power law representation of Comptonized emission with power law photon index 1.10 +/- 0.46 and a cut-off energy of 5.9(sup +3.0, sub -1.4) keV. The intensity decrease in the shoulders of dipping is energy-independent, consistent with electron scattering in the outer ionized regions of the absorber. In deep dipping the depth of dipping reached 100%, in the energy band below 5 keV, indicating that all emitting regions were covered by absorber. Intensity-selected dip spectra were well-fit by a model in which the point-like blackbody is rapidly covered, while the extended Comptonized emission is progressively overlapped by the absorber, with the, covering fraction rising to 95% in the deepest portion of the dip. The intensity of this component in the dip spectra could be modeled by a combination of electron scattering and photoelectric absorption. Dipping did not occur during the 2001 December observation, but remarkably, both bursting and flaring were observed contemporaneously.

  15. Ultraviolet and X-ray irradiance and flares from low-mass exoplanet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Brown, Alex

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential ``biomarker'' gases. We report first results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, a study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d <~ 20 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30-7000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on weakly active planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their weak optical activity indices (e.g., Ca II H and K equivalent widths). We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on ``optically inactive'' M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  16. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  17. Explaining observations of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Chugunov, Andrey I.; Kantor, Elena M.

    2014-09-01

    In a previous paper [M. E. Gusakov, A. I. Chugunov, and E. M. Kantor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 151101 (2014)], we introduced a new scenario that explains the existence of rapidly rotating warm neutron stars (NSs) observed in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs). Here it is described in more detail. The scenario takes into account the interaction between superfluid inertial modes and the normal (quadrupole) m=2 r mode, which can be driven unstable by the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) mechanism. This interaction can only occur at some fixed "resonance" stellar temperatures; it leads to formation of the "stability peaks" which stabilize a star in the vicinity of these temperatures. We demonstrate that a NS in LMXB spends a substantial fraction of time on the stability peak, that is, in the region of stellar temperatures and spin frequencies that has been previously thought to be CFS unstable with respect to excitation of r modes. We also find that the spin frequencies of NSs are limited by the CFS instability of normal (octupole) m=3 r mode rather than by m=2 r mode. This result agrees with the predicted value of the cutoff spin frequency ˜730 Hz in the spin distribution of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition, we analyze evolution of a NS after the end of the accretion phase and demonstrate that millisecond pulsars can be born in LMXBs within our scenario. Besides millisecond pulsars, our scenario also predicts a new class of LMXB descendants—hot and rapidly rotating nonaccreting NSs ("hot widows"/HOFNARs). Further comparison of the proposed theory with observations of rotating NSs can impose new important constraints on the properties of superdense matter.

  18. Very hard states in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Altamirano, D.; Patruno, A.; Gusinskaia, N. V.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2017-07-01

    We report on unusually very hard spectral states in three confirmed neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (1RXS J180408.9-342058, EXO 1745-248 and IGR J18245-2452) at a luminosity between ˜1036 and 1037 erg s-1. When fitting the Swift X-ray spectra (0.5-10 keV) in those states with an absorbed power-law model, we found photon indices of Γ ˜ 1, significantly lower than the Γ = 1.5-2.0 typically seen when such systems are in their so called hard state. For individual sources, very hard spectra were already previously identified, but here we show for the first time that likely our sources were in a distinct spectral state (i.e. different from the hard state) when they exhibited such very hard spectra. It is unclear how such very hard spectra can be formed; if the emission mechanism is similar to that operating in their hard states (i.e. up-scattering of soft photons due to hot electrons), then the electrons should have higher temperatures or a higher optical depth in the very hard state compared to those observed in the hard state. By using our obtained Γ as a tracer for the spectral evolution with luminosity, we have compared our results with those obtained by Wijnands et al. Our sample of sources follows the same track as the other neutron star systems in Wijnands et al., confirming their general results. However, we do not find that the accreting millisecond pulsars are systematically harder than the non-pulsating systems.

  19. Collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binary populations of galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-ray binary properties, formation rates, and constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  20. Formation of Black Hole Low-mass X-Ray Binaries in Hierarchical Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoz, Smadar; Fragos, Tassos; Geller, Aaron; Stephan, Alexander P.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) poses a theoretical challenge, as low-mass companions are not expected to survive the common-envelope scenario with the BH progenitor. Here we propose a formation mechanism that skips the common-envelope scenario and relies on triple-body dynamics. We study the evolution of hierarchical triples following the secular dynamical evolution up to the octupole-level of approximation, including general relativity, tidal effects, and post-main-sequence evolution such as mass loss, changes to stellar radii, and supernovae. During the dynamical evolution of the triple system the “eccentric Kozai-Lidov” mechanism can cause large eccentricity excitations in the LMXB progenitor, resulting in three main BH-LMXB formation channels. Here we define BH-LMXB candidates as systems where the inner BH-companion star crosses its Roche limit. In the “eccentric” channel (˜81% of the LMXBs in our simulations) the donor star crosses its Roche limit during an extreme eccentricity excitation while still on a wide orbit. Second, we find a “giant” LMXB channel (˜11%), where a system undergoes only moderate eccentricity excitations but the donor star fills its Roche-lobe after evolving toward the giant branch. Third, we identify a “classical” channel (˜8%), where tidal forces and magnetic braking shrink and circularize the orbit to short periods, triggering mass-transfer. Finally, for the giant channel we predict an eccentric (˜0.3-0.6) preferably inclined (˜40°, ˜140°) tertiary, typically on a wide enough orbit (˜104 au) to potentially become unbound later in the triple evolution. While this initial study considers only one representative system and neglects BH natal kicks, we expect our scenario to apply across a broad region of parameter space for triple-star systems.

  1. Probing X-ray burst - accretion disk interaction in low mass X-ray binaries through kilohertz quasiperiodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peille, P.; Olive, J.-F.; Barret, D.

    2014-07-01

    The intense radiation flux of Type I X-ray bursts is expected to interact with the accretion flow around neutron stars. High frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (kHz QPOs), observed at frequencies matching orbital frequencies at tens of gravitational radii, offer a unique probe of the innermost disk regions. In this paper, we follow the lower kHz QPOs, in response to Type I X-ray bursts, in two prototypical QPO sources, namely 4U 1636-536 and 4U 1608-522, as observed by the Proportional Counter Array of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We have selected a sample of 15 bursts for which the kHz QPO frequency can be tracked on timescales commensurable with the burst durations (tens of seconds). We find evidence that the QPOs are affected for over ~200 s during one exceptionally long burst and ~100 s during two others (although at a less significant level), while the burst emission has already decayed to a level that would enable the pre-burst QPO to be detected. On the other hand, for most of our burst-kHz QPO sample, we show that the QPO is detected as soon as the statistics allow and in the best cases, we are able to set an upper limit of ~20 s on the recovery time of the QPO. This diversity of behavior cannot be related to differences in burst peak luminosity. We discuss these results in the framework of recent findings that accretion onto the neutron star may be enhanced during Type I X-ray bursts. The subsequent disk depletion could explain the disappearance of the QPO for ~100 s, as possibly observed in two events. However, alternative scenarios would have to be invoked for explaining the short recovery timescales inferred from most bursts. Heating of the innermost disk regions would be a possibility, although we cannot exclude that the burst does not affect the QPO emission at all. Clearly the combination of fast timing and spectral information of Type I X-ray bursts holds great potential in the study of the dynamics of the inner accretion flow around neutron

  2. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low Mass X-Ray Binary System in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we have discovered a second bright X-ray source in the globular cluster M15 that is 2.7" to the west of AC211, the previously known low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) in this system. Prior to the 0.5" imaging capability of Chandra this second source could not have been resolved from AC211. The luminosity and spectrum of this new source, which we call M15-X2, are consistent with it also being a LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBs have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The new source, M15-X2, is coincident with a 18th U magnitude very blue star. The discovery of a second LMXB in M15 clears up a long standing puzzle where the X-ray and optical properties of AC211 appear consistent with the central source being hidden behind an accretion disk corona, and yet also showed a luminous X-ray burst suggesting the neutron star is directly visible. This discovery suggests instead that the X-ray burst did not come from AC211, but rather from the newly discovered X-ray source. We discuss the implications of this discovery for X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  3. Catalogue of cataclysmic binaries, low-mass X-ray binaries and related objects (Seventh edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2003-06-01

    The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, and stellar parameters of the components and other characteristc properties of 472 cataclysmic binaries, 71 low-mass X-ray binaries and 113 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition, the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 635 of the 656 objects, and a cross-reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 1 January 2003 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. All data can be accessed via the dedicated catalogue webpage at http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/RKcat/ and http://physics.open.ac.uk/RKcat/ and at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (30.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/404/301. We will update the information given on the catalogue webpage regularly, initially every six months.

  4. Low-mass X-ray binaries and globular clusters streamers and arcs in NGC 4278

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Fabbiano, G.; Brassington, N. J.

    2014-03-01

    We report significant inhomogeneities in the projected two-dimensional spatial distributions of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and globular clusters (GCs) of the intermediate mass elliptical galaxy NGC 4278. In the inner region of NGC 4278, a significant arc-like excess of LMXBs extending south of the center at ∼50'' in the western side of the galaxy can be associated with a similar overdensity of the spatial distribution of red GCs from Brassington et al. Using a recent catalog of GCs produced by Usher et al. and covering the whole field of the NGC 4278 galaxy, we have discovered two other significant density structures outside the D {sub 25} isophote to the W and E of the center of NGC 4278, associated with an overdensity and an underdensity, respectively. We discuss the nature of these structures in the context of the similar spatial inhomogeneities discovered in the LMXBs and GCs populations of NGC 4649 and NGC 4261, respectively. These features suggest streamers from disrupted and accreted dwarf companions.

  5. EVOLUTION OF TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES TO REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-11-20

    Redback millisecond pulsars (MSPs; hereafter redbacks) are a subpopulation of eclipsing MSPs in close binaries. The formation processes of these systems are not clear. The three pulsars showing transitions between rotation- and accretion-powered states belong to both redbacks and transient low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), suggesting a possible evolutionary link between them. Through binary evolution calculations, we show that the accretion disks in almost all LMXBs are subject to the thermal-viscous instability during certain evolutionary stages, and the parameter space for the disk instability covers the distribution of known redbacks in the orbital period—companion mass plane. We accordingly suggest that the abrupt reduction of the mass accretion rate during quiescence of transient LMXBs provides a plausible way to switch on the pulsar activity, leading to the formation of redbacks, if the neutron star has been spun up to be an energetic MSP. We investigate the evolution of redbacks, taking into account the evaporation feedback, and discuss its possible influence on the formation of black widow MSPs.

  6. WISE detection of the galactic low-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-20

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339–4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620–00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5–0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  7. ECLIPSE TIMINGS OF THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY EXO 0748-676. IV. THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Michael T.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Hertz, Paul L. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: Paul.Hertz@nasa.gov

    2009-07-01

    We report our complete database of X-ray eclipse timings of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676 observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. As of this writing we have accumulated 443 full X-ray eclipses, 392 of which have been observed with the Proportional Counter Array on RXTE. These include both observations where an eclipse was specifically targeted and those eclipses found in the RXTE data archive. Eclipse cycle count has been maintained since the discovery of the EXO 0748-676 system in 1985 February. We describe our observing and analysis techniques for each eclipse and describe improvements we have made since the last compilation by Wolff et al. The principal result of this paper is the database containing the timing results from a seven-parameter fit to the X-ray light curve for each observed eclipse along with the associated errors in the fitted parameters. Based on the standard O - C analysis, EXO 0748-676 has undergone four distinct orbital period epochs since its discovery. In addition, EXO 0748-676 shows small-scale events in the O - C curve that are likely due to short-lived changes in the secondary star.

  8. The neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary H 1658-298 back in quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Aastha; Wijnands, Rudy; Bahramian, Arash; Degenaar, Nathalie; Heinke, Craig

    2017-03-01

    The transient and eclipsing neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary H 1658-298 began its most recent outburst in August 2015 as determined using MAXI (ATel #7943) and we continued to monitor the outburst using Swift/XRT (e.g., ATel #7957, #8046).

  9. ROSAT Energy Spectra of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    The 0.1-2.4 keV bandpass of the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) offers an opportunity to study the very soft X-ray continuum of bright low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). In 46 pointed observations, 23 LMXBs were observed with count rates between 0.4 and 165.4 counts s-1. The survey identified a total of 29 different luminosity levels, which are compared with observations and identified spectral states from other missions. The atoll source 4U 1705-44 was observed near Eddington luminosities in an unusually high intensity state. Spectral analysis provided a measure of the interstellar column density for all 49 observations. The sensitivity of spectral fits depends strongly on column density. Fits to highly absorbed spectra are merely insensitive toward any particular spectral model. Sources with column densities well below 1022 cm-2 are best fitted by power laws, while the blackbody model gives clearly worse fits to the data. Most single-component fits from sources with low column densities, however, are not acceptable at all. The inclusion of a blackbody component in eight sources can improve the fits significantly. The obtained emission radii of less than 5 km suggest emission from the neutron star surface. In 10 sources acceptable fits can only be achieved by including soft-line components. With a spectral resolution of the PSPC of 320-450 eV, between 0.6 and 1.2 keV unresolved broad-line features were detected around 0.65, 0.85, and 1.0 keV. The line fluxes range within 10-11 and 10-12 ergs cm-2 s-1, with equivalent widths between 24 and 210 eV. In LMC X-2, 2S 0918-549, and 4U 1254-690, line emission is indicated for the first time. The soft emission observed in 4U 0614+091 compares with recent ASCA results, with a new feature indicated at 1.31 keV. The deduced line fluxes in 4U 1820-30 and Cyg X-2 showed variability of a factor of 2 within timescales of 1-2 days. Average fluxes of line components in 4U 1820-30 varied by the same factor over a

  10. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  11. THE ORIGIN OF BLACK HOLE SPIN IN GALACTIC LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; McClintock, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Galactic field black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are believed to form in situ via the evolution of isolated binaries. In the standard formation channel, these systems survived a common envelope phase, after which the remaining helium core of the primary star and the subsequently formed BH are not expected to be highly spinning. However, the measured spins of BHs in LMXBs cover the whole range of spin parameters. We propose here that the BH spin in LMXBs is acquired through accretion onto the BH after its formation. In order to test this hypothesis, we calculated extensive grids of detailed binary mass-transfer sequences. For each sequence, we examined whether, at any point in time, the calculated binary properties are in agreement with their observationally inferred counterparts of 16 Galactic LMXBs. The ''successful'' sequences give estimates of the mass that the BH has accreted since the onset of Roche-Lobe overflow. We find that in all Galactic LMXBs with measured BH spin, the origin of the spin can be accounted for by the accreted matter, and we make predictions about the maximum BH spin in LMXBs where no measurement is yet available. Furthermore, we derive limits on the maximum spin that any BH can have depending on current properties of the binary it resides in. Finally we discuss the implication that our findings have on the BH birth-mass distribution, which is shifted by ∼1.5 M {sub ☉} toward lower masses, compared to the currently observed one.

  12. The origin of Black-Hole Spin in Galactic Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Galactic field low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), like the ones for which black hole (BH) spin measurements are available, are believed to form in situ via the evolution of isolated binaries. In the standard formation channel, these systems survived a common envelope phase, after which the remaining helium core of the primary star and the subsequently formed BH are not expected to be highly spinning. However, the measured spins of BHs in LMXBs cover the whole range of spin parameters from a*~0 to a*1. In this talk I propose that the BH spin in LMXBs is acquired through accretion onto the BH during its long stable accretion phase. In order to test this hypothesis, I calculated extensive grids of binary evolutionary sequences in which a BH accretes matter from a close companion. For each evolutionary sequence, I examined whether, at any point in time, the calculated binary properties are in agreement with their observationally inferred counterparts of observed Galactic LMXBs with BH spin measurements. Mass-transfer sequences that simultaneously satisfy all observational constraints represent possible progenitors of the considered LMXBs and thus give estimates of the amount of matter that the BH has accreted since the onset of Roche-Lobe overflow. I find that in all Galactic LMXBs with measured BH spin, the origin of the spin can be accounted by the accreted matter. Furthermore, based on this hypothesis, I derive limits on the maximum spin that a BH can have depending on the orbital period of the binary it resides in, and give predictions on the maximum possible BH spin of Galactic LMXBs where a BH spin measurement is not yet available. Finally I will discuss the implication that our findings have on the birth black hole mass distribution.

  13. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC INTERMEDIATE/LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-08-10

    We investigate the formation and evolutionary sequences of Galactic intermediate- and low-mass X-ray binaries (I/LMXBs) by combining binary population synthesis (BPS) and detailed stellar evolutionary calculations. Using an updated BPS code we compute the evolution of massive binaries that leads to the formation of incipient I/LMXBs and present their distribution in the initial donor mass versus initial orbital period diagram. We then follow the evolution of the I/LMXBs until the formation of binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs). We find that the birthrate of the I/LMXB population is in the range of 9 × 10{sup −6}–3.4 × 10{sup −5} yr{sup −1}, compatible with that of BMSPs that are thought to descend from I/LMXBs. We show that during the evolution of I/LMXBs they are likely to be observed as relatively compact binaries with orbital periods ≲1 day and donor masses ≲0.3M{sub ⊙}. The resultant BMSPs have orbital periods ranging from less than 1 day to a few hundred days. These features are consistent with observations of LMXBs and BMSPs. We also confirm the discrepancies between theoretical predictions and observations mentioned in the literature, that is, the theoretical average mass transfer rates (∼10{sup −10} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) of LMXBs are considerably lower than observed, and the number of BMSPs with orbital periods ∼0.1–10 days is severely underestimated. These discrepancies imply that something is missing in the modeling of LMXBs, which is likely to be related to the mechanisms of the orbital angular momentum loss.

  14. REJECTING PROPOSED DENSE MATTER EQUATIONS OF STATE WITH QUIESCENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, Robert E. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-11-20

    Neutrons stars are unique laboratories for discriminating between the various proposed equations of state of matter at and above nuclear density. One sub-class of neutron stars—those inside quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs)—produce a thermal surface emission from which the neutron star radius (R {sub NS}) can be measured, using the widely accepted observational scenario for qLMXBs, assuming unmagnetized H atmospheres. In a combined spectral analysis, this work first reproduces a previously published measurement of the R {sub NS}, assumed to be the same for all neutron stars, using a slightly expanded data set. The radius measured is R{sub NS}=9.4±1.2 km. On the basis of spectral analysis alone, this measured value is not affected by imposing an assumption of causality in the core. However, the assumptions underlying this R {sub NS} measurement would be falsified by the observation of any neutron star with a mass >2.6 M {sub ☉}, since radii <11 km would be rejected if causality is assumed, which would exclude most of the R {sub NS} parameter space obtained in this analysis. Finally, this work directly tests a selection of dense matter equations of state: WFF1, AP4, MPA1, PAL1, MS0, and three versions of equations of state produced through chiral effective theory. Two of those, MS0 and PAL1, are rejected at the 99% confidence level, accounting for all quantifiable uncertainties, while the other cannot be excluded at >99% certainty.

  15. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  16. A Catalog Sample of Low-mass Galaxies Observed in X-Rays with Central Candidate Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Manni, L.; De Paolis, F.; Giordano, M.; Ingrosso, G.

    2017-03-01

    We present a sample of X-ray-selected candidate black holes in 51 low-mass galaxies with z ≤ 0.055 and masses up to 1010 M ⊙ obtained by cross-correlating the NASA-SLOAN Atlas with the 3XMM catalog. We have also searched in the available catalogs for radio counterparts of the black hole candidates and find that 19 of the previously selected sources also have a radio counterpart. Our results show that about 37% of the galaxies of our sample host an X-ray source (associated with a radio counterpart) spatially coincident with the galaxy center, in agreement with other recent works. For these nuclear sources, the X-ray/radio fundamental plane relation allows one to estimate the mass of the (central) candidate black holes, which are in the range of 104–2 × 108 M ⊙ (with a median value of ≃3 × 107 M ⊙ and eight candidates having masses below 107 M ⊙). This result, while suggesting that X-ray emitting black holes in low-mass galaxies may have had a key role in the evolution of such systems, makes it even more urgent to explain how such massive objects formed in galaxies. Of course, dedicated follow-up observations both in the X-ray and radio bands, as well as in the optical, are necessary in order to confirm our results.

  17. Combining Fits of The Optical Photometry and X-ray Spectra of the Low Mass X-ray Binary V1408 Aquilae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sebastian; Mason, Paul A.; Robinson, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    V1408 Aquilae is a binary system with a black hole primary accreting matter from a low mass secondary. We observed the system at the McDonald Observatory and collected 126 hours of high speed optical photometry on the source. We modeled the optical light curve using the XRbinary light curve synthesis software. The best fits to the optical light curve seem to suggest that the primary is a low mass black hole, however we cannot exclude some high mass solutions. Our models slightly favor a 3 solar mass primary at an inclination of about 13 degrees. In order to further constrain these parameters, and verify their validity we compared the fits of the optical light curve to fits to the X-ray spectra of the source. Using data from the Chandra Transmission Grating Catalog and Archive and the ISIS software analysis package we modeled the spectra of the source with a multi-temperature blackbody for a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning black hole and an additional photon power law component. The fits to the optical lightcurve and X-ray spectra are in agreement, from this we conclude that the case for V1408 Aql to be at a low inclination and harbor a low mass black hole is plausible.

  18. Jet quenching in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusinskaia, N. V.; Deller, A. T.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Degenaar, N.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Parikh, A. S.; Russell, T. D.; Altamirano, D.

    2017-09-01

    We present quasi-simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (Swift) observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) 1RXS J180408.9-342058 (J1804) during its 2015 outburst. We found that the radio jet of J1804 was bright (232 ± 4 μJy at 10 GHz) during the initial hard X-ray state, before being quenched by more than an order of magnitude during the soft X-ray state (19 ± 4 μJy). The source then was undetected in radio (<13 μJy) as it faded to quiescence. In NS-LMXBs, possible jet quenching has been observed in only three sources and the J1804 jet quenching we show here is the deepest and clearest example to date. Radio observations when the source was fading towards quiescence (LX = 1034-35 erg s-1) show that J1804 must follow a steep track in the radio/X-ray luminosity plane with β > 0.7 (where L_R ∝ L_X^{β }). Few other sources have been studied in this faint regime, but a steep track is inconsistent with the suggested behaviour for the recently identified class of transitional millisecond pulsars. J1804 also shows fainter radio emission at LX < 1035 erg s-1 than what is typically observed for accreting millisecond pulsars. This suggests that J1804 is likely not an accreting X-ray or transitional millisecond pulsar.

  19. Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yajuan; Zhang, Haotong; zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    We present the spectral analysis of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 using data from four Suzaku observations in 2010 March. 4U 1608-52 is a transient atoll source, and the analyzed observations contain the “island” and “banana” states, corresponding transitional, and soft states. The spectra are fitted with the hybrid model for the soft states, which consists of two thermal components (a multicolor accretion disk and a single-temperature blackbody) plus a broken power law. The fitting results show that the continuum spectra evolve during the different states. Fe emission line is often detected in low-mass X-ray binary, however, no obviously Fe line is detected in the four observations of 4U 1608-52.

  20. Hard X-Ray-selected AGNs in Low-mass Galaxies from the NuSTAR Serendipitous Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-T. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Reines, A. E.; Lansbury, G.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F.; Del Moro, A.; Gandhi, P.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Koss, M. J.; Lanz, L.; Luo, B.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ricci, C.; Trump, J. R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a sample of 10 low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the 40-month Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) serendipitous survey. The sample is selected to have robust NuSTAR detections at 3{--}24 {keV}, to be at z< 0.3, and to have optical r-band magnitudes at least 0.5 mag fainter than an {L}\\star galaxy at its redshift. The median values of absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and 2–10 X-ray luminosity of our sample are < {M}r> =-20.03, < {M}\\star > =4.6× {10}9 {M}ȯ , and < {L}2-10{keV}> =3.1× {10}42 erg s‑1, respectively. Five objects have detectable broad Hα emission in their optical spectra, indicating black hole masses of (1.1{--}10.4)× {10}6 {M}ȯ . We find that {30}-10+17 % of the galaxies in our sample do not show AGN-like optical narrow emission lines, and one of the 10 galaxies in our sample, J115851+4243.2, shows evidence for heavy X-ray absorption. This result implies that a non-negligible fraction of low-mass galaxies might harbor accreting massive black holes that are missed by optical spectroscopic surveys and < 10 {keV} X-ray surveys. The mid-IR colors of our sample also indicate that these optically normal low-mass AGNs cannot be efficiently identified with typical AGN selection criteria based on Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer colors. While the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray-selected low-mass AGN sample size is still limited, our results show that sensitive NuSTAR observations are capable of probing faint hard X-ray emission originating from the nuclei of low-mass galaxies out to moderate redshift (z< 0.3), thus providing a critical step in understanding AGN demographics in low-mass galaxies.

  1. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low-Mass X-Ray Binary in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    We report an observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory of 4U 2127+119, the X-ray source identified with the globular cluster M15. The Chandra observation reveals that 4U 2127+119 is in fact two bright sources, separated by 2.7 arcsec. One source is associated with AC 211, the previously identified optical counterpart to 4U 2127+119, a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). The second source, M15 X-2, is coincident with a 19th U magnitude blue star that is 3.3 arcsec from the cluster core. The Chandra count rate of M15 X-2 is 2.5 times higher than that of AC 211. Prior to the 0.5 arcsec imaging capability of Chandra, the presence of two so closely separated bright sources would not have been resolved. The optical counterpart, X-ray luminosity, and spectrum of M15 X-2 are consistent with it also being an LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBs have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The discovery of a second active LMXB in M15 solves a long-standing puzzle where the properties of AC 211 appear consistent with it being dominated by an extended accretion disk corona, and yet 4U 2127+119 also shows luminous X-ray bursts requiring that the neutron star be directly visible. The resolution of 4U 2127+119 into two sources suggests that the X-ray bursts did not come from AC 211 but rather from M15 X-2. We discuss the implications of this discovery for understanding the origin and evolution of LMXBs in globular clusters as well as X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  2. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low Mass X-ray Binary in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    We report an observation by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of 4U2127+119, the X-ray source identified with the globular cluster M15. The Chandra observation reveals that 4U2127+119 is in fact two bright sources, separated by 2.7". One source is associated with AC21 1, the previously identified optical counterpart to 4U2127+119, a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB). The second source, M15-X2, is coincident with a 19th U magnitude blue star that is 3.3" from the cluster core. The Chandra count rate of M15-X2 is 2.5 times higher than that of AC211. Prior to the 0.5" imaging capability of Chandra the presence of two so closely separated bright sources would not have been resolved, The optical counterpart, X-ray luminosity and spectrum of M15-X2 are consistent with it also being an LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBS have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The discovery of a second active LMXB in M15 solves a long standing puzzle where the properties of AC211 appear consistent with it being dominated by an extended accretion disk corona, and yet 4U2127+119 also shows luminous X-ray bursts requiring that the neutron star be directly visible. The resolution of 4U2127+119 into two sources suggests that the X-ray bursts did not come from AC211, but rather from M15X2. We discuss the implications of this discovery for understanding the origin and evolution of LMXBs in GCs as well as X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  3. THE X-RAY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF LOW MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES, THEIR METAL-RICH, AND METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2016-02-10

    We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the globular clusters (GCs) and fields of seven early-type galaxies. These galaxies are selected to have both deep Chandra observations, which allow their LMXB populations to be observed to X-ray luminosities of 10{sup 37}–10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}, and Hubble Space Telescope optical mosaics that enable the X-ray sources to be separated into field LMXBs, GC LMXBs, and contaminating background and foreground sources. We find that at all luminosities the number of field LMXBs per stellar mass is similar in these galaxies. This suggests that the field LMXB populations in these galaxies are not effected by the GC specific frequency, and that properties such as binary fraction and the stellar initial mass function are either similar across the sample or change in a way that does not affect the number of LMXBs. We compare the XLF of the field LMXBs to that of the GC LMXBs and find that they are significantly different with a p-value of 3 × 10{sup −6} (equivalent to 4.7σ for a normal distribution). The difference is such that the XLF of the GC LMXBs is flatter than that of the field LMXBs, with the GCs hosting relatively more bright sources and fewer faint sources. A comparison of the XLF of the metal-rich and metal-poor GCs hints that the metal-poor clusters may have more bright LMXBs, but the difference is not statistically significant.

  4. The Reverberation Lag in the Low-mass X-ray Binary H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Barbara; Ponti, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the inner accretion flow of a black hole X-ray binary during an outburst is still a matter of active research. X-ray reverberation lags are powerful tools for constraining disk-corona geometry. We present a study of X-ray lags in the black hole transient H1743-322. We compared the results obtained from analysis of all the publicly available XMM-Newton observations. These observations were carried out during two different outbursts that occurred in 2008 and 2014. During all the observations the source was caught in the hard state and at similar luminosities ({L}3-10{keV}/{L}{Edd}˜ 0.004). We detected a soft X-ray lag of ˜60 ms, most likely due to thermal reverberation. We did not detect any significant change of the lag amplitude among the different observations, indicating a similar disk-corona geometry at the same luminosity in the hard state. On the other hand, we observe significant differences between the reverberation lag detected in H1743-322 and in GX 339-4 (at similar luminosities in the hard state), which might indicate variations of the geometry from source to source.

  5. X-ray follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: a low-mass X-ray binary with gamma-ray Fermi-LAT association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-02-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9-4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims: To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods: We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results: The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d1 kpc2 erg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at ~13 kK and a cool one at ~4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (≳6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions: The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB black hole with a compact

  6. X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF ESO 243-49 HLX-1: COMPARISON WITH GALACTIC LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Wenda; Yu, Wenfei; Soria, Roberto; Altamirano, Diego

    2015-09-20

    We studied the outburst properties of the hyper-luminous X-ray source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, using the full set of Swift monitoring observations. We quantified the increase in the waiting time, recurrence time, and e-folding rise timescale along the outburst sequence, and the corresponding decrease in outburst duration, total radiated energy, and e-folding decay timescale, which confirms previous findings. HLX-1 spends less and less time in outburst and more and more time in quiescence, but its peak luminosity remains approximately constant. We compared the HLX-1 outburst properties with those of bright Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs). Our spectral analysis strengthens the similarity between state transitions in HLX-1 and those in Galactic LMXBTs. We also found that HLX-1 follows the nearly linear correlations between the hard-to-soft state transition luminosity and the peak luminosity, and between the rate of change of X-ray luminosity during the rise phase and the peak luminosity, which indicates that the occurrence of the hard-to-soft state transition of HLX-1 is similar to those of Galactic LMXBTs during outbursts. We found that HLX-1 does not follow the correlations between total radiated energy and peak luminosity, and between total radiated energy and e-folding rise/decay timescales we had previously identified in Galactic LMXBTs. HLX-1 would follow those correlations if the distance were several hundreds of kiloparsecs. However, invoking a much closer distance for HLX-1 is not a viable solution to this problem, as it introduces other, more serious inconsistencies with the observations.

  7. X-Ray Outbursts of ESO 243-49 HLX-1: Comparison with Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binary Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Wenda; Soria, Roberto; Altamirano, Diego; Yu, Wenfei

    2015-09-01

    We studied the outburst properties of the hyper-luminous X-ray source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, using the full set of Swift monitoring observations. We quantified the increase in the waiting time, recurrence time, and e-folding rise timescale along the outburst sequence, and the corresponding decrease in outburst duration, total radiated energy, and e-folding decay timescale, which confirms previous findings. HLX-1 spends less and less time in outburst and more and more time in quiescence, but its peak luminosity remains approximately constant. We compared the HLX-1 outburst properties with those of bright Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs). Our spectral analysis strengthens the similarity between state transitions in HLX-1 and those in Galactic LMXBTs. We also found that HLX-1 follows the nearly linear correlations between the hard-to-soft state transition luminosity and the peak luminosity, and between the rate of change of X-ray luminosity during the rise phase and the peak luminosity, which indicates that the occurrence of the hard-to-soft state transition of HLX-1 is similar to those of Galactic LMXBTs during outbursts. We found that HLX-1 does not follow the correlations between total radiated energy and peak luminosity, and between total radiated energy and e-folding rise/decay timescales we had previously identified in Galactic LMXBTs. HLX-1 would follow those correlations if the distance were several hundreds of kiloparsecs. However, invoking a much closer distance for HLX-1 is not a viable solution to this problem, as it introduces other, more serious inconsistencies with the observations.

  8. Long-duration X-Ray Flash and X-Ray-rich Gamma-Ray Bursts from Low-mass Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Recent numerical simulations suggest that Population III (Pop III) stars were born with masses not larger than ~100 M ⊙ and typically ~40 M ⊙. By self-consistently considering the jet generation and propagation in the envelope of these low-mass Pop III stars, we find that a Pop III blue supergiant star has the possibility of giving rise to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) even though it keeps a massive hydrogen envelope. We evaluate observational characteristics of Pop III GRBs and predict that Pop III GRBs have a duration of ~105 s in the observer frame and a peak luminosity of ~5 × 1050 erg s-1. Assuming that the E p-L p (or E p-E γ, iso) correlation holds for Pop III GRBs, we find that the spectrum peak energy falls at approximately a few keV (or ~100 keV) in the observer frame. We discuss the detectability of Pop III GRBs by future satellite missions such as EXIST and Lobster. If the E p-E γ, iso correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs at z ~ 9 as long-duration X-ray-rich GRBs by EXIST. Conversely, if the E p-L p correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs up to z ~ 19 as long-duration X-ray flashes by Lobster.

  9. X-ray Emission from Seyfert 2 Galaxies with Low-Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron

    2005-10-01

    We have recently identified the first sample of Seyfert 2 nuclei in host galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions smaller than 60 km/s, as a way to detect and study black holes with likely masses below 10^6 solar masses. These galaxies are Type 2 analogs of "dwarf" Seyfert 1 galaxies such as NGC 4395 and POX 52. We propose to obtain XMM exposures of four Seyfert 2 galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions in the range 25-47 km/s in order to (a) determine X-ray luminosities as part of an overall program to measure the SEDs of these sources; (b) determine the amount of X-ray absorption to establish whether these are obscured versions of NLS1 galaxies; (c) search for variability, which is expected for AGNs with very low black hole masses.

  10. Infrared observations of low-mass X-ray binaries. I - Candidates for bright bulge sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, T.; Charles, P. A.; Longmore, A. J.

    1991-09-01

    The first IR imaging of bright Galactic Bulge X-ray source fields is presented. In spite of the extreme crowding in these regions, found plausible candidates are found for the IR counterparts of GX17 + 2, GX13 + 1, and GX5 - 1. The optical/IR colors of the star at the radio position of GX17 + 2 cannot be reconciled with a normal star. It is suggested that there is a normal star superimposed on the IR counterpart of GX17 + 2, and the normal star dominates the optical flux, but GX17 + 2 makes a significant contribution to the combined flux in the IR. Bright IR objects are found within the radio error boxes of GX13 + 1 (K = 11) and GX5 - 1 (K of about 13.5) whose presence in small radio error boxes suggests that they are the IR counterparts of their respective X-ray sources.

  11. The Motif of Globular Clusters and Low Mass X-ray Binaries in Ellipticals: a Tale of Three Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Mineo, Stefano; Strader, Jay; Fragos, Tassos; Kim, Dong-Woo; Luo, Bin; Zezas, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    I will discuss significant inhomogeneities in the projected two-dimensional spatial distributions of Globular Clusters and Low Mass X-Ray Binaries observed in three elliptical galaxies with extensive spatial coverage in the optical and X-ray: NGC4261, NGC4649 and NGC4278. The spatial structures in the distributions of GCs and LMXBs have been detected with a new method based on the K-Nearest Neighbor density estimator of Dressler (1980), complemented by MonteCarlo simulations to establish the statistical significance of the results. I will present the spatial structures as a function of the color and luminosity of the GCs, and will compare their shape and significance with the spatial distribution of field LMXBs. I will then examine the nature of these structures in the context of the evolution history of the host galaxies.

  12. The changing photoionized plasma in the bright Low-Mass X-ray binary GX 13+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Trigo, Maria

    2006-10-01

    We propose five 10 ks XMM-Newton observations of GX13+1, the brightest low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) which exhibits strong X-ray absorption features. Such features have been observed in a number of LMXBs and are identified with ions such as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI. GX13+1 is the best source to study the variations in the lines with the intensity of the source due to its both high and strongly variable luminosity. We will test whether the absorption lines detected in GX13+1 by XMM-Newton and Chandra are consistent with the presence of a highly-ionized absorber located around the accretion disk, similar to other LMXBs and study the changes of such absorber. This reveals dynamics of the disk wind, which commonly exists in high luminosity accretion-disk systems as galactic binaries and AGNs.

  13. The Behavior of Accretion Disks in Low Mass X-ray Binaries: Disk Winds and Alpha Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on two low mass X-ray binaries. The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy with the ACS/SBC on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km/s as determined from the Doppler width of the C IV emission line. The broad and shallow eclipse indicates that the disk has a vertically-extended, optically-thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to 50% of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically-thick base of the disk wind. V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115) is a low mass X-ray binary which continues to be a black hole candidate. We have new photometric data of this system from the Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope's high speed CCD photometer at McDonald Observatory. The light curve is largely sinusoidal which we model with two components: a constant light source from the disk and a sinusoidal modulation at the orbital period from the irradiated face of the companion star. This is a radical re-interpretation of the orbital light curve. We do not require a large or asymmetric disk rim to account for the modulation in the light curve. Thus, the orbital inclination is unconstrained in our new model, removing the foundation for any claims of the compact object being a black hole.

  14. Radio luminosity upper limits of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GRO J1744-28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas; Degenaar, Nathalie; Miller-Jones, James; Tudor, Vlad

    2017-02-01

    Following the new outburst of the Galactic neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28 (ATels #10073, #10079), we performed target of opportunity observations of this source with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA).

  15. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE METALLICITY DEPENDENCE IN DYNAMICALLY FORMED EXTRAGALACTIC LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N.; Avendano Nandez, J. L.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Fragos, T.; Kim, D.-W.; Fabbiano, G.; Lombardi, J. C.; Voss, R.

    2012-12-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) effectively produce dynamically formed low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Observers detect {approx}100 times more LMXBs per stellar mass in GCs compared to stars in the fields of galaxies. Observationally, metal-rich GCs are about three times more likely to contain an X-ray source than their metal-poor counterparts. Recent observations have shown that this ratio holds in extragalactic GCs for all bright X-ray sources with L{sub X} between 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} and 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. In this Letter, we propose that the observed metallicity dependence of LMXBs in extragalactic GCs can be explained by the differences in the number densities and average masses of red giants in populations of different metallicities. Red giants serve as seeds for the dynamical production of bright LMXBs via two channels-binary exchanges and physical collisions-and the increase of the number densities and masses of red giants boost LMXB production, leading to the observed difference. We also discuss a possible effect of the age difference in stellar populations of different metallicities.

  16. The orbital ephemeris and eclipse transitions of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748 - 676

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, A.N.; Smale, A.P.; Verbunt, F.; Corbet, R.H.D. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD Utrecht Rijksuniversitet Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara )

    1991-01-01

    Using the eclipses as fiducial markers, an updated ephemeris for EXO 0748 - 676 is derived and evidence is found that between February 1985 and March 1989 the 3.82-h orbital period of EXO 0748 - 676 decreased with a time scale of -5 x 10 to the 6th yr. The sense of this change is the same as that predicted by simple models for the evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries containing main-sequence companions, but is a factor about 100 faster than expected. This rapid change in orbital period could result from the expansion of the companion due to the effects of X-ray heating. The eclipse transition durations are variable, with the shortest observed taking 1.5 s and the longest 40 s. This latter figure is about an order of magnitude too large to be due to absorption effects in the atmosphere of the secondary assuming a Roche geometry and likely stellar temperature. Either flaring activity or the presence of an X-ray heated evaporative wind or a corona may enhance the scale height of the companion's atmosphere producing the extended eclipse transitions. 38 refs.

  17. The orbital ephemeris and eclipse transitions of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748 - 676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Smale, A. P.; Verbunt, F.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Using the eclipses as fiducial markers, an updated ephemeris for EXO 0748 - 676 is derived and evidence is found that between February 1985 and March 1989 the 3.82-h orbital period of EXO 0748 - 676 decreased with a time scale of -5 x 10 to the 6th yr. The sense of this change is the same as that predicted by simple models for the evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries containing main-sequence companions, but is a factor about 100 faster than expected. This rapid change in orbital period could result from the expansion of the companion due to the effects of X-ray heating. The eclipse transition durations are variable, with the shortest observed taking 1.5 s and the longest 40 s. This latter figure is about an order of magnitude too large to be due to absorption effects in the atmosphere of the secondary assuming a Roche geometry and likely stellar temperature. Either flaring activity or the presence of an X-ray heated evaporative wind or a corona may enhance the scale height of the companion's atmosphere producing the extended eclipse transitions.

  18. PATTERNS OF X-RAY, CHROMOSPHERIC, AND RADIO EMISSION IN LOW-MASS STARS: FAST AND SLOW MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D. J.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection events in the atmospheres of low-mass dwarf stars can be classified as either slow or fast, depending on whether ohmic diffusion or Hall currents dominate in the reconnection process. We suggest that the separation of reconnection into slow and fast categories can help to explain some systematics of low-mass dwarfs as regards their emissions in X-rays, H{alpha}, and radio. On the one hand, in the warmer dwarfs (M7) are inefficient emitters in H{alpha} and X-rays but strong emitters in radio, may be understood in the context that only slow reconnection is permitted to occur in those stars, as a result of high electrical resistivity. However, even though only slow reconnection is permitted in the latter stars, the speed of the outflow jets from reconnection sites can serve as efficient sources of radio emission as a result of the electron cyclotron maser instability.

  19. Searches for millisecond pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, K. S.; Hertz, P.; Norris, J. P.; Vaughan, B. A.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitsuda, K.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Paradijs, J.; Penninx, W.; Van Der Klis, M.

    1991-01-01

    High-sensitivity search techniques for millisecond periods are presented and applied to data from the Japanese satellite Ginga and HEAO 1. The search is optimized for pulsed signals whose period, drift rate, and amplitude conform with what is expected for low-class X-ray binary (LMXB) sources. Consideration is given to how the current understanding of LMXBs guides the search strategy and sets these parameter limits. An optimized one-parameter coherence recovery technique (CRT) developed for recovery of phase coherence is presented. This technique provides a large increase in sensitivity over the method of incoherent summation of Fourier power spectra. The range of spin periods expected from LMXB phenomenology is discussed, the necessary constraints on the application of CRT are described in terms of integration time and orbital parameters, and the residual power unrecovered by the quadratic approximation for realistic cases is estimated.

  20. Searches for millisecond pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, K. S.; Hertz, P.; Norris, J. P.; Vaughan, B. A.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitsuda, K.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Paradijs, J.; Penninx, W.; Van Der Klis, M.

    1991-01-01

    High-sensitivity search techniques for millisecond periods are presented and applied to data from the Japanese satellite Ginga and HEAO 1. The search is optimized for pulsed signals whose period, drift rate, and amplitude conform with what is expected for low-class X-ray binary (LMXB) sources. Consideration is given to how the current understanding of LMXBs guides the search strategy and sets these parameter limits. An optimized one-parameter coherence recovery technique (CRT) developed for recovery of phase coherence is presented. This technique provides a large increase in sensitivity over the method of incoherent summation of Fourier power spectra. The range of spin periods expected from LMXB phenomenology is discussed, the necessary constraints on the application of CRT are described in terms of integration time and orbital parameters, and the residual power unrecovered by the quadratic approximation for realistic cases is estimated.

  1. LONG-DURATION X-RAY FLASH AND X-RAY-RICH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM LOW-MASS POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-11-10

    Recent numerical simulations suggest that Population III (Pop III) stars were born with masses not larger than {approx}100 M {sub Sun} and typically {approx}40 M {sub Sun }. By self-consistently considering the jet generation and propagation in the envelope of these low-mass Pop III stars, we find that a Pop III blue supergiant star has the possibility of giving rise to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) even though it keeps a massive hydrogen envelope. We evaluate observational characteristics of Pop III GRBs and predict that Pop III GRBs have a duration of {approx}10{sup 5} s in the observer frame and a peak luminosity of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg s{sup -1}. Assuming that the E {sub p}-L {sub p} (or E {sub p}-E {sub {gamma},iso}) correlation holds for Pop III GRBs, we find that the spectrum peak energy falls at approximately a few keV (or {approx}100 keV) in the observer frame. We discuss the detectability of Pop III GRBs by future satellite missions such as EXIST and Lobster. If the E {sub p}-E {sub {gamma},iso} correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs at z {approx} 9 as long-duration X-ray-rich GRBs by EXIST. Conversely, if the E {sub p}-L {sub p} correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs up to z {approx} 19 as long-duration X-ray flashes by Lobster.

  2. A CHANGE IN THE QUIESCENT X-RAY SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY MXB 1659-29

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; Cumming, A.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Wijnands, R.; Homan, J.

    2013-09-10

    The quasi-persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29 went into quiescence in 2001, and we have followed its quiescent X-ray evolution since. Observations over the first 4 yr showed a rapid drop in flux and temperature of the neutron star atmosphere, interpreted as cooling of the neutron star crust which had been heated during the 2.5 yr outburst. However, observations taken approximately 1400 and 2400 days into quiescence were consistent with each other, suggesting the crust had reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Here we present a new Chandra observation of MXB 1659-29 taken 11 yr into quiescence and 4 yr since the last Chandra observation. This new observation shows an unexpected factor of {approx}3 drop in count rate and change in spectral shape since the last observation, which cannot be explained simply by continued cooling. Two possible scenarios are that either the neutron star temperature has remained unchanged and there has been an increase in the column density, or, alternatively the neutron star temperature has dropped precipitously and the spectrum is now dominated by a power-law component. The first scenario may be possible given that MXB 1659-29 is a near edge-on system, and an increase in column density could be due to build-up of material in, and a thickening of, a truncated accretion disk during quiescence. But, a large change in disk height may not be plausible if standard accretion disk theory holds during quiescence. Alternatively, the disk may be precessing, leading to a higher column density during this latest observation.

  3. A New Comptonization Model for Weakly Magnetized, Accreting Neutron Stars in Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinelli, Ruben; Titarchuk, Lev; Paizis, Ada; Frontera, Filippo

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new model for the X-ray spectral fitting package XSPEC that takes into account the effects of both thermal and dynamical (i.e., bulk) Comptonization. The model consists of two components: one is the direct blackbody-like emission due to seed photons that are not subjected to effective Compton scattering, while the other is a convolution of the Green's function of the energy operator with a blackbody-like seed photon spectrum. When combined thermal and bulk effects are considered, the analytical form of the Green's function may be obtained as a solution of the diffusion equation describing Comptonization. Using data from the BeppoSAX, INTEGRAL, and RXTE satellites, we test our model on the spectra of a sample of six bright neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries with low magnetic fields, covering three different spectral states. Particular attention is given to the transient power-law-like hard X-ray (gtrsim30 keV) tails, which we interpret in the framework of the bulk motion Comptonization process. We show that the values of the best-fit δ-parameter, which represents the importance of bulk with respect to thermal Comptonization, can be physically meaningful and can at least qualitatively describe the physical conditions of the environment in the innermost part of the system. Moreover, we show that in fitting the thermal Comptonization spectra to the X-ray spectra of these systems, the best-fit parameters of our model are in excellent agreement with those from compTT, a broadly used and well-established XSPEC model.

  4. COMMON PATTERNS IN THE EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE LUMINOUS NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SUBCLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-08-10

    The X-ray transient XTE J1701–462 was the first source observed to evolve through all known subclasses of low-magnetic-field neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), as a result of large changes in its mass accretion rate. To investigate to what extent similar evolution is seen in other NS-LMXBs we have performed a detailed study of the color–color and hardness–intensity diagrams (CDs and HIDs) of Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1—three luminous X-ray binaries, containing weakly magnetized neutron stars, known to exhibit strong secular changes in their CD/HID tracks. Using the full set of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array data collected for the sources over the 16 year duration of the mission, we show that Cyg X-2 and Cir X-1 display CD/HID evolution with close similarities to XTE J1701–462. Although GX 13+1 shows behavior that is in some ways unique, it also exhibits similarities to XTE J1701–462, and we conclude that its overall CD/HID properties strongly indicate that it should be classified as a Z source, rather than as an atoll source. We conjecture that the secular evolution of Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1—illustrated by sequences of CD/HID tracks we construct—arises from changes in the mass accretion rate. Our results strengthen previous suggestions that within single sources Cyg-like Z source behavior takes place at higher luminosities and mass accretion rates than Sco-like Z behavior, and lend support to the notion that the mass accretion rate is the primary physical parameter distinguishing the various NS-LMXB subclasses.

  5. The Secret X-ray Lives of Cepheids: Presenting the First Unambiguous X-ray Detections of Classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, E.; Evans, N.; DePasquale, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chromospheric and transition region emissions have been found in certain Classical Cepheids by previous IUE studies and through our own much more recent FUSE study. However, X-ray emission has long been considered nonexistent in these cool supergiants. Here we report on the surprising discovery of X-ray emissions in three bright, nearby Classical Cepheids recently observed with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites - representing the first true detections of this class of variable star at X-ray wavelengths. Polaris (V = +1.98; F7 Ib-II; P = 3.97-d; d 130-pc), β Dor (V = +3.77; F6 Ia; P = 9.84-d; d 318-pc) and δ Cep (V = +4.07; F5 Iab; P = 5.37-d; d 273-pc) are currently the only three Cepheids to have been observed with modern X-ray satellites. However, only Polaris and β Dor have been observed with the FUSE satellite, and β Dor (which has multiple spectra) displays variability in the FUV emission strengths which appears to be correlated to its pulsation period. Unexpectedly, our early analyses of the X-ray data show that these Cepheids, despite their differences in spectral type and pulsation properties, all have log Lx values of 28.8-29 and similarly soft energy distributions. The initial results of our recent X-ray studies are presented along with our FUSE results to bring the high energy activity into better focus. Further FUV/X-ray observations have been proposed with HST/XMM to unambiguously determine the origin and nature of the observed high energy emissions from the targets, possibly arising from warm winds, shocks, or pulsationally induced magnetic activity. We gratefully acknowledge support for this project from NASA grants Chandra-GO6-7011A, 06-FUSE8-099 & XMM-AO7-55241 and NSF grant AST05-07542.

  6. On the Evolution of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries under the Influence of a Donor Stellar Wind Induced by X-Rays from the Accretor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, Icko, Jr.; Tutukov, Alexander V.; Fedorova, Alexandra V.

    1997-09-01

    In a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), an intense stellar wind from the mass donor may be a consequence of the absorption of X-rays from the mass-accreting neutron star or black hole, and such a wind could change the evolution of these binaries dramatically compared with the evolution of cataclysmic variables (CVs), which are close binaries in which the accretor is a white dwarf. An analytical study and numerical models show that, in the closest and brightest LMXBs, a relativistic companion can capture up to ~10% of the mass lost in the induced stellar wind (ISW) from the main-sequence or subgiant donor, and this is enough to keep the X-ray luminosity of a typical LMXB on the level of LX ~ 5000 L⊙ and to accelerate the rotation of an old neutron star with a low magnetic field into the millisecond-period range. A self-sustained ISW may exist even if the donor does not fill its Roche lobe, but the system can be bright (LX > 100 L⊙) only if the radius of the donor is a substantial fraction (>~0.8) of the Roche lobe radius. A lower limit on the Roche lobe filling factor follows from the circumstance that both the rate Ėwind at which work must be done to lift wind matter off the donor and the rate Ėabs at which the donor absorbs X-ray energy are proportional to ṀISW (the ISW mass-loss rate) and from the requirement that Ėwind<Ėabs in order for energy to be conserved. The observed number (~100) of bright LMXBs in our Galaxy can be understood as the product of a relatively short lifetime (a few × 107 yr) and a small theoretical birthrate (~2 × 10-6-8 × 10-6 yr-1), which is comparable to semiempirical estimates of the birthrate of LMXBs and millisecond pulsars (~2 × 10-6 yr-1). The theoretical lifetime is ~10-60 times shorter than when the ISW is not taken into account, and the theoretical birthrate is ~3-6 times smaller, because of the fact that the ISW acts to expand the orbit and reduce the number of systems that can evolve through an X-ray bright stage under

  7. Timing Observations of PSR J1023+0038 During a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaodand, Amruta; Archibald, Anne M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bogdanov, Slavko; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Patruno, Alessandro; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.

    2016-10-01

    Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star’s spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star’s magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star’s surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neutron star. We have phase-connected nine XMM-Newton observations of PSR J1023+0038 over the last 2.5 years of the LMXB state to establish a precise measurement of spin evolution. We find that the average spin-down rate as an LMXB is 26.8 ± 0.4% faster than the rate (-2.39 × 10-15 Hz s-1) determined during the RMSP state. This shows that negative angular momentum contributions (dipolar magnetic braking, and outflow) exceed positive ones (accreted material), and suggests that the pulsar wind continues to operate at a largely unmodified level. We discuss implications of this tight observational constraint in the context of possible accretion models.

  8. Partial Accretion in the Propeller Stage of Low-mass X-Ray Binary Aql X–1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, C.; Ekşi˙, K. Y.; Göğüş, E.; Güver, T.

    2017-10-01

    Aql X–1 is one of the most prolific low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs) showing outbursts almost annually. We present the results of our spectral analyses of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/proportional counter-array observations of the 2000 and 2011 outbursts. We investigate the spectral changes related to the changing disk-magnetosphere interaction modes of Aql X–1. The X-ray light curves of the outbursts of LMXBTs typically show phases of fast rise and exponential decay. The decay phase shows a “knee” where the flux goes from the slow-decay to the rapid-decay stage. We assume that the rapid decay corresponds to a weak propeller stage at which a fraction of the inflowing matter in the disk accretes onto the star. We introduce a novel method for inferring, from the light curve, the fraction of the inflowing matter in the disk that accretes onto the neutron star depending on the fastness parameter. We determine the fastness parameter range within which the transition from the accretion to the partial propeller stage is realized. This fastness parameter range is a measure of the scale height of the disk in units of the inner disk radius. We applied the method to a sample of outbursts of Aql X–1 with different maximum flux and duration times. We show that different outbursts with different maximum luminosity and duration follow a similar path in the parameter space of accreted/inflowing mass flux fraction versus fastness parameter.

  9. Links between quasi-periodic oscillations and accretion states in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, S. E.; Rouco-Escorial, A.; Kuulkers, E.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Sanna, A.

    2017-06-01

    We analysed the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data from a sample of bright accreting neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). With the aim of studying the quasi-periodic variability as a function of the accretion regime, we carried out a systematic search of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray time series of these systems, using the integrated fractional variability as a tracker for the accretion states. We found that the three QPO types originally identified in the 1980s for the brightest LMXBs, the so-called Z sources, i.e. horizontal, normal and flaring branch oscillations (HBOs, NBOs and FBOs, respectively), are also identified in the slightly less bright NS LMXBs, the so-called atoll sources, where we see QPOs with a behaviour consistent with the HBOs and FBOs. We compared the quasi-periodic variability properties of our NS sample with those of a sample of black hole (BH) LMXBs. We confirm the association between HBOs, NBOs and FBOs observed in Z sources, with the type-C, type-B and type-A QPOs, respectively, observed in BH systems, and we extended the comparison to the HBO-like and FBO-like QPOs seen in atoll sources. We conclude that the variability properties of BH and weakly magnetized NS LMXBs show strong similarities, with QPOs only weakly sensitive to the nature of the central compact object in both classes of systems. We find that the historical association between kHz QPOs and high-frequency QPOs, seen around NSs and BHs, respectively, is not obvious when comparing similar accretion states in the two kinds of systems.

  10. Constraining the formation of black holes in short-period black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2015-11-01

    The formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is still very uncertain. Two main uncertainties are the amount of mass ejected in the supernova (SN) event (if any) and the magnitude of the natal kick (NK) the BH receives at birth (if any). Repetto et al., studying the position of Galactic X-ray binaries containing BHs, found evidence for BHs receiving high NKs at birth. In this paper, we extend that study, taking into account the previous binary evolution of the sources as well. The seven short-period BH X-ray binaries that we use are compact binaries consisting of a low-mass star orbiting a BH in a period less than 1 d. We trace their binary evolution backwards in time, from the current observed state of mass transfer, to the moment the BH was formed, and we add the extra information on the kinematics of the binaries. We find that several systems could be explained by no NK, just mass ejection, while for two systems (and possibly more) a high kick is required. So unless the latter have an alternative formation, such as within a globular cluster, we conclude that at least some BHs get high kicks. This challenges the standard picture that BH kicks would be scaled down from neutron star kicks. Furthermore, we find that five systems could have formed with a non-zero NK but zero mass ejected (i.e. no SN) at formation, as predicted by neutrino-driven NKs.

  11. A COMPARISON OF BROAD IRON EMISSION LINES IN ARCHIVAL DATA OF NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Barret, Didier

    2012-08-10

    Relativistic X-ray disklines have been found in multiple neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, in close analogy with black holes across the mass scale. These lines have tremendous diagnostic power and have been used to constrain stellar radii and magnetic fields, often finding values that are consistent with independent timing techniques. Here, we compare CCD-based data from Suzaku with Fe K line profiles from archival data taken with gas-based spectrometers. In general, we find good consistency between the gas-based line profiles from EXOSAT, BeppoSAX, and RXTE and the CCD data from Suzaku, demonstrating that the broad profiles seen are intrinsic to the line and not broad due to instrumental issues. However, we do find that when fitting with a Gaussian line profile, the width of the Gaussian can depend on the continuum model in instruments with low spectral resolution, though when the different models fit equally well the line widths generally agree. We also demonstrate that three BeppoSAX observations show evidence for asymmetric lines, with a relativistic diskline model providing a significantly better fit than a Gaussian. We test this by using the posterior predictive p-value method, and bootstrapping of the spectra to show that such deviations from a Gaussian are unlikely to be observed by chance.

  12. The X-ray luminosity-temperature relation of a complete sample of low-mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Maughan, B. J.; Giles, P. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pacaud, F.; Burenin, R.; Hornstrup, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present Chandra observations of 23 galaxy groups and low-mass galaxy clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.15 with a median temperature of {˜ }2{keV}. The sample is a statistically complete flux-limited subset of the 400 deg2 survey. We investigated the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L) and temperature (T), taking selection biases fully into account. The logarithmic slope of the bolometric L-T relation was found to be 3.29 ± 0.33, consistent with values typically found for samples of more massive clusters. In combination with other recent studies of the L-T relation, we show that there is no evidence for the slope, normalization, or scatter of the L-T relation of galaxy groups being different than that of massive clusters. The exception to this is that in the special case of the most relaxed systems, the slope of the core-excised L-T relation appears to steepen from the self-similar value found for massive clusters to a steeper slope for the lower mass sample studied here. Thanks to our rigorous treatment of selection biases, these measurements provide a robust reference against which to compare predictions of models of the impact of feedback on the X-ray properties of galaxy groups.

  13. Spectral-Timing Analysis of Kilohetrz Quasi-Periodic Osciallations in Neutron Star Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Jon; Peille, Philippe; Cackett, Edward; Barret, Didier

    2017-08-01

    Kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations or kHz QPOs are intensity variations that occur in the X-ray band observed in neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. In such systems, matter is transferred from a secondary low-mass star to a neutron star via the process of accretion. kHz QPOs occur on the timescale of the inner accretion flow and may carry signatures of the physics of strong gravity (c2 ~ GM/R) and possibly clues to constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS). Both the timing behavior of kHz QPOs and the time-averaged spectra of these systems have been studied extensively. No model derived from these techniques has been able to illuminate the origin of kHz QPOs. Spectral-timing is an analysis technique that can be used to derive information about the nature of physical processes occurring within the accretion flow on the timescale of the kHz QPO. To date, kHz QPOs of (4) neutron star LMXB systems have been studied with spectral-timing techniques. We present a comprehensive study of spectral-timing products of kHz QPOs from systems where data is available in the RXTE archive to demonstrate the promise of this technique to gain insights regarding the origin of kHz QPOs. Specifically, we show correlated time-lags as a function of QPO frequency and energy for the various LMXB systems where kHz QPOs are detected.

  14. X-Ray Properties of Low-mass Pre-main Sequence Stars in the Orion Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Günther, Moritz; Testa, Paola; Canizares, Claude R.

    2015-09-01

    The Chandra HETG Orion Legacy Project (HOLP) is the first comprehensive set of observations of a very young massive stellar cluster that provides high-resolution X-ray spectra of very young stars over a wide mass range (0.7-2.3 {M}⊙ ). In this paper, we focus on the six brightest X-ray sources with T Tauri stellar counterparts that are well-characterized at optical and infrared wavelengths. All stars show column densities which are substantially smaller than expected from optical extinction, indicating that the sources are located on the near side of the cluster with respect to the observer as well as that these stars are embedded in more dusty environments. Stellar X-ray luminosities are well above 1031 erg s-1, in some cases exceeding 1032 erg s-1 for a substantial amount of time. The stars during these observations show no flares but are persistently bright. The spectra can be well fit with two temperature plasma components of 10 MK and 40 MK, of which the latter dominates the flux by a ratio 6:1 on average. The total emission measures range between 3-8 × 1054 cm-3 and are comparable to active coronal sources. The fits to the Ne ix He-Like K-shell lines indicate forbidden to inter-combination line ratios consistent with the low-density limit. Observed abundances compare well with active coronal sources underlying the coronal nature of these sources. The surface flux in this sample of 0.6-2.3 {M}⊙ classical T Tauri stars shows that coronal activity increases significantly between ages 0.1 and 10 Myr. The results demonstrate the power of X-ray line diagnostics to study coronal properties of T Tauri stars in young stellar clusters.

  15. DISCOVERY OF A SECOND TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6440

    SciTech Connect

    Heinke, C. O.; Budac, S. A.; Altamirano, D.; Linares, M.; Wijnands, R.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Servillat, M.; Grindlay, J. E.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Markwardt, C. B.; Swank, J. H.; Bailyn, C.

    2010-05-01

    We have discovered a new transient low-mass X-ray binary, NGC 6440 X-2, with Chandra/ACIS, RXTE/PCA, and Swift/XRT observations of the globular cluster NGC 6440. The discovery outburst (2009 July 28-31) peaked at L{sub X} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} and lasted for <4 days above L{sub X} = 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}. Four other outbursts (2009 May 29-June 4, August 29-September 1, October 1-3, and October 28-31) have been observed with RXTE/PCA (identifying millisecond pulsations) and Swift/XRT (confirming a positional association with NGC 6440 X-2), with similar peak luminosities and decay times. Optical and infrared imaging did not detect a clear counterpart, with best limits of V>21, B>22 in quiescence from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, g'>22 during the August outburst from Gemini-South GMOS imaging, and J {approx_gt} 18.5 and K {approx_gt} 17 during the July outburst from CTIO 4 m ISPI imaging. Archival Chandra X-ray images of the core do not detect the quiescent counterpart (L{sub X} < (1-2) x 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1}) and place a bolometric luminosity limit of L{sub NS} < 6 x 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1} (one of the lowest measured) for a hydrogen atmosphere neutron star. A short Chandra observation 10 days into quiescence found two photons at NGC 6440 X-2's position, suggesting enhanced quiescent emission at L{sub X} {approx} 6 x 10{sup 31} erg s{sup -1}. NGC 6440 X-2 currently shows the shortest recurrence time ({approx}31 days) of any known X-ray transient, although regular outbursts were not visible in the bulge scans before early 2009. Fast, low-luminosity transients like NGC 6440 X-2 may be easily missed by current X-ray monitoring.

  16. A First Robust Measurement of the Aging of Field Low Mass X-ray Binary Populations from Hubble and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret

    Our understanding of X-ray binary (XRB) formation and evolution have been revolutionized by HST and Chandra by allowing us to study in detail XRBs in extragalactic environments. Theoretically, XRB formation is sensitive to parent stellar population properties like metallicity and stellar age. These dependencies not only make XRBs promising populations for aiding in the measurement of galaxy properties themselves, but also have important astrophysical implications. For example, due to the relatively young stellar ages and primordial metallicities in the early Universe (z > 3), it is predicted that XRBs were more luminous than today and played a significant role in the heating of the intergalactic medium. Unlocking the potential of XRBs as useful probes of galaxy properties and understanding in detail their evolutionary pathways critically requires empirical constraints using well-studied galaxies that span a variety of evolutionary stages. In this ADAP, we will use the combined power of archival observations from Hubble and Chandra data of 16 nearby early-type galaxies to study how low-mass XRBs (LMXBs) populations evolve with age. LMXBs are critically important since they are the most numerous XRBs in the MW and are expected to dominate the normal galaxy Xray emissivity of the Universe out to z ~ 2. Understanding separately LMXBs that form via dynamical interactions (e.g., in globular clusters; GCs) versus those that form in-situ in galactic fields is an important poorly constrained area of XRB astrophysics. We are guided by the following key questions: 1. How does the shape and normalization of the field LMXB X-ray luminosity function (XLF) evolve as parent stellar populations age? Using theoretical population synthesis models, what can we learn about the evolution of contributions from various LMXB donor stars (e.g., red-giant, main-sequence, and white dwarf donors)? 2. Is there any evidence that globular cluster (GC) LMXBs seeded field LMXB populations through

  17. ASCA Observation of MS 1603.6+2600 (=UW Coronae Borealis): A Dipping Low-Mass X-ray Binary in the Outer Halo?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Koji; Smale, Alan; Stahle, Caroline K.; Schlegel, Eric M.; Wijnands, Rudy; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    MS 1603.6+2600 is a high-latitude X-ray binary with a 111 min orbital period, thought to be either an unusual cataclysmic variable or an unusual low-mass X-ray binary. In an ASCA observation in 1997 August, we find a burst whose light curve suggests a Type 1 (thermonuclear flash) origin. We also find an orbital X-ray modulation in MS 1603.6+2600, which is likely to be periodic dips, presumably due to azimuthal structure in the accretion disk. Both are consistent with this system being a normal low-mass X-ray binary harboring a neutron star, but at a great distance. We tentatively suggest that MS 1603.6+2600 is located in the outer halo of the Milky Way, perhaps associated with the globular cluster Palomar 14, 11 deg away from MS 1603.6+2600 on the sky at an estimated distance of 73.8 kpc.

  18. Upper Bounds on r-Mode Amplitudes from Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2M solar mass we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1×10(exp-8) to 1.5×10(exp-6). For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that approx. less than 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21M solar mass) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  19. UPPER BOUNDS ON r-MODE AMPLITUDES FROM OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-08-20

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2 M{sub Sun} we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}. For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that {approx}< 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21 M{sub Sun }) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  20. Erratum: ``Some Constraints on the Effect of Age and Metallicity on the Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Formation Rate'' (ApJ, 589, L81 [2003])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    The number of low-mass X-ray binaries in NGC 4365 that are within 0.5" of a globular cluster and considered to be matches is 18, not 23 as mistakenly reported in the first paragraph of § 3. The correct number is used elsewhere in the above Letter. The fraction of low-mass X-ray binaries that are associated with globular clusters in NGC 4365 is indeed 40% as noted later in the same paragraph. We thank W. Lewin for alerting us to this error.

  1. Further Constraints on Variations in the Initial Mass Function from Low-mass X-ray Binary Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Maraston, Claudia; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Coulter, David A.

    2017-05-01

    We present constraints on variations in the initial mass function (IMF) of nine local early-type galaxies based on their low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations. Comprised of accreting black holes and neutron stars, these LMXBs can be used to constrain the important high-mass end of the IMF. We consider LMXB populations beyond the cores of the galaxies (>0.2R e; covering 75%-90% of their stellar light) and find no evidence for systematic variations of the IMF with velocity dispersion (σ). We reject IMFs which become increasingly bottom-heavy with σ, up to steep power laws (exponent, α > 2.8) in massive galaxies (σ > 300 {km} {{{s}}}-1), for galactocentric radii >1/4 R e. Previously proposed IMFs that become increasingly bottom-heavy with σ are consistent with these data if only the number of low-mass stars (<0.5 M ⊙) varies. We note that our results are consistent with some recent work which proposes that extreme IMFs are only present in the central regions of these galaxies. We also consider IMFs that become increasingly top-heavy with σ, resulting in significantly more LMXBs. Such a model is consistent with these observations, but additional data are required to significantly distinguish between this and an invariant IMF. For six of these galaxies, we directly compare with published “IMF mismatch” parameters from the Atlas3D survey, α dyn. We find good agreement with the LMXB population if galaxies with higher α dyn have more top-heavy IMFs—although we caution that our sample is quite small. Future LMXB observations can provide further insights into the origin of α dyn variations.

  2. Implementation of the frequency-modulated sideband search method for gravitational waves from low mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammut, L.; Messenger, C.; Melatos, A.; Owen, B. J.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the practical implementation of the sideband search, a search for periodic gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems. The orbital motion of the source in its binary system causes frequency modulation in the combination of matched filters known as the F-statistic. The sideband search is based on the incoherent summation of these frequency-modulated F-statistic sidebands. It provides a new detection statistic for sources in binary systems, called the C-statistic. The search is well suited to low-mass x-ray binaries, the brightest of which, called Sco X-1, is an ideal target candidate. For sources like Sco X-1, with well-constrained orbital parameters, a slight variation on the search is possible. The extra orbital information can be used to approximately demodulate the data from the binary orbital motion in the coherent stage, before incoherently summing the now reduced number of sidebands. We investigate this approach and show that it improves the sensitivity of the standard Sco X-1 directed sideband search. Prior information on the neutron star inclination and gravitational wave polarization can also be used to improve upper limit sensitivity. We estimate the sensitivity of a Sco X-1 directed sideband search on ten days of LIGO data and show that it can beat previous upper limits in current LIGO data, with a possibility of constraining theoretical upper limits using future advanced instruments.

  3. The magnetohydrodynamical model of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-10

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  4. Neutron star crustal plate tectonics. I. Magnetic dipole evolution in millisecond pulsars and low-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Crust lattices in spinning-up or spinning-down neutron stars have growing shear stresses caused by neutron superfluid vortex lines pinned to lattice nuclei. For the most rapidly spinning stars, this stress will break and move the crust before vortex unpinning occurs. In spinning-down neutron stars, crustal plates will move an equatorial subduction zone in which the plates are forced into the stellar core below the crust. The opposite plate motion occurs in spinning-up stars. Magnetic fields which pass through the crust or have sources in it move with the crust. Spun-up neutron stars in accreting low-mass X-ray binaries LMXBs should then have almost axially symmetric magnetic fields. Spun-down ones with very weak magnetic fields should have external magnetic fields which enter and leave the neutron star surface only near its equator. The lowest field millisecond radiopulsars seem to be orthogonal rotators implying that they have not previously been spun-up in LMXBs but are neutron stars initially formed with periods near 0.001 s that subsequently spin down to their present periods. Accretion-induced white dwarf collapse is then the most plausible genesis for them. 29 refs.

  5. The Magnetohydrodynamical Model of Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binaries (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model is reexamined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1915-15, 4U 1728-34, and XTE 1807-294) with measured spins. In this model, the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at a low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at a high accretion rate due to the restriction of the innermost stable circular orbit.

  6. The population of low-mass X-ray binaries ejected from black-hole retaining globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, Matthew; Clausen, Drew; Ott, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The fate of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) formed in globular clusters (GCs) is still widely uncertain; recent studies suggest that GCs may retain a substantial population of BHs, in contrast to the long held belief of a few to zero BHs. We model the population of BH low-mass X-ray binaries (BH-LMXB) ejected from GCs that are representative of Milky Way GCs with variable BH populations. We simulate the formation of BH-binaries in GCs through exchange interactions between binary and single stars in the company of tens to hundreds of BHs. We construct Monte Carlo realizations of the present day BH-LMXB population that account for both the binary evolution of the ejected systems and the dynamical evolution of these binaries in the Milky Way potential. We find that the orbital parameters of the ejected binaries are sensitive to both the GC's observable structural parameters and its unobservable BH population. Our results suggest that these dynamically formed BH-LMXBs will be easily distinguishable, by their distinctive kinematic properties and larger BH masses, from those produced in the field. Identifying this population of BH-LMXBs, an ideal observable proxy for elusive single BHs, would provide observational constraints on the GC BH retention fraction.

  7. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  8. Soft x-ray emission from classical novae in outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Truran, J.W. . Dept. of Astronomy); Sparks, W.M. ); Krautter, J. ); MacDonald, J. . Dept. of Physics and Ast

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical modeling of novae in outburst predicts that they should be active emitters of radiation at soft x-ray wavelengths twice during their outburst. The first time occurs very early in the outburst when only a very sensitive all sky survey will be able to detect them. This period lasts only a few hours for the very fastest novae. They again become bright in x-rays late in the outburst when the remnant object becomes very hot and is still luminous. Both simulations and observations show that novae can remain very hot for months to years. It is important to observe them at these late times because a measurement both of the flux and temperature can provide information about the mass of the white dwarf, the turn-off time scale, and the energy budget of the outburst. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  9. X-ray Follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: A Low-mass X-ray Binary with Gamma-ray Fermi-LAT Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deMartino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9- 4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity lowmass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims. To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods. We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results. The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d2 1 kpcerg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at approximately 13 kK and a cool one at approximately 4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions. The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB

  10. A Chandra X-ray study of the young star cluster NGC 6231: low-mass population and initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Context. NGC 6231 is a massive young star cluster, near the center of the Sco OB1 association. While its OB members are well studied, its low-mass population has received little attention. We present high-spatial resolution Chandra ACIS-I X-ray data, where we detect 1613 point X-ray sources. Aims: Our main aim is to clarify global properties of NGC 6231 down to low masses through a detailed membership assessment, and to study the cluster stars' spatial distribution, the origin of their X-ray emission, the cluster age and formation history, and initial mass function. Methods: We use X-ray data, complemented by optical and IR data, to establish cluster membership. The spatial distribution of different stellar subgroups also provides highly significant constraints on cluster membership, as does the distribution of X-ray hardness. We perform spectral modelling of group-stacked X-ray source spectra. Results: We find a large cluster population down to 0.3 M⊙ (complete to 1 M⊙), with minimal non-member contamination, with a definite age spread (1-8 Myr) for the low-mass PMS stars. We argue that low-mass cluster stars also constitute the majority of the few hundreds unidentified X-ray sources. We find mass segregation for the most massive stars. The fraction of circumstellar-disk bearing members is found to be 5%. Photoevaporation of disks under the action of massive stars is suggested by the spatial distribution of the IR-excess stars. We also find strong Hα emission in 9% of cluster PMS stars. The dependence of X-ray properties on mass, stellar structure, and age agrees with extrapolations based on other young clusters. The cluster initial mass function, computed over 2 dex in mass, has a slope Γ -1.14. The total mass of cluster members above 1 M⊙ is 2.28 × 103M⊙, and the inferred total mass is 4.38 × 103M⊙. We also study the peculiar, hard X-ray spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 79. Full Tables B.1 and B.2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp

  11. Discovery of soft X-ray emission from V471 Tauri and UU Sagittae: two highly evolved, low-mass binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, D.; Charles, P.A.; Mason, K.O.

    1980-12-01

    We report here the discovery of soft X-ray emission from two highly evolved low-mass binaries using the HEAO 1 A-2 experiment. V471 Tau is a 5 x 10/sup 30/ ergs s/sup -1/ source in the Hyades with a white dwarf and K V star as components. UU Sge is a planetary nebula nucleus containing an sd0-B star and a K V-M V companion with a soft X-ray luminosity of approx.10/sup 32/ ergs s/sup -1/.

  12. Sgr A* and Its Environment: Low-mass Star Formation, the Origin of X-Ray Gas and Collimated Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Schödel, R.; Roberts, D. A.; Cotton, W.; Bushouse, H.; Arendt, R.; Royster, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution multiwavelength radio continuum images of the region within 150″ of Sgr A*, revealing a number of new extended features and stellar sources in this region. First, we detect a continuous 2″ east-west ridge of radio emission, linking Sgr A* and a cluster of stars associated with IRS 13 N and IRS 13E. The ridge suggests that an outflow of east-west blob-like structures is emerging from Sgr A*. In particular, we find arc-like radio structures within the ridge with morphologies suggestive of photoevaporative protoplanetary disks. We use infrared Ks and L‧ fluxes to show that the emission has similar characteristics to those of a protoplanetary disk irradiated by the intense radiation field at the Galactic center. This suggests that star formation has taken place within the S-cluster 2″ from Sgr A*. We suggest that the diffuse X-ray emission associated with Sgr A* is due to an expanding hot wind produced by the mass loss from B-type main sequence stars, and/or the disks of photoevaporation of low mass young stellar objects (YSOs) at a rate of ˜10-6 {M}⊙ yr-1. The proposed model naturally reduces the inferred accretion rate and is an alternative to the inflow-outflow style models to explain the underluminous nature of Sgr A*. Second, on a scale of 5″ from Sgr A*, we detect new cometary radio and infrared sources at a position angle PA ˜ 50° which is similar to that of two other cometary sources X3 and X7, all of which face Sgr A*. In addition, we detect a striking tower of radio emission at a PA ˜ 50°-60° along the major axis of the Sgr A East supernova remnant shell on a scale of 150″ from Sgr A*. We suggest that the cometary sources and the tower feature are tracing interaction sites of a mildly relativistic jet from Sgr A* with the atmosphere of stars and the nonthermal Sgr A East shell at a PA ˜ 50°-60° with \\dot{M}˜ 1× {10}-7 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, and opening angle 10°. Lastly, we suggest that the east-west ridge of

  13. X-ray emission at the low-mass end - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have used available IPC data and a critical compilation of cataloged optical data to measure the 0.16-3.5 keV X-ray emission from 88 K and 169 M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 pc from the Sun. The IPC detected 54 out of the 88 K stars, 70 out of the 138 M stars with M(v) less than 13.4, and 15 out of the 31 fainter M stars. We have identified a subsample of surveyed stars that is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood. On the basis of this subsample (1) we have shown the occurrence of a drop in the level of X-ray emission for M stars later than approximately M5; (2) we have built unbiased maximum likelihood X-ray luminosity functions for the K, early M, and late M stars; (3) we have confirmed, both for K and M stars, the decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars: and (4) we have shown that no obvious correlation is present between X-ray and bolometric luminosities in the entire representative samples of K and M stars, but only within flare stars which also seem to mark a saturation in X-ray luminosity level.

  14. Orbital and Spin Parameter Variations of Partial Eclipsing Low Mass X-Ray Binary X 1822-371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi; Hsieh, Hung-En; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang; Su, Yi-Hao

    2016-11-01

    We report our measurements for the orbital and spin parameters of X 1822-371 using its X-ray partial eclipsing profile and pulsar timing from data collected by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). Four more X-ray eclipse times obtained by the RXTE 2011 observations were combined with historical records to trace the evolution of the orbital period. We found that a cubic ephemeris likely better describes the evolution of the X-ray eclipse times during a time span of about 34 years with a marginal second order derivative of {\\ddot{P}}{orb}=(-1.05+/- 0.59)× {10}-19 s-1. Using the pulse arrival time delay technique, the orbital and spin parameters were obtained from RXTE observations from 1998 to 2011. The detected pulse periods show that the neutron star in X 1822-371 is continuously spun-up with a rate of {\\dot{P}}s=(-2.6288+/- 0.0095)× {10}-12 s s-1. Although the evolution of the epoch of the mean longitude l = π/2 (i.e., T π/2) gives an orbital period derivative value consistent with that obtained from the quadratic ephemeris evaluated from the X-ray eclipse, the detected T π/2 values are significantly and systematically earlier than the corresponding expected X-ray eclipse times by 90 ± 11 s. This deviation is probably caused by asymmetric X-ray emissions. We also attempted to constrain the mass and radius of the neutron star using the spin period change rate and concluded that the intrinsic luminosity of X 1822-371 is likely more than 1038 erg s-1.

  15. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints of the Quiescent Low-mass X-Ray Binaries X7 and X5 in the Globular Cluster 47 Tuc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Heinke, Craig O.; Özel, Feryal; Güver, Tolga

    2016-11-01

    We present Chandra/ACIS-S subarray observations of the quiescent neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries X7 and X5 in the globular cluster 47 Tuc. The large reduction in photon pile-up compared to previous deep exposures enables a substantial improvement in the spectroscopic determination of the NS radius and mass of these NSs. Modeling the thermal emission from the NS surface with a non-magnetized hydrogen atmosphere and accounting for numerous sources of uncertainties, we obtain for the NS in X7 a radius of R={11.1}-0.7+0.8 km for an assumed stellar mass of M = 1.4 M ⊙ (68% confidence level). We argue, based on astrophysical grounds, that the presence of a He atmosphere is unlikely for this source. Due to the excision of data affected by eclipses and variable absorption, the quiescent low-mass X-ray binary X5 provides less stringent constraints, leading to a radius of R={9.6}-1.1+0.9 km, assuming a hydrogen atmosphere and a mass of M = 1.4 M ⊙. When combined with all existing spectroscopic radius measurements from other quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and Type I X-ray bursts, these measurements strongly favor radii in the 9.9-11.2 km range for a ˜1.5 M ⊙ NS and point to a dense matter equation of state that is somewhat softer than the nucleonic ones that are consistent with laboratory experiments at low densities.

  16. X-ray cross-correlation analysis of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ya-Juan

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the cross-correlation function of the soft and hard X-rays of the atoll source 4U 1636-53 with RXTE data. The results show that the cross-correlations evolve along the different branches of the color-color diagram. At the lower left banana states, we have both positive and ambiguous correlations, and positive correlations are dominant for the lower banana and the upper banana states. The anti-correlation is detected at the top of the upper banana states. The cross-correlations of two atoll sources 4U 1735-44 and 4U 1608-52 have been studied in previous work, and the anti-correlations are detected at the lower left banana or the top of the upper banana states. Our results show that, in the 4U 1636-53, the distribution of the cross-correlations in the color-color diagram is similar to those of 4U 1735-44 and 4U 1608-52, and confirm further that the distribution of cross-correlations in color-color diagram could be correlated with the luminosity of the source.

  17. ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 4U 1608-522 IN THE UPPER-BANANA STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Soki; Makishima, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly magnetized neutron stars (NSs), 95 archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data sets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in the so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of {approx}< 10{sup 35}-4 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV Proportional Counter Array spectra, produced one from each data set, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, the presence of which was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by the so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of {approx}1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody (BB) emission with a temperature of {approx}2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the NS surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease is observed in the ratio of the BB luminosity to that of the disk component. This property suggests that it gradually becomes difficult for the matter flowing through the accretion disk to reach the NS surface, presumably forming outflows driven by the increased radiation pressure. On timescales of hours to days, the overall source variability was found to be controlled by two independent variables: the mass accretion rate and the innermost disk radius, which changes both physically and artificially.

  18. Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Observations of the Low-mass X-ray Binary 4U 1608-522 in the Upper-banana State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Soki; Makishima, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly magnetized neutron stars (NSs), 95 archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data sets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in the so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of <~ 1035-4 × 1037 erg s-1, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV Proportional Counter Array spectra, produced one from each data set, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, the presence of which was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by the so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of ~1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody (BB) emission with a temperature of ~2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the NS surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease is observed in the ratio of the BB luminosity to that of the disk component. This property suggests that it gradually becomes difficult for the matter flowing through the accretion disk to reach the NS surface, presumably forming outflows driven by the increased radiation pressure. On timescales of hours to days, the overall source variability was found to be controlled by two independent variables: the mass accretion rate and the innermost disk radius, which changes both physically and artificially.

  19. XTE J1701-462 AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF SUBCLASSES IN LOW-MAGNETIC-FIELD NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego; Mendez, Mariano; Lin Dacheng; Casella, Piergiorgio; Belloni, Tomaso M.

    2010-08-10

    We report on an analysis of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) XTE J1701-462, obtained during its 2006-2007 outburst. The X-ray properties of the source changed between those of various types of NS-LMXB subclasses. At high luminosities, the source switched between two types of Z source behavior and at low luminosities we observed a transition from Z source to atoll source behavior. These transitions between subclasses primarily manifest themselves as changes in the shapes of the tracks in X-ray color-color (CD) and hardness-intensity diagrams (HID), but they are accompanied by changes in the kHz quasi-periodic oscillations, broadband variability, burst behavior, and/or X-ray spectra. We find that for most of the outburst the low-energy X-ray flux is a good parameter to track the gradual evolution of the tracks in CD and HID, allowing us to resolve the evolution of the source in greater detail than before and relate the observed properties to other NS-LMXBs. We further find that during the transition from Z to atoll, characteristic behavior known as the atoll upper banana can equivalently be described as the final stage of a weakening Z source flaring branch, thereby blurring the line between the two subclasses. Our findings strongly suggest that the wide variety in behavior observed in NS-LXMBs with different luminosities can be linked through changes in a single variable parameter, namely the mass accretion rate, without the need for additional differences in the neutron star parameters or viewing angle. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the spectral changes observed in NS-LMXBs and suggest that, contrary to what is often assumed, the position along the color-color tracks of Z sources is not determined by the instantaneous mass accretion rate.

  20. Phase lags of quasi-periodic oscillations across source states in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego; Sanna, Andrea; Zhang, Guobao

    2016-09-01

    While there are many dynamical mechanisms and models that try to explain the origin and phenomenology of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) seen in the X-ray light curves of low-mass X-ray binaries, few of them address how the radiative processes occurring in these extreme environments give rise to the rich set of variability features actually observed in these light curves. A step towards this end comes from the study of the energy and frequency dependence of the phase lags of these QPOs. Here we used a methodology that allowed us to study, for the first time, the dependence of the phase lags of all QPOs in the range of 1-1300 Hz detected in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53 upon energy and frequency as the source changes its states as it moves through the colour-colour diagram. Our results suggest that within the context of models of up-scattering Comptonization, the phase lags dependences upon frequency and energy can be used to extract size scales and physical conditions of the medium that produces the lags.

  1. Phase lags of quasi-periodic oscillations across source states in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.

    2017-06-01

    The majority of attempts to explain the origin and phenomenology of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in low-mass X-ray binaries invoke dynamical models, and it was just in recent years that renewed attention has been given on how radiative processes occurring in these extreme environments gives rise to the variability features observed in the X-ray light curves of these systems. The study of the dependence of the phase lags upon the energy and frequency of the QPOs is a step towards this end. The methodology we developed here allowed us to study for the first time these dependencies for all QPOs detected in the range of 1 to 1300 Hz in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53 as the source changes its state during its cycle in the colour-colour diagram. Our results suggest that within the context of models of up-scattering Comptonization, the phase lags dependencies upon frequency and energy can be used to extract size scales and physical conditions of the medium that produces the lags.

  2. On the Optical-X-Ray Correlation from Outburst to Quiescence in Low-mass X-Ray Binaries: The Representative Cases of V404 Cyg and Cen X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; Russell, D. M.; Kolojonen, K. I. I.; Stella, L.; Hynes, R. I.; Corbel, S.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) show evidence of a global correlation of debated origin between X-ray and optical luminosity. We study for the first time this correlation in two transient LMXBs, the black hole (BH) V404 Cyg and the neutron star Cen X-4, over six orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity, from outburst to quiescence. After subtracting the contribution from the companion star, the Cen X-4 data can be described by a single power-law correlation of the form {L}{opt}\\propto {L}{{X}}0.44, consistent with disk reprocessing. We find a similar correlation slope for V404 Cyg in quiescence (0.46) and a steeper one (0.56) in the outburst hard state of 1989. However, V404 Cyg is about 160-280 times optically brighter, at a given 3-9 keV X-ray luminosity, compared to Cen X-4. This ratio is a factor of 10 smaller in quiescence, where the normalization of the V404 Cyg correlation also changes. Once the bolometric X-ray emission is considered and the known main differences between V404 Cyg and Cen X-4 are taken into account (a larger compact object mass, accretion disk size, and the presence of a strong jet contribution in the hard state for the BH system), the two systems lie on the same correlation. In V404 Cyg, the jet dominates spectrally at optical-infrared frequencies during the hard state but makes a negligible contribution in quiescence, which may account for the change in its correlation slope and normalization. These results provide a benchmark to compare with data from the 2015 outburst of V404 Cyg and, potentially, other transient LMXBs as well.

  3. Daily multiwavelength Swift monitoring of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4: evidence for accretion and reprocessing during quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; D'Angelo, C.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M.; Wijnands, R.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted the first long-term (60 d), multiwavelength (optical, ultraviolet, UV, and X-ray) simultaneous monitoring of Cen X-4 with daily Swift observations from 2012 June to August, with the goal of understanding variability in the low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4 during quiescence. We found Cen X-4 to be highly variable in all energy bands on time-scales from days to months, with the strongest quiescent variability a factor of 22 drop in the X-ray count rate in only 4 d. The X-ray, UV and optical (V band) emission are correlated on time-scales down to less than 110 s. The shape of the correlation is a power law with index γ about 0.2-0.6. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a hydrogen neutron star (NS) atmosphere (kT = 59-80 eV) and a power law (with spectral index Γ = 1.4-2.0), with the spectral shape remaining constant as the flux varies. Both components vary in tandem, with each responsible for about 50 per cent of the total X-ray flux, implying that they are physically linked. We conclude that the X-rays are likely generated by matter accreting down to the NS surface. Moreover, based on the short time-scale of the correlation, we also unambiguously demonstrate that the UV emission cannot be due to either thermal emission from the stream impact point, or a standard optically thick, geometrically thin disc. The spectral energy distribution shows a small UV emitting region, too hot to arise from the accretion disc, that we identified as a hotspot on the companion star. Therefore, the UV emission is most likely produced by reprocessing from the companion star, indeed the vertical size of the disc is small and can only reprocess a marginal fraction of the X-ray emission. We also found the accretion disc in quiescence to likely be UV faint, with a minimal contribution to the whole UV flux.

  4. DISCOVERY OF A 552 Hz BURST OSCILLATION IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY EXO 0748-676

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Duncan K.; Lin Jinrong; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Hartman, Jacob M.

    2010-03-10

    We report the detection of pulsations at 552 Hz in the rising phase of two type-I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts observed from the accreting neutron star EXO 0748-676 in 2007 January and December, by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The fractional amplitude was 15% (rms). The dynamic power density spectrum for each burst revealed an increase in frequency of {approx}1-2 Hz while the oscillation was present. The frequency drift, the high significance of the detections and the almost identical signal frequencies measured in two bursts separated by 11 months, confirms this signal as a burst oscillation similar to those found in 13 other sources to date. We thus conclude that the spin frequency in EXO 0748 - 676 is within a few Hz of 552 Hz, rather than 45 Hz as was suggested from an earlier signal detection by Villarreal and Strohmayer. Consequently, Doppler broadening must significantly affect spectral features arising from the neutron star surface, so that the narrow absorption features previously reported from an XMM-Newton spectrum could not have arisen there. The origin of both the previously reported 45 Hz oscillation and the X-ray absorption lines is now uncertain.

  5. Indication of a massive circumbinary planet orbiting the low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1658-298

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Chetana; Paul, Biswajit; Sharma, Rahul; Jaleel, Abdul; Dutta, Anjan

    2017-06-01

    We present an X-ray timing analysis of the transient X-ray binary MXB 1658-298, using data obtained from the RXTE and XMM-Newton observatories. We have made 27 new mid-eclipse time measurements from observations made during the two outbursts of the source. These new measurements have been combined with the previously known values to study long-term changes in orbital period of the binary system. We have found that the mid-eclipse timing record of MXB 1658-298 is quite unusual. The long-term evolution of mid-eclipse times indicates an overall orbital period decay with a time-scale of -6.5(7) × 107 yr. Over and above this orbital period decay, the O-C residual curve also shows a periodic residual on shorter time-scales. This sinusoidal variation has an amplitude of ˜9 lt-s and a period of ˜760 d. This is indicative of the presence of a third body around the compact X-ray binary. The mass and orbital radius of the third body are estimated to lie in the ranges 20.5-26.9 Jupiter mass and 750-860 lt-s, respectively. If true, then it will be the most massive circumbinary planet and also the smallest period binary known to host a planet.

  6. X-ray emission at low-mass end of the MS - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1992-01-01

    The 0.16-4.0 keV X-ray emission from K and M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 parsec of the sun was measured using all available Einstein Observatory IPC data and a critical compilation of catalogued optical data. Fifty four of 88 stars were detected, 70 of 138 M stars with Mv less than 13.4 (corresponding to M6) and 15 or 31 fainter M stars. The surveyed stars were grouped, on the basis of U, V, W space velocity components, into old-disk, young-disk, and halo population stars. Then, a subsample was selected which is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood, on the basis of which unbiased Maximum Likelihood X-ray luminosity functions were constructed for K, early M, and late M stars. The investigation revealed a decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars.

  7. Eclipse timings of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676: Statistical arguments against orbital period changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, Paul; Wood, Kent S.; Cominsky, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    EXO 0748-676, an eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary, is one of only about four or five low-mass X-ray binaries for which orbital period evolution has been reported. We observed a single eclipse egress with ROSAT . The time of this egress is consistent with the apparent increase in P(sub orb) previously reported on the basis of EXOSAT and Ginga observations. Standard analysis, in which O-C (observed minus calculated) timing residuals are examined for deviations from a constant period, implicitly assume that the only uncertainty in each residual is measurement error and that these errors are independent. We argue that the variable eclipse durations and profiles observed in EXO 0748-676 imply that there is an additional source of uncertainty in timing measurements, that this uncertainty is intrinsic to the binary system, and that it is correlated from observation to observation with a variance which increases as a function of the number of binary cycles between observations. This intrinsic variability gives rise to spurious trends in O-C residuals which are misinterpreted as changes in the orbital period. We describe several statistics tests which can be used to test for the presence of intrinsic variability. We apply those statistical tests which are suitable to the EXO 0748-676 observations. The apparent changes in the orbital period of EXO 0748-676 can be completely accounted for by intrinsic variability with an rms variability of approximately 0.35 s per orbital cycle. The variability appears to be correlated from cycle-to-cycle on timescales of less than 1 yr. We suggest that the intrinsic variability is related to slow changes in either the source's X-ray luminosity or the structure of the companion star's atmosphere. We note that several other X-ray binaries and cataclysmic variables have previously reported orbital period changes which may also be due to intrinsic variability rather than orbital period evolution.

  8. Deep Chandra observations of NGC 7457, the X-ray point source populations of a low-mass early-type galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Maraston, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    We present the X-ray point source population of NGC 7457 based on 124 ks of Chandra observations. Previous deep Chandra observations of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in early-type galaxies have typically targeted the large populations of massive galaxies. NGC 7457 is a nearby, early-type galaxy with a stellar luminosity of 1.7× 10^{10}{L_{K{⊙}}}, allowing us to investigate the populations in a relatively low-mass galaxy. We classify the detected X-ray sources into field LMXBs, globular cluster LMXBs and background active galactic nuclei based on identifying optical counterparts in new HST/ACS images. We detect 10 field LMXBs within the rext ellipse of NGC 7457 (with semimajor axis ∼9.1 kpc, ellipticity = 0.55). The corresponding number of LMXBs with X-ray luminosities (Lx)>2× 10^{37}{erg s^{-1}} per stellar luminosity is consistent with that observed in more massive galaxies, ∼7 per 10^{10} L_{K{⊙}}. We detect a small globular cluster population in these HST data and show that its colour distribution is likely bimodal and that its specific frequency is similar to that of other early-type galaxies. However, no X-ray emission is detected from any of these clusters. Using published data for other galaxies, we show that this non-detection is consistent with the small stellar mass of these clusters. We estimate that 0.11 (and 0.03) LMXBs are expected per 106M_{{⊙}} in metal-rich (and metal-poor) globular clusters. This corresponds to 1100 (and 330) LMXBs per 10^{10} L_{K{⊙}}, highlighting the enhanced formation efficiency of LMXBs in globular clusters. A nuclear X-ray source is detected, with Lx varying from 2.8 × 1038 to 6.8 × 1038 erg s-1. Combining this Lx with a published dynamical mass estimate for the central supermassive black hole in NGC 7457, we find that Lx/L_{Edd} varies from 0.5 × 10-6 to 1.3 × 10-6.

  9. The X-Ray Luminosity Function of Low-mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-type Galaxies, Their Metal-rich, and Metal-poor Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2016-02-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the globular clusters (GCs) and fields of seven early-type galaxies. These galaxies are selected to have both deep Chandra observations, which allow their LMXB populations to be observed to X-ray luminosities of 1037-1038 erg s-1, and Hubble Space Telescope optical mosaics that enable the X-ray sources to be separated into field LMXBs, GC LMXBs, and contaminating background and foreground sources. We find that at all luminosities the number of field LMXBs per stellar mass is similar in these galaxies. This suggests that the field LMXB populations in these galaxies are not effected by the GC specific frequency, and that properties such as binary fraction and the stellar initial mass function are either similar across the sample or change in a way that does not affect the number of LMXBs. We compare the XLF of the field LMXBs to that of the GC LMXBs and find that they are significantly different with a p-value of 3 × 10-6 (equivalent to 4.7σ for a normal distribution). The difference is such that the XLF of the GC LMXBs is flatter than that of the field LMXBs, with the GCs hosting relatively more bright sources and fewer faint sources. A comparison of the XLF of the metal-rich and metal-poor GCs hints that the metal-poor clusters may have more bright LMXBs, but the difference is not statistically significant.

  10. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, M. G. B.; Méndez, M.; Sanna, A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the time lags and the coherence of the X-ray light curves of the neutron star low mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53. These quantities are frequency-dependent measures of the time or phase delay and of the degree of linear correlation between two X-ray light curves in two different energies bands; they encode information about the size and geometry of the medium that produces them.

  11. The puzzling negative orbit-period derivative of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1820-30 in NGC 6624

    SciTech Connect

    Peuten, M.; Brockamp, M.; Küpper, A. H. W.; Kroupa, P. E-mail: brockamp@astro.uni-bonn.de E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2014-11-10

    4U 1820-30 is a low-mass X-ray binary near the center of the globular cluster NGC 6624 consisting of, at least, one neutron star and one helium white dwarf. Analyzing 16 yr of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) allows us to measure its orbital period and its time derivative with unprecedented accuracy to be P = 685.01197 ± 0.00003 s and P-dot / P=−5.3±0.3×10{sup −8} yr{sup −1}. Hence, we confirm that the period derivative is significantly negative at the >17σ level, contrary to theoretical expectations for an isolated X-ray binary. We discuss possible scenarios that could explain this discrepancy and conclude that the center of NGC 6624 most likely contains large amounts of nonluminous matter such as dark remnants. We also discuss the possibility of an IMBH inside NGC 6624, or that a dark remnant close to 4U 1820-30 causes the observed shift.

  12. Simplified Picture of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries Based on Data from Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Asai, Kazumi

    2013-04-01

    We propose a simplified picture of low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) based on data obtained from Aql X-1 and 4U 1608- 52, which often produce outbursts. In this picture we propose at least three states and three state transitions: i.e., the states: (1) soft state, (2) hard-high state, and (3) hard-low state, and the state transitions: (i) hard-high state to soft state, (ii) soft state to hard-high state, and (iii) hard-high state to hard-low state or vice versa. Gases from the accretion disc of an NS-LMXB penetrate almost the entire magnetic field and accrete onto the neutron star in cases (1) and (2), whereas in case (3) some gases accrete around the magnetic poles in a manner resembling the behavior of an X-ray pulsar, and considerable gas is dispersed or ejected by the propeller effect. Transition (iii) occurs when the Alfvén radius is equal to the co-rotation radius. Therefore, in this case it is possible to estimate the strength of the neutron star's magnetic field by detecting transition (iii). We also discuss the no-accretion X-ray state or the recycled pulsar state, in which the Alfvén radius is larger than the light cylinder radius.

  13. The effect of accretion on the measurement of neutron star mass and radius in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Latvala, Outi-Marja; Galloway, Duncan K.; Kuulkers, Erik; Suleimanov, Valery F.

    2014-08-01

    Spectral measurements of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries have been used to measure neutron star (NS) masses and radii. A number of systematic issues affect such measurements and have raised concerns as to the robustness of the methods. We present analysis of the X-ray emission from bursts observed from 4U 1608-52 at various persistent fluxes. We find a strong dependence of the burst properties on the flux and spectral hardness of the persistent emission before burst. Bursts occurring during the low accretion rate (hard) state exhibit evolution of the blackbody normalization consistent with the theoretical predictions of NS atmosphere models. However, bursts occurring during the high accretion rate (soft) state show roughly constant normalization, which is inconsistent with the NS atmosphere models and therefore these bursts cannot be easily used to determine NS parameters. We analyse the hard-state burst to put the lower limit on the NS radius R in 4U 1608-52 of 12 km (for masses 1.0-2.4 M⊙). We constrain R to be between 13 and 16 km for masses 1.2-1.6 M⊙. The best agreement with the theoretical NS mass-radius relations is achieved for source distances in the range 3.1-3.7 kpc. We expect that the radius limit will be 10 per cent lower if spectral models including rapid rotation are used instead.

  14. A cold neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary HETE J1900.1-2455 after 10 yr of active accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Reynolds, M. T.; Wijnands, R.; Page, D.

    2017-02-01

    The neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and intermittent millisecond X-ray pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455 returned to quiescence in late 2015, after a prolonged accretion outburst of ≃10 yr. Using a Chandra observation taken ≃180 d into quiescence, we detect the source at a luminosity of ≃4.5 × 1031 (D/4.7 kpc)2 erg s-1 (0.5-10 keV). The X-ray spectrum can be described by a neutron star atmosphere model with a temperature of ≃54 eV for an observer at infinity. We perform thermal evolution calculations based on the 2016 quiescent data and a ≲98 eV temperature upper limit inferred from a Swift observation taken during an unusually brief (≲2 weeks) quiescent episode in 2007. We find no evidence in the present data that the thermal properties of the crust, such as the heating rate and thermal conductivity, are different than those of non-pulsating neutron stars. Finding this neutron star so cold after its long outburst imposes interesting constraints on the heat capacity of the stellar core; these become even stronger if further cooling were to occur.

  15. A Test of the Nature of the Fe K Line in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Fabian, Andy C.; D'Aì, Antonino; Parker, Michael L.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Burderi, Luciano; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Egron, Elise; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Lin, Dacheng; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems as well as in neutron star systems. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk which is broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) has been a matter of debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the “continuous clocking” mode, and thus was free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides a highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  16. An Fe XXIV Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 +/- 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe xxvi (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition.We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of nu < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 +/- 1)×10(exp 17) /sq. cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >103.6 erg cm/s. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an "atoll" source

  17. Deep Chandra observations of NGC 7457, the X-ray point source populations of a low mass early-type galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Maraston, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We present the X-ray point source population of NGC 7457 based on 124 ks of Chandra observations. Previous deep Chandra observations of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in early-type galaxies have typically targeted the large populations of massive galaxies. NGC 7457 is a nearby, early-type galaxy with a stellar luminosity of 1.7× 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}, allowing us to investigate the populations in a relatively low mass galaxy. We classify the detected X-ray sources into field LMXBs, globular cluster LMXBs, and background AGN based on identifying optical counterparts in new HST/ACS images. We detect 10 field LMXBs within the rext ellipse of NGC 7457 (with semi-major axis ˜ 9.1 kpc, ellipticity = 0.55). The corresponding number of LMXBs with {Lx} > 2 × 10^{37} {{erg s^{-1}}} per stellar luminosity is consistent with that observed in more massive galaxies, ˜7 per 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}. We detect a small globular cluster population in these HST data and show that its colour distribution is likely bimodal and that its specific frequency is similar to that of other early type galaxies. However, no X-ray emission is detected from any of these clusters. Using published data for other galaxies, we show that this non-detection is consistent with the small stellar mass of these clusters. We estimate that 0.11 (and 0.03) LMXBs are expected per 106 {M_{⊙}} in metal-rich (and metal-poor) globular clusters. This corresponds to 1100 (and 330) LMXBs per 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}, highlighting the enhanced formation efficiency of LMXBs in globular clusters. A nuclear X-ray source is detected with Lx varying from 2.8-6.8× 10^{38} {{erg s^{-1}}}. Combining this Lx with a published dynamical mass estimate for the central SMBH in NGC 7457, we find that {Lx}/L_{Edd} varies from 0.5 - 1.3 × 10-6.

  18. Crustal Cooling in the Neutron Star Low-Mass X-Ray Binary KS 1731-260

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Rachael L.

    Neutron stars in binary systems can undergo periods of accretion (outburst), where in- falling material heats the crust of the star out of thermal equilibrium with the core. When accretion stops (quiescence), we can directly observe the thermal relaxation of the crust. Crustal cooling of accretion-heated neutron stars provides insight into the stellar interior of neutron stars. The neutron star X-ray transient, KS 1731-260, was in outburst for 12.5 years before returning to quiescence in 2001. Here, we present a 150 ks Chandra observation of KS 1731-260 taken in August 2015, about 14.5 years into quiescence. We find that the neutron star surface temperature is consistent with the previous observation, suggesting the crust has reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Using a theoretical thermal evolution code, we fit the observed cooling curves and constrain the core temperature, composition, and the required level of extra shallow heating.

  19. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  20. BANYAN. III. Radial Velocity, Rotation, and X-Ray Emission of Low-mass Star Candidates in Nearby Young Kinematic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s-1 and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R X parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  1. Truncation of the Accretion Disk at One-third of the Eddington Limit in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Aquila X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlam, R. M.; Miller, J. M.; Degenaar, N.; Sanna, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Altamirano, D.; King, A. L.

    2017-10-01

    We perform a reflection study on a new observation of the neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Aquila X-1 taken with NuSTAR during the 2016 August outburst and compare with the 2014 July outburst. The source was captured at ∼32% L Edd, which is over four times more luminous than the previous observation during the 2014 outburst. Both observations exhibit a broadened Fe line profile. Through reflection modeling, we determine that the inner disk is truncated {R}{in,2016}={11}-1+2 {R}g (where R g = GM/c 2) and {R}{in,2014}=14+/- 2 {R}g (errors quoted at the 90% confidence level). Fiducial NS parameters (M NS = 1.4 M ⊙, R NS = 10 km) give a stellar radius of R NS = 4.85 R g ; our measurements rule out a disk extending to that radius at more than the 6σ level of confidence. We are able to place an upper limit on the magnetic field strength of B ≤ 3.0–4.5 × 109 G at the magnetic poles, assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius in each case. This is consistent with previous estimates of the magnetic field strength for Aquila X-1. However, if the magnetosphere is not responsible for truncating the disk prior to the NS surface, we estimate a boundary layer with a maximum extent of {R}{BL,2016}∼ 10 {R}g and {R}{BL,2014}∼ 6 {R}g. Additionally, we compare the magnetic field strength inferred from the Fe line profile of Aquila X-1 and other NS low-mass X-ray binaries to known accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars.

  2. QUARK-NOVAE IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES. II. APPLICATION TO G87-7 AND TO GRB 110328A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Staff, Jan; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-12-20

    We propose a simple model explaining two outstanding astrophysical problems related to compact objects: (1) that of stars such as G87-7 (alias EG 50) that constitute a class of relatively low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) which nevertheless fall away from the C/O composition and (2) that of GRB 110328A/Swift J164449.3+57345 which showed spectacularly long-lived strong X-ray flaring, posing a challenge to standard gamma-ray burst models. We argue that both these observations may have an explanation within the unified framework of a quark-nova (QN) occurring in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB; neutron star (NS)-WD). For LMXBs, where the binary separation is sufficiently tight, ejecta from the exploding NS triggers nuclear burning in the WD on impact, possibly leading to Fe-rich composition compact WDs with mass 0.43 M{sub Sun} < M{sub WD} < 0.72 M{sub Sun }, reminiscent of G87-7. Our results rely on the assumption, which ultimately needs to be tested by hydrodynamic and nucleosynthesis simulations, that under certain circumstances the WD can avoid the thermonuclear runaway. For heavier WDs (i.e., M{sub WD} > 0.72 M{sub Sun }) experiencing the QN shock, degeneracy will not be lifted when carbon burning begins, and a sub-Chandrasekhar Type Ia supernova may result in our model. Under slightly different conditions and for pure He WDs (i.e., M{sub WD} < 0.43 M{sub Sun }), the WD is ablated and its ashes raining down on the quark star (QS) leads to accretion-driven X-ray luminosity with energetics and duration reminiscent of GRB 110328A. We predict additional flaring activity toward the end of the accretion phase if the QS turns into a black hole.

  3. On the Origin of the Near-infrared Emission from the Neutron-star Low-mass X-Ray Binary GX 9+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Homan, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    We have determined an improved position for the luminous persistent neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary and atoll source GX 9+1 from archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data. The new position significantly differs from a previously published Chandra position for this source. Based on the revised X-ray position we have identified a new near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 9+1 in Ks-band images obtained with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. NIR spectra of this {K}s=16.5+/- 0.1 mag star, taken with the FIRE spectrograph on the Baade Telescope, show a strong Br γ emission line, which is a clear signature that we discovered the true NIR counterpart to GX 9+1. The mass donor in GX 9+1 cannot be a late-type giant, as such a star would be brighter than the estimated absolute Ks magnitude of the NIR counterpart. The slope of the dereddened NIR spectrum is poorly constrained due to uncertainties in the column density NH and NIR extinction. Considering the source’s distance and X-ray luminosity, we argue that NH likely lies near the high end of the previously suggested range. If this is indeed the case, the NIR spectrum is consistent with thermal emission from a heated accretion disk, possibly with a contribution from the secondary. In this respect, GX 9+1 is similar to other bright atolls and the Z sources, whose NIR spectra do not show the slope that is expected for a dominant contribution from optically thin synchrotron emission from the inner regions of a jet. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  4. Dynamical formation of black hole low-mass X-ray binaries in the field: an alternative to the common envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klencki, Jakub; Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Gładysz, Wojciech; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Very wide binaries (>500 au) are subject to numerous encounters with fly-by stars in the Galactic field and can be perturbed into highly eccentric orbits (e ∼ 0.99). For such systems, the tidal interactions at close pericentre passages can lead to orbit circularization and, possibly, to mass transfer, consequently producing X-ray binaries without the need for the common envelope. We test this scenario for the case of black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) by performing a population synthesis with a numerical treatment of random stellar encounters. We test various models for the threshold pericentre distance under which the tidal forces cause circularization. We estimate that fly-by interactions can produce a current population of ∼60-220 BH LMXBs in the Galactic field. The results are sensitive to assumptions on the tidal circularization efficiency and the BH natal kick, because zero to very small kick velocities of several km s-1 are required for the wide systems to survive the BH formation (∼60 per cent of the cases in our simulations). We show that the most likely donors are low-mass stars (<1 M⊙; at the onset of mass transfer) as observed in the population of known sources (∼20). However, the low number of systems formed along this route is in contrast with the most recent observational estimate of the number of dormant BH LMXBs in the Galaxy 104-108. If, indeed, the numbers are so high, alternative formation channels of BHs with low-mass donors need to be identified.

  5. THE STELLAR MASS–HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOW-MASS X-RAY GROUPS AT 0.5< z< 1 IN THE CDFS WITH CSI

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Mulchaey, John S.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2015-01-30

    Since z∼1, the stellar mass density locked in low-mass groups and clusters has grown by a factor of ∼8. Here, we make the first statistical measurements of the stellar mass content of low-mass X-ray groups at 0.5X-ray observations in the Chandra Deep Field South. These ultra-deep observations allow us to identify bona fide low-mass groups at high redshift and enable measurements of their total halo masses. We compute aggregate stellar masses for these halos using galaxies from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) spectroscopic redshift survey. Stars comprise ∼3%–4% of the total mass of group halos with masses 10{sup 12.8}

  6. Restablished Accretion in Post-outburst Classical Novae Revealed by X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernanz, Margarita; Ferri, Carlo; Sala, Glòria

    2009-05-01

    Classical novae are explosions on accreting white dwarfs (hereinafter WDs) in cataclysmic variables (hereinafter CVs) a hydrogen thermonuclear runaway on top of the WD is responsible for the outburst. X-rays provide a unique way to study the turn-off of H-burning, because super soft X-rays reveal the hot WD photosphere, but also to understand how accretion is established again in the binary system. Observations with XMM-Newton of some post-outburst novae have revealed such a process, but a coverage up to larger energies -as Simbol-X will provide- is fundamental to well understand the characteristics of the binary system and of the nova ejecta. We present a brief summary of our results up to now and prospects for the Simbol-X mission.

  7. Potential cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust in the low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Page, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Deller, A. T.; Gusinskaia, N.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Homan, J.; Linares, M.; Miller, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2017-04-01

    We have monitored the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 in quiescence after its ˜4.5 month outburst in 2015. The source has been observed using Swift and XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectra were dominated by a thermal component. The thermal evolution showed a gradual X-ray luminosity decay from ˜18 × 1032 to ˜4 × 1032 (D/5.8 kpc)2 erg s-1 between ˜8 and ˜379 d in quiescence, and the inferred neutron star surface temperature (for an observer at infinity; using a neutron star atmosphere model) decreased from ˜100 to ˜71 eV. This can be interpreted as cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust. Modelling the observed temperature curve (using nscool) indicated that the source required ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon of shallow heating in addition to the standard deep crustal heating to explain its thermal evolution. Alternatively, the decay could also be modelled without the presence of deep crustal heating, only having a shallow heat source (again ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon was required). However, the XMM-Newton data statistically required an additional power-law component. This component contributed ˜30 per cent of the total unabsorbed flux in 0.5-10 keV energy range. The physical origin of this component is unknown. One possibility is that it arises from low-level accretion. The presence of this component in the spectrum complicates our cooling crust interpretation because it might indicate that the smooth luminosity and temperature decay curves we observed may not be due to crust cooling but due to some other process.

  8. An Fe XXVI Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low Mass X-ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2009-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectra of the dipping Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) 1A 1744-361 during its July 2008 outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power-law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge at 7.6 keV. In the residuals of the combined spectrum we find a significant absorption line at 6.961+/-0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2 - 1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of 7+/-1 x 10(exp 17)/sq cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of > 10(exp 3.6) erg cm/s. The properties of this line are consistent with those observed in other dipping LMXBs. Using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data accumulated during this latest outburst we present an updated color-color diagram which clearly shows that IA 1744-361 is an "atoll" source. Finally, using additional dips found in the RXTE and CXO data we provide an updated orbital period estimate of 52+/-5 minutes.

  9. DISCOVERY OF PSR J1227−4853: A TRANSITION FROM A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TO A REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Stappers, Ben; Ray, Paul S.; Wolff, Michael; Wood, Kent S.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Deneva, Julia; Camilo, Fernando; Johnson, Tyrel J.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bassa, Cees G.; Keane, Evan F.; Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Harding, Alice K.

    2015-02-10

    XSS J12270−4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9−4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227−4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm{sup −3} associated with this source, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824−2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227−4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17–0.46 M{sub ⊙} suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227−4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ∼10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.

  10. Potential cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust in the low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Page, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Deller, A. T.; Gusinskaia, N.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Homan, J.; Linares, M.; Miller, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2017-01-01

    We have monitored the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 in quiescence after its ˜4.5 month outburst in 2015. The source has been observed using Swift and XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectra were dominated by a thermal component. The thermal evolution showed a gradual X-ray luminosity decay from ˜18 × 1032 to ˜4 × 1032 (D/5.8 kpc)2 erg s-1 between ˜8 to ˜379 days in quiescence and the inferred neutron star surface temperature (for an observer at infinity; using a neutron star atmosphere model) decreased from ˜100 to ˜71 eV. This can be interpreted as cooling of an accretion heated neutron star crust. Modeling the observed temperature curve (using NSCOOL) indicated that the source required ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon of shallow heating in addition to the standard deep crustal heating to explain its thermal evolution. Alternatively, the decay could also be modelled without the presence of deep crustal heating, only having a shallow heat source (again ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon was required). However, the XMM-Newton data statistically required an additional power-law component. This component contributed ˜30 per cent of the total unabsorbed flux in 0.5 - 10 keV energy range. The physical origin of this component is unknown. One possibility is that it arises from low-level accretion. The presence of this component in the spectrum complicates our cooling crust interpretation because it might indicate that the smooth luminosity and temperature decay curves we observed may not be due to crust cooling but due to some other process.

  11. The Low-Mass X-Ray Binary X1832-330 in the Globular Cluster NGC 6652: A Serendipitous ASCA Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Koji; Smale, Alan P.

    1999-01-01

    The Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) X1832-330 in NGC 6652 is one of about 10 bright X-ray sources to have been discovered in Globular Clusters. We report on a serendipitous ASCA observation of this Globular Cluster LMXB, during which a Type I burst was detected and the persistent, non-burst emission of the source was at its brightest level recorded to date. No orbital modulation was detected, which argues against a high inclination for the X1832-330 system. The spectrum of the persistent emission can be fit with a power law plus a partial covering absorber, although other models are not ruled out. Our time-resolved spectral analysis through the burst shows, for the first time, clear evidence for spectral cooling from kT = 2.4 +/- 0.6 keV to kT = 1.0 +/- 0.1 keV during the decay. The measured peak flux during the burst is approximately 10% of the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 Solar Mass neutron star. These are characteristic of a Type I burst, in the context of the relatively low quiescent luminosity of X1832-330.

  12. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Chia - Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of approx. 8 R(sub G), which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L(sub Edd) approx. 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  13. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ˜8 R G, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L Edd ˜ 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  14. ON THE FORMATION OF THE PECULIAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J17480-2446 IN TERZAN 5

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Long; Li Xiangdong

    2013-07-20

    IGR J17480-2446 is an accreting X-ray pulsar in a low-mass X-ray binary harbored in the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5. Compared with other accreting millisecond pulsars, IGR J17480-2446 is peculiar for its low spin frequency (11 Hz), which suggests that it might be a mildly recycled neutron star at the very early phase of mass transfer. However, this model seems to be in contrast with the low field strength deduced from the kilo-Hertz quasi-periodic oscillations observed in IGR J17480-2446. Here, we suggest an alternative interpretation, assuming that the current binary system was formed during an exchange encounter either between a binary (which contains a recycled neutron star) and the current donor, or between a binary and an isolated, recycled neutron star. In the resulting binary, the spin axis of the neutron star could be parallel or anti-parallel with the orbital axis. In the latter case, the abnormally low frequency of IGR J17480-2446 may result from the spin-down to spin-up evolution of the neutron star. We also briefly discuss the possible observational implications of the pulsar in this scenario.

  15. A NuSTAR Observation of the Reflection Spectrum of the Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1728-34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleator, Clio C.; Tomsick, John A.; King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Chenevez, Jerome; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on a simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34. We identified and removed four Type I X-ray bursts during the observation in order to study the persistent emission. The continuum spectrum is hard and described well by a blackbody with kT=1.5 keV and a cutoff power law with Lambda = 1.5, and a cutoff temperature of 25 keV. Residuals between 6 and 8 keV provide strong evidence of a broad Fe K(alpha) line. By modeling the spectrum with a relativistically blurred reflection model, we find an upper limit for the inner disk radius of R(sub in) < or = 2R(sub ISCO). Consequently, we find that R(sub NS) < or = 23 km, assuming M = 1.4 Stellar Mass and a = 0.15. We also find an upper limit on the magnetic field of B < or =2 x 10(exp 8) G.

  16. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Intrinsic Lyα Profile Reconstructions and UV, X-ray, and Optical Correlations of Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.

    2016-01-01

    UV stellar radiation can significantly impact planetary atmospheres through heating and photochemistry, even regulating production of potential biomarkers. Cool stars emit the majority of their UV radiation in the form of emission lines, and the incident UV radiation on close-in habitable-zone planets is significant. Lyα (1215.67 Å) dominates the 912 - 3200 Å spectrum of cool stars, but strong absorption from the interstellar medium (ISM) makes direct observations of the intrinsic Lyα emission of even nearby stars challenging. The MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems) has completed observations of 7 M and 4 K stars hosting exoplanets (d < 22 pc) with simultaneous X-ray and ground-based optical spectroscopy for many of the targets. We have reconstructed the intrinsic Lyα profiles using an MCMC technique and used the results to estimate the extreme ultraviolet (100 - 911 Å) spectrum. We also present empirical relations between chromospheric UV and optical lines, e.g., Lyα, Mg II, Ca II H & K, and Hα, for use when direct UV observations of low-mass exoplanet host stars are not possible. The spectra presented here will be made publicly available through MAST to support exoplanet atmosphere modeling.

  17. The Stellar Mass-Halo Mass Relation for Low-mass X-Ray Groups At 0.5< z< 1 in the CDFS With CSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Shannon G.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Mulchaey, John S.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2015-02-01

    Since z˜ 1, the stellar mass density locked in low-mass groups and clusters has grown by a factor of ˜8. Here, we make the first statistical measurements of the stellar mass content of low-mass X-ray groups at 0.5\\lt z\\lt 1, enabling the calibration of stellar-to-halo mass scales for wide-field optical and infrared surveys. Groups are selected from combined Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations in the Chandra Deep Field South. These ultra-deep observations allow us to identify bona fide low-mass groups at high redshift and enable measurements of their total halo masses. We compute aggregate stellar masses for these halos using galaxies from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) spectroscopic redshift survey. Stars comprise ˜3%-4% of the total mass of group halos with masses {{10}12.8}\\lt {{M}200}/{{M}⊙ }\\lt {{10}13.5} (about the mass of Fornax and one-fiftieth the mass of Virgo). Complementing our sample with higher mass halos at these redshifts, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass ratio decreases toward higher halo masses, consistent with other work in the local and high redshift universe. The observed scatter about the stellar-halo mass relation is σ ˜ 0.25 dex, which is relatively small and suggests that total group stellar mass can serve as a rough proxy for halo mass. We find no evidence for any significant evolution in the stellar-halo mass relation since z≲ 1. Quantifying the stellar content in groups since this epoch is critical given that hierarchical assembly leads to such halos growing in number density and hosting increasing shares of quiescent galaxies. This Letter includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. This research is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. Classical novae and type I X-ray bursts: Challenges for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, A. José, J. Sala, G.

    2014-04-15

    Classical nova explosions and type I X-ray bursts are the most frequent types of thermonuclear stellar explosions in the Galaxy. Both phenomena arise from thermonuclear ignition in the envelopes of accreting compact objects in close binary star systems. Detailed observations of these events have stimulated numerous studies in theoretical astrophysics and experimental nuclear physics. We discuss observational features of these phenomena and theoretical efforts to better understand the energy production and nucleosynthesis in these explosions. We also examine and summarize studies directed at identifying nuclear physics quantities with uncertainties that significantly affect model predictions.

  19. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-08-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  20. Spectral-timing Analysis of the Lower kHz QPO in the Low-mass X-Ray Binary Aquila X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Jon S.; Cackett, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ∼30 μs between the 3.0–8.0 keV and 8.0–20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4-σ confidence, which may raise questions about the role of reverberation in the production of lags.

  1. A New Correlation with Lower Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillation Frequency in the Ensemble of Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkut, M. Hakan; Duran, Şİvan; Çatmabacak, Önder; Çatmabacak, Onur

    2016-11-01

    We study the dependence of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) frequency on accretion-related parameters in the ensemble of neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries. Based on the mass accretion rate, \\dot{M}, and the magnetic field strength, B, on the surface of the neutron star, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and \\dot{M}/{B}2. The correlation holds in the current ensemble of Z and atoll sources and therefore can explain the lack of correlation between the kHz QPO frequency and X-ray luminosity in the same ensemble. The average run of lower kHz QPO frequencies throughout the correlation can be described by a power-law fit to source data. The simple power law, however, cannot describe the frequency distribution in an individual source. The model function fit to frequency data, on the other hand, can account for the observed distribution of lower kHz QPO frequencies in the case of individual sources as well as the ensemble of sources. The model function depends on the basic length scales, such as the magnetospheric radius and the radial width of the boundary region, both of which are expected to vary with \\dot{M} to determine the QPO frequencies. In addition to modifying the length scales, and hence the QPO frequencies, the variation in \\dot{M}, being sufficiently large, may also lead to distinct accretion regimes, which would be characterized by Z and atoll phases.

  2. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. III. Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries and Globular Clusters in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Mei, Simona; Merritt, David; Milosavljević, Miloš; Peng, Eric W.; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2004-09-01

    The ACIS instrument on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory has been used to carry out the first systematic study of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in M87, the giant elliptical galaxy near the dynamical center of the Virgo Cluster. These images-with a total exposure time of 154 ks-are the deepest X-ray observations yet obtained of M87. We identify 174 X-ray point sources, of which ~150 are likely LMXBs. This LMXB catalog is combined with deep F475W and F850LP images taken with ACS on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (as part of the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey) to examine the connection between LMXBs and globular clusters in M87. Of the 1688 globular clusters in our catalog, fX=3.6%+/-0.5% contain an LMXB. Dividing the globular cluster sample by metallicity, we find that the metal-rich clusters are 3+/-1 times more likely to harbor an LMXB than their metal-poor counterparts. In agreement with previous findings for other galaxies based on smaller LMXB samples, we find the efficiency of LMXB formation to scale with both cluster metallicity Z and luminosity, in the sense that brighter, more metal-rich clusters are more likely to contain an LMXB. For the first time, however, we are able to demonstrate that the probability pX that a given cluster will contain an LMXB depends sensitively on the dynamical properties of the host cluster. Specifically, we use the HST images to measure the half-light radius, concentration index, and central density ρ0 for each globular and define a parameter Γ, which is related to the tidal capture and binary-neutron star exchange rate. Our preferred form for pX is then pX~Γρ-0.42+/-0.110(Z/Zsolar)0.33+/-0.1. We argue that if the form of pX is determined by dynamical processes, then the observed metallicity dependence is a consequence of an increased number of neutron stars per unit mass in metal-rich globular clusters. Finally, we present a critical examination of the LMXB luminosity function in M87 and reexamine the published LMXB

  3. Evolutionary sequences of very hot, low-mass, accreting white dwarfs with application to symbiotic variables and ultrasoft/supersoft low-luminosity x-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sion, Edward M.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first detailed model results of quasi-static evolutionary sequences of very hot low-mass white dwarfs accreting hydrogen-rich material at rates between 1 x 10(exp -7) and 1 x 10(exp -9) solar mass/yr. Most of the sequences were generated from starting models whose core thermal structures were not thermally relaxed in the thermal pulse cycle-averaged sense of an asymptotic giant branch stellar core. Hence, the evolution at constant accretion rate was not invariably characterized by series of identical shell flashes. Sequences exhibiting stable steady state nuclear burning at the accretion supply rate as well as sequences exhibiting recurrent thermonuclear shell flashes are presented and discussed. In some cases, the white dwarf accretors remain small (less than 10(exp 11) cm) and very hot even during the shell flash episode. They then experience continued but reduced hydrogen shell burning during the longer quiescent intervals while their surface temperatures increase both because of compressional heating and envelope structure readjustment in response to accretion over thousands of years. Both accretion and continued hydrogen burning power these models with luminosities of a few times 10(exp 37) ergs/s. We suggest that the physical properties of these model sequences are of considerable relevance to the observed outburst and quiescent behavior of those symbiotic variables and symbiotic novae containing low-mass white dwarfs. We also suggest that our models are relevant to the observational characteristics of the growing class of low-luminosity, supersoft/ultrasoft X-ray sources in globular clusters, and the Magellanic Clouds.

  4. Evolutionary sequences of very hot, low-mass, accreting white dwarfs with application to symbiotic variables and ultrasoft/supersoft low-luminosity x-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sion, Edward M.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first detailed model results of quasi-static evolutionary sequences of very hot low-mass white dwarfs accreting hydrogen-rich material at rates between 1 x 10(exp -7) and 1 x 10(exp -9) solar mass/yr. Most of the sequences were generated from starting models whose core thermal structures were not thermally relaxed in the thermal pulse cycle-averaged sense of an asymptotic giant branch stellar core. Hence, the evolution at constant accretion rate was not invariably characterized by series of identical shell flashes. Sequences exhibiting stable steady state nuclear burning at the accretion supply rate as well as sequences exhibiting recurrent thermonuclear shell flashes are presented and discussed. In some cases, the white dwarf accretors remain small (less than 10(exp 11) cm) and very hot even during the shell flash episode. They then experience continued but reduced hydrogen shell burning during the longer quiescent intervals while their surface temperatures increase both because of compressional heating and envelope structure readjustment in response to accretion over thousands of years. Both accretion and continued hydrogen burning power these models with luminosities of a few times 10(exp 37) ergs/s. We suggest that the physical properties of these model sequences are of considerable relevance to the observed outburst and quiescent behavior of those symbiotic variables and symbiotic novae containing low-mass white dwarfs. We also suggest that our models are relevant to the observational characteristics of the growing class of low-luminosity, supersoft/ultrasoft X-ray sources in globular clusters, and the Magellanic Clouds.

  5. The X-ray soft excess in classical T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, M.; Telleschi, A.

    2007-11-01

    Aims:We study an anomaly in the X-ray flux (or luminosity) ratio between the O vii λλ21.6-22.1 triplet and the O viii Lyα line seen in classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). This ratio is unusually high when compared with ratios for main-sequence and non-accreting T Tauri stars (Telleschi et al. 2007c, A&A, 468, 443). We compare these samples to identify the source of the excess. A sample of recently discovered X-ray stars with a soft component attributed to jet emission is also considered. Methods: We discuss data obtained from the XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud (XEST) project, complemented by data from the published literature. We also present data from the CTTS RU Lup. Results: All CTTS in the sample show an anomalous O vii/O viii flux ratio when compared with WTTS or MS stars. The anomaly is due to an excess of cool, O vii emitting material rather than a deficiency of hotter plasma. The excess plasma must therefore have temperatures of ⪉2 MK. This soft excess does not correlate with UV excesses of CTTS, but seems to be related to the stellar X-ray luminosity. The spectra of the jet-driving TTS do not fit into this context. Conclusions: The soft excess depends both on the presence of accretion streams in CTTS and on magnetic activity. The gas may be shock-heated near the surface, although it may also be heated in the magnetospheric accretion funnels. The soft component of the jet-driving sources is unlikely to be due to the same process.

  6. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624: Evidence for Neon-rich Degenerate Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juett, Adrienne M.; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2003-12-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy of the neutron star/low-mass X-ray binaries 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624 with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board XMM-Newton. Previous low-resolution spectra of both sources showed a broad, linelike feature at 0.7 keV that was originally attributed to unresolved line emission. We recently showed that this feature could also be due to excess neutral Ne absorption, and this is confirmed by the new high-resolution Chandra and XMM spectra. The Chandra spectra are each well fitted by an absorbed-power-law+blackbody model with a modified Ne/O number ratio of 0.52+/-0.12 for 2S 0918-549 and 1.5+/-0.3 for 4U 1543-624, compared to the interstellar medium value of 0.18. The XMM spectrum of 2S 0918-549 is best fitted by an absorbed-power-law model with a Ne/O number ratio of 0.46+/-0.03, consistent with the Chandra result. On the other hand, the XMM spectrum of 4U 1543-624 is softer and less luminous than the Chandra spectrum and has a best-fit Ne/O number ratio of 0.54+/-0.03. The difference between the measured abundances and the expected interstellar ratio, as well as the variation of the column densities of O and Ne in 4U 1543-624, supports the suggestion that there is absorption local to these binaries. We propose that the variations in the O and Ne column densities of 4U 1543-624 are caused by changes in the ionization structure of the local absorbing material. It is important to understand the effect of ionization on the measured absorption columns before the abundance of the local material can be determined. This work supports our earlier suggestion that 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624 are ultracompact binaries with Ne-rich companions.

  7. THE MASS AND RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN THE BULGE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Oezel, Feryal; Guever, Tolga; Gould, Andrew E-mail: tguver@email.arizona.edu

    2012-03-20

    Measurements of neutron star masses and radii are instrumental in determining the equation of state of their interiors, understanding the dividing line between neutron stars and black holes, and obtaining accurate statistics of source populations in the Galaxy. We report here on the measurement of the mass and radius of the neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary KS 1731-260. The analysis of the spectroscopic data on multiple thermonuclear bursts yields well-constrained values for the apparent angular area and the Eddington flux of the source, both of which depend in a distinct way on the mass and radius of the neutron star. The binary KS 1731-260 is in the direction of the Galactic bulge, allowing a distance estimate based on the density of stars in that direction. Making use of the Han and Gould model, we determine the probability distribution over the distance to the source, which is approximately flat between 7 and 9 kpc. Combining these measurements, we place a strong upper bound on the radius of the neutron star, R {<=} 12.5 km, while confining its mass to M {<=} 2.1 M{sub Sun }.

  8. ON THE GEOMETRIC NATURE OF LOW-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN NEUTRON-STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Fridriksson, Joel K.

    2015-10-10

    We report on a detailed analysis of the so-called ∼1 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the eclipsing and dipping neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748–676. This type of QPO has previously been shown to have a geometric origin. Our study focuses on the evolution of the QPO as the source moves through the color–color diagram in which it traces out an atoll-source-like track. The QPO frequency increases from ∼0.4 Hz in the hard state to ∼25 Hz as the source approaches the soft state. Combining power spectra based on QPO frequency reveals additional features that strongly resemble those seen in non-dipping/eclipsing atoll sources. We show that the low-frequency QPOs in atoll sources and the ∼1 Hz QPO in EXO 0748–676 follow similar relations with respect to the noise components in their power spectra. We conclude that the frequencies of both types of QPOs are likely set by (the same) precession of a misaligned inner accretion disk. For high-inclination systems like EXO 0748–676 this results in modulations of the neutron-star emission due to obscuration or scattering, while for lower-inclination systems the modulations likely arise from relativistic Doppler-boosting and light-bending effects.

  9. A 2.15 hr ORBITAL PERIOD FOR THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY XB 1832-330 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6652

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M. C.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Elshamouty, K. G.; Edmonds, P. D. E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2012-03-10

    We present a candidate orbital period for the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XB 1832-330 in the globular cluster NGC 6652 using a 6.5 hr Gemini South observation of the optical counterpart of the system. Light curves in g' and r' for two LMXBs in the cluster, sources A and B in previous literature, were extracted and analyzed for periodicity using the ISIS image subtraction package. A clear sinusoidal modulation is evident in both of A's curves, of amplitude {approx}0.11 mag in g' and {approx}0.065 mag in r', while B's curves exhibit rapid flickering, of amplitude {approx}1 mag in g' and {approx}0.5 mag in r'. A Lomb-Scargle test revealed a 2.15 hr periodic variation in the magnitude of A with a false alarm probability less than 10{sup -11}, and no significant periodicity in the light curve for B. Though it is possible that saturated stars in the vicinity of our sources partially contaminated our signal, the identification of A's binary period is nonetheless robust.

  10. NuSTAR observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GX 349+2 throughout its Z-track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughenour, Benjamin; Cackett, Edward; Miller, Jon M.

    2017-08-01

    Although the brightest class of neutron star low mass X-ray binaries, known as Z-sources, have been well studied, their behavior is not fully understood. In particular, what causes these sources to trace out the characteristic Z-shaped pattern on color-color or hardness-intensity diagrams is not well known. By studying the physical properties of the different spectral states of these sources, we may better understand such variability. With that goal in mind, we present a recent NuSTAR observation of the Z-source GX 349+2, which spans approximately 2 days, and covers all its spectral states. By creating a hardness-intensity diagram we were able to extract four spectra and trace the change in spectral parameters throughout the Z track. GX 349+2 shows a strong, broad Fe Kα line in all states. Through modeling of the reflection spectrum and Fe Kα line we find that in most states the inner disk radius is consistent with remaining unchanged, and being close to the neutron star. However, during the brightest flaring branch the inner disk radius from reflection is not well constrained.

  11. A comparison of classical histology to anatomy revealed by hard x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Stock, Stuart; Robinson, Alan; Byskosh, Orest; Zheng, Jing; Soriano, Carmen; Xiao, Xianghui; Whitlon, Donna

    2016-10-01

    Many diseases trigger morphological changes in affected tissue. Today, classical histology is still the "gold standard" used to study and describe those changes. Classical histology, however, is time consuming and requires chemical tissue manipulations that can result in significant tissue distortions. It is sometimes difficult to separate tissue-processing artifacts from changes caused by the disease process. We show that synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can be used to examine non-embedded, hydrated tissue at a resolution comparable to that obtained with classical histology. The data analysis from stacks of reconstructed micro-CT images is more flexible and faster than when using the classical, physically embedded sections that are by necessity fixed in a particular orientation. We show that in a three-dimensional (3D) structure with meticulous structural details such as the cochlea and the kidney, micro-CT is more flexible, faster and more convenient for morphological studies and disease diagnoses.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIUS OF NEUTRON STARS WITH HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE QUIESCENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, Robert E.; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie A. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-07-20

    This paper presents the measurement of the neutron star (NS) radius using the thermal spectra from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) inside globular clusters (GCs). Recent observations of NSs have presented evidence that cold ultra dense matter-present in the core of NSs-is best described by ''normal matter'' equations of state (EoSs). Such EoSs predict that the radii of NSs, R{sub NS}, are quasi-constant (within measurement errors, of {approx}10%) for astrophysically relevant masses (M{sub NS}>0.5 M{sub Sun }). The present work adopts this theoretical prediction as an assumption, and uses it to constrain a single R{sub NS} value from five qLMXB targets with available high signal-to-noise X-ray spectroscopic data. Employing a Markov chain Monte-Carlo approach, we produce the marginalized posterior distribution for R{sub NS}, constrained to be the same value for all five NSs in the sample. An effort was made to include all quantifiable sources of uncertainty into the uncertainty of the quoted radius measurement. These include the uncertainties in the distances to the GCs, the uncertainties due to the Galactic absorption in the direction of the GCs, and the possibility of a hard power-law spectral component for count excesses at high photon energy, which are observed in some qLMXBs in the Galactic plane. Using conservative assumptions, we found that the radius, common to the five qLMXBs and constant for a wide range of masses, lies in the low range of possible NS radii, R{sub NS}=9.1{sup +1.3}{sub -1.5} km (90%-confidence). Such a value is consistent with low-R{sub NS} equations of state. We compare this result with previous radius measurements of NSs from various analyses of different types of systems. In addition, we compare the spectral analyses of individual qLMXBs to previous works.

  13. The nature of the island and banana states in atoll sources and a unified model for low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. J.; Gibiec, A.; Bałucińska-Church, M.

    2014-03-01

    We propose an explanation of the island and banana states and the relation between atoll and Z-track sources, constituting a unified model for low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). We find a dramatic transition at a luminosity of 1-2 × 1037 erg s-1 above which the high-energy cut-off ECO of the Comptonized emission in all sources is low at a few keV. There is thermal equilibrium between the neutron star at ˜2 keV and the Comptonizing accretion disc corona (ADC) causing the low ECO in the banana state of atolls and all states of the Z-track sources. Below this luminosity, ECO increases towards 100 keV causing the hardness of the island state. Thermal equilibrium is lost, the ADC becoming much hotter than the neutron star via an additional coronal heating mechanism. This suggests a unified model of LMXB: the banana state is a basic state with the mass accretion rate dot{M} increasing, corresponding to the normal branch of Z-track sources. The island state has high ADC temperature, this state not existing in the Z-sources with luminosities much greater than the critical value. The Z-track sources have an additional flaring branch consistent with unstable nuclear burning on the neutron star at high dot{M}. This burning regime does not exist at low dot{M} so this branch is not seen in atolls (except GX atolls). The horizontal branch in Z-track sources has a strong increase in radiation pressure disrupting the inner disc and launching relativistic jets.

  14. A classical nova, V2487 Oph 1998, seen in x-rays before and after its explosion.

    PubMed

    Hernanz, Margarita; Sala, Glòria

    2002-10-11

    Classical nova explosions are very energetic and frequent phenomena caused by explosive hydrogen burning on top of an accreting white dwarf. Observations of the recent nova V2487 Oph 1998 by the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite (XMM-Newton) provide evidence that accretion (probably on a magnetic white dwarf) was reestablished as early as 2.7 years after the explosion. In addition, positional correlation with a source previously discovered by the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT) in 1990 suggests that the site of a nova explosion had been seen in x-rays before the outburst.

  15. Central Engine and Host Galaxy of RXJ 1301.9+2747: A Multiwavelength View of a Low-mass Black Hole Active Galactic Nuclei with Ultra-soft X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, X. W.; Wang, T. G.; Jiang, N.; Wang, J. X.; Sun, L. M.; Zhou, H. Y.

    2017-03-01

    RXJ 1301.9+2747 is an optically identified very-low-mass AGN candidate with {M}{BH}∼ 1× {10}6 {M}ȯ , which shows extremely soft X-ray emission and unusual X-ray variability in the form of short-lived flares. We present an analysis of multiwavelength observations of RXJ 1301.9+2747 in order to study the properties of the active nucleus and its host galaxy. The UV-to-X-ray spectrum in the quiescent state can be well and self-consistently described by a thermal and a Comptonized emission from the accretion disk, with the black body dominating ∼70% of the X-rays in the 0.2–2 keV. The same model can describe the X-ray spectrum in the flare state, but the Comptonized component becomes dominant (∼80%). The best fit implies an Eddington ratio of ∼0.14 and a black-hole mass of (1.7-2.8)× {10}6 M ⊙, in agreement with the estimation from the optical data within errors. However, the best-fitting model under predicts the optical flux for the HST point source by a factor of ∼2. The excess of nuclear optical emission could be attributed to a nuclear stellar cluster, which is frequently seen in low-mass AGNs. The X-ray to optical spectral slope ({α }{ox}) is lower than in most other active galaxies, which may be attributed to intrinsically X-ray weakness due to very little hot and optically thin coronal emission. We performed a pilot search for weak or hidden broad emission lines using optical spectropolarimetry observations, but no polarized broad lines are detected. The host galaxy appears to be a disk galaxy with a boxy pseudobulge or nuclear bar accounting for ∼15% of the total starlight, which is consistent with the general characteristics of the host of low-mass AGNs.

  16. THE MASS AND THE RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SAX J1748.9-2021

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal

    2013-03-01

    We use time-resolved spectroscopy of thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed from SAX J1748.9-2021 to infer the mass and the radius of the neutron star in the binary. Four X-ray bursts observed from the source with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer enable us to measure the angular size and the Eddington limit on the neutron star surface. Combined with a distance measurement to the globular cluster NGC 6440, in which SAX J1748.9-2021 resides, we obtain two solutions for the neutron star radius and mass, R = 8.18 {+-} 1.62 km and M = 1.78 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} or R = 10.93 {+-} 2.09 km and M = 1.33 {+-} 0.33 M{sub Sun }.

  17. Search for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and accretion-related parameters in the ensemble of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çatmabacak, Önder; Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of neutron star sources in the ensemble of low-mass X-ray binaries shows no evidence for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies and X-ray luminosity. Sources differing by orders of magnitude in luminosity can exhibit similar range of QPO frequencies. We study the possibility for the existence of a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and accretion related parameters. The parameters such as the mass accretion rate and the size of the boundary region in the innermost disk are expected to be related to X-ray luminosity. Using the up-to-date data of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, we search for a possible correlation between lower kHz QPO frequencies and mass accretion rate through the mass and radius values predicted by different equations of state for the neutron star. The range of mass accretion rate for each source can be estimated if the accretion luminosity is assumed to be represented well by the X-ray luminosity of the source. Although we find no correlation between mass accretion rate and QPO frequencies, the source distribution seems to be in accordance with a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and the parameter combining the neutron star magnetic field and the mas accretion rate. The model function we employ to descibe the correlation is able to account for the scattering of individual sources around a simple power law. The correlation argues disk-magnetosphere interaction as the origin of these millisecond oscillations.

  18. Infrared observations of low-mass X-ray binaries. II - Discovery of a variable infrared counterpart to GX13 + 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, P. A.; Naylor, T.

    1992-03-01

    Using the IRCAM on UKIRT, it has been discovered that the bright (K = 11 mag) infrared source (NCL 101) at the precise radio position of the Galactic Bulge X-ray source, GX13 + 1, is variable, making it the first of the bright central sources to be so identified. The variability (about 1 mag) is on a time-scale of days or longer, the source remaining constant to within 0.05 mag (in K) during a single 5-hr monitoring run. If this variation is an orbital modulation, then the long period implies that the distinction between Z and Atoll sources is more complex than simply the orbital period. A deep INT Prime Focus image of the field reveals no visible counterpart to this object, with a limit of R greater than 22, indicating heavy obscuration that is consistent with the observed X-ray absorption.

  19. X-rays from intermediate mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    I will review the X-ray properties of intermediate mass stars and discuss possible X-ray generating mechanisms. Main-sequence stars of spectral type mid B to mid A neither drive sufficiently strong winds to produce shock generated X-rays, nor possess an outer convection zone to generate dynamo driven magnetic activity and coronae. Consequently they should be virtually X-ray dark and occasionally detected X-ray emission was usually attributed to undetected low-mass companions. However, in magnetic intermediate mass stars, the Ap/Bp stars, a different X-ray production mechanism may operate. It is termed the magnetically channeled wind-shock model, where the stellar wind from both hemispheres is channelled towards the equatorial plane, collides and forms a rigidly rotating disk around the star. The strong shocks of the nearly head-on wind collision as well as the existence of magnetically confined plasma in a dynamic circumstellar disk can lead to diverse X-ray phenomena. In this sense Ap/Bp stars bridge the 'classical' X-ray regimes of cool and hot stars.

  20. Discovery of the Near-infrared Counterpart to the Luminous Neutron-star Low-mass X-Ray Binary GX 3+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this Ks = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (LX ≈ 1036-1037 erg s-1) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. Discovery of the near-infrared counterpart to the luminous neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary GX 3+1

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, Maureen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this K{sub s} = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (L{sub X} ≈ 10{sup 36}-10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux.

  2. A test of the nature of the Fe K Line in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Fabian, Andrew C.; D'Ai, Antonino; Parker, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Burderi, Luciano; Salvo, Tiziana; Egron, Elise; Homan, Jeroen; Iaria, Rosario; Lin, Dacheng; Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-04-01

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems, and in neutron star systems as well. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk, and broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star LMXBs has been under debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra HETGS observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the "continuous clocking" mode and thus free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  3. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Argiroffi, C.; Miceli, M.; Reale, F.; Peres, G.; Matsakos, T.; Stehle, H. C.; Ibgui, L.

    2014-01-01

    Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption of the emission due to the thick surrounding medium. Here we consider a 2D MHD model describing an accretion stream propagating through the atmosphere of a CTTS and impacting onto its chromosphere. The model includes all the relevant physics, namely the gravity, the thermal conduction, and the radiative cooling, and a realistic description of the unperturbed stellar atmosphere (from the chromosphere to the corona). From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission emerging from the hot slab produced by the accretion shock, exploring different configurations and strengths of the stellar magnetic field. The synthesis includes the local absorption by the thick surrounding medium and the Doppler shift of lines due to the component of plasma velocity along the line-of-sight. We explore the effects of absorption on the emerging X-ray spectrum, considering different inclinations of the accretion stream with respect to the observer. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  4. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Šuhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-04-01

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ˜6 deg2 of the XMM-Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y500 signal that is (17 ± 9) per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on these SZE mass-observable relations.

  5. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.;  uhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-02-25

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on

  6. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J. J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.

    2015-04-11

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from similar to 6 deg(2) of the XMM-Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (>= 10(42) erg s(-1)) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y-500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8 sigma with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8 sigma significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y-500 signal that is (17 +/- 9) per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on these SZE mass

  7. The properties of cross-correlation and spectra of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Ya-Juan; Yuan, Hai-Long; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2014-03-01

    With RXTE data, we analyzed the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the cross-correlation has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.

  8. The Properties of Cross-correlation and Spectra of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu; Yuan, Hai-Long; Wang, Ya-Nan; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Li, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-03-01

    With RXTE data, we analyzed the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the cross-correlation has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.

  9. BeppoSAX and RXTE Spectral Study of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1705-44: Spectral Hardening during the Banana Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shrader, Chris; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the X-ray spectra of the atoll 4U 1705-44 when the source undergoes the island-banana state transition. We use the RXTE and BeppoSAX observations for this analysis. We demonstrate that the broadband energy spectral distributions for all evolutinary states can be fitted by a model consisting of two Comptonized components. One arises from the seed photons coming from a neutron star (NS) atmosphere at a temperature {{kT}}{{s}1}≲ 1.5 keV (herein Comptb1), and a second results from the seed photons of {T}{{s}2} ˜ 1.1-1.3 keV coming from the disk (herein Comptb2). We found that we needed to add a low-temperature blackbody and an iron-line (Gaussian) component to the model in order to obtain high-quality fits. The data analysis using this model indicates that the power-law photon index {{{Γ }}}1 of our model is always about 2, independently of the spectral state. Another parameter, {{{Γ }}}2, demonstrates a two-phase behavior depending on the spectral state. {{{Γ }}}2 is quasi-constant at {{{Γ }}}2˜ 2 when the electron temperature {{kT}}{{e}}(2)\\lt 80 keV, and {{{Γ }}}2 is less than 2, in the range of 1.3\\lt {{{Γ }}}2\\lt 2, when {{kT}}{{e}}(2)\\gt 80 keV. This phase is similar to that previously found in the Z-source Sco X-1. We interpret the decreasing index phase using a model in which a super-Eddington radiation pressure from the NS causes an expansion of the Compton cloud similar to that found previously in Sco X-1 during the Flaring branch.

  10. UV And X-Ray Emission from Impacts of Fragmented Accretion Streams on Classical T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Salvatore; Orlando, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni; Argiroffi, Costanza; Reale, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    According to the magnetoshperic accretion scenario, during their evo- lution, Classical T Tauri stars accrete material from their circumstellar disk. The accretion process is regulated by the stellar magnetic eld and produces hot and dense post-shocks on the stellar surface as a result of impacts of the downfalling material. The impact regions are expected to strongly radiate in UV and X-rays. Several lines of evidence support the magnetospheric accretion scenario, especially in optical and infrared bands. However several points still remain unclear as, for instance,where the complex-pro le UV lines originate, or whether and how UV and X-ray emission is produced in the same shock region. The analysis of a large solar eruption has shown that EUV excesses might be e ectively produced by the impact of dense fragments onto the stellar surface. Since a steady accretion stream does not reprouce observations, in this work we investi- gate the e ects of a fragmented accretion stream on the uxes and pro les of C IV and O VIII emission lines. To this end we model the impact of a fragmented accretion stream onto the chromosphere of a CTTS with 2D axysimmetric magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. Our model takes into account of the gravity, the stellar magnetic eld, the thermal conduction and the radiative cooling from an optically thin plasma. From the model results, we synthesize the UV and X-ray emission including the e ect of Doppler shift along the line of sight. We nd that a fragmented accretion stream produces complex pro les of UV emission lines which consists of multiple components with di erent Doppler shifts. Our model predicts line pro les that are consistent with those observed and explain their origin as due to the stream fragmentation.

  11. Impacts of fragmented accretion streams onto classical T Tauri stars: UV and X-ray emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, S.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The accretion process in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) can be studied through the analysis of some UV and X-ray emission lines which trace hot gas flows and act as diagnostics of the post-shock downfalling plasma. In the UV-band, where higher spectral resolution is available, these lines are characterized by rather complex profiles whose origin is still not clear. Aims: We investigate the origin of UV and X-ray emission at impact regions of density structured (fragmented) accretion streams. We study if and how the stream fragmentation and the resulting structure of the post-shock region determine the observed profiles of UV and X-ray emission lines. Methods: We modeled the impact of an accretion stream consisting of a series of dense blobs onto the chromosphere of a CTTS through two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We explored different levels of stream fragmentation and accretion rates. From the model results, we synthesize C IV (1550 Å) and O VIII (18.97 Å) line profiles. Results: The impacts of accreting blobs onto the stellar chromosphere produce reverse shocks propagating through the blobs and shocked upflows. These upflows, in turn, hit and shock the subsequent downfalling fragments. As a result, several plasma components differing for the downfalling velocity, density, and temperature are present altoghether. The profiles of C IV doublet are characterized by two main components: one narrow and redshifted to speed ≈ 50 km s-1 and the other broader and consisting of subcomponents with redshift to speed in the range 200-400 km s-1. The profiles of O VIII lines appear more symmetric than C IV and are redshifted to speed ≈ 150 km s-1. Conclusions: Our model predicts profiles of C IV line remarkably similar to those observed and explains their origin in a natural way as due to stream fragmentation. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Quantum-classical calculations of X-ray photoelectron spectra of polymers-Polymethyl methacrylate revisited.

    PubMed

    Löytynoja, T; Harczuk, I; Jänkälä, K; Vahtras, O; Ågren, H

    2017-03-28

    In this work, we apply quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach to predict core-electron binding energies and chemical shifts of polymers, obtainable via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), using polymethyl methacrylate as a demonstration example. The results indicate that standard parametrizations of the quantum part (basis sets, level of correlation) and the molecular mechanics parts (decomposed charges, polarizabilities, and capping technique) are sufficient for the QM/MM model to be predictive for XPS of polymers. It is found that the polymer environment produces contributions to the XPS binding energies that are close to monotonous with the number of monomer units, totally amounting to approximately an eV decrease in binding energies. In most of the cases, the order of the shifts is maintained, and even the relative size of the differential shifts is largely preserved. The coupling of the internal core-hole relaxation to the polymer environment is found to be weak in each case, amounting only to one or two tenths of an eV. The main polymeric effect is actually well estimated already at the frozen orbital level of theory, which in turn implies a substantial computational simplification. These conclusions are best represented by the cases where the ionized monomer and its immediate surrounding are treated quantum mechanically. If the QM region includes only a single monomer, a couple of anomalies are spotted, which are referred to the QM/MM interface itself and to the neglect of a possible charge transfer.

  13. Signatures of DNA flexibility, interactions and sequence-related structural variations in classical X-ray diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Kornyshev, A A; Lee, D J; Wynveen, A; Leikin, S

    2011-09-01

    The theory of X-ray diffraction from ideal, rigid helices allowed Watson and Crick to unravel the DNA structure, thereby elucidating functions encoded in it. Yet, as we know now, the DNA double helix is neither ideal nor rigid. Its structure varies with the base pair sequence. Its flexibility leads to thermal fluctuations and allows molecules to adapt their structure to optimize their intermolecular interactions. In addition to the double helix symmetry revealed by Watson and Crick, classical X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA contain information about the flexibility, interactions and sequence-related variations encoded within the helical structure. To extract this information, we have developed a new diffraction theory that accounts for these effects. We show how double helix non-ideality and fluctuations broaden the diffraction peaks. Meridional intensity profiles of the peaks at the first three helical layer lines reveal information about structural adaptation and intermolecular interactions. The meridional width of the fifth layer line peaks is inversely proportional to the helical coherence length that characterizes sequence-related and thermal variations in the double helix structure. Analysis of measured fiber diffraction patterns based on this theory yields important parameters that control DNA structure, packing and function.

  14. Signatures of DNA flexibility, interactions and sequence-related structural variations in classical X-ray diffraction patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Lee, D. J.; Wynveen, A.; Leikin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of X-ray diffraction from ideal, rigid helices allowed Watson and Crick to unravel the DNA structure, thereby elucidating functions encoded in it. Yet, as we know now, the DNA double helix is neither ideal nor rigid. Its structure varies with the base pair sequence. Its flexibility leads to thermal fluctuations and allows molecules to adapt their structure to optimize their intermolecular interactions. In addition to the double helix symmetry revealed by Watson and Crick, classical X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA contain information about the flexibility, interactions and sequence-related variations encoded within the helical structure. To extract this information, we have developed a new diffraction theory that accounts for these effects. We show how double helix non-ideality and fluctuations broaden the diffraction peaks. Meridional intensity profiles of the peaks at the first three helical layer lines reveal information about structural adaptation and intermolecular interactions. The meridional width of the fifth layer line peaks is inversely proportional to the helical coherence length that characterizes sequence-related and thermal variations in the double helix structure. Analysis of measured fiber diffraction patterns based on this theory yields important parameters that control DNA structure, packing and function. PMID:21593127

  15. Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arnab

    I present the experimental studies of phase transitions in three different compounds in this thesis. The first one, SrCu2(BO3)2 is a physical realization of the Shastry-Sutherland model where, using precise lattice measurements, we examined the pressure-dependent phase diagram. We found two separate quantum phase transitions in the compound, the first one being a second order transition from a dimer to an intermediate magnetic state, and the second being a first order monoclinic distortion from the intermediate state to a presumed magnetically ordered state. In the second compound, NiS2, using a combination of transport and x-ray diffraction we proved that neither magnetism nor lattice symmetry, but rather electron-electron correlations, plays an active role in the insulator-metal phase transition in pure NiS2 under high pressure. Following this we make an attempt to delve the critical scaling laws using high pressure transport measurements in a helium dilution refrigerator. We observed a resistivity drop of over five orders and an effective of mass enhancement near the critical region. I detail the technical endeavors adopted for leading us to the critical behavior. The third compound, TbTe3, was believed to show only one charge density wave (CDW). We discovered a second CDW, but at a much lower transition temperature to the first one. Our results pointed to bidirectional ordering in TbTe3, a compound that has been otherwise considered a canonical model for one-dimensional CDW physics. The order parameter for this new CDW appears to deviate from standard mean-field behavior. This is only the second rare-earth telluride for which a q-vector has been determined for a second CDW, and the first for which the temperature dependence of that q-vector was characterized.

  16. Relation between spectral changes and the presence of the lower kHz QPO in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guobao; Méndez, Mariano; Sanna, Andrea; Ribeiro, Evandro M.; Gelfand, Joseph D.

    2017-03-01

    We fitted the 3-180 keV spectrum of all the observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53 taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer using a model that includes a thermal Comptonization component. We found that in the low hard state the power-law index of this component, Γ, gradually increases as the source moves in the colour-colour diagram. When the source undergoes a transition from the hard to the soft state Γ drops abruptly; once the source is in the soft state Γ increases again and then decreases gradually as the source spectrum softens further. The changes in Γ, together with changes of the electron temperature, reflect changes of the optical depth in the corona. The lower kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) in this source appears only in observations during the transition from the hard to the soft state, when the optical depth of the corona is high and changes depends strongly upon the position of the source in the colour-colour diagram. Our results are consistent with a scenario in which the lower kHz QPO reflects a global mode in the system that results from the resonance between the disc and/or the neutron star surface, and the Comptonizing corona.

  17. Studying Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: Revealing the Optical Counterpart in 1747-214 and Measuring the Masses of the Black Holes in 1859+226 and 1009-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Tomsick, John A.

    2003-02-01

    Low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) contain compact, black hole (BH) or neutron star (NS) primaries, and cool, low-mass secondary stars. A limited number of BHs and NSs have accurate mass measurements. It is important to determine the primary mass of the LMXBs to better understand how BH masses influence their outburst behavior, and to better constrain the NS equations of state. To determine the mass of the primary object we need to measure the orbital inclination, i. We propose to determine i for two BH LMXBs, XTE J1859+226 and GRS 1009-45 (=N Vel 93) through modeling of their ellipsoidal variations. Because most LMXBs are not eclipsing, modeling their light curves is currently the only feasible method for determining the inclination. We will model the light curves with WD98. We also propose to identify the optical counterpart to the NS system EXO 1747-214, in order to begin the process of measuring the NS mass. We have successfully used NOAO facilities and this modeling technique to find accurate BH masses in four LMXBs. In order to expand the sample of known BH and NS systems, we request seven nights on the KPNO and CTIO 4m to obtain optical and infrared data on XTE J1859+226, GRS 1009-45, and EXO 1747-214.

  18. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  19. A STUDY OF THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY DIP SOURCES XB 1916 - 053, XB 1323 - 619, X 1624 - 490 AND 4U 1746 - 371 OBSERVED WITH INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Balman, S.

    2009-07-15

    We detect dipping activity/modulations in the light curve of the four low-mass X-ray binaries in the 3-10 keV and 20-40 keV energy ranges. The spectral parameters derived from the fits to the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory data are consistent with hot coronal structures in these systems where we find a range of plasma temperatures 3.0-224.9 keV. The unabsorbed X-ray to soft gamma-ray fluxes between 4 keV and 200 keV are 5.9 x 10{sup -10} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for XB 1916 - 053, 3.3 x 10{sup -10} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for XB 1323 - 619, 21.6 x 10{sup -10} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for X 1624 - 490, and 11.0 x 10{sup -10} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for 4U 1746 - 371. The optical depth to Compton scattering, {tau}, varies in a range 4.4-0.002 consistent with electron densities n {sub e} < 1.4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. In general, we find no significant difference in the dip and non-dip spectra in the ISGRI energy range (above 20 keV) for all the four sources. We only detect absorption differences between dipping and non-dipping intervals for XB 1916 - 053 and X 1624 - 490 in the JEM-X energy range. Fits in the 4-200 keV range including an additional photoionized absorber model for the two sources show that XB 1916 - 053 has the highest ionized absorber among the two.

  20. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in supergiant fast X-ray transient and classical supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-García, A.; Shenar, T.; Torrejón, J. M.; Oskinova, L.; Martínez-Núñez, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Rodes-Roca, J. J.; González-Galán, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Bernabeu, G.; Sander, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are two types of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. Aims: To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyze the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. As a next step, we compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. Methods: We use archival infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations, and analyze them with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. We derive the physical properties of the stars and their stellar winds, accounting for the influence of X-rays on the stellar winds. Results: We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). The distance to the sources have been revised and also agree well with the estimations already available in the literature. In IGR J17544-2619 we are able to narrow the uncertainty to d = 3.0 ± 0.2 kpc. From the stellar radius of the donor and its X-ray behavior, the eccentricity of IGR J17544-2619 is constrained to e< 0.25. The derived chemical abundances point to certain mixing during the lifetime of the donors. An important difference between the stellar winds of the

  1. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE ACCRETION SHOCKS IN CLASSICAL T TAURI STARS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL ABSORPTION IN THE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Peres, G.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Ibgui, L.; Matsakos, T.; Stehle, C.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues, we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthetic spectra, and we directly compare the results with observations. Our model shows that the X-ray fluxes inferred from the emerging spectra are lower than expected because of the complex local absorption by the optically thick material of the chromosphere and of the unperturbed stream. Moreover, our model, including the effects of local absorption, explains in a natural way the apparently puzzling pattern of density versus temperature observed in the X-ray emission from accretion shocks.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Accretion Shocks in Classical T Tauri Stars: The Role of Local Absorption in the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Argiroffi, C.; Miceli, M.; Peres, G.; Matsakos, T.; Stehle, C.; Ibgui, L.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues, we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthetic spectra, and we directly compare the results with observations. Our model shows that the X-ray fluxes inferred from the emerging spectra are lower than expected because of the complex local absorption by the optically thick material of the chromosphere and of the unperturbed stream. Moreover, our model, including the effects of local absorption, explains in a natural way the apparently puzzling pattern of density versus temperature observed in the X-ray emission from accretion shocks.

  3. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Méndez, Mariano; Sanna, Andrea; Horvath, Jorge E.

    2013-08-01

    We studied the energy and frequency dependence of the Fourier time lags and intrinsic coherence of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53, using a large data set obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We confirmed that, in both sources, the time lags of the lower kHz QPO are soft and their magnitude increases with energy. We also found that: (i) In 4U 1636-53, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at ˜ 30 μs in the QPO frequency range 500-850 Hz, and decrease to ˜ 10 μs when the QPO frequency increases further. In 4U 1608-52, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at 40 μs up to 800 Hz, the highest frequency reached by this QPO in our data. (ii) In both sources, the time lags of the upper kHz QPO are hard, independent of energy or frequency and inconsistent with the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO. (iii) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO remains constant at ˜0.6 between 5 and 12 keV, and drops to zero above that energy. The intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with being zero across the full energy range. (iv) In 4U 1636-53, the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO increases from ˜0 at ˜600 Hz to ˜1, and it decreases to ˜0.5 at 920 Hz; in 4U 1608-52, the intrinsic coherence is consistent with the same trend. (v) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with zero over the full frequency range of the QPO, except in 4U 1636-53 between 700 and 900 Hz where the intrinsic coherence marginally increases. We discuss our results in the context of scenarios in which the soft lags are either due to reflection off the accretion disc or up-/down-scattering in a hot medium close to the neutron star. We finally explore the connection between, on one hand the time lags and the intrinsic coherence of the kHz QPOs, and on the other the QPOs' amplitude and quality factor in

  4. Testing the relativistic precession model using low-frequency and kHz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries with known spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doesburgh, Marieke; van der Klis, Michiel

    2017-03-01

    We analyse all available RXTE data on a sample of 13 low-mass X-ray binaries with known neutron star spin that are not persistent pulsars. We carefully measure the correlations between the centroid frequencies of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We compare these correlations to the prediction of the relativistic precession model that, due to frame dragging, a QPO will occur at the Lense-Thirring precession frequency νLT of a test-particle orbit whose orbital frequency is the upper kHz QPO frequency νu. Contrary to the most prominent previous studies, we find two different oscillations in the range predicted for νLT that are simultaneously present over a wide range of νu. Additionally, one of the low-frequency noise components evolves into a (third) QPO in the νLT range when νu exceeds 600 Hz. The frequencies of these QPOs all correlate to νu following power laws with indices between 0.4 and 3.3, significantly exceeding the predicted value of 2.0 in 80 per cent of the cases (at 3 to >20σ). Also, there is no evidence that the neutron star spin frequency affects any of these three QPO frequencies, as would be expected for frame dragging. Finally, the observed QPO frequencies tend to be higher than the νLT predicted for reasonable neutron star specific moment of inertia. In the light of recent successes of precession models in black holes, we briefly discuss ways in which such precession can occur in neutron stars at frequencies different from test-particle values and consistent with those observed. A precessing torus geometry and other torques than frame dragging may allow precession to produce the observed frequency correlations, but can only explain one of the three QPOs in the νLT range.

  5. SWIFT X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET MONITORING OF THE CLASSICAL NOVA V458 VUL (NOVA VUL 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, J.-U.; Drake, J. J.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Boyd, D.; Bode, M. F.; Brady, S.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Steeghs, D.; Kitamoto, S.; Takei, D.; Knigge, C.; Miller, I.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Schwarz, G.; Staels, B.; Tsujimoto, M.; Wesson, R.

    2009-05-15

    We describe the highly variable X-ray and UV emission of V458 Vul (Nova Vul 2007), observed by Swift between 1 and 422 days after outburst. Initially bright only in the UV, V458 Vul became a variable hard X-ray source due to optically thin thermal emission at kT = 0.64 keV with an X-ray band unabsorbed luminosity of 2.3 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} during days 71-140. The X-ray spectrum at this time requires a low Fe abundance (0.2{sup +0.3} {sub -0.1} solar), consistent with a Suzaku measurement around the same time. On day 315 we find a new X-ray spectral component which can be described by a blackbody with temperature of kT = 23{sup +9} {sub -5} eV, while the previous hard X-ray component has declined by a factor of 3.8. The spectrum of this soft X-ray component resembles those typically seen in the class of supersoft sources (SSS) which suggests that the nova ejecta were starting to clear and/or that the white dwarf photosphere is shrinking to the point at which its thermal emission reaches into the X-ray band. We find a high degree of variability in the soft component with a flare rising by an order of magnitude in count rate in 0.2 days. In the following observations on days 342.4-383.6, the soft component was not seen, only to emerge again on day 397. The hard component continued to evolve, and we found an anticorrelation between the hard X-ray emission and the UV emission, yielding a Spearman rank probability of 97%. After day 397, the hard component was still present, was variable, and continued to fade at an extremely slow rate but could not be analyzed owing to pile-up contamination from the bright SSS component.

  6. Breaking the efficiency limit for high-frequency blazed multilayer soft x-ray gratings: Conical vs classical diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goray, L. I.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2016-09-05

    High-frequency multilayer-coated blazed diffraction gratings (HFMBGs) are most promising elements for ultrahigh resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy. As it has been demonstrated recently [Voronov et al., Opt. Express 23, 4771 (2015)], the efficiency limit for in-plane diffraction can exceed 2–3 times, in higher orders too, when the period of a HFMBG is shorter than an attenuation length for soft x-rays and a bilayer asymmetry is designed. In this letter, using numerical experiments based on the rigorous electromagnetic theory, a possibility of off-plane diffraction and symmetrical multilayer coatings to enhance the efficiency of soft-x-ray high-order HFMBGs very closely to the absolute limit, i.e., 0.92–0.98 of the reflectance of the respective W/B4C multilayer, has been demonstrated.

  7. X-rays from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars: 2D MHD modeling and the role of local absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Reale, F.; Peres, G.; Matsakos, T.; Sthelé, C.; Ibgui, L.

    2014-08-01

    In classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) strong shocks are formed where the accretion funnel impacts with the denser stellar chromosphere. Although current models of accretion provide a plausible global picture of this process, some fundamental aspects are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is order of magnitudes lower than predicted; the observed density and temperature structures of the hot post-shock region are puzzling and still unexplained by models. To address these issues we performed 2D MHD simulations describing an accretion stream impacting onto the chromosphere of a CTTS, exploring different configurations and strengths of the magnetic field. From the model results we then synthesized the X-ray emission emerging from the hot post-shock, taking into account the local absorption due to the pre-shock stream and surrounding atmosphere. We find that the different configurations and strengths of the magnetic field profoundly affect the hot post-shock properties. Moreover the emerging X-ray emission strongly depends also on the viewing angle under which accretion is observed. Some of the explored configuration are able to reproduce the observed features of X-ray spectra of CTTS.

  8. The panchromatic spectroscopic evolution of the classical CO nova V339 Delphini (Nova Del 2013) until X-ray turnoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, S. N.; Mason, E.; Schwarz, G. J.; Teyssier, F. M.; Buil, C.; De Gennaro Aquino, I.; Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Scaringi, S.; Starrfield, S.; van Winckel, H.; Williams, R. E.; Woodward, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Classical novae are the product of thermonuclear runaway-initiated explosions occurring on accreting white dwarfs. Aims: V339 Del (Nova Delphinus 2013) was one of the brightest classical novae of the last hundred years. Spectroscopy and photometry are available from γ-rays through infrared at stages that have frequently not been observed well. The complete data set is intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with modeling and for understanding more sparsely monitored historical classical and recurrent novae. This paper is the first in the series of reports on the development of the nova. We report here on the early stages of the outburst, through the X-ray active stage. Methods: A time sequence of optical, flux calibrated high resolution spectra was obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) using FIES simultaneously, or contemporaneously, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope during the early stages of the outburst. These were supplemented with Mercator/HERMES optical spectra. High resolution IUE ultraviolet spectra of OS And 1986, taken during the Fe curtain phase, served as a template for the distance determination. We used standard plasma diagnostics (e.g., [O III] and [N II] line ratios, and the Hβ line flux) to constrain electron densities and temperatures of the ejecta. Using Monte Carlo modeling of the ejecta, we derived the structure, filling factor, and mass from comparisons of the optical and ultraviolet line profiles. Results: We derive an extinction of E(B - V) = 0.23 ± 0.05 from the spectral energy distribution, the interstellar absorption, and H I emission lines. The distance, about 4-4.5 kpc, is in agreement with the inferred distance from near infrared interferometry. The maximum velocity was about 2500 km s-1, measured from the UV resonance and optical profiles. The ejecta showed considerable fine structure in all transitions, much of which persisted as emission knots. The

  9. The low-mass classic Algol-type binary UU Leo revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Gui

    2013-12-01

    New multi-color photometry of the eclipsing binary UU Leo, acquired from 2010 to 2013, was carried out by using the 60-cm and 85-cm telescopes at the Xinglong station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. With the updated Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric solution was derived from BVR light curves. The results imply that UU Leo is a semi-detached Algol-type binary, with a mass ratio of q = 0.100(±0.002). The change in orbital period was reanalyzed based on all available eclipsing times. The O - C curve could be described by an upward parabola superimposed on a quasi-sinusoidal curve. The period and semi-amplitudes are Pmod = 54.5(±1.1) yr and A = 0.0273d(±0.0015d), which may be attributed to the light-time effect via the presence of an invisible third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +4.64(±0.14) × 10-7d yr-1, which may be interpreted by the conserved mass being transferred from the secondary to the primary. With mass being transferred, the low-mass Algol-type binary UU Leo may evolve into a binary system with a main sequence star and a helium white dwarf.

  10. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  11. UV observations of x ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1990-01-01

    IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) has observed both high and low mass x ray binaries throughout its life. The UV spectra of high mass systems reveal the nature of the massive companion star and the effects of the x ray illumination of the stellar wind. In loss mass systems, the x ray illuminated disk or companion star dominates the UV light. System parameters and the characteristics of the accretion disk can be inferred.

  12. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q, omega) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q-->0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q, omega) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  13. APPLICATION OF PREMACK’S THEORY TO A CLASSICALLY CONDITIONED SUCROSE AVERSION INDUCED BY X-RAY EXPOSURE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    for the applicability to classical conditioning of Premack’s reinforcement theory in which the rate of reinforced responding is determined in part by the precontingency rate of the response. (Author)

  14. THE 7.1 HR X-RAY-ULTRAVIOLET-NEAR-INFRARED PERIOD OF THE {gamma}-RAY CLASSICAL NOVA MONOCEROTIS 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Beardmore, A. P.; Wagner, R. M.; Shore, S. N.; Starrfield, S.; Woodward, C. E.

    2013-05-10

    Nova Monocerotis 2012 is the third {gamma}-ray transient identified with a thermonuclear runaway on a white dwarf, that is, a nova event. Swift monitoring has revealed the distinct evolution of the harder and super-soft X-ray spectral components, while Swift-UV and V- and I-band photometry show a gradual decline with subtle changes of slope. During the super-soft emission phase, a coherent 7.1 hr modulation was found in the soft X-ray, UV, optical, and near-IR data, varying in phase across all wavebands. Assuming this period to be orbital, the system has a near-main-sequence secondary, with little appreciable stellar wind. This distinguishes it from the first GeV nova, V407 Cyg, where the {gamma}-rays were proposed to form through shock-accelerated particles as the ejecta interacted with the red giant wind. We favor a model in which the {gamma}-rays arise from the shock of the ejecta with material close to the white dwarf in the orbital plane. This suggests that classical novae may commonly be GeV sources. We ascribe the orbital modulation to a raised section of an accretion disk passing through the line of sight, periodically blocking and reflecting much of the emission. The disk must therefore have reformed by day 150 after outburst.

  15. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  16. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  17. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  18. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  19. Skull x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Radiography of skull, chest, and cervical spine - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  1. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  2. The Secret Lives of Cepheids: The prototype Classical Cepheid δ Cephei is a Pulsed Variable X-ray and FUV Source - Implications for achieving a high precision Hubble Constant (Ho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Neilson, Hilding; Harper, Graham M.; Remage Evans, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    As part of our “Secret Lives of Cepheids” program, we report that the prototype Classical Cepheid - δ Cep is an X-ray source with pulsation-modulated X-ray & FUV emissions. Recent Chandra X-ray observations, when combined with our previous Chandra & XMM-Newton data, confirm a periodic sharp ~ 5 fold increase in X-ray flux at ~ 0.5φ. The X-ray emission phases with the star's pulsation P = 5.366-d, confirms that the X-ray emissions arise from the Cepheid itself and not from a companion. The X-ray variation is “spike-like” with an Lx (max) ~ 2.1 x1029 erg/s, with plasma temperatures of ~ 2 - 6 MK. The HST-COS FUV fluxes increase ~10-20 times and reach maximum strengths during ~0.88-0.97φ - prior to maximum brightness. The FUV emissions arise from ionized plasmas with T ~10 - 300 x103 K. The FUV emission lines show turbulent broadening near the maximum fluxes. The FUV emissions are best explained by pulsation-induced collisional shocks originating from the star’s pulsating atmosphere. However, the X-ray emissions occur 0.5 - 0.6 φ (~3 days) later than the FUV emission line maxima. Thus, it appears that the X-ray emissions arise further out from the star. We suggests that to produce the observed high temperature X-ray emitting plasmas, that the X-rays most likely arise from pulsation-shock induced turbulent-magnetic heated plasmas. If this behavior is extended to other Cepheids, the presence of pulsation induced X-ray and FUV emissions could play major roles in the dynamics and heating of Cepheid atmospheres and could have consequences affecting the Cepheid Period-Luminosity (P-L) law. For example, the additional energy and shock-heating could produce enhanced mass loss leading to the formation of circumstellar shells. For example, the presence of circumstellar matter could bias the P-L relation if not accounted for. Similar X-ray - UV behavior is indicated by at least one other Cepheid, β Doradus.This research is supported from grants from NASA for

  3. A model of an X-ray-illuminated accretion disk and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The X-ray-illuminated surface of the accretion disk in a low-mass X-ray Binary (LMXRB) and the X-ray-heated corona above the disk produce optical, UV, and soft X-ray emission lines. This paper presents 1D models of the emission line spectra and the vertical temperature and density structures at different radii. The models include a detailed treatment of the important atomic processes and an escape probability treatment of radiative transfer. Soker and Raymond (1993) use the density structure predicted by these models for a 2D Monte Carlo simulation of the photon scattering in the accretion disk corona (ADC) to examine the effects of the ADC on the angular distribution of X-rays and the flux of X-rays incident on the outer disk. This paper concentrates on the emission line fluxes for various elemental abundances and disk parameters. The UV lines of the classic LMXRBs are consistent with the model predictions. Some CNO processing is necessary to account for the nitrogen and helium abundances in Sco X-1 and other LMXRBs. Comparison of the models with observed spectra also points to a soft X-ray component with luminosity comparable to the hard X-rays. The models predict a substantial luminosity in the group of highly ionized iron lines near 100 A.

  4. A model of an X-ray-illuminated accretion disk and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The X-ray-illuminated surface of the accretion disk in a low-mass X-ray Binary (LMXRB) and the X-ray-heated corona above the disk produce optical, UV, and soft X-ray emission lines. This paper presents 1D models of the emission line spectra and the vertical temperature and density structures at different radii. The models include a detailed treatment of the important atomic processes and an escape probability treatment of radiative transfer. Soker and Raymond (1993) use the density structure predicted by these models for a 2D Monte Carlo simulation of the photon scattering in the accretion disk corona (ADC) to examine the effects of the ADC on the angular distribution of X-rays and the flux of X-rays incident on the outer disk. This paper concentrates on the emission line fluxes for various elemental abundances and disk parameters. The UV lines of the classic LMXRBs are consistent with the model predictions. Some CNO processing is necessary to account for the nitrogen and helium abundances in Sco X-1 and other LMXRBs. Comparison of the models with observed spectra also points to a soft X-ray component with luminosity comparable to the hard X-rays. The models predict a substantial luminosity in the group of highly ionized iron lines near 100 A.

  5. The Shocking Truth about Cepheids: The Secret X-ray Lives of Classical Cepheids: Origin of Pulsed FUV and X-Ray Emissions of delta Cep and beta Dor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby, John; Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cepheid variable stars (delta Cep) and (beta Dor) have shown FUV spectral emission features from hot (10,000- 300,000 K) plasma that correlate with the phasing of their pulsations.(see Engle et al. 2014). These FUV spectral emissions that include NV 1240, OI 1305,C II 1335A, Si IV 1400A, and He II 1640 show peaks prior to the maximum optical brightness (during the "piston" phase of the pulsation that is observed to be in phase with the stellar pulsations, but the observed X-ray emission occurs near minimum light (near 0.4-0.5P) during the maximum radius and coolest phase of the star. Cepheid stars are an integral part of the cosmic distance ladder, due to their Period-Luminosity relationship (the Leavitt Law). Understanding the dynamics of Cepheid stars, especially with respect to FUV and X-ray emissions, is necessary to be confident in assertions derived from the cosmic distance ladder, including establishing the Hubble Constant to more accurate values.Presented here is a possible explanation for the pulsation period-related observed UV and X-ray emissions of these Cepheids. Using stellar interior and atmosphere models, conditions found in the ionization zone and outer atmosphere of these stars may be conducive to shocks being formed that are capable of temperatures great enough to produce x-ray emission. The mechanics of these shocks and their propagation in the atmosphere of the stars can potentially explain both the apparent pulsation-phased peaks for the FUV, as well as the pulsation-phase dependent (currently unexplained) X-ray emissions.This research was supported by NASA Grants: HST grant HST-GO-13019-A, XMM-Newton grant NNX14AAF12G, andChandra Grant GO-15202X. We are very thankful for this support.

  6. X-Ray Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2004-07-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are an exciting addition to the zoo of X-ray sources. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations have detected diffuse X-ray emission from shocked fast winds in PN interiors as well as bow-shocks of fast collimated outflows impinging on the nebular envelope. Point X-ray sources associated with PN central stars are also detected, with the soft X-ray (<0.5 keV) emission originating from the photospheres of stars hotter than ˜100,000 K, and the hard X-ray (≫0.5 keV) emission from instability shocks in the fast stellar wind itself or from a low-mass companion's coronal activity. X-ray observations of PNe offer a unique opportunity to directly examine the dynamic effects of fast stellar winds and collimated outflows, and help us understand the formation and evolution of PNe.

  7. The physics of black hole x ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. C.; Kim, S.-W.; Moscoso, M. D.; Mineshige, S.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray transients that are established or plausible black hole candidates have been discovered at a rate of about one per year in the galaxy for the last five years. There are now well over a dozen black hole candidates, most being in the category of X-ray novae with low-mass companions. There may be hundreds of such transient systems in the galaxy yet to be discovered. Classic black hole candidates like Cygnus X-1 with massive companions are in the minority, and their census in the galaxy and magellanic clouds is likely to be complete. The black hole X-ray novae (BHXN) do not represent only the most common environment in which to discover black holes. Their time dependence gives a major new probe with which to study the physics of accretion into black holes. The BHXN show both a soft X-ray flux from an optically thick disk and a hard power law tail that is reminiscent of AGN spectra. The result may be new insight into the classical systems like Cyg X-1 and LMC X-1 that show similar power law tails, but also to accretion into supermassive black holes and AGN.

  8. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  9. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  10. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  11. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  12. The Unusual X-Ray Spectrum of FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Briggs, Kevin R.; Güdel, Manuel

    2006-06-01

    FU Orionis objects (FUors) have undergone strong optical outbursts and are thought to be young low-mass stars accreting at high rates of up to M˙acc~10-4 Msolar yr-1. FUors have been extensively studied at optical and infrared wavelengths, but little is known about their X-ray properties. We have thus initiated a program aimed at searching for and characterizing their X-ray emission. First results are presented here for the prototype star FU Orionis based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton. Its CCD X-ray spectrum is unusual compared to those of accreting classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). The cool and hot plasma components typically detected in CTTSs are present but are seen through different absorption column densities. The absorption of the cool component is consistent with AV~2.4 mag anticipated from optical studies, but the absorption of the hot component is at least 10 times larger. The origin of the excess absorption is uncertain, but cold accreting gas or a strong near-neutral wind are likely candidates. The hot plasma component accounts for most of the observed X-ray flux, and thermal models give very high temperatures kT>=5 keV. The most prominent feature in the X-ray spectrum is an exceptionally strong Fe K emission line at 6.67 keV, and weak emission from fluorescent Fe I at ~6.4 keV may also be present. The high plasma temperature clearly demonstrates that the emission is dominated by magnetic processes. We discuss possible origins of the unusual X-ray spectrum in the context of a complex physical environment that likely includes disk accretion, a strong wind, magnetic activity, and close binarity.

  13. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowski, K. M.; Dul, D. T.; Wrobel, A.; Korecki, P.

    2013-06-03

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  14. The bright unidentified γ-ray source 1FGL J1227.9–4852: Can it be associated with a low-mass X-ray binary? [The bright unidentified γ-ray source 1FGL J1227.9–4852: Can it be associated with an LMXB?

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A. B.; Corbel, S.; Camilo, F.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Ferrara, E. C.; Kerr, M.; Koerding, E.; Kozieł, D.; Stawarz, Ł.

    2011-07-08

    We present an analysis of high energy (HE; 0.1–300 GeV) γ-ray observations of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, follow-up radio observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Parkes radio telescopes of the same field and follow-up optical observations with the ESO VLT. We also examine archival XMMNewton and INTEGRAL X-ray observations of the region around this source. The γ-ray spectrum of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 is best fitted with an exponentially cut-off power law, reminiscent of the population of pulsars observed by Fermi. A previously unknown, compact radio source within the 99.7 per cent error circle of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 is discovered and has a morphology consistent either with an AGN core/jet structure or with two roughly symmetric lobes of a distant radio galaxy. A single bright X-ray source XSS J12270–4859, a low-mass X-ray binary, also lies within the 1FGL J1227.9–4852 error circle and we report the first detection of radio emission from this source. The potential association of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 with each of these counterparts is discussed. Based upon the available data we find the association of the γ-ray source to the compact double radio source unlikely and suggest that XSS J12270–4859 is a more likely counterpart to the new HE source. As a result, we propose that XSS J12270–4859 may be a millisecond binary pulsar and draw comparisons with PSR J1023+0038.

  15. The bright unidentified γ-ray source 1FGL J1227.9–4852: Can it be associated with a low-mass X-ray binary? [The bright unidentified γ-ray source 1FGL J1227.9–4852: Can it be associated with an LMXB?

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, A. B.; Szostek, A.; Corbel, S.; ...

    2011-07-08

    We present an analysis of high energy (HE; 0.1–300 GeV) γ-ray observations of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, follow-up radio observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Parkes radio telescopes of the same field and follow-up optical observations with the ESO VLT. We also examine archival XMM–Newton and INTEGRAL X-ray observations of the region around this source. The γ-ray spectrum of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 is best fitted with an exponentially cut-off power law, reminiscent of the population of pulsars observed by Fermi. A previously unknown, compact radio source within the 99.7 per centmore » error circle of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 is discovered and has a morphology consistent either with an AGN core/jet structure or with two roughly symmetric lobes of a distant radio galaxy. A single bright X-ray source XSS J12270–4859, a low-mass X-ray binary, also lies within the 1FGL J1227.9–4852 error circle and we report the first detection of radio emission from this source. The potential association of 1FGL J1227.9–4852 with each of these counterparts is discussed. Based upon the available data we find the association of the γ-ray source to the compact double radio source unlikely and suggest that XSS J12270–4859 is a more likely counterpart to the new HE source. As a result, we propose that XSS J12270–4859 may be a millisecond binary pulsar and draw comparisons with PSR J1023+0038.« less

  16. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... not being scanned. Alternative Names X-ray - bone Images Skeleton Skeletal spine Osteogenic sarcoma - x-ray References ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  17. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  18. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  19. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  20. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... image. For most x-rays, the risk of cancer or defects is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray ... Geleijns J, Tack D. Medical physics: radiation risks. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ...

  1. X-Ray Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Radiographic Image Acquisition & Processing Software for Security Markets. Used in operation of commercial x-ray scanners and manipulation of x-ray images for emergency responders including State, Local, Federal, and US Military bomb technicians and analysts.

  2. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  3. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  4. The naked T Tauri stars - The low-mass pre-main sequence unveiled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.

    1987-01-01

    The search for low-mass premain-sequence (PMS) stars associated with X-ray sources in regions of star formation is discussed. The survey to date has revealed at least 30 low-mass PMS stars in the Tau-Aur region, and a comparable number in Oph. These stars are the naked T Tau stars, unveiled versions of the well-known classical T Tau stars. The properties of these newly discovered PMS stars and their relation to the classical T Tau stars are discussed, and it is concluded that the naked T Tau stars are the true low-mass PMS stars, and that the observable characteristics defining the classical T Tau stars are due to the interaction of an underlying, fairly normal star with a dominant circumstellar environment. The impact the naked T Tau stars are likely to have on models of the PMS evolution of low-mass stars is considered.

  5. The naked T Tauri stars - The low-mass pre-main sequence unveiled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.

    1987-01-01

    The search for low-mass premain-sequence (PMS) stars associated with X-ray sources in regions of star formation is discussed. The survey to date has revealed at least 30 low-mass PMS stars in the Tau-Aur region, and a comparable number in Oph. These stars are the naked T Tau stars, unveiled versions of the well-known classical T Tau stars. The properties of these newly discovered PMS stars and their relation to the classical T Tau stars are discussed, and it is concluded that the naked T Tau stars are the true low-mass PMS stars, and that the observable characteristics defining the classical T Tau stars are due to the interaction of an underlying, fairly normal star with a dominant circumstellar environment. The impact the naked T Tau stars are likely to have on models of the PMS evolution of low-mass stars is considered.

  6. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  7. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 10(33) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  8. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 1033 ergs-1) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  9. DN Tauri - coronal activity and accretion in a young low-mass CTTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, J.; Güdel, M.; Günther, H. M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) are young, accreting low-mass stars; their X-ray emission differs from that of their main-sequence counterparts in a number of aspects. Aims: We study the specific case of DN Tau, a young M0-type accreting CTTS, to extend the range of young CTTSs studied with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy at lower masses and to compare its high-energy properties with those of similar objects. Methods: We use a deep XMM-Newton observation of DN Tau to investigate its X-ray properties and X-ray generating mechanisms. Specifically, we examine the presence of X-ray emission from magnetic activity and accretion shocks. We also compare our new X-ray data with UV data taken simultaneously and with X-ray/UV observations performed before. Results: We find that the X-ray emission from DN Tau is dominated by coronal plasma generated via magnetic activity, but also clearly detect a contribution of the accretion shocks to the cool plasma component at ≲2 MK as consistently inferred from density and temperature analysis. Typical phenomena of active coronae, such as flaring, the presence of very hot plasma at 30 MK, and an abundance pattern showing the inverse FIP effect, are seen on DN Tau. Strong variations in the emission measure of the cooler plasma components between the 2005 and 2010 data point to accretion related changes; in contrast, the hotter coronal plasma component is virtually unchanged. The UV light curve taken simultaneously is in general not related to the X-ray brightness, but exhibits clear counterparts during the observed X-ray flares. Conclusions: The X-ray properties of DN Tau are similar to those of more massive CTTSs, but its low mass and large radius associated with its youth shift the accretion shocks to lower temperatures, reducing their imprint in the X-ray regime. DN Tau's overall X-ray properties are dominated by strong magnetic activity.

  10. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  11. The Integrated X-Ray Spectrum of Galactic Populations of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.; Becker, C. M.; Fabbiano, G.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the composite X-ray spectrum of a population of unresolved SSS's in a spiral galaxy such as our own or M31. The sources are meant to represent the total underlying population corresponding to all sources which have bolometric luminosities in the range of 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s and kT on the order of tens of eV. These include close-binary supersoft sources, symbiotic novae, and planetary nebulae, for example. In order to determine whether the associated X-ray signal would be detectable, we also 'seed' the galaxy with other types of X-ray sources, specifically low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB's). We find that the total spectrum due to SSS's, LMXB's, and HMXB's exhibits a soft peak which owes its presence to the SSS population. Preliminary indications are that this soft peak may be observable.

  12. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Type 1 X-ray bursts, optical, infrared, and radio properties of the galactic bulge sources, are discussed. It was proven that these burst sources are neutron stars in low mass, close binary stellar systems. Several burst sources are found in globular clusters with high central densities. Optical type 1 X-ray bursts were observed from three sources. Type 2 X-ray bursts, observed from the Rapid Burster, are due to an accretion instability which converts gravitational potential energy into heat and radiation, which makes them of a fundamentally different nature from Type 1 bursts.

  13. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  14. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  16. X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gray. For some types of X-ray tests, a contrast medium — such as iodine or barium — is introduced into your body to provide greater detail on the images. X-ray technology is used to examine many parts of the ...

  17. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, it is called a KUB (kidneys, ureters, bladder) x-ray.

  18. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  19. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a source that surveys the fundamentals of x-ray lasers and summarizes recent advances. The author emphasizes x-ray lasers created using high temperature plasmas as the medium. Specific topics discussed included electron-collisional excitation pumping, plasma laser pumping, and gamma-ray lasers. Numerous literature references provided.

  20. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to-guide for specialists. It provides comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. The book collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development.

  1. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  2. X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, T.

    In spite of the recent advances in X-ray instrumentation, polarimetry remains an area which has been virtually unexplored in the last 20 years. The scientific motivation to study polarization has increased during this time: emission models designed to repro- duce X-ray spectra can be tested using polarization, and polarization detected in other wavelength bands makes clear predictions as to the X-ray polarization. Polarization remains the only way to infer geometrical properties of sources which are too small to be spatially resolved. At the same time, there has been recent progress in instrumen- tation which is likely to allow searches for X-ray polarization at levels significantly below what was possible for early detectors. In this talk I will review the history of X-ray polarimetry, discuss some experimental techniques and the scientific problems which can be addressed by future experiments.

  3. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  4. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  5. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  6. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  7. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  8. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  9. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  10. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  11. The potential of X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, F.

    2014-07-01

    Up-scattering of low-energy photons by Inverse Compton processes in a hot gas of electrons (i.e. Comptonization) is a common astrophysical mechanism particularly important in accreting systems like X-ray binaries (XRBs) and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Polarization signals produced by scattering strongly depend on the optical thickness and geometry of the scattering medium as well as on the observer's viewing angle. The polarization degree and angle can be used to constrain, for example, the still unknown parameters which characterize the hot corona responsible for the production of X-ray radiation in AGN or the dominant mechanism responsible for the broadening of the Iron K-alpha emission line whose origin is still a matter of debate in the case of low mass X-ray binaries with a neutron star. Conducting accurate Monte Carlo simulations we show the potential of X-ray polarimetry, a new perspective of X-ray astronomy. The spectroscopic part of our results can already be exploited today in the light of XMM-Newton and Chandra data and is even more appealing in the perspective of data from NuStar and future X-ray missions.

  12. Search for X-ray emission from Nova Cygni 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Brecher, K.; Buff, J.; Clark, G. W.; Joss, P. C.; Matilsky, T.

    1976-01-01

    A search for X-rays from Nova Cygni 1975 was carried out before, during, and after the time of optical maximum. No X-rays were detected over the spectral range 0.1-50 keV. On the basis of these results a strong upper limit of .0001 has been placed on the ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity for this nova, consistent with effective temperatures of about 10,000 K. If Nova Cygni 1975 is a virgin nova, its low mass exchange rate would imply that any associated X-ray emission would not be detectable by present techniques.

  13. X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures can form the basis of a very high-performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-theart calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous bandpasses, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated X-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. This chapter briefly reviews the detection scheme, the state of the art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  14. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this page, ... ray views may be uncomfortable. If the whole skeleton is being imaged, the test usually takes 1 ...

  15. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  16. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  17. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  18. X-ray emission from T Tauri stars in the Lupus 3 star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondoin, P.

    2006-08-01

    Aims.In this paper, I present analysis results of an {XMM-Newton} observation of the Lupus 3 region that contains a high proportion of young low mass (M < 0.3 M⊙) T Tauri stars in the Lupus star-forming complex. Methods: .The detection of X-ray sources in 0.5 to 4.5 keV images of the Lupus 3 core was performed using the standard source detection method of the {XMM-Newton} Science Analysis Software. The detected sources were correlated with a list of Herbig-Haro objects and Hα emission stars that contains mainly classical T Tauri stars, with a catalogue of weak-line T Tauri Stars and with a recent list of new low-mass members of the Lupus 3 dark cloud found in a visible-light spectroscopic survey at the center of the Lupus 3 star-forming core. The light curves and spectra of the brightest X-ray sources with known T Tauri star counterparts were analysed. Results: .One hundred and two X-ray sources were detected in the 30´ diameter field-of-view of the EPIC cameras, of which 25 have visible or near-IR counterparts that are known as pre-main sequence stars. Their X-ray luminosity ranges from 3 × 1028 to 3 × 1030 erg s-1. Two of these objects with mass estimates lower than 0.075 M⊙ have an X-ray luminosity of about 4-7 × 1028 erg s-1, comparable with that of flaring young brown dwarfs. A linear correlation is found between the X-ray luminosity and the mass or volume of the stars that is qualitatively expected from some models of distributed turbulent dynamos. The EPIC spectra of the X-ray brightest sources can be fitted using optically thin plasma emission models with two components at temperatures in the ranges 3-9 × 106 K and 1-50 × 107 K, respectively. The large emission measure of hot plasma may be caused by disruptions of magnetic fields associated with an intense flaring activity, while the X-ray emission from the "cool" plasma components may result from solar-type active regions. The emission measures of the plasma components are of the order of 1052

  19. Clocking femtosecond X rays.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Mills, D M; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Lowney, D P; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Düsterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-03-25

    Linear-accelerator-based sources will revolutionize ultrafast x-ray science due to their unprecedented brightness and short pulse duration. However, time-resolved studies at the resolution of the x-ray pulse duration are hampered by the inability to precisely synchronize an external laser to the accelerator. At the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source at the Stanford Linear-Accelerator Center we solved this problem by measuring the arrival time of each high energy electron bunch with electro-optic sampling. This measurement indirectly determined the arrival time of each x-ray pulse relative to an external pump laser pulse with a time resolution of better than 60 fs rms.

  20. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  1. Globular cluster X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D.

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual binary systems, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs), with formation rates per unit mass exceeding those in the Galactic disk by orders of magnitude. The high stellar densities in globular clusters trigger various dynamical interactions: exchange encounters, direct collisions, destruction of binaries, and tidal capture. This binary population is, in turn, critical to the stabilization of globular clusters against gravitational collapse; the long-term stability of a cluster is thought to depend on tapping into the gravitational binding energy of such close binaries. I will present an overview of the current state of globular cluster X-ray observations, as well as our work on deep Chandra observations of M4, where we reach some of the lowest X-ray luminosities in any globular cluster (comparable to the deep observations of 47 Tuc and NGC 6397). One of M4 X-ray sources previously classified as a white dwarf binary is likely a neutron star binary, and another X-ray source is a sub-subgiant, the nature of which is still unclear. skip=3pt

  2. X-ray Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    Material irradiated by X-rays produces backscattered radiation which is commonly known as the Reflection Spectrum. It consists of a structured continuum, due at high energies to the competition between photoelectric absorption and electron scattering enhanced at low energies by emission from the material itself, together with a complex line spectrum. We briefly review the history of X-ray reflection in astronomy and discuss various methods for computing the reflection spectrum from cold and ionized gas, illustrated with results from our own work reflionx. We discuss how the reflection spectrum can be used to obtain the geometry of the accretion flow, particularly the inner regions around black holes and neutron stars.

  3. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The preliminary results from the Sco X-1 and Cyg X-1 obtained from the Apollo 15 X-ray detector data are presented along with preliminary results of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric data of the lunar surface composition. The production of the characteristic X-rays following the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface is described along with the X-ray spectrometer. Preliminary analyses of the astronomical X-ray observation and the X-ray fluorescence data are presented.

  4. X-Ray Properties of Young Stars and Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, E.; Townsley, L.; Güdel, M.; Stassun, K.

    Although the environments of star and planet formation are thermodynamically cold, substantial X-ray emission from 10-100 MK plasmas is present. In low-mass pre-main-sequence stars, X-rays are produced by violent magnetic reconnection flares. In high-mass O stars, they are produced by wind shocks on both stellar and parsec scales. The recent Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project, XMM-Newton Extended Survey of Taurus, and Chandra studies of more distant high-mass star-forming regions reveal a wealth of X-ray phenomenology and astrophysics. X-ray flares mostly resemble solar-like magnetic activity from multipolar surface fields, although extreme flares may arise in field lines extending to the protoplanetary disk. Accretion plays a secondary role. Fluorescent iron line emission and absorption in inclined disks demonstrate that X-rays can efficiently illuminate disk material. The consequent ionization of disk gas and irradiation of disk solids addresses a variety of important astrophysical issues of disk dynamics, planet formation, and meteoritics. New observations of massive star-forming environments such as M 17, the Carina Nebula, and 30 Doradus show remarkably complex X-ray morphologies including the low-mass stellar population, diffuse X-ray flows from blister Hii regions, and inhomogeneous superbubbles. X-ray astronomy is thus providing qualitatively new insights into star and planet formation.

  5. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  6. Neck x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at cervical vertebrae. These are the 7 bones of the spine in the neck. ... A neck x-ray can detect: Bone joint that is out of position (dislocation) Breathing in a foreign object Broken bone (fracture) Disk problems (disks ...

  7. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test if you have signs of: A fracture Tumor Arthritis (inflammation of the joints) Normal Results The x-ray shows normal structures for the age of the person. What Abnormal Results Mean ... bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Arthritis Other conditions for ...

  8. Heating the Primordial Soup: X-raying the Circumstellar Disk of T Cha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Huenemoerder, D.; Kastner, J. H.; Bessell, M. S.; Sacco, G.

    2014-01-01

    The classical T Tauri Star (cTTS) T Chamaeleontis (T Cha) presents a unique opportunity to probe pre-main sequence star-disk interactions and late-stage circumstellar disk evolution. T Cha is the only known example of a nearly edge-on, actively accreting star/disk system within ~110 pc, and furthermore may be orbited by a low-mass companion or massive planet that has cleared an inner hole in its disk. The star is characterized by strong variability in the optical 3 magnitudes in the V band) as well as large and variable extinction (AV in the range of 1-5). Like most cTTS, T Cha is also a luminous X-ray source. We present preliminary results of two observations (totaling 150 ks) of T Cha with Chandra’s HETGS. Our motivations are to (a) determine the intrinsic X-ray spectrum of T Cha, so as to establish whether its X-ray emission can be attributed to accretion shocks, coronal emission, or a combination; (b) investigate whether its X-ray flux exhibits modulation that may be related to the stellar rotational period 3.3 days); and (c) take advantage of the nearly-edge-on disk viewing geometry to model the spectrum of X-rays absorbed by the gaseous disk orbiting T Cha. These results will serve as much-needed input to models of magnetospheric accretion and irradiated, planet-forming disks. This research is supported via award number GO3-14022X to RIT issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of NASA under contract NAS803060. Additional support is provided by National Science Foundation grant AST-1108950 to RIT.

  9. Planetary X ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies for an X-ray experiment using solid state detectors and for an experiment using a proportional counter for investigating Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres are reported. Background counting rates through the forward aperture and leakage fluxes are discussed for each design. It is concluded that the best choice of instrument appears to have following the characteristics: (1) two separate multiwire proportional counters for redundancy; (2) passive collimation to restrict the field to about 5 deg, wiregrid modulation collimation to about 0.1 deg angular resolution; (3) no active shielding system around the counter body; and (4) light passive shielding around any portion of the counter body exposed to space to absorb most of the cosmic X-ray background.

  10. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  11. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  12. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  13. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  14. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  15. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  16. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  17. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of GX 339-4 in an X-ray high state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Maejima, Y.; Bradt, H. V.; Remillard, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Optical emission, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays have been observed simultaneously from the black hole candidate GX 3339-4 in a typical high state. Each of these components is interpreted as arising from a characteristic region of the accretion disk. Considered as a black hole, GX 339-4 lacks the variable 2 keV blackbody component that would be emitted from the 'solid' surface of a neutron star in the low-mass neutron star binaries. The X-ray emission in the high state is therefore extremely soft and stable in time. The intermediate disk region is optically thick and geometrically thin. The observed soft X-ray component with a 'disk blackbody' spectrum comes from this region. The innermost disk region is dynamically unstable due to the effect of general relativity and possibly due to radiation pressure. This region is responsible for the generation of the hard X-ray tail through Comptonization.

  18. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

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  19. Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  20. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  1. Encapsulating X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Bradley, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor-deposited polymer shields crystals from environment while allowing X rays to pass. Polymer coating transparental to X rays applied to mercuric iodide detector in partial vacuum. Coating protects crystal from sublimation, chemical attack, and electrical degradation.

  2. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  3. Formation and Evolution of X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragkos, Anastasios

    X-ray binaries - mass-transferring binary stellar systems with compact object accretors - are unique astrophysical laboratories. They carry information about many complex physical processes such as star formation, compact object formation, and evolution of interacting binaries. My thesis work involves the study of the formation and evolution of Galactic and extra-galacticX-ray binaries using both detailed and realistic simulation tools, and population synthesis techniques. I applied an innovative analysis method that allows the reconstruction of the full evolutionary history of known black hole X-ray binaries back to the time of compact object formation. This analysis takes into account all the available observationally determined properties of a system, and models in detail four of its evolutionary evolutionary phases: mass transfer through the ongoing X-ray phase, tidal evolution before the onset of Roche-lobe overflow, motion through the Galactic potential after the formation of the black hole, and binary orbital dynamics at the time of core collapse. Motivated by deep extra-galactic Chandra survey observations, I worked on population synthesis models of low-mass X-ray binaries in the two elliptical galaxies NGC3379 and NGC4278. These simulations were targeted at understanding the origin of the shape and normalization of the observed X-ray luminosity functions. In a follow up study, I proposed a physically motivated prescription for the modeling of transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary properties, such as duty cycle, outburst duration and recurrence time. This prescription enabled the direct comparison of transient low-mass X-ray binary population synthesis models to the Chandra X-ray survey of the two ellipticals NGC3379 and NGC4278. Finally, I worked on population synthesismodels of black holeX-ray binaries in the MilkyWay. This work was motivated by recent developments in observational techniques for the measurement of black hole spin magnitudes in

  4. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich GRBs Observed by Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H.; Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Barbier, L.; Fenimore, E.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Sato, G.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Palmer, D.

    2007-01-01

    We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2005 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) and conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs)observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirmed that our known redshift samples are consistent with the correlation between the peak energy (Epeak) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows are similar to those of gamma-ray burst afterglows, but the temporal properties of the two classes are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRBs afterglow show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of X-ray afterglows of XRFs are systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared with that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences in the X-ray afterglow between XRFs and C-GRBs are key to understanding not only a mysterious shallow-to-steep phase in the X-ray afterglow but also the unique nature of XRFs.

  5. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF X-RAY-SELECTED YOUNG STARS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai

    2015-12-15

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (∼3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1–B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and three weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81–594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84–594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76–594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20–594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and K{sub s} bands, of all sources, is found to be ∼0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ∼0.1 mag, in the K{sub s} band. The addition of one O star and seven B1–B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy of X-Ray-selected Young Stars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai

    2015-12-01

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (˜3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1-B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and three weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81-594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84-594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76-594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20-594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and Ks bands, of all sources, is found to be ˜0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ˜0.1 mag, in the Ks band. The addition of one O star and seven B1-B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.

  7. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  18. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  19. SZ/X-ray scaling relations using X-ray data and Planck Nominal maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martino, I.; Atrio-Barandela, F.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the relation between the Comptonization parameter predicted using X-ray data YC, Xray and the X-ray luminosity LX, both magnitudes derived from ROSAT data, with the Comptonization parameter YC, SZ measured on Planck 2013 foreground cleaned Nominal maps. The 560 clusters of our sample includes clusters with masses M ≥ 1013 M⊙, one order of magnitude smaller than those used by the Planck Collaboration in a similar analysis. It also contains eight times more clusters in the redshift interval z ≤ 0.3. The prediction of the β = 2/3 model convolved with the Planck antenna beam agrees with the anisotropies measured in foreground cleaned Planck Nominal maps within the X-ray emitting region, confirming the results of an earlier analysis. The universal pressure profile overestimates the signal by a 15-21 per cent depending on the angular aperture. We show that the discrepancy is not due to the presence of cool-core systems but it is an indication of a brake in the LX - M relation towards low mass systems. We show that relation of the Comptonization parameter averaged over the region that emits 99 per cent of the X-ray flux and and the X-ray luminosity is consistent with the predictions of the self-similar model. We confirm previous findings that the scaling relations studied here do not evolve with redshift within the range probed by our catalogue.

  20. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  1. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  2. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  3. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  4. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  5. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  6. British X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.

    1986-09-01

    The development of solar and cosmic X-ray studies in the UK, in particular the Skylark and Ariel programs, is discussed. The characteristics and capabilities of the X-ray emulsion detector developed to monitor the solar X-radiation in the Skylark program, and of the proportional counter spectrometer developed for solar X-ray measurements on the Ariel I satellite are described. The designs and functions of the pin-hole camera, the Bragg crystal spectrometer, and the X-ray spectroheliograph are exmained. The Skylark observations of cosmic X-ray sources and high-resolution solar spectra, and the Ariel 5 data on cosmic X-ray sources are presented. Consideration is given to the Ariel 6, the U.S. Einstein Observatory, Exosat, and ASTRO-C.

  7. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  8. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s-1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  9. X-Ray Optics for the 2020's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Will

    2010-01-01

    X-ray optics is an essential and enabling technology for x-ray astronomy. This slide presentation presents the authors views on the requirements for x-ray optics as progress is made toward building IXO and preparing for the 2020's. The presentation reviews the status of several technologies that are being developed and outlines the steps that we as a community needs to take to move toward x-ray optics meeting the five key requirements: (1) high angular resolution, (2) large effective area, (3) low mass, (4) fast production, and (5) low cost. There is discussion of segmentation vs full shell, size of the mirror segment, mirror segment frabrication, post-slumping figure improvement, and characterization of coating quality.

  10. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2017-09-01

    Neutron stars in X-ray binary systems are fascinating objects that display a wide range of timing and spectral phenomena in the X-rays. Not only parameters of the neutron stars, like magnetic field strength and spin period evolve in their active binary phase, the neutron stars also affect the binary systems and their immediate surroundings in many ways. Here we discuss some aspects of the interactions of the neutron stars with their environments that are revelaed from their X-ray emission. We discuss some recent developments involving the process of accretion onto high magnetic field neutron stars: accretion stream structure and formation, shape of pulse profile and its changes with accretion torque. Various recent studies of reprocessing of X-rays in the accretion disk surface, vertical structures of the accretion disk and wind of companion star are also discussed here. The X-ray pulsars among the binary neutron stars provide excellent handle to make accurate measurement of the orbital parameters and thus also evolution of the binray orbits that take place over time scale of a fraction of a million years to tens of millions of years. The orbital period evolution of X-ray binaries have shown them to be rather complex systems. Orbital evolution of X-ray binaries can also be carried out from timing of the X-ray eclipses and there have been some surprising results in that direction, including orbital period glitches in two X-ray binaries and possible detection of the most massive circum-binary planet around a Low Mass X-ray Binary.

  11. X-Ray Polarization Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    anatomic structures. Johns and Yaffe (2), building on the work of Alvarez and Macovski (3) and that of Lehmann et al (4), discuss a method for...sources of contrast related to both the wave and par- ticulate nature of x rays. References 1. Johns PC, Yaffe MJ. X-ray characterization of normal and...application to mammography. Med Phys 1985; 12:289–296. 3. Alvarez RE, Macovski A. Energy-selective reconstructions in x-ray computerized tomography. Phys

  12. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  13. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  15. Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystal structure of novel classical 6,5,6-tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines as dual thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Xilin; L.Kisliuk, Roy; Piraino, Jennifer; Cody, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Classical antifolates (4-7) with a tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold and a flexible and rigid benzoylglutamate were synthesized as dual thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. Oxidative aromatization of ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate (±)-9 to ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate 10 with 10% Pd/C was a key synthetic step. Compounds with 2-CH3 substituents inhibited human (h) TS (IC50 = 0.26-0.8 μM), but not hDHFR. Substitution of the 2-CH3 with a 2-NH2 increases hTS inhibition by more than 10-fold and also affords excellent hDHFR inhibition (IC50 = 0.09-0.1 μM). This study shows that the tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold is highly conducive to single hTS or dual hTS-hDHFR inhibition depending on the 2-position substituents. The X-ray crystal structures of 6 and 7 with hDHFR reveal, for the first time, that tricyclics 6 and 7 bind with the benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine ring in the folate binding mode with the thieno S mimicking the 4-amino of methotrexate. PMID:21550809

  16. X-ray photonics: Bending X-rays with nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    X-ray counterparts of visible light optical elements are notoriously difficult to realize because the refractive index of all materials is close to unity. It has now been demonstrated that curved waveguides fabricated on a silicon chip can channel and deflect X-ray beams by consecutive grazing reflections.

  17. THIRTY NEW LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Cameron, Andrew C.; Liu, Michael C.; Neill Reid, I. E-mail: Andrew.Cameron@st-and.ac.u E-mail: mliu@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-06-20

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P{sub rot} to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P{sub rot}, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems.

  18. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  19. Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, M. K.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past two decades, grazing incidence optics have transformed observational x-ray astronomy into a major scientific discipline at the cutting edge of research in astrophysics and cosmology. This review summarizes the fundamental design principles of grazing incidence optics for astronomical applications, describes the capabilities of the current generation of x-ray telescopes, and explores several avenues of future development.

  20. Dual x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2011-04-01

    Dual x-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. We discuss the physics of the method and exhibit its limitations and show it is related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the x-ray absorption coefficients of materials.

  1. X-ray position detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    An X-ray position detector for real time operation is described. A set of proportional counters is arranged into an array which can detect and indicate the position of an X-ray interaction within the array, in the X Y plane.

  2. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to distill from observational and theoretical information on the galactic bulge X-ray sources in general, and on the X-ray burst sources in particular, those aspects which seem to have the greatest relevance to the understanding of these sources. Galactic bulge sources appear to be collapsed objects of roughly solar mass, in most cases neutron stars, which are accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions. Type I bursts seem to result from thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of some of these neutron stars, while the type II bursts from the Rapid Burster are almost certainly due to an instability in the accretion flow onto a neutron star. It is concluded that the studies cited offer a new and powerful observational handle on the fundamental properties of neutron stars and of the interacting binary systems in which they are often contained.

  3. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A [Livermore, CA

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  4. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  6. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; hide

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  7. X-Ray States of Redback Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as "redbacks," constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L X), between (6-9) × 1032 erg s-1 (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 1033 erg s-1 (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L X in the pulsar state (>1032 erg s-1).

  8. Long-term optical/X-ray correlations in LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, David

    We have been monitoring the long-term variability of ~30 low-mass X-ray binaries at optical wavelengths with the two 2-m Faulkes Telescopes. With six to eight years of light curves in several filters for most sources, the data provide a rich database of accretion history in samples of transient, quiescent and persistently accreting LMXBs. Here, we correlate the long-term optical evolution (on week to years timescales) of LMXBs with the hard X-ray flux evolution from Swift BAT, RXTE and INTEGRAL. For black hole LMXBs in the hard state, the optical and X-ray fluxes are highly correlated. In some sources, the clear hard X-ray drop/rise over the hard-to-soft/soft-to-hard state transition is replicated (to a lesser extent) in the optical light curves, and are associated with optical colour changes. Lags between optical and X-ray fluxes are apparent, in both the timing of the peak fluxes (e.g. the optical peak of some outbursts occur several days later than the hard X-ray flux peak) and the drop/rises over state transitions. Optical/X-ray cross-correlations have revealed X-ray lags of several days in some persistent sources, which are likely to represent the viscous timescale of the accretion disc. We demonstrate how the properties of the correlations (correlation index values, lag timescales, dependency on spectral state) can be used to infer the optical emission mechanisms. High amplitude optical drop/rises over state transitions are associated with synchrotron emission from jets, and we discuss whether the same is seen in transient, state changing neutron star LMXBs. We also search for optical correlations to the long-term (hundreds of days) X-ray variability timescales seen in some LMXBs.

  9. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  10. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment.

  11. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  12. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  13. Dissociative X-ray Lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Q.; Liu, J.-C.; Ågren, H.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Gel'mukhanov, F.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray lasing is predicted to ensue when molecules are pumped into dissociative core-excited states by a free-electron-laser pulse. The lasing is due to the population inversion created in the neutral dissociation product, and the process features self-trapping of the x-ray pulse at the gain ridge. Simulations performed for the HCl molecule pumped at the 2p1/2→6σ resonance demonstrate that the scheme can be used to create ultrashort coherent x-ray pulses.

  14. X-RAY MONITORING OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaret, Philip; Feng Hua

    2009-09-10

    X-ray monitoring observations were performed with the Swift observatory of the ultraluminous X-ray sources Holmberg IX X-1, NGC 5408 X-1, and NGC 4395 X-2 and also of the nuclear X-ray source in NGC 4395. Holmberg IX X-1 remains in the hard X-ray spectral state as its flux varies by a factor of 7 up to a (isotropic) luminosity of 2.8 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}. This behavior may suggest an unusually massive compact object. We find excess power at periods near 60 days and 28 days in the X-ray emission from Holmberg IX X-1. Additional monitoring is required to test the significance of these signals. NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 4395 X-2 appear to remain in the soft spectral state found by Chandra and XMM with little variation in spectral hardness even as the luminosity changes by a factor of 9. We found an outburst from the nuclear source in NGC 4395 reaching an X-ray luminosity of 9 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, several times higher than any previously reported.

  15. Compact Optical Counterparts of Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lian; Feng, Hua; Grisé, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-08-01

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at timescales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low-mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power law, F νvpropνα with α in the range 1.0-2.0 and the optically emitting region has a size on the order of 1012 cm. Exceptions are NGC 2403 X-1 and M83 IXO 82, which show optical spectra consistent with direct emission from a standard thin disk, M101 ULX-1 and M81 ULS1, which have X-ray to optical flux ratios more similar to high-mass X-ray binaries, and IC 342 X-1, in which the optical light may be dominated by the companion star. Inconsistent extinction between the optical counterpart of NGC 5204 X-1 and the nearby optical nebulae suggests that they may be unrelated.

  16. Chandra Detection of Intracluster X-Ray sources in Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Meicun; Li, Zhiyuan; Peng, Eric W.; Liu, Chengze

    2017-09-01

    We present a survey of X-ray point sources in the nearest and dynamically young galaxy cluster, Virgo, using archival Chandra observations that sample the vicinity of 80 early-type member galaxies. The X-ray source populations at the outskirts of these galaxies are of particular interest. We detect a total of 1046 point sources (excluding galactic nuclei) out to a projected galactocentric radius of ∼40 kpc and down to a limiting 0.5–8 keV luminosity of ∼ 2× {10}38 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. Based on the cumulative spatial and flux distributions of these sources, we statistically identify ∼120 excess sources that are not associated with the main stellar content of the individual galaxies, nor with the cosmic X-ray background. This excess is significant at a 3.5σ level, when Poisson error and cosmic variance are taken into account. On the other hand, no significant excess sources are found at the outskirts of a control sample of field galaxies, suggesting that at least some fraction of the excess sources around the Virgo galaxies are truly intracluster X-ray sources. Assisted with ground-based and HST optical imaging of Virgo, we discuss the origins of these intracluster X-ray sources, in terms of supernova-kicked low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), globular clusters, LMXBs associated with the diffuse intracluster light, stripped nucleated dwarf galaxies and free-floating massive black holes.

  17. COMPACT OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Lian; Feng Hua; Grise, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-08-20

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at timescales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low-mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power law, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}} with {alpha} in the range 1.0-2.0 and the optically emitting region has a size on the order of 10{sup 12} cm. Exceptions are NGC 2403 X-1 and M83 IXO 82, which show optical spectra consistent with direct emission from a standard thin disk, M101 ULX-1 and M81 ULS1, which have X-ray to optical flux ratios more similar to high-mass X-ray binaries, and IC 342 X-1, in which the optical light may be dominated by the companion star. Inconsistent extinction between the optical counterpart of NGC 5204 X-1 and the nearby optical nebulae suggests that they may be unrelated.

  18. The Hard X-Ray Telescope Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Joensen, K.; Romaine, S.; Worrall, D.; Cameron, R.; Weisskopf, M.; Ramsey, B.; Bilbro, J.; Kroeger, R.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A.; Smither, R.; Christensen, F.; Citterio, O.; von Ballmoos, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) mission concept contains focusing telescopes that collectively, observe simultaneously from the ultraviolet to 100 keV and in several narrow bands extending to 1 MeV. In pointed observations HXT is expected to have an order of magnitude more sensitivity and much finer angular resolution in the 10 to 100 keV band than all current and currently planned future missions, and considerably more sensitivity for detecting narrow lines in the 100 keV to 1 MeV regime. The detectors are small, cooled arrays of relatively low mass with very good energy resolution and some polarization sensitivity. HXT contains two types of hard X-ray telescopes. One type, called the modular modular telescope (MMT) utilizes a novel type of multilayer coating and small graze angles to extend the regime of focusing to 100keV. There is a two stage imaging detector at each focus, a CCD for X-rays < 10 keV followed down stream by either a germanium strip array or cadmium zinc telluride array for 10-100 keV X-rays. The other type of telescope, called the Laue Crystal Telescope (LCT) is a single adjustable array of several hundred Ge crystals that focus by Laue scattering. Individual picomotors adjust the angle of each crystal to diffract photons of a fixed energy to the same point along the optic axis where they converge upon a movable array of cooled germanium detectors. The LCT will have high sensitivity for detecting narrow X-ray lines of known energy such as those expected from Type 1 supernova. The UV monitor is a three telescope system that provides coverage in the ultraviolet band for study of time correlated changes across the broad electromagnetic spectrum of an AGN such as are expected in ``reverberation'' models. A WWW page will be created as a public bulletin board. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG8-1194

  19. The Swift X-ray Telescope Cluster Survey. II. X-ray spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, P.; Moretti, A.; Tundo, E.; Liu, T.; Rosati, P.; Borgani, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; D'Avanzo, P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present a spectral analysis of a new, flux-limited sample of 72 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies identified with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite down to a flux limit of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 (SWXCS). We carry out a detailed X-ray spectral analysis with the twofold aim of measuring redshifts and characterizing the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) for the majority of the SWXCS sources. Methods: Optical counterparts and spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for some of the sources are obtained with a cross-correlation with the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Additional photometric redshifts are computed with a dedicated follow-up program with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and a cross-correlation with the SDSS. In addition, we also blindly search for the Hydrogen-like and He-like iron Kα emission line complex in the X-ray spectrum. We detect the iron emission lines in 35% of the sample, and hence obtain a robust measure of the X-ray redshift zX with typical rms error 1-5%. We use zX whenever the optical redshift is not available. Finally, for all the sources with measured redshift, background-subtracted spectra are fitted with a single-temperature mekal model to measure global temperature, X-ray luminosity and iron abundance of the ICM. We perform extensive spectral simulations to accounts for fitting bias, and to assess the robustness of our results. We derive a criterion to select reliable best-fit models and an empirical formula to account for fitting bias. The bias-corrected values are then used to investigate the scaling properties of the X-ray observables. Results: Overall, we are able to characterize the ICM of 46 sources with redshifts (64% of the sample). The sample is mostly constituted by clusters with temperatures between 3 and 10 keV, plus 14 low-mass clusters and groups with temperatures below 3 keV. The redshift distribution peaks around z ~ 0.25 and extends up to z ~ 1, with 60% of the sample at 0.1 < z

  20. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be taken before children receive x-rays. Considerations There are some back problems that an x- ... imaging for low back pain: advice for high-value health care from the American College of Physicians. ...

  1. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  2. CELESTIAL X-RAY SOURCES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    sources, (4) the physical conditions in the pulsating x-ray source in the Crab Nebula , and (5) miscellaneous related topics. A bibliography of all work performed under the contract is given. (Author)

  3. Nanoscale X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakdinawat, Anne; Attwood, David

    2010-12-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in the field of soft- and hard-X-ray microscopy, both technically, through developments in source, optics and imaging methodologies, and also scientifically, through a wide range of applications. While an ever-growing community is pursuing the extensive applications of today's available X-ray tools, other groups are investigating improvements in techniques, including new optics, higher spatial resolutions, brighter compact sources and shorter-duration X-ray pulses. This Review covers recent work in the development of direct image-forming X-ray microscopy techniques and the relevant applications, including three-dimensional biological tomography, dynamical processes in magnetic nanostructures, chemical speciation studies, industrial applications related to solar cells and batteries, and studies of archaeological materials and historical works of art.

  4. Future x-ray missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2002-11-01

    Recent results from XMM-Newton and Chandra show that sufficiently sensitive x_ray imaging and spectroscopic capabilities allow one to observe the evolution of active galaxies out to z ~ 6, the x-ray signature of luminous star forming galaxies at z~3, as well as the origin and evolution of cosmic structure. With the advent of new optical/UV/IR and radio capabilities in the next decade, it is appropriate to evaluate the future capabilities of planned x-ray missions (e.g., Constellation_X and Astro-E2) as well as other missions being developed (e.g., Gen-X, XEUS, and Astro-G) or under advance planning (MAXIM and EXIST). I will present a summary of the present status of the field and the capabilities of these missions for extragalactic x-ray astronomy.

  5. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... radiologist (a doctor who is specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  6. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... a radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... Results A radiologist, a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images, will look at ...

  8. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  9. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  11. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  12. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the X-ray spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources, ranging from nearby stars to distant quasars, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of such spectroscopy as a useful and unique tool in the elucidation of the physical parameters of the sources. The spectroscopic analysis of degenerate and nondegenerate stellar systems, galactic clusters and active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants is discussed.

  13. X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The primary advantage of the X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) NDE method is that features are not superposed in the image, thereby rendering them easier to interpret than radiographic projection images. Industrial XRCT systems, unlike medical diagnostic systems, have no size and dosage constraints; they are accordingly used for systems from the scale of gas turbine blades, with hundreds-of-kV energies, to those of the scale of ICBMs, requiring MV-level X-ray energies.

  14. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  15. X-ray Sensitive Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    The research resulted in a composite material that holds a quasi-permanent electric charge and rapidly discharges the electric charge upon X-ray...temperature extremes encountered during processing and potential application. (U) The result of these efforts was a composite material that would hold a...quasi-permanent electric charge and rapidly discharge the electric charge upon X-ray exposure. The composite material combined the properties of an

  16. Black Hole X Ray Nova Outburst with XTE and HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1998-01-01

    We obtained multiwavelength coverage of the soft X-ray transient. GRO J1655-40 during its 1996 outburst, using HST (Hubble Space Telescope), RXTE (Rossi X Ray Timing Explorer), CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory), and ground-based facilities. This outburst was qualitatively different from other SXT (Soft X Ray Telescope) outbursts and from previous outbursts of this source. The onset of hard X-ray activity occurred very slowly, over several months, and was delayed relative to the soft X-ray rise. During this period, the optical fluxes declined steadily. This apparent anticorrelation is not consistent with with the standard disk instability model of SXT outbursts, nor is it expected if the optical output is dominated by reprocessed X-rays, as in persistent low-mass X-ray binaries. Based on the strength of the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature, we constrain the reddening to be E(B - V) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1, a result which is consistent with the known properties of the source and with the strength of other interstellar absorption lines. After this dereddening we find that the spectra are dominated by a component peaking in the optical, with the expected v (sup l/3) disk spectrum seen only in the ultraviolet. Bowen fluorescence lines of NIII and OIII are also seen, as well as possible P Cyg profiles in the ultraviolet resonance lines. These features suggest an accretion-disk wind. The X-ray spectra broadly resemble the high/soft state commonly seen in black hole candidates, but evolve through two substates.

  17. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  18. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of research activities carried out in the area of cosmic X-ray physics is presented. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer DXS which has been flown twice as a rocket payload is described. The observation times proved to be too small for meaningful X-ray data to be obtained. Data collection and reduction activities from the Ultra-Soft X-ray background (UXT) instrument are described. UXT consists of three mechanically-collimated X-ray gas proportional counters with window/filter combinations which allow measurements in three energy bands, Be (80-110 eV), B (90-187 eV), and O (e84-532 eV). The Be band measurements provide an important constraint on local absorption of X-rays from the hot component of the local interstellar medium. Work has also continued on the development of a calorimetric detector for high-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.1 keV - 8keV energy range.

  19. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  20. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  1. Element Abundances in X-ray Emitting Plasmas in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola

    2010-12-01

    Studies of element abundances in stars are of fundamental interest for their impact in a wide astrophysical context, from our understanding of galactic chemistry and its evolution, to their effect on models of stellar interiors, to the influence of the composition of material in young stellar environments on the planet formation process. We review recent results of studies of abundance properties of X-ray emitting plasmas in stars, ranging from the corona of the Sun and other solar-like stars, to pre-main sequence low-mass stars, and to early-type stars. We discuss the status of our understanding of abundance patterns in stellar X-ray plasmas, and recent advances made possible by accurate diagnostics now accessible thanks to the high resolution X-ray spectroscopy with Chandra and XMM-Newton.

  2. A radio pulsar/x-ray binary link.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Anne M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ransom, Scott M; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason W T; Lynch, Ryan; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Roberts, Mallory S E; Jenet, Frederick; Champion, David J; Rosen, Rachel; Barlow, Brad N; Dunlap, Bart H; Remillard, Ronald A

    2009-06-12

    Radio pulsars with millisecond spin periods are thought to have been spun up by the transfer of matter and angular momentum from a low-mass companion star during an x-ray-emitting phase. The spin periods of the neutron stars in several such low-mass x-ray binary (LMXB) systems have been shown to be in the millisecond regime, but no radio pulsations have been detected. Here we report on detection and follow-up observations of a nearby radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) in a circular binary orbit with an optically identified companion star. Optical observations indicate that an accretion disk was present in this system within the past decade. Our optical data show no evidence that one exists today, suggesting that the radio MSP has turned on after a recent LMXB phase.

  3. X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B.; Tzanavaris, P.; Tremmel, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-02-10

    High-redshift galaxies permit the study of the formation and evolution of X-ray binary (XRB) populations on cosmological timescales, probing a wide range of metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs). In this paper, we present results from a large-scale population synthesis study that models the XRB populations from the first galaxies of the universe until today. We use as input to our modeling the Millennium II cosmological simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history and metallicity evolution of the universe. Our modeling, which is constrained by the observed X-ray properties of local galaxies, gives predictions about the global scaling of emission from XRB populations with properties such as SFR and stellar mass, and the evolution of these relations with redshift. Our simulations show that the X-ray luminosity density (X-ray luminosity per unit volume) from XRBs in our universe today is dominated by low-mass XRBs, and it is only at z {approx}> 2.5 that high-mass XRBs become dominant. We also find that there is a delay of {approx}1.1 Gyr between the peak of X-ray emissivity from low-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 2.1) and the peak of SFR density (at z {approx} 3.1). The peak of the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 3.9) happens {approx}0.8 Gyr before the peak of the SFR density, which is due to the metallicity evolution of the universe.

  4. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  5. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Sholukhova, O.; Abolmasov, P.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss a new type of X-ray sources discovered in galaxies -- ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). They are of two order of magnitude brighter in X-rays than the brightest Galactic black holes. Two mod- els of ULXs are discussed: "intermediate mass" black holes, 100 - 10000 solar masses, with standard accretion disks, and "stellar mass" black holes with su- percritical accretion disks like that in the Galactic object SS 433. A study of gas nebulae surrounding these objects gives us a new important information on the central sources. The observed X-ray radiation of ULXs is not enough to power their nebulae. To understand both spectra and power of the nebulae one needs a powerful UV source. The ULXs must be such bright in UV range as they are in X-rays. Spectroscopy of gas filaments surrounding SS 433 proves that the intrinsic face-on luminosity of the supercritical accretion disk in the far UV region to be "sim; 10^40 erg/s. We expect that observations of ULXs with the WSO-UV Observatory, measurements their UV fluxes and spectral slopes solve the problem of ULXs between the two known models of these sources.

  6. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  7. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  8. Clocking Femtosecond X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Mills, D M; Pahl, R; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Lowney, D P; MacPhee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Calleman, C; Huldt, G; der Spoel, D v; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Hastings, J B

    2004-10-08

    The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) produces the brightest ultrafast x-ray pulses in the world, and is the first to employ compressed femtosecond electron bunches for the x-ray source. Both SPPS and future X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL's) will use precise measurements of individual electron bunches to time the arrival of x-ray pulses for time-resolved experiments. At SPPS we use electro-optic sampling (EOS) to perform these measurements. Here we present the first results using this method. An ultrafast laser pulse (135 fs) passes through an electro-optic crystal adjacent to the electron beam. The refractive index of the crystal is distorted by the strong electromagnetic fields of the ultra-relativistic electrons, and this transient birefringence is imprinted on the laser polarization. A polarizer decodes this signal, producing a time-dependent image of the compressed electron bunch. Our measurements yield the relative timing between an ultrafast optical laser and an ultrafast x-ray pulse to within 60 fs, making it possible to use the SPPS to observe atomic-scale ultrafast dynamics initiated by laser-matter interaction.

  9. X-ray emission from the young brown dwarfs of the Taurus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, N.; Briggs, K. R.; Güdel, M.; Guieu, S.; Franciosini, E.; Palla, F.; Dougados, C.; Monin, J.-L.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Audard, M.; Telleschi, A.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:We report the X-ray properties of young (~3 Myr) bona fide brown dwarfs of the Taurus Molecular Cloud (TMC). Methods: The XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the TMC (XEST) is a large program designed to systematically investigate the X-ray properties of young stellar/substellar objects in the TMC. In particular, the area surveyed by 15 XMM-Newton pointings (of which three are archival observations), supplemented with one archival Chandra observation, allows us to study 17 brown dwarfs with M spectral types. Results: Half of this sample (9 out of 17 brown dwarfs) is detected; 7 brown dwarfs are detected here for the first time in X-rays. We observed a flare from one brown dwarf. We confirm several previous findings on brown dwarf X-ray activity: a log-log relation between X-ray and bolometric luminosity for stars (with L* ≤ 10 L_⊙) and brown dwarfs detected in X-rays, which is consistent with a mean X-ray fractional luminosity < log(L_X/L_*)> =-3.5 ± 0.4; for the XEST brown dwarfs, the median of log(L_X/L_*) (including upper limits) is -4.0; a shallow log-log relation between X-ray fractional luminosity and mass; a log-log relation between X-ray fractional luminosity and effective temperature; a log-log relation between X-ray surface flux and effective temperature. We find no significant log-log correlation between the X-ray fractional luminosity and EW(Hα). Accreting and nonaccreting brown dwarfs have a similar X-ray fractional luminosity. The median X-ray fractional luminosity of nonaccreting brown dwarfs is about 4 times lower than the mean saturation value for rapidly rotating low-mass field stars. Our TMC brown dwarfs have higher X-ray fractional luminosity than brown dwarfs in the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project. Conclusions: The X-ray fractional luminosity declines from low-mass stars to M-type brown dwarfs, and as a sample, the brown dwarfs are less efficient X-ray emitters than low-mass stars. We thus conclude that while the brown dwarf atmospheres

  10. AN X-RAY STUDY OF THE ETHYLENE GLYCOLMONTMORILLONITE COMPLEX.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SOILS, * MONTMORILLONITE , *GLYCOLS, *X RAY SPECTROSCOPY, X RAY SPECTRA, X RAY SPECTRA, X RAY SPECTRA, CLAY MINERALS, COMPLEX COMPOUNDS, FOURIER ANALYSIS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, THERMAL PROPERTIES, MATHEMATICAL MODELS.

  11. X-ray emitting T Tauri stars in the L1551 cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koyama, Katsuji; Reid, I. Neill; Carkner, Lee; Feigelson, Eric D.; Montmerle, Thierry

    1995-01-01

    Low mass pre-main sequence stars in the nearby Lynds 1551 star forming cloud are studied with the ROSAT and ASCA X-ray satellites. An 8 ksec ROSAT image reveals 38 sources including 7 well-known T Tauri stars, 2 likely new weak-lined T Tauri stars, 5 potential new weak-lined T Tauri stars, one is a young B9 star, and the remaining sources are unrelated to the cloud or poorly identified. A 40 ksec ASCA image of the cloud detects seven of the ROSAT sources. Spectral fitting of the brighter X-ray emitting stars suggests the emission is produced in either a multi-temperature plasma, with temperatures near 0.2 and 1 keV, or a single-temperature plasma with low metal abundances. XZ Tau, a young classical T Tauri star, is much stronger in ASCA than ROSAT observations showing a harder (1.5-2.0 kev) component. Timing analysis reveals all but one of the T Tauri stars are variable on timescales ranging from one hour to a year. A powerful flare, emitting 3 x 10(exp 34) ergs within a 40 minute rise and fall, was observed by ASCA on the weak-lined T Tauri star V826 Tau. The event was preceded and followed by constant quiescent X-ray emission. The extreme classical T Tauri star XZ Tau was also caught during both high and low states, varying by a factor of 15 between the ASCA and ROSAT observations. Neither of the luminous infrared embedded protostars L1551-IRS 5 or L1551NE were detected by ROSAT or ASCA.

  12. Projection x-ray topography system at 1-BM x-ray optics test beamline at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav Liu, Zunping; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Lang, Keenan; Goetze, Kurt; Sullivan, Joseph; Macrander, Albert; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael

    2016-07-27

    Projection X-ray topography of single crystals is a classic technique for the evaluation of intrinsic crystal quality of large crystals. In this technique a crystal sample and an area detector (e.g., X-ray film) collecting intensity of a chosen crystallographic reflection are translated simultaneously across an X-ray beam collimated in the diffraction scattering plane (e.g., [1, 2]). A bending magnet beamline of a third-generation synchrotron source delivering x-ray beam with a large horizontal divergence, and therefore, a large horizontal beam size at a crystal sample position offers an opportunity to obtain X-ray topographs of large crystalline samples (e.g., 6-inch wafers) in just a few exposures. Here we report projection X-ray topography system implemented recently at 1-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. A selected X-ray topograph of a 6-inch wafer of 4H-SiC illustrates capabilities and limitations of the technique.

  13. Pinhole interferometry with coherent hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Leitenberger, Wolfram; Wendrock, Horst; Bischoff, Lothar; Weitkamp, Timm

    2004-03-01

    This paper discusses the experimental realisation of two types of X-ray interferometer based on pinhole diffraction. In both interferometers the beam splitter was a thin metal foil containing micrometer pinholes to divide the incident X-ray wave into two coherent waves. The interference pattern was studied using an energy-dispersive detector to simultaneously investigate in a large spectral range the diffraction properties of the white synchrotron radiation. For a highly absorbing pinhole mask the interference fringes from the classical Young's double-pinhole experiment were recorded and the degree of coherence of X-rays could be determined. In the case of low absorption of the metal foil at higher X-ray energies (>15 keV) the interference pattern of a point diffraction interferometer was observed using the same set-up. The spectral refraction index of the metal foil was determined.

  14. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  15. Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip; Feng, Hua; Roberts, Timothy P.

    2017-08-01

    We review observations of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). X-ray spectroscopic and timing studies of ULXs suggest a new accretion state distinct from those seen in Galactic stellar-mass black hole binaries. The detection of coherent pulsations indicates the presence of neutron-star accretors in three ULXs and therefore apparently super-Eddington luminosities. Optical and X-ray line profiles of ULXs and the properties of associated radio and optical nebulae suggest that ULXs produce powerful outflows, also indicative of super-Eddington accretion. We discuss models of super-Eddington accretion and their relation to the observed behaviors of ULXs. We review the evidence for intermediate mass black holes in ULXs. We consider the implications of ULXs for super-Eddington accretion in active galactic nuclei, heating of the early universe, and the origin of the black hole binary recently detected via gravitational waves.

  16. X-ray Timing Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present new, extended X-ray timing measurements of the ultra-compact binary candidates V407 Vul and RX J0806.3+1527 (J0806), as well as a summary of the first high resolution X-ray spectra of 50806 obtained with the Chandra/LETG. The temporal baseline for both objects is approximately 12 years, and our measurements confirm the secular spin-up in their X-ray periods. The spin-up rate in 50806 is remarkably uniform at 3.55x10(exp -16)Hz/s, with a measurement precision of 0.2%. We place a limit (90% confidence) on 1 d dot nu < 4x10(exp -26)Hz/sq s. Interestingly, for V407 Vul we find the first evidence that the spin-up rate is slowing, with d dot\

  17. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  18. The X-Ray Globular Cluster Population in NGC 1399

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Loewenstein, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard F.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on X-ray sources detected in the Chandra images of the elliptical galaxy NGC 1399 and identified with globular clusters (GCs). The 8'x 8' Chandra image shows that a large fraction of the 2-10 keV X-ray emission is resolved into point sources, with a luminosity threshold of 5 x 10 (exp 37) ergs s-1. These sources are most likely Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs). More than 70% of the X-ray sources, in a region imaged by Hubble Space Telescope (HST), are located within GCs. Many of these sources have super-Eddington luminosity (for an accreting neutron star) and their average luminosity is higher than the remaining sources. This association suggests that, in giant elliptical galaxies, luminous X-ray binaries preferentially form in GCs. The spectral properties of the GC and non-GC sources are in most cases similar to those of LMXBs in our galaxy. Two of the brightest sources, one of which is in GC, have a much softer spectra as seen in the high state black hole. The "apparent" super-Eddington luminosity in many cases may be due to multiple LMXB systems within individual GC, but with some of the most extreme luminous systems containing massive black holes.

  19. The X-ray Halo of GX5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Dame, T. M.; Costantini, Elisa; Predehl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Using Chandra observations we have measured the energy-resolved dust-scattered X-ray halo around the low-mass X-ray binary GX5-1, detecting for the first time multiply scattered X-rays from interstellar dust. % e compared the observed X-ray halo at various energies to predictions from a range of dust models. These fits used both smoothly-distributed dust as well as dust in clumped clouds, with CO and 21 cm observations helping to determine the position of the clouds along the line of sight. We found that the BARE-GR-B model of Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004) generally led to the best results, although inadequacies in both the overall model and the data limit our conclusions. We did find that the composite dust models of Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004), especially the "no carbon" models, gave uniformly poor results. Although models using cloud positions and densities derived naively from CO and 21 cm data gave generally poor results, plausible adjustments to the distance of the largest cloud and the mass of a cloud in the expanding 3 kpc Arm lead to significantly improved fits. We suggest that combining X-ray halo, CO, and 21 cm observations will be a fruitful method to improve our understanding of both the gas and dust phases of the interstellar medium.

  20. X-Ray Probes of Cosmic Star Formation History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; White, Nicholas E.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the imprints left by a cosmological evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) on the evolution of X-ray luminosities Lx of normal galaxies, using the scheme earlier proposed by us, wherein the evolution of LX of a galaxy is driven by the evolution of its X-ray binary population. As indicated in our earlier work, the profile of Lx with redshift can both serve as a diagnostic probe of the SFR profile and constrain evolutionary models for X-ray binaries. We report here the first calculation of the expected evolution of X-ray luminosities of galaxies, updating our work by using a suite of more recently developed SFR profiles that span the currently plausible range. The first Chandra deep imaging results on Lx evolution are beginning to probe the SFR profile of bright spiral galaxies; the early results are consistent with predictions based on current SFR models. Using these new SFR profiles, the resolution of the "birthrate problem" of low-mass X-ray binaries and recycled, millisecond pulsars in terms of an evolving global SFR is more complete. We discuss the possible impact of the variations in the SFR profile of individual galaxies and galaxy types.

  1. The Central X-Ray Point Source in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Hernquist, Lars E.; Heyl, Jeremy S.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-02-01

    The spectacular ``first light'' observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory revealed an X-ray point source near the center of the 300 yr old Cas A supernova remnant. We present an analysis of the public X-ray spectral and timing data. No coherent pulsations were detected in the Chandra/HRC data. The 3 σ upper limit on the pulsed fraction is less than 35% for P>20 ms. The Chandra/ACIS spectrum of the point source may be fitted with an ideal blackbody (kT=0.5 keV) or with blackbody models modified by the presence of a neutron star atmosphere (kT=0.25-0.35 keV), but the temperature is higher and the inferred emitting area lower than expected for a 300 yr old neutron star according to standard cooling models. The spectrum may also be fitted with a power-law model (photon index Γ=2.8-3.6). Both the spectral properties and the timing limits of the point source are inconsistent with a young Crab-like pulsar but are quite similar to the properties of the anomalous X-ray pulsars. The spectral parameters are also very similar to those of the other radio-quiet X-ray point sources in the supernova remnants Pup A, RCW 103, and PKS 1209-52. Current limits on an optical counterpart for the Cas A point source rule out models that invoke fallback accretion onto a compact object if fallback disk properties are similar to those in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. However, the optical limits are marginally consistent with plausible alternative assumptions for a fallback disk. In this case, accreting neutron star models can explain the X-ray data, but an accreting black hole model is not promising.

  2. Portable X-Ray Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  3. Coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitney, John Allen

    Conventional x-ray diffraction has historically been done under conditions such that the measured signal consists of an incoherent addition of scattering which is coherent only on a length scale determined by the properties of the beam. The result of the incoherent summation is a statistical averaging over the whole illuminated volume of the sample, which yields certain kinds of information with a high degree of precision and has been key to the success of x-ray diffraction in a variety of applications. Coherent x-ray scattering techniques, such as coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) and x-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (XIFS), attempt to reduce or eliminate any incoherent averaging so that specific, local structures couple to the measurement without being averaged out. In the case of XIFS, the result is analogous to dynamical light scattering, but with sensitivity to length scales less than 200 nm and time scales from 10-3 s to 103 s. When combined with phase retrieval, CXD represents an imaging technique with the penetration, in situ capabilities, and contrast mechanisms associated with x-rays and with a spatial resolution ultimately limited by the x-ray wavelength. In practice, however, the spatial resolution of CXD imaging is limited by exposure to about 100 A. This thesis describes CXD measurements of the binary alloy Cu3Au and the adaptation of phase retrieval methods for the reconstruction of real-space images of Cu3Au antiphase domains. The theoretical foundations of CXD are described in Chapter 1 as derived from the kinematical formulation for x-ray diffraction and from the temporal and spatial coherence of radiation. The antiphase domain structure of Cu 3Au is described, along with the associated reciprocal-space structure which is measured by CXD. CXD measurements place relatively stringent requirements on the coherence properties of the beam and on the detection mechanism of the experiment; these requirements and the means by which they have been

  4. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  5. X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We describe the chemical information that can be obtained by means of hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). XES is presented as a technique that is complementary to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and that provides valuable information with respect to the electronic structure (local charge- and spin-density) as well as the ligand environment of a 3d transition metal. We address non-resonant and resonant XES and present results that were recorded on Mn model systems and the Mn(4)Ca-cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. A brief description of the instrumentation is given with an outlook toward future developments.

  6. X-rays from stars.

    PubMed

    Güdel, Manuel

    2002-09-15

    More than two years of observation with Chandra and XMM-Newton has provided a rich harvest of new results on the physics of stellar coronae and winds. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy in particular has opened new windows to the structure, the dynamics and the composition of stellar atmospheres. The present paper presents selected results from the areas of hot and cool stars and star formation, summarizing new views of the thermal structure and energy release in stellar coronae, observations of magnetically active brown dwarfs, the structure of winds in hot stars, the physics in colliding-wind binary systems, and X-rays from protostars and stellar jets.

  7. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  8. Compact Flash X-Ray Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    Flash x-ray units are used to diagnose pulsed power driven experiments on the Pegasus machine at Los Alamos. Several unique designs of Marx powered...employing an x-ray tube configuration which allows closely spaced x-ray emitting anodes. These units all emit a 10 ns FWHM x-ray pulse. Their Marx banks

  9. X-ray exposure sensor and controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. Martin (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An exposure controller for x-ray equipment is provided, which comprises a portable and accurate sensor which can be placed adjacent to and directly beneath the area of interest of an x-ray plate, and which measures the amount of exposure received by that area, and turns off the x-ray equipment when the exposure for the particular area of interest on the x-ray plate reaches the value which provides an optimal x-ray plate.

  10. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  11. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  12. X-ray backscatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  13. Rontgen's Discovery of X Rays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thumm, Walter

    1975-01-01

    Relates the story of Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen and presents one view of the extent to which the discovery of the x-ray was an accident. Reconstructs the sequence of events that led to the discovery and includes photographs of the lab where he worked and replicas of apparatus used. (GS)

  14. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  15. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  16. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  17. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  18. Stellar x-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, B.; Uchida, Y.; Kosugi, T.; Hudson, H. S.

    1995-01-01

    What is the importance of stellar X-ray flares to astrophysics, or even more, to the world at large? In the case of the Sun, changes in solar activity at the two temporal extremes can have quite significant consequences. Longterm changes in solar activity, such as the Maunder Minimum, can apparently lead to non-negligible alterations of the earth's climate. The extreme short term changes are solar flares, the most energetic of which can cause communications disruptions, power outages and ionizing radiation levels amounting to medical X-ray dosages on long commercial flights and even potentially lethal exposures for unshielded astronauts. Why does the Sun exhibit such behaviour? Even if we had a detailed knowledge of the relevant physical processes on the Sun - which we may be on the way to having in hand as evidenced by these Proceedings- our understanding would remain incomplete in regard to fundamental causation so long as we could not say whether the Sun is, in this respect, unique among the stars. This current paper discusses the stellar x-ray flare detections and astronomical models (quasi-static cooling model and two-ribbon model) that are used to observe the x-ray emission.

  19. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  20. X-Rays from Pluto

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-14

    The first detection of Pluto in X-rays has been made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in conjunction with observations from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft. As New Horizons approached Pluto in late 2014 and then flew by the planet during the summer of 2015, Chandra obtained data during four separate observations. During each observation, Chandra detected low-energy X-rays from the small planet. The main panel in this graphic is an optical image taken from New Horizons on its approach to Pluto, while the inset shows an image of Pluto in X-rays from Chandra. There is a significant difference in scale between the optical and X-ray images. New Horizons made a close flyby of Pluto but Chandra is located near the Earth, so the level of detail visible in the two images is very different. The Chandra image is 180,000 miles across at the distance of Pluto, but the planet is only 1,500 miles across. Pluto is detected in the X-ray image as a point source, showing the sharpest level of detail available for Chandra or any other X-ray observatory. This means that details over scales that are smaller than the X-ray source cannot be seen here. Detecting X-rays from Pluto is a somewhat surprising result given that Pluto - a cold, rocky world without a magnetic field - has no natural mechanism for emitting X-rays. However, scientists knew from previous observations of comets that the interaction between the gases surrounding such planetary bodies and the solar wind - the constant streams of charged particles from the sun that speed throughout the solar system -- can create X-rays. The researchers were particularly interested in learning more about the interaction between the gases in Pluto's atmosphere and the solar wind. The New Horizon spacecraft carries an instrument designed to measure that activity up-close -- Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) -- and scientists examined that data and proposed that Pluto contains a very mild, close-in bowshock, where the solar wind first

  1. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  2. Compact x-ray source and panel

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  3. X-ray states of redback millisecond pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as 'redbacks', constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L {sub X}), between (6-9) × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1} (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L {sub X} in the pulsar state (>10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}).

  4. X-Ray Streak Camera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaanimagi, Paul Ants

    Streak cameras are acknowledged as the only instruments capable of unambiguously diagnosing optical phenomena with a time resolution of the order of a picosecond on a single shot basis. As streak cameras become more extensively used for diagnostics in such fields as picosecond laser pulse generation, photo-chemistry, laser produced plasma studies, the instrument's capabilities are also being examined and limitations are becoming noticeable. One of the aims of this dissertation is to investigate the question of streak camera fidelity, especially with regard to linearity and dynamic range as a function of the time resolution. It is shown that the dynamic range is proportional to the product of the instrumental time resolution and the pulse width. The implications for femtosecond diagnostic capability are self-evident but a study of the sources of the limitations suggest distinct avenues for improving the systems. Since a streak camera employs an electron analog of the optical signal, clearly space charge will cause significant distortion at large current densities and consequently limit the dynamic range. Problems also result from nonlinear photocathode response, electron lens distortions, time of flight dispersion, phosphor reciprocity failure and nonlinear intensifier gain. The solution for some of these problems requires modifications to the basic tube designs. The National Research Council of Canada x-ray streak camera (based on a RCA C73435 image tube) was used as the starting point for testing electron optic designs and implementing the desired modifications. The objective of this work was to improve our x-ray diagnostic in sensitivity and in time resolution capability to < 10 ps. Ultimately this streak camera was to be used to time resolve the x -ray emission from plasmas produced by the COCO II and high pressure CO(,2) laser facilities at NRC. Features of the redesigned x-ray streak camera include: a large photocathode area (1.3 x 25 mm), a photoelectron

  5. An X-Ray Survey of the Open Cluster NGC 6475 (M7) with ROSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Stauffer, John R.; Caillault, J.-P.; Balachandran, Suchitra; Stern, Robert A.; Randich, Sofia

    1995-01-01

    A ROSAT x-ray survey, with complimentary optical photometry, of the open cluster NGC 6475 has enabled the detection of approx. 50 late-F to K0 and approx. 70 K/M dwarf new candidate members, providing the first reliable detection of low-mass stars in this low. galactic latitude, 220 Myr old cluster. The x-ray observations reported here have a typical limiting sensitivity of L(sub x) approx. equal to 10(exp 29) erg/s. The detection frequency of early type cluster members is consistent with the hypothesis that the x-ray emitting early type stars are binary systems with an unseen, low-mass secondary producing the x rays. The ratio between x-ray and bolometric luminosity among NGC 6475 members saturates at a spectral-type/color which is intermediate between that in much younger and in much older clusters, consistent with rotational spindown of solar-type stars upon their arrival on the ZAMS. The upper envelope of x-ray luminosity as a function of spectral type is comparable to that of the Pleiades, with the observed spread in x-ray luminosity among low-mass members being likely due to the presence of binaries and relatively rapid rotators. However, the list of x-ray selected candidate members is likely biased against low-mass, slowly rotating single stars. While some preliminary spectroscopic information is given in an appendix, further spectroscopic observations of the new candidate members will aid in interpreting the coronal activity among solar-type NGC 6475 members and their relation to similar stars in older and younger open clusters.

  6. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  7. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  8. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of 2 hr and a radiated energy output of 5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx5E32 ergs and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx1E35-1E36 ergs for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx1E33-1E34 ergs. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  9. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of <αOX> = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  10. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  11. Effective X-ray beam size measurements of an X-ray tube and polycapillary X-ray lens system using a scanning X-ray fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherase, Mihai R.; Vargas, Andres Felipe

    2017-03-01

    Size measurements of an X-ray beam produced by an integrated polycapillary X-ray lens (PXL) and X-ray tube system were performed by means of a scanning X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) method using three different metallic wires. The beam size was obtained by fitting the SXRF data with the analytical convolution between a Gaussian and a constant functions. For each chemical element in the wire an effective energy was calculated based on the incident X-ray spectrum and its photoelectric cross section. The proposed method can be used to measure the effective X-ray beam size in XRF microscopy studies.

  12. X-ray observations of black widow pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, P. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Camilo, F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kerr, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Stairs, I. H.

    2014-03-10

    We describe the first X-ray observations of five short orbital period (P{sub B} < 1 day), γ-ray emitting, binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Four of these—PSRs J0023+0923, J1124–3653, J1810+1744, and J2256–1024—are 'black-widow' pulsars, with degenerate companions of mass <<0.1 M {sub ☉}, three of which exhibit radio eclipses. The fifth source, PSR J2215+5135, is an eclipsing 'redback' with a near Roche-lobe filling ∼0.2 solar mass non-degenerate companion. Data were taken using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and covered a full binary orbit for each pulsar. Two pulsars, PSRs J2215+5135 and J2256–1024, show significant orbital variability while PSR J1124–3653 shows marginal orbital variability. The lightcurves for these three pulsars have X-ray flux minima coinciding with the phases of the radio eclipses. This phenomenon is consistent with an intrabinary shock emission interpretation for the X-rays. The other two pulsars, PSRs J0023+0923 and J1810+1744, are fainter and do not demonstrate variability at a level we can detect in these data. All five spectra are fit with three separate models: a power-law model, a blackbody model, and a combined model with both power-law and blackbody components. The preferred spectral fits yield power-law indices that range from 1.3 to 3.2 and blackbody temperatures in the hundreds of eV. The spectrum for PSR J2215+5135 shows a significant hard X-ray component, with a large number of counts above 2 keV, which is additional evidence for the presence of intrabinary shock emission. This is similar to what has been detected in the low-mass X-ray binary to MSP transition object PSR J1023+0038.

  13. SIXE: An X-ray experiment for a minisatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, Jordi; Bravo, Eduardo; Gómez-Gomar, Jordi; Hernanz, Margarida; García-Berro, Enrique; Giovannelli, Franco; La Padula, Cesare D.; Sabau, Lola; Gutiérrez, Jordi; José, Jordi; García-Senz, Domingo; Bausells, Joan; Cabestany, Joan; Madrenas, Jordi; Angulo, Manuel; Fernández-Valbuena, Manuel; Herrera, Erardo; Reina, Manuel; Talavera, Antonio

    1999-12-01

    SIXE (Spanish Italian X-ray Experiment) is an X-ray detector with geometric area of 2300 cm2, formed by four identical gas-filled Multicell Proportional Counters, and devoted to study the long term spectroscopy of selected X-ray sources in the energy range 3-50 keV. The main characteristics of SIXE are: time accuracy of 1 microsecond, spectral resolution of 5% for E>35 keV and 46/E% for E<35 keV, continuum sensitivity (3σ in 105 s) of 2×10-6 ph/cm2.s-1.keV-1, and line sensitivity (3σ in 105 s) of 8×10-6 ph/cm2.s-1. The size of the instruments and the requirements of the payload (weight 103 kg, full dimensions 660×660×450 mm3, power budget <60 W, on-board memory 2 Gbits, telemetry rate <100 kbps) make this experiment fully compatible with a minisatellite mission. The experiment, whose feasibility study has just been finished, has been proposed for flying on the Spanish MINISAT-02 satellite, in a 3 years long mission starting about 2002-2004. The main scientific goal is the study of the short and long term variability of a selected set of X-ray sources, such as quasars, Seyfert galaxies, high and low mass X-ray binaries, etc. The philosophy of the mission will provide the unique opportunity for the study of X-ray sources with a temporal accuracy of 1 microsecond all through the time range 10-5:107 s.

  14. X-ray Bursts and Oscillations: Prospects with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2016-04-01

    X-ray bursts (Type I) are produced by thermonuclear flashes in the accreted surface layers of some neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs). High frequency oscillations are observed during some of these bursts. These "burst oscillations" result from rotational modulation of an inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the neutron star surface induced by ignition and subsequent spreading of the thermonuclear flash. They provide a means to measure the spin rates of accreting neutron stars and since the burst emission arises from the neutron star surface, a unique probe of neutron star structure. To date, virtually all observations of such oscillations have been made with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We have developed a burst model employing the Schwarzschild + Doppler approximation for surface emission coupled with realistic flame spreading geometries and burst cooling to compute light curves and oscillation amplitudes for both the rising and cooling phases of X-ray bursts. We use this model to explore the capabilities for the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) to detect and study burst oscillations, particularly in the energy band below 3 keV. NICER is an International Space Station attached payload (X-ray telescope) with capabilities optimized for fast timing of neutron stars in the 0.2-10 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission around the end of 2016. We will present results of simulated X-ray bursts with NICER that explore its burst oscillation detection capabilities and prospects for inferring neutron star properties from phase-resolved spectra.

  15. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-Ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the recently completed Chandra/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library of 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular (α ˜ 1.50 ± 0.07) to elliptical (˜1.21 ± 0.02), to spirals (˜0.80 ± 0.02), to peculiars (˜0.55 ± 0.30), and to irregulars (˜0.26 ± 0.10). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosities for different types of galaxies. A radial dependency is found for ellipticals, with a flatter XLF slope for sources located between D 25 and 2D 25, suggesting the XLF slopes in the outer region of early-type galaxies are dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters. This study shows that the ULX rate in early-type galaxies is 0.24 ± 0.05 ULXs per surveyed galaxy, on a 5σ confidence level. The XLF for ULXs in late-type galaxies extends smoothly until it drops abruptly around 4 × 1040 erg s-1, and this break may suggest a mild boundary between the stellar black hole population possibly including 30 M ⊙ black holes with super-Eddington radiation and intermediate mass black holes.

  16. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.

    2017-06-01

    The origin of Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in external galaxies whose X-ray luminosities exceed those of the brightest black holes in our Galaxy by hundreds and thousands of times is mysterious. Here we report that all nearby persistent ULXs ever spectroscopically observed have the same optical spectra similar to that of SS 433, the only known supercritical accretor in our Galaxy. The spectra are apparently of WNL type (late nitrogen Wolf-Rayet stars) or LBV (luminous blue variables) in their hot state, which are very scarce stellar objects. We find that the spectra do not originate from WNL/LBV type donors and not in heated accretion disks, but from very hot winds from the accretion disks, which have similar physical conditions as the stellar winds from these stars. Our results suggest that bona-fide ULXs must constitute a homogeneous class of objects, which most likely have supercritical accretion disks.

  17. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  18. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  19. Tunable Coherent X-rays.

    PubMed

    Attwood, D; Halbach, K; Kim, K J

    1985-06-14

    A modern 1- to 2-billion-electron-volt synchrotron radiation facility (based on high-brightness electron beams and magnetic undulators) would generate coherent (laser-like) soft x-rays of wavelengths as short as 10 angstroms. The radiation would also be broadly tunable and subject to full polarization control. Radiation with these properties could be used for phase- and element-sensitive microprobing of biological assemblies and material interfaces as well as reserch on the production of electronic microstructures with features smaller than 1000 angstroms. These short wavelength capabilities, which extend to the K-absorption edges of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, are neither available nor projected for laboratory XUV lasers. Higher energy storage rings (5 to 6 billion electron volts) would generate significantly less coherent radiation and would be further compromised by additional x-ray thermal loading of optical components.

  20. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  1. Deterministic retrieval of complex Green's functions using hard X rays.

    PubMed

    Vine, D J; Paganin, D M; Pavlov, K M; Uesugi, K; Takeuchi, A; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, N; Kämpfe, T; Kley, E-B; Förster, E

    2009-01-30

    A massively parallel deterministic method is described for reconstructing shift-invariant complex Green's functions. As a first experimental implementation, we use a single phase contrast x-ray image to reconstruct the complex Green's function associated with Bragg reflection from a thick perfect crystal. The reconstruction is in excellent agreement with a classic prediction of dynamical diffraction theory.

  2. [Hardware and software for X-ray therapy planning].

    PubMed

    Zhizniakov, A L; Semenov, S I; Sushkova, L T; Troitskii, D P; Chirkov, K V

    2007-01-01

    Hardware, circuitry, and software suggested in this work make it possible to use the SLS-9 X-ray simulator for classical and computer tomographic imaging. The suggested hardware and software can be used as a basis for designing special-purpose tomographic systems.

  3. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: A New Probe of Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Observations of thermonuclear (also called Type 1) X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed large amplitude, high coherence X-ray brightness oscillations with frequencies in the 300 - 600 Hz range. Substantial spectral and timing evidence point to rotational modulation of the X-ray burst flux as the cause of these oscillations, and it is likely that they reveal the spin frequencies of neutron stars in LMXB from which they are detected. Here we review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and describe how they can be used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars as well as the physics of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars.

  4. Black Hole X-Ray Nova Outburst with XTE and HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1999-01-01

    We obtained multiwavelength coverage of the soft X-ray transient GRO J1655-40 during its 1996 outburst, using HST, RXTE, CGRO, and ground-based facilities. This outburst was qualitatively different from other SXT outbursts and from previous outbursts of this source. The onset of hard X-ray activity occurred very slowly, over several months, and was delayed relative to the soft X-ray rise. During this period, the optical fluxes declined steadily. This apparent anticorrelation is not consistent with with the standard disk instability model of SXT outbursts, nor is it expected if the optical output is dominated by reprocessed X-rays, as in persistent low-mass X-ray binaries. .

  5. X-ray emission from 4U 2129+47 (= V1727 Cygni) in quiescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Observations with the ROSAT HRI allow detection of weak X-ray flux from the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 2129+47 during its current quiescent state. The quiescent luminosity is similar to that seen in several other quiescent LMXBs containing neutron stars. The quiescent X-ray light curve may not show the eclipse seen when the source was in its high state, which would indicate that the enhanced vertical structure present in the disk during the high state has collapsed. This in turn provides support for the idea that the vertical structure in LMXB accretion disks is a consequence of high X-ray luminosity. A comparison of the absorption of low-energy X-rays due to the interstellar medium (determined from Einstein IPC observations) and the optical extinction does not rule out the triple system hypothesis.

  6. Detection of burning ashes from thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajava, J. J. E.; Nättilä, J.; Poutanen, J.; Cumming, A.; Suleimanov, V.; Kuulkers, E.

    2017-01-01

    When neutron stars (NS) accrete gas from low-mass binary companions, explosive nuclear burning reactions in the NS envelope fuse hydrogen and helium into heavier elements. The resulting thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts produce energy spectra that are fit well with black bodies, but a significant number of burst observations show deviations from Planck spectra. Here we present our analysis of RXTE/PCA observations of X-ray bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary HETE J1900.1-2455. We have discovered that the non-Planckian spectra are caused by photoionization edges. The anticorrelation between the strength of the edges and the colour temperature suggests that the edges are produced by the nuclear burning ashes that have been transported upwards by convection and become exposed at the photosphere. The atmosphere model fits show that occasionally the photosphere can consist entirely of metals, and that the peculiar changes in blackbody temperature and radius can be attributed to the emergence and disappearance of metals in the photosphere. As the metals are detected already in the Eddington-limited phase, it is possible that a radiatively driven wind ejects some of the burning ashes into the interstellar space.

  7. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  8. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  9. An extended galactic population of low-luminosity x-ray sources (CVs?) and the diffuse x-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, Eyal; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1995-01-01

    possible nature of these soures, including their being subdwarfs, low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs), massive black holes, and old neutron stars. We argue that the inferred X-ray and optical luminosities of these sources, the slope of their energy spectrum, and the derived local number density and spatial distribution are all consistent with their being intrinsically faint cataclysmic variables with low accretion rates. We suggest a few possibilities for the origin of such population, including an origin from disrupted globular clusters or dark clusters. We make predictions and suggest tests that could either confirm or rule out our proposal in the near future.

  10. Coordinated X-ray and optical observations of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augusteijn, T.; Karatasos, K.; Papadakis, M.; Paterakis, G.; Kikuchi, S.; Brosch, N.; Leibowitz, E.; Hertz, P.; Mitsuda, K.; Dotani, T.

    1992-01-01

    We present the results of coordinated, partly simultaneous, optical and X-ray (Ginga) observations of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. We find that the division between the optically bright and faint state, at a blue magnitude B = 12.8, corresponds to the change from the normal to the flaring branch in the X-ray color-color diagram as proposed by Priedhorsky et al. (1986). From archival Walraven data we find that in both optical states the orbital light curve is approximately sinusoidal, and have a similar amplitudes.

  11. Hunting stellar-mass black holes in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral-Santana, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    In the last 50 years of X-ray astronomy we have detected nearly 60 Galactic stellar-mass black hole (BH) candidates in transient X-ray binaries, i.e. systems with low-mass companions and sporadic outburst episodes. In addition, we have detected 2 more systems with high-mass companion stars. Only 17 out of the ˜60 transients have been dynamically confirmed although we have established strong constrains in two more systems. In this contribution, we will introduce the X-ray binaries, summarise their status and present the latest advances in the field.

  12. Coordinated X-ray and optical observations of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augusteijn, T.; Karatasos, K.; Papadakis, M.; Paterakis, G.; Kikuchi, S.; Brosch, N.; Leibowitz, E.; Hertz, P.; Mitsuda, K.; Dotani, T.

    1992-01-01

    We present the results of coordinated, partly simultaneous, optical and X-ray (Ginga) observations of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. We find that the division between the optically bright and faint state, at a blue magnitude B = 12.8, corresponds to the change from the normal to the flaring branch in the X-ray color-color diagram as proposed by Priedhorsky et al. (1986). From archival Walraven data we find that in both optical states the orbital light curve is approximately sinusoidal, and have a similar amplitudes.

  13. X-ray imaging and x-ray source development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Balhorn, R.; Anderson, E.

    1993-12-01

    The Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a continuing effort to develop both x-ray sources and x-ray sources and x-ray microscopy. This effort includes the ongoing development of: (1) a wide range of x-ray lasers at the Nova Laser Facility, (2) a zone plate lens--multilayer mirror based x-ray microscope (3) three dimensional, high resolution x-ray microscopy (4) short wavelength, normal incidence multilayer x-ray mirrors, (5) compact, high average power lasers for producing x-ray lasers and laser plasma x-ray sources. We have constructed and operated an x-ray laser based transmission x-ray microscope. The advantage offered by the x-ray laser source is the extreme high brightness allows high resolution images to be made on a timescale faster than that for x-ray damage effects to appear. The microscope, consists of: the x-ray laser, a multilayer coated, near normal incidence spherical mirror used as a condenser, a silicon nitride specimen holder, an x-ray zone plate used as an objective lens, and a microchannel plate x-ray detector. The x-ray laser used is the Ni-like Ta x-ray laser operating with a wavelength of 4.48 nm, a pulselength of 200 spec, a divergence of 10 mrad, and an output energy of 10 microjoules.

  14. New Perspectives on the X-Ray Emission of HD 104237 and Other Nearby Herbig Ae/Be Stars from XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Güdel, Manuel; Audard, Marc; Smith, Kester

    2004-10-01

    The origin of the X-ray emission from Herbig Ae/Be stars is not yet known. These intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars lie on radiative tracks and are not expected to emit X-rays via solar-like magnetic processes, nor are their winds powerful enough to produce X-rays by radiative wind shocks as in more massive O-type stars. The emission could originate in unseen low-mass companions, or it may be intrinsic to the Herbig stars themselves if they still have primordial magnetic fields or can sustain magnetic activity via a nonsolar dynamo. We present new X-ray observations of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 104237 (=DX Cha) with XMM-Newton, whose objective is to clarify the origin of the emission. Several X-ray emission lines are clearly visible in the CCD spectra, including the high-temperature Fe Kα complex. The emission can be accurately modeled as a multitemperature thermal plasma with cool (kT<1 keV) and hot (kT>~3 keV) components. The presence of a hot component is compelling evidence that the X-rays originate in magnetically confined plasma, either in the Herbig star itself or in the corona of an as yet unseen late-type companion. The X-ray temperatures and luminosity (logLX=30.5 ergs s-1) are within the range expected for a T Tauri companion, but high-resolution Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope images constrain the separation of a putative companion to less than 1". We place these new results into broader context by comparing the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of a sample of nearby Herbig stars with those of T Tauri stars and classical main-sequence Be stars. We also test the predictions of a model that attributes the X-ray emission of Herbig stars to magnetic activity that is sustained by a shear-powered dynamo.

  15. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY DRACO

    SciTech Connect

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with L{sub X} > 3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup −1} in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  16. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  17. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  18. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  19. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  20. Predicting ultraluminous X-ray source demographics from geometrical beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; King, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    The ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) population is known to contain neutron stars (NS), but the relative number of these compared to black hole (BH) primaries is unknown. Assuming classical supercritical accretion and resultant geometrical beaming, we show that the observed population ratio can be predicted from the mean masses of each family of compact objects and the relative spatial density of NSs to BHs. Conversely - and perhaps more importantly - given even a crude estimate for the spatial densities, an estimate of the fraction of the population containing NSs will begin to constrain the mean mass of BHs in ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  1. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  2. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  3. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 247: X-RAY POPULATION AND A SUPERSOFT ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing; Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip; Zhang Shuangnan

    2011-08-20

    We report on a new XMM-Newton observation of NGC 247 from 2009 December. The galaxy contains a supersoft, ultraluminous X-ray source whose spectrum consists of a thermal component with a temperature about 0.1 keV and a power-law tail with a photon index around 2.5. The thermal emission is absolutely the dominant component, contributing 96% of the total luminosity in the 0.3-10 keV band. Variability is detected at timescales of 10{sup 2} s and longer with a {nu}{sup -1} power spectrum. These properties are consistent with black hole binaries in the thermal state and suggest the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole of at least 600 solar masses. However, the integrated root-mean-square power is much higher than typically found in the thermal state. An alternative explanation of the emission could be a photosphere with a radius about 10{sup 9} cm. A possible absorption feature around 1 keV is detected, which may be due to absorption of highly ionized winds. X-ray sources within the disk of NGC 247 have a luminosity function consistent with that found in low-mass X-ray binaries. We confirm previous results that X-rays from the quasar PHL 6625 may be absorbed by gas in NGC 247, mainly at energies below 0.3 keV.

  4. X-ray optics: Diamond brilliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Colella, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Most materials either absorb or transmit X-rays. This is useful for imaging but makes it notoriously difficult to build mirrors for reflective X-ray optics. A demonstration of the high X-ray reflectivity of diamond could provide a timely solution to make the most of the next generation of free-electron lasers.

  5. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  6. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  7. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    SciTech Connect

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? print full article print this chapter email this article Radiographic, or X-ray, examinations provide your dentist with an important tool ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) Print A A A ... You Have Questions What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A scoliosis X-ray is a relatively safe and painless test that ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine Print A A A What's in this article? ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  13. Supernova SN 2014C X-ray

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-24

    This image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows spiral galaxy NGC 7331, center, in a three-color X-ray image. Red, green and blue colors are used for low, medium and high-energy X-rays, respectively. An unusual supernova called SN 2014C has been spotted in this galaxy. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21089

  14. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  15. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's in this article? What ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  16. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  17. THE GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY: OUTLINE AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Ratti, E. M.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Dieball, A.; Hynes, R. I.; Clem, J.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Greiss, S.; Wijnands, R.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.

    2011-06-01

    We introduce the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) and we provide the Chandra source list for the region that has been observed to date. Among the goals of the GBS are constraining the neutron star (NS) equation of state and the black hole (BH) mass distribution via the identification of eclipsing NS and BH low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The latter goal will, in addition, be obtained by significantly enlarging the number of BH systems for which a BH mass can be derived. Further goals include constraining X-ray binary formation scenarios, in particular the common envelope phase and the occurrence of kicks, via source-type number counts and an investigation of the spatial distribution of X-ray binaries, respectively. The GBS targets two strips of 6{sup 0} x 1{sup 0} (12 deg{sup 2} in total), one above (1{sup 0} < b < 2{sup 0}) and one below (-2{sup 0} < b < -1{sup 0}) the Galactic plane in the direction of the Galactic center at both X-ray and optical wavelengths. By avoiding the Galactic plane (-1{sup 0} < b < 1{sup 0}) we limit the influence of extinction on the X-ray and optical emission but still sample relatively large number densities of sources. The survey is designed such that a large fraction of the X-ray sources can be identified from their optical spectra. The X-ray survey, by design, covers a large area on the sky while the depth is shallow using 2 ks per Chandra pointing. In this way we maximize the predicted number ratio of (quiescent) LMXBs to cataclysmic variables. The survey is approximately homogeneous in depth to a 0.5-10 keV flux of 7.7 x 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. So far, we have covered about two-thirds (8.3 deg{sup 2}) of the projected survey area with Chandra providing over 1200 unique X-ray sources. We discuss the characteristics and the variability of the brightest of these sources.

  18. Mobile X-Ray Unit.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-28

    anode 8 surrounded by a coaxial annulus of stainless steel mesh which 9 serves as the cathode, control electronics, and a plurality of 10 spark gap...34Siemens-tube" configuration. More 7 particularly, the X-ray tube 16 has a conical copper/tungsten 8 anode 28, and a stainless steel mesh punched to...160 and 162 each having a typical diameter of 14 2.75 inches. The conflat flanges 160 and 162 are mated to a 15 stainless steel tube 164 having a

  19. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  20. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.