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Sample records for classical mechanics

  1. Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Tai L.

    1995-05-01

    Bring Classical Mechanics To Life With a Realistic Software Simulation! You can enhance the thorough coverage of Chow's Classical Mechanics with a hands-on, real-world experience! John Wiley & Sons, Inc. is proud to announce a new computer simulation for classical mechanics. Developed by the Consortium for Upper-Level Physics Software (CUPS), this simulation offers complex, often realistic calculations of models of various physical systems. Classical Mechanics Simulations (54881-2) is the perfect complement to Chow's text. Like all of the CUPS simulations, it is remarkably easy to use, yet sophisticated enough for explorations of new ideas. Other Important Features Include: * Six powerful simulations include: The Motion Generator, Rotation of Three-Dimensional Objects, Coupled Oscillators, Anharmonic Oscillators, Gravitational Orbits, and Collisions * Pascal source code for all programs is supplied and a number of exercises suggest specific ways the programs can be modified. * Simulations usually include graphical (often animated) displays. The entire CUPS simulation series consists of nine book/software simulations which comprise most of the undergraduate physics major's curriculum.

  2. Classical Mechanics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosing, Juliet W.

    2006-12-01

    At Pacific University we have included a lab with our upper division Classical Mechanics class. We do a combination of physical labs (air resistance, harmonic motion, amusement park physics), Maple labs (software), and projects. Presentation of some of the labs, results and challenges with this course will be included.

  3. Operator Formulation of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the construction of an operator formulation of classical mechanics which is directly concerned with wave packets in configuration space and is more similar to that of convential quantum theory than other extant operator formulations of classical mechanics. (Author/HM)

  4. Classical Mechanics as Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, Hrvoje

    2007-12-03

    All measurable predictions of classical mechanics can be reproduced from a quantum-like interpretation of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The key observation leading to classical physics is the fact that a wave function that satisfies a linear equation is real and positive, rather than complex. This has profound implications on the role of the Bohmian classical-like interpretation of linear quantum mechanics, as well as on the possibilities to find a consistent interpretation of arbitrary nonlinear generalizations of quantum mechanics.

  5. Introduction to classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Helmut

    In this way, the formerly nice boundaries between determinism and randomness themselves become fuzzy, or rather, there is a delicate interplay between determinism and randomness. To the geodesist, the inevitable presence of measuring errors comes into mind (and perhaps also the discussion on the statistical character of collocation). At the end of sec. 4.1 we have found a common mathematical superstructure for Hamiltonian mechanics and stationary stochastic processes, and according to Kac (1959), even "prime numbers play a game of chance". And "improperly posed problems" are very popular nowadays... So Laplace's demon mentioned at the beginning of this section, will find himself out of business in our present world, and he may wish to look for another, less ambitious, job.

  6. Quantum localization of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  7. Teaching Classical Mechanics Using Smartphones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf. Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming." Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics…

  8. Classical Mechanics: A Modern Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Martin W.

    2000-12-01

    Classical Mechanics is a clear introduction to the subject, combining a user-friendly style with an authoritative approach, whilst requiring minimal prerequisite mathematics - only elementary calculus and simple vectors are presumed. The text starts with a careful look at Newton's Laws, before applying them in one dimension to oscillations and collisions. More advanced applications - including gravitational orbits, rigid body dynamics and mechanics in rotating frames - are deferred until after the limitations of Newton's inertial frames have been highlighted through an exposition of Einstein's Special Relativity. The examples given throughout are often unusual for an elementary text, although they are made accessible through discussion and diagrams. Complete revision summaries are given at the end of each chapter, together with problems designed to be both illustrative and challenging. Features: * Comprehensive introduction to classical mechanics and relativity * Many novel examples, e.g. stability of the universe, falling cats, crickets bats and snooker * Includes many problems with numerical answers * Revision notes at the end of each chapter

  9. Teaching classical mechanics using smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-09-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf.4 Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming."5 Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics teachers could add that smartphones are "perfect for teaching science." The software iMecaProf displays in real time the measured data on a screen. The visual representation is built upon the formalism of classical mechanics. iMecaProf receives data 100 times a second from iPhone sensors through a Wi-Fi connection using the application Sensor Data.6 Data are the three components of the acceleration vector in the smartphone frame and smartphone's orientation through three angles (yaw, pitch, and roll). For circular motion (uniform or not), iMecaProf uses independent measurements of the rotation angle θ, the angular speed dθ/dt, and the angular acceleration d2θ/dt2.

  10. Classical mechanics of nonconservative systems.

    PubMed

    Galley, Chad R

    2013-04-26

    Hamilton's principle of stationary action lies at the foundation of theoretical physics and is applied in many other disciplines from pure mathematics to economics. Despite its utility, Hamilton's principle has a subtle pitfall that often goes unnoticed in physics: it is formulated as a boundary value problem in time but is used to derive equations of motion that are solved with initial data. This subtlety can have undesirable effects. I present a formulation of Hamilton's principle that is compatible with initial value problems. Remarkably, this leads to a natural formulation for the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics of generic nonconservative systems, thereby filling a long-standing gap in classical mechanics. Thus, dissipative effects, for example, can be studied with new tools that may have applications in a variety of disciplines. The new formalism is demonstrated by two examples of nonconservative systems: an object moving in a fluid with viscous drag forces and a harmonic oscillator coupled to a dissipative environment. PMID:23679733

  11. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  12. Factors Influencing the Learning of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Audrey B.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a study investigating the combined effect of certain variables on student achievement in classical mechanics. The purpose was to (1) describe preinstructional knowledge and skills; (2) correlate these variables with the student's success in learning classical mechanics; and (3) develop hypothesis about relationships between these…

  13. Bridging classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D.; Seifert, F.; Chao, L. S.; Li, S.; Newell, D. B.; Pratt, J. R.; Williams, C.; Schlamminger, S.

    2016-10-01

    Using a watt balance and a frequency comb, a mass-energy equivalence is derived. The watt balance compares mechanical power measured in terms of the meter, the second, and the kilogram to electrical power measured in terms of the volt and the ohm. A direct link between mechanical action and the Planck constant is established by the practical realization of the electrical units derived from the Josephson and the quantum Hall effects. By using frequency combs to measure velocities and acceleration of gravity, the unit of mass can be realized from a set of three defining constants: the Planck constant h, the speed of light c, and the hyperfine splitting frequency of 133Cs.

  14. Enhancing non-classicality in mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Gröblacher, Simon; Paternostro, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    We study the effects of post-selection measurements on both the non-classicality of the state of a mechanical oscillator and the entanglement between two mechanical systems that are part of a distributed optomechanical network. We address the cases of both Gaussian and non-Gaussian measurements, identifying in which cases simple photon counting and Geiger-like measurements are effective in distilling a strongly non-classical mechanical state and enhancing the purely mechanical entanglement between two elements of the network.

  15. Classical Mechanics Experiments using Wiimotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Alexander; Ochoa, Romulo

    2010-02-01

    The Wii, a video game console, is a very popular device. Although computationally it is not a powerful machine by today's standards, to a physics educator the controllers are its most important components. The Wiimote (or remote) controller contains a three-axis accelerometer, an infrared detector, and Bluetooth connectivity at a relatively low price. Thanks to available open source code, such as GlovePie, any PC or Laptop with Bluetooth capability can detect the information sent out by the Wiimote. We present experiments that use two or three Wiimotes simultaneously to measure the variable accelerations in two mass systems interacting via springs. Normal modes are determined from the data obtained. Masses and spring constants are varied to analyze their impact on the accelerations of the systems. We present the results of our experiments and compare them with those predicted using Lagrangian mechanics. )

  16. Thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2011-12-14

    We present a new method for calculating quantum mechanical corrections to classical free energies, based on thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics. In contrast to previous methods, our method is numerically stable even in the presence of strong quantum delocalization. We first illustrate the method and its relationship to a well-established method with an analysis of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We then show that our method can be used to calculate the quantum mechanical contributions to the free energies of ice and water for a flexible water model, a problem for which the established method is unstable.

  17. Comparison of Classical and Quantum Mechanical Uncertainties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peslak, John, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons are made for the particle-in-a-box, the harmonic oscillator, and the one-electron atom. A classical uncertainty principle is derived and compared with its quantum-mechanical counterpart. The results are discussed in terms of the statistical interpretation of the uncertainty principle. (Author/BB)

  18. Time in classical and in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the time concept in classical mechanics from the perspective of the invariants of a motion. The analysis shows that there is a conceptual gap concerning time in the Dirac-Heisenberg-von Neumann formalism and that Bohr's complementarity principle does not fill the gap. In the Dirac-Heisenberg-von Neumann formalism, a particle's properties are represented by Heisenberg matrices. This axiom is the source of the time problem in quantum mechanics.

  19. Born rule in quantum and classical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Brumer, Paul; Gong Jiangbin

    2006-05-15

    Considerable effort has been devoted to deriving the Born rule [i.e., that {psi}(x){sup 2}dx is the probability of finding a system, described by {psi}, between x and x+dx] in quantum mechanics. Here we show that the Born rule is not solely quantum mechanical; rather, it arises naturally in the Hilbert-space formulation of classical mechanics as well. These results provide insights into the nature of the Born rule, and impact on its understanding in the framework of quantum mechanics.

  20. Statistical mechanics based on fractional classical and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Korichi, Z.; Meftah, M. T.

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to study some problems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional classical and quantum mechanics. At first stage we have presented the thermodynamical properties of the classical ideal gas and the system of N classical oscillators. In both cases, the Hamiltonian contains fractional exponents of the phase space (position and momentum). At the second stage, in the context of the fractional quantum mechanics, we have calculated the thermodynamical properties for the black body radiation, studied the Bose-Einstein statistics with the related problem of the condensation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  1. Optimum Onager: The Classical Mechanics of a Classical Siege Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The onager is a throwing weapon of classical antiquity, familiar to both the ancient Greeks and Romans. Here we analyze the dynamics of onager operation and derive the optimum angle for launching a projectile to its maximum range. There is plenty of scope for further considerations about increasing onager range, and so by thinking about how this…

  2. Classical and Quantum-Mechanical State Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanna, F. C.; Mello, P. A.; Revzen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the subject of state reconstruction in classical and in quantum physics, a subject that deals with the experimentally acquired information that allows the determination of the physical state of a system. Our first purpose is to explain a method for retrieving a classical state in phase space, similar to that…

  3. The molecular mechanisms of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Felberbaum, Rachael S.

    2005-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the appearance of giant abnormal cells called Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. HRS cells arise from germinal center B lymphocytes and in about 50 percent of patients, are infected with Epstein-Barr Virus. In addition, HRS cells show constitutive NF-kappaB activation and are resistant to apoptosis. This paper reviews several recent studies that for the first time implicate specific molecules in the pathogenesis of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma. Targeting these molecules could lead to the development of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:16720015

  4. Classical phase space and statistical mechanics of identical particles.

    PubMed

    Hansson, T H; Isakov, S B; Leinaas, J M; Lindström, U

    2001-02-01

    Starting from the quantum theory of identical particles, we show how to define a classical mechanics that retains information about the quantum statistics. We consider two examples of relevance for the quantum Hall effect: identical particles in the lowest Landau level, and vortices in the Chern-Simons Ginzburg-Landau model. In both cases the resulting classical statistical mechanics is shown to be a nontrivial classical limit of Haldane's exclusion statistics.

  5. Supernovae in Binary Systems: An Application of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitalas, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the supernova explosion in a binary system as an application of classical mechanics. This presentation is intended to illustrate the power of the equivalent one-body problem and provide undergraduate students with a variety of insights into elementary classical mechanics. (HM)

  6. From classical mechanics to Feynman graphs with *-products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesche, Bernhard

    1984-05-01

    Quantum mechanics can be formulated on a phase space using so-called *-products. This formulation illustrates the relations to classical mechanics particularly clearly. We show that *-products, furthermore, are closely related to Feynman graphs.

  7. Coherently enhanced measurements in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Daniel; Popescu, Sandu

    2014-08-01

    In all quantitative sciences, it is common practice to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of noisy measurements by measuring identically prepared systems N times and averaging the measurement results. This leads to a scaling of the sensitivity as 1/√N, known in quantum measurement theory as the "standard quantum limit" (SQL). It is known that if one puts the N systems into an entangled state, a scaling as 1/N can be achieved, the socalled "Heisenberg limit" (HL), but decoherence problems have so far prevented implementation of such protocols for large N. Here we show that a method of coherent averaging inspired by a recent entanglement-free quantum enhanced measurement protocol is capable of achieving a sensitivity that scales as 1/N in a purely classical setup. This may substantially improve the measurement of very weak interactions in the classical realm, and, in particular, open a novel route to measuring the gravitational constant with enhanced precision.

  8. Teaching Classical Statistical Mechanics: A Simulation Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a one-dimensional model for an ideal gas to study development of disordered motion in Newtonian mechanics. A Monte Carlo procedure for simulation of the statistical ensemble of an ideal gas with fixed total energy is developed. Compares both approaches for a pseudoexperimental foundation of statistical mechanics. (Author/JN)

  9. Perturbation theory via Feynman diagrams in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, R.; Mauro, D.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we show how Feynman diagrams, which are used as a tool to implement perturbation theory in quantum field theory, can be very useful also in classical mechanics, provided we introduce also at the classical level concepts such as path integrals and generating functionals.

  10. A Computer-based Course in Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, D.; Sherwood, B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes and illustrates the tutorial and homework exercise lessons, student routing, course organization, administration, and evaluation of a PLATO computer-based course in classical mechanics. An appendix lists 41 lessons developed for the course. (CMV)

  11. Hamilton's Principle and Approximate Solutions to Problems in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to use the Ritz method for obtaining approximate solutions to problems expressed in variational form directly from the variational equation. Application of this method to classical mechanics is given. (MLH)

  12. Linear and nonlinear oscilations in Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Enrique; Martinez, Juan L.; Camacho, Edgar

    1997-04-01

    The theory of small oscilations is very important in many areas of physics and others sciences due to the simple form of the equations and the easy interpretetion of the results. In this work we show three examples of mechanical systems and using the Lagrangian formulation, we study the linear regime making approaches to the Lagrange's equations, and for the analysis of the nonlinear behavior of the systems we use the Hamiltonian formulation, we use the program MATHEMATICA for the whole analysis. MATHEMATICA is useful because many students can approach to the analysis and simulations using modern tools like the simbolic and numerical computacional packages.

  13. Numerical continuation in classical mechanics and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Aleix; Chausse, Victor; Meseguer, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, modern numerical continuation methodologies are presented as a way of understanding and computing multiplicity of solutions in undergraduate physics problems. Mechanical and thermodynamical problems are used as a storyline to introduce the mathematical formalism required to clarify the distinction between the uniqueness and multiplicity of equilibrium solutions and the critical states of a nonlinear physical problem, as well as to illustrate how these novel numerical continuation techniques are implemented in practice. The paper provides simple numerical Matlab codes that are easily adaptable to other problems, as well as updated software and literature resources.

  14. A wave equation interpolating between classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, W. P.; Greenberger, D. M.; Kobe, D. H.; Scully, M. O.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a ‘master’ wave equation for a family of complex-valued waves {{Φ }}\\equiv R{exp}[{{{i}}S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }}] whose phase dynamics is dictated by the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the classical action {S}({cl)}. For a special choice of the dynamics of the amplitude R which eliminates all remnants of classical mechanics associated with {S}({cl)} our wave equation reduces to the Schrödinger equation. In this case the amplitude satisfies a Schrödinger equation analogous to that of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field where the roles of the scalar and the vector potentials are played by the classical energy and the momentum, respectively. In general this amplitude is complex and thereby creates in addition to the classical phase {S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }} a quantum phase. Classical statistical mechanics, as described by a classical matter wave, follows from our wave equation when we choose the dynamics of the amplitude such that it remains real for all times. Our analysis shows that classical and quantum matter waves are distinguished by two different choices of the dynamics of their amplitudes rather than two values of Planck’s constant. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Richard Lewis Arnowitt—a pioneer of many-body theory, a path finder at the interface of gravity and quantum mechanics, and a true leader in non-relativistic and relativistic quantum field theory.

  15. Models on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hooft, Gerard 't

    2015-08-01

    Arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there cannot be physical laws that require 'conspiracy'. It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In this report, several such counterexamples are shown. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. So now the question is asked: how can such a model feature 'conspiracy', and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations? Arguments concerning Bell's theorem are further sharpened.

  16. Models on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hooft, Gerard 't

    2015-08-01

    Arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there cannot be physical laws that require 'conspiracy'. It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In this report, several such counterexamples are shown. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. So now the question is asked: how can such a model feature 'conspiracy', and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations? Arguments concerning Bell's theorem are further sharpened. PMID:26124246

  17. Novel Evasion Mechanisms of the Classical Complement Pathway.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zwarthoff, Seline A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-09-15

    Complement is a network of soluble and cell surface-associated proteins that gives rise to a self-amplifying, yet tightly regulated system with fundamental roles in immune surveillance and clearance. Complement becomes activated on the surface of nonself cells by one of three initiating mechanisms known as the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. Evasion of complement function is a hallmark of invasive pathogens and hematophagous organisms. Although many complement-inhibition strategies hinge on hijacking activities of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, an increasing number of uniquely evolved evasion molecules have been discovered over the past decade. In this review, we focus on several recent investigations that revealed mechanistically distinct inhibitors of the classical pathway. Because the classical pathway is an important and specific mediator of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, in-depth knowledge of novel evasion mechanisms could direct future development of therapeutic anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:27591336

  18. Novel Evasion Mechanisms of the Classical Complement Pathway.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zwarthoff, Seline A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-09-15

    Complement is a network of soluble and cell surface-associated proteins that gives rise to a self-amplifying, yet tightly regulated system with fundamental roles in immune surveillance and clearance. Complement becomes activated on the surface of nonself cells by one of three initiating mechanisms known as the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. Evasion of complement function is a hallmark of invasive pathogens and hematophagous organisms. Although many complement-inhibition strategies hinge on hijacking activities of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, an increasing number of uniquely evolved evasion molecules have been discovered over the past decade. In this review, we focus on several recent investigations that revealed mechanistically distinct inhibitors of the classical pathway. Because the classical pathway is an important and specific mediator of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, in-depth knowledge of novel evasion mechanisms could direct future development of therapeutic anti-inflammatory molecules.

  19. A Primer on Elliptic Functions with Applications in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brizard, Alain J.

    2009-01-01

    The Jacobi and Weierstrass elliptic functions used to be part of the standard mathematical arsenal of physics students. They appear as solutions of many important problems in classical mechanics: the motion of a planar pendulum (Jacobi), the motion of a force-free asymmetric top (Jacobi), the motion of a spherical pendulum (Weierstrass) and the…

  20. Brain Mechanisms of Extinction of the Classically Conditioned Eyeblink Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Richard F.; Robleto, Karla; Poulos, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    It is well established that the cerebellum and its associated circuitry are essential for classical conditioning of the eyeblink response and other discrete motor responses (e.g., limb flexion, head turn, etc.) learned with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). However, brain mechanisms underlying extinction of these responses are still…

  1. Bohmian mechanics, collapse models and the emergence of classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroš, Marko; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of classical trajectories in Bohmian mechanics, when a macroscopic object interacts with an external environment. We show that in such a case the conditional wave function of the system follows a dynamics which, under reasonable assumptions, corresponds to that of the Ghirardi–Rimini–Weber (GRW) collapse model. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories evolve classically. Our analysis also shows how the GRW (istantaneous) collapse process can be derived by an underlying continuous interaction of a quantum system with an external agent, thus throwing a light on how collapses can emerge from a deeper level theory.

  2. Bohmian mechanics, collapse models and the emergence of classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroš, Marko; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of classical trajectories in Bohmian mechanics, when a macroscopic object interacts with an external environment. We show that in such a case the conditional wave function of the system follows a dynamics which, under reasonable assumptions, corresponds to that of the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories evolve classically. Our analysis also shows how the GRW (istantaneous) collapse process can be derived by an underlying continuous interaction of a quantum system with an external agent, thus throwing a light on how collapses can emerge from a deeper level theory.

  3. On the necessary truth of the laws of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrigol, Olivier

    The idealization of primitive mechanical experience is shown to lead to four mutually related formulations of classical mechanics based on connections, action at a distance, stresses, and collisions. For a given structure of spacetime and a given characterization of mechanical systems, fundamental laws (including Newton's law of acceleration and d'Alembert's principle) are derived from a few general principles regarding the comprehensibility of motion. Special emphasis is placed on the "secular principle," according to which the evolution of a system at the relevant time scale should not depend on finer details of the applied forces.

  4. Classical and quantum mechanics of the nonrelativistic Snyder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignemi, S.

    2011-07-01

    The Snyder model is an example of noncommutative spacetime admitting a fundamental length scale β and invariant under Lorentz transformations, that can be interpreted as a realization of the doubly special relativity axioms. Here, we consider its nonrelativistic counterpart, i.e. the Snyder model restricted to three-dimensional Euclidean space. We discuss the classical and the quantum mechanics of a free particle in this framework, and show that they strongly depend on the sign of a coupling constant λ, appearing in the fundamental commutators and proportional to β2. For example, if λ is negative, momenta are bounded. On the contrary, for positive λ, positions and areas are quantized. We also give the exact solution of the harmonic oscillator equations both in the classical and the quantum case, and show that its frequency is energy dependent.

  5. Gauge transformations and conserved quantities in classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, Bertrand; Malterre, Daniel; Medina, Ernesto

    2016-08-01

    We are taught that gauge transformations in classical and quantum mechanics do not change the physics of the problem. Nevertheless, here we discuss three broad scenarios where under gauge transformations: (i) conservation laws are not preserved in the usual manner; (ii) non-gauge-invariant quantities can be associated with physical observables; and (iii) there are changes in the physical boundary conditions of the wave function that render it non-single-valued. We give worked examples that illustrate these points, in contrast to general opinions from classic texts. We also give a historical perspective on the development of Abelian gauge theory in relation to our particular points. Our aim is to provide a discussion of these issues at the graduate level.

  6. Physics on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2014-04-01

    Nature's laws in the domain where relativistic effects, gravitational effects and quantum effects are all comparatively strong are far from understood. This domain is called the Planck scale. Conceivably, a theory can be constructed where the quantum nature of phenomena at such scales can be attributed to something fundamentally simpler. However, arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there can't be physical laws that require "conspiracy". It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In the lecture we will show several such counterexamples. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. This theory is often portrayed as to underly the quantum field theory of the subatomic particles, including the "Standard Model". So now the question is asked: how can this model feature "conspiracy", and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations?

  7. Minimum length from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity.

    PubMed

    Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D H

    2004-11-19

    We derive fundamental limits on measurements of position, arising from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. First, we show that any primitive probe or target used in an experiment must be larger than the Planck length lP. This suggests a Planck-size minimum ball of uncertainty in any measurement. Next, we study interferometers (such as LIGO) whose precision is much finer than the size of any individual components and hence are not obviously limited by the minimum ball. Nevertheless, we deduce a fundamental limit on their accuracy of order lP. Our results imply a device independent limit on possible position measurements.

  8. Kepler unbound: Some elegant curiosities of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKay, Niall J.; Salour, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We explain two exotic systems of classical mechanics: the McIntosh-Cisneros-Zwanziger ("MICZ") Kepler system, of motion of a charged particle in the presence of a modified dyon; and Gibbons and Manton's description of the slow motion of well-separated solitonic ("BPS") monopoles using Taub-NUT space. Each system is characterized by the conservation of a Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector, and we use elementary vector techniques to show that each obeys a subtly different variation on Kepler's three laws for the Newton-Coulomb two-body problem, including a new modified Kepler third law for BPS monopoles.

  9. Super classical quantum mechanics: The best interpretation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Willis E.

    2001-04-01

    It has been shown that Newtonian classical mechanics (NCM) suffers from several kinds of chaotic indeterminacies. That means, a large set of problems treated with NCM gives results which are in wild disagreement with observation. In the present paper, these shortcomings are repaired in a simple, obvious, and essentially unique manner. The NCM theory is thereby transformed into a new theory which is fully equivalent to the Heisenberg, Schrödinger, and Dirac nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, with the vital addition of Born's probabilistic interpretation of the wave function built in from the start. I call this new theory "super classical quantum mechanics" (SCQM). Using Ehrenfest's theorem of 1927, the classical limit of the new theory, SCQM, is seen to give exactly the results expected of the repaired Newtonian theory of classical mechanics.

  10. A quantum mechanical point of view to perturbative problems in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1993-11-01

    In this article it is shown that perturbative methods currently exploited in quantum mechanics can be used to treat a classical Liouville problem describing the evolution of an ensemble of noncollisional particles. The method discussed is based on the concepts of an evolution operator and interaction picture, which can be introduced for a classical Hamiltonian in full analogy with quantum mechanics. The usefulness of the developed method to treat the quantum extension of the Liouville equation is also stressed.

  11. On the Mean Field and Classical Limits of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golse, François; Mouhot, Clément; Paul, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The main result in this paper is a new inequality bearing on solutions of the N-body linear Schrödinger equation and of the mean field Hartree equation. This inequality implies that the mean field limit of the quantum mechanics of N identical particles is uniform in the classical limit and provides a quantitative estimate of the quality of the approximation. This result applies to the case of C 1,1 interaction potentials. The quantity measuring the approximation of the N-body quantum dynamics by its mean field limit is analogous to the Monge-Kantorovich (or Wasserstein) distance with exponent 2. The inequality satisfied by this quantity is reminiscent of the work of Dobrushin on the mean field limit in classical mechanics [Func. Anal. Appl. 13, 115-123, (1979)]. Our approach to this problem is based on a direct analysis of the N-particle Liouville equation, and avoids using techniques based on the BBGKY hierarchy or on second quantization.

  12. To Quantum Mechanics Through Projection of Classical Statistical Mechanics on Prespace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2005-10-01

    We show that in opposite to a common opinion quantum mechanics can be represented as projection of classical statistical model on prequantum space -- prespace. All distinguishing features of the quantum probabilistic model (interference of probabilities, Born's rule, complex probabilistic amplitudes, Hilbert state space, representation of observables by operators) are present in a latent form in the classical Kolmogorov probability model. However, classical model should be considered as a contextual model (in the sense that all probabilities are determined by contexts - complexes of physical conditions). Moreover, the prequantum→quantum map is well defined only for two fundamental physical variables (in quantum mechanics these are position and momentum). Quantum mechanics is a projection of classical statistical model through these two "reference observables". Similarly, ordinary classical statistical mechanics on physical phase space is a projection of classical statistical mechanics on prespace, We also introduce a mental prespace and consider its quantum-like representation. Mental prespace describes subconsciousness and its quantum-like representation gives a model of consciousness.

  13. Approximate travelling waves for generalized KPP equations and classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elworthy, K. D.; Truman, A.; Zhao, H. Z.; Gaines, J. G.

    1994-09-01

    We consider the existence of approximate travelling waves of generalized Kolmogoroff, Petrovskii, Piscounoff (KPP) equations in which the initial distribution can depend on a small parameter mu which in the limit mu approaches 0 is the sum of some delta-functions or a step function. Using the method of Elworthy & Truman (1982) we construct a classical path which is the backward flow of a classical newtonian mechanics with given initial position and velocity before the time at which the caustic appears. By the Feynman-Kac formula and the Maruyana-Girsanov-Cameron-Martin transformation we obtain an identity from which, with a late caustic assumption, we see the propagation of the global wave front and the shape of the trough. Our theory shoes clearly how the initial distribution contributes to the propagation of the travelling wave. Finally, we prove a Huygens priciple for KPP equations on complete riemannian manifolds without cut locus, with some bounds on their volume element, in particular Cartan-Hadamard manifolds.

  14. Macro parameters describing the mechanical behavior of classical guitars.

    PubMed

    Elie, Benjamin; Gautier, François; David, Bertrand

    2012-12-01

    Since the 1960s and 1970s, researchers have proposed simplified models using only a few parameters to describe the vibro-acoustical behavior of string instruments in the low-frequency range. This paper presents a method for deriving and estimating a few important parameters or features describing the mechanical behavior of classical guitars over a broader frequency range. These features are selected under the constraint that the measurements may readily be made in the workshop of an instrument maker. The computations of these features use estimates of the modal parameters over a large frequency range, made with the high-resolution subspace ESPRIT algorithm (Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariant Techniques) and the signal enumeration technique ESTER (ESTimation of ERror). The methods are applied to experiments on real metal and wood plates and numerical simulations of them. The results on guitars show a nearly constant mode density in the mid- and high-frequency ranges, as it is found for a flat panel. Four features are chosen as characteristic parameters of this equivalent plate: Mass, rigidity, characteristic admittance, and the mobility deviation. Application to a set of 12 guitars indicates that these features are good candidates to discriminate different classes of classical guitars.

  15. Macro parameters describing the mechanical behavior of classical guitars.

    PubMed

    Elie, Benjamin; Gautier, François; David, Bertrand

    2012-12-01

    Since the 1960s and 1970s, researchers have proposed simplified models using only a few parameters to describe the vibro-acoustical behavior of string instruments in the low-frequency range. This paper presents a method for deriving and estimating a few important parameters or features describing the mechanical behavior of classical guitars over a broader frequency range. These features are selected under the constraint that the measurements may readily be made in the workshop of an instrument maker. The computations of these features use estimates of the modal parameters over a large frequency range, made with the high-resolution subspace ESPRIT algorithm (Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariant Techniques) and the signal enumeration technique ESTER (ESTimation of ERror). The methods are applied to experiments on real metal and wood plates and numerical simulations of them. The results on guitars show a nearly constant mode density in the mid- and high-frequency ranges, as it is found for a flat panel. Four features are chosen as characteristic parameters of this equivalent plate: Mass, rigidity, characteristic admittance, and the mobility deviation. Application to a set of 12 guitars indicates that these features are good candidates to discriminate different classes of classical guitars. PMID:23231130

  16. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT’s truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m0.5, typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  17. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene.

  18. On classical mechanical systems with non-linear constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Gláucio; Kobayashi, Marcelo H.

    2004-03-01

    In the present work, we analyze classical mechanical systems with non-linear constraints in the velocities. We prove that the d'Alembert-Chetaev trajectories of a constrained mechanical system satisfy both Gauss' principle of least constraint and Hölder's principle. In the case of a free mechanics, they also satisfy Hertz's principle of least curvature if the constraint manifold is a cone. We show that the Gibbs-Maggi-Appell (GMA) vector field (i.e. the second-order vector field which defines the d'Alembert-Chetaev trajectories) conserves energy for any potential energy if, and only if, the constraint is homogeneous (i.e. if the Liouville vector field is tangent to the constraint manifold). We introduce the Jacobi-Carathéodory metric tensor and prove Jacobi-Carathéodory's theorem assuming that the constraint manifold is a cone. Finally, we present a version of Liouville's theorem on the conservation of volume for the flow of the GMA vector field.

  19. Integrable systems and lie symmetries in classical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, T.

    1986-01-01

    The interrelationship between integrability and symmetries in classical mechanics is studied. Two-dimensional time- and velocity-independent potentials form the domain of the study. It is shown that, contrary to folklore, existence of a single finite symmetry does not ensure integrability. A method due to Darboux is used to construct potentials that admit a time-independent invariant. All potentials admitting invariants linear or quadratic in the momentum coordinates are constructed. These are the only integrable potentials which can be expressed as arbitrary functions of certain arguments. A complete construction of potentials admitting higher-order invariants does not seem possible. However, the necessary general forms for potentials that admit a particular invariant of arbitrary order are found. These invariants must be spherically symmetric in the leading terms. Two kinds of symmetries are studied: point Lie symmetries of the Newtonian equations of motion for conservative potentials, and point Noether symmetries of the action functionals obtained from the standard Lagrangians associated with these potentials. All conservative potentials which admit these symmetries are constructed. The class of potentials admitting Noether symmetries is shown to be a subclass of those admitting Lie symmetries.

  20. Fundamental Principles of Classical Mechanics: a Geometrical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai S.

    2014-07-01

    Classical mechanics is the quantitative study of the laws of motion for oscopic physical systems with mass. The fundamental laws of this subject, known as Newton's Laws of Motion, are expressed in terms of second-order differential equations governing the time evolution of vectors in a so-called configuration space of a system (see Chapter 12). In an elementary setting, these are usually vectors in 3-dimensional Euclidean space, such as position vectors of point particles; but typically they can be vectors in higher dimensional and more abstract spaces. A general knowledge of the mathematical properties of vectors, not only in their most intuitive incarnations as directed arrows in physical space but as elements of abstract linear vector spaces, and those of linear operators (transformations) on vector spaces as well, is then indispensable in laying the groundwork for both the physical and the more advanced mathematical - more precisely topological and geometrical - concepts that will prove to be vital in our subject. In this beginning chapter we will review these properties, and introduce the all-important related notions of dual spaces and tensor products of vector spaces. The notational convention for vectorial and tensorial indices used for the rest of this book (except when otherwise specified) will also be established...

  1. Categorical quantum mechanics II: Classical-quantum interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob; Kissinger, Aleks

    2016-08-01

    This is the second part of a three-part overview, in which we derive the category-theoretic backbone of quantum theory from a process ontology, treating quantum theory as a theory of systems, processes and their interactions. In this part, we focus on classical-quantum interaction. Classical and quantum systems are treated as distinct types, of which the respective behavioral properties are specified in terms of processes and their compositions. In particular, classicality is witnessed by ‘spiders’ which fuse together whenever they connect. We define mixedness and show that pure processes are extremal in the space of all processes, and we define entanglement and show that quantum theory indeed exhibits entanglement. We discuss the classification of tripartite qubit entanglement and show that both the GHZ-state and the W-state come from spider-like families of processes, which differ only in how they behave when they are connected by two or more wires. We define measurements and provide fully comprehensive descriptions of several quantum protocols involving classical data flow. Finally, we give a notion of ‘genuine quantumness’, from which special processes called ‘phase spiders’ arise, and get a first glimpse of quantum nonlocality.

  2. Interpreting nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy with the classical mechanical analogs of double-sided Feynman diagrams.

    PubMed

    Noid, W G; Loring, Roger F

    2004-10-15

    Observables in coherent, multiple-pulse infrared spectroscopy may be computed from a vibrational nonlinear response function. This response function is conventionally calculated quantum-mechanically, but the challenges in applying quantum mechanics to large, anharmonic systems motivate the examination of classical mechanical vibrational nonlinear response functions. We present an approximate formulation of the classical mechanical third-order vibrational response function for an anharmonic solute oscillator interacting with a harmonic solvent, which establishes a clear connection between classical and quantum mechanical treatments. This formalism permits the identification of the classical mechanical analog of the pure dephasing of a quantum mechanical degree of freedom, and suggests the construction of classical mechanical analogs of the double-sided Feynman diagrams of quantum mechanics, which are widely applied to nonlinear spectroscopy. Application of a rotating wave approximation permits the analytic extraction of signals obeying particular spatial phase matching conditions from a classical-mechanical response function. Calculations of the third-order response function for an anharmonic oscillator coupled to a harmonic solvent are compared to numerically correct classical mechanical results.

  3. Comparison of effect of induction and classical sintering to mechanical properties of powder metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çivi, Can; Atik, Enver

    2012-09-01

    Because of solidifying to component, sintering is the most important step of the production of powder metal parts. Generally it is made classical furnace. Alternatively sintering furnace, it is done that induction sintering studies. Induction sintering provide a grand time and energy savings since components hot up rapidly and sintering time is lower than classical sintering in furnace. Because of that induction sintering is an important alternative at sintering process. In this study, mechanical properties of induction sintered Fe based components included Cu and Graphite were compared with classical sintered components. Parameters of same mechanical properties of induction sintered and classical sintered components were identified.

  4. Nonstationary Quantum Mechanics. III. Quantum Mechanics Does Not Incorporate Classical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Nickola Stefanov

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that disagreement between the prediction of classical and conventional quantum mechanics about momentum probabilities exists in the case of a quasiclassical motion. The discussion is based on the detailed consideration of two specific potentials: U( x)= x and the oscillatory potential U( x)= mω 2 x 2/2. The results of the present Part III represent a further development of the idea in Todorov (1980) about the possible inefficiency of conventional theory in the case of potentials swiftly varying with time.

  5. Classical mechanics on noncommutative space with Lie-algebraic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Miao Yangang; Wang Xudong; Yu Shaojie

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Suggest a useful method to look for new Lie-algebraic noncommutative spaces. > Find out two new Lie-algebraic noncommutative spaces. > Derive Newton and Hamilton equations that present unimaginable extra forces. > Analyse the source of unimaginable extra forces from space noncummutativity. > Provide various intriguing classical trajectories. - Abstract: We investigate the kinetics of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with a constant external force on a Lie-algebraic noncommutative space. The structure constants of a Lie algebra, also called noncommutative parameters, are constrained in general due to some algebraic properties, such as the antisymmetry and Jacobi identity. Through solving the constraint equations the structure constants satisfy, we obtain two new sorts of algebraic structures, each of which corresponds to one type of noncommutative spaces. Based on such types of noncommutative spaces as the starting point, we analyze the classical motion of the particle interacting with a constant external force by means of the Hamiltonian formalism on a Poisson manifold. Our results not only include that of a recent work as our special cases, but also provide new trajectories of motion governed mainly by marvelous extra forces. The extra forces with the unimaginable tx-dot-,(xx-dot)-, and (xx-double dot)-dependence besides with the usual t-, x-, and x-dot-dependence, originating from a variety of noncommutativity between different spatial coordinates and between spatial coordinates and momenta as well, deform greatly the particle's ordinary trajectories we are quite familiar with on the Euclidean (commutative) space.

  6. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching. It is shown that the contrast between these relativistic and classical quantities can be presented in a straightforward manner and with a minimal level of (undergraduate) mathematics.

  7. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  8. [Classical dengue transmission dynamics involving mechanical control and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Restrepo, Leonardo D; Vergaño-Salazar, Juan G; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever transmission dynamics were studied in an endemic region considering the use of preventative measures and mechanical control in reducing transmission of the disease. A system of ordinary differential equations was proposed, describing the dynamics and their evolution as determined by numerical simulation. Different mechanical control and prophylaxis strategies were compared to the situation without control. The basic reproduction number R₀ was determined R₀ to show that if R₀ > 1 there would be a risk of an epidemic and otherwise the disease would have low impact levels. The basic reproduction number helps determine the dynamics' future pattern and contrast the results so obtained with those obtained numerically. It was concluded that although prophylaxis and mechanical control alone provide effective results in controlling the disease, if both controls are combined then infection levels become significantly reduced. Around 60 % mechanical control and prevention levels are needed to provide suitable results in controlling dengue outbreaks.

  9. Introduction to classical mechanics of systems with constraints, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumov, A. V.; Solovev, L. D.

    Lagrangians whose symmetry transformations include arbitrary functions on time are shown to be, with necessity, degenerate. The Hamiltionian formalism for mechanical systems with degenerate Lagrangians is presented. The algorithm of producing the constraints and the total Hamiltonian is described. The reduction of a Hamiltonian mechanical system to a surface in the extended phase space and application of Dirac brackets to calculate poisson brackets of the reduced system are considered.

  10. On the hypothesis that quantum mechanism manifests classical mechanics: Numerical approach to the correspondence in search of quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Bong

    1993-09-01

    Quantum manifestation of classical chaos has been one of the extensively studied subjects for more than a decade. Yet clear understanding of its nature still remains to be an open question partly due to the lack of a canonical definition of quantum chaos. The classical definition seems to be unsuitable in quantum mechanics partly because of the Heisenberg quantum uncertainty. In this regard, quantum chaos is somewhat misleading and needs to be clarified at the very fundamental level of physics. Since it is well known that quantum mechanics is more fundamental than classical mechanics, the quantum description of classically chaotic nature should be attainable in the limit of large quantum numbers. The focus of my research, therefore, lies on the correspondence principle for classically chaotic systems. The chaotic damped driven pendulum is mainly studied numerically using the split operator method that solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. For classically dissipative chaotic systems in which (multi)fractal strange attractors often emerge, several quantum dissipative mechanisms are also considered. For instance, Hoover`s and Kubo-Fox-Keizer`s approaches are studied with some computational analyses. But the notion of complex energy with non-Hermiticity is extensively applied. Moreover, the Wigner and Husimi distribution functions are examined with an equivalent classical distribution in phase-space, and dynamical properties of the wave packet in configuration and momentum spaces are also explored. The results indicate that quantum dynamics embraces classical dynamics although the classicalquantum correspondence fails to be observed in the classically chaotic regime. Even in the semi-classical limits, classically chaotic phenomena would eventually be suppressed by the quantum uncertainty.

  11. Classical and quantum mechanical studies of HF in an intense laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Dardi, P.S.; Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    The behavior of an HF molecule in an intense laser field is investigated with both classical trajectories and quantum dynamics. Vibration-rotation transition probabilities and energy absorption as a function of laser pulse time are calculated for the diatomic initially in its ground state. For comparison, results are also reported for a model nonrotating HF molecule. It is found that classical mechanics does not predict the correct time behavior of the system, nor does it predict the correct rotational state distributions. Classical mechanics does, however, predict pulse time averaged quantities to be the correct order of magnitude. There is also a correct general trend of increased multiphoton excitation for laser frequencies red-shifted from the one-photon resonance, although multiphoton resonance peaks are not observed in the classical results and far too little multiphoton excitation is predicted. The effect of laser phase has also been investigated and shown to be relatively unimportant in both the classical and quantum dynamics.

  12. Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A.; Mavrodiev, S. Cht.

    2010-05-04

    Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schredinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

  13. Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Proton and Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A.; Mavrodiev, S. Cht.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schroedinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

  14. Simulation of chemical reactions in solution by a combination of classical and quantum mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onida, Giovanni; Andreoni, Wanda

    1995-09-01

    A classical trajectory mapping method was developed to study chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In this method, the trajectories were calculated on a classical potential surface and the free energy profile was obtained by mapping the classical surface to the quantum mechanical surface obtained by the semiempirical AM1 method. There is no need to perform expensive quantum mechanical calculations at each iteration step. This method was applied to proton transfer reactions both in aqueous solution and in papain. The results are encouraging, indicating the applicability of this hybrid method to chemical reactions both in solution and in enzymes.

  15. From the attempt of certain classical reformulations of quantum mechanics to quasi-probability representations

    SciTech Connect

    Stulpe, Werner

    2014-01-15

    The concept of an injective affine embedding of the quantum states into a set of classical states, i.e., into the set of the probability measures on some measurable space, as well as its relation to statistically complete observables is revisited, and its limitation in view of a classical reformulation of the statistical scheme of quantum mechanics is discussed. In particular, on the basis of a theorem concerning a non-denseness property of a set of coexistent effects, it is shown that an injective classical embedding of the quantum states cannot be supplemented by an at least approximate classical description of the quantum mechanical effects. As an alternative approach, the concept of quasi-probability representations of quantum mechanics is considered.

  16. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss – in light of these recent insights – the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  17. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles.

  18. Classical Mechanics with Computational Physics in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbun, J. E.

    2006-11-01

    Efforts to incorporate computational physics in the undergraduate curriculum have made use of Matlab, IDL, Maple, Mathematica, Fortran, and C^1 as well as Java.^2 The benefits of similar undertakings in our undergraduate curriculum are that students learn ways to go beyond what they learn in the classroom and use computational techniques to explore more realistic physics applications. Students become better prepared to perform research that will be useful throughout their scientific careers.^3 Undergraduate physics in general can benefit by building on such efforts. Recently, I have developed a draft of a textbook for the junior level mechanics physics course with computer applications.^4 The text uses the traditional analytical approach, yet it incorporates computational physics to build on it. The text does not intend to teach students how to program; instead, it makes use of students' abilities to use programming to go beyond the analytical approach and complement their understanding. An in-house computational environment, however, is strongly encouraged. Selected examples of representative lecture problems will be discussed. ^1 ''Computation and Problem Solving in Undergraduate Physics,'' David M. Cook, Lawrence University (2003). ^2 ''Simulations in Physics: Applications to Physical Systems,'' H. Gould, J. Tobochnik, and W Christian. ^3 R. Landau, APS Bull. Vol 50, 1069 (2005) ^4J. E. Hasbun, APS Bull. Vol. 51, 452 (2006)

  19. Quantum versus classical foundation of statistical mechanics under experimentally realistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Peter; Evstigneev, Mykhaylo

    2013-11-01

    Focusing on isolated macroscopic systems, described in terms of either a quantum mechanical or a classical model, our two key questions are how far does an initial ensemble (usually far from equilibrium and largely unknown in detail) evolve towards a stationary long-time behavior (equilibration) and how far is this steady state in agreement with the microcanonical ensemble as predicted by statistical mechanics (thermalization). A recently developed quantum mechanical treatment of the problem is briefly summarized, putting particular emphasis on the realistic modeling of experimental measurements and nonequilibrium initial conditions. Within this framework, equilibration can be proven under very weak assumptions about those measurements and initial conditions, while thermalization still requires quite strong additional hypotheses. An analogous approach within the framework of classical mechanics is developed and compared with the quantum case. In particular, the assumptions to guarantee classical equilibration are now rather strong, while thermalization then follows under relatively weak additional conditions.

  20. Comparative role of potential structure in classical, semiclassical, and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Judson, R.S.; Shi, S.; Rabitz, H.

    1989-02-15

    The corresponding effects of features in the potential on classical, semiclassical, and quantum mechanics are probed using the technique of functional sensitivity analysis. It is shown that the classical and quantum functional sensitivities are equivalent in the classical (small (h/2..pi..)) and harmonic limits. Classical and quantum mechanics are known to react in qualitatively similar ways provided that features on the potential are smooth on the length scale of oscillations in the quantum wave function. By using functional sensitivity analysis, we are able to show in detail how the classical and quantum dynamics differ in the way that they sense the potential. Two examples are given, the first of which is the harmonic oscillator. This problem is well understood by other means but is useful to examine because it illustrates the detailed information about the interaction of the potential and the dynamics which can be provided by functional sensitivity analysis, simplifying the analysis of more complex systems. The second example is the collinear H+H/sub 2/ reaction. In that case there are a number of detailed and striking differences between the ways that classical and quantum mechanics react to features on the potential. For features which are broad compared to oscillations in the wave function, the two react in qualitatively the same way. The sensitivities are oscillatory, however, and there are phasing differences between the classical and quantum sensitivity functions. This means that using classical mechanics plus experimental data in an inversion scheme intended to find the ''true'' potential will necessarily introduce sizeable errors.

  1. Ground-state properties of the retinal molecule: from quantum mechanical to classical mechanical computations of retinal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Suhai, Sandor

    2011-01-01

    Retinal proteins are excellent systems for understanding essential physiological processes such as signal transduction and ion pumping. Although the conjugated polyene system of the retinal chromophore is best described with quantum mechanics, simulations of the long-timescale dynamics of a retinal protein in its physiological, flexible, lipid-membrane environment can only be performed at the classical mechanical level. Torsional energy barriers are a critical ingredient of the classical force-field parameters. Here we review briefly current retinal force fields and discuss new quantum mechanical computations to assess how the retinal Schiff base model and the approach used to derive the force-field parameters may influence the torsional potentials.

  2. Critical comparison of classical and quantum mechanical treatments of the phase equilibria of water

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2006-03-17

    The Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation technique was used to compare the phase equilibria of the rigid TIP4P water model [J.\\ Chem.\\ Phys.\\ {\\bf 79}, 926, (1983)] utilizing classical and quantum statistical mechanical treatments. The quantum statistical mechanical treatment generally resulted in lower liquid densities and higher vapor densities, showing a narrowing in the phase envelope. As a result, the calculated critical temperature and normal boiling point were higher from the quantum simulations than the classical by 20~and 17~K, respectively, but the critical densities were very close. A semiclassical treatment, involving a low order expansion in Plank's constant, resulted in densities and vapor pressures that fluctuated between the values for the classical and quantum statistical mechanics values, with no definite agreement with either.

  3. Quantum and classical control of single photon states via a mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Myers, Casey R.; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    Optomechanical systems typically use light to control the quantum state of a mechanical resonator. In this paper, we propose a scheme for controlling the quantum state of light using the mechanical degree of freedom as a controlled beam splitter. Preparing the mechanical resonator in non-classical states enables an optomechanical Stern-Gerlach interferometer. When the mechanical resonator has a small coherent amplitude it acts as a quantum control, entangling the optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. As the coherent amplitude of the resonator increases, we recover single photon and two-photon interference via a classically controlled beam splitter. The visibility of the two-photon interference is particularly sensitive to coherent excitations in the mechanical resonator and this could form the basis of an optically transduced weak-force sensor.

  4. Inferring the statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics from the classical limit

    PubMed

    Gottfried

    2000-06-01

    It is widely believed that the statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics cannot be inferred from the Schrodinger equation itself, and must be stated as an additional independent axiom. Here I propose that the situation is not so stark. For systems that have both continuous and discrete degrees of freedom (such as coordinates and spin respectively), the statistical interpretation for the discrete variables is implied by requiring that the system's gross motion can be classically described under circumstances specified by the Schrodinger equation. However, this is not a full-fledged derivation of the statistical interpretation because it does not apply to the continuous variables of classical mechanics.

  5. Examining the Construction Process: A Study of Changes in Level 10 Students' Understanding of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Explores students' conceptual understanding and conceptual growth in classical mechanics in the natural context of a grade 10 science classroom. Findings indicate that students' knowledge structures remained stable across the 10 weeks and remained unchanged 4 weeks after instruction ceased. Contains 30 references. (Author/JRH)

  6. Application of Hamilton's Principle to the Study of the Anharmonic Oscillator in Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Gilmartin, Harvey

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a form of Hamilton's principle for classical mechanics appropriate to the study of arbitrary self-sustained vibrations in one dimension. It is applied as an approximate computational tool to the study of several examples of anharmonic oscillation. (Author/GA)

  7. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  8. Axioms for quantum mechanics: relativistic causality, retrocausality, and the existence of a classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrlich, Daniel

    Y. Aharonov and A. Shimony both conjectured that two axioms - relativistic causality (``no superluminal signalling'') and nonlocality - so nearly contradict each other that only quantum mechanics reconciles them. Can we indeed derive quantum mechanics, at least in part, from these two axioms? No: ``PR-box'' correlations show that quantum correlations are not the most nonlocal correlations consistent with relativistic causality. Here we replace ``nonlocality'' with ``retrocausality'' and supplement the axioms of relativistic causality and retrocausality with a natural and minimal third axiom: the existence of a classical limit, in which macroscopic observables commute. That is, just as quantum mechanics has a classical limit, so must any generalization of quantum mechanics. In this limit, PR-box correlations violaterelativistic causality. Generalized to all stronger-than-quantum bipartite correlations, this result is a derivation of Tsirelson's bound (a theorem of quantum mechanics) from the three axioms of relativistic causality, retrocausality and the existence of a classical limit. Although the derivation does not assume quantum mechanics, it points to the Hilbert space structure that underlies quantum correlations. I thank the John Templeton Foundation (Project ID 43297) and the Israel Science Foundation (Grant No. 1190/13) for support.

  9. The two limits of the Schrödinger equation in the semi-classical approximation: Discerned and non-discerned particles in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondran, Michel; Gondran, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    We study, in the semi-classical approximation, the convergence of the quantum density and the quantum action, solutions to the Madelung equations, when the Planck constant h tends to 0. We find two different solutions which depend on the initial density . In the first case where the initial quantum density is a classical density ρ0(X), the quantum density and the quantum action converge to a classical action and a classical density which satisfy the statistical Hamilton-Jacobi equations. These are the equations of a set of classical particles whose initial positions are known only by the density ρ0(X). In the second case, where initial density converges to a Dirac density, the density converges to the Dirac function which corresponds to a unique classical trajectory. Therefore we introduce into classical mechanics non-discerned particles (case 1), which explain the Gibbs paradox, and discerned particles (case 2). Finally, we deduce a quantum mechanics interpretation which depends on the initial conditions (preparation), the Broglie-Bohm interpretation in the first case and the Schrödinger interpretation in the second case.

  10. Classical and quantum-mechanical treatments of nonsequential double ionization with few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Liu, X.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-10-01

    We address nonsequential double ionization induced by strong, linearly polarized laser fields of only a few cycles, considering a physical mechanism in which the second electron is dislodged by the inelastic collision of the first electron with its parent ion. The problem is treated classically, using an ensemble model, and quantum mechanically, within the strong-field and uniform saddle-point approximations. In the latter case, the results are interpreted in terms of “quantum orbits,” which can be related to the trajectories of a classical electron in an electric field. We obtain highly asymmetric electron momentum distributions, which strongly depend on the absolute phase, i.e., on the phase difference between the pulse envelope and its carrier frequency. Around a particular value of this parameter, the distributions shift from the region of positive to that of negative momenta, or vice versa, in a radical fashion. This behavior is investigated in detail for several driving-field parameters, and provides a very efficient method for measuring the absolute phase. Both models yield very similar distributions, which share the same physical explanation. There exist, however, minor discrepancies due to the fact that, beyond the region for which electron-impact ionization is classically allowed, the yields from the quantum-mechanical computation decay exponentially, whereas their classical counterparts vanish.

  11. Quantum vs Classical Mechanics for a 'Simple' Dissociation Reaction. Should They Give the Same Results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    When performing molecular dynamical simulations on light systems at low energies, there is always the risk of producing data that bear no similarity to experiment. Indeed, John Barker himself was particularly anxious about treating Ar scattering from surfaces using classical mechanics where it had been shown experimentally in his own lab that diffraction occurs. In such cases, the correct procedure is probably to play the trump card "... well of course, quantum effects will modify this so that....." and retire gracefully. For our particular interests, the tables are turned in that we are interested in gas-surface dynamical studies for highly quantized systems, but would be interested to know when it is possible to use classical mechanics in order that a greater dimensionality might be treated. For molecular dissociation and scattering, it has been oft quoted that the greater the number of degrees of freedom, the more appropriate is classical mechanics, primarily because of the mass averaging over the quantized dimensions. Is this true? We have been investigating the dissociation of hydrogen molecules at surfaces and in this talk I will present quantum results for dissociation and scattering, along with a novel method for their interpretation based upon adiabatic potential energy surfaces. Comparison with classical calculations will be made and conclusions drawn. a novel method for their interpretation based upon adiabatic potential energy surfaces

  12. Spike-coding mechanisms of cerebellar temporal processing in classical conditioning and voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenji; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Time is a fundamental and critical factor in daily life. Millisecond timing, which is the underlying temporal processing for speaking, dancing, and other activities, is reported to rely on the cerebellum. In this review, we discuss the cerebellar spike-coding mechanisms for temporal processing. Although the contribution of the cerebellum to both classical conditioning and voluntary movements is well known, the difference of the mechanisms for temporal processing between classical conditioning and voluntary movements is not clear. Therefore, we review the evidence of cerebellar temporal processing in studies of classical conditioning and voluntary movements and report the similarities and differences between them. From some studies, which used tasks that can change some of the temporal properties (e.g., the duration of interstimulus intervals) with keeping identical movements, we concluded that classical conditioning and voluntary movements may share a common spike-coding mechanism because simple spikes in Purkinje cells decrease at predicted times for responses regardless of the intervals between responses or stimulation.

  13. Hannay Angle: Yet Another Symmetry-Protected Topological Order Parameter in Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The topological way of thinking now goes beyond quantum solids, and topological characters of classical mechanical systems obeying Newton's law are attracting current interest. To provide a physical insight into the topological numbers in mechanics, we demonstrate the use of the Hannay angle, a "classical" Berry phase, as a symmetry-protected topological order parameter. The Hannay angle is derived using a canonical transformation that maps Newton's equation to a Schrödinger-type equation, and the condition for the quantization is discussed in connection with the symmetry in mechanics. Also, we demonstrate the use of the Hannay angle for a topological characterization of a spring-mass model focusing on the bulk-edge correspondence.

  14. The Philosophy of Fields and Particles in Classical and Quantum Mechanics, Including the Problem of Renormalisation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Nick

    1995-01-01

    This work first explicates the philosophy of classical and quantum fields and particles. I am interested in determining how science can have a metaphysical dimension, and then with the claim that the quantum revolution has an important metaphysical component. I argue that the metaphysical implications of a theory are properties of its models, as classical mechanics determines properties of atomic diversity and temporal continuity with its representations of distinct, continuous trajectories. It is often suggested that classical statistical physics requires that many particle states be represented so that permuting properties leads to distinct states; this implies that individuals can be reidentified across possible worlds in a non-qualitative way. I show there is no evidence for this conclusion, an important result, for it is claimed that quantum particles are not individuals. This claim is based on the misconception about classical statistics, but also on a conflation of notions of identity; I show that, while transworld identity is incompatible with quantum mechanics, other classical notions may be consistently ascribed. I also give a field-particle distinction that applies usefully in both quantum and classical domains. In the former the distinction helps defeat claims of underdetermined by data, in the latter it helps provide a minimal field metaphysics. Next I tackle renormalisation: I show how divergences occur in approximate, perturbative calculations, and demonstrate how finite, empirically verified, answers are obtained. These techniques seem to show that the predictions are not logical consequences of the exact theory. I use the techniques of the renormalisation group to establish that perturbative renormalised quantum field theory does indeed approximate the consequences of field theory. Finally, I discuss the idea (Cao and Schweber, 1994) that renormalisation proves that there can be no quantum theory of everything, only a patchwork of effective

  15. Why irreversibility? The formulation of classical and quantum mechanics for nonintegrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prigogine, I.

    1995-01-05

    Nonintegrable Poincare systems with a continuous spectrum lead to the appearance of diffusive terms in the frame of classical or quantum dynamics. These terms break time symmetry. They lead, therefore, to limitations to classical trajectory theory and of wave-function formalism. These diffusive terms correspond to well-defined classes of dynamical processes. The diffusive effects are amplified in situations corresponding to persistent interactions. As a result, we have to include, already, in the fundamental dynamical description the two basic aspects, probability and irreversibility, which are so conspicuous on the macroscopic level. We have to formulate both classical and quantum mechanics on the Liouville level of probability distributions. For integrable systems, we recover the usual formulation of classical or quantum mechanics. Instead of being primitive concepts, which cannot be further analyzed, trajectories and wave functions appear as special solutions of the Liouville-von Neumann equations. This extension of classical and quantum dynamics permits us to unify the two concepts of nature that we inherited from the nineteenth century, based, on the one hand, on dynamical time-reversible laws and, on the other, on an evolutionary view associated to entropy. It leads also to a unified formulation of quantum theory, avoiding the conventional dual structure based on Schroedinger`s equation, on the one hand, and on the {open_quotes}collapse{close_quotes} of the wave function, on the other. A dynamical interpretation is given to processes such as decoherence or approach to equilibrium without any appeal to extra dynamic considerations. There is a striking parallelism between classical and quantum theory. For large Poincare systems (LPS), we have, in general, both a {open_quotes}collapse{close_quotes} of trajectories and of wave functions. In both cases, we need a generalized formulation of dynamics in terms of probability distributions or density matrices.

  16. Entropy theorems in classical mechanics, general relativity, and the gravitational two-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Bonetti, Luca; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2016-09-01

    In classical Hamiltonian theories, entropy may be understood either as a statistical property of canonical systems or as a mechanical property, that is, as a monotonic function of the phase space along trajectories. In classical mechanics, there are theorems which have been proposed for proving the nonexistence of entropy in the latter sense. We explicate, clarify, and extend the proofs of these theorems to some standard matter (scalar and electromagnetic) field theories in curved spacetime, and then we show why these proofs fail in general relativity; due to properties of the gravitational Hamiltonian and phase space measures, the second law of thermodynamics holds. As a concrete application, we focus on the consequences of these results for the gravitational two-body problem, and in particular, we prove the noncompactness of the phase space of perturbed Schwarzschild-Droste spacetimes. We thus identify the lack of recurring orbits in phase space as a distinct sign of dissipation and hence entropy production.

  17. Classical limits of quantum mechanics on a non-commutative configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Benatti, Fabio; Gouba, Laure

    2013-06-15

    We consider a model of non-commutative quantum mechanics given by two harmonic oscillators over a non-commutative two dimensional configuration space. We study possible ways of removing the non-commutativity based on the classical limit context known as anti-Wick quantization. We show that removal of non-commutativity from the configuration space and from the canonical operators is not commuting operation.

  18. Feeding behavior of Aplysia: a model system for comparing cellular mechanisms of classical and operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Douglas A; Byrne, John H

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural circuitry that mediates the behavior is well characterized and amenable to detailed cellular analyses, substantial progress has been made toward a comparative analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying these two forms of associative learning. Both forms of associative learning use the same reinforcement pathway (the esophageal nerve, En) and the same reinforcement transmitter (dopamine, DA). In addition, at least one cellular locus of plasticity (cell B51) is modified by both forms of associative learning. However, the two forms of associative learning have opposite effects on B51. Classical conditioning decreases the excitability of B51, whereas operant conditioning increases the excitability of B51. Thus, the approach of using two forms of associative learning to modify a single behavior, which is mediated by an analytically tractable neural circuit, is revealing similarities and differences in the mechanisms that underlie classical and operant conditioning.

  19. Peridynamic theory of solids from the perspective of classical statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, R.; Foster, J. T.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the classical statistical mechanics has been explored in order to develop statistical mechanical framework for peridynamics. Peridynamic equation of motion is known as upscaled Newton's equation. The peridynamic system consists of finite number of nonlocally interacting particles at nano and meso scales. This particle representation of peridynamics can be treated in terms of classical statistical mechanics. Hence, in this work the phase space is constructed based on the PD particle from their evolving momentum pi and positions xi. The statistical ensembles are derived by defining appropriate partition functions. The algorithms for NVE and NPH implemented in the classical molecular dynamics are revisited for equilibrium peridynamic models. The current work introduces Langevin dynamics to the peridynamic theory through fluctuation-dissipation principle. This introduces a heat bath to the peridynamic system which eliminates the ambiguity with the role of temperature in a peridynamic system. Finally, it was seen that the homogenization of a peridynamic model with finite number of particles approaches to a conventional continuum model. The upscaled non-equilibrium peridynamics has potential applications in modeling wide variety of multiscale-multiphysics problems from nano to macro scale or vice versa.

  20. Structure and Binding Mechanism of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin: A Divergent Classical Cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brasch; O Harrison; G Ahlsen; S Carnally; R Henderson; B Honig; L Shapiro

    2011-12-31

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a divergent member of the type II classical cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins, mediates homophilic adhesion in the vascular endothelium. Previous investigations with a bacterially produced protein suggested that VE-cadherin forms cell surface trimers that bind between apposed cells to form hexamers. Here we report studies of mammalian-produced VE-cadherin ectodomains suggesting that, like other classical cadherins, VE-cadherin forms adhesive trans dimers between monomers located on opposing cell surfaces. Trimerization of the bacterially produced protein appears to be an artifact that arises from a lack of glycosylation. We also present the 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the VE-cadherin EC1-2 adhesive region, which reveals homodimerization via the strand-swap mechanism common to classical cadherins. In common with type II cadherins, strand-swap binding involves two tryptophan anchor residues, but the adhesive interface resembles type I cadherins in that VE-cadherin does not form a large nonswapped hydrophobic surface. Thus, VE-cadherin is an outlier among classical cadherins, with characteristics of both type I and type II subfamilies.

  1. Magnetic monopoles and dyons revisited: a useful contribution to the study of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato P.

    2015-05-01

    Graduate-level physics curricula in many countries around the world, as well as senior-level undergraduate ones in some major institutions, include classical mechanics courses, mostly based on Goldstein’s textbook masterpiece. During the discussion of central force motion, however, the Kepler problem is virtually the only serious application presented. In this paper, we present another problem that is also soluble, namely the interaction of Schwinger’s dual-charged (dyon) particles. While the electromagnetic interaction of magnetic monopoles and electric charges was studied in detail some 40 years ago, we consider that a pedagogical discussion of it from an essentially classical mechanics point of view is a useful contribution for students. Following a path that generalizes Kepler’s problem and Rutherford scattering, we show that they exhibit remarkable properties such as stable non-planar orbits, as well as rainbow and glory scattering, which are not present in the ordinary scattering of two singly charged particles. Moreover, it can be extended further to the relativistic case and to a semi-classical quantization, which can also be included in the class discussion.

  2. Canonical quantization of classical mechanics in curvilinear coordinates. Invariant quantization procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Błaszak, Maciej Domański, Ziemowit

    2013-12-15

    In the paper is presented an invariant quantization procedure of classical mechanics on the phase space over flat configuration space. Then, the passage to an operator representation of quantum mechanics in a Hilbert space over configuration space is derived. An explicit form of position and momentum operators as well as their appropriate ordering in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates is demonstrated. Finally, the extension of presented formalism onto non-flat case and related ambiguities of the process of quantization are discussed. -- Highlights: •An invariant quantization procedure of classical mechanics on the phase space over flat configuration space is presented. •The passage to an operator representation of quantum mechanics in a Hilbert space over configuration space is derived. •Explicit form of position and momentum operators and their appropriate ordering in curvilinear coordinates is shown. •The invariant form of Hamiltonian operators quadratic and cubic in momenta is derived. •The extension of presented formalism onto non-flat case and related ambiguities of the quantization process are discussed.

  3. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-03-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal U(1) B - L extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The U(1) B - L symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy the perturbativity of the running couplings and the electroweak vacuum stability as well as the naturalness of the electroweak scale.

  4. Is classical mechanics a prerequisite for learning physics of the 20th century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walwema, Godfrey B.; French, Debbie A.; Verley, Jim D.; Burrows, Andrea C.

    2016-11-01

    Physics of the 20th century has contributed significantly to modern technology, and yet many physics students are never availed the opportunity to study it as part of the curriculum. One of the possible reasons why it is not taught in high school and introductory physics courses could be because curriculum designers believe that students need a solid background in classical mechanics and calculus in order to study physics of the 20th century such as the photoelectric effect, special and general relativity, the uncertainty principle, etc. This presumption may not be justifiable or valid. The authors of this paper contend that teaching physics of the 20th century aids students in relating physics to modern technology and the real world, making studying physics exciting. In this study, the authors correlated scores for matched questions in the Mechanics Baseline Test and a physics of the 20th century test in order to examine the trend of the scores. The participants included undergraduate students attending an introductory algebra-based physics course with no intention of taking physics at a higher level. The analysis of the scores showed no significant correlation for any of the matched pairs of questions. The purpose of this article is to recommend that even without a solid background in classical mechanics, teachers can introduce physics of the 20th century to their students for increased interest.

  5. Non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons from a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Ralf; Hong, Sungkun; Norte, Richard A.; Slater, Joshua A.; Shang, Juying; Krause, Alexander G.; Anant, Vikas; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Gröblacher, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Interfacing a single photon with another quantum system is a key capability in modern quantum information science. It allows quantum states of matter, such as spin states of atoms, atomic ensembles or solids, to be prepared and manipulated by photon counting and, in particular, to be distributed over long distances. Such light-matter interfaces have become crucial to fundamental tests of quantum physics and realizations of quantum networks. Here we report non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons—the quanta of mechanical motion—from a nanomechanical resonator. We implement a full quantum protocol involving initialization of the resonator in its quantum ground state of motion and subsequent generation and read-out of correlated photon-phonon pairs. The observed violation of a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality is clear evidence for the non-classical nature of the mechanical state generated. Our results demonstrate the availability of on-chip solid-state mechanical resonators as light-matter quantum interfaces. The performance we achieved will enable studies of macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as applications in quantum communication, as quantum memories and as quantum transducers.

  6. An interpretation within philosophy of the relationship between classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibelius, Patrick

    1989-11-01

    A mapping of a finite directed graph onto a curve in space-time is considered. The mapping induces the dynamics of a free particle moving along the curve. The distinction between the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian formulation of particle mechanics is expressed in terms of the distinction between referring to a particle in space and time and referring to the points in space which the particle occupies, respectively. These elements are combined to yield an interpretation of Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics. Describing a bound state of a system as a particle is discussed.

  7. Use of the poincare sphere in polarization optics and classical and quantum mechanics. Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.

    1997-03-01

    The method of the Poincaré sphere, which was proposed by Henri Poincaré in 1891-1892, is a convenient approach to represent polarized light. This method is graphical: each point on the sphere corresponds to a certain polarization state. Apart from the obvious representation of polarized light, the method of the Poincaré sphere permits efficient solution of problems that result from the use of a set of phase plates or a combination of phase plates and ideally homogeneous polarizers. Recently, to calculate the geometric phase (which is often called the Berry phase) in polarization optics and quantum and classical mechanics, the method of the Poincaré sphere has drawn much attention, since it allows us to carry out these calculations very efficiently and intuitively using the solid angle resting, on a closed curve on the Poincaré sphere that corresponds to the change in the state of light polarization or in the state of spin of an elementary particle or its orientation in space from the viewpoint of systems in classical mechanics. The review considers papers on the above problems.

  8. Quantization in classical mechanics and its relation to the Bohmian {Psi}-field

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V.D.; Vlasenko, D.S.; Mavrodiev, S.Cht.

    2011-08-15

    Research highlights: > The Schroedinger equation is derived from the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. > This derivation is based on the Chetaev theorem on stable dynamical trajectories. > The conditions for correctness of trajectory quantum mechanics are discussed. - Abstract: Based on the Chetaev theorem on stable dynamical trajectories in the presence of dissipative forces, we obtain the generalized condition for stability of Hamilton systems in the form of the Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the energy of dissipative forces, which generate the Chetaev generalized condition of stability, coincides exactly with the Bohm 'quantum' potential. Within the frame-work of Bohmian quantum mechanics supplemented by the generalized Chetaev theorem and on the basis of the principle of least action for dissipative forces, we show that the squared amplitude of a wave function in the Schroedinger equation is equivalent semantically and syntactically to the probability density function for the number of particle trajectories, relative to which the velocity and the position of the particle are not hidden parameters. The conditions for the correctness of trajectory interpretation of quantum mechanics are discussed.

  9. Exploring Synergy between Classic Mutagens and Antibiotics To Examine Mechanisms of Synergy and Antibiotic Action

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lisa Yun; D'Souza, Sara; Lam, Karen; Kang, Tina Manzhu

    2015-01-01

    We used classical mutagens in Gram-negative Escherichia coli to study synergies with different classes of antibiotics, test models of antibiotic mechanisms of action, and examine the basis of synergy. We used 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), zebularine (ZEB), 5-azacytidine (5AZ), 2-aminopurine (2AP), and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5BrdU) as mutagens (with bactericidal potency of 4NQO > ZEB > 5AZ > 2AP > 5BrdU) and vancomycin (VAN), ciprofloxacin (CPR), trimethoprim (TMP), gentamicin (GEN), tetracycline (TET), erythromycin (ERY), and chloramphenicol (CHL) as antibiotics. We detected the strongest synergies with 4NQO, an agent that oxidizes guanines and ultimately results in double-strand breaks when paired with the bactericidal antibiotics VAN, TMP, CPR, and GEN, but no synergies with the bacteriostatic antibiotics TET, ERY, and CHL. Each of the other mutagens displays synergies with the bactericidal antibiotics to various degrees that reflect their potencies, as well as with some of the other mutagens. The results support recent models showing that bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria principally by ultimately generating more double-strand breaks than can be repaired. We discuss the synergies seen here and elsewhere as representing dose effects of not the proximal target damage but rather the ultimate resulting double-strand breaks. We also used the results of pairwise tests to place the classic mutagens into functional antibacterial categories within a previously defined drug interaction network. PMID:26711761

  10. Photonic Rutherford scattering: A classical and quantum mechanical analogy in ray and wave optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmke, Markus; Cichos, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Using Fermat's least-optical-path principle, the family of ray trajectories through a special (but common) type of a gradient refractive index lens n(r)=n0+ΔnR /r is solved analytically. The solution gives a ray equation r(ϕ) that is closely related to Rutherford scattering trajectories; we therefore refer to this refraction process as "photonic Rutherford scattering." It is shown that not only do the classical limits correspond but also the wave-mechanical pictures coincide—the time-independent Schrödingier equation and the Helmholtz equation permit the same mapping between the scattering of massive particles and optical scalar waves. Scattering of narrow beams of light finally recovers the classical trajectories. The analysis suggests that photothermal single-particle microscopy measures photonic Rutherford scattering in specific limits and allows for an individual single-scatterer probing. A macroscopic experiment is demonstrated to directly measure the scattering angle to impact parameter relation, which is otherwise accessible only indirectly in Rutherford-scattering experiments.

  11. On the complexity of classical and quantum algorithms for numerical problems in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessen, Arvid J.

    Our understanding of complex quantum mechanical processes is limited by our inability to solve the equations that govern them except for simple cases. Numerical simulation of quantum systems appears to be our best option to understand, design and improve quantum systems. It turns out, however, that computational problems in quantum mechanics are notoriously difficult to treat numerically. The computational time that is required often scales exponentially with the size of the problem. One of the most radical approaches for treating quantum problems was proposed by Feytiman in 1982 [46]: he suggested that quantum mechanics itself showed a promising way to simulate quantum physics. This idea, the so called quantum computer, showed its potential convincingly in one important regime with the development of Shor's integer factorization algorithm which improves exponentially on the best known classical algorithm. In this thesis we explore six different computational problems from quantum mechanics, study their computational complexity and try to find ways to remedy them. In the first problem we investigate the reasons behind the improved performance of Shor's and similar algorithms. We show that the key quantum part in Shor's algorithm, the quantum phase estimation algorithm, achieves its good performance through the use of power queries and we give lower bounds for all phase estimation algorithms that use power queries that match the known upper bounds. Our research indicates that problems that allow the use of power queries will achieve similar exponential improvements over classical algorithms. We then apply our lower bound technique for power queries to the Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem and show matching lower bounds to the upper bounds of Papageorgiou and Wozniakowski [85]. It seems to be very difficult, though, to find nontrivial instances of the Sturm-Lionville problem for which power queries can be simulated efficiently. A quantum computer differs from a

  12. Some reflections on the role of semi-classical atomic models in the teaching and learning of introductory quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Colm

    2016-03-01

    The role of "semi-classical" (Bohr-Sommerfeld) and "semi-quantum-mechanical" (atomic orbital) models in the context of the teaching of atomic theory is considered. It is suggested that an appropriate treatment of such models can serve as a useful adjunct to quantum mechanical study of atomic systems.

  13. Superconducting-magnatic proximity systems and mathematical analogies to classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Thomas E.

    We present a model of a magnetic thin film that accurately replicates the features of exchange springs and use it to study the superconducting proximity effects when placed between two superconductors. The exchange spring is found to possess a mathematical analogy to the frictionless spherical pendulum at constant azimuthal frequency, also known as the bead on a hoop, which is occasionally used in introductory classical mechanics courses as an example of Least Action Principles. We provide the exact closed form, analytic solution of the bead and hoop through the use of Jacobi elliptic functions to this nearly 200 year old problem. The general solution strategy used to solve the mechanics problem is used to obtain the order parameter of a wide, dirty superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor (SFS) trilayer to find the Green's functions analytically in the case of a uniform exchange field. The exchange spring is then substituted for the homogeneous ferromagnet and used to numerically investigate the emergence of long range triplet pairing as a function of the twisting magnetization profile.

  14. The physical vulnerability of elements at risk: a methodology based on fluid and classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzorana, B.; Fuchs, S.; Levaggi, L.

    2012-04-01

    The impacts of the flood events occurred in autumn 2011 in the Italian regions Liguria and Tuscany revived the engagement of the public decision makers to enhance in synergy flood control and land use planning. In this context, the design of efficient flood risk mitigation strategies and their subsequent implementation critically relies on a careful vulnerability analysis of both, the immobile and mobile elements at risk potentially exposed to flood hazards. Based on fluid and classical mechanics notions we developed computation schemes enabling for a dynamic vulnerability and risk analysis facing a broad typological variety of elements at risk. The methodological skeleton consists of (1) hydrodynamic computation of the time-varying flood intensities resulting for each element at risk in a succession of loading configurations; (2) modelling the mechanical response of the impacted elements through static, elasto-static and dynamic analyses; (3) characterising the mechanical response through proper structural damage variables and (4) economic valuation of the expected losses as a function of the quantified damage variables. From a computational perspective we coupled the description of the hydrodynamic flow behaviour and the induced structural modifications of the elements at risk exposed. Valuation methods, suitable to support a correct mapping from the value domains of the physical damage variables to the economic loss values are discussed. In such a way we target to complement from a methodological perspective the existing, mainly empirical, vulnerability and risk assessment approaches to refine the conceptual framework of the cost-benefit analysis. Moreover, we aim to support the design of effective flood risk mitigation strategies by diminishing the main criticalities within the systems prone to flood risk.

  15. Transport cross sections based on a screened interaction potential: Comparison of classical and quantum-mechanical results

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-06-15

    Standard classical and quantum-mechanical methods are used to characterize the momentum-transfer cross section needed in energy-loss calculations and simulations for heavy, swift charges moving in an electron gas. By applying a well-known, finite-range screened Coulombic potential energy to model the two-body collision, the quantitative applicability range of the classical cross section is investigated as a function of charge (Z), screening length (R), and scattering relative velocity (v). The a posteriori condition (Z/R)/v{sup 2}<1, as an upper bound for heavy charges, is deduced for this applicability range from the comparative study performed.

  16. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2016-02-15

    In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, "Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?" The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call 'reasoning') to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player's brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences.

  17. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S.; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2016-01-01

    In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, “Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?” The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call ‘reasoning’) to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player’s brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences. PMID:26875685

  18. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S.; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2016-02-01

    In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, “Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?” The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call ‘reasoning’) to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player’s brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences.

  19. Therapeutic mechanisms of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions: from indirect evidence to testable hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Pommy, Jessica M

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol and drug addiction are major public health problems, and existing treatments are only moderately effective. Although there has been interest for over half a century in the therapeutic use of classic hallucinogens to treat addictions, clinical research with these drugs was halted at an early stage in the early 1970s, leaving many fundamental questions unanswered. In the past two decades, clinical research on classic hallucinogens has resumed, although addiction treatment trials are only now beginning. The purpose of this paper is to provide a targeted review of the research most relevant to the therapeutic potential of hallucinogens, and to integrate this information with current thinking about addiction and recovery. On the basis of this information, we present a heuristic model which organizes a number of hypotheses that may be tested in future research. We conclude that existing evidence provides a convincing rationale for further research on the effects of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addiction. PMID:22761106

  20. The dynamics of the H(+) + D(2) reaction: a comparison of quantum mechanical wavepacket, quasi-classical and statistical-quasi-classical results.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Bulut, N; Smith, Sean C; Balint-Kurti, G G; Hankel, M

    2010-02-01

    A detailed study of the proton exchange reaction H(+) + D(2)(v = 0, j = 0) --> HD + D(+) on its ground 1(1)A' potential energy surface has been carried out using 'exact' close-coupled quantum mechanical wavepacket (WP-EQM), quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), and statistical quasi-classical trajectory (SQCT) calculations for a range of collision energies starting from the reaction threshold to 1.3 eV. The WP-EQM calculations include all total angular momenta up to J(max) = 50, and therefore the various dynamical observables are converged up to 0.6 eV. It has been found that it is necessary to include all Coriolis couplings to obtain reliable converged results. Reaction probabilities obtained using the different methods are thoroughly compared as a function of the total energy for a series of J values. Comparisons are also made of total reaction cross sections as function of the collision energy, and rate constants. In addition, opacity functions, integral cross sections (ICS) and differential cross sections (DCS) are presented at 102 meV, 201.3 meV and 524.6 meV collision energy. The agreement between the three sets of results is only qualitative. The QCT calculations fail to describe the overall reactivity and most of the dynamical observables correctly. At low collision energies, the QCT method is plagued by the lack of conservation of zero point energy, whilst at higher collision energies and/or total angular momenta, the appearance of an effective repulsive potential associated with the centrifugal motion "over" the well causes a substantial decrease of the reactivity. In turn, the statistical models overestimate the reactivity over the whole range of collision energies as compared with the WP-EQM method. Specifically, at sufficiently high collision energies the reaction cannot be deemed to be statistical and important dynamical effects seem to be present. In general the WP-EQM results lie in between those obtained using the QCT and SQCT methods. One of the main

  1. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  2. Non-Noetherian symmetries for oscillators in classical mechanics and in field theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojman, Sergio A.; Delajara, Jamie; Pena, Leda

    1995-01-01

    Infinitely many new conservation laws both for free fields as well as for test fields evolving on a given gravitational background are presented. The conserved currents are constructed using the field theoretical counterpart of a recently discovered non-Noetherian symmetry which gives rise to a new way of solving the classical small oscillations problem. Several examples are discussed.

  3. Probabilities for time-dependent properties in classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, Marcelo; Vanni, Leonardo; Laura, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    We present a formalism which allows one to define probabilities for expressions that involve properties at different times for classical and quantum systems and we study its lattice structure. The formalism is based on the notion of time translation of properties. In the quantum case, the properties involved should satisfy compatibility conditions in order to obtain well-defined probabilities. The formalism is applied to describe the double-slit experiment.

  4. Mechanistic insights into Mg2+-independent prenylation by CloQ from classical molecular mechanics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bayse, Craig A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the mechanism of prenyltransferases is important to the design of engineered proteins capable of synthesizing derivatives of naturally occurring therapeutic agents. CloQ is a Mg(2+)-independent aromatic prenyltransferase (APTase) that transfers a dimethylallyl group to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in the biosynthetic pathway for clorobiocin. APTases consist of a common ABBA fold that defines a β-barrel containing the reaction cavity. Positively charged basic residues line the inside of the β-barrel of CloQ to activate the pyrophosphate leaving group to replace the function of the Mg(2+) cofactor in other APTases. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of CloQ, its E281G and F68S mutants, and the related NovQ were used to explore the binding of the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (4HPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate substrates in the reactive cavity and the role of various conserved residues. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential of mean force (PMF) calculations show that the effect of the replacement of the Mg(2+) cofactor with basic residues yields a similar activation barrier for prenylation to Mg(2+)-dependent APTases like NphB. The topology of the binding pocket for 4HPP is important for selective prenylation at the ortho position of the ring. Methylation at this position alters the conformation of the substrate for O-prenylation at the phenol group. Further, a two-dimensional PMF scan shows that a "reverse" prenylation product may be a possible target for protein engineering.

  5. COL5A1 haploinsufficiency is a common molecular mechanism underlying the classical form of EDS.

    PubMed Central

    Wenstrup, R J; Florer, J B; Willing, M C; Giunta, C; Steinmann, B; Young, F; Susic, M; Cole, W G

    2000-01-01

    We have identified haploinsufficiency of the COL5A1 gene that encodes the proalpha1(V) chain of type V collagen in the classical form of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a heritable connective-tissue disorder that severely alters the collagen-fibrillar structure of the dermis, joints, eyes, and blood vessels. Eight of 28 probands with classical EDS who were heterozygous for expressed polymorphisms in COL5A1 showed complete or nearly complete loss of expression of one COL5A1 allele. Reduced levels of proalpha1(V) mRNA relative to the levels of another type V collagen mRNA, proalpha2(V), were also observed in the cultured fibroblasts from EDS probands. Products of the two COL5A1 alleles were approximately equal after the addition of cycloheximide to the fibroblast cultures. After harvesting of mRNAs from cycloheximide-treated cultured fibroblasts, heteroduplex analysis of overlapping reverse transcriptase-PCR segments spanning the complete proalpha1(V) cDNA showed anomalies in four of the eight probands that led to identification of causative mutations, and, in the remaining four probands, targeting of CGA-->TGA mutations in genomic DNA revealed a premature stop at codon in one of them. We estimate that approximately one-third of individuals with classical EDS have mutations of COL5A1 that result in haploinsufficiency. These findings indicate that the normal formation of the heterotypic collagen fibrils that contain types I, III, and V collagen requires the expression of both COL5A1 alleles. PMID:10777716

  6. The classical and quantum mechanics of a particle on a knot

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, V.V.

    2015-08-15

    A free particle is constrained to move on a knot obtained by winding around a putative torus. The classical equations of motion for this system are solved in a closed form. The exact energy eigenspectrum, in the thin torus limit, is obtained by mapping the time-independent Schrödinger equation to the Mathieu equation. In the general case, the eigenvalue problem is described by the Hill equation. Finite-thickness corrections are incorporated perturbatively by truncating the Hill equation. Comparisons and contrasts between this problem and the well-studied problem of a particle on a circle (planar rigid rotor) are performed throughout.

  7. Connection between quantum-mechanical and classical time evolution via a dynamical invariant

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, Dieter; Moshinsky, Marcos

    2006-06-15

    The time evolution of a quantum system with at most quadratic Hamiltonian is described with the help of different methods, namely the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, the time propagator or Feynman kernel, and the Wigner function. It is shown that all three methods are connected via a dynamical invariant, the so-called Ermakov invariant. This invariant introduces explicitly the quantum aspect via the position uncertainty and its possible time dependence. The importance of this aspect, also for the difference between classical and quantum dynamics, and in particular the role of the initial position uncertainty is investigated.

  8. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  9. Dynamics of classical particles in oval or elliptic billiards with a dispersing mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Diogo Ricardo da; Dettmann, Carl P.; Oliveira, Juliano A. de; Leonel, Edson D.

    2015-03-15

    Some dynamical properties for an oval billiard with a scatterer in its interior are studied. The dynamics consists of a classical particle colliding between an inner circle and an external boundary given by an oval, elliptical, or circle shapes, exploring for the first time some natural generalizations. The billiard is indeed a generalization of the annular billiard, which is of strong interest for understanding marginally unstable periodic orbits and their role in the boundary between regular and chaotic regions in both classical and quantum (including experimental) systems. For the oval billiard, which has a mixed phase space, the presence of an obstacle is an interesting addition. We demonstrate, with details, how to obtain the equations of the mapping, and the changes in the phase space are discussed. We study the linear stability of some fixed points and show both analytically and numerically the occurrence of direct and inverse parabolic bifurcations. Lyapunov exponents and generalized bifurcation diagrams are obtained. Moreover, histograms of the number of successive iterations for orbits that stay in a cusp are studied. These histograms are shown to be scaling invariant when changing the radius of the scatterer, and they have a power law slope around −3. The results here can be generalized to other kinds of external boundaries.

  10. Dynamics of classical particles in oval or elliptic billiards with a dispersing mechanism.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Diogo Ricardo; Dettmann, Carl P; de Oliveira, Juliano A; Leonel, Edson D

    2015-03-01

    Some dynamical properties for an oval billiard with a scatterer in its interior are studied. The dynamics consists of a classical particle colliding between an inner circle and an external boundary given by an oval, elliptical, or circle shapes, exploring for the first time some natural generalizations. The billiard is indeed a generalization of the annular billiard, which is of strong interest for understanding marginally unstable periodic orbits and their role in the boundary between regular and chaotic regions in both classical and quantum (including experimental) systems. For the oval billiard, which has a mixed phase space, the presence of an obstacle is an interesting addition. We demonstrate, with details, how to obtain the equations of the mapping, and the changes in the phase space are discussed. We study the linear stability of some fixed points and show both analytically and numerically the occurrence of direct and inverse parabolic bifurcations. Lyapunov exponents and generalized bifurcation diagrams are obtained. Moreover, histograms of the number of successive iterations for orbits that stay in a cusp are studied. These histograms are shown to be scaling invariant when changing the radius of the scatterer, and they have a power law slope around -3. The results here can be generalized to other kinds of external boundaries.

  11. Dynamics of classical particles in oval or elliptic billiards with a dispersing mechanism.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Diogo Ricardo; Dettmann, Carl P; de Oliveira, Juliano A; Leonel, Edson D

    2015-03-01

    Some dynamical properties for an oval billiard with a scatterer in its interior are studied. The dynamics consists of a classical particle colliding between an inner circle and an external boundary given by an oval, elliptical, or circle shapes, exploring for the first time some natural generalizations. The billiard is indeed a generalization of the annular billiard, which is of strong interest for understanding marginally unstable periodic orbits and their role in the boundary between regular and chaotic regions in both classical and quantum (including experimental) systems. For the oval billiard, which has a mixed phase space, the presence of an obstacle is an interesting addition. We demonstrate, with details, how to obtain the equations of the mapping, and the changes in the phase space are discussed. We study the linear stability of some fixed points and show both analytically and numerically the occurrence of direct and inverse parabolic bifurcations. Lyapunov exponents and generalized bifurcation diagrams are obtained. Moreover, histograms of the number of successive iterations for orbits that stay in a cusp are studied. These histograms are shown to be scaling invariant when changing the radius of the scatterer, and they have a power law slope around -3. The results here can be generalized to other kinds of external boundaries. PMID:25833431

  12. Historical and critical review of the development of nonholonomic mechanics: the classical period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexey V.; Mamaev, Ivan S.; Bizyaev, Ivan A.

    2016-07-01

    In this historical review we describe in detail the main stages of the development of nonholonomic mechanics starting from the work of Earnshaw and Ferrers to the monograph of Yu. I.Neimark and N.A. Fufaev. In the appendix to this review we discuss the d'Alembert-Lagrange principle in nonholonomic mechanics and permutation relations.

  13. Classical and Targeted Anticancer Drugs: An Appraisal of Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor cells resist the action of multiple anticancer drugs, often with widely different chemical structures, have been pursued for more than 30 years. The identification of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug efflux transporter protein with affinity for multiple therapeutic drugs, provided an important potential mechanism and further work, which identified other members of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family that act as drug transporters. Several observations, including results of clinical trials with pharmacological inhibitors of P-gp, have suggested that mechanisms other than efflux transporters should be considered as contributors to resistance, and in this review mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance are considered more broadly. Cells in human tumors exist is a state of continuous turnover, allowing ongoing selection and "survival of the fittest." Tumor cells die not only as a consequence of drug therapy but also by apoptosis induced by their microenvironment. Cell death can be mediated by host immune mechanisms and by nonimmune cells acting on so-called death receptors. The tumor cell proliferation rate is also important because it controls tumor regeneration. Resistance to therapy might therefore be considered to arise from a reduction of several distinct cell death mechanisms, as well as from an increased ability to regenerate. This review provides a perspective on these mechanisms, together with brief descriptions of some of the methods that can be used to investigate them in a clinical situation. PMID:26910066

  14. [Mechanisms and regulation of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in filamentous fungi: classical cases and new models].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Ivonne; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia; Montoya, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable carbon source on earth. However, this polymer structure comprises a physical and chemical barrier for carbon access, which has limited its exploitation. In nature, only a few percentage of microorganisms may degrade this polymer by cellulase expression. Filamentous fungi are one of the most active and efficient groups among these microorganisms. This review describes similarities and differences between cellulase activity mechanisms and regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression for 3 of the most studied cellulolytic filamentous fungi models: Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans, and the recently described model Neurospora crassa. Unlike gene expression mechanisms, it was found that enzymatic activity mechanisms are similar for all the studied models. Understanding the distinctive elements of each system is essential for the development of strategies for the improvement of cellulase production, either by providing the optimum environment (fermentation conditions) or increasing gene expression in these microorganisms by genetic engineering.

  15. Energy Transfer Sensitization of Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters: More than Just the Classical Förster Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eunkeu; Huston, Alan L.; Shabaev, Andrew; Efros, Alexander; Currie, Marc; Susumu, Kimihiro; Bussmann, Konrad; Goswami, Ramasis; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent gold nanocrystals (AuNCs) are a recently-developed material with potential optic, electronic and biological applications. They also demonstrate energy transfer (ET) acceptor/sensitization properties which have been ascribed to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and, to a lesser extent, nanosurface energy transfer (NSET). Here, we investigate AuNC acceptor interactions with three structurally/functionally-distinct donor classes including organic dyes, metal chelates and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Donor quenching was observed for every donor-acceptor pair although AuNC sensitization was only observed from metal-chelates and QDs. FRET theory dramatically underestimated the observed energy transfer while NSET-based damping models provided better fits but could not reproduce the experimental data. We consider additional factors including AuNC magnetic dipoles, density of excited-states, dephasing time, and enhanced intersystem crossing that can also influence ET. Cumulatively, data suggests that AuNC sensitization is not by classical FRET or NSET and we provide a simplified distance-independent ET model to fit such experimental data. PMID:27774984

  16. A Collector Plate Mechanism-Based Classical Intergranular Precipitation Model for Al Alloys Sensitized at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Gaosong; Derrick, Alexander T.; Zhu, Yakun; Free, Michael L.

    2015-11-01

    The sensitization behavior of Al 5xxx alloys is mainly caused by the formation of Mg-rich precipitates at grain boundaries. In this study, a classical nucleation-growth-coarsening theory for the description of intergranular precipitation is formulated, which adopts a collector plate mechanism, an equivalent average Mg concentration at the grain boundary, and new coarsening mechanisms. Three coarsening mechanisms, the modified Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner, the Kirchner mechanism, and a combination of these two mechanisms, are compared. Modeling results reveal that the Kirchner mechanism will breakdown when continuity ( √ {Nπ R2 } ) is close to 1. According to the new model, the coarsening still accounts for a small fraction (only 10 pct) in the final growth rate after aging at 343 K (70 °C) for 40 months, which is confirmed by the precipitate size distribution data. Thickness and continuity results predicted by the new model agree well with the experimental results obtained from scanning transmission electron microscopy images of Al 5083 H131 alloys aged at 343 K (70 °C) for different times. In addition, the new model is also applied to a high-temperature [453 K (180 °C)] situation, where coarsening of precipitates is observed.

  17. Classical and quantum-mechanical axioms with the higher time derivative formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalov, Timur

    2013-06-01

    A Newtonian mechanics model is essentially the model of a point body in an inertial reference frame. How to describe extended bodies in non-inertial (vibration) reference frames with the random initial conditions? One of the most generalized ways of descriptions (known as the higher derivatives formalism) consists in taking into account the infinite number of the higher temporal derivatives of the coordinates in the Lagrange function. Such formalism describing physical objects in the infinite dimensions space does not contradict to the quantum mechanics and infinite dimensions Hilbert space.

  18. Classical conditioning mechanisms can differentiate between seeing and doing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Schmajuk, Nestor A

    2012-01-01

    We show that the attentional-associative SLG model of classical conditioning, based on the 1996 research of Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray, correctly describes experimental results regarded as evidence of causal learning in rats: (a) interventions attenuate responding following common-cause training but do not interfere on subsequent responding during observation, and (b) interventions do not affect responding after direct-cause training or (c) causal-chain training. According to the model, responding to the weakly attended test stimulus is strongly inhibited by the intervention in the common-cause case. Instead, in the direct-cause and causal-chain cases, the strongly attended test stimulus becomes inhibitory, thereby overshadowing the inhibitory effect of interventions. Most importantly, the model predicted that with relatively few test trials (a) the 2008 results of Experiment 3 by Leising, Wong, Waldmann, and Blaisdell should be similar to those of Dwyer, Starns, and Honey's 2009 Experiment 1, showing that interventions equally affect responding after common-cause and direct-cause training; and (b) the 2006 results of Experiment 2a by Blaisdell, Sawa, Leising, and Waldmann should be similar to those of Dwyer, Starns, and Honey's 2009 Experiment 2, showing that interventions equally affect responding after common-cause and causal-chain training. When those data were made available to us, we confirmed those predictions. In agreement with the SLG associative model, but not with causal model theory, this evidence supports the notion that the attenuation of responding by interventions only following common-cause training is the consequence of well-known learning processes-latent inhibition, sensory preconditioning, conditioned inhibition, protection from extinction, and overshadowing.

  19. Classical conditioning mechanisms can differentiate between seeing and doing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Schmajuk, Nestor A

    2012-01-01

    We show that the attentional-associative SLG model of classical conditioning, based on the 1996 research of Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray, correctly describes experimental results regarded as evidence of causal learning in rats: (a) interventions attenuate responding following common-cause training but do not interfere on subsequent responding during observation, and (b) interventions do not affect responding after direct-cause training or (c) causal-chain training. According to the model, responding to the weakly attended test stimulus is strongly inhibited by the intervention in the common-cause case. Instead, in the direct-cause and causal-chain cases, the strongly attended test stimulus becomes inhibitory, thereby overshadowing the inhibitory effect of interventions. Most importantly, the model predicted that with relatively few test trials (a) the 2008 results of Experiment 3 by Leising, Wong, Waldmann, and Blaisdell should be similar to those of Dwyer, Starns, and Honey's 2009 Experiment 1, showing that interventions equally affect responding after common-cause and direct-cause training; and (b) the 2006 results of Experiment 2a by Blaisdell, Sawa, Leising, and Waldmann should be similar to those of Dwyer, Starns, and Honey's 2009 Experiment 2, showing that interventions equally affect responding after common-cause and causal-chain training. When those data were made available to us, we confirmed those predictions. In agreement with the SLG associative model, but not with causal model theory, this evidence supports the notion that the attenuation of responding by interventions only following common-cause training is the consequence of well-known learning processes-latent inhibition, sensory preconditioning, conditioned inhibition, protection from extinction, and overshadowing. PMID:22229589

  20. Racemization of Isobornyl Chloride via Carbocations: A Nonclassical Look at a Classic Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzepa, Henry S.; Allan, Charlotte S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of carbonium ions as intermediates in chemical reaction mechanisms derives from the early work of Julius Stieglitz and the more famous Hans Meerwein, the latter studying the racemization of isobornyl chloride when treated with Lewis acids. This review analyzes how key mechanistic concepts for this reaction evolved and gives the…

  1. A Formal Derivation of the Gibbs Entropy for Classical Systems Following the Schrodinger Quantum Mechanical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santillan, M.; Zeron, E. S.; Del Rio-Correa, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    In the traditional statistical mechanics textbooks, the entropy concept is first introduced for the microcanonical ensemble and then extended to the canonical and grand-canonical cases. However, in the authors' experience, this procedure makes it difficult for the student to see the bigger picture and, although quite ingenuous, the subtleness of…

  2. The road to matrix mechanics: I. Classical interpretation of the anomalous optical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellari, Lucio

    2016-09-01

    This paper is the first one of a series of two on the role of the optical dispersion in the historical development of early quantum mechanics. As preparation for the successive paper on Ladenburg’s development of the phenomenological theory of radiative transitions between the stationary states of an atom by Einstein, we present here the current theories on optical dispersion between the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century.

  3. Computational algorithms dealing with the classical and statistical mechanics of celestial scale polymers in space elevator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Steven; Golubovic, Leonardo

    Prospects to build Space Elevator (SE) systems have become realistic with ultra-strong materials such as carbon nano-tubes and diamond nano-threads. At cosmic length-scales, space elevators can be modeled as polymer like floppy strings of tethered mass beads. A new venue in SE science has emerged with the introduction of the Rotating Space Elevator (RSE) concept supported by novel algorithms discussed in this presentation. An RSE is a loopy string reaching into outer space. Unlike the classical geostationary SE concepts of Tsiolkovsky, Artsutanov, and Pearson, our RSE exhibits an internal rotation. Thanks to this, objects sliding along the RSE loop spontaneously oscillate between two turning points, one of which is close to the Earth whereas the other one is in outer space. The RSE concept thus solves a major problem in SE technology which is how to supply energy to the climbers moving along space elevator strings. The investigation of the classical and statistical mechanics of a floppy string interacting with objects sliding along it required development of subtle computational algorithms described in this presentation

  4. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes with Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studied for years, but questions remain due, in part, to the difficulty of probing the effects of protein motion and hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and human heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride allowed for observation of the change in barrier height upon inclusion of quantum dynamics. Similar calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle in order to approximate kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The change in barrier height in YADH is indicative of a zero-point energy (ZPE) contribution and is evidence that catalysis occurs via a protein compression that mediates a near-barrierless hydride transfer. Calculation of the KIE using the difference in barrier height between the hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results.

  5. True Variational Principles and Time-Space Finite Element Methods for Classical and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrall, Bradley T.

    For the first time true variational principles are formulated for the analysis of the continuum problems of heat diffusion, dynamic thermoelasticity, poroelasticity, and time-dependent quantum mechanics. This is accomplished by considering the stationarity of a mixed convolved action, which can be seen as a modern counterpart to the original actions posed in Hamilton's principle and its many extensions. By including fractional derivatives, convolution integrals, and mixed variables into the definition of the action these new variational principles overcome the shortcomings of the many other variational methods based on Hamilton's principle, namely the inability to include dissipation in a consistent manner and the unjustified need to constrain variations on the primary unknowns of a system at the end of the time interval. These new variational principles then provide ideal weak forms from which novel time-space finite element methods having certain attractive properties are formulated.

  6. A model for incorporating computation without changing the course: An example from middle-division classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2014-03-01

    Although much of the research done by modern physicists would be impossible without the use of computers, today's physics curricula do not generally reflect their importance and utility. To more tightly connect undergraduate preparation with professional practice, we integrated computational instruction into middle-division classical mechanics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our model for integration works with the constraints of faculty who do not specialize in computation by placing a strong emphasis on an adaptable curriculum. It also includes the construction of learning goals and the design of activities consistent with those goals, including assessment of student computational fluency. We present critiques of our model as we work to develop an effective and sustainable model for computational instruction in the undergraduate curriculum.

  7. Some Implications of a Scale-Invariant Model of Statistical Mechanics to Classical and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    2016-03-01

    A scale-invariant model of statistical mechanics is applied to described modified forms of four laws of classical thermodynamics. Following de Broglie formula λrk = h /mkvrk , frequency of matter waves is defined as νrk = k /mkvrk leading to stochastic definitions of (Planck, Boltzmann) universal constants (h =mk <λrk > c , k =mk <νrk > c), λrkνrk = c , relating to spatiotemporal Casimir vacuum fluctuations. Invariant Mach number Maβ = v /vrβ is introduced leading to hierarchy of ``supersonic'' flow separated by shock front, viewed as ``event-horizon'' EHβ, from subsonic flow that terminates at surface of stagnant condensate of ``atoms'' defined as ``black-hole'' BHβ at scale β thus resulting in hierarchy of embedded ``black holes'' at molecular- atomic-, electron-, photon-, tachyon-. . . scales, ad infinitum. Classical black hole will correspond to solid phase photon or solid-light. It is argued that Bardeen-Carter-Hawking (1973) first law of black hole mechanics δM = (κ / 8 π) δA +ΩH δJ +ΦH δQ , instead of dE = TdS - PdV suggested by Bekenstein (1973), is analogous to first law of thermodynamics expressed as TdS = PdV + dE such that entropy of black hole, rather than to its horizon surface area, will be related to its total energy hence enthalpy H = TS leading to SBH = 4 kN in exact agreement with prediction of Major and Setter.

  8. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes from Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierlenga, Michael; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studies for years but questions remain, due to the difficulty in determining the participation of protein dynamics and quantum effects, especially hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride during the reaction allows for observation of the change in barrier height due to inclusion of quantum effects. Additionally, the same calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle to validate our methods with experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects. The change in barrier height in YADH upon inclusion of quantum effects is indicative of a zero-point energy contribution, and is evidence that the protein mediates a near-barrierless transfer of the rate-limiting hydride. Calculation of kinetic isotope effects using the average difference in barrier between hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results. The authors acknowledge the support of the National Institutes of Health Grants GM068036 and GM102226.

  9. Immune-Regulatory Mechanisms of Classical and Experimental Multiple Sclerosis Drugs: A Special Focus on Helminth-Derived Treatments.

    PubMed

    Peón, Alberto N; Terrazas, Luis I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most prevalent autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Its pathophysiology is centered on neuron myelin sheath destruction in a manner largely dependent upon CD4+/CD8+ T-cell autoreactivity against myelin antigens, inducing Th1/Th17 pathogenic responses with the resulting production of free radicals and soluble mediators that exhibit the effector mechanisms of neurodegeneration. The immune response responsible for this disease is complex and challenges modern medicine. Consequently, many experimental therapies have been proposed in addition to the classical array of immunoregulatory/ immunosuppressive drugs that are normally used to treat MS. In this review, we will describe the effects and mechanisms of action of widely used disease-modifying MS drugs as well as those of select treatments that are currently in the experimental phase. Special emphasis is placed on helminth-derived immunoregulators, as some of them have shown promising results. Additionally, we will compare the mechanisms of action of both the MS drugs and the helminth-derived treatments to discuss the potential importance of some signaling pathways in the control of MS.

  10. Introduction to Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, David

    2008-01-01

    Preface; 1. Strategies for solving problems; 2. Statics; 3. Using F=ma; 4. Oscillations; 5. Conservation of energy and momentum; 6. The Lagrangian model; 7. Central forces; 8. Angular momentum, Part I (constant L); 9. Angular momentum, Part II (general L); 10. Accelerating frames of reference; 11. Relativity (kinematics); 12. Relativity (dynamics); 13. 4-vectors; 14. General relativity; Appendices; References; Index.

  11. Combined quantum mechanics (TDDFT) and classical electrodynamics (Mie theory) methods for calculating surface enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Jonathan; Valley, Nicholas; Blaber, Martin G; Schatz, George C

    2012-09-27

    Multiscale models that combine quantum mechanics and classical electrodynamics are presented, which allow for the evaluation of surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) and hyper-Raman scattering spectra (SEHRS) for both chemical (CHEM) and electrodynamic (EM) enhancement mechanisms. In these models, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for a system consisting of the adsorbed molecule and a metal cluster fragment of the metal particle is coupled to Mie theory for the metal particle, with the surface of the cluster being overlaid with the surface of the metal particle. In model A, the electromagnetic enhancement from plasmon-excitation of the metal particle is combined with the chemical enhancement associated with a static treatment of the molecule-metal structure to determine overall spectra. In model B, the frequency dependence of the Raman spectrum of the isolated molecule is combined with the enhancements determined in model A to refine the enhancement estimate. An equivalent theory at the level of model A is developed for hyper-Raman spectra calculations. Application to pyridine interacting with a 20 nm diameter silver sphere is presented, including comparisons with an earlier model (denoted G), which combines plasmon enhanced fields with gas-phase Raman (or hyper-Raman) spectra. The EM enhancement factor for spherical particles at 357 nm is found to be 10(4) and 10(6) for SERS and SEHRS, respectively. Including both chemical and electromagnetic mechanisms at the level of model A leads to enhancements on the order of 10(4) and 10(9) for SERS and SEHRS.

  12. Computational methods in the exploration of the classical and statistical mechanics of celestial scale strings: Rotating Space Elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Steven; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    With the advent of ultra-strong materials, the Space Elevator has changed from science fiction to real science. We discuss computational and theoretical methods we developed to explore classical and statistical mechanics of rotating Space Elevators (RSE). An RSE is a loopy string reaching deep into outer space. The floppy RSE loop executes a motion which is nearly a superposition of two rotations: geosynchronous rotation around the Earth, and yet another faster rotational motion of the string which goes on around a line perpendicular to the Earth at its equator. Strikingly, objects sliding along the RSE loop spontaneously oscillate between two turning points, one of which is close to the Earth (starting point) whereas the other one is deeply in the outer space. The RSE concept thus solves a major problem in space elevator science which is how to supply energy to the climbers moving along space elevator strings. The exploration of the dynamics of a floppy string interacting with objects sliding along it has required development of novel finite element algorithms described in this presentation. We thank Prof. Duncan Lorimer of WVU for kindly providing us access to his computational facility.

  13. RNA sequencing reveals region-specific molecular mechanisms associated with epileptogenesis in a model of classical hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, A. S.; de Matos, A. H.; do Canto, A. M.; Rocha, C. S.; Carvalho, B. S.; Pascoal, V. D. B.; Norwood, B.; Bauer, S.; Rosenow, F.; Gilioli, R.; Cendes, F.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete transcriptome analysis of the dorsal (dDG) and ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) of a rat epilepsy model presenting a hippocampal lesion with a strict resemblance to classical hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We collected the dDG and vDG by laser microdissection 15 days after electrical stimulation and performed high-throughput RNA-sequencing. There were many differentially regulated genes, some of which were specific to either of the two sub-regions in stimulated animals. Gene ontology analysis indicated an enrichment of inflammation-related processes in both sub-regions and of axonal guidance and calcium signaling processes exclusively in the vDG. There was also a differential regulation of genes encoding molecules involved in synaptic function, neural electrical activity and neuropeptides in stimulated rats. The data presented here suggests, in the time point analyzed, a remarkable interaction among several molecular components which takes place in the damaged hippocampi. Furthermore, even though similar mechanisms may function in different regions of the DG, the molecular components involved seem to be region specific. PMID:26935982

  14. Classical Electrodynamics Coupled to Quantum Mechanics for Calculation of Molecular Optical Properties: a RT-TDDFT/FDTD Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hanning; McMahon, J. M.; Ratner, Mark A.; Schatz, George C.

    2010-09-02

    A new multiscale computational methodology was developed to effectively incorporate the scattered electric field of a plasmonic nanoparticle into a quantum mechanical (QM) optical property calculation for a nearby dye molecule. For a given location of the dye molecule with respect to the nanoparticle, a frequency-dependent scattering response function was first determined by the classical electrodynamics (ED) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach. Subsequently, the time-dependent scattered electric field at the dye molecule was calculated using the FDTD scattering response function through a multidimensional Fourier transform to reflect the effect of polarization of the nanoparticle on the local field at the molecule. Finally, a real-time time-dependent density function theory (RT-TDDFT) approach was employed to obtain a desired optical property (such as absorption cross section) of the dye molecule in the presence of the nanoparticle’s scattered electric field. Our hybrid QM/ED methodology was demonstrated by investigating the absorption spectrum of the N3 dye molecule and the Raman spectrum of pyridine, both of which were shown to be significantly enhanced by a 20 nm diameter silver sphere. In contrast to traditional quantum mechanical optical calculations in which the field at the molecule is entirely determined by intensity and polarization direction of the incident light, in this work we show that the light propagation direction as well as polarization and intensity are important to nanoparticle-bound dye molecule response. At no additional computation cost compared to conventional ED and QM calculations, this method provides a reliable way to couple the response of the dye molecule’s individual electrons to the collective dielectric response of the nanoparticle.

  15. Lewis pair polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs: acid, base and monomer scope and polymerization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuetao; Miyake, Garret M; John, Mallory G; Falivene, Laura; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2012-08-14

    Classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (LPs) of the strong Lewis acid (LA) Al(C(6)F(5))(3) with several Lewis base (LB) classes have been found to exhibit exceptional activity in the Lewis pair polymerization (LPP) of conjugated polar alkenes such as methyl methacrylate (MMA) as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (MBL) and γ-methyl-α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (γ-MMBL), leading to high molecular weight polymers, often with narrow molecular weight distributions. This study has investigated a large number of LPs, consisting of 11 LAs as well as 10 achiral and 4 chiral LBs, for LPP of 12 monomers of several different types. Although some more common LAs can also be utilized for LPP, Al(C(6)F(5))(3)-based LPs are far more active and effective than other LA-based LPs. On the other hand, several classes of LBs, when paired with Al(C(6)F(5))(3), can render highly active and effective LPP of MMA and γ-MMBL; such LBs include phosphines (e.g., P(t)Bu(3)), chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), and phosphazene superbases (e.g., P(4)-(t)Bu). The P(4)-(t)Bu/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair exhibits the highest activity of the LP series, with a remarkably high turn-over frequency of 9.6 × 10(4) h(-1) (0.125 mol% catalyst, 100% MMA conversion in 30 s, M(n) = 2.12 × 10(5) g mol(-1), PDI = 1.34). The polymers produced by LPs at RT are typically atactic (P(γ)MMBL with ∼47% mr) or syndio-rich (PMMA with ∼70-75% rr), but highly syndiotactic PMMA with rr ∼91% can be produced by chiral or achiral LPs at -78 °C. Mechanistic studies have identified and structurally characterized zwitterionic phosphonium and imidazolium enolaluminates as the active species of the current LPP system, which are formed by the reaction of the monomer·Al(C(6)F(5))(3) adduct with P(t)Bu(3) and NHC bases, respectively. Kinetic studies have revealed that the MMA polymerization by the (t)Bu(3)P/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair is zero-order in monomer concentration after an initial

  16. Lewis pair polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs: acid, base and monomer scope and polymerization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuetao; Miyake, Garret M; John, Mallory G; Falivene, Laura; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2012-08-14

    Classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (LPs) of the strong Lewis acid (LA) Al(C(6)F(5))(3) with several Lewis base (LB) classes have been found to exhibit exceptional activity in the Lewis pair polymerization (LPP) of conjugated polar alkenes such as methyl methacrylate (MMA) as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (MBL) and γ-methyl-α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (γ-MMBL), leading to high molecular weight polymers, often with narrow molecular weight distributions. This study has investigated a large number of LPs, consisting of 11 LAs as well as 10 achiral and 4 chiral LBs, for LPP of 12 monomers of several different types. Although some more common LAs can also be utilized for LPP, Al(C(6)F(5))(3)-based LPs are far more active and effective than other LA-based LPs. On the other hand, several classes of LBs, when paired with Al(C(6)F(5))(3), can render highly active and effective LPP of MMA and γ-MMBL; such LBs include phosphines (e.g., P(t)Bu(3)), chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), and phosphazene superbases (e.g., P(4)-(t)Bu). The P(4)-(t)Bu/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair exhibits the highest activity of the LP series, with a remarkably high turn-over frequency of 9.6 × 10(4) h(-1) (0.125 mol% catalyst, 100% MMA conversion in 30 s, M(n) = 2.12 × 10(5) g mol(-1), PDI = 1.34). The polymers produced by LPs at RT are typically atactic (P(γ)MMBL with ∼47% mr) or syndio-rich (PMMA with ∼70-75% rr), but highly syndiotactic PMMA with rr ∼91% can be produced by chiral or achiral LPs at -78 °C. Mechanistic studies have identified and structurally characterized zwitterionic phosphonium and imidazolium enolaluminates as the active species of the current LPP system, which are formed by the reaction of the monomer·Al(C(6)F(5))(3) adduct with P(t)Bu(3) and NHC bases, respectively. Kinetic studies have revealed that the MMA polymerization by the (t)Bu(3)P/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair is zero-order in monomer concentration after an initial

  17. Classics Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  18. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin–Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand–Levitan–Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  19. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  20. From quantum mechanics to classical statistical physics: Generalized Rokhsar-Kivelson Hamiltonians and the 'Stochastic Matrix Form' decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Castelnovo, Claudio . E-mail: castel@buphy.bu.edu; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher; Pujol, Pierre

    2005-08-01

    Quantum Hamiltonians that are fine-tuned to their so-called Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) points, first presented in the context of quantum dimer models, are defined by their representations in preferred bases in which their ground state wave functions are intimately related to the partition functions of combinatorial problems of classical statistical physics. We show that all the known examples of quantum Hamiltonians, when fine-tuned to their RK points, belong to a larger class of real, symmetric, and irreducible matrices that admit what we dub a Stochastic Matrix Form (SMF) decomposition. Matrices that are SMF decomposable are shown to be in one-to-one correspondence with stochastic classical systems described by a Master equation of the matrix type, hence their name. It then follows that the equilibrium partition function of the stochastic classical system partly controls the zero-temperature quantum phase diagram, while the relaxation rates of the stochastic classical system coincide with the excitation spectrum of the quantum problem. Given a generic quantum Hamiltonian construed as an abstract operator defined on some Hilbert space, we prove that there exists a continuous manifold of bases in which the representation of the quantum Hamiltonian is SMF decomposable, i.e., there is a (continuous) manifold of distinct stochastic classical systems related to the same quantum problem. Finally, we illustrate with three examples of Hamiltonians fine-tuned to their RK points, the triangular quantum dimer model, the quantum eight-vertex model, and the quantum three-coloring model on the honeycomb lattice, how they can be understood within our framework, and how this allows for immediate generalizations, e.g., by adding non-trivial interactions to these models.

  1. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  2. An extension of the classical theory of algebraic invariants to pseudo-Riemannian geometry and Hamiltonian mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLenaghan, Raymond G.; Smirnov, Roman G.; The, Dennis

    2004-03-01

    We develop a new approach to the study of Killing tensors defined in pseudo-Riemannian spaces of constant curvature that is ideologically close to the classical theory of invariants. The main idea, which provides the foundation of the new approach, is to treat a Killing tensor as an algebraic object determined by a set of parameters of the corresponding vector space of Killing tensors under the action of the isometry group. The spaces of group invariants and conformal group invariants of valence two Killing tensors defined in the Minkowski plane are described. The group invariants, which are the generators of the space of invariants, are applied to the problem of classification of orthogonally separable Hamiltonian systems defined in the Minkowski plane. Transformation formulas to separable coordinates expressed in terms of the parameters of the corresponding space of Killing tensors are presented. The results are applied to the problem of orthogonal separability of the Drach superintegrable potentials.

  3. InGaAs tunnel diodes for the calibration of semi-classical and quantum mechanical band-to-band tunneling models

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin; Verreck, Devin; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Groeseneken, Guido; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Rooyackers, Rita; Merckling, Clément; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Voon Y.; Van De Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart

    2014-05-14

    Promising predictions are made for III-V tunnel-field-effect transistor (FET), but there is still uncertainty on the parameters used in the band-to-band tunneling models. Therefore, two simulators are calibrated in this paper; the first one uses a semi-classical tunneling model based on Kane's formalism, and the second one is a quantum mechanical simulator implemented with an envelope function formalism. The calibration is done for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As using several p+/intrinsic/n+ diodes with different intrinsic region thicknesses. The dopant profile is determined by SIMS and capacitance-voltage measurements. Error bars are used based on statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measurement techniques. The obtained parameters are in close agreement with theoretically predicted values and validate the semi-classical and quantum mechanical models. Finally, the models are applied to predict the input characteristics of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As n- and p-lineTFET, with the n-lineTFET showing competitive performance compared to MOSFET.

  4. Complementarity between Quantum and Classical Mechanics in Chemical Modeling. The H + HeH+ → H2 + + He Reaction: A Rigourous Test for Reaction Dynamics Methods.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Coppola, Carla Maria; De Fazio, Dario

    2015-12-24

    In this work we present a dynamical study of the H + HeH+ → H2+ + He reaction in a collision energy range from 0.1 meV to 10 eV, suitable to be used in applicative models. The paper extends and complements a recent work [ Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 16, 11662] devoted to the characterization of the reactivity from the ultracold regime up to the three-body dissociation breakup. In particular, the accuracy of the quasi-classical trajectory method below the three-body dissociation threshold has been assessed by a detailed comparison with previous calculations performed with different reaction dynamics methods, whereas the reliability of the results in the high energy range has been checked by a direct comparison with the available experimental data. Integral cross sections for several HeH+ roto-vibrational states have been analyzed and used to understand the extent of quantum effects in the reaction dynamics. By using the quasi-classical trajectory method and quantum mechanical close coupling data, respectively, in the high and low collision energy ranges, we obtain highly accurate thermal rate costants until 15 000 K including all (178) the roto-vibrational bound and quasi-bound states of HeH+. The role of the collision-induced dissociation is also discussed and explicitly calculated for the ground roto-vibrational state of HeH+.

  5. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  6. Study of classical thermo-mechanical equations in ultrafast thermo-elastic domain: electronic sputtering from metal-dielectric nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Fouran; Stoquert, J. P.; Pivin, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    The utility of thermo-mechanical equations in the ultrafast thermo-elastic domain is tested by studying the electronic sputtering from metal-dielectric nanocomposites (NCs) induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. It is observed that the sputtering yield of metal atoms from such NC films strongly depends on the size of the metal nanoparticles (NPs) and the properties of host dielectric matrices. The decrease of the melting temperature of small NPs, superheating at the surface of NPs due to additional electron-surface scattering and transient melting of the dielectric matrices induce complex thermal effects. The dependence of the sputtering yield on the size of the NPs has been obtained by evaluating the transient stress and strain induced by thermal effects in the framework of the ultrafast thermo-elastic model.

  7. Equivalence between the mechanical model and energy-transfer theory for the classical decay rates of molecules near a spherical particle.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Leung, P T; Tsai, D P

    2012-05-14

    In the classical modeling of decay rates for molecules interacting with a nontrivial environment, it is well known that two alternate approaches exist which include: (1) a mechanical model treating the system as a damped harmonic oscillator driven by the reflected fields from the environment; and (2) a model based on the radiative and nonradiative energy transfers from the excited molecular system to the environment. While the exact equivalence of the two methods is not trivial and has been explicitly demonstrated only for planar geometry, it has been widely taken for granted and applied to other geometries such as in the interaction of the molecule with a spherical particle. Here we provide a rigorous proof of such equivalence for the molecule-sphere problem via a direct calculation of the decay rates adopting each of the two different approaches.

  8. Scalability of a Low-Cost Multi-Teraflop Linux Cluster for High-End Classical Atomistic and Quantum Mechanical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Saini, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Scalability of a low-cost, Intel Xeon-based, multi-Teraflop Linux cluster is tested for two high-end scientific applications: Classical atomistic simulation based on the molecular dynamics method and quantum mechanical calculation based on the density functional theory. These scalable parallel applications use space-time multiresolution algorithms and feature computational-space decomposition, wavelet-based adaptive load balancing, and spacefilling-curve-based data compression for scalable I/O. Comparative performance tests are performed on a 1,024-processor Linux cluster and a conventional higher-end parallel supercomputer, 1,184-processor IBM SP4. The results show that the performance of the Linux cluster is comparable to that of the SP4. We also study various effects, such as the sharing of memory and L2 cache among processors, on the performance.

  9. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  10. Heterolysis of H2 Across a Classical Lewis Pair, 2,6-Lutidine-BCl3: Synthesis, Characterization, and Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Autrey, Thomas; Parab, Kshitij K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Potter, Robert G.; Camaioni, Donald M.

    2015-09-10

    We report on a combined computational and experimental study of the activation of hydrogen using for 2,6-lutidine (Lut)/BCl3 Lewis pairs. Herein we describe the synthetic approach used to obtain a new FLP, Lut-BCl3 that activates molecular H2 at ~10 bar, 100 °C in toluene or lutidine as the solvent. The resulting compound is an unexpected neutral hydride, LutBHCl2, rather than the ion pair, which we attribute to ligand redistribution. The mechanism for activation was modeled with density functional theory and accurate G3(MP2)B3 theory. The dative bond in Lut-BCl3 is calculated to have a bond enthalpy of 15 kcal/mol. The separated pair is calculated to react with H2 and form the [LutH+][HBCl3–] ion pair with a barrier of 13 kcal/mol. Metathesis with LutBCl3 produces LutBHCl2 and [LutH][BCl4]. The overall reaction is exothermic by 8.5 kcal/mol. An alternative pathway was explored involving lutidine–borenium cation pair activating H2. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences, and Geosciences, and was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  11. Heterolysis of H2 Across a Classical Lewis Pair, 2,6-Lutidine⋅BCl3 : Synthesis, Characterization, and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ginovska, Bojana; Autrey, Tom; Parab, Kshitij; Bowden, Mark E; Potter, Robert G; Camaioni, Donald M

    2015-10-26

    We report that 2,6-lutidine⋅trichloroborane (Lut⋅BCl3 ) reacts with H2 in toluene, bromobenzene, dichloromethane, and Lut solvents producing the neutral hydride, Lut⋅BHCl2 . The mechanism was modeled with density functional theory, and energies of stationary states were calculated at the G3(MP2)B3 level of theory. Lut⋅BCl3 was calculated to react with H2 and form the ion pair, [LutH(+) ][HBCl3 (-) ], with a barrier of ΔH(≠) =24.7 kcal mol(-1) (ΔG(≠) =29.8 kcal mol(-1) ). Metathesis with a second molecule of Lut⋅BCl3 produced Lut⋅BHCl2 and [LutH(+) ][BCl4 (-) ]. The overall reaction is exothermic by 6.0 kcal mol(-1) (Δr G°=-1.1). Alternate pathways were explored involving the borenium cation (LutBCl2 (+) ) and the four-membered boracycle [(CH2 {NC5 H3 Me})BCl2 ]. Barriers for addition of H2 across the Lut/LutBCl2 (+) pair and the boracycle BC bond are substantially higher (ΔG(≠) =42.1 and 49.4 kcal mol(-1) , respectively), such that these pathways are excluded. The barrier for addition of H2 to the boracycle BN bond is comparable (ΔH(≠) =28.5 and ΔG(≠) =32 kcal mol(-1) ). Conversion of the intermediate 2-(BHCl2 CH2 )-6-Me(C5 H3 NH) to Lut⋅BHCl2 may occur by intermolecular steps involving proton/hydride transfers to Lut/BCl3 . Intramolecular protodeboronation, which could form Lut⋅BHCl2 directly, is prohibited by a high barrier (ΔH(≠) =52, ΔG(≠) =51 kcal mol(-1) ). PMID:26493883

  12. The concerted mechanism of photo-induced biprotonic transfer in 7-azaindole dimers: A model for the secondary evolution of the classic C2h dimer and comparison of four mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Javier; Pérez, Pilar; del Valle, Juan Carlos; de Paz, J. L. G.; Kasha, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the formation in gas phase, during a short time, of the delicately symmetrical coplanar C2h classic 7-azaindole (7AI) doubly hydrogen-bonded dimer. Of the five card-pack or otherwise random geometry structures most likely to be formed in the supersonic jet expansion molecular beam, none would be an obvious precursor to the C2h dimer. One unstable dimer with dipole–dipole, van der Waals, and plane-to-plane hydrogen bonding is shown to be capable of unhinging about the hydrogen-bond pair as an axis, from 0° to 90° to 180°, yielding a deep minimum for the C2h structure with its delicate geometry and symmetry. This relaxation mechanism is feasible in the 3-μs interval between the nozzle escape and the first laser pulse interception of the molecular beam. In the second part of the paper four published mechanisms are compared for concerted vs. two-step biprotonic phototransfer for the 7AI dimers. The dependence of the latter two models on H-atom instead of proton-transfer as an intermediate step negates the mechanism in a singlet (π,π*) electronic state by the valency repulsion, in the 3-electron orbital that would be generated. The concerted mechanism for biprotonic phototransfer is reaffirmed by the analysis of the quantum mechanical conditions set on the biprotonic transfer in the photo-excited molecular 7AI pair. PMID:11983884

  13. What classicality? Decoherence and Bohr's classical concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian; Camilleri, Kristian

    2011-03-01

    Niels Bohr famously insisted on the indispensability of what he termed "classical concepts." In the context of the decoherence program, on the other hand, it has become fashionable to talk about the "dynamical emergence of classicality" from the quantum formalism alone. Does this mean that decoherence challenges Bohr's dictum—for example, that classical concepts do not need to be assumed but can be derived? In this paper we'll try to shed some light down the murky waters where formalism and philosophy cohabitate. To begin, we'll clarify the notion of classicality in the decoherence description. We'll then discuss Bohr's and Heisenberg's take on the quantum—classical problem and reflect on different meanings of the terms "classicality" and "classical concepts" in the writings of Bohr and his followers. This analysis will allow us to put forward some tentative suggestions for how we may better understand the relation between decoherence-induced classicality and Bohr's classical concepts.

  14. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K; Persson, Kristin A

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg(2+) → Mg(+)), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI(-) exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg(+). In contrast, BH4(-) and BF4(-) are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  15. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohuui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K.; Persson, Kristin A.

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg2+ -> Mg+), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg+. In contrast, BH4 and BF4 are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  16. Topological spectrum of classical configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Nettel, Francisco; Quevedo, Hernando

    2007-11-14

    For any classical field configuration or mechanical system with a finite number of degrees of freedom we introduce the concept of topological spectrum. It is based upon the assumption that for any classical configuration there exists a principle fiber bundle that contains all the physical and geometric information of the configuration. The topological spectrum follows from the investigation of the corresponding topological invariants. Examples are given which illustrate the procedure and the significance of the topological spectrum as a discretization relationship among the parameters that determine the physical meaning of classical configurations.

  17. Testing the Palma-Clary Reduced Dimensionality Model Using Classical Mechanics on the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vikár, Anna; Nagy, Tibor; Lendvay, György

    2016-07-14

    Application of exact quantum scattering methods in theoretical reaction dynamics of bimolecular reactions is limited by the complexity of the equations of nuclear motion to be solved. Simplification is often achieved by reducing the number of degrees of freedom to be explicitly handled by freezing the less important spectator modes. The reaction cross sections obtained in reduced-dimensionality (RD) quantum scattering methods can be used in the calculation of rate coefficients, but their physical meaning is limited. The accurate test of the performance of a reduced-dimensionality method would be a comparison of the RD cross sections with those obtained in accurate full-dimensional (FD) calculations, which is not feasible because of the lack of complete full-dimensional results. However, classical mechanics allows one to perform reaction dynamics calculations using both the RD and the FD model. In this paper, an RD versus FD comparison is made for the 8-dimensional Palma-Clary model on the example of four isotopologs of the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 reaction, which has 12 internal dimensions. In the Palma-Clary model, the only restriction is that the methyl group is confined to maintain C3v symmetry. Both RD and FD opacity and excitation functions as well as differential cross sections were calculated using the quasiclassical trajectory method. The initial reactant separation has been handled according to our one-period averaging method [ Nagy et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 014104 ]. The RD and FD excitation functions were found to be close to each other for some isotopologs, but in general, the RD reactivity parameters are lower than the FD reactivity parameters beyond statistical error, and for one of the isotopologs, the deviation is significant. This indicates that the goodness of RD cross sections cannot be taken for granted. PMID:26918703

  18. Entanglement with classical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.F.; Thomas, J.E.

    2004-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple classical-field optical heterodyne method which employs postselection to reproduce the polarization correlations of a four-particle entangled state. We give a heuristic argument relating this method to the measurement of multiple quantum fields by correlated homodyne detection. We suggest that using multiple classical fields and postselection, one can reproduce the polarization correlations obtained in quantum experiments which employ multiple single-photon sources and linear optics to prepare multiparticle entangled states. Our experimental scheme produces four spatially separated beams which are separately detected by mixing with four independent optical local oscillators (LO) of variable polarization. Analog multiplication of the four beat signals enables projection onto a four-particle polarization-state basis. Appropriate band pass filtering is used to produce a signal proportional to the projections of the maximally entangled four-field polarization state, H{sub 1})H{sub 2})H{sub 3})H{sub 4})+V{sub 1})V{sub 2})V{sub 3})V{sub 4}), onto the product of the four LO polarizations. Since the data from multiple observers is combined prior to postselection, this method does not constitute a test of nonlocality. However, we reproduce the polarization correlations of the 32 elements in the truth table from the quantum mechanical Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger experiments on the violation of local realism. We also demonstrate a form of classical entanglement swapping in a four-particle basis.

  19. Classical anomalies for spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Jorge; Plyushchay, Mikhail

    1998-02-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of classical anomaly. It is observed for 3D Berezin-Marinov (BM), Barducci-Casalbuoni-Lusanna (BCL) and Cortés-Plyushchay-Velázquez (CPV) pseudoclassical spin particle models. We show that quantum mechanically these different models correspond to the same P, T-invariant system of planar fermions, but the quantum system has global symmetries being not reproducible classically in full in any of the models. We demonstrate that the specific U(1) gauge symmetry characterized by the opposite coupling constants of spin s = + {1}/{2} and s = - {1}/{2} states has a natural classical analog in the CPV model but can be reproduced in the BM and BCL models in an obscure and rather artificial form. We also show that the BM and BCL models quantum mechanically are equivalent in any odd-dimensional space-time, but describe different quantum systems in even space-time dimensions.

  20. Electromagnetism, Optics, Acoustics, Heat Transfer, Classical Mechanics, and Fluid Dynamics Two Unconditional Stable Schemes for Simulation of Heat Equation on Manifold Using DEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zheng

    2011-02-01

    To predict the heat diffusion in a given region over time, it is often necessary to find the numerical solution for heat equation. However, the computational domain of classical numerical methods are limited to flat spacetime. With the techniques of discrete differential calculus, we propose two unconditional stable numerical schemes for simulation heat equation on space manifold and time. The analysis of their stability and error is accomplished by the use of maximum principle.

  1. On classical cloning and no-cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Nicholas J.

    2012-02-01

    It is part of information theory folklore that, while quantum theory prohibits the generic (or universal) cloning of states, such cloning is allowed by classical information theory. Indeed, many take the phenomenon of no-cloning to be one of the features that distinguishes quantum mechanics from classical mechanics. In this paper, we argue that pace conventional wisdom, in the case where one does not include a machine system, there is an analog of the no-cloning theorem for classical systems. However, upon adjoining a non-trivial machine system (or ancilla) one finds that, pace the quantum case, the obstruction to cloning disappears for pure states. We begin by discussing some conceptual points and category-theoretic generalities having to do with cloning, and proceed to discuss no-cloning in both the case of (non-statistical) classical mechanics and classical statistical mechanics.

  2. Quantum computing classical physics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  3. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  4. The Classics Revivified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dorothy, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The eight articles in this bulletin suggest methods of introducing classical literature into the English curriculum. Article titles are: "Ideas for Teaching Classical Mythology"; "What Novels Should High School Students Read?"; "Enlivening the Classics for Live Students"; "Poetry in Performance: The Value of Song and Oral Interpretation in…

  5. Time, classical and quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniello, P.; Ciaglia, F. M.; Di Cosmo, F.; Marmo, G.; Pérez-Pardo, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new point of view regarding the problem of time in quantum mechanics, based on the idea of replacing the usual time operator T with a suitable real-valued function T on the space of physical states. The proper characterization of the function T relies on a particular relation with the dynamical evolution of the system rather than with the infinitesimal generator of the dynamics (Hamiltonian). We first consider the case of classical hamiltonian mechanics, where observables are functions on phase space and the tools of differential geometry can be applied. The idea is then extended to the case of the unitary evolution of pure states of finite-level quantum systems by means of the geometric formulation of quantum mechanics. It is found that T is a function on the space of pure states which is not associated with any self-adjoint operator. The link between T and the dynamical evolution is interpreted as defining a simultaneity relation for the states of the system with respect to the dynamical evolution itself. It turns out that different dynamical evolutions lead to different notions of simultaneity, i.e., the notion of simultaneity is a dynamical notion.

  6. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Exact Soliton Solutions to a Generalized Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Si-Liu; Liang, Jian-Chu; Yi, Lin

    2010-01-01

    The (1+1)-dimensional F-expansion technique and the homogeneous nonlinear balance principle have been generalized and applied for solving exact solutions to a general (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) with varying coefficients and a harmonica potential. We found that there exist two kinds of soliton solutions. The evolution features of exact solutions have been numerically studied. The (3+1)D soliton solutions may help us to understand the nonlinear wave propagation in the nonlinear media such as classical optical waves and the matter waves of the Bose-Einstein condensates.

  7. Chaos in the classical mechanics of bound and quasi-bound HX-4He complexes with X = F, Cl, Br, CN.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Antonio; Hernández, Henar; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Losada, J C; Benito, R M; Borondo, F; Farrelly, David

    2009-10-01

    The classical dynamics of weakly bound floppy van der Waals complexes have been extensively studied in the past except for the weakest of all, i.e., those involving He atoms. These complexes are of considerable current interest in light of recent experimental work focussed on the study of molecules trapped in small droplets of the quantum solvent (4)He. Despite a number of quantum investigations, details on the dynamics of how quantum solvation occurs remain unclear. In this paper, the classical rotational dynamics of a series of van der Waals complexes, HX-(4)He with X = F, Cl, Br, CN, are studied. In all cases, the ground state dynamics are found to be almost entirely chaotic, in sharp contrast to other floppy complexes, such as HCl-Ar, for which chaos sets in only at relatively high energies. The consequences of this result for quantum solvation are discussed. We also investigate rotationally excited states with J = 1 which, except for HCN-(4)He, are actually resonances that decay by rotational pre-dissociation. PMID:19756276

  8. From quantum ladder climbing to classical autoresonance

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, G.; Friedland, L.; Zigler, A.

    2004-01-01

    The autoresonance phenomenon allows excitation of a classical, oscillatory nonlinear system to high energies by using a weak, chirped frequency forcing. Ladder climbing is its counterpart in quantum mechanics. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, conditions for the transition from the quantum to the classical regimes are outlined. The similarities and differences between the two approaches are presented.

  9. Classical decoherence in a nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, O.; Vavrek, F.; Fefferman, A. D.; Bourgeois, O.; Collin, E.

    2016-07-01

    Decoherence is an essential mechanism that defines the boundary between classical and quantum behaviours, while imposing technological bounds for quantum devices. Little is known about quantum coherence of mechanical systems, as opposed to electromagnetic degrees of freedom. But decoherence can also be thought of in a purely classical context, as the loss of phase coherence in the classical phase space. Indeed the bridge between quantum and classical physics is under intense investigation, using, in particular, classical nanomechanical analogues of quantum phenomena. In the present work, by separating pure dephasing from dissipation, we quantitatively model the classical decoherence of a mechanical resonator: through the experimental control of frequency fluctuations, we engineer artificial dephasing. Building on the fruitful analogy introduced between spins/quantum bits and nanomechanical modes, we report on the methods available to define pure dephasing in these systems, while demonstrating the intrinsic almost-ideal properties of silicon nitride beams. These experimental and theoretical results, at the boundary between classical nanomechanics and quantum information fields, are prerequisite in the understanding of decoherence processes in mechanical devices, both classical and quantum.

  10. Classical and Quantum Spreading of Position Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, J. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates that the standard deviation of the position probability of a particle moving freely in one dimension is a function of the standard deviation of its velocity distribution and time in classical or quantum mechanics. (SL)

  11. Solvation Mechanism of Task-Specific Ionic Liquids in Water: A Combined Investigation Using Classical Molecular Dynamics and Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, Surya V J; Zhdanov, Ravil K; Belosludov, Rodion V; Belosludov, Vladimir R; Subbotin, Oleg S; Kanie, Kiyoshi; Funaki, Kenji; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    The solvation behavior of task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) containing a common, L-histidine derived imidazolium cation [C20H28N3O3](+) and different anions, bromide-[Br](-) and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide-[NTF2](-), in water is examined, computationally. These amino acid functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) are taken into account because of their ability to react with rare earth metal salts. It has been noted that the TSIL with [Br](-) is more soluble than its counterpart TSIL with [NTF2](-), experimentally. In this theoretical work, the combined classical molecular dynamics (CMD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to study the behavior of the bulk phase of these two TSILs in the vicinity of water (H2O) molecules with different concentrations. Initially, all the constructed systems are equilibrated using the CMD method. The final structures of the equilibrated systems are extracted for DFT calculations. Under CMD operation, the radial distribution function (RDF) plots and viscosity of TSILs are analyzed to understand the effect of water on TSILs. In the DFT regime, binding energy per H2O, charge transfer, charge density mapping, and electronic density of states (EDOS) analyses are done. The CMD results along with the DFT results are consolidated to support the hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of the TSILs. Interestingly, we have found a strong correlation between the viscosity and the EDOS results that leads to an understanding of the hydration properties of the TSILs.

  12. Classic-Ada(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, Lois

    1989-01-01

    The SPS product, Classic-Ada, is a software tool that supports object-oriented Ada programming with powerful inheritance and dynamic binding. Object Oriented Design (OOD) is an easy, natural development paradigm, but it is not supported by Ada. Following the DOD Ada mandate, SPS developed Classic-Ada to provide a tool which supports OOD and implements code in Ada. It consists of a design language, a code generator and a toolset. As a design language, Classic-Ada supports the object-oriented principles of information hiding, data abstraction, dynamic binding, and inheritance. It also supports natural reuse and incremental development through inheritance, code factoring, and Ada, Classic-Ada, dynamic binding and static binding in the same program. Only nine new constructs were added to Ada to provide object-oriented design capabilities. The Classic-Ada code generator translates user application code into fully compliant, ready-to-run, standard Ada. The Classic-Ada toolset is fully supported by SPS and consists of an object generator, a builder, a dictionary manager, and a reporter. Demonstrations of Classic-Ada and the Classic-Ada Browser were given at the workshop.

  13. The Need for Classics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilburn, K.

    1975-01-01

    Criticizes traditional reasons for Classics study and states that education is the initiation of a new generation into the skills and knowledge structures of an existing tradition. Aesthetics and philosophy, religion and morals, knowledge of self and others, and mathematics and science may be understood through Classics.

  14. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Rajesh T.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J.; Kursula, Petri

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki=1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1:2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  15. Structural basis for dual-inhibition mechanism of a non-classical Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor from horseshoe crab in complex with subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Rajesh T; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki = 1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1∶2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  16. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30-90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other's CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that is

  17. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A.

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30–90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other’s CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that

  18. From classical psychodynamics to evidence synthesis: the motif of repression and a contemporary understanding of a key mediatory mechanism in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mick P; Martin, Colin R

    2012-06-01

    The stress vulnerability model has proven to be a politically important model for two reasons. It has provided the framework that defines a temporal and dynamic process whereby a person's uniquely determined biopsychosocial vulnerability to schizophrenia symptoms interacts with his or her capacity to manage stress and the amount and type of stress experienced in such a way that the person experiences schizophrenia symptoms. Second, the development of this framework promoted the notion of inherited and acquired vulnerability. Implicit was that vulnerability was individually determined and that there was a role for psychosocial factors in the development/maintenance of schizophrenia symptoms. This proved to be a catalyst for the development of studies implicating psychosocial factors in the etiology of schizophrenia symptoms. Studies derived from cognitive-behavioral theories have proven the most successful in identifying thinking patterns, emotional disturbances, and neurocognitive and defensive vulnerability factors inherent in the development of schizophrenia symptoms. Historically, within the psychoanalytic school there has been debate regarding the role of repressive coping mechanisms in schizophrenia development. Psychoanalytic theories have always appeared incapable of providing etiologic explanations of schizophrenia symptoms, with the possible exception of Melanie Klein, than other more salient psychosocial schools. Mechanisms within the process of repressive coping are consistent with evidence and mechanisms supporting the stress vulnerability models and existing cognitive-behavioral theories regarding development of paranoid delusions. These mechanisms are less consistent with social cognitive explanations of schizophrenia symptoms.

  19. From classical psychodynamics to evidence synthesis: the motif of repression and a contemporary understanding of a key mediatory mechanism in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mick P; Martin, Colin R

    2012-06-01

    The stress vulnerability model has proven to be a politically important model for two reasons. It has provided the framework that defines a temporal and dynamic process whereby a person's uniquely determined biopsychosocial vulnerability to schizophrenia symptoms interacts with his or her capacity to manage stress and the amount and type of stress experienced in such a way that the person experiences schizophrenia symptoms. Second, the development of this framework promoted the notion of inherited and acquired vulnerability. Implicit was that vulnerability was individually determined and that there was a role for psychosocial factors in the development/maintenance of schizophrenia symptoms. This proved to be a catalyst for the development of studies implicating psychosocial factors in the etiology of schizophrenia symptoms. Studies derived from cognitive-behavioral theories have proven the most successful in identifying thinking patterns, emotional disturbances, and neurocognitive and defensive vulnerability factors inherent in the development of schizophrenia symptoms. Historically, within the psychoanalytic school there has been debate regarding the role of repressive coping mechanisms in schizophrenia development. Psychoanalytic theories have always appeared incapable of providing etiologic explanations of schizophrenia symptoms, with the possible exception of Melanie Klein, than other more salient psychosocial schools. Mechanisms within the process of repressive coping are consistent with evidence and mechanisms supporting the stress vulnerability models and existing cognitive-behavioral theories regarding development of paranoid delusions. These mechanisms are less consistent with social cognitive explanations of schizophrenia symptoms. PMID:22359200

  20. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ..-->.. HC/sub 2/H, HNC ..-->.. HCN, and H/sub 2/CO ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I ..-->.. Na /sup +/ + I/sup -/ is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features. (WHM)

  1. Classical decoherence in a nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, Olivier; Fefferman, Andrew; Gazizulin, Rasul; Godfrin, Henri; Bourgeois, Olivier; Collin, Eddy; ULT Grenoble Team

    Decoherence can be viewed either in its quantum picture, where it stands for the loss of phase coherence of a superposition state, or as its classical equivalent, where the phase of an oscillating signal is smeared due to frequency fluctuations. Little is known about quantum coherence of mechanical systems, as opposed to electromagnetic degrees of freedom. Indeed the bridge between quantum and classical physics is under intense investigation, using in particular classical nanomechanical analogues of quantum phenomena. Here we report on a model experiment in which the coherence of a high quality silicon-nitride mechanical resonator is defined in the classical picture. Its intrinsic properties are characterized over an unprecedentedly large dynamic range. By engineering frequency fluctuations, we can create artificial pure dephasing and study its effects on the dynamics of the system. Finally, we develop the methods to characterize pure dephasing that can be applied to a wide range of mechanical devices.

  2. No return to classical reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, David; Leifer, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    At a fundamental level, the classical picture of the world is dead, and has been dead now for almost a century. Pinning down exactly which quantum phenomena are responsible for this has proved to be a tricky and controversial question, but a lot of progress has been made in the past few decades. We now have a range of precise statements showing that whatever the ultimate laws of nature are, they cannot be classical. In this article, we review results on the fundamental phenomena of quantum theory that cannot be understood in classical terms. We proceed by first granting quite a broad notion of classicality, describe a range of quantum phenomena (such as randomness, discreteness, the indistinguishability of states, measurement-uncertainty, measurement-disturbance, complementarity, non-commutativity, interference, the no-cloning theorem and the collapse of the wave-packet) that do fall under its liberal scope, and then finally describe some aspects of quantum physics that can never admit a classical understanding - the intrinsically quantum mechanical aspects of nature. The most famous of these is Bell's theorem, but we also review two more recent results in this area. Firstly, Hardy's theorem shows that even a finite-dimensional quantum system must contain an infinite amount of information, and secondly, the Pusey-Barrett-Rudolph theorem shows that the wave function must be an objective property of an individual quantum system. Besides being of foundational interest, results of this sort now find surprising practical applications in areas such as quantum information science and the simulation of quantum systems.

  3. A Classical Science Transformed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    1979-01-01

    Describes how satellites and other tools of space technology have transformed classical geodesy into the science of space geodynamics. The establishment and the activities of the French Center for Geodynamic and Astronomical Research Studies (CERGA) are also included. (HM)

  4. Enzymatic and Inhibition Mechanism of Human Aromatase (CYP19A1) Enzyme. A Computational Perspective from QM/MM and Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Cavalli, Andrea; Colombo, Giorgio; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme human aromatase (HA), a member of the cytochrome P450 family, catalyses in a highly specific and peculiar manner the conversion of estrogens to androgens. Thus, this enzyme is a relevant target for inhibitor design for the treatment of breast cancer and currently there are several HA inhibitors employed in clinical practice. The HA crystal structure was solved only in 2009 and, since then, several studies have been done to characterize a variety of its structural, dynamical and mechanistic properties. In the last decade, the predictive power and the accuracy of computer simulations techniques, either relying on force field or on "ab initio" description of the system, has enormously increased. This was mainly due to the development of more accurate algorithms, which allow accelerating the time-scale accessible by simulations techniques, and to the increase of computer power. Hence, computer simulations can now accurately paint an atomistic picture to the molecular mechanism of biomolecules providing also an estimate of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme at increasingly quantitative level. In this review, on the basis of selected examples taken from our work, we summarize current active research topics concerning HA enzyme, with a focus on computational studies. In particular, we will illustrate current results and novel hypothesis concerning the final (rate-determining) aromatization step promoted by this enzyme, on how the structural/dynamics/functional properties of HA are modulated in a membrane lipophilic environment, and finally on novel possible (allosteric) inhibition mechanisms which may modulate estrogen production in HA. PMID:27337972

  5. Different RNA splicing mechanisms contribute to diverse infective outcome of classical swine fever viruses of differing virulence: insights from the deep sequencing data in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Pengbo; Zhou, Yulu; Liang, Wulong; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying RNA splicing regulation in response to viral infection are poorly understood. Classical swine fever (CSF), one of the most economically important and highly contagious swine diseases worldwide, is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to obtain the digital gene expression (DGE) profile in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVEC) to identify different response genes for CSFV by using both Shimen and C strains. The numbers of clean tags obtained from the libraries of the control and both CSFV-infected libraries were 3,473,370, 3,498,355, and 3,327,493 respectively. In the comparison among the control, CSFV-C, and CSFV-Shimen groups, 644, 158, and 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were confirmed in the three groups. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of these DEGs were enriched in spliceosome, ribosome, proteasome, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, cell cycle, focal adhesion, Wnt signalling pathway, etc., where the processes differ between CSFV strains of differing virulence. To further elucidate important mechanisms related to the differential infection by the CSFV Shimen and C strains, we identified four possible profiles to assess the significantly expressed genes only by CSFV Shimen or CSFV C strain. GO analysis showed that infection with CSFV Shimen and C strains disturbed 'RNA splicing' of SUVEC, resulting in differential 'gene expression' in SUVEC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was identified as a significant response regulator contributed to impact on SUVEC function for CSFV Shimen. This computational study suggests that CSFV of differing virulence could induce alterations in RNA splicing regulation in the host cell to change cell metabolism, resulting in acute haemorrhage and pathological damage or infectious tolerance.

  6. Different RNA splicing mechanisms contribute to diverse infective outcome of classical swine fever viruses of differing virulence: insights from the deep sequencing data in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Pengbo; Zhou, Yulu; Liang, Wulong

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying RNA splicing regulation in response to viral infection are poorly understood. Classical swine fever (CSF), one of the most economically important and highly contagious swine diseases worldwide, is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to obtain the digital gene expression (DGE) profile in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVEC) to identify different response genes for CSFV by using both Shimen and C strains. The numbers of clean tags obtained from the libraries of the control and both CSFV-infected libraries were 3,473,370, 3,498,355, and 3,327,493 respectively. In the comparison among the control, CSFV-C, and CSFV-Shimen groups, 644, 158, and 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were confirmed in the three groups. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of these DEGs were enriched in spliceosome, ribosome, proteasome, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, cell cycle, focal adhesion, Wnt signalling pathway, etc., where the processes differ between CSFV strains of differing virulence. To further elucidate important mechanisms related to the differential infection by the CSFV Shimen and C strains, we identified four possible profiles to assess the significantly expressed genes only by CSFV Shimen or CSFV C strain. GO analysis showed that infection with CSFV Shimen and C strains disturbed ‘RNA splicing’ of SUVEC, resulting in differential ‘gene expression’ in SUVEC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was identified as a significant response regulator contributed to impact on SUVEC function for CSFV Shimen. This computational study suggests that CSFV of differing virulence could induce alterations in RNA splicing regulation in the host cell to change cell metabolism, resulting in acute haemorrhage and pathological damage or infectious tolerance. PMID:27330868

  7. Different RNA splicing mechanisms contribute to diverse infective outcome of classical swine fever viruses of differing virulence: insights from the deep sequencing data in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Pengbo; Zhou, Yulu; Liang, Wulong; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying RNA splicing regulation in response to viral infection are poorly understood. Classical swine fever (CSF), one of the most economically important and highly contagious swine diseases worldwide, is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to obtain the digital gene expression (DGE) profile in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVEC) to identify different response genes for CSFV by using both Shimen and C strains. The numbers of clean tags obtained from the libraries of the control and both CSFV-infected libraries were 3,473,370, 3,498,355, and 3,327,493 respectively. In the comparison among the control, CSFV-C, and CSFV-Shimen groups, 644, 158, and 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were confirmed in the three groups. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of these DEGs were enriched in spliceosome, ribosome, proteasome, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, cell cycle, focal adhesion, Wnt signalling pathway, etc., where the processes differ between CSFV strains of differing virulence. To further elucidate important mechanisms related to the differential infection by the CSFV Shimen and C strains, we identified four possible profiles to assess the significantly expressed genes only by CSFV Shimen or CSFV C strain. GO analysis showed that infection with CSFV Shimen and C strains disturbed 'RNA splicing' of SUVEC, resulting in differential 'gene expression' in SUVEC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was identified as a significant response regulator contributed to impact on SUVEC function for CSFV Shimen. This computational study suggests that CSFV of differing virulence could induce alterations in RNA splicing regulation in the host cell to change cell metabolism, resulting in acute haemorrhage and pathological damage or infectious tolerance. PMID:27330868

  8. Combined linear response quantum mechanics and classical electrodynamics (QM/ED) method for the calculation of surface-enhanced Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Jonathan; Schatz, George C

    2012-03-01

    A multiscale method is presented that allows for evaluation of plasmon-enhanced optical properties of nanoparticle/molecule complexes with no additional cost compared to standard electrodynamics (ED) and linear response quantum mechanics (QM) calculations for the particle and molecule, respectively, but with polarization and orientation effects automatically described. The approach first calculates the total field of the nanoparticle by ED using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The field intensity in the frequency domain as a function of distance from the nanoparticle is calculated via a Fourier transform. The molecular optical properties are then calculated with QM in the frequency domain in the presence of the total field of the nanoparticle. Back-coupling due to dipolar reradiation effects is included in the single-molecule plane wave approximation. The effects of polarization and partial orientation averaging are considered. The QM/ED method is evaluated for the well-characterized test case of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of pyridine bound to silver, as well as for the resonant Raman chromophore rhodamine 6G. The electromagnetic contribution to the enhancement factor is 10(4) for pyridine and 10(2) for rhodamine 6G.

  9. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  10. Diagnosis of classical galactosaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Monk, A M; Mitchell, A J; Milligan, D W; Holton, J B

    1977-01-01

    We report a child with classical galactosaemia whose diagnosis was missed until 12 weeks of age. The limitations of urine screening tests are discussed and the wider use of a qualitative enzyme assay for screening is recommended. Reference ranges for a quantitative enzyme assay using 14galacoste-1-phosphate as substrate are presented. PMID:606167

  11. Classics in What Sense?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camic, Charles

    2008-01-01

    They seem the perfect bookends for the social psychologist's collection of "classics" of the field. Two volumes, nearly identical in shape and weight and exactly a century old in 2008--each professing to usher "social psychology" into the world as they both place the hybrid expression square in their titles but then proceed to stake out the field…

  12. Teaching Tomorrow's Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tighe, Mary Ann; Avinger, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Describes young adult novels that may prove to be classics of the genre. Discusses "The "Chocolate War" by Robert Cormier, "The Outsiders" by S. E. Hinton, "The Witch of Blackbird Pond" by Elizabeth George Speare, and "On Fortune's Wheel" by Cynthia Voight. (HB)

  13. Careers in the Classics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    America's few Black classics professors have overcome contempt and criticism to contribute a unique perspective to the study of the ancient world. Dr. Patrice Rankine, an associate professor from Purdue University, has grown used to the irony. As one of the few Black classicists teaching at an American university, he has drawn plenty of skepticism…

  14. Classical Mythology. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Mark P. O.; Lenardon, Robert J.

    Designed for students with little or no background in classical literature, this book introduces the Greek and Roman myths of creation, myths of the gods, Greek sagas and local legends, and presents contemporary theories about the myths. Drawing on Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, Vergil, and others, the book provides many translations and paraphrases of…

  15. The Classical Cake Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Norman N.; Fisch, Forest N.

    1973-01-01

    Discussed are techniques of presentation and solution of the Classical Cake Problem. A frosted cake with a square base is to be cut into n pieces with the volume of cake and frosting the same for each piece. Needed are minimal geometric concepts and the formula for the volume of a prism. (JP)

  16. Classicism and Romanticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Gregory H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes one teacher's methods for introducing to secondary English students the concepts of Classicism and Romanticism in relation to pictures of gardens, architecture, music, and literary works. Outlines how the unit leads to a writing assignment based on collected responses over time. (HB)

  17. Renewing Literary Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue suggest techniques for classroom use of literature that has "withstood the test of time." The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "The Storytelling Connection for the Classics" (Mary Ellen Martin); (2) "Elizabeth Bennet: A Liberated Woman" (Geneva Marking); (3) "Hawthorne: A Study in…

  18. Un-renormalized classical electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Ibison, Michael . E-mail: ibison@earthtech.org

    2006-02-15

    This paper follows in the tradition of direct-action versions of electromagnetism having the aim of avoiding a balance of infinities wherein a mechanical mass offsets an infinite electromagnetic mass so as to arrive at a finite observed value. However, the direct-action approach ultimately failed in that respect because its initial exclusion of self-action was later found to be untenable in the relativistic domain. Pursing the same end, this paper examines instead a version of electromagnetism wherein mechanical action is excluded and self-action is retained. It is shown that the resulting theory is effectively interacting due to the presence of infinite forces. A vehicle for the investigation is a pair of classical point charges in a positronium-like arrangement for which the orbits are found to be self-sustaining and naturally quantized.

  19. Factors Influencing Learning of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Audrey B.; And Others

    Beginning college physics students' misconceptions about moving objects, their mathematics skills, and formal reasoning ability, are all believed to be related to their achievement in physics. It is hypothesized that students whose knowledge structures include misconceptions that are in conflict with concepts in the lectures and text will have…

  20. The Statistical Interpretation of Classical Thermodynamic Heating and Expansion Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartier, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model has been developed and applied to interpret thermodynamic processes typically presented from the macroscopic, classical perspective. Through this model, students learn and apply the concepts of statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and classical thermodynamics in the analysis of the (i) constant volume heating, (ii)…

  1. Classical higgs fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanashvily, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    We consider a classical gauge theory on a principal fiber bundle P → X in the case where its structure group G is reduced to a subgroup H in the presence of classical Higgs fields described by global sections of the quotient fiber bundle P/H → X. We show that matter fields with the exact symmetry group H in such a theory are described by sections of the composition fiber bundle Y → P/H → X, where Y → P/H is the fiber bundle with the structure group H, and the Lagrangian of these sections is factored by virtue of the vertical covariant differential determined by a connection on the fiber bundle Y → P/H.

  2. Revisiting a Classic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Ibram

    2008-01-01

    As a 26-year-old English teacher in 1958, Chinua Achebe had no idea that the book he was writing would become a literary classic, not only in Africa but also throughout the world. He could only try to articulate the feelings he had for his countrymen and women. Achebe had a burning desire to tell the true story of Africa and African humanity. The…

  3. Quantum Mechanics From the Cradle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John L.

    1974-01-01

    States that the major problem in learning quantum mechanics is often the student's ignorance of classical mechanics and that one conceptual hurdle in quantum mechanics is its statistical nature, in contrast to the determinism of classical mechanics. (MLH)

  4. Classical command of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Ben W; Unger, Falk; Vazirani, Umesh

    2013-04-25

    Quantum computation and cryptography both involve scenarios in which a user interacts with an imperfectly modelled or 'untrusted' system. It is therefore of fundamental and practical interest to devise tests that reveal whether the system is behaving as instructed. In 1969, Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt proposed an experimental test that can be passed by a quantum-mechanical system but not by a system restricted to classical physics. Here we extend this test to enable the characterization of a large quantum system. We describe a scheme that can be used to determine the initial state and to classically command the system to evolve according to desired dynamics. The bipartite system is treated as two black boxes, with no assumptions about their inner workings except that they obey quantum physics. The scheme works even if the system is explicitly designed to undermine it; any misbehaviour is detected. Among its applications, our scheme makes it possible to test whether a claimed quantum computer is truly quantum. It also advances towards a goal of quantum cryptography: namely, the use of 'untrusted' devices to establish a shared random key, with security based on the validity of quantum physics.

  5. Classical command of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Ben W; Unger, Falk; Vazirani, Umesh

    2013-04-25

    Quantum computation and cryptography both involve scenarios in which a user interacts with an imperfectly modelled or 'untrusted' system. It is therefore of fundamental and practical interest to devise tests that reveal whether the system is behaving as instructed. In 1969, Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt proposed an experimental test that can be passed by a quantum-mechanical system but not by a system restricted to classical physics. Here we extend this test to enable the characterization of a large quantum system. We describe a scheme that can be used to determine the initial state and to classically command the system to evolve according to desired dynamics. The bipartite system is treated as two black boxes, with no assumptions about their inner workings except that they obey quantum physics. The scheme works even if the system is explicitly designed to undermine it; any misbehaviour is detected. Among its applications, our scheme makes it possible to test whether a claimed quantum computer is truly quantum. It also advances towards a goal of quantum cryptography: namely, the use of 'untrusted' devices to establish a shared random key, with security based on the validity of quantum physics. PMID:23619692

  6. Arbitrated quantum signature of classical messages without using authenticated classical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi-Ping; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2014-01-01

    This paper points out design confusion existing in all the arbitrated quantum signatures (AQS) that require public discussions over authenticated classical channels. Instead, an AQS scheme of classical messages without using authenticated classical channels is proposed here. A cryptographic hash function is used in combine with quantum mechanics to check the existence of an eavesdropping or to verify a signature. In addition, by using only single photons, this scheme provides higher efficiency both in quantum transmissions and generations. The proposed AQS scheme is shown to be immune to several well-known attacks, i.e., the Trojan-horse attacks and the existential forgery attack.

  7. Maxwell and the classical wave particle dualism.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, J T

    2008-05-28

    Maxwell's equations are one of the greatest theoretical achievements in physics of all times. They have survived three successive theoretical revolutions, associated with the advent of relativity, quantum mechanics and modern quantum field theory. In particular, they provide the theoretical framework for the understanding of the classical wave particle dualism.

  8. Classical Nernst engine.

    PubMed

    Stark, Julian; Brandner, Kay; Saito, Keiji; Seifert, Udo

    2014-04-11

    We introduce a simple model for an engine based on the Nernst effect. In the presence of a magnetic field, a vertical heat current can drive a horizontal particle current against a chemical potential. For a microscopic model invoking classical particle trajectories subject to the Lorentz force, we prove a universal bound 3-2√2≃0.172 for the ratio between the maximum efficiency and the Carnot efficiency. This bound, as the slightly lower one 1/6 for efficiency at maximum power, can indeed be saturated for a large magnetic field and small fugacity.

  9. Semi-classical Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestone, John

    2016-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. We describe semi-classical approaches that can be used to obtain a more intuitive physical feel for several QED processes including electro-statics, Compton scattering, pair annihilation, the anomalous magnetic moment, and the Lamb shift, that could be taught easily to undergraduate students. Any physicist who brings their laptop to the talk will be able to build spread sheets in less than 10 minutes to calculate g/2 =1.001160 and a Lamb shift of 1057 MHz.

  10. Classical Liquids in Fractal Dimension.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Marco; Schnyder, Simon K; Brady, John F; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-08-28

    We introduce fractal liquids by generalizing classical liquids of integer dimensions d=1,2,3 to a noninteger dimension dl. The particles composing the liquid are fractal objects and their configuration space is also fractal, with the same dimension. Realizations of our generic model system include microphase separated binary liquids in porous media, and highly branched liquid droplets confined to a fractal polymer backbone in a gel. Here, we study the thermodynamics and pair correlations of fractal liquids by computer simulation and semianalytical statistical mechanics. Our results are based on a model where fractal hard spheres move on a near-critical percolating lattice cluster. The predictions of the fractal Percus-Yevick liquid integral equation compare well with our simulation results.

  11. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  12. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  13. Classical dynamics on curved Snyder space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivetić, B.; Meljanac, S.; Mignemi, S.

    2014-05-01

    We study the classical dynamics of a particle in nonrelativistic Snyder-de Sitter space. We show that for spherically symmetric systems, parameterizing the solutions in terms of an auxiliary time variable, which is a function only of the physical time and of the energy and angular momentum of the particles, one can reduce the problem to the equivalent one in classical mechanics. We also discuss a relativistic extension of these results, and a generalization to the case in which the algebra is realized in flat space.

  14. Decoherence, chaos, the quantum and the classical

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Paz, J.P.

    1994-04-01

    The key ideas of the environment-induced decoherence approach are reviewed. Application of decoherence to the transition from quantum to classical in open quantum systems with chaotic classical analogs is described. The arrow of time is, in this context, a result of the information loss to the correlations with the environment. The asymptotic rate of entropy production (which is reached quickly, on the dynamical timescale) is independent of the details of the coupling of the quantum system to the environment, and is set by the Lyapunov exponents. We also briefly outline the existential interpretation of quantum mechanics, justifying the slogan ``No information without representation.``

  15. Nucleosynthesis in classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi; Hernanz, Margarita; Iliadis, Christian

    2006-10-01

    Classical novae are dramatic stellar explosions with an energy release that is only overcome by supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. These unique cataclysmic events constitute a crucible where different scientific disciplines merge, including astrophysics, nuclear and atomic physics, cosmochemistry, high-energy physics or computer science. In this review, we focus on the nucleosynthesis accompanying nova outbursts. Theoretical predictions are compared with the elemental abundances inferred from observations of the nova ejecta as well as with the isotopic abundance ratios measured in meteorites. Special emphasis is given to the interplay between nova outbursts and the Galactic abundance pattern and on the synthesis of radioactive nuclei for which γ-ray signals are expected. Finally, we analyze the key role played by nuclear physics in our understanding of the nova phenomenon by means of recent experiments and a thorough account of the impact of nuclear uncertainties.

  16. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness.

    PubMed

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as 'D-Wave' chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional 'classical' computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize 'temperature chaos' as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip. PMID:26483257

  17. Vibrational predissociation quasiclassical tunnelling and classical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karni, Y.; Nikitin, E. E.

    A comparative study of vibrational predissociation dynamics is presented Two collinear models of the van der Waals complex are used with a realistic medium strength coupling parameter The predissociation rates are calculated by four different approaches an accurate quantum mechanical method by the complex scaling technique first order approximations in the diabatic FOD and adiabatic FOA basis and purely classically It is shown that FOA within the improved semiclassical Landau method provides an excellent description of the dynamical tunnelling of the system from all the quasibound states into continuum at the same time FOD yields noticeably higher rates though the transition probabilities are very low At low excitation energies of the van der Waals bond the classical description yields zero rates in accord with the KAM theorem At higher excitation energies the classical rates are higher than the quasiclassical rates since the classical system dissociates via the diffusion through the holes in the phase space which are still too narrow to let the quantum system escape A simple explanation of a parallelism between quantum and classical rates is suggested under a condition when the first order quantum treatment is applicable

  18. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness.

    PubMed

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-10-20

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as 'D-Wave' chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional 'classical' computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize 'temperature chaos' as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  19. Quantum Computing's Classical Problem, Classical Computing's Quantum Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    Tasked with the challenge to build better and better computers, quantum computing and classical computing face the same conundrum: the success of classical computing systems. Small quantum computing systems have been demonstrated, and intermediate-scale systems are on the horizon, capable of calculating numeric results or simulating physical systems far beyond what humans can do by hand. However, to be commercially viable, they must surpass what our wildly successful, highly advanced classical computers can already do. At the same time, those classical computers continue to advance, but those advances are now constrained by thermodynamics, and will soon be limited by the discrete nature of atomic matter and ultimately quantum effects. Technological advances benefit both quantum and classical machinery, altering the competitive landscape. Can we build quantum computing systems that out-compute classical systems capable of some logic gates per month? This article will discuss the interplay in these competing and cooperating technological trends.

  20. Understanding the Planck blackbody spectrum and Landau diamagnetism within classical electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2016-11-01

    Electromagnetism is a relativistic theory, and one must exercise care in coupling this theory with nonrelativistic classical mechanics and with nonrelativistic classical statistical mechanics. Indeed historically, both the blackbody radiation spectrum and diamagnetism within classical theory have been misunderstood because of two crucial failures: (1) the neglect of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, and (2) the use of erroneous combinations of nonrelativistic mechanics with relativistic electrodynamics. Here we review the treatment of classical blackbody radiation, and show that the presence of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation can explain both the Planck blackbody spectrum and Landau diamagnetism at thermal equilibrium within classical electromagnetic theory. The analysis requires that relativistic electromagnetism is joined appropriately with simple nonrelativistic mechanical systems which can be regarded as the zero-velocity limits of relativistic systems, and that nonrelativistic classical statistical mechanics is applied only in the low-frequency limit when zero-point energy makes no contribution.

  1. Classical system boundaries cannot be determined within quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Chris

    Multiple observers who interact with environmental encodings of the states of a macroscopic quantum system S as required by quantum Darwinism cannot demonstrate that they are jointly observing S without a joint a priori assumption of a classical boundary separating S from its environment E. Quantum Darwinism cannot, therefore, be regarded as providing a purely quantum-mechanical explanation of the "emergence" of classicality.

  2. Extended symmetrical classical electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, A V; Kalashnikov, E G

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a modification of classical electrodynamics in which "ordinary" point charges are absent. The modified equations contain additional terms describing the induced charges and currents. The densities of the induced charges and currents depend on the vector k and the vectors of the electromagnetic field, E and B . It is shown that the vectors E and B can be defined in terms of two four-potentials and the components of k are the components of a four-tensor of the third rank. The Lagrangian of the modified electrodynamics is defined. The conditions are derived at which only one four-potential determines the behavior of the electromagnetic field. It is also shown that static modified electrodynamics can describe the electromagnetic field in the inner region of an electric monopole. In the outer region of the electric monopole the electric field is governed by the Maxwell equations. It follows from boundary conditions at the interface between the inner and outer regions of the monopole that the vector k has a discrete spectrum. The electric and magnetic fields, energy, and angular momentum of the monopole are found for different eigenvalues of k .

  3. The classic: Bone morphogenetic protein.

    PubMed

    Urist, Marshall R; Strates, Basil S

    2009-12-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Marshall R. Urist and Basil S. Strates, Bone Morphogenetic Protein. An accompanying biographical sketch of Marshall R. Urist, MD is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1067-4; a second Classic Article is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1069-2; and a third Classic Article is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1070-9. The Classic Article is copyright 1971 by Sage Publications Inc. Journals and is reprinted with permission from Urist MR, Strates BS. Bone morphogenetic protein. J Dent Res. 1971;50:1392-1406.

  4. The classic: Bone morphogenetic protein.

    PubMed

    Urist, Marshall R; Strates, Basil S

    2009-12-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Marshall R. Urist and Basil S. Strates, Bone Morphogenetic Protein. An accompanying biographical sketch of Marshall R. Urist, MD is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1067-4; a second Classic Article is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1069-2; and a third Classic Article is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1070-9. The Classic Article is copyright 1971 by Sage Publications Inc. Journals and is reprinted with permission from Urist MR, Strates BS. Bone morphogenetic protein. J Dent Res. 1971;50:1392-1406. PMID:19727989

  5. A Classic Beauty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    M51, whose name comes from being the 51st entry in Charles Messier's catalog, is considered to be one of the classic examples of a spiral galaxy. At a distance of about 30 million light-years from Earth, it is also one of the brightest spirals in the night sky. A composite image of M51, also known as the Whirlpool Galaxy, shows the majesty of its structure in a dramatic new way through several of NASA's orbiting observatories. X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory reveals point-like sources (purple) that are black holes and neutron stars in binary star systems. Chandra also detects a diffuse glow of hot gas that permeates the space between the stars. Optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (green) and infrared emission from the Spitzer Space Telescope (red) both highlight long lanes in the spiral arms that consist of stars and gas laced with dust. A view of M51 with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer telescope shows hot, young stars that produce lots of ultraviolet energy (blue).

    The textbook spiral structure is thought be the result of an interaction M51 is experiencing with its close galactic neighbor, NGC 5195, which is seen just above. Some simulations suggest M51's sharp spiral shape was partially caused when NGC 5195 passed through its main disk about 500 million years ago. This gravitational tug of war may also have triggered an increased level of star formation in M51. The companion galaxy's pull would be inducing extra starbirth by compressing gas, jump-starting the process by which stars form.

  6. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  7. Classical electrodynamic systems interacting with classical electromagnetic random radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Daniel C.

    1990-02-01

    In the past, a few researchers have presented arguments indicating that a statistical equilibrium state of classical charged particles necessarily demands the existence of a temperature-independent, incident classical electromagnetic random radiation. Indeed, when classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation is included in the analysis of problems with macroscopic boundaries, or in the analysis of charged particles in linear force fields, then good agreement with nature is obtained. In general, however, this agreement has not been found to hold for charged particles bound in nonlinear force fields. The point is raised here that this disagreement arising for nonlinear force fields may be a premature conclusion on this classical theory for describing atomic systems, because past calculations have not directed strict attention to electromagnetic interactions between charges. This point is illustrated here by examining the classical hydrogen atom and showing that this problem has still not been adequately solved.

  8. Crossover from quantum to classical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morr, Dirk K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the crossover from quantum to classical transport has become of fundamental importance not only for technological applications due to the creation of sub-10-nm transistors - an important building block of our modern life - but also for elucidating the role played by quantum mechanics in the evolutionary fitness of biological complexes. This article provides a basic introduction into the nature of charge and energy transport in the quantum and classical regimes. It discusses the characteristic transport properties in both limits and demonstrates how they can be connected through the loss of quantum mechanical coherence. The salient features of the crossover physics are identified, and their importance in opening new transport regimes and in understanding efficient and robust energy transport in biological complexes are demonstrated.

  9. Classical Analogs of a Diatomic Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, L.; Diaz-de-Anda, A.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.; Morales, A.; Flores, J.; Monsivais, G.

    2010-12-21

    Using one dimensional rods with different configurations classical analogs of quantum mechanical systems frequently used in solid state physics can be obtained. Among this analogs we have recently discussed locally periodic rods which lead to band spectra; the effect of a topological defect, and the Wannier Stark ladders. In this paper, we present an elastic analog of the diatomic chain and show how the acoustical and optical bands emerge, as well of the nature of the wave amplitudes.

  10. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism.

    PubMed

    Carati, A; Benfenati, F; Galgani, L

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  11. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  12. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-09-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein-Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used.

  13. Classic African American Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assert that there are classic African American children's books and to identify a sampling of them. The author presents multiple definitions of the term classic based on the responses of children's literature experts and relevant scholarship. Next, the manner in which data were collected and analyzed in regard to…

  14. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  15. Comparison of quantum and classical relaxation in spin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wieser, R

    2013-04-01

    The classical Landau-Lifshitz equation with a damping term has been derived from the time evolution of a quantum mechanical wave function under the assumption of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator. Further, the trajectory of a classical spin (S) has been compared with the expectation value of the spin operator (Ŝ). A good agreement between classical and quantum mechanical trajectories can be found for Hamiltonians linear in Ŝ or S, respectively. Quadratic or higher order terms in the Hamiltonian result in a disagreement.

  16. Classical models of the spin 1/2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Lazaro, Carlos H.

    We proposed a Quaternionic mechanical system motivated by the Foucault pendulum as a classical model for the dynamics of the spin ½ system. We showed that this mechanical system contains the dynamics of the spin state of the electron under a uniform magnetic field as it is given by the Schrodinger-Pauli-Equation (SPE). We closed with a characterization of the dynamics of this generalized classical system by showing that it is equivalent with the dynamics of the Schrodinger Pauli Equation as long as the solutions to the generalized classical system are roots of the Lagrangian, that is the condition L = 0 holds.

  17. Classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Addictive disorders are very common and have devastating individual and social consequences. Currently available treatment is moderately effective at best. After many years of neglect, there is renewed interest in potential clinical uses for classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions and other behavioral health conditions. In this paper we provide a comprehensive review of both historical and recent clinical research on the use of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addiction, selectively review other relevant research concerning hallucinogens, and suggest directions for future research. Clinical trial data are very limited except for the use of LSD in the treatment of alcoholism, where a meta-analysis of controlled trials has demonstrated a consistent and clinically significant beneficial effect of high-dose LSD. Recent pilot studies of psilocybin-assisted treatment of nicotine and alcohol dependence had strikingly positive outcomes, but controlled trials will be necessary to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Although plausible biological mechanisms have been proposed, currently the strongest evidence is for the role of mystical or other meaningful experiences as mediators of therapeutic effects. Classic hallucinogens have an excellent record of safety in the context of clinical research. Given our limited understanding of the clinically relevant effects of classic hallucinogens, there is a wealth of opportunities for research that could contribute important new knowledge and potentially lead to valuable new treatments for addiction. PMID:25784600

  18. On the emergence of classical gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larjo, Klaus

    In this thesis I will discuss how certain black holes arise as an effective, thermodynamical description from non-singular microstates in string theory. This provides a possible solution to the information paradox, and strengthens the case for treating black holes as thermodynamical objects. I will characterize the data defining a microstate of a black hole in several settings, and demonstrate that most of the data is unmeasurable for a classical observer. I will further show that the data that is measurable is universal for nearly all microstates, making it impossible for a classical observer to distinguish between microstates, thus giving rise to an effective statistical description for the black hole. In the first half of the thesis I will work with two specific systems: the half-BPS sector of [Special characters omitted.] = 4 super Yang-Mills the and the conformal field theory corresponding to the D1/D5 system; in both cases the high degree of symmetry present provides great control over potentially intractable computations. For these systems, I will further specify the conditions a quantum mechanical microstate must satisfy in order to have a classical description in terms of a unique metric, and define a 'metric operator' whose eigenstates correspond to classical geometries. In the second half of the thesis I will consider a much broader setting, general [Special characters omitted.] = I superconformal quiver gauge the= ories and their dual gravity theories, and demonstrate that a similar effective description arises also in this setting.

  19. Classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Addictive disorders are very common and have devastating individual and social consequences. Currently available treatment is moderately effective at best. After many years of neglect, there is renewed interest in potential clinical uses for classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions and other behavioral health conditions. In this paper we provide a comprehensive review of both historical and recent clinical research on the use of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addiction, selectively review other relevant research concerning hallucinogens, and suggest directions for future research. Clinical trial data are very limited except for the use of LSD in the treatment of alcoholism, where a meta-analysis of controlled trials has demonstrated a consistent and clinically significant beneficial effect of high-dose LSD. Recent pilot studies of psilocybin-assisted treatment of nicotine and alcohol dependence had strikingly positive outcomes, but controlled trials will be necessary to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Although plausible biological mechanisms have been proposed, currently the strongest evidence is for the role of mystical or other meaningful experiences as mediators of therapeutic effects. Classic hallucinogens have an excellent record of safety in the context of clinical research. Given our limited understanding of the clinically relevant effects of classic hallucinogens, there is a wealth of opportunities for research that could contribute important new knowledge and potentially lead to valuable new treatments for addiction.

  20. Beyond quantum-classical analogies: high time for agreement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, Michele

    Lately, many quantum-classical analogies have been investigated and published in many acknowledged journals. Such a surge of research on conceptual connections between quantum and classical physics forces us to ask whether the correspondence between the quantum and classical interpretation of the reality is deeper than the correspondence principle stated by Bohr. Here, after a short introduction to quantum-classical analogies from the recent literature, we try to examine the question from the perspective of a possible agreement between quantum and classical laws. A paradigmatic example is given in the striking equivalence between the classical Mie theory of electromagnetic scattering from spherical scatterers and the corresponding quantum-mechanical wave scattering analyzed in terms of partial waves. The key features that make the correspondence possible are examined and finally employed to deal with the fundamental blackbody problem that marks the initial separation between classical and quantum physics. The procedure allows us to recover the blackbody spectrum in classical terms and the proof is rich in consequences. Among them, the strong analogy between the quantum vacuum and its classical counterpart.

  1. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  2. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  3. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  4. Classical and quantum dynamics of the impulsively driven hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Melles, M.; Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |

    1992-12-01

    We investigate the classical and quantum dynamics of the hydrogen atom in a Rydberg state subject to a sequence of periodic and random pulses. One goal of this study is to test the validity of classical electron transport theories. We analyze the critical momentum transfer for which 10% of the Rydberg atoms are ionized after a large number of pulses as a function of the frequency of the perturbation. The quantum mechanical results for a periodic sequence of pulses exhibit clear structures which are not present in a classical simulation. These structures are shown to vanish for the case of stochastic pulses for which agreement is obtained between the classical and quantum mechanical results. The dynamics of the quantum mechanical periodic system is analyzed in terms of quasi-eigenstates of the period-one time evolution operator.

  5. Classical and quantum dynamics of the impulsively driven hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Melles, M.; Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the classical and quantum dynamics of the hydrogen atom in a Rydberg state subject to a sequence of periodic and random pulses. One goal of this study is to test the validity of classical electron transport theories. We analyze the critical momentum transfer for which 10% of the Rydberg atoms are ionized after a large number of pulses as a function of the frequency of the perturbation. The quantum mechanical results for a periodic sequence of pulses exhibit clear structures which are not present in a classical simulation. These structures are shown to vanish for the case of stochastic pulses for which agreement is obtained between the classical and quantum mechanical results. The dynamics of the quantum mechanical periodic system is analyzed in terms of quasi-eigenstates of the period-one time evolution operator.

  6. Local Refinements in Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackeldey, Konstantin; Weber, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Quantum mechanics provide a detailed description of the physical and chemical behavior of molecules. However, with increasing size of the system the complexity rises exponentially, which is prohibitive for efficient dynamical simulation. In contrast, classical molecular dynamics procure a coarser description by using less degrees of freedom. Thus, it seems natural to seek for an adequate trade-off between accurateness and computational feasibility in the simulation of molecules. Here, we propose a novel method, which combines classical molecular simulations with quantum mechanics for molecular systems. For this we decompose the state space of the respective molecule into subsets, by employing a meshfree partition of unity. We show, that this partition allows us to localize an empirical force field and to run locally constrained classical trajectories. Within each subset, we compute the energy on the quantum level for a fixed number of spatial states (ab initio points). With these energy values from the ab initio points we have a local scattered data problem, which can be solved by the moving least squares method.

  7. Hidden invariance of the free classical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, S. )

    1994-06-01

    A formalism describing the dynamics of classical and quantum systems from a group theoretical point of view is presented. We apply it to the simple example of the classical free particle. The Galileo group [ital G] is the symmetry group of the free equations of motion. Consideration of the free particle Lagrangian semi-invariance under [ital G] leads to a larger symmetry group, which is a central extension of the Galileo group by the real numbers. We study the dynamics associated with this group, and characterize quantities like Noether invariants and evolution equations in terms of group geometric objects. An extension of the Galileo group by [ital U](1) leads to quantum mechanics.

  8. Axions: Bose Einstein condensate or classical field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha

    2015-05-01

    The axion is a motivated dark matter candidate, so it would be interesting to find features in Large Scale Structures specific to axion dark matter. Such features were proposed for a Bose Einstein condensate of axions, leading to confusion in the literature (to which I contributed) about whether axions condense due to their gravitational interactions. This note argues that the Bose Einstein condensation of axions is a red herring: the axion dark matter produced by the misalignment mechanism is already a classical field, which has the distinctive features attributed to the axion condensate (BE condensates are described as classical fields). This note also estimates that the rate at which axion particles condense to the field, or the field evaporates to particles, is negligible.

  9. Quantum and classical dissipation of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra-Sierra, V.G.; Anzaldo-Meneses, A.; Cardoso, J.L.; Hernández-Saldaña, H.; Kunold, A.; Roa-Neri, J.A.E.

    2013-08-15

    A Hamiltonian approach is presented to study the two dimensional motion of damped electric charges in time dependent electromagnetic fields. The classical and the corresponding quantum mechanical problems are solved for particular cases using canonical transformations applied to Hamiltonians for a particle with variable mass. Green’s function is constructed and, from it, the motion of a Gaussian wave packet is studied in detail. -- Highlights: •Hamiltonian of a damped charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Exact Green’s function of a charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Time evolution of a Gaussian wave packet of a damped charged particle. •Classical and quantum dynamics of a damped electric charge.

  10. Dissipative Forces and Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, John S.; Thompson, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to include the dissipative forces of classical mechanics in quantum mechanics by the use of non-Hermetian Hamiltonians. The Ehrenfest theorem for such Hamiltonians is derived, and simple examples which show the classical correspondences are given. (MLH)

  11. Classical Foundations: Leah Rochel Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the accomplishments of Leah Rochel Johnson, Assistant Professor of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and History, Pennsylvania State University. It provides insight into her values and beliefs and testimony from those who work most closely with her.

  12. Fundamental theories of waves and particles formulated without classical mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.

    2010-12-01

    Quantum and classical mechanics are two conceptually and mathematically different theories of physics, and yet they do use the same concept of classical mass that was originally introduced by Newton in his formulation of the laws of dynamics. In this paper, physical consequences of using the classical mass by both theories are explored, and a novel approach that allows formulating fundamental (Galilean invariant) theories of waves and particles without formally introducing the classical mass is presented. In this new formulation, the theories depend only on one common parameter called 'wave mass', which is deduced from experiments for selected elementary particles and for the classical mass of one kilogram. It is shown that quantum theory with the wave mass is independent of the Planck constant and that higher accuracy of performing calculations can be attained by such theory. Natural units in connection with the presented approach are also discussed and justification beyond dimensional analysis is given for the particular choice of such units.

  13. Classical theory of radiating strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Haws, D.; Hindmarsh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The divergent part of the self force of a radiating string coupled to gravity, an antisymmetric tensor and a dilaton in four dimensions are calculated to first order in classical perturbation theory. While this divergence can be absorbed into a renormalization of the string tension, demanding that both it and the divergence in the energy momentum tensor vanish forces the string to have the couplings of compactified N = 1 D = 10 supergravity. In effect, supersymmetry cures the classical infinities.

  14. The classical microwave frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Thomann, Pierre; Laurent-Guy, Bernier; Willemin, Philippe; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    Some key problems are presented encountered in the classical microwave frequency standards which are still not solved today. The point of view expressed benefits from the experience gained both in the industry and in the research lab, on the following classical microwave frequency standards: active and passive H, conventional and laser pumped Cs beam tube, small conventional and laser pumped Rubidium. The accent is put on the Rubidium standard.

  15. Quantum money with classical verification

    SciTech Connect

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-12-04

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

  16. Classical vs. non-classical pathways of mineral formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Yoreo, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent chemical analyses, microscopy studies and computer simulations suggest many minerals nucleate through aggregation of pre-nucleation clusters and grow by particle-mediated processes that involve amorphous or disordered precursors. Still other analyses, both experimental and computational, conclude that even simple mineral systems like calcium carbonate form via a barrier-free process of liquid-liquid separation, which is followed by dehydration of the ion-rich phase to form the solid products. However, careful measurements of calcite nucleation rates on a variety of ionized surfaces give results that are in complete agreement with the expectations of classical nucleation theory, in which clusters growing through ion-by-ion addition overcome a free energy barrier through the natural microscopic density fluctuations of the system. Here the challenge of integrating these seemingly disparate observations and analyses into a coherent picture of mineral formation is addressed by considering the energy barriers to calcite formation predicted by the classical theory and the changes in those barriers brought about by the introduction of interfaces and clusters, both stable and metastable. Results from a suite of in situ TEM, AFM, and optical experiments combined with simulations are used to illustrate the conclusions. The analyses show that the expected barrier to homogeneous calcite nucleation is prohibitive even at concentrations exceeding the solubility limit of amorphous calcium carbonate. However, as demonstrated by experiments on self-assembled monolayers, the introduction of surfaces that moderately decrease the interfacial energy associated with the forming nucleus can reduce the magnitude of the barrier to a level that is easily surmounted under typical laboratory conditions. In the absence of such surfaces, experiments that proceed by continually increasing supersaturation with time can easily by-pass direct nucleation of calcite and open up pathways through

  17. Path-integral approach to 't Hooft's derivation of quantum physics from classical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blasone, Massimo; Jizba, Petr; Kleinert, Hagen

    2005-05-15

    We present a path-integral formulation of 't Hooft's derivation of quantum physics from classical physics. The crucial ingredient of this formulation is Gozzi et al.'s supersymmetric path integral of classical mechanics. We quantize explicitly two simple classical systems: the planar mathematical pendulum and the Roessler dynamical system.

  18. Planck's radiation law: is a quantum-classical perspective possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Planck's radiation law provides the solution to the blackbody problem that marks the decline of classical physics and the rise of the quantum theory of the radiation field. Here, we venture to suggest the possibility that classical physics might be equally suitable to deal with the blackbody problem. A classical version of the Planck's radiation law seems to be achievable if we learn from the quantum-classical correspondence between classical Mie theory and quantum-mechanical wave scattering from spherical scatterers (partial wave analysis). This correspondence designs a procedure for countable energy levels of the radiation trapped within the blackbody treated within the multipole approach of classical electrodynamics (in place of the customary and problematic expansion in terms of plane waves that give rise to the ultraviolet catastrophe). In turn, introducing the Boltzmann discretization of energy levels, the tools of classical thermodynamics and statistical theory become available for the task. On the other hand, the final result depends on a free parameter whose physical units are those of an action. Tuning this parameter on the value given by the Planck constant makes the classical result agree with the canonical Planck's radiation law.

  19. Quantum Particles from Classical Probabilities in Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2012-10-01

    Quantum particles in a potential are described by classical statistical probabilities. We formulate a basic time evolution law for the probability distribution of classical position and momentum such that all known quantum phenomena follow, including interference or tunneling. The appropriate quantum observables for position and momentum contain a statistical part which reflects the roughness of the probability distribution. "Zwitters" realize a continuous interpolation between quantum and classical particles. Such objects may provide for an effective one-particle description of classical or quantum collective states as droplets of a liquid, macromolecules or a Bose-Einstein condensate. They may also be used for quantitative fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. We show that the ground state for zwitters has no longer a sharp energy. This feature permits to put quantitative experimental bounds on a small parameter for possible deviations from quantum mechanics.

  20. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions.

  1. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions. PMID:15638649

  2. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt-Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit.

  3. INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu

    2011-07-20

    We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

  4. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  5. Classical picture of postexponential decay

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Martorell, J.; Sprung, D. W. L.

    2010-04-15

    Postexponential decay of the probability density of a quantum particle leaving a trap can be reproduced accurately, except for interference oscillations at the transition to the postexponential regime, by means of an ensemble of classical particles emitted with constant probability per unit time and the same half-life as the quantum system. The energy distribution of the ensemble is chosen to be identical to the quantum distribution, and the classical point source is located at the scattering length of the corresponding quantum system. A one-dimensional example is provided to illustrate the general argument.

  6. Relative Clauses in Classical Nahuatl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langacker, Ronald W.

    1975-01-01

    Jane Rosenthal's paper on relative clauses in Classical Nahuatl is discussed, and it is argued that she misses an important generalization. An alternative analysis to a class of relative pronouns and new rules for the distribution of relative pronouns are proposed. (SC)

  7. Quantization of Inequivalent Classical Hamiltonians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Ian K.

    1979-01-01

    Shows how the quantization of a Hamiltonian which is not canonically related to the energy is ambiguous and thereby results in conflicting physical interpretations. Concludes that only the Hamiltonian corresponding to the total energy of a classical system or one canonically related to it is suitable for consistent quantization. (GA)

  8. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  9. Classical Music as Enforced Utopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In classical music composition, whatever thematic or harmonic conflicts may be engineered along the way, everything always turns out for the best. Similar utopian thinking underlies performance: performers see their job as faithfully carrying out their master's (the composer's) wishes. The more perfectly they represent them, the happier the…

  10. Identity from classical invariant theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    A simple derivation is given of a well-known relation involving the so-called Cayley Operator of classical invariant theory. The proof is induction-free and independent of Capelli's identity; it makes use only of a known-theorem in the theory of determinants and some elementary combinatorics.

  11. Interpretation neutrality in the classical domain of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaler, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    I show explicitly how concerns about wave function collapse and ontology can be decoupled from the bulk of technical analysis necessary to recover localized, approximately Newtonian trajectories from quantum theory. In doing so, I demonstrate that the account of classical behavior provided by decoherence theory can be straightforwardly tailored to give accounts of classical behavior on multiple interpretations of quantum theory, including the Everett, de Broglie-Bohm and GRW interpretations. I further show that this interpretation-neutral, decoherence-based account conforms to a general view of inter-theoretic reduction in physics that I have elaborated elsewhere, which differs from the oversimplified picture that treats reduction as a matter of simply taking limits. This interpretation-neutral account rests on a general three-pronged strategy for reduction between quantum and classical theories that combines decoherence, an appropriate form of Ehrenfest's Theorem, and a decoherence-compatible mechanism for collapse. It also incorporates a novel argument as to why branch-relative trajectories should be approximately Newtonian, which is based on a little-discussed extension of Ehrenfest's Theorem to open systems, rather than on the more commonly cited but less germane closed-systems version. In the Conclusion, I briefly suggest how the strategy for quantum-classical reduction described here might be extended to reduction between other classical and quantum theories, including classical and quantum field theory and classical and quantum gravity.

  12. Quantum-classical dynamics of wave fields.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2007-02-21

    An approach to the quantum-classical mechanics of phase space dependent operators, which has been proposed recently, is remodeled as a formalism for wave fields. Such wave fields obey a system of coupled nonlinear equations that can be written by means of a suitable non-Hamiltonian bracket. As an example, the theory is applied to the relaxation dynamics of the spin-boson model. In the adiabatic limit, a good agreement with calculations performed by the operator approach is obtained. Moreover, the theory proposed in this paper can take nonadiabatic effects into account without resorting to surface-hopping approximations. Hence, the results obtained follow qualitatively those of previous surface-hopping calculations and increase by a factor of (at least) 2, the time length over which nonadiabatic dynamics can be propagated with small statistical errors. Moreover, it is worth to note that the dynamics of quantum-classical wave fields proposed here is a straightforward non-Hamiltonian generalization of the formalism for nonlinear quantum mechanics that Weinberg introduced recently.

  13. Relational Quadrilateralland i: the Classical Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-12-01

    Relational particle mechanics models bolster the relational side of the absolute versus relational motion debate. They are additionally toy models for the dynamical formulation of general relativity (GR) and its problem of time (PoT). They cover two aspects that the more commonly studied minisuperspace GR models do not: (1) by having a nontrivial notion of structure and thus of cosmological structure formation and of localized records. (2) They have linear as well as quadratic constraints, which is crucial as regards modeling many PoT facets. I previously solved relational triangleland classically, quantum mechanically and as regards a local resolution of the PoT. This rested on triangleland's shape space being 𝕊2 with isometry group SO(3), allowing for use of widely-known geometry, methods and atomic/molecular physics analogies. I now extend this work to the relational quadrilateral, which is far more typical of the general N-a-gon, represents a "diagonal to nondiagonal Bianchi IX minisuperspace" step-up in complexity, and encodes further PoT subtleties. The shape space now being ℂℙ2 with isometry group SU(3)/ℤ3, I now need to draw on geometry, shape statistics and particle physics to solve this model; this is therefore an interdisciplinary paper. This Paper treats quadrilateralland at the classical level, and then paper II provides a quantum treatment.

  14. A classical examination of the Stark effect in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Andrew; Greene, Chris H.; Clark, William

    1997-04-01

    The response of a hydrogen atom to a perturbative electric field (the Stark effect) is presented from a classical viewpoint. In previous studies Hezel et al. (T. P. Hezel, C. E. Burkhardt, M. Ciocca, and J. J. Leventhal, Am. J. Phys. 60), 324 (1992). examined the linear Stark effect classically and found that the linear Stark splitting of the degenerate hydrogenic energy levels (n-states) corresponds to a rotation of the plane of the electron orbit about the electric field vector. In the present work we find classical energy shifts (not just precession frequencies) in the hydrogen atom in situations that correspond to both the linear and quadratic Stark effects. We then compare these classical energy shifts to the exact quantum mechanical values for the Stark effect. We find that the linear Stark effect can be accurately reproduced classically (given the correct initial conditions). In contrast, quantum mechanical results for the quadratic Stark effect cannot be accurately reproduced classically, except in the correspondence principle limit of large principal quantum numbers n. A paper based on this work has been recently submitted to Phys. Rev. A(Preprints of this paper are avaliable on the internet at ftp://fermion.colorado.edu/pub/preprints/Sta rk/ .). This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  15. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2013-03-01

    Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on (a) a model diatomic molecule, (b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and (c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous quantum state-to-state transition probability control landscape.

  16. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes in phase space.

    PubMed

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2013-03-28

    Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on (a) a model diatomic molecule, (b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and (c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous quantum state-to-state transition probability control landscape.

  17. On energy absorption in classical electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedecke, G. H.

    2001-02-01

    Using only classical electromagnetic energy conservation laws and causality, we show that the net average power absorbed by any mechanically isolated illuminated medium in steady state must be zero, but that for linear model media it is nonzero. This contradiction implies that all media must behave inelastically. We also show in general that the average power absorbed at an incident frequency, which is equal to the total taken from an incident wave minus that scattered elastically, is also equal to the average power scattered inelastically plus that carried off mechanically, if any. Finally, we infer that while the conventional linear theory cannot predict the spectral distribution of inelastic scattering, it may be applied as always to predict the propagation, absorption, and elastic scattering of weak illumination in passive media.

  18. Extending In Vitro Conditioning in "Aplysia" to Analyze Operant and Classical Processes in the Same Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brembs, Bjorn; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Operant and classical conditioning are major processes shaping behavioral responses in all animals. Although the understanding of the mechanisms of classical conditioning has expanded significantly, the understanding of the mechanisms of operant conditioning is more limited. Recent developments in "Aplysia" are helping to narrow the gap in the…

  19. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  20. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim de; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis.

  1. Invariants from classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Rafael; Leal, Lorenzo

    2008-06-15

    We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from perturbative classical field theories depending on external parameters. By applying our methods to several field theories such as Abelian BF, Chern-Simons, and two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, we obtain, respectively, the linking number for embedded submanifolds in compact varieties, the Gauss' and the second Milnor's invariant for links in S{sup 3}, and invariants under area-preserving diffeomorphisms for configurations of immersed planar curves.

  2. Classical music and the teeth.

    PubMed

    Eramo, Stefano; Di Biase, Mary Jo; De Carolis, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Teeth and their pathologies are frequent themes in classical music. The teeth have inspired popular songwriters such as Thomas Crecquillon, Carl Loewe, Amilcare Ponchielli & Christian Sinding; as well as composers whose works are still played all over the world, such as Robert Schumann and Jacques Offenbach. This paper examines several selections in which the inspiring theme is the teeth and the pain they can cause, from the suffering of toothache, to the happier occasion of a baby's first tooth. PMID:23691776

  3. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis. PMID:25672294

  4. Quantum fields with classical perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dereziński, Jan

    2014-07-15

    The main purpose of these notes is a review of various models of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) involving quadratic Lagrangians. We discuss scalar and vector bosons, spin 1/2 fermions, both neutral and charged. Beside free theories, we study their interactions with classical perturbations, called, depending on the context, an external linear source, mass-like term, current or electromagnetic potential. The notes may serve as a first introduction to QFT.

  5. The origins of classical homoeopathy?

    PubMed

    Campbell, A

    1999-06-01

    Writers on homoeopathy frequently refer to classical homoeopathy, usually with the implication that this is the most complete and authoritative version of Hahnemann's views. However, such claims do not correspond with the historical facts. Homoeopathy arrived in the USA early in the 19th century and there underwent considerable modifications at the hands of its most influential adherents, who were deeply influenced by the ideas of Emanuel Swedenborg. J.T. Kent is particularly important in this respect and he also introduced ideas from other sources. The 'extremist' character of Kentian homoeopathy goes far to explain the gulf that has separated homoeopathy from orthodox medicine until comparatively recently. Kentian views were brought to Britain by Margaret Tyler early in the 20th century and became dominant after the First World War, to give rise to what is called classical homoeopathy today. This is not only a considerable modification of Hahnemann's teaching, but it fails to take account of Hahnemann's late ideas which he developed in his Paris years and incorporated in the sixth edition of 'The Organon', published posthumously in 1920. Whatever one's opinion of the value of classical homoeopathy, it cannot be legitimately represented as a purely Hahnemannian teaching.

  6. What is a Particle in Classical Physics? A Wave?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2005-11-01

    The concepts of ``particle" and ``wave" play important roles in quantum mechanics in that a given microscopic system can, under the proper circumstances, display properties of each.ootnotetextA Messiah, Quantum Mechanics, Vols. I and II (Wiley, 1961). However, these categories have their genesis in classical mechanicsootnotetextH. Goldstein, Classical Mechanics (Addison-Wesley, 1980, 2nd edition). and we must turn to this area to understand what they mean. In particular, it must be clearly understood that these concepts are idealistic representations of physical phenomena and, as a consequence, each may not correspond to any actual physical system. We discuss the definition of ``particle'' from the perspective of how it has been defined in standard textbooks and carry out a similar analysis for the notion of ``wave.'' We then define ``particle'' and ``wave'' within the context of classical mechanics by means of their respective equations of motion. The general (tentative) conclusion is that within the framework of classical mechanics the concepts of ``particle'' and ``wave'' systems may be unambiguously defined.

  7. Entanglement in the classical limit: Quantum correlations from classical probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Matzkin, A.

    2011-08-15

    We investigate entanglement for a composite closed system endowed with a scaling property which allows the dynamics to be kept invariant while the effective Planck constant ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sub eff} of the system is varied. Entanglement increases as ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sub eff}{yields}0. Moreover, for sufficiently low ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sub eff} the evolution of the quantum correlations, encapsulated, for example, in the quantum discord, can be obtained from the mutual information of the corresponding classical system. We show this behavior is due to the local suppression of path interferences in the interaction that generates the entanglement.

  8. Three approaches to classical thermal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gozzi, E.; Penco, R.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > Classical thermal field theory admits three equivalent path integral formulations. > Classical Feynman rules can be derived for all three formulations. > Quantum Feynman rules reduce to classical ones at high temperatures. > Classical Feynman rules become much simpler when superfields are introduced. - Abstract: In this paper we study three different functional approaches to classical thermal field theory, which turn out to be the classical counterparts of three well-known different formulations of quantum thermal field theory: the closed-time path (CTP) formalism, the thermofield dynamics (TFD) and the Matsubara approach.

  9. Modeling the quantum evolution of the universe through classical matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitelli, João Paulo M.; Letelier, Patricio S.

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that the canonical quantization of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) filled with a perfect fluid leads to nonsingular universes which, for later times, behave as their classical counterpart. This means that the expectation value of the scale factor (t) never vanishes and, as t→ infty , we recover the classical expression for the scale factor. In this paper, we show that such universes can be reproduced by classical cosmology given that the universe is filled with an exotic matter. In the case of a perfect fluid, we find an implicit equation of state (EoS). We then show that this single fluid with an implict EoS is equivalent to two non-interacting fluids, one of them representing stiff matter with negative energy density. In the case of two non-interacting scalar fields, one of them of the phantom type, we find their potential energy. In both cases we find that quantum mechanics changes completely the configuration of matter for small values of time, by adding a fluid or a scalar field with negative energy density. As time passes, the density of negative energy decreases and we recover the ordinary content of the classical universe. The more the initial wave function of the universe is concentrated around the classical big bang singularity, the more it is necessary to add negative energy, since this type of energy will be responsible for the removal of the classical singularity.

  10. A Simple Explanation of the Classic Hydrostatic Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the…

  11. Comparison of classical and quantum dynamics for collinear cluster scattering.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Andreas; Marković, Nikola

    2005-04-01

    The collinear dynamics of a cluster of four particles colliding with a fixed particle representing a surface is investigated using a four-dimensional wave packet approach. The properties of the system are chosen to resemble a water cluster interacting with graphite, but a deeper surface-particle potential is also considered causing significant dissociation of the cluster. Having four different product arrangement channels the system is quantum mechanically demanding but still manageable. The dynamical richness makes it a suitable benchmark system for evaluation of classical and quantum/classical schemes. The average energy transferred to the cluster and the three dissociation probabilities are presented as function of the initial state of the cluster. In addition to wave packet data, results obtained using quasiclassical as well as Wigner sampled classical trajectories are presented. The main conclusion is that classical mechanics can describe the dynamics of the system in a very satisfactory way. Including zero-point energy in the classical simulations is particularly important for a good description of dissociation but less important for energy transfer.

  12. Classical dynamics on Snyder spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignemi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We study the classical dynamics of a particle in Snyder spacetime, adopting the formalism of constrained Hamiltonian systems introduced by Dirac. We show that the motion of a particle in a scalar potential is deformed with respect to special relativity by terms of order βE2. A remarkable result is that in the relativistic Snyder model a consistent choice of the time variable must necessarily depend on the dynamics. This is a consequence of the nontrivial mixing between position and momentum coordinates intrinsic to the Snyder model.

  13. Classical analog of quantum phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.

    1992-07-01

    A modified version of the Feynman relativistic chessboard model (FCM) is investigated in which the paths involved are spirals in the space-time. Portions of the paths in which the particle`s proper time is reversed are interpreted in terms of antiparticles. With this intepretation the particle-antiparticle field produced by such trajectories provides a classical analog of the phase associated with particle paths in the unmodified FCM. It is shwon that in the nonrelativistic limit the resulting kernel is the correct Dirac propagator and that particle-antiparticle symmetry is in this case responsible for quantum interference. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Eyeblink classical conditioning in the preweanling lamb.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy B; Stanton, Mark E; Goodlett, Charles R; Cudd, Timothy A

    2008-06-01

    Classical conditioning of eyeblink responses has been one of the most important models for studying the neurobiology of learning, with many comparative, ontogenetic, and clinical applications. The current study reports the development of procedures to conduct eyeblink conditioning in preweanling lambs and demonstrates successful conditioning using these procedures. These methods will permit application of eyeblink conditioning procedures in the analysis of functional correlates of cerebellar damage in a sheep model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, which has significant advantages over more common laboratory rodent models. Because sheep have been widely used for studies of pathogenesis and mechanisms of injury with many different prenatal or perinatal physiological insults, eyeblink conditioning can provide a well-studied method to assess postnatal behavioral outcomes, which heretofore have not typically been pursued with ovine models of developmental insults.

  15. Innovations in classical hormonal targets for endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Nicola; Freschi, Letizia; Wenger, Jean-Marie; Streuli, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic disease of unknown etiology that affects approximately 10% of women in reproductive age. Several evidences show that endometriosis lesions are associated to hormonal imbalance, including estrogen synthesis, metabolism and responsiveness and progesterone resistance. These hormonal alterations influence the ability of endometrial cells to proliferate, migrate and to infiltrate the mesothelium, causing inflammation, pain and infertility. Hormonal imbalance in endometriosis represents also a target for treatment. We provide an overview on therapeutic strategies based on innovations of classical hormonal mechanisms involved in the development of endometriosis lesions. The development phase of new molecules targeting these pathways is also discussed. Endometriosis is a chronic disease involving young women and additional biological targets of estrogen and progesterone pharmacological manipulation (brain, bone and cardiovascular tissue) need to be carefully considered in order to improve and overcome current limits of long-term medical management of endometriosis.

  16. Fluctuations in classical sum rules.

    PubMed

    Elton, John R; Lakshminarayan, Arul; Tomsovic, Steven

    2010-10-01

    Classical sum rules arise in a wide variety of physical contexts. Asymptotic expressions have been derived for many of these sum rules in the limit of long orbital period (or large action). Although sum-rule convergence may well be exponentially rapid for chaotic systems in a global phase-space sense with time, individual contributions to the sums may fluctuate with a width which diverges in time. Our interest is in the global convergence of sum rules as well as their local fluctuations. It turns out that a simple version of a lazy baker map gives an ideal system in which classical sum rules, their corrections, and their fluctuations can be worked out analytically. This is worked out in detail for the Hannay-Ozorio sum rule. In this particular case the rate of convergence of the sum rule is found to be governed by the Pollicott-Ruelle resonances, and both local and global boundaries for which the sum rule may converge are given. In addition, the width of the fluctuations is considered and worked out analytically, and it is shown to have an interesting dependence on the location of the region over which the sum rule is applied. It is also found that as the region of application is decreased in size the fluctuations grow. This suggests a way of controlling the length scale of the fluctuations by considering a time dependent phase-space volume, which for the lazy baker map decreases exponentially rapidly with time.

  17. Noise and the classical musician.

    PubMed Central

    McBride, D.; Gill, F.; Proops, D.; Harrington, M.; Gardiner, K.; Attwell, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To test the hypothesis that noise exposure may cause hearing loss in classical musicians. DESIGN--Comparison of hearing levels between two risk groups identified during the study by measuring sound levels. SETTING--Symphony orchestra and occupational health department in the west Midlands. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Hearing level as measured by clinical pure tone audiometry. RESULTS--Trumpet and piccolo players received a noise dose of 160% and 124%, respectively, over mean levels during part of the study. Comparison of the hearing levels of 18 woodwind and brass musicians with 18 string musicians matched for age and sex did not show a significant difference in hearing, the mean difference in the hearing levels at the high (2, 4, and 8 KHz) audiometric frequencies being 1.02 dB (95% confidence interval -2.39 to 4.43). CONCLUSIONS--This study showed that there is a potential for occupational hearing loss in classical orchestral musicians. Images p1561-a p1562-a PMID:1286387

  18. Introducing the Classics to Reluctant Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Lissa J.

    Using the pocket classics can be a painless way to introduce the classics to eighth-grade students. Condensed versions of the classics can take the sting out of the reading, stimulate students' interest, and help prepare them for high school. To offer students in one eighth-grade class some control over their own learning, a contract system was…

  19. Diminuendo: Classical Music and the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    How is the tradition of Western classical music faring on university campuses? Before answering this question, it is necessary to understand what has transpired with classical music in the wider culture, as the relationship between the two is so strong. In this article, the author discusses how classical music has taken a big cultural hit in…

  20. Quantum correlations and dynamics from classical random fields valued in complex Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-08-15

    One of the crucial differences between mathematical models of classical and quantum mechanics (QM) is the use of the tensor product of the state spaces of subsystems as the state space of the corresponding composite system. (To describe an ensemble of classical composite systems, one uses random variables taking values in the Cartesian product of the state spaces of subsystems.) We show that, nevertheless, it is possible to establish a natural correspondence between the classical and the quantum probabilistic descriptions of composite systems. Quantum averages for composite systems (including entangled) can be represented as averages with respect to classical random fields. It is essentially what Albert Einstein dreamed of. QM is represented as classical statistical mechanics with infinite-dimensional phase space. While the mathematical construction is completely rigorous, its physical interpretation is a complicated problem. We present the basic physical interpretation of prequantum classical statistical field theory in Sec. II. However, this is only the first step toward real physical theory.

  1. The classic "brown-ring" reaction in a new medium: kinetics, mechanism, and spectroscopy of the reversible binding of nitric oxide to iron(II) in an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Begel, Svetlana; Heinemann, Frank W; Stopa, Grzegorz; Stochel, Grazyna; van Eldik, Rudi

    2011-05-01

    To elucidate the applicability and properties of ionic liquids (ILs) to serve as chemical reaction media for the activation of small molecules by transition-metal complexes, detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies were performed on the reversible binding of NO to FeCl(2) dissolved in the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([emim][dca]) as a solvent. We report, for the first time, the application of laser flash photolysis at ambient and high pressure to study the kinetics of this reaction in an IL. The kinetic data and activation parameters for the "on" and "off" reactions suggest that both processes follow a limiting dissociative (D) ligand substitution mechanism, in contrast to that reported for the same reaction in aqueous solution, where this well-known "brown-ring" reaction follows an interchange dissociative (I(d)) ligand substitution mechanism. The observed difference apparently arises from the participation of the IL anion as a N-donor ligand, as evidenced by the formation of polymeric [Fe(dca)(3)Cl](x)[emim](2x) chains in the solid state and verified by X-ray crystallography. In addition, infrared (IR), Mössbauer, and EPR spectra were recorded for the monomeric reaction product [Fe(dca)(5)NO](3-) formed in the IL, and the parameters closely resemble those of the {FeNO}(7) unit in other well-characterized nitrosyl complexes. It is concluded that its electronic structure is best described by the presence of a high-spin Fe(III) (S = 5/2) center antiferromagnetically coupled to NO(-) (S = 1), yielding the observed spin quartet ground state (S(t) = 3/2). PMID:21428419

  2. Entanglement, the quantum formalism and the classical world

    SciTech Connect

    Matzkin, A.

    2011-09-23

    75 years after the term 'entanglement' was coined to a peculiar feature inherent to quantum systems, the connection between quantum and classical mechanics remains an open problem. Drawing on recent results obtained in semiclassical systems, we discuss here the fate of entanglement in a closed system as Planck's constant becomes vanishingly small. In that case the generation of entanglement in a quantum system is perfectly reproduced by properly defined correlations of the corresponding classical system. We speculate on what these results could imply regarding the status of entanglement and of the ensuing quantum correlations.

  3. High-NOON states by mixing quantum and classical light.

    PubMed

    Afek, Itai; Ambar, Oron; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-05-14

    Precision measurements can be brought to their ultimate limit by harnessing the principles of quantum mechanics. In optics, multiphoton entangled states, known as NOON states, can be used to obtain high-precision phase measurements, becoming more and more advantageous as the number of photons grows. We generated "high-NOON" states (N = 5) by multiphoton interference of quantum down-converted light with a classical coherent state in an approach that is inherently scalable. Super-resolving phase measurements with up to five entangled photons were produced with a visibility higher than that obtainable using classical light only.

  4. Classical Concepts in Quantum Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ömer, Bernhard

    2005-07-01

    The rapid progress of computer technology has been accompanied by a corresponding evolution of software development, from hardwired components and binary machine code to high level programming languages, which allowed to master the increasing hardware complexity and fully exploit its potential. This paper investigates, how classical concepts like hardware abstraction, hierarchical programs, data types, memory management, flow of control, and structured programming can be used in quantum computing. The experimental language QCL will be introduced as an example, how elements like irreversible functions, local variables, and conditional branching, which have no direct quantum counterparts, can be implemented, and how nonclassical features like the reversibility of unitary transformation or the nonobservability of quantum states can be accounted for within the framework of a procedural programming language.

  5. Classical Cosmology Through Animation Stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijic, Milan; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2010-05-01

    Computer animations are a powerful tool for explanation and communication of ideas, especially to a younger generation. Our team completed a three part sequence of short, computer animated stories about the insight and discoveries that lead to the understanding of the overall structure of the universe. Our principal characters are Immanuel Kant, Henrietta Leavitt, and Edwin Hubble. We utilized animations to model and visualize the physical concepts behind each discovery and to recreate the characters, locations, and flavor of the time. The animations vary in length from 6 to 11 minutes. The instructors or presenters may wish to utilize them separately or together. The animations may be used for learning classical cosmology in a visual way in GE astronomy courses, in pre-college science classes, or in public science education setting.

  6. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  7. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qiang; Lehoucq, R. B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2014-12-31

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary. The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. As a result, an immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.

  8. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Du, Qiang; Lehoucq, R. B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2014-12-31

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary.more » The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. As a result, an immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.« less

  9. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary. The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. An immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.

  10. A generalization of Fermat's principle for classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2014-09-01

    The analogy between dynamics and optics had a great influence on the development of the foundations of classical and quantum mechanics. We take this analogy one step further and investigate the validity of Fermat's principle in many-dimensional spaces describing dynamical systems (i.e., the quantum Hilbert space and the classical phase and configuration space). We propose that if the notion of a metric distance is well defined in that space and the velocity of the representative point of the system is an invariant of motion, then a generalized version of Fermat's principle will hold. We substantiate this conjecture for time-independent quantum systems and for a classical system consisting of coupled harmonic oscillators. An exception to this principle is the configuration space of a charged particle in a constant magnetic field; in this case the principle is valid in a frame rotating by half the Larmor frequency, not the stationary lab frame.

  11. Quantum-classical interactions through the path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Dimitrios

    2007-03-01

    I consider the case of two interacting scalar fields, ϕ and ψ, and use the path integral formalism in order to treat the first classically and the second quantum-mechanically. I derive the Feynman rules and the resulting equation of motion for the classical field which should be an improvement of the usual semiclassical procedure. As an application I use this method in order to enforce Gauss’s law as a classical equation in a non-Abelian gauge theory. I argue that the theory is renormalizable and equivalent to the usual Yang-Mills theory as far as the gauge field terms are concerned. There are additional terms in the effective action that depend on the Lagrange multiplier field λ that is used to enforce the constraint. These terms and their relation to the confining properties of the theory are discussed.

  12. Generic emergence of classical features in quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Piani, Marco; Horodecki, Paweł

    2015-08-01

    Quantum Darwinism posits that only specific information about a quantum system that is redundantly proliferated to many parts of its environment becomes accessible and objective, leading to the emergence of classical reality. However, it is not clear under what conditions this mechanism holds true. Here we prove that the emergence of classical features along the lines of quantum Darwinism is a general feature of any quantum dynamics: observers who acquire information indirectly through the environment have effective access at most to classical information about one and the same measurement of the quantum system. Our analysis does not rely on a strict conceptual splitting between a system-of-interest and its environment, and allows one to interpret any system as part of the environment of any other system. Finally, our approach leads to a full operational characterization of quantum discord in terms of local redistribution of correlations.

  13. Generic emergence of classical features in quantum Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Piani, Marco; Horodecki, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism posits that only specific information about a quantum system that is redundantly proliferated to many parts of its environment becomes accessible and objective, leading to the emergence of classical reality. However, it is not clear under what conditions this mechanism holds true. Here we prove that the emergence of classical features along the lines of quantum Darwinism is a general feature of any quantum dynamics: observers who acquire information indirectly through the environment have effective access at most to classical information about one and the same measurement of the quantum system. Our analysis does not rely on a strict conceptual splitting between a system-of-interest and its environment, and allows one to interpret any system as part of the environment of any other system. Finally, our approach leads to a full operational characterization of quantum discord in terms of local redistribution of correlations.

  14. Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regimes.

    PubMed

    Geneste, Grégory; Ottochian, Alistar; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2015-07-15

    Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate proton transport in BaSnO3. Structural optimizations in the stable and saddle point configurations for transfer (hopping) and reorientation allow description of the high-temperature classical and semi-classical regimes, in which diffusion occurs by over-barrier motion. At lower temperature (typically below 300 K), we describe the thermally-assisted quantum regime, in which protonic motion is of quantum nature and occurs in "coincidence" configurations favored by thermal fluctuations of the surrounding atoms. Both the non-adiabatic and the adiabatic limits are examined. In the adiabatic limit, the protonic energy landscape in the coincidence configuration is very flat. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of the proton in the coincidence potential reveal, in the transfer case, that the density of probability of H(+) has its maximum at the saddle point, because the zero-point energy exceeds the coincidence barrier. Arguments are given that support the adiabatic picture for the transfer mechanism. In the case of reorientation, the time scales for the existence of the coincidence and for protonic motion, as estimated from the time-energy uncertainty principle by using a simple one-dimensional model, are of the same order of magnitude, suggesting that the adiabatic limit is not reached. Protonic transfer and reorientation in this oxide are therefore governed by different mechanisms below room temperature. PMID:26126772

  15. On the complete symmetry group of the classical Kepler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.

    1994-11-01

    A rather strong concept of symmetry is introduced in classical mechanics, in the sense that some mechanical systems can be completely characterized by the symmetry laws they obey. Accordingly, a ``complete symmetry group'' realization in mechanics must be endowed with the following two features: (1) the group acts freely and transitively on the manifold of all allowed motions of the system; (2) the given equations of motion are the only ordinary differential equations that remain invariant under the specified action of the group. This program is applied successfully to the classical Kepler problem, since the complete symmetry group for this particular system is here obtained. The importance of this result for the quantum kinematic theory of the Kepler system is emphasized.

  16. Two-slit experiment: quantum and classical probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Inter-relation between quantum and classical probability models is one of the most fundamental problems of quantum foundations. Nowadays this problem also plays an important role in quantum technologies, in quantum cryptography and the theory of quantum random generators. In this letter, we compare the viewpoint of Richard Feynman that the behavior of quantum particles cannot be described by classical probability theory with the viewpoint that quantum-classical inter-relation is more complicated (cf, in particular, with the tomographic model of quantum mechanics developed in detail by Vladimir Man'ko). As a basic example, we consider the two-slit experiment, which played a crucial role in quantum foundational debates at the beginning of quantum mechanics (QM). In particular, its analysis led Niels Bohr to the formulation of the principle of complementarity. First, we demonstrate that in complete accordance with Feynman's viewpoint, the probabilities for the two-slit experiment have the non-Kolmogorovian structure, since they violate one of basic laws of classical probability theory, the law of total probability (the heart of the Bayesian analysis). However, then we show that these probabilities can be embedded in a natural way into the classical (Kolmogorov, 1933) probability model. To do this, one has to take into account the randomness of selection of different experimental contexts, the joint consideration of which led Feynman to a conclusion about the non-classicality of quantum probability. We compare this embedding of non-Kolmogorovian quantum probabilities into the Kolmogorov model with well-known embeddings of non-Euclidean geometries into Euclidean space (e.g., the Poincaré disk model for the Lobachvesky plane).

  17. Scale covariant physics: a 'quantum deformation' of classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Yehonatan; Yavneh, Irad

    2010-02-01

    We present a deformation of classical electrodynamics, continuously depending on a 'quantum parameter', featuring manifest gauge, Poincaré and scale covariance. The theory, dubbed extended charge dynamics (ECD), associates a certain length scale with each charge which, due to scale covariance, is an attribute of a solution, not a parameter of the theory. When the EM field experienced by an ECD charge is slowly varying over that length scale, the dynamics of the charge reduces to classical dynamics, its emitted radiation reduces to the familiar Liénard-Wiechert potential and the above length scale is identified as the charge's Compton length. It is conjectured that quantum mechanics describes statistical aspects of ensembles of ECD solutions, much like classical thermodynamics describes statistical aspects of ensembles of classical solutions. A unique 'remote sensing' feature of ECD, supporting that conjecture, is presented, along with an explanation for the illusion of a photon within a classical treatment of the EM field. Finally, a novel conservation law associated with the scale covariance of ECD is derived, indicating that the scale of a solution may 'drift' with time at a constant rate, much like translation covariance implies a uniform drift of the (average) position.

  18. New developments in classical chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-01-01

    Classical chaotic scattering is a topic of fundamental interest in nonlinear physics due to the numerous existing applications in fields such as celestial mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics and fluid mechanics, among others. Many new advances in chaotic scattering have been achieved in the last few decades. This work provides a current overview of the field, where our attention has been mainly focused on the most important contributions related to the theoretical framework of chaotic scattering, the fractal dimension, the basins boundaries and new applications, among others. Numerical techniques and algorithms, as well as analytical tools used for its analysis, are also included. We also show some of the experimental setups that have been implemented to study diverse manifestations of chaotic scattering. Furthermore, new theoretical aspects such as the study of this phenomenon in time-dependent systems, different transitions and bifurcations to chaotic scattering and a classification of boundaries in different types according to symbolic dynamics are also shown. Finally, some recent progress on chaotic scattering in higher dimensions is also described. PMID:23242261

  19. Comparison of timing and classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Holder, M D; Roberts, S

    1985-04-01

    Four experiments with rats investigated if the timing of a stimulus (sound) correlated with the strength of a conditioned response (CR) to the stimulus. The timing (effective duration) of the stimulus was measured using the peak procedure, similar to a discrete-trials fixed-interval procedure. The rats were trained so that their response rate reached a maximum about 40 s or 60 s after the onset of a light; the time of the maximum measured from the start of the light (peak time) was the measure of timing. On some trials, the light was preceded by a short (5 s) or long (20 s or 30 s) interval of sound. We assumed that the difference in peak time after long and short sounds reflected the timing of the sound--if the sound was timed, the longer sound would produce a lower peak time; if the sound was not timed, the two durations of sound would produce the same peak time. The CR was lever-pressing during the sound. The sound was treated in various ways: presented alone (Experiments 1, 3, and 4), followed by food (Experiments 1, 3, and 4), preceded by food (Experiment 3), and followed by food after 20 s (Experiment 4). Treatments that produced no timing of sound produced no CR, and treatments that increased (or diseased) timing also increased (or decreased) the CR. The results suggest that there is overlap between the mechanisms that produce time discrimination and the mechanisms that produce classical conditioning.

  20. New developments in classical chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-01-01

    Classical chaotic scattering is a topic of fundamental interest in nonlinear physics due to the numerous existing applications in fields such as celestial mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics and fluid mechanics, among others. Many new advances in chaotic scattering have been achieved in the last few decades. This work provides a current overview of the field, where our attention has been mainly focused on the most important contributions related to the theoretical framework of chaotic scattering, the fractal dimension, the basins boundaries and new applications, among others. Numerical techniques and algorithms, as well as analytical tools used for its analysis, are also included. We also show some of the experimental setups that have been implemented to study diverse manifestations of chaotic scattering. Furthermore, new theoretical aspects such as the study of this phenomenon in time-dependent systems, different transitions and bifurcations to chaotic scattering and a classification of boundaries in different types according to symbolic dynamics are also shown. Finally, some recent progress on chaotic scattering in higher dimensions is also described.

  1. Indeterminism in Classical Dynamics of Particle Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory; Vishniac, Ethan; Lalescu, Cristian; Aluie, Hussein; Kanov, Kalin; Burns, Randal; Meneveau, Charles; Szalay, Alex

    2013-03-01

    We show that ``God plays dice'' not only in quantum mechanics but also in the classical dynamics of particles advected by turbulent fluids. With a fixed deterministic flow velocity and an exactly known initial position, the particle motion is nevertheless completely unpredictable! In analogy with spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets which persists as external field is taken to zero, the particle trajectories in turbulent flow remain random as external noise vanishes. The necessary ingredient is a rough advecting field with a power-law energy spectrum extending to smaller scales as noise is taken to zero. The physical mechanism of ``spontaneous stochasticity'' is the explosive dispersion of particle pairs proposed by L. F. Richardson in 1926, so the phenomenon should be observable in laboratory and natural turbulent flows. We present here the first empirical corroboration of these effects in high Reynolds-number numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic fluid turbulence. Since power-law spectra are seen in many other systems in condensed matter, geophysics and astrophysics, the phenomenon should occur rather widely. Fast reconnection in solar flares and other astrophysical systems can be explained by spontaneous stochasticity of magnetic field-line motion

  2. The equation of motion of an electron : a debate in classical and quantum physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.-J.

    1999-01-27

    The current status of understanding of the equation of motion of an electron is summarized. Classically, a consistent, linearized theory exists for an electron of finite extent, as long as the size of the electron is larger than the classical electron radius. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics seems to offer a tine theory even in the point-particle limit.

  3. A Synthetic Approach to the Transfer Matrix Method in Classical and Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a synthetic approach to the transfer matrix method in classical and quantum physics. This method is an efficient tool to deal with complicated physical systems of practical importance in geometrical light or charged particle optics, classical electronics, mechanics, electromagnetics and quantum physics. Teaching…

  4. Classical and Quantum Vibration in a Nonseparable, Nonharmonic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Karen Marie

    Studies of vibrational dynamics have been performed on a two-dimensional model potential surface V(x,z; R), adapted from the ab initio surface previously used in this laboratory to analyze dynamics of the bifluoride ion (FHF) ^-. The model potential has C _{2v} symmetry, but is strongly anharmonic and nonseparable in the dynamical variables (x,z); its character changes as the parameter R is varied. Quantum and classical descriptions of vibrational states in this system are compared with corresponding Self-Consistent Field (SCF) approximations. Insights provided by each approach are assessed. Systematic Fermi resonances appear in the quantum mechanical states (at energies up to approximately 10,000 cm^{-1}) arising from crossings of quantum SCF levels with two quanta of vibration exchanged between x and z modes. The lowest quantum states of each symmetry are well described by the SCF approximation except near such crossings. Calculations using Configuration Interaction were done to obtain accurate eigenstates and examine correlations in the quantum mechanics. The Classical Self-Consistent Field (CSCF) method provides a description of the mechanics similar to that given by its quantum counterpart. Classical bound state methods based on semiclassical quantization of quasiperiodic trajectories are unable to give a corresponding description. At energies as low as the quantum ground state, the true classical dynamics is strongly disturbed by resonant interactions. At higher energies the number and strength of these disruptions is so great that the motion is largely irregular. The most prominent effect is a 1:1 frequency resonance associated with strong reorganization of the classical motion along pronounced valleys of the potential surface lying at +/-26^circ to the x-axis. This phenomenon has been studied by analysis of the true dynamics and by application of classical canonical perturbation theory to the zero-order CSCF description. It is found that the latter gives a

  5. Strongly magnetized classical plasma models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Peyraud, J.; Dewitt, C.

    1974-01-01

    Discrete particle processes in the presence of a strong external magnetic field were investigated. These processes include equations of state and other equilibrium thermodynamic relations, thermal relaxation phenomena, transport properties, and microscopic statistical fluctuations in such quantities as the electric field and the charge density. Results from the equilibrium statistical mechanics of two-dimensional plasmas are discussed, along with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the electrostatic guiding-center plasma (a two-dimensional plasma model).

  6. Effect of geometry on the classical entanglement in a chaotic optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sijo K; Sabuco, Juan; Chew, Lock Yue; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2015-12-14

    The effect of boundary deformation on the classical entanglement which appears in the classical electromagnetic field is considered. A chaotic billiard geometry is used to explore the influence of the mechanical modification of the optical fiber cross-sectional geometry on the production of classical entanglement within the electromagnetic fields. For the experimental realization of our idea, we propose an optical fiber with a cross section that belongs to the family of Robnik chaotic billiards. Our results show that a modification of the fiber geometry from a regular to a chaotic regime can enhance the transverse mode classical entanglement.

  7. Classical randomness in quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo; Lo Presti, Paoloplacido; Perinotti, Paolo

    2005-07-01

    Similarly to quantum states, also quantum measurements can be 'mixed', corresponding to a random choice within an ensemble of measuring apparatuses. Such mixing is equivalent to a sort of hidden variable, which produces a noise of purely classical nature. It is then natural to ask which apparatuses are indecomposable, i.e. do not correspond to any random choice of apparatuses. This problem is interesting not only for foundations, but also for applications, since most optimization strategies give optimal apparatuses that are indecomposable. Mathematically the problem is posed describing each measuring apparatus by a positive operator-valued measure (POVM), which gives the statistics of the outcomes for any input state. The POVMs form a convex set, and in this language the indecomposable apparatuses are represented by extremal points—the analogous of 'pure states' in the convex set of states. Differently from the case of states, however, indecomposable POVMs are not necessarily rank-one, e.g. von Neumann measurements. In this paper we give a complete classification of indecomposable apparatuses (for discrete spectrum), by providing different necessary and sufficient conditions for extremality of POVMs, along with a simple general algorithm for the decomposition of a POVM into extremals. As an interesting application, 'informationally complete' measurements are analysed in this respect. The convex set of POVMs is fully characterized by determining its border in terms of simple algebraic properties of the corresponding POVMs.

  8. Crystallization of classical multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We develop a method for calculating the equilibrium properties of the liquid-solid phase transition in a classical, ideal, multicomponent plasma. Our method is a semianalytic calculation that relies on extending the accurate fitting formulas available for the one-, two-, and three-component plasmas to the case of a plasma with an arbitrary number of components. We compare our results to those of C. J. Horowitz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 75, 066101 (2007)], who used a molecular-dynamics simulation to study the chemical properties of a 17-species mixture relevant to the ocean-crust boundary of an accreting neutron star at the point where half the mixture has solidified. Given the same initial composition as Horowitz et al., we are able to reproduce to good accuracy both the liquid and solid compositions at the half-freezing point; we find abundances for most species within 10% of the simulation values. Our method allows the phase diagram of complex mixtures to be explored more thoroughly than possible with numerical simulations. We briefly discuss the implications for the nature of the liquid-solid boundary in accreting neutron stars.

  9. Classical universes are perfectly predictable!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jan Hendrik

    I argue that in a classical universe, all the events that ever happen are encoded in each of the universe's parts. This conflicts with a statement which is widely believed to lie at the basis of relativity theory: that the events in a space-time region R determine only the events in R's domain of dependence but not those in other space-time regions. I show how, from this understanding, a new prediction method (which I call the 'Smoothness Method') can be obtained which allows us to predict future events on the basis of local observational data. Like traditional prediction methods, this method makes use of so-called ' ceteris paribus clauses', i.e. assumptions about the unobserved parts of the universe. However, these assumptions are used in a way which enables us to predict the behaviour of open systems with arbitrary accuracy, regardless of the influence of their environment-which has not been achieved by traditional methods. In a sequel to this paper (Schmidt, 1998), I will prove the Uniqueness and Predictability Theorems on which the Smoothness Method is based, and comment in more detail on its mathematical properties.

  10. Open questions in classical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D. )

    1994-04-01

    In this work, the authors discuss some outstanding open questions regarding the validity and uniqueness of the standard second-order Newton-Einstein classical gravitational theory. On the observational side the authors discuss the degree to which the realm of validity of Newton's law of gravity can actually be extended to distances much larger than the solar system distance scales on which the law was originally established. On the theoretical side the authors identify some commonly accepted (but actually still open to question) assumptions which go into the formulation of the standard second-order Einstein theory in the first place. In particular, it is shown that while the familiar second-order Poisson gravitational equation (and accordingly its second-order covariant Einstein generalization) may be sufficient to yield Newton's law of gravity they are not in fact necessary. The standard theory thus still awaits the identification of some principle which would then make it necessary too. It is shown that current observational information does not exclusively mandate the standard theory, and that the conformal invariant fourth-order theory of gravity considered recently by Mannheim and Kazanas is also able to meet the constraints of data, and in fact to do so without the need for any so far unobserved nonluminous or dark matter. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Fortunato, Mauro; Parisi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction; Part I. Basic Features of Quantum Mechanics: 1. From classical mechanics to quantum mechanics; 2. Quantum observable and states; 3. Quantum dynamics; 4. Examples of quantum dynamics; 5. Density matrix; Part II. More Advanced Topics: 6. Angular momentum and spin; 7. Identical particles; 8. Symmetries and conservation laws; 9. The measurement problem; Part III. Matter and Light: 10. Perturbations and approximation methods; 11. Hydrogen and helium atoms; 12. Hydrogen molecular ion; 13. Quantum optics; Part IV. Quantum Information: State and Correlations: 14. Quantum theory of open systems; 15. State measurement in quantum mechanics; 16. Entanglement: non-separability; 17. Entanglement: quantum information; References; Index.

  12. PR-Box Correlations Have No Classical Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrlich, Daniel

    One of Yakir Aharonov's endlessly captivating physics ideas is the conjecture that two axioms, namely relativistic causality ("no superluminal signalling") and nonlocality, so nearly contradict each other that a unique theory—quantum mechanics—reconciles them. But superquantum (or "PR-box") correlations imply that quantum mechanics is not the most nonlocal theory (in the sense of nonlocal correlations) consistent with relativistic causality. Let us consider supplementing these two axioms with a minimal third axiom: there exists a classical limit in which macroscopic observables commute. That is, just as quantum mechanics has a classical limit, so must any generalization of quantum mechanics. In this classical limit, PR-box correlations violate relativistic causality. Generalized to all stronger-than-quantum bipartite correlations, this result is a derivation of Tsirelson's bound without assuming quantum mechanics. [Editors note: for a video of the talk given by Dr. Rohrlich at the Aharonov-80 conference in 2012 at Chapman University, see http://quantum.chapman.edu/talk-10.

  13. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  14. Classical Solution Thermodynamics: A Retrospective View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ness, H. C.; Abbott, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Examines topics related to classical solution thermodynamics, considering energy, enthalpy, and the Gibbs function. Applicable mathematical equations are introduced and discussed when appropriate. (JN)

  15. Classical teleportation of a quantum Bit

    PubMed

    Cerf; Gisin; Massar

    2000-03-13

    Classical teleportation is defined as a scenario where the sender is given the classical description of an arbitrary quantum state while the receiver simulates any measurement on it. This scenario is shown to be achievable by transmitting only a few classical bits if the sender and receiver initially share local hidden variables. Specifically, a communication of 2.19 bits is sufficient on average for the classical teleportation of a qubit, when restricted to von Neumann measurements. The generalization to positive-operator-valued measurements is also discussed.

  16. Primary Mediastinal Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) is rare. Nodular sclerosis CHL (NS-CHL) is the most common subtype involving the anterior mediastinum and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. Primary thymic CHL is exceedingly rare. The disease typically affects young women and is asymptomatic in 30% to 50% of patients. Common symptoms include fatigue, chest pain, dyspnea and cough, but vary depending on the location and size of the tumor. B-symptoms develop in 30% of cases. By imaging, primary mediastinal CHL presents as mediastinal widening/mediastinal mass that does not invade adjacent organs but may compress vital structures as bulky disease. Histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. Primary mediastinal NS-CHL consists of nodules of polymorphous inflammatory cells surrounded by broad fibrous bands extending from a thickened lymph node capsule. The cellular nodules contain variable numbers of large Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells, required for diagnosis. Primary thymic CHL may exhibit prominent cystic changes. The histopathologic recognition of NS-CHL can be challenging in cases with prominent fibrosis, scant cellularity, artifactual cell distortion, or an exuberant granulomatous reaction. The differential diagnosis includes primary mediastinal non-HLs, mediastinal germ cell tumors, thymoma, and metastatic carcinoma or melanoma to the mediastinum. Distinction from primary mediastinal non-HLs is crucial for adequate therapeutic decisions. Approximately 95% of patients with primary mediastinal CHL will be alive and free of disease at 10 years after treatment with short courses of combined chemoradiotherapy. In this review, we discuss the history, classification, epidemiology, clinicoradiologic features, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis, and treatment of primary mediastinal CHL. PMID:27441757

  17. Introduction to classical mechanics of systems with constraints, part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumov, A. V.; Solovev, L. D.

    For systems with second class constraints the reduced phase space is constructed. It is shown that physically equivalent points of the phase space for systems with first class constraints are connected by canonical transformations generated by linear combinations of the first class constraints. For every system with first class constraints a physically equivalent system with second class constraints is constructed. As an illustrative application of the theory the relativistic straightline string is considered.

  18. Grid generation using classical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1980-01-01

    A brief historical review of conformal mapping and its applications to problems in fluid mechanics and electromagnetism is presented. The use of conformal mapping as a grid generator is described. The philosophy of the 'closed form' approach and its application to a Neumann problem is discussed. Karman-Trefftz mappings and grids for ablated, three dimensional bodies are also discussed.

  19. Viscoelastic effects in a two-dimensional classical electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Ravi

    1987-08-01

    The shear viscosity of a classical two-dimensional (2D) electron liquid is estimated by adapting the theory of Kirkwood, Buff, and Green for three dimensions to two dimensions. It is found to be large enough so that shear modes, if not overdamped by other scattering mechanisms, should be able to propagate through the electron liquid above a minimum temperature-dependent frequency, which is a small fraction of the highest frequency in the corresponding 2D electron solid.

  20. Evolution of Fractal Patterns during a Classical-Quantum Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Micolich, A. P.; Taylor, R. P.; Davies, A. G.; Bird, J. P.; Newbury, R.; Fromhold, T. M.; Ehlert, A.; Linke, H.; Macks, L. D.; Tribe, W. R.

    2001-07-16

    We investigate how fractals evolve into nonfractal behavior as the generation process is gradually suppressed. Fractals observed in the conductance of semiconductor billiards are of particular interest because the generation process is semiclassical and can be suppressed by transitions towards either fully classical or fully quantum-mechanical conduction. Investigating a range of billiards, we identify a ''universal'' behavior in the changeover from fractal to nonfractal conductance, which is described by a smooth evolution rather than deterioration in the fractal scaling properties.

  1. Classical geometric resolution of the Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen paradox

    PubMed Central

    Ne'eman, Yuval

    1983-01-01

    I show that, in the geometry of a fiber bundle describing a gauge theory, curvature and parallel transport ensure and impose nonseparability. The “Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen paradox” is thus resolved “classically.” I conjecture that the ostentatiously “implausible” features of the quantum treatment are due to the fact that space—time separability, a basic assumption of single-particle nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, does not fit the bundle geometry of the complete physics. PMID:16593392

  2. No-broadcasting theorem and its classical counterpart.

    PubMed

    Kalev, Amir; Hen, Itay

    2008-05-30

    Although it is widely accepted that "no-broadcasting"-the nonclonability of quantum information-is a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics, an impossibility theorem for the broadcasting of general density matrices has not yet been formulated. In this Letter, we present a general proof for the no-broadcasting theorem, which applies to arbitrary density matrices. The proof relies on entropic considerations, and as such can also be directly linked to its classical counterpart, which applies to probabilistic distributions of statistical ensembles.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum-Classical Correspondence: Dynamical Quantization and the Classical Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, L.

    2004-11-01

    In only 150 pages, not counting appendices, references, or the index, this book is one author’s perspective of the massive theoretical and philosophical hurdles in the no-man’s-land separating the classical and quantum domains of physics. It ends with him emphasizing his own theoretical contribution to this area. In his own words, he has attempted to answer: 1. ‘How can we obtain the quantum dynamics of open systems initially described by the equations of motion of classical physics (quantization process)? 2. ‘How can we retrieve classical dynamics from the quantum mechanical equations of motion by means of a classical limiting process (dequantization process)?’ However, this monograph seems overly ambitious. Although the publisher’s description refers to this book as ‘an accessible entrée’, we find that this author scrambles too hastily over the peaks of information that are contained in his large collection of 272 references. Introductory motivating discussions are lacking. Profound ideas are glossed over superficially and shoddily. Equations morph. But no new convincing understanding of the physical world results. The author takes the viewpoint that physical systems are always in interaction with their environment and are thus not isolated and, therefore, not Hamiltonian. This impels him to produce a method of quantization of these stochastic systems without the need of a Hamiltonian. He also has interest in obtaining the classical limit of the quantized results. However, this reviewer does not understand why one needs to consider open systems to understand ‘quantum-classical correspondence’. The author demonstrates his method using various examples of the Smoluchowski form of the Fokker--Planck equation. He then renders these equations in a Wigner representation, uses what he terms ‘an infinitesimality condition’, and associates with a constant having the dimensions of an action. He thereby claims to develop master equations, such as

  4. Embedding Quantum into Classical: Contextualization vs Conditionalization

    PubMed Central

    Dzhafarov, Ehtibar N.; Kujala, Janne V.

    2014-01-01

    We compare two approaches to embedding joint distributions of random variables recorded under different conditions (such as spins of entangled particles for different settings) into the framework of classical, Kolmogorovian probability theory. In the contextualization approach each random variable is “automatically” labeled by all conditions under which it is recorded, and the random variables across a set of mutually exclusive conditions are probabilistically coupled (imposed a joint distribution upon). Analysis of all possible probabilistic couplings for a given set of random variables allows one to characterize various relations between their separate distributions (such as Bell-type inequalities or quantum-mechanical constraints). In the conditionalization approach one considers the conditions under which the random variables are recorded as if they were values of another random variable, so that the observed distributions are interpreted as conditional ones. This approach is uninformative with respect to relations between the distributions observed under different conditions because any set of such distributions is compatible with any distribution assigned to the conditions. PMID:24681665

  5. Renormalization from Classical to Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Arnab

    The concept of renormalization was first introduced by Dirac to investigate the infinite self energy of an electron classically. This radical theory was probably the first time when an infinity occurring in a physical system was systematically investigated. This thesis presents a new perspective of renormalization by introducing methods from metric geometry to control divergences. We start by extending Dirac's work and analyzing how the radiation reaction due to the precision of the electron's magnetic moment affects its motion. This is followed by modeling scalar field theory on lattices of various kinds. Scale invariance, which plays a major role in the very few renormalizable theories in nature, is inbuilt in our formalism. We also use Wilson's ideas of effective theory and finite element methods to study continuum systems. Renormalization group transformations form the central theme in this picture. By incorporating finite element methods, an idea borrowed from mechanical engineering, we study scalar fields on triangular lattices in a hierarchal manner. In our case, the cotangent formula turns out to be a fixed point of the renormalization group transformations. We end our thesis by introducing a new metric for space-time which emerges from the scalar field itself. The standard techniques used in the theory of renormalization so far attempt to redefine coupling constants of the theory to remove divergences at short distance scales. In our formalism, we deduce the distance scale itself. In our notion of distance, built from correlation functions of the fields, the divergences disappear.

  6. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-01-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed–Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein–Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used. PMID:27147112

  7. Why/How Does Classics Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartledge, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Classics is in the news--or on the screen: "Gladiator" a few years ago, "Troy" very recently, "Alexander" as I write. How significant is this current Hollywood fascination with the ancient Greeks and Romans? Or should we take far more seriously the decline of the teaching of the Classical languages in schools, a decline so grave as to prompt a…

  8. Teaching the Classics in High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Anne Crout

    1998-01-01

    Discusses why the classics can be difficult to teach in high schools. Offers suggestions for making difficult literature more approachable for high school students by scaffolding students' engagement with classic texts; building background knowledge; developing vocabulary; facilitating the reading of the text; and through enrichment an extension.…

  9. The Classical Performing Arts of India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtiss, Marie Joy

    A monograph of the numerous activities that have contributed to the current renaissance of India's classical performing arts covers the theoretical aspects, musical instruments, the main schools of classical dance, and drama. Besides the basic research described, the total project produced a set of 300 slides with annotated listing, picturing the…

  10. Unification of quantum theory and classical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-07-01

    A program is described for unifying quantum theory and classical physics on the basis of the Copenhagen-interpretation idea of external reality and a recently discovered classical part of the electromagnetic field. The program effects an integration of the intuitions of Heisenberg, Bohr, and Einstein.

  11. On entanglement-assisted classical capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holevo, A. S.

    2002-09-01

    We give a modified proof of the recent result of C. H. Bennett, P. W. Shor, J. A. Smolin, and A. V. Thapliyal concerning entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel and discuss the relation between entanglement-assisted and unassisted classical capacities.

  12. Tarnished Gold: Classical Music in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A few articles have appeared recently regarding the subject of the health of classical music (or more broadly, the fine arts) in America. These include "Classical Music's New Golden Age," by Heather Mac Donald, in the "City Journal" and "The Decline of the Audience," by Terry Teachout, in "Commentary." These articles appeared around the time of…

  13. New Classical and New Keynesian Macroeconomics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vane, Howard; Snowdon, Brian

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes underlying tenets and policy implications of new classical and new Keynesian macroeconomics. Compares new approaches with orthodox Keynesian and monetarist schools of thought. Identifies the fundamental difference between new classical and new Keynesian models as the assumption regarding the speed of wage and price adjustment following…

  14. The Classics Major and Liberal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberal Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Over the course of eighteen months, a project based at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, studied undergraduate programs in classics with the goal of developing a better sense of how a major in classics fit within the broader agenda of liberal education. The study adopted a student-centered approach, employing a team of six…

  15. Classic and Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John M.

    Through an analysis of several stories, this paper defines the similarities and differences between classic and hard-boiled detective fiction. The characters and plots of three stories are discussed: "The Red House" by A. A. Milne; "I, The Jury" by Mickey Spillane; and "League of Frightened Men" by Rex Stout. The classic detective story is defined…

  16. Rediscovering the Classics: The Project Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Ruth; Lubell, Marcia

    Focusing on seven classics of literature that are most challenging for teachers and students, but which are also a part of the high school literary canon, this book shares ways to create a learner-centered classroom for the study of literature. For each of the seven classics, the book "walks teachers through" the teaching-learning process,…

  17. Modal analysis of a classical guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2002-11-01

    Using holographic interferometry, we have determined the modes of vibration of a classical guitar (by the first author) having an asymmetrically-braced top plate and a crossed braced back of unique design. The vibrational modes and acoustical properties are compared with other classical guitars.

  18. The Dance of Spain: Classical Folkloric Flamenco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Clifford J.

    A text on the classical and folk dance of Spain includes a pretest, provided in both English and Spanish; text about the dance in general and the dance of Spain, both classical and folkloric; tests on the text, in both English and Spanish; more specific readings about the traditions of flamenco, castanets, and "el jaleo"; a glossary of flamenco…

  19. Classical Conditioning: Eliciting the Right Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    Classical conditioning is responsible for students' positive and negative feelings, whether directed toward subject matter, peers, teachers, or education in general. This article explains how educators can use classical conditioning principles (such as reinforcement, extinction, and paired stimuli) to create an anxiety-free learning environment.…

  20. Classical transport in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  1. NUCLEAR THERMOMETERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Downen, Lori N.; Iliadis, Christian; Jose, Jordi; Starrfield, Sumner

    2013-01-10

    Classical novae are stellar explosions occurring in binary systems, consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence companion. Thermonuclear runaways on the surface of massive white dwarfs, consisting of oxygen and neon, are believed to reach peak temperatures of several hundred million kelvin. These temperatures are strongly correlated with the underlying white dwarf mass. The observational counterparts of such models are likely associated with outbursts that show strong spectral lines of neon in their shells (neon novae). The goals of this work are to investigate how useful elemental abundances are for constraining the peak temperatures achieved during these outbursts and determine how robust 'nova thermometers' are with respect to uncertain nuclear physics input. We present updated observed abundances in neon novae and perform a series of hydrodynamic simulations for several white dwarf masses. We find that the most useful thermometers, N/O, N/Al, O/S, S/Al, O/Na, Na/Al, O/P, and P/Al, are those with the steepest monotonic dependence on peak temperature. The sensitivity of these thermometers to thermonuclear reaction rate variations is explored using post-processing nucleosynthesis simulations. The ratios N/O, N/Al, O/Na, and Na/Al are robust, meaning they are minimally affected by uncertain rates. However, their dependence on peak temperature is relatively weak. The ratios O/S, S/Al, O/P, and P/Al reveal strong dependences on temperature and the poorly known {sup 30}P(p, {gamma}){sup 31}S rate. We compare our model predictions to neon nova observations and obtain the following estimates for the underlying white dwarf masses: 1.34-1.35 M {sub Sun} (V838 Her), 1.18-1.21 M {sub Sun} (V382 Vel), {<=}1.3 M {sub Sun} (V693 CrA), {<=}1.2 M {sub Sun} (LMC 1990 no. 1), and {<=}1.2 M {sub Sun} (QU Vul).

  2. k-Cosymplectic Classical Field Theories: Tulczyjew and Skinner-Rusk Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Angel M.; Román-Roy, Narciso; Salgado, Modesto; Vilariño, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    The k-cosymplectic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms of first-order classical field theories are reviewed and completed. In particular, they are stated for singular and almost-regular systems. Subsequently, several alternative formulations for k-cosymplectic first-order field theories are developed: First, generalizing the construction of Tulczyjew for mechanics, we give a new interpretation of the classical field equations. Second, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms are unified by giving an extension of the Skinner-Rusk formulation on classical mechanics.

  3. Detecting multipartite classical states and their resemblances

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lin; Modi, Kavan; Vacanti, Giovanni; Chitambar, Eric

    2011-02-15

    We study various types of multipartite states lying near the quantum-classical boundary. The so-called classical states are precisely those in which each party can perfectly identify a locally held state without disturbing the global state, a task known as nondisruptive local state identification (NDLID). We show NDLID to be closely related local broadcasting, and we introduce a class of states called generalized classical states which allow for both NDLID and multipartite broadcasting when the most general quantum measurements are permitted. Simple analytical methods and a physical criterion are given for detecting whether a multipartite state is classical or generalized classical. For deciding the latter, a semidefinite programming algorithm is presented which may find use in other fields such as signal processing.

  4. Bidirectional Classical Stochastic Processes with Measurements and Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement on a quantum system is said to cause the "collapse" of the quantum state vector or density matrix. An analogous collapse occurs with measurements on a classical stochastic process. This paper addresses the question of describing the response of a classical stochastic process when there is feedback from the output of a measurement to the input, and is intended to give a model for quantum-mechanical processes that occur along a space-like reaction coordinate. The classical system can be thought of in physical terms as two counterflowing probability streams, which stochastically exchange probability currents in a way that the net probability current, and hence the overall probability, suitably interpreted, is conserved. The proposed formalism extends the . mathematics of those stochastic processes describable with linear, single-step, unidirectional transition probabilities, known as Markov chains and stochastic matrices. It is shown that a certain rearrangement and combination of the input and output of two stochastic matrices of the same order yields another matrix of the same type. Each measurement causes the partial collapse of the probability current distribution in the midst of such a process, giving rise to calculable, but non-Markov, values for the ensuing modification of the system's output probability distribution. The paper concludes with an analysis of a classical probabilistic version of the so-called grandfather paradox.

  5. Quantum and classical simulations of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiao

    to a fast discovery of accessible topological paths towards the global minimum. The ATMC can be readily linked to systems described by classical model potentials or systems described quantum mechanically. Serial and parallel versions of the ATMC have been implemented and applied for the structural optimization of classical Lennard-Jones nanoclusters and Morse nanoclusters, and tight-binding calcium nanoclusters, crystallization of infinite Lennard-Jones liquid, and optimization of the folding process leading to the native state of a polypeptide chain.

  6. Geometric Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    1999-10-01

    Mechanics for the nonmathematician-a modern approach For physicists, mechanics is quite obviously geometric, yet the classical approach typically emphasizes abstract, mathematical formalism. Setting out to make mechanics both accessible and interesting for nonmathematicians, Richard Talman uses geometric methods to reveal qualitative aspects of the theory. He introduces concepts from differential geometry, differential forms, and tensor analysis, then applies them to areas of classical mechanics as well as other areas of physics, including optics, crystal diffraction, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. For easy reference, Dr. Talman treats separately Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Newtonian mechanics-exploring their geometric structure through vector fields, symplectic geometry, and gauge invariance respectively. Practical perturbative methods of approximation are also developed. Geometric Mechanics features illustrative examples and assumes only basic knowledge of Lagrangian mechanics. Of related interest . . . APPLIED DYNAMICS With Applications to Multibody and Mechatronic Systems Francis C. Moon A contemporary look at dynamics at an intermediate level, including nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. 1998 (0-471-13828-2) 504 pp. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Applied Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers Bruce Kusse and Erik Westwig A comprehensive treatment of the mathematical methods used to solve practical problems in physics and engineering. 1998 (0-471-15431-8) 680 pp.

  7. Coupled harmonic oscillators for the measurement of a weak classical force at the standard quantum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Leaci, Paola; Ortolan, Antonello

    2007-12-15

    We discuss limitations in precision measurements of a weak classical force coupled to quantum mechanical systems, the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL). Among the several contexts exploiting the measurement of classical signals, gravitational wave (GW) detection is of paramount importance. In this framework, we analyze the quantum limited sensitivity of a free test mass, a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator, two harmonic oscillators with equal masses and different resonance frequencies, and finally two mechanical oscillators with different masses and resonating at the same frequency. The sensitivity analysis of the latter two cases illustrates the potentialities of back-action reduction and classical impedance matching schemes, respectively. By examining coupled quantum oscillators as detectors of classical signals, we found a viable path to approach the SQL for planned or operating GW detectors, such as DUAL and AURIGA.

  8. Applying classical geometry intuition to quantum spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin S.; Archibald, James L.

    2016-09-01

    Using concepts of geometric orthogonality and linear independence, we logically deduce the form of the Pauli spin matrices and the relationships between the three spatially orthogonal basis sets of the spin-1/2 system. Rather than a mathematically rigorous derivation, the relationships are found by forcing expectation values of the different basis states to have the properties we expect of a classical, geometric coordinate system. The process highlights the correspondence of quantum angular momentum with classical notions of geometric orthogonality, even for the inherently non-classical spin-1/2 system. In the process, differences in and connections between geometrical space and Hilbert space are illustrated.

  9. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benet, L.; Flores, J.; Hernández-Saldaña, H.; Izrailev, F. M.; Leyvraz, F.; Seligman, T. H.

    2003-02-01

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics.

  10. Classical endocrine diseases causing obesity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jolanta U

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with several endocrine diseases, including common ones such as hypothyroidism and polycystic ovarian syndrome to rare ones such as Cushing's syndrome, central hypothyroidism and hypothalamic disorders. The mechanisms for the development of obesity vary in according to the endocrine condition. Hypothyroidism is associated with accumulation of hyaluronic acid within various tissues, additional fluid retention due to reduced cardiac output and reduced thermogenesis. The pathophysiology of obesity associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome remains complex as obesity itself may simultaneously be the cause and the effect of the syndrome. Net excess of androgen appears to be pivotal in the development of central obesity. In Cushing's syndrome, an interaction with thyroid and growth hormones plays an important role in addition to an increased adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. This review also describes remaining rare cases: hypothalamic obesity due to central hypothyroidism and combined hormone deficiencies. PMID:18230905

  11. Controlling the sense of molecular rotation: Classical versus quantum analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.; Kitano, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2011-02-15

    Recently, it was predicted theoretically and verified experimentally that a pair of delayed and cross-polarized short laser pulses can create molecular ensembles with a well-defined sense of rotation (clockwise or counterclockwise). Here we provide a comparative study of the classical and quantum aspects of the underlying mechanism for linear molecules and for symmetric tops, like benzene molecules, that were used for the first experimental demonstration of the effect. Very good quantitative agreement is found between the classical description of the process and the rigorous quantum-mechanical analysis at the relevant experimental conditions. Both approaches predict the same optimal values for the delay between pulses and the angle between them, and deliver the same magnitude of the induced oriented angular momentum of the molecular ensemble. As expected, quantum and classical analyses substantially deviate when the delay between pulses is comparable with the period of quantum rotational revivals. However, time-averaged characteristics of the excited molecular ensemble are equally well described by these two approaches. This is illustrated by calculating the anisotropic time-averaged angular distribution of the double-pulse excited molecules, which reflects persistent confinement of the molecular axes to the rotation plane defined by two polarization vectors of the pulses.

  12. Controlling the sense of molecular rotation: Classical versus quantum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Kitano, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2011-02-01

    Recently, it was predicted theoretically and verified experimentally that a pair of delayed and cross-polarized short laser pulses can create molecular ensembles with a well-defined sense of rotation (clockwise or counterclockwise). Here we provide a comparative study of the classical and quantum aspects of the underlying mechanism for linear molecules and for symmetric tops, like benzene molecules, that were used for the first experimental demonstration of the effect. Very good quantitative agreement is found between the classical description of the process and the rigorous quantum-mechanical analysis at the relevant experimental conditions. Both approaches predict the same optimal values for the delay between pulses and the angle between them, and deliver the same magnitude of the induced oriented angular momentum of the molecular ensemble. As expected, quantum and classical analyses substantially deviate when the delay between pulses is comparable with the period of quantum rotational revivals. However, time-averaged characteristics of the excited molecular ensemble are equally well described by these two approaches. This is illustrated by calculating the anisotropic time-averaged angular distribution of the double-pulse excited molecules, which reflects persistent confinement of the molecular axes to the rotation plane defined by two polarization vectors of the pulses.

  13. Classical imaging theory of a microlens with super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yubo; Barbastathis, George; Zhang, Baile

    2013-08-15

    Super-resolution in imaging through a transparent spherical microlens has attracted lots of attention because of recent promising experimental results with remarkable resolution improvement. To provide physical insight for this super-resolution phenomenon, previous studies adopted a phenomenological explanation mainly based on the super-focusing effect of a photonic nanojet, while a direct imaging calculation with classical imaging theory has rarely been studied. Here we theoretically model the imaging process through a microlens with vectorial electromagnetic analysis, and then exclude the previously plausible explanation of super-resolution based on the super-focusing effect. The results showed that, in the context of classical imaging theory subject to the two-point resolution criterion, a microlens with a perfect spherical shape cannot achieve the experimentally verified sub-100 nm resolution. Therefore, there must be some other physical mechanisms that contribute to the reported ultrahigh resolution but have not been revealed in theory.

  14. Non-classical radiation emission by a coherent conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgues, Jean-Charles; Gasse, Gabriel; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental evidence that the microwave electromagnetic field generated by a normal conductor, here a tunnel junction placed at ultra-low temperature, can be non-classical. By measuring the quadratures of the electromagnetic field at one or two frequencies in the GHz range, we demonstrate the existence of squeezing as well as entanglement in such radiation. In one experiment, we observe that the variance of one quadrature of the photo-assisted noise generated by the junction goes below its vacuum level. In the second experiment, we demonstrate the existence of correlations between the quadratures taken at two frequencies, which can be stronger than allowed by classical mechanics, proving that the radiation at those two frequencies are entangled.

  15. Path integral approach to electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Xu; Feng, Feng; Ying-Jun, Li

    2016-05-01

    As is known to all, the electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential is one of the most widespread applications of quantum theory. Nevertheless, many discussions about electron scattering are based upon single-particle Schrodinger equation or Dirac equation in quantum mechanics rather than the method of quantum field theory. In this paper, by using the path integral approach of quantum field theory, we perturbatively evaluate the scattering amplitude up to the second order for the electron scattering by the classical electromagnetic potential. The results we derive are convenient to apply to all sorts of potential forms. Furthermore, by means of the obtained results, we give explicit calculations for the one-dimensional electric potential. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374360, 11405266, and 11505285) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01504).

  16. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  17. Quantum-to-classical transition in cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fink, J M; Steffen, L; Studer, P; Bishop, Lev S; Baur, M; Bianchetti, R; Bozyigit, D; Lang, C; Filipp, S; Leek, P J; Wallraff, A

    2010-10-15

    The quantum properties of electromagnetic, mechanical or other harmonic oscillators can be revealed by investigating their strong coherent coupling to a single quantum two level system in an approach known as cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). At temperatures much lower than the characteristic energy level spacing the observation of vacuum Rabi oscillations or mode splittings with one or a few quanta asserts the quantum nature of the oscillator. Here, we study how the classical response of a cavity QED system emerges from the quantum one when its thermal occupation-or effective temperature-is raised gradually over 5 orders of magnitude. In this way we explore in detail the continuous quantum-to-classical crossover and demonstrate how to extract effective cavity field temperatures from both spectroscopic and time-resolved vacuum Rabi measurements.

  18. Classical imaging theory of a microlens with super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yubo; Barbastathis, George; Zhang, Baile

    2013-08-15

    Super-resolution in imaging through a transparent spherical microlens has attracted lots of attention because of recent promising experimental results with remarkable resolution improvement. To provide physical insight for this super-resolution phenomenon, previous studies adopted a phenomenological explanation mainly based on the super-focusing effect of a photonic nanojet, while a direct imaging calculation with classical imaging theory has rarely been studied. Here we theoretically model the imaging process through a microlens with vectorial electromagnetic analysis, and then exclude the previously plausible explanation of super-resolution based on the super-focusing effect. The results showed that, in the context of classical imaging theory subject to the two-point resolution criterion, a microlens with a perfect spherical shape cannot achieve the experimentally verified sub-100 nm resolution. Therefore, there must be some other physical mechanisms that contribute to the reported ultrahigh resolution but have not been revealed in theory. PMID:24104628

  19. Artist at Work: Illustrating the Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Barry

    1987-01-01

    An illustrator who specializes in children's classics, such as "Alice in Wonderland" and the "Wonderful Wizard of Oz" describes his work process, reveals his ideas about art, and considers some of the projects he has worked on. (NKA)

  20. Classic Phenylketonuria: Diagnosis Through Heterozygote Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Robert F.; Elsas, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the identification of the asymptomatic carrier of classic phenylketonuria (PKU) 59 male and female normal control Ss were differentiated from 18 males and females heterozgous for PKU. (DB)

  1. Classical dynamics of the relativistic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims at a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of the classical relativistic oscillator. Numerical integration of its dynamical equations permits a thorough treatment of its motion. Both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are considered.

  2. Equilibration properties of classical integrable field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Andrea; Mussardo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    We study the equilibration properties of classical integrable field theories at a finite energy density, with a time evolution that starts from initial conditions far from equilibrium. These classical field theories may be regarded as quantum field theories in the regime of high occupation numbers. This observation permits to recover the classical quantities from the quantum ones by taking a proper \\hslash \\to 0 limit. In particular, the time averages of the classical theories can be expressed in terms of a suitable version of the LeClair-Mussardo formula relative to the generalized Gibbs ensemble. For the purposes of handling time averages, our approach provides a solution of the problem of the infinite gap solutions of the inverse scattering method.

  3. Secure quantum communication using classical correlated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, D.; de Almeida, N. G.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a secure protocol to send quantum information from one part to another without a quantum channel. In our protocol, which resembles quantum teleportation, a sender (Alice) and a receiver (Bob) share classical correlated states instead of EPR ones, with Alice performing measurements in two different bases and then communicating her results to Bob through a classical channel. Our secure quantum communication protocol requires the same amount of classical bits as the standard quantum teleportation protocol. In our scheme, as in the usual quantum teleportation protocol, once the classical channel is established in a secure way, a spy (Eve) will never be able to recover the information of the unknown quantum state, even if she is aware of Alice's measurement results. Security, advantages, and limitations of our protocol are discussed and compared with the standard quantum teleportation protocol.

  4. Classics in the Classroom: Great Expectations Fulfilled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Shela

    1986-01-01

    Describes how an English teacher in a Queens, New York, ghetto school introduced her grade nine students to Charles Dickens's "Great Expectations." Focuses on students' responses, which eventually became enthusiastic, and discusses the use of classics within the curriculum. (KH)

  5. Secure quantum communication using classical correlated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, D.; de Almeida, N. G.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a secure protocol to send quantum information from one part to another without a quantum channel. In our protocol, which resembles quantum teleportation, a sender (Alice) and a receiver (Bob) share classical correlated states instead of EPR ones, with Alice performing measurements in two different bases and then communicating her results to Bob through a classical channel. Our secure quantum communication protocol requires the same amount of classical bits as the standard quantum teleportation protocol. In our scheme, as in the usual quantum teleportation protocol, once the classical channel is established in a secure way, a spy (Eve) will never be able to recover the information of the unknown quantum state, even if she is aware of Alice's measurement results. Security, advantages, and limitations of our protocol are discussed and compared with the standard quantum teleportation protocol.

  6. The Copernican Revolution in the Classics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Arnold

    1976-01-01

    It is argued that the purpose of the study of the classics should be to learn about the ancient Greeks and Romans as they were rather than as an end in itself. Traditional methods of teaching are evaluated. (RM)

  7. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Danna; Peterson, Charles G; Dallmann, Nicholas; Hughes, Richard J; Mccabe, Kevin P; Nordholt, Jane E; Tyagi, Hush T; Peters, Nicholas A; Toliver, Paul; Chapman, Thomas E; Runser, Robert J; Mcnown, Scott R

    2008-01-01

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  8. Classical Proofs' Essence and Diagrammatic Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescanne, Pierre; Žunić, Dragiša

    2011-09-01

    We present a congruence relation on classical proofs represented in the sequent calculus, which identifies proofs up to trivial rule permutation. The study is performed in the framework of *X calculus, designed to provide a Curry-Howard correspondence for classical logic, and the diagrammatic calculus. We show that each congruence class has a single diagrammatic representation. Congruence equations are given explicitly and induce a congruence relation on terms so that reducing modulo this relation, on terms, corresponds to diagram reduction.

  9. Understanding singularities — Classical and quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, Deborah A.; Helliwell, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    The definitions of classical and quantum singularities are reviewed. Examples are given of both as well as their utility in general relativity. In particular, the classical and quantum singularity structure of certain interesting conformally static spherically symmetric spacetimes modeling scalar field collapse are reviewed. The spacetimes include the Roberts spacetime, the Husain-Martinez-Nuñez spacetime and the Fonarev spacetime. The importance of understanding spacetime singularity structure is discussed.

  10. Quantum-classical correspondence principles for locally nonequilibrium driven systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Many of the core concepts and (especially field-theoretic) tools of statistical mechanics have developed within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium, where state variables are all taken to be charges, meaning that their values are inherently preserved under reversal of the direction of time. A principle concern of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics is to understand the emergence and stability of currents, quantities whose values change sign under time reversal. Whereas the correspondence between classical charge-valued state variables and their underlying statistical or quantum ensembles is quite well understood, the study of currents away from equilibrium has been more fragmentary, with classical descriptions relying on the asymmetric auxiliary-field formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (and often restricted to the Markovian assumption of Doi and Peliti), while quantum descriptions employ a symmetric two-field formalism introduced by Schwinger and further clarified by Keldysh. In this paper we demonstrate that for quantum ensembles in which superposition is not violated by very strong conditions of decoherence, there is a large natural generalization of the principles and tools of equilibrium, which not only admits but requires the introduction of current-valued state variables. For these systems, not only do Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) and Schwinger-Keldysh (SK) field methods both exist, in some cases they provide inequivalent classical and quantum descriptions of identical ensembles. With these systems for examples, we can both study the correspondence between classical and quantum descriptions of currents, and also clarify the nature of the mapping between the structurally homologous but interpretationally different MSR and SK formalisms.

  11. Quantum and Classical Electrostatics Among Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    Quantum theory has been unquestionably successful at describing physics at the atomic scale. However, it becomes more difficult to apply as the system size grows. On the other hand, classical physics breaks down at sufficiently short length scales but is clearly correct at larger distances. The purpose of methods such as QM/MM is to gain the advantages of both quantum and classical regimes: quantum theory should provide accuracy at the shortest scales, and classical theory, with its somewhat more tractable computational demands, allows results to be computed for systems that would be inaccessible with a purely quantum approach. This strategy will be most effective when one knows with good accuracy the length scale at which quantum calculations are no longer necessary and classical calculations are sufficient. To this end, we have performed both classical and quantum calculations for systems comprising a small number of atoms for which experimental data is also available. The classical calculations are fully exact; the quantum calculations are at the MP4(SDTQ)/aug-cc-pV5Z and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z levels. The precision of both sets of calculations along with the existence of experimental results allows us to draw conclusions about the range of utility of the respective calculations. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NLM and utilized the computational resources of the NIH HPC Biowulf cluster.

  12. Classical and non-classical MHC I molecule manipulation by human cytomegalovirus: so many targets—but how many arrows in the quiver?

    PubMed Central

    Halenius, Anne; Gerke, Carolin; Hengel, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Major mechanisms for the recognition of pathogens by immune cells have evolved to employ classical and non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules. Classical MHC I molecules present antigenic peptide ligands on infected cells to CD8+ T cells, whereas a key function for non-classical MHC I molecules is to mediate inhibitory or activating stimuli in natural killer (NK) cells. The structural diversity of MHC I puts immense pressure on persisting viruses, including cytomegaloviruses. The very large coding capacity of the human cytomegalovirus allows it to express a whole arsenal of immunoevasive factors assigned to individual MHC class I targets. This review summarizes achievements from more than two decades of intense research on how human cytomegalovirus manipulates MHC I molecules and escapes elimination by the immune system. PMID:25418469

  13. Non-classical light for quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Elizabeth Anne

    Non-classical light is both easily encoded with quantum information and robust against decoherence, making it a key resource that enables many quantum information applications including quantum computing, quantum communication, and quantum metrology. We present a wide range of experimental and theoretical research toward the generation, detection, characterization, and storage of non-classical states of light with an eye toward quantum information applications. To provide a basis for the rest of the work, we begin by discussing theoretically the role of photon number statistics in optical quantum information and the use of second-order optical coherence to characterize non-classical light. Building on that, we present an original tool for the difficult problem of reconstructing the underlying mode distribution of multi-mode optical fields using simple measurements of higher-order optical coherence. We then move on to the problem of generating and storing single photons. We do this in a solid-state medium, a rare-earth ion-doped crystal, with a long-lived spin transition ideal for storing quantum information. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of this concept by showing correlations between the optical fields that herald storage and retrieval of collective excitations. This scheme can be used for the two important and distinct applications of generating single photons on-demand and storing quantum information and entanglement. The detection of non-classical light is a task as important as its generation. To this end, we study detectors with near unity detection efficiency and photon number resolution for use in quantum-enabled metrology. We use such a detector to experimentally demonstrate compression of spatial fringes and investigate the possibility of improving measurement resolution with classical and non-classical light. Finally, we report a set of experiments using photon number statistics to characterize classical and non-classical light. We

  14. Clusters of classical water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2009-11-01

    charge in the models plays a crucial role. In this respect models with SPC geometry provided structures different from the TIP4P-type potentials, including polarizable ones. The TIP4P variants form configurations similar to one another. Results for TIP4P-EW and for TIP4P/2005 were especially close to each other in every respect. This is also true for the BSV and the DC pair. The charge-on-spring models (SWM4-DP and SWM4-NDP) are also very similar to each other, despite the sign exchange of charges on the spring particle and the oxygen. The spherical polarization of water is crucial. Due to the planar polarization of the SPC-FQ and the TIP4P-FQ models, they prefer planar arrangements contrary to other polarizable models and quantum chemical calculations. The tetrahedral geometry of TIP5P stabilizes additional clusters with peculiar geometries and small O-O distances. Inclusion of vibrations causes only insignificant changes in the characteristic geometries but decreases the internal energy relative to its reference rigid version. Comparing with quantum mechanical calculations the GCP model provided the best overall results.

  15. The classical model for moment tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, W.; Tape, C.

    2013-12-01

    A seismic moment tensor is a description of an earthquake source, but the description is indirect. The moment tensor describes seismic radiation rather than the actual physical process that initiates the radiation. A moment tensor 'model' then ties the physical process to the moment tensor. The model is not unique, and the physical process is therefore not unique. In the classical moment tensor model (Aki and Richards, 1980), an earthquake arises from slip along a planar fault, but with the slip not necessarily in the plane of the fault. The model specifies the resulting moment tensor in terms of the slip vector, the fault normal vector, and the Lame elastic parameters, assuming isotropy. We review the classical model in the context of the fundamental lune. The lune is closely related to the space of moment tensors, and it provides a setting that is conceptually natural as well as pictorial. In addition to the classical model, we consider a crack plus double couple model (CDC model) in which a moment tensor is regarded as the sum of a crack tensor and a double couple. A compilation of full moment tensors from the literature reveals large deviations in Poisson's ratio as implied by the classical model. Either the classical model is inadequate or the published full moment tensors have very large uncertainties. We question the common interpretation of the isotropic component as a volume change in the source region.

  16. Trading Classical and Quantum Computational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey; Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A.

    2016-04-01

    We propose examples of a hybrid quantum-classical simulation where a classical computer assisted by a small quantum processor can efficiently simulate a larger quantum system. First, we consider sparse quantum circuits such that each qubit participates in O (1 ) two-qubit gates. It is shown that any sparse circuit on n +k qubits can be simulated by sparse circuits on n qubits and a classical processing that takes time 2O (k )poly (n ) . Second, we study Pauli-based computation (PBC), where allowed operations are nondestructive eigenvalue measurements of n -qubit Pauli operators. The computation begins by initializing each qubit in the so-called magic state. This model is known to be equivalent to the universal quantum computer. We show that any PBC on n +k qubits can be simulated by PBCs on n qubits and a classical processing that takes time 2O (k )poly (n ). Finally, we propose a purely classical algorithm that can simulate a PBC on n qubits in a time 2α npoly (n ) , where α ≈0.94 . This improves upon the brute-force simulation method, which takes time 2npoly (n ). Our algorithm exploits the fact that n -fold tensor products of magic states admit a low-rank decomposition into n -qubit stabilizer states.

  17. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-15

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham–Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out. -- Highlights: •Extension of the classical action principle for dissipative systems. •New derivation of the Abraham–Lorentz force for a point charge. •Absence of a runaway solution of the Abraham–Lorentz force. •Acausality in classical electrodynamics. •Renormalization of classical electrodynamics of point charges.

  18. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2006-09-15

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-sea can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other charges in the macroscopic or the microscopic side, respectively. The functional form of the quantum renormalization group, the generalization of the renormalization group method for the density matrix, is proposed to follow the scale dependence through the quantum-classical crossover in a systematical manner.

  19. Quantum entanglement capacity with classical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    For any quantum discrete memoryless channel, we define a quantity called quantum entanglement capacity with classical feedback (EB) , and we show that this quantity lies between two other well-studied quantities. These two quantities—namely the quantum capacity assisted by two-way classical communication (Q2) and the quantum capacity with classical feedback (QB) —are widely conjectured to be different: There exists a quantum discrete memoryless channel for which Q2>QB . We then present a general scheme to convert any quantum error-correcting codes into adaptive protocols for this newly defined quantity of the quantum depolarizing channel, and illustrate with the repetition code and Shor code. We contrast the present notion with entanglement purification protocols by showing that, whilst the Leung-Shor protocol can be applied directly, recurrence methods need to be supplemented with other techniques but at the same time offer a way to improve the aforementioned repetition code. For the quantum depolarizing channel, we prove a formula that gives lower bounds on the quantum capacity with classical feedback from any EB protocols. We then apply this formula to the EB protocols that we discuss to obtain lower bounds on the quantum capacity with classical feedback of the quantum depolarizing channel.

  20. Crossover from Classical to Quantum Kibble-Zurek Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvi, Pietro; Morigi, Giovanna; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2016-06-01

    The Kibble-Zurek (KZ) hypothesis identifies the relevant time scales in out-of-equilibrium dynamics of critical systems employing concepts valid at equilibrium: It predicts the scaling of the defect formation immediately after quenches across classical and quantum phase transitions as a function of the quench speed. Here, we study the crossover between the scaling dictated by a slow quench, which is ruled by the critical properties of the quantum phase transition, and the excitations due to a faster quench, where the dynamics is often well described by the classical model. We estimate the value of the quench rate that separates the two regimes and support our argument using numerical simulations of the out-of-equilibrium many-body dynamics. For the specific case of a ϕ4 model we demonstrate that the two regimes exhibit two different power-law scalings, which are in agreement with the KZ theory when applied to the quantum and classical cases. This result contributes to extending the prediction power of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and to providing insight into recent experimental observations in systems of cold atoms and ions.

  1. Electron spin or "classically non-describable two-valuedness"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulini, Domenico

    In December 1924 Wolfgang Pauli proposed the idea of an inner degree of freedom of the electron, which he insisted should be thought of as genuinely quantum mechanical in nature. Shortly thereafter Ralph Kronig and a little later Samuel Goudsmit and George Uhlenbeck took up a less radical stance by suggesting that this degree of freedom somehow corresponded to an inner rotational motion, though it was unclear from the very beginning how literal one was actually supposed to take this picture, since it was immediately recognised (already by Goudsmit and Uhlenbeck) that it would very likely lead to serious problems with Special Relativity if the model were to reproduce the electron's values for mass, charge, angular momentum, and magnetic moment. However, probably due to the then overwhelming impression that classical concepts were generally insufficient for the proper description of microscopic phenomena, a more detailed reasoning was never given. In this contribution I shall investigate in some detail what the restrictions on the physical quantities just mentioned are, if they are to be reproduced by rather simple classical models of the electron within the framework of Special Relativity. It turns out that surface stresses play a decisive role and that the question of whether a classical model for the electron does indeed contradict Special Relativity can only be answered on the basis of an exact solution, which has hitherto not been given.

  2. Observation of Quantum Fingerprinting Beating the Classical Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Xu, Feihu; Yin, Hua-Lei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Chen, Si-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li; You, Li-Xing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Quantum communication has historically been at the forefront of advancements, from fundamental tests of quantum physics to utilizing the quantum-mechanical properties of physical systems for practical applications. In the field of communication complexity, quantum communication allows the advantage of an exponential reduction in the transmitted information over classical communication to accomplish distributed computational tasks. However, to date, demonstrating this advantage in a practical setting continues to be a central challenge. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting protocol that for the first time surpasses the ultimate classical limit to transmitted information. Ultralow noise superconducting single-photon detectors and a stable fiber-based Sagnac interferometer are used to implement a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the classical proven lower bound over 20 km standard telecom fiber for input sizes of up to 2 Gbits. The results pave the way for experimentally exploring the advanced features of quantum communication and open a new window of opportunity for research in communication complexity and testing the foundations of physics.

  3. Observation of Quantum Fingerprinting Beating the Classical Limit.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Xu, Feihu; Yin, Hua-Lei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Chen, Si-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li; You, Li-Xing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-06-17

    Quantum communication has historically been at the forefront of advancements, from fundamental tests of quantum physics to utilizing the quantum-mechanical properties of physical systems for practical applications. In the field of communication complexity, quantum communication allows the advantage of an exponential reduction in the transmitted information over classical communication to accomplish distributed computational tasks. However, to date, demonstrating this advantage in a practical setting continues to be a central challenge. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting protocol that for the first time surpasses the ultimate classical limit to transmitted information. Ultralow noise superconducting single-photon detectors and a stable fiber-based Sagnac interferometer are used to implement a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the classical proven lower bound over 20 km standard telecom fiber for input sizes of up to 2 Gbits. The results pave the way for experimentally exploring the advanced features of quantum communication and open a new window of opportunity for research in communication complexity and testing the foundations of physics. PMID:27367371

  4. Observation of Quantum Fingerprinting Beating the Classical Limit.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Xu, Feihu; Yin, Hua-Lei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Chen, Si-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li; You, Li-Xing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-06-17

    Quantum communication has historically been at the forefront of advancements, from fundamental tests of quantum physics to utilizing the quantum-mechanical properties of physical systems for practical applications. In the field of communication complexity, quantum communication allows the advantage of an exponential reduction in the transmitted information over classical communication to accomplish distributed computational tasks. However, to date, demonstrating this advantage in a practical setting continues to be a central challenge. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting protocol that for the first time surpasses the ultimate classical limit to transmitted information. Ultralow noise superconducting single-photon detectors and a stable fiber-based Sagnac interferometer are used to implement a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the classical proven lower bound over 20 km standard telecom fiber for input sizes of up to 2 Gbits. The results pave the way for experimentally exploring the advanced features of quantum communication and open a new window of opportunity for research in communication complexity and testing the foundations of physics.

  5. Crossover from Classical to Quantum Kibble-Zurek Scaling.

    PubMed

    Silvi, Pietro; Morigi, Giovanna; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2016-06-01

    The Kibble-Zurek (KZ) hypothesis identifies the relevant time scales in out-of-equilibrium dynamics of critical systems employing concepts valid at equilibrium: It predicts the scaling of the defect formation immediately after quenches across classical and quantum phase transitions as a function of the quench speed. Here, we study the crossover between the scaling dictated by a slow quench, which is ruled by the critical properties of the quantum phase transition, and the excitations due to a faster quench, where the dynamics is often well described by the classical model. We estimate the value of the quench rate that separates the two regimes and support our argument using numerical simulations of the out-of-equilibrium many-body dynamics. For the specific case of a ϕ^{4} model we demonstrate that the two regimes exhibit two different power-law scalings, which are in agreement with the KZ theory when applied to the quantum and classical cases. This result contributes to extending the prediction power of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and to providing insight into recent experimental observations in systems of cold atoms and ions. PMID:27314729

  6. Observation of the Quantum-Classical Transition via Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beierle, Peter; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    A collimated electron beam with an energy ranging from .5 keV- 5 keV is passed over a 1 cm long conducting surface. The electrons are diffracted from a 100 nm periodic SiN free-standing grating. The surface is place within the electron near-field diffraction distance. The loss of visibility of the far-field diffraction pattern is measured, which indicates the amount of decoherence that the electrons experienced as they passed over the surface. It has been determined through the visibility as a function of the height with respect to the surface that a) one can observe the transition of the electron's behavior between classical and quantum mechanics, b) that our experiment can be used to rule out a classical theoretical model of the surface decohering mechanism (consistent with Hasselbach's work), and c) this experimental setup is simpler than the use of an interferometer. Comparing a silicon to a gold surface, we are in the process of testing a wider array of theoretical models for the mechanism of decoherence. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under award number 1306565.

  7. Does Bohm's Quantum Force Have a Classical Origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, David C.

    2016-08-01

    In the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics, the electron is stationary in the ground state of hydrogenic atoms, because the quantum force exactly cancels the Coulomb attraction of the electron to the nucleus. In this paper it is shown that classical electrodynamics similarly predicts the Coulomb force can be effectively canceled by part of the magnetic force that occurs between two similar particles each consisting of a point charge moving with circulatory motion at the speed of light. Supposition of such motion is the basis of the Zitterbewegung interpretation of quantum mechanics. The magnetic force between two luminally-circulating charges for separation large compared to their circulatory motions contains a radial inverse square law part with magnitude equal to the Coulomb force, sinusoidally modulated by the phase difference between the circulatory motions. When the particles have equal mass and their circulatory motions are aligned but out of phase, part of the magnetic force is equal but opposite the Coulomb force. This raises a possibility that the quantum force of Bohmian mechanics may be attributable to the magnetic force of classical electrodynamics. It is further shown that relative motion between the particles leads to modulation of the magnetic force with spatial period equal to the de Broglie wavelength.

  8. AKT mediated glycolytic shift regulates autophagy in classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matta, Sumit Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is considered as an innate defense mechanism primarily due to its role in the targeting of intracellular pathogens for lysosomal degradation. Here we report inhibition of autophagy as an adaptive response in classically activated macrophages that helps achieve high cellular ROS production and cell death-another hallmark of innate mechanisms. We show prolonged classical activation of Raw 264.7 macrophages by treating them with IFN-γ and LPS inhibited autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy was dependent on nitric oxide (NO) production which activated the AKT-mTOR signaling, the known negative regulators of autophagy. Autophagy inhibition in these cells was accompanied with a shift to aerobic glycolysis along with a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MOMP). The decline in MOMP coupled with autophagy inhibition led to increased mitochondrial content and considerably elevated cellular ROS, eventually causing cell death. Next, using specific siRNA mediated knockdowns we show AKT was responsible for the glycolytic shift and autophagy inhibition in activated macrophages. Surprisingly, AKT knockdown in activated macrophages also rescued them from cell death. Finally we show that AKT mediated autophagy inhibition in the activated macrophages correlated with the depletion of glucose from the extracellular medium, and glucose supplementation not only rescued autophagy levels and reversed other phenotypes of activated macrophages, but also inhibited cell death. Thus we report here a novel link between AKT mediated glycolytic metabolism and autophagy in the activated macrophages, and provide a possible mechanism for sustained macrophage activation in vivo.

  9. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  10. A simple explanation of the classic hydrostatic paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-07-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the same. However, if the shape of the container is different, the amount of the liquid (and as a consequence the weight) can greatly vary. In this paper, a simple explanation of the hydrostatic paradox, specifically designed and implemented for educational purposes regarding secondary education, is provided.

  11. Multisymplectic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Formalisms of Classical Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Roy, Narciso

    2009-11-01

    This review paper is devoted to presenting the standard multisymplectic formulation for describing geometrically classical field theories, both the regular and singular cases. First, the main features of the Lagrangian formalism are revisited and, second, the Hamiltonian formalism is constructed using Hamiltonian sections. In both cases, the variational principles leading to the Euler-Lagrange and the Hamilton-De Donder-Weyl equations, respectively, are stated, and these field equations are given in different but equivalent geometrical ways in each formalism. Finally, both are unified in a new formulation (which has been developed in the last years), following the original ideas of Rusk and Skinner for mechanical systems.

  12. A simple example of a classical gauge transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the manner in which the interaction of a gravitational field with a diffusing gas is induced by a gauge transformation. Since the gas can be thought of as a field, the diffusion process may be represented by a Lagrangian density with the symmetry property of invariance under translation. While this property is lost when the field interacts with a static gravitational field, it is formally restored when an appropriate gauge transformation is performed. This ascription of field properties to a gas offers an illuminating illustration of the coupling of matter to a gauge field within the context of classical mechanics.

  13. Modeling Classical Heat Conduction in FLAG

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Hendon, Raymond Cori

    2015-01-12

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory FLAG code contains both electron and ion heat conduction modules; these have been constructed to be directly relevant to user application problems. However, formal code verification of these modules requires quantitative comparison to exact solutions of the underlying mathematical models. A wide variety of exact solutions to the classical heat conduction equation are available for this purpose. This report summarizes efforts involving the representation of the classical heat conduction equation as following from the large electron-ion coupling limit of the electron and ion 3T temperature equations, subject to electron and ion conduction processes. In FLAG, this limiting behavior is quantitatively verified using a simple exact solution of the classical heat conduction equation. For this test problem, both heat conduction modules produce nearly identical spatial electron and ion temperature profiles that converge at slightly less than 2nd order to the corresponding exact solution.

  14. Classical approach to multichromophoric resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Duque, Sebastián; Brumer, Paul; Pachón, Leonardo A

    2015-09-11

    A classical formulation of the quantum multichromophoric theory of resonance energy transfer is developed on the basis of classical electrodynamics. The theory allows for the identification of a variety of processes of different order in the interactions that contribute to the energy transfer in molecular aggregates with intracoupling in donors and acceptor chromophores. Enhanced rates in multichromophoric resonance energy transfer are shown to be well described by this theory. Specifically, in a coupling configuration between N_{A} acceptors and N_{D} donors, the theory correctly predicts an enhancement of the energy transfer rate dependent on the total number of donor-acceptor pairs. As an example, the theory, applied to the transfer rate in light harvesting II, gives results in excellent agreement with experiment. Finally, it is explicitly shown that as long as linear response theory holds, the classical multichromophoric theory formally coincides with the quantum formulation.

  15. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  16. Quantum dynamics simulation with classical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, John S.; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    In a previous paper [J. S. Briggs and A. Eisfeld, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.85.052111 85, 052111 (2012)] we showed that the time development of the complex amplitudes of N coupled quantum states can be mapped by the time development of positions and velocities of N coupled classical oscillators. Here we examine to what extent this mapping can be realized to simulate the “quantum,” properties of entanglement and qubit manipulation. By working through specific examples, e.g., of quantum gate operation, we seek to illuminate quantum and classical differences which hitherto have been treated more mathematically. In addition, we show that important quantum coupled phenomena, such as the Landau-Zener transition and the occurrence of Fano resonances can be simulated by classical oscillators.

  17. Classical approach to multichromophoric resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Duque, Sebastián; Brumer, Paul; Pachón, Leonardo A

    2015-09-11

    A classical formulation of the quantum multichromophoric theory of resonance energy transfer is developed on the basis of classical electrodynamics. The theory allows for the identification of a variety of processes of different order in the interactions that contribute to the energy transfer in molecular aggregates with intracoupling in donors and acceptor chromophores. Enhanced rates in multichromophoric resonance energy transfer are shown to be well described by this theory. Specifically, in a coupling configuration between N_{A} acceptors and N_{D} donors, the theory correctly predicts an enhancement of the energy transfer rate dependent on the total number of donor-acceptor pairs. As an example, the theory, applied to the transfer rate in light harvesting II, gives results in excellent agreement with experiment. Finally, it is explicitly shown that as long as linear response theory holds, the classical multichromophoric theory formally coincides with the quantum formulation. PMID:26406811

  18. Coexistence of peptides with classical neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D; Seroogy, K; Tsuruo, Y; Ceccatelli, S; Lindh, B; Meister, B; Melander, T; Schalling, M; Bartfai, T

    1987-07-15

    In the present article the fact is emphasized that neuropeptides often are located in the same neurons as classical transmitters such as acetylcholine, 5-hydroxy-tryptamine, catecholamines, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) etc. This raises the possibility that neurons produce, store and release more than one messenger molecule. The exact functional role of such coexisting peptides is often difficult to evaluate, especially in the central nervous system. In the periphery some studies indicate apparently meaningful interactions of different types with the classical transmitter, but other types of actions including trophic effects have been observed. More recently it has been shown that some neurons contain more than one classical transmitter, e.g. 5-HT plus GABA, further underlining the view that transfer of information across synapses may be more complex than perhaps hitherto assumed. PMID:2885215

  19. Classical analogs of double electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhengyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2013-03-01

    Double electromagnetically induced transparency (DEIT) in a four-level atomic system with tripod-type energy-level configuration is modeled by using two classical systems. The first is a set of three coupled harmonic oscillators subject to frictional forces and external drives and the second is a set of three coupled RLC circuits with electric resistors and alternating voltage sources. It is shown that both of the two classical systems have absorption spectra of DEIT similar to that of the four-level tripod-type atomic system. These classical analogies provide simple and intuitive physical description of quantum interference processes and can be used to illustrate experimental observations of the DEIT in quantum systems.

  20. Quantum and classical optics-emerging links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.; Qian, Xiao-Feng; Qasimi, Asma Al; Ali, Hazrat; Alonso, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Cuevas, R.; Little, Bethany J.; Howell, John C.; Malhotra, Tanya; Vamivakas, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum optics and classical optics are linked in ways that are becoming apparent as a result of numerous recent detailed examinations of the relationships that elementary notions of optics have with each other. These elementary notions include interference, polarization, coherence, complementarity and entanglement. All of them are present in both quantum and classical optics. They have historic origins, and at least partly for this reason not all of them have quantitative definitions that are universally accepted. This makes further investigation into their engagement in optics very desirable. We pay particular attention to effects that arise from the mere co-existence of separately identifiable and readily available vector spaces. Exploitation of these vector-space relationships are shown to have unfamiliar theoretical implications and new options for observation. It is our goal to bring emerging quantum-classical links into wider view and to indicate directions in which forthcoming and future work will promote discussion and lead to unified understanding.

  1. Role of classical conditioning in learning gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle

    2007-07-01

    Nausea and/or vomiting are aversive gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Nausea and vomiting manifest unconditionally after a nauseogenic experience. However, there is correlative, quasiexperimental and experimental evidence that nausea and vomiting can also be learned via classical (Pavlovian) conditioning and might occur in anticipation of the nauseogenic event. Classical conditioning of nausea can develop with chemotherapy in cancer patients. Initially, nausea and vomiting occur during and after the administration of cytotoxic drugs (post-treatment nausea and vomiting) as unconditioned responses (UR). In addition, 20%-30% of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy report these side effects, despite antiemetic medication, when being re-exposed to the stimuli that usually signal the chemotherapy session and its drug infusion. These symptoms are called anticipatory nausea (AN) and/or anticipatory vomiting (ANV) and are explained by classical conditioning. Moreover, there is recent evidence for the assumption that post-chemotherapy nausea is at least partly influenced by learning. After summarizing the relevant assumptions of the conditioning model, revealing that a context can become a conditioned stimulus (CS), the present paper summarizes data that nausea and/or vomiting is acquired by classical conditioning and, consequently, may be alleviated by conditioning techniques. Our own research has focussed on two aspects and is emphasized here. First, a conditioned nausea model was established in healthy humans using body rotation as the nausea-inducing treatment. The validity of this motion-sickness model to examine conditioning mechanisms in the acquisition and alleviation of conditioned nausea and associated endocrine and immunological responses is summarized. Results from the rotation-induced motion sickness model showed that gender is an important moderator variable to be considered in further studies. This paper concludes with a review of the application of the

  2. Wigner phase space distribution via classical adiabatic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2015-09-21

    Evaluation of the Wigner phase space density for systems of many degrees of freedom presents an extremely demanding task because of the oscillatory nature of the Fourier-type integral. We propose a simple and efficient, approximate procedure for generating the Wigner distribution that avoids the computational difficulties associated with the Wigner transform. Starting from a suitable zeroth-order Hamiltonian, for which the Wigner density is available (either analytically or numerically), the phase space distribution is propagated in time via classical trajectories, while the perturbation is gradually switched on. According to the classical adiabatic theorem, each trajectory maintains a constant action if the perturbation is switched on infinitely slowly. We show that the adiabatic switching procedure produces the exact Wigner density for harmonic oscillator eigenstates and also for eigenstates of anharmonic Hamiltonians within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We generalize the approach to finite temperature by introducing a density rescaling factor that depends on the energy of each trajectory. Time-dependent properties are obtained simply by continuing the integration of each trajectory under the full target Hamiltonian. Further, by construction, the generated approximate Wigner distribution is invariant under classical propagation, and thus, thermodynamic properties are strictly preserved. Numerical tests on one-dimensional and dissipative systems indicate that the method produces results in very good agreement with those obtained by full quantum mechanical methods over a wide temperature range. The method is simple and efficient, as it requires no input besides the force fields required for classical trajectory integration, and is ideal for use in quasiclassical trajectory calculations.

  3. Learning, Realizability and Games in Classical Arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschieri, Federico

    2010-12-01

    In this dissertation we provide mathematical evidence that the concept of learning can be used to give a new and intuitive computational semantics of classical proofs in various fragments of Predicative Arithmetic. First, we extend Kreisel modified realizability to a classical fragment of first order Arithmetic, Heyting Arithmetic plus EM1 (Excluded middle axiom restricted to Sigma^0_1 formulas). We introduce a new realizability semantics we call "Interactive Learning-Based Realizability". Our realizers are self-correcting programs, which learn from their errors and evolve through time. Secondly, we extend the class of learning based realizers to a classical version PCFclass of PCF and, then, compare the resulting notion of realizability with Coquand game semantics and prove a full soundness and completeness result. In particular, we show there is a one-to-one correspondence between realizers and recursive winning strategies in the 1-Backtracking version of Tarski games. Third, we provide a complete and fully detailed constructive analysis of learning as it arises in learning based realizability for HA+EM1, Avigad's update procedures and epsilon substitution method for Peano Arithmetic PA. We present new constructive techniques to bound the length of learning processes and we apply them to reprove - by means of our theory - the classic result of Godel that provably total functions of PA can be represented in Godel's system T. Last, we give an axiomatization of the kind of learning that is needed to computationally interpret Predicative classical second order Arithmetic. Our work is an extension of Avigad's and generalizes the concept of update procedure to the transfinite case. Transfinite update procedures have to learn values of transfinite sequences of non computable functions in order to extract witnesses from classical proofs.

  4. Observable signatures of a classical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Lin, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Eternal inflation arising from a potential landscape predicts that our universe is one realization of many possible cosmological histories. One way to access different cosmological histories is via the nucleation of bubble universes from a metastable false vacuum. Another way to sample different cosmological histories is via classical transitions, the creation of pocket universes through the collision between bubbles. Using relativistic numerical simulations, we examine the possibility of observationally determining if our observable universe resulted from a classical transition. We find that classical transitions produce spatially infinite, approximately open Friedman-Robertson-Walker universes. The leading set of observables in the aftermath of a classical transition are negative spatial curvature and a contribution to the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature quadrupole. The level of curvature and magnitude of the quadrupole are dependent on the position of the observer, and we determine the possible range of observables for two classes of single-scalar field models. For the first class, where the inflationary phase has a lower energy than the vacuum preceding the classical transition, the magnitude of the observed quadrupole generally falls to zero with distance from the collision while the spatial curvature grows to a constant. For the second class, where the inflationary phase has a higher energy than the vacuum preceding the classical transition, the magnitude of the observed quadrupole generically falls to zero with distance from the collision while the spatial curvature grows without bound. We find that the magnitude of the quadrupole and curvature grow with increasing centre of mass energy of the collision, and explore variations of the parameters in the scalar field lagrangian.

  5. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    SciTech Connect

    Belhadi, Z.; Menas, F.; Bérard, A.; Mohrbach, H.

    2014-12-15

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac’s formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way.

  6. The classic. Review article: Traffic accidents. 1966.

    PubMed

    Tscherne, H

    2013-09-01

    This Classic Article is a translation of the original work by Prof. Harald Tscherne, Der Straßenunfall [Traffic Accidents]. An accompanying biographical sketch of Prof. Tscherne is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-3011-x . An online version of the original German article is available as supplemental material. The Classic Article is reproduced with permission from Brüder Hollinek & Co. GesmbH, Purkersdorf, Austria. The original article was published in Wien Med Wochenschr. 1966;116:105-108. (Translated by Dr. Roman Pfeifer.).

  7. Are Volume Plasmons Excitable by Classical Light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höflich, Katja; Gösele, Ulrich; Christiansen, Silke

    2009-08-01

    Volume plasmons are collective eigenmodes of the free-electron gas inside a metal. Because of their longitudinal character and the transversal nature of light, the photoexcitation of volume plasmons is forbidden in classical electrodynamics. Nevertheless, we show their existence for metallic nanoshells using analytical solutions of the classical scattering problem. Solely for the case of a vanishing real part of the shell permittivity, a local maximum at the natural plasma frequency appears in the extinction spectra. For explaining our observations, we suggest a simple physical picture which is supported by examples on silver and gold shells.

  8. Are volume plasmons excitable by classical light?

    PubMed

    Höflich, Katja; Gösele, Ulrich; Christiansen, Silke

    2009-08-21

    Volume plasmons are collective eigenmodes of the free-electron gas inside a metal. Because of their longitudinal character and the transversal nature of light, the photoexcitation of volume plasmons is forbidden in classical electrodynamics. Nevertheless, we show their existence for metallic nanoshells using analytical solutions of the classical scattering problem. Solely for the case of a vanishing real part of the shell permittivity, a local maximum at the natural plasma frequency appears in the extinction spectra. For explaining our observations, we suggest a simple physical picture which is supported by examples on silver and gold shells.

  9. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhadi, Z.; Menas, F.; Bérard, A.; Mohrbach, H.

    2014-12-01

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac's formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way.

  10. Classical communication cost of quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainz, Ana Belén; Aolita, Leandro; Brunner, Nicolas; Gallego, Rodrigo; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Quantum steering is observed when performing appropriate local measurements on an entangled state. Here we discuss the possibility of simulating classically this effect, using classical communication instead of entanglement. We show that infinite communication is necessary for exactly simulating steering for any pure entangled state, as well as for a class of mixed entangled states. Moreover, we discuss the communication cost of steering for general entangled states, as well as approximate simulation. Our findings reveal striking differences between Bell nonlocality and steering and provide a natural way of measuring the strength of the latter.

  11. Classical swine fever in China: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Li, Su; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-08-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is an OIE-listed, highly contagious, often fatal disease of swine worldwide. Currently, the disease is controlled by prophylactic vaccination in China and many other countries using the modified live vaccines derived from C-strain, which was developed in China in the mid-1950s. This minireview summarizes the epidemiology, diagnostic assays, control and challenges of CSF in China. Though CSF is essentially under control, complete eradication of CSF in China remains a challenging task and needs long-term, joint efforts of stakeholders.

  12. Classic papers in Solar Energy: Solar distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, E.D.

    1990-06-01

    The following Classic Paper was presented by Professor Howe at the first international Conference on Solar Energy at Tucson, Arizona, USA in 1955. That conference was sponsored by the Association of Applied solar Energy (AFASE), the precursor of ISES. Although this paper does not represent the many developments in solar distillation later applied by Professor Howe in the South Pacific, it is a classic paper because it presents Professor Howe's pioneering work in setting up the Seawater Conversion Laboratory in Richmond for the University of California at Berkeley, US. The research of Professor Howe and his colleagues at the Seawater Conversion Laboratory formed the foundation of contemporary solar energy desalination and distillation systems.

  13. Can Communicative Principles Enhance Classical Language Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overland, Paul; Fields, Lee; Noonan, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Is it feasible for nonfluent instructors to teach Biblical Hebrew by communicative principles? If it is feasible, will communicative instruction enhance postsecondary learning of a classical language? To begin answering these questions, two consultants representing second language acquisition (SLA) and technology-assisted language learning led 8…

  14. The Classical Version of Stokes' Theorem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Using only fairly simple and elementary considerations--essentially from first year undergraduate mathematics--we show how the classical Stokes' theorem for any given surface and vector field in R[superscript 3] follows from an application of Gauss' divergence theorem to a suitable modification of the vector field in a tubular shell around the…

  15. Multi-time equations, classical and quantum

    PubMed Central

    Petrat, Sören; Tumulka, Roderich

    2014-01-01

    Multi-time equations are evolution equations involving several time variables, one for each particle. Such equations have been considered for the purpose of making theories manifestly Lorentz invariant. We compare their status and significance in classical and quantum physics. PMID:24711721

  16. The Strange World of Classical Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David

    2010-01-01

    We have heard many times that the commonsense world of classical physics was shattered by Einstein's revelation of the laws of relativity. This is certainly true; the shift from our everyday notions of time and space to those revealed by relativity is one of the greatest stretches the mind can make. What is seldom appreciated is that the laws of…

  17. Foreign Language, the Classics, and College Admissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFleur, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey, funded by the American Classical League (ACL) and conducted during 1990-91, that assessed attitudes toward high school foreign-language study, in particular the study of Latin and Greek, in the college admissions process. (21 references) (VWL)

  18. Classical Physics Experiments in the Amusement Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagge, Sara; Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2002-01-01

    An amusement park is a large physics laboratory, full of rotating and accelerated coordinate systems. The forces are experienced throughout the body and can be studied with simple equipment or with electronics depending on age and experience. In this paper, we propose adaptations of classical physics experiments for use on traditional rides.…

  19. Classical physics experiments in the amusement park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, Sara; Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2002-11-01

    An amusement park is a large physics laboratory, full of rotating and accelerated coordinate systems. The forces are experienced throughout the body and can be studied with simple equipment or with electronics depending on age and experience. In this paper, we propose adaptations of classical physics experiments for use on traditional rides.

  20. Studying the Leaders of Classical Antiquity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Helen E.

    This paper describes a graduate seminar for educational administrators, using works of ancient Greek and Roman literature as bases for the consideration of organization and leadership problems identified in theoretical literature. The seminar was team taught by professors from the Departments of Educational Administration and Classics at the…

  1. Classical "Topoi" and the Academic Commonplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrove, Laurence E.

    An investigation of the various ways the term "topos" is used in classical rhetoric reveals the limited range of invention strategies offered by academic discourse pedagogy. Donald Bartholmae's work on basic writing addresses the relationship of the commonplace to topical invention within academic discourse. Investigation of the history of…

  2. Using CAS to Solve Classical Mathematics Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Maurice J.; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, calculus has displaced many algebraic methods for solving classical problems. This article illustrates an algebraic method for finding the zeros of polynomial functions that is closely related to Newton's method (devised in 1669, published in 1711), which is encountered in calculus. By exploring this problem, precalculus students…

  3. Classical Pragmatism on Mind and Rationality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2005-01-01

    One of the major changes in twentieth century philosophy was the so-called linguistic turn, in which natural and formal languages became central subjects of study. This meant that theories of meaning became mostly about linguistic meaning, thinking was now analyzed in terms of symbol manipulation, and rules of classical logic formed the nucleus of…

  4. Classical and quantum Kummer shape algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odzijewicz, A.; Wawreniuk, E.

    2016-07-01

    We study a family of integrable systems of nonlinearly coupled harmonic oscillators on the classical and quantum levels. We show that the integrability of these systems follows from their symmetry characterized by algebras, here called Kummer shape algebras. The resolution of identity for a wide class of reproducing kernels is found. A number of examples, illustrating this theory, are also presented.

  5. Zeno's arrow and classical phase space logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmoreland, Michael D.; Schumacher, Benjamin W.

    1994-06-01

    We analyze the Zeno's familiar paradox of the arrow using recently developed non-Boolean derived logics for classical systems. We show that the paradox depends upon a premise that is identically false in such logics, so that the language of experimental propositions is immune to the paradox.

  6. Louis Guttman's Contributions to Classical Test Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.; Williams, Richard H.; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Ross, Donald

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on Louis Guttman's contributions to the classical theory of educational and psychological tests, one of the lesser known of his many contributions to quantitative methods in the social sciences. Guttman's work in this field provided a rigorous mathematical basis for ideas that, for many decades after Spearman's initial work,…

  7. Classic Readers Theatre for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchers, Suzanne I.; Kroll, Jennifer L.

    This book presents 16 original scripts that have been adapted from classic works of literature for use for readers theatre with young adults and ESL (English as a Second Language) students. Adaptations of the following works are included: "Little Women" (Louisa May Alcott); episodes from "Don Quixote" (Miguel de Cervantes; "The Necklace" (Guy de…

  8. Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Robert J., Ed.; And Others

    Noting the rediscovery by composition scholars of the tradition of classical rhetoric, this collection of essays explores the resurgence in the teaching of written discourse in college English departments. The 18 articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "The Revival of Rhetoric in America," by Robert Connors, Lisa Ede, and Andrea Lunsford;…

  9. Classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido Alzar, C. L.; Martinez, M. A. G.; Nussenzveig, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In a system of just two coupled harmonic oscillators subject to a harmonic driving force, we reproduce the phenomenology observed in EIT. We also describe a simple experiment with two linearly coupled RLC circuits which can be incorporated into an undergraduate laboratory.

  10. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age. PMID:23866841

  11. Entanglement in Quantum-Classical Hybrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    It is noted that the phenomenon of entanglement is not a prerogative of quantum systems, but also occurs in other, non-classical systems such as quantum-classical hybrids, and covers the concept of entanglement as a special type of global constraint imposed upon a broad class of dynamical systems. Application of hybrid systems for physics of life, as well as for quantum-inspired computing, has been outlined. In representing the Schroedinger equation in the Madelung form, there is feedback from the Liouville equation to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the form of the quantum potential. Preserving the same topology, the innovators replaced the quantum potential with other types of feedback, and investigated the property of these hybrid systems. A function of probability density has been introduced. Non-locality associated with a global geometrical constraint that leads to an entanglement effect was demonstrated. Despite such a quantum like characteristic, the hybrid can be of classical scale and all the measurements can be performed classically. This new emergence of entanglement sheds light on the concept of non-locality in physics.

  12. Priority in the Classical Conditioning of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windholz, George; Lamal, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contrary to widely held belief, Watons and Rayner's (1920) experiment with Little Albert is not first reported case of classical conditioning of a child. Their work was preceded by that of Bogen and of Krasnogorskii. Mateer's work either preceded or coincided with Watons and Rayner's. This article clarifies chronology of these early studies of…

  13. The Role of Contingency in Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papini, Mauricio R.; Bitterman, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    Early experiments suggesting that classical conditioning depends on the contingency between conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US) are reconsidered along with later evidence that shows conditioning of the CS and its context in random training. CS-US contingency is neither necessary nor sufficient for conditioning. (SLD)

  14. Stimulus Configuration, Classical Conditioning, and Hippocampal Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmajuk, Nestor A.; DiCarlo, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of the hippocampus in classical conditioning is described in terms of a multilayer network portraying stimulus configuration. A model of hippocampal function is presented, and computer simulations are used to study neural activity in the various brain areas mapped according to the model. (SLD)

  15. Attitudes of Children Established by Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnabei, Fred; And Others

    This study examined the attitudes of children established by classical conditioning. Subjects were 4th graders (26 males and 31 females). Each child was randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. A posttest-only design was used with positive and negative word associations presented to the experimental group, and neutral word…

  16. Unified classical path theories of pressure broadening.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottcher, C.

    1971-01-01

    Derivation of a unified classical path theory of pressure broadening, using only elementary concepts. It is shown that the theory of Smith, Cooper and Vidal (1969) is only correct at all frequencies to first order in the number density of perturbers.

  17. Classical Linguistics in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of classical linguistic studies in the United States. Cites many of the important American classicists from the nineteenth century to the present. Also gives the history of some scholarly organizations, including the Linguistic Society of America and the American Philological Association. (LMO)

  18. Comparison of the quantum and classical calculations of flux density of (220) channeled positrons in Si crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotchenko, K. B.; Tukhfatullin, TA; Pivovarov, Yu L.; Eikhorn, Yu L.

    2016-07-01

    Simulation of flux-peaking effect of the 255 MeV positrons channeled in (220) Si crystals is performed in the frame of classical and quantum mechanics. Comparison of the results obtained using both approaches shows relatively good agreement.

  19. Observing classical nucleation theory at work by monitoring phase transitions with molecular precision

    PubMed Central

    Sleutel, Mike; Lutsko, Jim; Van Driessche, Alexander E.S.; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Maes, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that many phase transitions do not follow nucleation pathways as envisaged by the classical nucleation theory. Many substances can traverse intermediate states before arriving at the stable phase. The apparent ubiquity of multi-step nucleation has made the inverse question relevant: does multistep nucleation always dominate single-step pathways? Here we provide an explicit example of the classical nucleation mechanism for a system known to exhibit the characteristics of multi-step nucleation. Molecular resolution atomic force microscopy imaging of the two-dimensional nucleation of the protein glucose isomerase demonstrates that the interior of subcritical clusters is in the same state as the crystalline bulk phase. Our data show that despite having all the characteristics typically associated with rich phase behaviour, glucose isomerase 2D crystals are formed classically. These observations illustrate the resurfacing importance of the classical nucleation theory by re-validating some of the key assumptions that have been recently questioned. PMID:25465441

  20. Classical Photogrammetry and Uav - Selected Ascpects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikrut, S.

    2016-06-01

    The UAV technology seems to be highly future-oriented due to its low costs as compared to traditional aerial images taken from classical photogrammetry aircrafts. The AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow - Department of Geoinformation, Photogrammetry and Environmental Remote Sensing focuses mainly on geometry and radiometry of recorded images. Various scientific research centres all over the world have been conducting the relevant research for years. The paper presents selected aspects of processing digital images made with the UAV technology. It provides on a practical example a comparison between a digital image taken from an airborne (classical) height, and the one made from an UAV level. In his research the author of the paper is trying to find an answer to the question: to what extent does the UAV technology diverge today from classical photogrammetry, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of both methods? The flight plan was made over the Tokarnia Village Museum (more than 0.5 km2) for two separate flights: the first was made by an UAV - System FT-03A built by FlyTech Solution Ltd. The second was made with the use of a classical photogrammetric Cesna aircraft furnished with an airborne photogrammetric camera (Ultra Cam Eagle). Both sets of photographs were taken with pixel size of about 3 cm, in order to have reliable data allowing for both systems to be compared. The project has made aerotriangulation independently for the two flights. The DTM was generated automatically, and the last step was the generation of an orthophoto. The geometry of images was checked under the process of aerotriangulation. To compare the accuracy of these two flights, control and check points were used. RMSE were calculated. The radiometry was checked by a visual method and using the author's own algorithm for feature extraction (to define edges with subpixel accuracy). After initial pre-processing of data, the images were put together, and shown side by side

  1. A test of the possibility of calculating absorption spectra by mixed quantum-classical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Kenneth; Metiu, Horia

    1992-10-01

    Some of the most efficient methods for studying systems having a large number of degrees of freedom treat a few degrees of freedom quantum mechanically and the remainder classically. Here we examine how these methods fare when used to calculate the cross section for photon absorption by a quantum system imbedded in a medium. To test the method, we study a model which has two degrees of freedom and mimicks the properties of a one-dimensional alkali atom-He dimer. We treat the electron motion quantum mechanically and the distance between the He atom and the alkali ion classically. Light absorption occurs because the electron is coupled to radiation. The calculation of the absorption cross section by quantum-classical methods fails rather dramatically-at certain frequencies, the absorption coefficient is negative. By comparing with exact quantum calculations, we show that this failure takes place because the time evolution of the classical variables influences the dynamics of the quantum degree of freedom through the Hamiltonian only; important information, which a fully quantum treatment would put in the wave function, is missing. To repair this flaw, we experiment with a method which uses a swarm of classical trajectories to generate a ``classical wave function.'' The results are encouraging, but require substantial computer time when the number of classical variables is large. We argue that in the limit of many classical degrees of freedom, accurate calculations can be performed by using the time-dependent Hartree method and treating some degrees of freedom by exact numerical methods (e.g., a fast Fourier transform procedure) and the others by Gaussian wave packets or any other propagation method that is accurate for a very short time. This procedure leads to a simple time domain picture of dephasing and line broadening in the case of a localized quantum system imbedded in a medium with heavy atoms.

  2. Stereodynamics of chemical reactions: quasi-classical, quantum and mixed quantum-classical theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwu; Zhao, Guangjiu

    2012-04-01

    In this review, some benchmark works by Han and coworkers on the stereodynamics of typical chemical reactions, triatomic reactions H + D2, Cl + H2 and O + H2 and polyatomic reaction Cl+CH4/CD4, are presented by using the quasi-classical, quantum and mixed quantum-classical methods. The product alignment and orientation in these A+BC model reactions are discussed in detail. We have also compared our theoretical results with experimental measurements and demonstrated that our theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method ignores some quantum effects like the tunneling effect and zero-point energy. The quantum method will be very time-consuming. Moreover, the mixed quantum-classical method can take into account some quantum effects and hence is expected to be applicable to large systems and widely used in chemical stereodynamics studies.

  3. Classical and Quantum Probability for Biologists - Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review (oriented to biologists looking for applications of QM) is to provide a detailed comparative analysis of classical (Kolmogorovian) and quantum (Dirac-von Neumann) models. We will stress differences in the definition of conditional probability and as a consequence in the structures of matrices of transition probabilities, especially the condition of double stochasticity which arises naturally in QM. One of the most fundamental differences between two models is deformation of the classical formula of total probability (FTP) which plays an important role in statistics and decision making. An additional term appears in the QM-version of FTP - so called interference term. Finally, we discuss Bell's inequality and show that the common viewpoint that its violation induces either nonlocality or "death of realism" has not been completely justified. For us it is merely a sign of non-Kolmogorovianity of probabilistic data collected in a few experiments with incompatible setups of measurement devices.

  4. Hearing loss among classical-orchestra musicians.

    PubMed

    Toppila, Esko; Koskinen, Heli; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2011-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate classical musicians' risk of hearing loss. We studied 63 musicians from four Helsinki classical orchestras. We measured their hearing loss with an audiometer, found their prior amount of exposure to sound and some individual susceptibility factors with a questionnaire, measured their present sound exposure with dosimeters, and tested their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, then compared their hearing loss to ISO 1999-1990's predictions. The musicians' hearing loss distribution corresponded to that of the general population, but highly exposed musicians had greater hearing loss at frequencies over 3 kHz than less-exposed ones. Their individual susceptibility factors were low. Music deteriorates hearing, but by less than what ISO 1999-1990 predicted. The low number of individual susceptibility factors explained the difference, but only reduced hearing loss and not the prevalence of tinnitus.

  5. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-01

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham-Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out.

  6. Radiative corrections in symmetrized classical electrodynamics

    PubMed

    Van Meter JR; Kerman; Chen; Hartemann

    2000-12-01

    The physics of radiation reaction for a point charge is discussed within the context of classical electrodynamics. The fundamental equations of classical electrodynamics are first symmetrized to include magnetic charges: a double four-potential formalism is introduced, in terms of which the field tensor and its dual are employed to symmetrize Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force equation in covariant form. Within this framework, the symmetrized Dirac-Lorentz equation is derived, including radiation reaction (self-force) for a particle possessing both electric and magnetic charge. The connection with electromagnetic duality is outlined, and an in-depth discussion of nonlocal four-momentum conservation for the wave-particle system is given.

  7. CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS REQUIRE ENHANCED MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Izzard, Robert; Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed

    2012-11-20

    Measurements of rates of period change of Classical Cepheids probe stellar physics and evolution. Additionally, better understanding of Cepheid structure and evolution provides greater insight into their use as standard candles and tools for measuring the Hubble constant. Our recent study of the period change of the nearest Cepheid, Polaris, suggested that it is undergoing enhanced mass loss when compared to canonical stellar evolution model predictions. In this work, we expand the analysis to rates of period change measured for about 200 Galactic Cepheids and compare them to population synthesis models of Cepheids including convective core overshooting and enhanced mass loss. Rates of period change predicted from stellar evolution models without mass loss do not agree with observed rates, whereas including enhanced mass loss yields predicted rates in better agreement with observations. This is the first evidence that enhanced mass loss as suggested previously for Polaris and {delta} Cephei must be a ubiquitous property of Classical Cepheids.

  8. An Introduction to Classical Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    1997-08-01

    A fundamental and thorough description of classical electromagnetic radiation, this book is a balance of physical and mathematical explanation and includes over 300 illustrations. Starting from Maxwell's equations, the author demonstrates how fundamental concepts are applied in a wide variety of examples from areas such as classical optics, antenna analysis, and electromagnetic scattering. An interweaving of theoretical and experimental results gives insight into the physical and historical foundations of the subject. The book gives equal footing to the radiation of pulses and the more conventional time harmonic signals. With more than 140 problems, it can be used as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in electrical engineering and physics, and will also be of interest to scientists and engineers working in applied electromagnetics. A solutions manual is available for instructors.

  9. The classical geometrization of the electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo Duarte, Celso

    2015-08-01

    Following the line of the history, if by one side the electromagnetic theory was consolidated on the 19th century, the emergence of the special and the general relativity theories on the 20th century opened possibilities of further developments, with the search for the unification of the gravitation and the electromagnetism on a single unified theory. Some attempts to the geometrization of the electromagnetism emerged in this context, where these first models resided strictly on a classical basis. Posteriorly, they were followed by more complete and embracing quantum field theories. The present work reconsiders the classical viewpoint, with the purpose of showing that at first-order of approximation the electromagnetism constitutes a geometric structure aside other phenomena as gravitation, and that magnetic monopoles do not exist at least up to this order of approximation. Even though being limited, the model is consistent and offers the possibility of an experimental test of validity.

  10. Monodisperse cluster crystals: Classical and quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Méndez, Rogelio; Mezzacapo, Fabio; Cinti, Fabio; Lechner, Wolfgang; Pupillo, Guido

    2015-11-01

    We study the phases and dynamics of a gas of monodisperse particles interacting via soft-core potentials in two spatial dimensions, which is of interest for soft-matter colloidal systems and quantum atomic gases. Using exact theoretical methods, we demonstrate that the equilibrium low-temperature classical phase simultaneously breaks continuous translational symmetry and dynamic space-time homogeneity, whose absence is usually associated with out-of-equilibrium glassy phenomena. This results in an exotic self-assembled cluster crystal with coexisting liquidlike long-time dynamical properties, which corresponds to a classical analog of supersolid behavior. We demonstrate that the effects of quantum fluctuations and bosonic statistics on cluster-glassy crystals are separate and competing: Zero-point motion tends to destabilize crystalline order, which can be restored by bosonic statistics. PMID:26651695

  11. New variables for classical and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1986-01-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity based on certain spinorial variables is introduced. These variables simplify the constraints of general relativity considerably and enable one to imbed the constraint surface in the phase space of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills theory. The imbedding suggests new ways of attacking a number of problems in both classical and quantum gravity. Some illustrative applications are discussed.

  12. Quantum-classical transitions in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto; Armano, Giuliano

    2013-04-01

    The inherent properties of specific physical systems can be used as metaphors for investigation of the behavior of complex networks. This insight has already been put into practice in previous work, e.g., studying the network evolution in terms of phase transitions of quantum gases or representing distances among nodes as if they were particle energies. This paper shows that the emergence of different structures in complex networks, such as the scale-free and the winner-takes-all networks, can be represented in terms of a quantum-classical transition for quantum gases. In particular, we propose a model of fermionic networks that allows us to investigate the network evolution and its dependence on the system temperature. Simulations, performed in accordance with the cited model, clearly highlight the separation between classical random and winner-takes-all networks, in full correspondence with the separation between classical and quantum regions for quantum gases. We deem this model useful for the analysis of synthetic and real complex networks.

  13. The classical model for moment tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Walter; Tape, Carl

    2013-12-01

    A seismic moment tensor is a description of an earthquake source, but the description is indirect. The moment tensor describes seismic radiation rather than the actual physical process that initiates the radiation. A moment tensor `model' then ties the physical process to the moment tensor. The model is not unique, and the physical process is therefore not unique. In the classical moment tensor model, an earthquake arises from slip along a planar fault, but with the slip not necessarily in the plane of the fault. The model specifies the resulting moment tensor in terms of the slip vector, the fault normal vector and the Lamé elastic parameters, assuming isotropy. We review the classical model in the context of the fundamental lune. The lune is closely related to the space of moment tensors, and it provides a setting that is conceptually natural as well as pictorial. In addition to the classical model, we consider a crack plus double-couple model (CDC model) in which a moment tensor is regarded as the sum of a crack tensor and a double couple.

  14. Defining Astrology in Ancient and Classical History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Astrology in the ancient and classical worlds can be partly defined by its role, and partly by the way in which scholars spoke about it. The problem is complicated by the fact that the word is Greek - it has no Babylonian or Egyptian cognates - and even in Greece it was interchangeable with its cousin, 'astronomy'. Yet if we are to understand the role of the sky, stars and planets in culture, debates about the nature of ancient astrology, by both classical and modern scholars, must be taken into account. This talk will consider modern scholars' typologies of ancient astrology, together with ancient debates from Cicero in the 1st century BC, to Plotinus (204/5-270 AD) and Isidore of Seville (c. 560 - 4 April 636). It will consider the implications for our understanding of astronomy's role in culture, and conclude that in the classical period astrology may be best understood through its diversity and allegiance to competing philosophies, and that its functions were therefore similarly varied.

  15. Large classical universes emerging from quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2009-04-15

    It is generally believed that one cannot obtain a large universe from quantum cosmological models without an inflationary phase in the classical expanding era because the typical size of the universe after leaving the quantum regime should be around the Planck length, and the standard decelerated classical expansion after that is not sufficient to enlarge the universe in the time available. For instance, in many quantum minisuperspace bouncing models studied in the literature, solutions where the universe leaves the quantum regime in the expanding phase with appropriate size have negligible probability amplitude with respect to solutions leaving this regime around the Planck length. In this paper, I present a general class of moving Gaussian solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation where the velocity of the wave in minisuperspace along the scale factor axis, which is the new large parameter introduced in order to circumvent the above-mentioned problem, induces a large acceleration around the quantum bounce, forcing the universe to leave the quantum regime sufficiently big to increase afterwards to the present size, without needing any classical inflationary phase in between, and with reasonable relative probability amplitudes with respect to models leaving the quantum regime around the Planck scale. Furthermore, linear perturbations around this background model are free of any trans-Planckian problem.

  16. Acoustical study of classical Peking Opera singing.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Gu, Lide; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic characteristics of classical opera singing differ considerably between the Western and the Chinese cultures. Singers in the classical Peking opera tradition specialize on one out of a limited number of standard roles. Audio and electroglottograph signals were recorded for four performers of the Old Man role and three performers of the Colorful Face role. Recordings were made of the singers' speech and when they sang recitatives and songs from their roles. Sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, and spectrum characteristics were analyzed. Histograms showing the distribution of fundamental frequency showed marked peaks for the songs, suggesting a scale tone structure. Some of the intervals between these peaks were similar to those used in Western music. Vibrato rate was about 3.5Hz, that is, considerably slower than in Western classical singing. Spectra of vibrato-free tones contained unbroken series of harmonic partials sometimes reaching up to 17 000Hz. Long-term-average spectrum (LTAS) curves showed no trace of a singer's formant cluster. However, the Colorful Face role singers' LTAS showed a marked peak near 3300Hz, somewhat similar to that found in Western pop music singers. The mean LTAS spectrum slope between 700 and 6000Hz decreased by about 0.2dB/octave per dB of equivalent sound level. PMID:21621380

  17. The Strange World of Classical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David

    2010-02-01

    We have heard many times that the commonsense world of classical physics was shattered by Einstein's revelation of the laws of relativity. This is certainly true; the shift from our everyday notions of time and space to those revealed by relativity is one of the greatest stretches the mind can make. What is seldom appreciated is that the laws of classical physics yield equally strange (or arguably even stranger) results if the observer happens to be in a very high velocity reference frame. This article addresses two questions: In Part I we examine what the world would look like if relativity was not in effect and you happened to be in a reference frame traveling at a high percentage of the speed of light or faster than light (perfectly allowable in this model), a conceptual world that existed on a foundation of Newtonian physics and the aether. It turns out that this is a weirder place than is generally realized. In Part II we see that classical physics in these frames is self-contradictory. Neither the consideration of Maxwell's equations nor the Michelson-Morley experiment is necessary to see these contradictions; they are implicit in the logic of the physics itself.

  18. Acoustical study of classical Peking Opera singing.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Gu, Lide; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic characteristics of classical opera singing differ considerably between the Western and the Chinese cultures. Singers in the classical Peking opera tradition specialize on one out of a limited number of standard roles. Audio and electroglottograph signals were recorded for four performers of the Old Man role and three performers of the Colorful Face role. Recordings were made of the singers' speech and when they sang recitatives and songs from their roles. Sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, and spectrum characteristics were analyzed. Histograms showing the distribution of fundamental frequency showed marked peaks for the songs, suggesting a scale tone structure. Some of the intervals between these peaks were similar to those used in Western music. Vibrato rate was about 3.5Hz, that is, considerably slower than in Western classical singing. Spectra of vibrato-free tones contained unbroken series of harmonic partials sometimes reaching up to 17 000Hz. Long-term-average spectrum (LTAS) curves showed no trace of a singer's formant cluster. However, the Colorful Face role singers' LTAS showed a marked peak near 3300Hz, somewhat similar to that found in Western pop music singers. The mean LTAS spectrum slope between 700 and 6000Hz decreased by about 0.2dB/octave per dB of equivalent sound level.

  19. The Classical Theory of Light Colors: a Paradigm for Description of Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Nicolae; Agop, Maricel; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan Dezideriu; Butuc, Irina; Ghizdovat, Vlad

    2016-06-01

    The color is an interaction property: of the interaction of light with matter. Classically speaking it is therefore akin to the forces. But while forces engendered the mechanical view of the world, the colors generated the optical view. One of the modern concepts of interaction between the fundamental particles of matter - the quantum chromodynamics - aims to fill the gap between mechanics and optics, in a specific description of strong interactions. We show here that this modern description of the particle interactions has ties with both the classical and quantum theories of light, regardless of the connection between forces and colors. In a word, the light is a universal model in the description of matter. The description involves classical Yang-Mills fields related to color.

  20. Bridging quantum and classical plasmonics with a quantum-corrected model.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ruben; Borisov, Andrei G; Nordlander, Peter; Aizpurua, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic coupling between plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles allows for engineering of the optical response and generation of strong localized near-fields. Classical electrodynamics fails to describe this coupling across sub-nanometer gaps, where quantum effects become important owing to non-local screening and the spill-out of electrons. However, full quantum simulations are not presently feasible for realistically sized systems. Here we present a novel approach, the quantum-corrected model (QCM), that incorporates quantum-mechanical effects within a classical electrodynamic framework. The QCM approach models the junction between adjacent nanoparticles by means of a local dielectric response that includes electron tunnelling and tunnelling resistivity at the gap and can be integrated within a classical electrodynamical description of large and complex structures. The QCM predicts optical properties in excellent agreement with fully quantum mechanical calculations for small interacting systems, opening a new venue for addressing quantum effects in realistic plasmonic systems.