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Sample records for claude amra norbert

  1. Claude Ruggieri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the 19th century, rocket enthusiasts and inventors began to appear in almost every country. Some people thought these early rocket pioneers were geniuses, and others thought they were crazy. Claude Ruggieri, an Italian living in Paris, apparently rocketed small animals into space as early as 1806. The payloads were recovered by parachute. As depicted here by artist Larry Toschik, French authorities were not always impressed with rocket research. They halted Ruggieri's plans to launch a small boy using a rocket cluster. (Reproduced from a drawing by Larry Toschik and presented here courtesy of the artist and Motorola Inc.)

  2. AMRA: An Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamic code for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, T.; Müller, E.

    2001-08-01

    Implementation details and test cases of a newly developed hydrodynamic code, amra, are presented. The numerical scheme exploits the adaptive mesh refinement technique coupled to modern high-resolution schemes which are suitable for relativistic and non-relativistic flows. Various physical processes are incorporated using the operator splitting approach, and include self-gravity, nuclear burning, physical viscosity, implicit and explicit schemes for conductive transport, simplified photoionization, and radiative losses from an optically thin plasma. Several aspects related to the accuracy and stability of the scheme are discussed in the context of hydrodynamic and astrophysical flows.

  3. [Was Claude Bernard an atheist?].

    PubMed

    Donnet, V

    1998-01-01

    During his stay at Villefranche-sur-Saône College, Claude Bernard became acquainted with Ferdinand Donnet, appointed a short while ago, priest of the Parish. This priest became Cardinal and carried out his apostolate at Bordeaux for 47 years. 40 years after their meeting at Villefranche, Cardinal Donnet and Claude Bernard found again each other as "Sénateurs d'Empire" in Paris. In his writings, Claude Bernard never mentioned Religion: he rather gave impression, in many ways, of being anticlerical! Paul Bert and his colleagues looked upon Claude Bernard as a great priest of atheism. Shortly after his death, Cardinal Donnet wrote a letter where he entirely proved that Claude Bernard has been, on the contrary, a fervent catholic.

  4. [Claude Bernard: beyond the controversy].

    PubMed

    Wise, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Claude Bernard created controversy because of his originality of thought, his rejection of dogma and lack of respect for tradition. Some of his controversies resulted in unjustifiable personal and scientific attacks by others which probably affected both his morale and his health. In addition, he was undoubtedly envied for his success and the firmness with which he supported his results and conclusions. The counterattacks which he directed towards others were also not always justified, and sometimes displayed disdain for his adversaries' method and results - without having the strength to admit his own rare errors. None of this detracted from his status as the most eminent of scientists of his era.

  5. [Norbert Elias and a narrative about ageing and death].

    PubMed

    do O, Alarcon Agra

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the contribution made by Norbert Elias (1897-1990) to the problematization of old age by analyzing his text "Envelhecer e morrer". Here, the sociologist is seen as an author of texts which can help build up references that span disciplinary boundaries, or even overcome the polarization between 'health-' and 'social-'related knowledge, making it possible to form the desired field of study on ageing. Though Elias sometimes aligns himself with ideas bordering on an idealization of ageing from a pre-capitalist 'Golden Age', he does offer insights which deserve to be taken into consideration, especially when he relates the contemporary experience of ageing to the invention of modernity itself.

  6. Rocks at Belle-Isle, Port-Domois, Claude Monet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauch, Marion Cosgrove

    2004-01-01

    This article is a description of the artist Claude Monet. The article describes the life and art of Claude Monet, focusing in on his work, Rocks at Bell-Isle, Port-Domois. A brief discussion of the significant elements of the painting is provided. The article also includes a list of discussion questions and suggested classroom activities.

  7. Claude Bernard and his revelations in physiology.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, C S

    2014-03-01

    It was in Saint-Julien near Villefranche that Claude Bernard was born on 12 July 1813. About 20 years later he moved to Paris to become a dramatist but was directed into the study of medicine, the service at the Hôtel Dieu of Magendie that led him to the Collège de France. He entered Magendie's laboratory as a voluntary assistant and within a year became official préparateur. His early work on the chorda tympani and his MD thesis on gastric juice in 1843 set him on his lifelong discoveries in physiology. The central role of hepatic glycogenesis in the formation of sugar in animals was established around 1850, and he proceeded to show that section of the cervical fibres of the sympathetic chain led to congestion and increased temperature on that side of the face-resulting from paralysis of the vasomotor nerves. And there were vasodilator as well as vasoconstrictor fibres. After the salivary glands, the pancreas caught his attention and he discovered its ability to emulsify fatty material. Toxic and therapeutic substances were analysed: carbon monoxide paralyses carriage of oxygen by taking its place on haemoglobin; and curare abolishes voluntary movement by paralysis at the motor end-plate. But Bernard was above all a general physiologist, exemplified in 1872 and 1873 in his Lectures on the phenomena of life common to animals and plants, summarised in the aperçu 'the constancy of the internal environment is the condition of the free and independent life'. Claude Bernard died on Sunday 10 February 1878 in Paris.

  8. Astronaut Claude Nicollier at RMS controls on aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Swiss Astronaut Claude Nicollier is pictured at the aft flight deck station he occupies. Among Nicollier 's responsibilities were the control of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) during operations with the Hubble Space Telesocpe (HST).

  9. [Claude Bernard and the "standard European urine"].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Fangerau, H

    2010-07-01

    During the nineteenth century the analysis of urine was based on technical tools for the quantification of its constituents. The transformation of diagnostic signs into numbers made reference and normal values indispensable for the verification of the transition point between "normal" and "pathological". It needed the reconfiguration of disease concepts to link measured data and values with specific clinical pictures. Ontological disease concepts were replaced by a gradual understanding of health and disease. During this process the "normal value" became the crucial point of discussion.Taking a statement by Claude Bernard (1813-1878) about the nonsense of chemical mean values as a starting point the paper focuses on the contemporary debate about the role and function of quantification in medical diagnostics. The methodological reference points of the analysis are Georges Canguilhem's considerations about the normal and the pathological and Ludwik Fleck's thought collectives. The acceptance or rejection of normal value concepts is bound to specific thought styles. Permanent challenges to traditional qualifying semiotics resulted in a slow transformation of semiotic thought styles into quantifying diagnostics. The "technisation" of medicine during the nineteenth century fostered this process. The clinical laboratory helped to establish a"mathematisation" of medicine.

  10. Intercultural Identities in W. G. Sebald's "The Emigrants" and Norbert Gstrein's "Die englischen Jahre"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses W. G. Sebald's "The Emigrants" and Norbert Gstrein's "Die englischen Jahre" from the perspective of intercultural identity. In Sebald's work, intercultural identity emerges as a political crisis that leads to a series of devastating personal crises: Sebald's protagonists' inability to fully abandon early ethnic and national…

  11. A note about Norbert Wiener and his contribution to Harmonic Analysis and Tauberian Theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almira, J. M.; Romero, A. E.

    2009-05-01

    In this note we explain the main motivations Norbert Wiener had for the creation of his Generalized Harmonic Analysis [13] and his Tauberian Theorems [14]. Although these papers belong to the most pure mathematical tradition, they were deeply based on some Engineering and Physics Problems and Wiener was able to use them for such diverse areas as Optics, Brownian motion, Filter Theory, Prediction Theory and Cybernetics.

  12. Astronaut Claude Nicollier participates in RMS training at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Swiss scientits Claude Nicollier (left), STS-61 mission specialist, waits his turn at the controls for the remote manipulator system (RMS) during a training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Mark Norman of MSFC has control of the RMS in this frame.

  13. Claude Claremont's Contribution to the History of Science and Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallenberg, Harvey R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of Claude Claremont to science education for children and his 1937 book, "Spanning Space," which outlines the building of models of bridges and other structures out of paper. Also describes how children and their teachers can build a model strut tower and a steam engine. (MDM)

  14. Claude McKay: Black Protest in Western Traditional Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson-Weems, Clenora

    1992-01-01

    The protest poetry of Claude McKay, a leading writer of the Harlem Renaissance, is couched in the Western sonnet form. How the poetic form supports or conflicts with the messages of African-American pride and contempt for racism is examined. (SLD)

  15. Variability, Constraints, and Creativity: Shedding Light on Claude Monet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Patricia D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how creative individuals maintain high levels of variability, examining how Claude Monet's habitually high level of variability in painting was acquired during his childhood and early apprenticeship and maintained throughout his adult career by a continuous series of task constraints imposed by the artist on his own work. For Monet,…

  16. Variability, constraints, and creativity. Shedding light on Claude Monet.

    PubMed

    Stokes, P D

    2001-04-01

    Recent experimental research suggests 2 things. The first is that along with learning how to do something, people also learn how variably or differently to continue doing it. The second is that high variability is maintained by constraining, precluding a currently successful, often repetitive solution to a problem. In this view, Claude Monet's habitually high level of variability in painting was acquired during his childhood and early apprenticeship and was maintained throughout his adult career by a continuous series of task constraints imposed by the artist on his own work. For Monet, variability was rewarded and rewarding.

  17. Reconsidering Feminisms and the Work of Norbert Elias for Understanding Gender, Sport and Sport-Related Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Louise

    2008-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the relationships between feminist perspectives and the figurational/process-sociological perspective of Norbert Elias for understanding gender, sport and sport-related activities. The main aim of the article is to respond to Colwell's claim that there are differences between feminist and figurational approaches to…

  18. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation.

  19. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation. PMID:23789508

  20. Claude Lévi-Strauss on Race, History, and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    In 1952, the French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss published a small booklet titled Race and History. It formed part of a series of pamphlets on the so-called “race-question” by leading anthropologists and geneticists, which UNESCO published as part of its campaign against racism. Roughly twenty years later, in 1971, UNESCO invited Lévi-Strauss to give a lecture to open the International Year of Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination. This time the lecture, titled “Race and culture,” caused a scandal. In 2005, on occasion of the Organisation’s 60th anniversary, Lévi-Strauss was once again invited by UNESCO to give a lecture. It followed the same lines as his 1971 speech, but now met with acclaim. In my paper I will analyze Lévi-Strauss’ interventions with respect to their reliance on contemporary genetics. Lévi-Strauss always saw a close analogy between structuralist anthropology and genetics, and derived his anti-evolutionary stance from the combinatory logic that both disciplines endorsed. I will argue, that it was this combinatory logic which created room for historical contingency and agency in Lévi-Strauss’ understanding of the history of humankind. PMID:25685173

  1. Norbert Elias's motion pictures: history, cinema and gestures in the process of civilization.

    PubMed

    Algazi, Gadi

    2008-09-01

    Norbert Elias's project in The process of civilization (1939) involved reconstructing invisible movement--both the slow tempoof long-term historical change and the modification of psychic structures and embodied dispositions. To do this, he resorted to uncommon devices: treating historical texts as constituting a series amenable to a rudimentary discourse analysis, he constructed an imagined 'curve of civilization' serving as an approximation of the hidden process of change. Elias's curve was not supposed to represent single past states, but movement itself, its direction and pace. This novel concept of historical representation was related to the perception of cinema as a new medium making actual movement visible. But beyond making it possible to imagine how one could telescope long-term historical process, cinema also held the promise of serving as a microscope, making the minute movements of the human body, gestures and manners available for close inspection. While anthropologists were devising ways of using the new medium to document fleeting gestures and bodily postures, it was used by popular audiences as a source for remodelling behaviour and acquiring polite manners and body techniques, as noticed by such acute observers as Marcel Mauss and Joseph Roth. Hence, popular appropriation of the cinema gave rise to a heightened awareness of the historicity of gestures and the changing modalities of their transmission. Cinema was itself part of the accelerated motion of history, of a perceived change of pace in the process of civilization, which in its turn shed light on its historical antecedents and played an essential role in rethinking the notion of civilization and culture.

  2. Electronic Still Camera image of Astronaut Claude Nicollier working with RMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The robot arm controlling work of Swiss scientist Astronaut Claude Nicollier was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and downlinked to ground controllers soon afterward. Electronic still photography is a technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitze an image with resolution approaching film quality.

  3. Astronaut Claude Nicollier on flight deck at controls of the RMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Swiss Astronaut Claude Nicollier, mission specialist, is stationed on Endeavour's flight deck during one of the five Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing space walks. The controls for the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) are left of frame center. Two space walkers can be seen through the aft windows.

  4. Children's Invented Notations and Verbal Responses to a Piano Work by Claude Debussy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkoshi, Rivka

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the way children listen to classical music composed for them and the effect of age on their spontaneous invented notations and verbal responses. The musical selection is a piano piece for children by Claude Debussy:"'Jimbo's Lullaby" from "Children's Corner". Two hundred and nine children 4-9.5-years-old…

  5. Development of small size Claude cycle helium refrigerator with micro turbo-expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, H.; Harada, S.; Matsubara, K.; Saito, S.

    The present Claude-cycle He refrigerator, developed for design performance of 5 W at 4.5 K, employs two-stage expansion microturbines, perforated plate heat exchangers, and a single-stage, screw-type compressor. Attention is given to design and test results of the major system components, with emphasis on microturbine performance. The performance data obtained lead to a 50-percent estimated efficiency at the design point for both stages of the expander.

  6. [Claude Balme, a caregiver of the Egyptian expedition of Bonaparte (1766-1850)].

    PubMed

    Ségal, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The author explains military surgeon Balme's biograpyhy, especially during Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign (1798-1801). As there is some possible confusion with another Claude Balme, some archives deserve to be closely scrutinized. Through Balme's reports the author insists on his courageous part in several scurvy or plague epidemics. He was himself marked on his face; he ended his life in Lyons as a town-councillor. PMID:25966538

  7. Plant anesthesia supports similarities between animals and plants: Claude Bernard's forgotten studies.

    PubMed

    Grémiaux, Alexandre; Yokawa, Ken; Mancuso, Stefano; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    The French scientist Claude Bernard (1813-1878) is famous for his discoveries in physiology and for introducing rigorous experimental methods to medicine and biology. One of his major technical innovations was the use of chemicals in order to disrupt normal physiological function to test hypotheses. But less known is his conviction that the physiological functions of all living organisms rely on the same underlying principles. He hypothesized that similarly to animals, plants are also able to sense changes in their environment. He called this ability "sensitivity." In order to test his ideas, he performed anesthesia on plants and the results of these experiments were presented in 1878 in "Leçonssur les phénomènes de la vie communs aux animaux et aux végétaux." The phenomena described by Claude Bernard more than a century ago are not fully understood yet. Here, we present a short overview of anesthetic effects in animals and we discuss how anesthesia affects plant movements, seed germination, and photosynthesis. Surprisingly, these phenomena may have ecological relevance, since stressed plants generate anesthetics such as ethylene and ether. Finally, we discuss Claude Bernard's interpretations and conclusions in the perspective of modern plant sciences. PMID:24476640

  8. Plant anesthesia supports similarities between animals and plants: Claude Bernard's forgotten studies.

    PubMed

    Grémiaux, Alexandre; Yokawa, Ken; Mancuso, Stefano; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    The French scientist Claude Bernard (1813-1878) is famous for his discoveries in physiology and for introducing rigorous experimental methods to medicine and biology. One of his major technical innovations was the use of chemicals in order to disrupt normal physiological function to test hypotheses. But less known is his conviction that the physiological functions of all living organisms rely on the same underlying principles. He hypothesized that similarly to animals, plants are also able to sense changes in their environment. He called this ability "sensitivity." In order to test his ideas, he performed anesthesia on plants and the results of these experiments were presented in 1878 in "Leçonssur les phénomènes de la vie communs aux animaux et aux végétaux." The phenomena described by Claude Bernard more than a century ago are not fully understood yet. Here, we present a short overview of anesthetic effects in animals and we discuss how anesthesia affects plant movements, seed germination, and photosynthesis. Surprisingly, these phenomena may have ecological relevance, since stressed plants generate anesthetics such as ethylene and ether. Finally, we discuss Claude Bernard's interpretations and conclusions in the perspective of modern plant sciences.

  9. Ilya Neustadt, Norbert Elias, and the Leicester Department: personal correspondence and the history of sociology in Britain.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, John; Hughes, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The central aims of this paper are: (1) to explore the utility of using personal correspondence as a source of data for sociological investigations into the history of sociology in the UK; (2) in relation to this undertaking, to advance the beginnings of a figurational analysis of epistolary forms; and (3), to provide an empirically-grounded discussion of the historical significance of the Department of Sociology at the University of Leicester (a University largely ignored in 'standard histories' of the subject) at a formative phase in the development of the discipline within the UK. The correspondence drawn upon in the paper is between Norbert Elias and Ilya Neustadt between 1962 and 1964 when Elias was Professor of Sociology at the University of Ghana and Ilya Neustadt was Professor of Sociology and Head of the Sociology Department at the University of Leicester. From an analysis of this correspondence, we elucidate an emergent dynamic to the relationship between Neustadt and Elias, one which, we argue, undergirds the development of sociology at Leicester and the distinctive character of the intellectual climate that prevailed there during the 1960s. The paper concludes with a consideration of whether it was a collapse of this dynamic that led to a total breakdown in the relationship between Neustadt and Elias, and by extension, an important phase in the expansion of sociology at Leicester.

  10. Composite turbine blade design options for Claude (open) cycle OTEC power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R

    1985-11-01

    Small-scale turbine rotors made from composites offer several technical advantages for a Claude (open) cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system. Westinghouse Electric Corporation has designed a composite turbine rotor/disk using state-of-the-art analysis methods for large-scale (100-MW/sub e/) open cycle OTEC applications. Near-term demonstrations using conventional low-pressure turbine blade shapes with composite material would achieve feasibility and modern credibility of the open cycle OTEC power system. Application of composite blades for low-pressure turbo-machinery potentially improves the reliability of conventional metal blades affected by stress corrosion.

  11. Between the laboratory and the museum: Claude Bernard and the problem of time.

    PubMed

    Schmidgen, Henning

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relation between biological and historical time with respect to Claude Bernard's Lectures on the Phenomena of Life Common to Animals and Plants (1878). These lectures mirror Bernard's turn from the experimental physiology of animal organisms to a "general physiology" of elementary organisms, or cells, and discuss the problematic interrelation of science, life, and time. The paper argues that experimental life sciences in Bernard's sense are always also "living sciences," i.e., sciences in dynamic development. The perspectives of this conception are discussed with reference to Hans-Jörg Rheinberger's historical studies concerning the materiality and semiotics of "experimental systems."

  12. Podcasting at the University of Virginia Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

    PubMed

    Ragon, Bart; Looney, Ryan P

    2007-01-01

    The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library co-sponsors a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series in the fall and spring of each year. Each lecture is produced and recorded for the benefit of the University of Virginia Heath System and members of the surrounding community. In the fall of 2005, the Library decided to begin podcasting the lectures via the Internet. This article describes the investigation process for creating access to the content via podcast, Webcast, and direct download. The article also addresses how the Library is teaching podcasting in its annual Multimedia Bootcamp and exploring additional uses for podcasting. doi:10.1300/J115v26n01_02.

  13. [Claude Bernard, the experimental method, and the Société de Biologie].

    PubMed

    Bange, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Claude Bernard was one of the founder of the Société de Biologie created in 1849. He actively took part to it from its very beginning by presenting various communications and several important memoirs. Epistemological thoughts found in these memoirs lead to the methodological chapters introducing the volumes of his edited lessons given at the Collège de France. In 1865, these texts formed the basis to his Introduction à l'étude de la Médecine expérimentale, in which Bernard claims the experimental method should rely on the principle of determinism of the phenomena of Life. He was a dutiful President of the Société from 1867 until his death. He nevertheless was not often involved in debates, but agreed on the defense of the scientific principles he had claimed. He remained influential until his death, as noted in 1899 by the report Engène Gley wrote on the Société de Biologie during its fifty first years. Gley points regularly to Bernard's axioms which remained the true scientific credo of French biologists.

  14. [Claude Bernard: a personal scientific fame that he probably would have not appreciated].

    PubMed

    Cugini, P

    2004-04-01

    Claude Bernard has been a great medical physiologist of the ninenteenth century, who was able to convince biologists and physicians that the "experimental method" can and must be applied to the phenomena of living matter, as it is applied in physics and chemistry. With the concept of the "universality of the experimental method", the Modern Experimental Medicine begun to exist. However, C. Bernard deserves of further honor, having identified and promulgated a law of the living matter, i.e., the law concerning the "constancy of the interior biological environment". Such a law was later consacrated in 1929 by G.W. Cannon with the term "homeostasis". The homeostatic conception of biological functions had a great epistemological impact in the history of biology and medicine. As a matter of fact, all the modern biologists and physicians are today educated at the light of the homeostatic systems. Accordingly, C. Bernard is celebrated in his fame as the tutor of scientific medicine. Reading, however, what C. Bernard has written on the personalism and the eponimy of scientific ideas, one is prone to think that he would have not appreciated the dogmatic exaltation, the cult of his ideas on the biological constancy. He was aware that "... it is a fundamental rule in science to modify and change the ideas going on". And again "... But, since these ideas are not immutable verities, one must be ready to abandon and modify them when they cease to represent the reality". And again "The systems and doctrines are personal and pretend to be immortal and to preserve their personality. The experimental method, however, is impersonal; it zeroes the individuality and sacrifices the particular ideas of the a single person in favor of a general verity, which is established by means of the experimental criterion". And again "The great persons have never been promoters of absolute ed eternal verities in experimental sciences". And again "Any person who made the science to proceed, never

  15. The Scriptural Cantatas "Esther" and "Jacob, et Rachel" of Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre: Historical Context and Performance Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    This project explores two sacred cantatas of Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre, "Esther" and "Jacob, et Rachel". The cultural milieu in which the sacred cantatas of Jacquet de La Guerre were written and performed will be discussed, as well as possible venues for their original performances, including the Parisian salon, and the Royale maison…

  16. [The chief surgeon Claude Louis Sommé (1772-1855) French military physician, surgeon of Antwerp hospital].

    PubMed

    Tricot, Jean-pierre

    2015-01-01

    Claude Louis Sommé was born in Paris in 1772. After surgical studies between 1790 and 1792, he successfully embraced a military career in the armies of Napoleon at different fronts and in several hospitals. In 1806 he submitted his doctoral thesis at the Special Medical School of Strasburg, Dissertation upon Pain. The same year he presented his dismissal from he imperial armies and became chief-surgeon at the St Elisabeth hospital of Antwerp where he stayed on duty until his death in 1855. Sommé wrote a lot of medical books: surgical, anatomical and physiological. After the battle of Waterloo one third of the injured soldiers were transferred to Antwerp and were attended in his department. He also played an important role as a professor at the Primary Medical School of Antwerp. Sommé also created the botanical garden of Antwerp, close to the hospital. PMID:27029134

  17. [A brief history of the baroreceptor reflex: from Claude Bernard to Arthur C. Guyton. Illustrated with some classical experiments].

    PubMed

    Estañol, Bruno; Porras-Betancourt, Manuel; Padilla-Leyva, Miguel Ángel; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    The baroreceptor reflex is poorly known by most physicians even though is fundamental in stabilizing the blood pressure on a beat to beat basis and is crucial for survival. Its fascinating history is briefly reviewed in this article. In 1852 Claude Bernard discovered that the sympathetic nerves of the neck innervate the blood vessels of the skin of the rabbit. Edgar Douglas Adrian in 1932 demonstrated that the sympathetic nerves that innervate the blood vessels discharge spontaneously at a rate of 4-6 per second and thus discovered the physiological basis of the vasomotor tone. In the XIX century Ludwig Traube and Karl Constantine Ewald Hering discovered that blood pressure fluctuates synchronously with respiratory movements and Sigmund Mayer observed that there are also slow non respiratory fluctuations of blood pressure. In 1921 Heinrich Ewald Hering found that high pressure baroreceptors are located in the carotid sinuses and demonstrated that the stimulation of the afferent nerve that innervates it induces bradycardia and hypotension. These studies were further advanced by Corneille Heymans who won the Nobel Prize for these studies in 1938. Later Cowley and Guyton produced sino-aortic denervation in dogs and thereby could demonstrate the fundamental importance of the baroreceptor reflex in the stabilization of blood pressure.

  18. [Comment on “Plate tectonics: Scientific revolution or scientific program?” by Jean-Claude Mareschal] Development of plate tectonics theory: The missing piece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, Bruce R.

    The recent article by Jean-Claude Mareschal (“Plate Tectonics: Scientific Revolution or Scientific Program?” in Eos, May 19, 1987, p. 529) adds to the interesting literature on the evolution of the theory of plate tectonics. It is curious that an aspect of the general theory that seems to be little considered and mentioned by Mareschal or others who write about the history of development of the theory, but that was vitally important in my own acceptance of the theory, was the discovery of subduction and, to a lesser extent, abduction.

  19. [Claude Bernard and the Comptes Rendus de la Société de Biologie: the movie of the physiological revolution by him who made it (1849-1878)].

    PubMed

    Hainaut, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Claude Bernard presented most of his fundamental results to the Société de Biologie, including proof of the modulation of the nervous system by the internal micromilieu. However, he did not describe the principle of a stable internal milieu as a condition for free life. Physiology, which is a part of biology, was not founded on cellular biology. Rather, Claude Bernard considered chemistry, anatomy and histology as the necessary auxiliary sciences for physiology. His articles are direct pictures, and not isolated ones, despite possible limitations, from a pre-montage movie of the physiological revolution he thought he had initiated, but not finished.

  20. Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture. Becoming a truly helpful teacher: considerably more challenging, and potentially more fun, than merely doing business as usual.

    PubMed

    Jason, Hilliard

    2007-12-01

    Few medical faculty members are adequately prepared for their instructional responsibilities. Our educational traditions were established before we had research-based understandings of the teaching-learning process and before brain research began informing our understandings of how humans achieve lasting learning. Yet, there are several advantages you may have. If your expertise is at one of the frontiers of human biology, your teaching can be inherently fascinating to aspiring health professionals. If your work has implications for human health, you have another potential basis for engaging future clinicians. And, thanks to Claude Bernard's influence, you likely are "process oriented," a necessary mindset for being an effective teacher. There are also challenges you may face. Your medical students will mostly become clinicians. Unless you can help them see connections between your offerings and their future work, you may not capture and sustain their interest. To be effective, teachers, like clinicians, need to be interactive, make on-the-spot decisions, and be "emotional literate." If you aren't comfortable with these demands, you may have work to do toward becoming a truly helpful teacher. Program changes may be needed. Might your program need to change 1) from being adversarial and controlling to being supportive and trust based or 2) from mainly dispensing information to mainly asking and inviting questions? In conclusion, making changes toward becoming a truly helpful teacher can bring benefits to your students while increasing your sense of satisfaction and fulfillment as a teacher. If you choose to change, be gentle with yourself, as you should be when expecting your students to make important changes.

  1. Essays in Honor of Claude M. Wise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Arthur J., Ed.; And Others

    The essays in this collection cover a wide variety of topics related to linguistics and speech. Many essays cover topics concerned with phonology: phonological units, developmental phonology, phonetic reality, rhythmic prose, sound syntax, and meaning, interconsonantal differences, and Japanese and English consonant phonemes. Other topics in the…

  2. From Claude Bernard to the Batcave and beyond: using Batman as a hook for physiology education.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul

    2011-03-01

    Communicating physiology to the general public and popularizing science can be tremendously rewarding activities. Providing relevant and compelling points of linkage, however, between the scientific experiences and the interests of the general public can be challenging. One avenue for popularizing science is to link scientific concepts to images, personalities, and icons in popular culture. Currently, comic book superhero movies and television shows are extremely popular, and Batman was used as the vehicle for popularizing concepts of exercise science, neuroscience, and physiology in my recent book, Becoming Batman: the Possibility of a Superhero. The objective of this book was to bring scientific understanding to the broader public by using the physical image and impression everyone has of Batman and his abilities and then connecting this to the underlying science. The objective of this article is to share some of the details of the process and the positive and negative outcomes of using such an approach with other academics who may be interested in similar activities. It is my goal that by sharing this experience I may stimulate like-minded readers to initiate their own similar projects and to also be emboldened to try and integrate popular culture touchstones in their own teaching practice.

  3. The Claude Bernard Lecture, 1989 - Deterministic chaos: The science and the fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, D.

    1990-02-01

    A general review of the ideas of chaos is presented. Particular attention is given to the problem of finding out whether or not various time evolutions observed in nature correspond to low-dimensional deterministic dynamics. The 'dimensions' of the order 6 that are obtained are found to be very close to the upper bound 2log(10)N permitted by the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm (1983).

  4. From Claude Bernard to the Batcave and Beyond: Using Batman as a Hook for Physiology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, E. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Communicating physiology to the general public and popularizing science can be tremendously rewarding activities. Providing relevant and compelling points of linkage, however, between the scientific experiences and the interests of the general public can be challenging. One avenue for popularizing science is to link scientific concepts to images,…

  5. The 2014 Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture: The Social Contract of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The shift to competency-based education expands the role of the teacher from that of a provider of information and into a shaper of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. These roles are facilitated by establishing a social contract between the instructor and learner, a contract that clearly defines the rights and duties of each. Adopting greater…

  6. Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pathways for Programming in Mouse, Monkey, and Man—Where Do We Go Next? The 2014 Norbert Freinkel Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jacob E

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus continue to increase worldwide and span the spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Alarmingly, 1 in 10 infants and toddlers is obese, and 1 in 5 youths is both obese and at risk for metabolic syndrome prior to puberty. The mechanisms underlying how poor maternal health imparts risk for future metabolic disease in the offspring are beginning to emerge in deeply phenotyped human and nonhuman primate models. Maternal diet and obesity impact fuels, hormones, and inflammation with powerful effects on fetal metabolic systems. These are accompanied by persistent changes in the infant microbiome and epigenome and in offspring behavior. These results suggest that gestational and lactational dietary exposures are driving health risks in the next generation. Whether maternal diet can prevent changes in the womb to alter infant life-course disease risk is still unknown. Controlled, mechanistic studies to identify interventions are sorely needed for a healthier next generation. PMID:26207051

  7. Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pathways for Programming in Mouse, Monkey, and Man—Where Do We Go Next? The 2014 Norbert Freinkel Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jacob E

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus continue to increase worldwide and span the spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Alarmingly, 1 in 10 infants and toddlers is obese, and 1 in 5 youths is both obese and at risk for metabolic syndrome prior to puberty. The mechanisms underlying how poor maternal health imparts risk for future metabolic disease in the offspring are beginning to emerge in deeply phenotyped human and nonhuman primate models. Maternal diet and obesity impact fuels, hormones, and inflammation with powerful effects on fetal metabolic systems. These are accompanied by persistent changes in the infant microbiome and epigenome and in offspring behavior. These results suggest that gestational and lactational dietary exposures are driving health risks in the next generation. Whether maternal diet can prevent changes in the womb to alter infant life-course disease risk is still unknown. Controlled, mechanistic studies to identify interventions are sorely needed for a healthier next generation.

  8. Comment on 'Compositional convection in a reactive crystalline mush and melt differentiation' by Stephen Tait and Claude Jaupart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoon, Roger N.

    1994-06-01

    At the end of their analysis of convection in magma chambers, Tait and Jaupart (1992) 'speculated' that the platiniferous dunitic pipes in the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, are 'fossil chimney structure', which developed by a process of 'compositional convection.' A hypothesis that accounts for all of the characteristics of the platiniferous dunitis pipes has not been establihsed, bu the evidence against Tait and Jaupart's suggestions is considerable: (1) a two-stage hypotheis should by entrained; (2) the magneusium dunites are primitive rocks that are unlikely to be related to residual liquids; (3) residual liquids evolved from the Lower Zone (LZ) - Lower Critical Zone (LCZ) would not be sufficiently differentiated to account for the iron-rich assemblages; (4) suitably iron-rich residual melts may be derived from the Upper Critical Zone (UCZ), but they would be extremely dense amd liable to drain downward; and (5) the absence of plagioclase is not compatible with 'typical' interstitial liquids.

  9. Philosophical basis and some historical aspects of systems biology: from Hegel to Noble - applications for bioenergetic research.

    PubMed

    Saks, Valdur; Monge, Claire; Guzun, Rita

    2009-03-01

    We live in times of paradigmatic changes for the biological sciences. Reductionism, that for the last six decades has been the philosophical basis of biochemistry and molecular biology, is being displaced by Systems Biology, which favors the study of integrated systems. Historically, Systems Biology - defined as the higher level analysis of complex biological systems - was pioneered by Claude Bernard in physiology, Norbert Wiener with the development of cybernetics, and Erwin Schrödinger in his thermodynamic approach to the living. Systems Biology applies methods inspired by cybernetics, network analysis, and non-equilibrium dynamics of open systems. These developments follow very precisely the dialectical principles of development from thesis to antithesis to synthesis discovered by Hegel. Systems Biology opens new perspectives for studies of the integrated processes of energy metabolism in different cells. These integrated systems acquire new, system-level properties due to interaction of cellular components, such as metabolic compartmentation, channeling and functional coupling mechanisms, which are central for regulation of the energy fluxes. State of the art of these studies in the new area of Molecular System Bioenergetics is analyzed.

  10. Philosophical Basis and Some Historical Aspects of Systems Biology: From Hegel to Noble - Applications for Bioenergetic Research

    PubMed Central

    Saks, Valdur; Monge, Claire; Guzun, Rita

    2009-01-01

    We live in times of paradigmatic changes for the biological sciences. Reductionism, that for the last six decades has been the philosophical basis of biochemistry and molecular biology, is being displaced by Systems Biology, which favors the study of integrated systems. Historically, Systems Biology - defined as the higher level analysis of complex biological systems - was pioneered by Claude Bernard in physiology, Norbert Wiener with the development of cybernetics, and Erwin Schrödinger in his thermodynamic approach to the living. Systems Biology applies methods inspired by cybernetics, network analysis, and non-equilibrium dynamics of open systems. These developments follow very precisely the dialectical principles of development from thesis to antithesis to synthesis discovered by Hegel. Systems Biology opens new perspectives for studies of the integrated processes of energy metabolism in different cells. These integrated systems acquire new, system-level properties due to interaction of cellular components, such as metabolic compartmentation, channeling and functional coupling mechanisms, which are central for regulation of the energy fluxes. State of the art of these studies in the new area of Molecular System Bioenergetics is analyzed. PMID:19399243

  11. Report of the Task Force on Medical Record Education. American Medical Record Association.

    PubMed

    1986-12-01

    An eight-member task force on medical record education was created in 1985 as part of AMRA's strategic planning process and long history of commitment to education. This report on their activities was presented to the Board of Directors in September 1986. While not intended to be a definitive work plan, the recommendations in the report involve the entire AMRA membership. The task force expects and encourages extensive debate on the issues and recommendations contained herein.

  12. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19-20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  13. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19–20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  14. A Space-Time Adaptive Method for Simulating Complex Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, E. M.; Greenside, H. S.; Henriquez, C. S.

    2000-03-01

    A new space-time adaptive mesh refinement algorithm (AMRA) is presented and analyzed which, by automatically adding and deleting local patches of higher-resolution Cartesian meshes, can simulate quantitatively accurate models of cardiac electrical dynamics efficiently in large domains. We find in two space dimensions that the AMRA is able to achieve a factor of 5 speedup and a factor of 5 reduction in memory while achieving the same accuracy compared to a code based on a uniform space-time mesh at the highest resolution of the AMRA method. We summarize applications of the code to the Luo-Rudy 1 cardiac model in large two- and three-dimensional domains and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the initiation of arrhythmias.

  15. Beyond Compassion: Children of Sex Workers in Kolkata's Sonagachi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sircar, Oishik; Dutta, Debolina

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, children of sex workers from Kolkata's Sonagachi red-light district formed their own collective, Amra Padatik ("We are Foot Soldiers"), to work for gaining dignity for their mothers and claiming their own rights as children of sex workers. In this article the authors speak to AP's founder members to demystify the culture of fear…

  16. Chromosomal and symbiotic relationships of rhizobia nodulating Medicago truncatula and M. laciniata.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) is a sequence-based method used to characterize bacterial genomes. This method was used to examine the genetic structure of Medicago-nodulating rhizobia at the Amra site, which is located in an arid region of Tunisia. Here the annual medics M. laciniata and M. tru...

  17. "Requestioning" AIDS: An Ethical Reflection From 1993 to Today. Reflections on Claude Vandevyer's "Homosexuals and AIDS: A New Approach to the Illness" from Journal of Homosexuality 25(3).

    PubMed

    Lau, Travis

    2016-01-01

    This article serves as one of the supplementary pieces of this special issue on "Mapping Queer Bioethics," in which we take a solipsistic turn to "map" the Journal of Homosexuality itself. Here, the author examines the first feature-length article to address the relationship between HIV status and homosexuality. Lingering on both the temporal gap between the dawn of AIDS in American discourse and its inclusion in this journal, the author asks us to consider (in hindsight) such a delay bearing in mind queer theoretical projects of the present such as gay shame, stigma, and queer biopolitics.

  18. "Requestioning" AIDS: An Ethical Reflection From 1993 to Today. Reflections on Claude Vandevyer's "Homosexuals and AIDS: A New Approach to the Illness" from Journal of Homosexuality 25(3).

    PubMed

    Lau, Travis

    2016-01-01

    This article serves as one of the supplementary pieces of this special issue on "Mapping Queer Bioethics," in which we take a solipsistic turn to "map" the Journal of Homosexuality itself. Here, the author examines the first feature-length article to address the relationship between HIV status and homosexuality. Lingering on both the temporal gap between the dawn of AIDS in American discourse and its inclusion in this journal, the author asks us to consider (in hindsight) such a delay bearing in mind queer theoretical projects of the present such as gay shame, stigma, and queer biopolitics. PMID:26642922

  19. Teaching and learning in the interactive classroom.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, D U

    2006-12-01

    The Claude Bernard Distinguished Lectureship of the Teaching of Physiology Section is presented annually at the Experimental Biology meeting. The lectureship is named for Prof. Claude Bernard, the experimental physiologist who is credited with introducing the concept of homeostasis. The 2006 Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture was given by Dr. Dee U. Silverthorn from the University of Texas at Austin, TX.

  20. Teaching and Learning in the Interactive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, D. U.

    2006-01-01

    The Claude Bernard Distinguished Lectureship of the Teaching of Physiology Section is presented annually at the Experimental Biology meeting. The lectureship is named for Prof. Claude Bernard, the experimental physiologist who is credited with introducing the concept of homeostasis. The 2006 Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture was given by Dr.…

  1. Efficient simulation of three-dimensional anisotropic cardiac tissue using an adaptive mesh refinement method.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Elizabeth M; Greenside, Henry S; Henriquez, Craig S

    2003-09-01

    A recently developed space-time adaptive mesh refinement algorithm (AMRA) for simulating isotropic one- and two-dimensional excitable media is generalized to simulate three-dimensional anisotropic media. The accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm is investigated for anisotropic and inhomogeneous 2D and 3D domains using the Luo-Rudy 1 (LR1) and FitzHugh-Nagumo models. For a propagating wave in a 3D slab of tissue with LR1 membrane kinetics and rotational anisotropy comparable to that found in the human heart, factors of 50 and 30 are found, respectively, for the speedup and for the savings in memory compared to an algorithm using a uniform space-time mesh at the finest resolution of the AMRA method. For anisotropic 2D and 3D media, we find no reduction in accuracy compared to a uniform space-time mesh. These results suggest that the AMRA will be able to simulate the 3D electrical dynamics of canine ventricles quantitatively for 1 s using 32 1-GHz Alpha processors in approximately 9 h.

  2. Found Space in a Courtyard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curley, Kenneth

    1974-01-01

    Skyrocketing interest rates and soaring construction costs are taking their toll on college and university building programs. At St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin, plans are underway to recycle a residence hall for use as a library. (Author)

  3. 78 FR 50054 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Type: New NVO & OFF License. Icon Logistics Services LLC (OFF), 14725B Baltimore Avenue, Laurel, MD...:, Claude Sterling, President (QI), David Desrouleaux, Vice President, Application Type: Add NVO...

  4. A brief description about the fathers of computer and information sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majid; Shah, Tariq; Shahab, Ali

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we are mainly presenting a tribute to the fathers of computer and information sciences, George Boole and Claude Elwood Shannon with their hardships and achievements. This piece of writing also elaborates the applications of George Boole's and Claude Shannon's works in different disciplines.

  5. Geodiversity characterization and assessment of the Morainic Amphitheatre of Rivoli -Avigliana (NW-Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Enrico; Lucchesi, Stefania; Perotti, Luigi; Giardino, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The concept of Geodiversity in its wide sense refers specifically to particular geosystems that are in themselves complex (e.g diverse) assemblages of bedrock, landform, and soil features. Therefore, geodiversity assessment is strictly related to landscape structure, whose studies are in the field of complex Physical Geography. Moreover, Geodiversity studies provide a fundamental base for geoconservation and environmental management in a holistic way. This is particularly true within complex geomorphological environments, where many intrinsic and extrinsic factors are interconnected. Various procedures has been already applied for the creation of geodiversity maps in different geomorphological context, but especially in wide areas with a large geodiversity of landforms. Pleistocene morainic amphitheatres of the Alpine piedmont regions are indeed particular and complex environments: not only for the geological and geomorphological points of view, but also for their relationships with biotic components and human life. The aim of this study is to carry out a geodiversity characterization of the Rivoli-Avigliana Morainic Amphitheatre (AMRA; NW Italy). The AMRA separates the lower Susa Valley from the middle course of the Sangone River; it is a set of low hills and depressions related to glacial pulsations aged between 750,000 and 12,000 years ago. Earth Sciences knowledge of the area has been compared to detailed field geomorphological and territorial data in order to determine qualitative and quantitative landscape parameters and to evaluate their validity for geodiversity assessment. A first qualitative characterization of the AMRA and an estimation of its geodiversity have been performed by means of geomorphological mapping and stratigraphic studies, including geomorphosites assessment for the same area. Then, geodiversity characterization and evaluation have been performed through the definition and application of quantitative parameters (landform energy, slope

  6. Identifying Configurations of Higher Education: Reflections on Concepts That Compare Complex Cultural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alheit, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the idea of qualitative comparing in order to create a "heuristic concept" that will enable relational structures to be examined, drawing on the sociological tradition founded by Norbert Elias. Subsequently, an empirical research example -- the comparison of three "mentality spaces" in post-socialist…

  7. Within the Shadows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Noah

    1989-01-01

    Discusses why Black inventors historically were not recognized by society and the consequences of this discrimination. Covers the following inventors who defied the odds and beat the stereotype to invent important items: (1) Norbert Rillieux; (2) Jan Ernst Matzeliger; (3) Granville T. Woods; and (4) Garrett A. Morgan. (JS)

  8. Continuity and Change in the Experiences of Transition from School to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, John; O'Connor, Henrietta

    2007-01-01

    Using previously unanalysed data from Norbert Elias's lost study of young workers in Leicester--the "Adjustment of Young Workers to Work Situations and Adult Roles" (1962-1964), and data from a subsequent restudy of the same respondents in 2003-2005, this paper focuses on three main themes. First, we critically examine the concept of transition as…

  9. Configurations of Activity: From the Coupling of Individual Actions to the Emergence of Collective Activity. A Study of Mathematics Teaching Situation in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veyrunes, Philippe; Gal-Petitfaux, Nathalie; Durand, Marc

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and uses the notion of configuration of activity, which extends the Norbert Elias's original concept of social configuration based on the study and analysis of individual and collective activity. Although this concept embraces all types of social activities, in the present study the authors used it to describe and analyse…

  10. Revista de Documentacao de Estudos em Linguistica Teorica e Aplicada (DELTA): Novos Estudos em Gamatica Gerativa (Journal of Documentary Studies in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics [DELTA]: New Studies in Generative Grammar).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revista de Documentacao de Estudos em Linguistica Teorica e Aplicada, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue contains the following articles: "Resumption and Last Resort" (Joseph Aoun); "Existentials, A-Chains, and Reconstruction" (Norbert Hornstein); "How Long Was the Nineteenth Century" (David Lightfoot); "Formal Features and Parameter Setting: A View From Portuguese Past Participles and Romance Future Tenses" (Lucia Lobata); "Revisiting…

  11. Internationalization, Globalization and Relationship Networks as an Epistemological Framework Based on Comparative Studies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Amelia Molina; Lara, José Luis Horacio Andrade

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present some thoughts on the epistemological framework of comparative studies in education. We present some concepts on the internationalization, globalization and inter-relation networks, based on Jürgen Schriewer, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Norbert Elias's theoretical concepts. These reflections were built within the framework of…

  12. 75 FR 28103 - Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    .... Mary's), Norbert Beans, President; Brenda Paukan, Tribal Administrator; G. Simone Paukan, ICWA Case Worker, P.O. Box 48, 200 Paukan Avenue, St. Mary's, AK 99658-0048; Phone: (907) 438- 2932; ICWA direct... . Andreafski, Yupiit of, Carol Alstrom, ICWA Program Director, P.O. Box 88, St. Mary's, AK 99658-0088;...

  13. "Una Communita" Poco Nota della Communicazione non Verbale: Come Communicano il Direttore e l'Orchestra (A Little Known "Community" of Nonverbal Communication: How the Conductor and Orchestra Communicate).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonardi, Magda Farago

    1992-01-01

    Examines how conductors and orchestras communicate. Communication is essentially nonverbal. Conductors use gestures, gaze, facial expression, nods and posture to deliver their message. Norbert Weiner's Cybernetic Theory of human communication is seen as a means of analyzing precisely how this musical communication takes place. (16 references) (LET)

  14. Out of a creative jumble of ideas in the middle of last Century: Wiener, interdisciplinarity, and all that.

    PubMed

    Montagnini, Leone; Tabacchi, Marco Elio; Termini, Settimo

    2016-01-01

    Is Biophysics an interdisciplinary science? In order to answer this rhetorical question, it can be useful to look back at history of disciplines, as well as that of the scientific institutions helping their development. In this contribution some aspects of the unusual hodgepodge of concepts involving Biophysics, the legacy of Cybernetics, cognitive science and the central figure of Norbert Wiener are presented and discussed.

  15. [Apothecaries' arms of Voltaire's family].

    PubMed

    Chaigneau, M

    1998-01-01

    Apothecaries of Voltaire's family can be divided into two groups. Marceton Family: Claude Marceton, Hierosme and Pierre Testefolle, from Thouars. Arouet family: Jehan Arouet, Pierre Rochard and Jean Gougeard. Five of those apothecaries beand arms. PMID:11625327

  16. Great Help for Older Americans | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may prevent or delay disability. Claude D. Pepper Older American Independence Centers (OAICs) University of California ... Wake Forest University P.I. Stephen Kritchevsky, PhD Pepper Coordinating Center Kevin High, MD University of Florida ...

  17. Jets Spout Far Closer to Black Hole Than Thought, Scientists Say

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    opportunity to study the origin, evolution, and long-term behavior of jets because the X rays come from a region very close to the black hole. Of the hundreds of jets observed in the radio and X-ray bands, this is the only one for which we have a solid statement that it contains atomic nuclei and for which we are sure of the internal temperature and density." Supermassive black holes with jets, such as quasars, might display similar behavior, but they are so massive and so distant that changes cannot be observed because time scales are too long. Thus SS 433 serves as a laboratory to study the jet phenomenon "close to home," Marshall said. As such, further Chandra observations are planned. Collaborators on the investigation were Claude Canizares, Julie Kane, and Norbert Schulz, all of MIT. For images, refer to http://space.mit.edu/~hermanm/ss433.html.

  18. A Weather Analysis System for the Baja California Peninsula: Tropical Cyclone Season of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, L. M.

    2009-05-01

    General characteristics of tropical weather systems are documented on a real-time basis. This study covers the warm season of 2008, from May through November, and includes observations from satellite imagery as well as reports from a rain-gauge network. During this season, the basin had 16 tropical storms and three of them made landfall in the Baja California peninsula, in northwestern Mexico. Tropical storm Julio developed in August and tropical storm Lowell made landfall in mid-September. Norbert, in early October, was the most intense hurricane of the season with strong winds and heavy rainfall that caused significant damage to the infrastructure in the southern peninsula. By the next day, the system moved over the mainland, causing major flooding in Sinaloa, Sonora, and Chihuahua. By request of the Baja California government, a meteorological perspective associated with the structure, intensity, and motion of Hurricane Norbert was presented. This consisted of high-resolution satellite imagery used to explain the spatial and temporal patterns of convection. This material provided an integral analysis of Norbert's behavior during its approach and passage over land, and it was one element, used by emergency managers, to determine the extent of the affected areas.

  19. Thermodynamic design of natural gas liquefaction cycles for offshore application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Lim, Hye Su; Choe, Kun Hyung

    2014-09-01

    A thermodynamic study is carried out for natural gas liquefaction cycles applicable to offshore floating plants, as partial efforts of an ongoing governmental project in Korea. For offshore liquefaction, the most suitable cycle may be different from the on-land LNG processes under operation, because compactness and simple operation are important as well as thermodynamic efficiency. As a turbine-based cycle, closed Claude cycle is proposed to use NG (natural gas) itself as refrigerant. The optimal condition for NG Claude cycle is determined with a process simulator (Aspen HYSYS), and the results are compared with fully-developed C3-MR (propane pre-cooled mixed refrigerant) JT cycles and various N2 (nitrogen) Brayton cycles in terms of efficiency and compactness. The newly proposed NG Claude cycle could be a good candidate for offshore LNG processes.

  20. Simplified Helium Refrigerator Cycle Analysis Using the `Carnot Step'

    SciTech Connect

    P. Knudsen; V. Ganni

    2006-05-01

    An analysis of the Claude form of an idealized helium liquefier for the minimum input work reveals the ''Carnot Step'' for helium refrigerator cycles. As the ''Carnot Step'' for a multi-stage polytropic compression process consists of equal pressure ratio stages; similarly for an idealized helium liquefier the ''Carnot Step'' consists of equal temperature ratio stages for a given number of expansion stages. This paper presents the analytical basis and some useful equations for the preliminary examination of existing and new Claude helium refrigeration cycles.

  1. Videotape Recording of Narcotic Addicts in Group Therapy: The Analysis of Communicational and Interactive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soloway, Irv

    An approach to the study of drug sub-culture groups and a model for predictive research in the identification and isolation of heroin addicts are developed in this thesis. The basic methodologies employed are the linguistic methods of Kenneth Pike and Claude Levi-Strauss for use in the analysis of social phenomena. Communicative mechanisms by…

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Over-the-Counter Drug Use by the Elderly. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains the prepared statements and panel testimony from the Congressional hearing on over-the-counter (OTC) drug use by the elderly. Opening statements are given by Representatives Claude Pepper (chairman), Ralph Regula, Mary Rose Oakar, Michael Bilirakis, Tom Lantos, and Hal Daub. Topics which are covered include the incidence and…

  3. Astronaut Jeffrey Hoffman on RMS during third of five HST EVAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Jeffrey A. Hoffman signals directions to Swiss Astronaut Claude Nicollier, as the latter controls the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm during the third of five space walks on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission. A portion of the Earth's surface can be seen directly behind him.

  4. Hubble Space Telescoe being surveyed by cameras mounted on the RMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is backdropped against the blackness of space in this 70mm frame recorded during a video survey of the spacecraft following the telescope's berthing in Endeavour's cargo bay. Swiss scientist Claude Nicollier controlled the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm slowly so that mounted TV cameras could show flight controllers the various areas on the telescope.

  5. Travaux Neuchatelois de linguistique (Neuchatel Working Papers in Linguistics).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Linguistique.

    This collection of working papers in linguistics includes four works. "Autour de la racine indo-europeenne 'pet-' ('voler') (pour servir a l'histoire des faits latins)" ("Concerning the Indo-European Root 'Pet-' ('To Fly') (To Serve as an Example of Latin Facts)" by Claude Sandoz looks at the Latin manifestations of the root and illustrates the…

  6. A Physiologist's View of Homeostasis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of…

  7. Sartre: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Edith, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Edith Kern, Claude-Edmonde Magny, Henri Peyre, Kenneth Douglas, Edmund Wilson, Theophil Spoerri, Jacques Guicharnaud, Eric Bentley, Robert Champigny, Oreste F. Pucciani, Frederic Jameson, Rene Girard, Guido…

  8. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  9. 75 FR 51518 - Office of the Secretary: Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards Membership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ..., Anthony T. Gee, King W. Gibbs, David C. Griffith, Michael S. Holian, Thomas P. Horne, Dwight A. Johnson.... John Geraci, Michael Guerci, Lloyd S. Harris, Claude Kratzke, Stephen R. Maddox, John M. Markison... Saul, Roger Simons, James F. Smith, Daniel C. Walter, Gregory A. Wood, Stephen Office of...

  10. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Second Congress, Second Session on Nutrition and Human Needs. Part 2--Nutritional Needs of Nation's Older Americans. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., June 14, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    This hearing before the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs began with opening statements by a number of senators. Following this, statements were made by a number of witnesses, including Hon. Claude Pepper, a U.S. Representative from the Eleventh District of the State of Florida; Dr. Jean Mayer, professor of nutrition, Harvard…

  11. A Course Connecting Astronomy to Art, History, and Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Don

    2015-01-01

    For the past 20 years the author has taught an Honors College course combining astronomy and the humanities. The purpose of this note is to give examples of methods that can be adapted to classroom use for topics including night sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Claude Monet, historical events influenced by astronomical factors,…

  12. Pathways and Participation in Vocational and Technical Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This document presents 10 national reports on widely differing traditions regarding vocational and technical education and training (VOTEC) in Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. Chapter 1, "Synthesis of Country Reports" (Claude Pair), covers programs and pathways, quantitative trends in participation, and hypotheses…

  13. Evolution of an Educator: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, Harold I.

    2004-01-01

    In selecting a Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecturer, the Teaching Section looks for an individual who has made major contributions to physiology education. Dr. Harold Modell has certainly earned this honor. Harold has an undergraduate degree from the University of Minnesota, a Masters in biomedical engineering from Iowa State, and, continuing the…

  14. [The sense of the senseless, psychoanalytic aspects of delusion in psychosis].

    PubMed

    Chaperot, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The psychoanalytic approach to delusion in psychosis leads us to examine the function of a "furrow". It is necessary to remain in the furrow in order not to become delusional. References to Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Mélanie Klein and Jean-Claude Maleval enlighten us as to the origin and the function of delusion as an attempt to give meaning.

  15. Endeavour returns from Hubble servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    During the hour-long descent from space ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier helped mission commander Dick Covey and pilot Ken Bowersox monitor the shuttle's cockpit displays. During their 11-day mission the astronauts fitted the telescope with corrective optics and a new set of European solar panels. If all goes according to plan the observatory will be restored to very nearly its original capability. The first images from the rejuvenated telescope should be released in about 6-8 weeks. ESA had a major role in this mission. In addition to providing the solar arrays, the European Space Agency helped NASA test the Costar corrective optics system. ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier operated the shuttle's robot arm throughout the complex spacewalks to service the telescope and during the crucial capture and release phases. "This was a particularly important international mission from the standpoint of our Swiss and European Space Agency crew member Claude Nicollier, who played an incredibly important part in the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope", mission commander Dick told Swiss Minister of Internal Affairs Mrs Ruth Dreifuss, during a VIP telephone call on Sunday morning. "If there was an unsung hero of this mission it would be Claude and his arm because without them we could not have worked the way we did and been as successful as we were".

  16. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  17. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  18. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  19. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile...

  20. It's a Wrap! A Study of Installations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project for junior and senior high school students called the wrapped chair project where students wrapped chairs using torn sheets in the style of artists, Christo Javacheff and Jeanne-Claude de-Guillebon. Explains that students created thumbnail sketches and drew their finished drawing in either charcoal or chalk. (CMK)

  1. Actes des Journees de linguistique (Proceedings of the Linguistics Conference) (12th, Quebec City, Canada, March 26-27, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boissonneault, Chantal, Ed.

    Papers on language research include: "L'expression de l'opposition en Latin" ("The Expression of Opposition in Latin" (Claude Begin); "Le francais de l'Abitibi: characteristiques phonetiques et origine socio-geographique des locuteurs" ("The French of Abitibi: Phonetic Characteristics and Socio-Geographic Origin of Speakers") (Chantal…

  2. ESA Mission Specialist (MS) Nicollier dons EMU for simulation in JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 prior to an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation. Hanging from the EMU neck ring is the communications carrier assembly (CCA).

  3. ESA Mission Specialist (MS) Nicollier dons EMU for simulation in JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier, smiling, pauses during the donning of his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Nicollier is preparing for an underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation and familiarization session in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Hanging from the EMU neck ring is the communications carrier assembly (CCA) strap.

  4. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American Physiology Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rall, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological…

  5. Monet's Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovich-Cheney, Laura

    2007-01-01

    From 1899 until his death in 1926, Claude Monet painted a series of watercolor landscapes of his water lily garden and Japanese bridge in Giverny, France. Monet eventually abandoned the banks entirely as subject matter and concentrated solely on the water. These paintings, particularly "The Water Lilies," show a surface in which the shimmering…

  6. Observatoire de Lyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Observatoire de Lyon is a laboratory of Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, under the authority of the INSTITUT NATIONAL DES SCIENCES DE L'UNIVERS. It constitutes the Centre de Recherche astrophysique de Lyon together with the astrophysics group of the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon....

  7. Charting a Global Future for Education in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton, Ann J.

    2005-01-01

    The 2005 Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture was presented at the XXXV International Congress of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) in San Diego, CA, by Ann J. Sefton. Dr. Sefton is an Emeritus Professor of Physiology of the University of Sydney and co-Chair of the IUPS Education Committee. A full profile of Dr. Sefton is included in this issue's "The…

  8. The Attempted Dismantling of the Medicare Home Care Benefit. A Report by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Claude

    This document presents Congressman Claude Pepper's report on the Medicare Home Care Benefit. Section I traces the history of home health care in the United States. Section II offers statistics and general background information about older Americans and Medicare. The beginning of the Medicare home care benefit and its present operation are…

  9. Alcohol and the Elderly. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (June 10, 1983, Astoria, N.Y.).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    The proceedings of the Congressional hearing on alcohol and the elderly are presented. Following introductory statements by the committee chairman, Senator Claude Pepper, and Representatives Mario Biaggi and Geraldine Ferraro, the briefing paper, "Crisis in Health Care Part 2: Alcoholism," prepared by the subcommittee staff is presented. Issues…

  10. HMO's and Medicare: Problems in the Oversight of a Promising Partnership. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine problems in the partnership of Medicare and Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO's). Opening statements are included from committee chairman Claude Pepper and from Representative Lawrence J. Smith. Two panels of witnesses address…

  11. Abuses in Guardianship of the Elderly and Infirm: A National Disgrace. A Briefing by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (September 25, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents a briefing by Representative Claude Pepper on the abuses in guardianship of the elderly and infirm, and testimony from witnesses at the Congressional hearing called to examine the issue of guardianship abuse. The opening statement of Representative Pepper and a prepared statement of Representative Helen Delich Bentley are…

  12. Hearing on H.R. 670, The School Completion and Incentives Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Miami, Florida).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document presents witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing. Statements are included from Representatives Claude Pepper, Carl Perkins, Charles Hayes, and Nick Rahall. Witnesses providing testimony include: (1) Joseph Fernandez, Superintendent of Dade County Public Schools, Florida; (2) Nan Rich, who describes…

  13. Elder Abuse. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains testimony and prepared statements from a Congressional hearing called to examine the issue of elder abuse. Chairman Claude Pepper's opening statement discusses the horror of elder abuse and calls for federal legislation, similar to the child abuse legislation, for combating elder abuse. Elder abuse is defined as physical…

  14. Federal Drug Law Enforcement and Interdiction. Hearing before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, May 22, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control.

    This document contains testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing on federal drug law enforcement. Statements are given from Congressman Claude Pepper, the staff director of the National Narcotics Border Interdiction System (NNBIS), an administrator from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), a commissioner from the…

  15. European astronaut training in Houston.

    PubMed

    Chiarenza, O

    1993-11-01

    Three European astronauts are currently training as Space Shuttle Mission Specialists at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. Two of the astronauts, Maurizio Cheli and Jean-Francois Clervoy, recently became members of NASA's 'astronaut pool' and have entered the Advanced Training phase. The third one, Claude Nicollier, is now preparing for the mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope in December.

  16. Ability Is Ageless. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents the text of a hearing on the relationship of ability to age, in reference to removing age caps so that age will be irrelevent to getting and keeping a job. Statements by Representatives Ron Wyden, Claude Pepper, Ralph Regula, Bill Schuette, Jim Lightfoot, Ike Skelton, George Wortley, and Don Bonker are included. Testimony by…

  17. Catastrophic Health Insurance: The Tennessee Perspective. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (Chattanooga, Tennessee).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing held in Chattanooga, Tennessee to gain that state's perspective on catastrophic health insurance. Opening statements are included from Representatives Marilyn Lloyd and Claude Pepper. Two panels of witnesses provide testimony. The first panel,…

  18. APS at 125: A Look Back at the Founding of the American Physiological Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Kathy L.

    2013-01-01

    Early efforts in physiological research in the United States were produced by lone investigators working in laboratories funded by their own medical practices. In Europe, however, Claude Bernard and Carl Ludwig produced a new model of scientific research laboratories funded by the state that sought to develop the pursuit of biomedical research as…

  19. Actes des Journees de linguistique (Proceedings of the Linguistics Conference) (13th, Quebec, Canada, March 25-26, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Eric, Ed.

    Papers on language research in this volume include the following: Pour une comparaison des voyelles nasals du Quebec et du Haut-Jura: observations, methodologie et outils infomatiques (A Comparison of Quebec and Haut-Jura's Nasal Vowels: Observations, Methodologies, and Instrumentation) (Vincent Arnaud and Claude Paradis); Le negociation du sens…

  20. 77 FR 25538 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... DOMENICA CALHOUN BRIAN DOUGLAS CALZAVARA RICCARDO BRUNO CARRASCO FRANCESCO CARRASCO JAIME CARY LISA JANE... LEWIS CHARLES ALBERT LEWIS MARY ELLEN LI ZHISHUN ] LIANG HSIAO-YUN TANG LIANG PHILLIP CHINCHIEN LIM FUNG... AILEEN MCKAY DOUGLAS MAXWELL MCKAY JAMES ALEXANDER MERTENS DIANE MARIE MESSERLI OLIVIER JEAN-CLAUDE...

  1. 75 FR 8652 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, NE Application for Subzone CNH America, LLC (Agricultural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... plant located at 3445 W. Stolley Park Road; and Site 2 (38.93 acres)--warehouse located at 1011 Claude Road. The facilities are used for the manufacture, testing, warehousing and distribution of combines...: Articles of plastic (incl. tubes, hoses, fittings, stoppers and lids); articles of rubber (incl....

  2. An Evolution in Student-Centered Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    The American Physiological Society (APS) Teaching Section annually honors an educator through its Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture at the Experimental Biology meeting. Since I knew about my selection for almost a year, I had a long time to think about what I wanted to say and how I wanted to say it. The theme of my presentation was…

  3. Workers' Attitudes to Technical Change: An Integrated Survey of Research. Industrial Relations Aspects of Manpower Policy 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touraine, Alain; And Others

    Methods for encouraging positive worker attitude and behavior toward change were examined to provide a basis for re-evaluation of current policies and programs relating to introduction of technological changes. The literature reviewed is presented in sections of: (1) "The Worker and the Occupational System," by Claude Durand, (2) "The Worker and…

  4. Judge Rules Plagiarism-Detection Tool Falls under "Fair Use"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Judge Claude M. Hilton, of the U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Virginia, in March found that scanning the student papers for the purpose of detecting plagiarism is a "highly transformative" use that falls under the fair-use provision of copyright law. He ruled that the company "makes no use of any work's particular expressive or creative…

  5. Peut-on ne pas etre eclectique? (Can We Not Be Eclectic?)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Goffic, Pierre

    1977-01-01

    An interview with Jean-Claude Chevalier in which the advantages and dangers of eclecticism are discussed. Some topics covered are: the role of traditional grammar; recent linguistic research in French; the development of teaching methods; Chomsky's theory of universal grammar. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  6. Haitian Art: Exploring Cultural Identity. Instructional Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Anne Marie; Robinson, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Presents an instructional resource on Haitian art and provides historical information on Haiti. Features four artists: (1) Hector Hyppolite; (2) Edouard Duval-Carrie; (3) Paul Claude Gardere; and (4) Bien-Aime Sylvain. Includes background information on each artist, learning activities, and reproductions of their artwork. (CMK)

  7. Long-Term Care: Need for a National Policy. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (December 15, 1983, San Francisco, California).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains transcripts of witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to review the need for a national health care policy for long-term care. Opening statements are presented from committee chairman Claude Pepper and from Representatives Sala Burton and Barbara Boxer. Testmonies are presented from…

  8. Long-Term Care Insurance: Coverage Varies Widely in a Developing Market. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care, Select Committeee on Aging, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    In response to a request by Congressman Claude Pepper, the General Accounting Office (GAO) conducted a study to examine the private long-term care insurance market. The GAO analyzed the premiums, benefits, and limitations of 33 policies offered by 25 insurers in 1986. The GAO assessed the potential for abuse in this market by surveying state…

  9. Coding and Quantization in Communications and Microeconomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Since information theory was developed by Claude E. Shannon, in addition to its primary role in communications and networking, it has broadened to find applications in many other areas of science and technology, such as microeconomics, statistics, and neuroscience. This thesis investigates the application of information theoretic viewpoints to two…

  10. 76 FR 35271 - Toyota Motor Corporation, Inc., on Behalf of Toyota Corporation, and Toyota Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ...: June 10, 2011. Claude H. Harris, Director, Office of Vehicle Safety Compliance. BILLING CODE 4910-59-P ...) and 30120(h) (see implementing rule at 49 CFR part 556), Toyota has petitioned for an exemption from... statutory provisions (49 U.S.C. 30118(d) and 30120(h)) that permit manufacturers to file petitions for...

  11. Auf De Suche Nach Der Guten Schule: In Search of a Great School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirichello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This module is the result of the author Michael Chirichello's visit to Luxembourg in 2008. He includes the contact information here for the Atert-Lycee Redange principal or director: Claude Boever, Directeur, email: directeur@alr.lu This publication aligns with the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISSLC) Standard 1: "An…

  12. Harlem, History, and First-Year Composition: Reconstructing the Harlem of the 1930s through Multiple Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    2003-01-01

    Describing the Harlem Riot of 1935, black author and poet Claude McKay wrote, "On Tuesday the crowds went crazy like the remnants of a defeated, abandoned, and hungry army. Their rioting was the gesture of despair of a bewildered, baffled, and disillusioned people". By nearly all accounts, the riot marks the historical end of the Harlem…

  13. Panning for Gold: Utility of the World Wide Web for Metadata and Authority Control in Special Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellero, Nadine P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of the World Wide Web as a name authority resource and tool for special collections' analytic-level cataloging, based on experiences at The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. Highlights include primary documents and metadata; authority control and the Web as authority source information; and future possibilities. (Author/LRW)

  14. If Only Clairaut Had Dynamic Geometric Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hyewon; Reys, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Geometry is a major area of study in middle school mathematics, yet middle school and secondary students have difficulty learning important geometric concepts. This article considers Alexis-Claude Clairaut's approach that emphasizes engaging student curiosity about key ideas and theorems instead of directly teaching theorems before their…

  15. STS-103 crew signs autographs after presentation at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    After a presentation at KSC for employees and VIPs about their mission, STS-103 crew members sign autographs. From left are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier and Jean-Francois Clervoy, Pilot Scott Kelly, and Mission Specialist Steven Smith. The STS- 103 mission, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope, included three space walks. STS-103 launched Dec. 19, 1999, and landed Dec. 27, 1999.

  16. STS-103 crew signs autographs after presentation at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    After a presentation at KSC for employees and VIPs about their mission, STS-103 crew members sign autographs. From left are Mission Specialist Steven Smith, Pilot Scott Kelly, and Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy and Claude Nicollier. The STS- 103 mission, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope, included three space walks. STS-103 launched Dec. 19, 1999, and landed Dec. 27, 1999.

  17. Repetition Makes an Impression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slemmer, Paula M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes two art projects, one for second-grade students and the other for third-grade students, inspired by the artwork of Claude Monet. The second-graders created leaf prints to frame the Impressionist autumn trees they painted, while the third-grade lesson centered around the videotape "Linnea in Monet's Garden." (CMK)

  18. Kindergarten Monets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionne, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Integrating art with literature and science enhances students' learning and retention. Whenever possible, the introduction of the author's art lessons include a relevant artist, such as Claude Monet. In this article, kindergartners paint a pond and learn how to make water lilies using colored tissue-paper squares. (Contains 4 resources.)

  19. Monet Flowers: How My Summer Trip Inspired a Garden of Art...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunay, Cecelia M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson plan designed for first- through fifth-grade students in which they made their own impressionist-style artworks. Explains that the lesson was introduced with a discussion on Claude Monet, his many art prints, and the impressionist genre. Explores the differences between things of nature and man-made objects. Notes materials and…

  20. Modern Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkus, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Claude Monet and the Impressionists were the forward thinkers and painters of their time. They used quick brushstrokes and a rapid pace to capture lively outdoor scenes. Inspired by the colors and shadows revealed by sunlight, the Impressionists typically worked outside, without many preliminary sketches or drafts. This was in direct contrast to…

  1. Landscapes. Artists' Workshop Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Penny; Roundhill, Clare

    This instructional resource, designed to be used by and with elementary level students, provides inspiration for landscape painting by presenting the work of six different artists. These include: "Fuji in Clear Weather" (Katsushika Hokusai, 1823-29); "The Tree of Life" (Gustav Klimt, c. 1905-1909); "The Waterlily Pond" (Claude Monet, 1899);…

  2. Shades of Monet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baber, Bonnie

    1999-01-01

    Presents an art lesson for elementary students using painter Claude Monet as an introduction to Impressionism. Discusses Monet and his artwork. Explains that the students copy Monet's painting "The House of Parliament, Sunset" in order to draw the contour or outline of the buildings. (CMK)

  3. A Monet Garden Installation: A Momentary Gift of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Discusses art lessons where students created a three-dimensional rendering of Claude Monet's gardens using the Impressionist style. Focused on teaching students about art history, Impressionistic art, and installation of art. Addresses the goals of the lesson and the process of creating the art. (CMK)

  4. Show Me the Monet!...and Other Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Michele

    1999-01-01

    Describes a project designed to advertise art history where eighth-grade students painted the classroom door windows throughout their school recreating famous classic paintings from various artists, such as Claude Monet or Vincent van Gogh. Explains that the students learned about different artistic styles and exhibited a great deal of pride in…

  5. Retreat to Eden: Time and the Cosmos in Monet's Images of Giverny.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Call, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Attempts to explain Claude Monet's obsession with water lilies in the last 25 years of his life through an interdisciplinary approach combining ideas from the history of landscape design, social history, and anthropology. Offers Monet's gardens at Giverny (France), his series paintings, and the railroad as some possible influences on his painting.…

  6. Monet's Water Lilies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroni, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Students love the colors of Monet prints. The sunny yellows, misty blues, soft lavenders, and outrageous oranges. Using this as inspiration, Michelle Maroni wanted her students to discover new painting techniques and ways of planning a composition with more spontaneity. In this article, she describes how she introduced Claude Monet to her students…

  7. Integrate the Arts. Monet's Garden Pops Up!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Mary

    1996-01-01

    This article outlines the steps in an art activity on the elements of landscapes and touches on the topic of perspective. In the activity students create three-dimensional secret gardens of their own out of construction paper. The activity is based on Claude Monet's painting and his garden in Giverny (Normandy, France). (SM)

  8. Native Sons: A Critical Study of Twentieth-Century Negro American Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolies, Edward

    This analysis of 20th-century Negro literature contains chapters discussing 16 authors: (1) "The First Forty Years: 1900-1940," including W. E. B. DuBois, Charles W. Chesnutt, James W. Johnson, Paul L. Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, and Countee Cullen; (2) "Migration: William Attaway and 'Blood on the Forge'"; (3) "Richard…

  9. On the Shoulders of Giants: From Boole to Shannon to Taube: The Origins and Development of Computerized Information from the Mid-19th Century to the Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the evolution of computerized information storage and retrieval from its mid-nineteenth century beginnings in theoretical works on logic by George Boole, to the applications of Boole's logic to switching circuits by Claude Shannon in the 1930s, to the development of coordinate indexing by Mortimer Taube in the 1940s and 1950s. (Contains…

  10. Faith, Friendship and Learning: Intercultural Communication in the Republic of Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kenneth; Anderson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This article uses the renowned antiquarian Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (1580-1637) as a case study to examine the intellectual and religious culture of the early seventeenth century. In particular, using his extensive correspondence, it investigates the manner in which the exchange of letters could be used to reinforce the identity of one…

  11. Structural Reform in Higher Education Collective Bargaining. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions (12th, New York, New York, April 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    Structural reform in higher education collective bargaining is examined in these conference proceedings, along with recent state bargaining legislation, and legal, union, and management views concerning sex discrimination in higher education. The 19 article topics and authors include: the problem of reshaping the fringe package (Claude Campbell);…

  12. Linking Stereotype Threat and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.

    2007-01-01

    Claude Steele's stereotype threat hypothesis has attracted significant attention in recent years. This study tested one of the main tenets of his theory--that stereotype threat serves to increase individual anxiety levels, thus hurting performance--using real-time measures of physiological arousal. Subjects were randomly assigned to either high or…

  13. Gender, Stereotype Threat, and Anxiety: Psychophysiological and Cognitive Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Claude Steele's stereotype threat hypothesis proposed that negative group stereotypes increase individual anxiety levels, hurting performance. However, the role of anxiety in stereotype threat has not been fully explored. This study examined the hypothesis that experimental manipulation of stereotype threat would influence real-time…

  14. [The sense of the senseless, psychoanalytic aspects of delusion in psychosis].

    PubMed

    Chaperot, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The psychoanalytic approach to delusion in psychosis leads us to examine the function of a "furrow". It is necessary to remain in the furrow in order not to become delusional. References to Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Mélanie Klein and Jean-Claude Maleval enlighten us as to the origin and the function of delusion as an attempt to give meaning. PMID:21416882

  15. Poststructuralism as Theory and Practice in the English Classroom. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Harold K., Jr.

    This digest provides a historical review of some current literary theories and practices which developed from contemporary philosophy. Structuralism, associated with Ferdinand de Saussure and Claude Levi-Strauss, with a seemingly scientific view of language and culture posited a systemic "center" that organized and sustained an entire structure.…

  16. Chandra Discovers the X-ray Signature of a Powerful Wind from a Galactic Microquasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has detected, for the first time in X rays, a stellar fingerprint known as a P Cygni profile--the distinctive spectral signature of a powerful wind produced by an object in space. The discovery reveals a 4.5-million-mile-per-hour wind coming from a highly compact pair of stars in our galaxy, report researchers from Penn State and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in a paper they will present on 8 November 2000 during a meeting of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. The paper also has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "To our knowledge, these are the first P Cygni profiles reported in X rays," say researchers Niel Brandt, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, and Norbert S. Schulz, research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The team made the discovery during their first observation of a binary-star system with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched into space in July 1999. The system, known as Circinus X-1, is located about 20,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Circinus near the Southern Cross. It contains a super-dense neutron star in orbit around a normal fusion-burning star like our Sun. Although Circinus X-1 was discovered in 1971, many properties of this system remain mysterious because Circinus X-1 lies in the galactic plane where obscuring dust and gas have blocked its effective study in many wavelengths. The P Cygni spectral profile, previously detected primarily at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths but never before in X rays, is the textbook tool astronomers rely on for probing stellar winds. The profile looks like the outline of a roller coaster, with one really big hill and valley in the middle, on a data plot with velocity on one axis and the flow rate of photons per second on the other. It is named after the famous star P Cygni, in which such

  17. [Pertinence of the Elias approach in history of medicine].

    PubMed

    Wenger, Alexandre

    2003-01-01

    Norbert Elias has notably influenced the historiography of the Early Modern Period since the 1970s. In the course of the borrowing of his concepts by different disciplines, the uniqueness of these concepts was nevertheless altered. This article aims to show that Elias' 'Sociology of configurations' proposed an original point of view on Longue Durée in history. It thus suggests: 1) to re-evaluate the historical dimension of Elias' sociology; 2) to question eventual contributions to present-day research to the history of medicine and health.

  18. The story of the body and the story of the person: towards an ethics of representing human bodies and body-parts.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2005-01-01

    Western culture has a few traditions of representing the human body - among them mortuary art (gisants), the freak show, the culture of the relics, renaissance art and pre-modern and modern anatomy. A historical analysis in the spirit of Norbert Elias is offered with regard to body - person relationship in anatomy. Modern anatomy is characterized by separating the story of the person from the story of the body, a strategy that is incompatible with the bio-psycho-social paradigm of clinical medicine. The paper discusses different aspects of the above traditions and how they might bear on this conflict and on contemporary bioethics and bedside practice.

  19. Quantum mechanical coherence, resonance, and mind

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-03-26

    Norbert Wiener and J.B.S. Haldane suggested during the early thirties that the profound changes in our conception of matter entailed by quantum theory opens the way for our thoughts, and other experiential or mind-like qualities, to play a role in nature that is causally interactive and effective, rather than purely epiphenomenal, as required by classical mechanics. The mathematical basis of this suggestion is described here, and it is then shown how, by giving mind this efficacious role in natural process, the classical character of our perceptions of the quantum universe can be seen to be a consequence of evolutionary pressures for the survival of the species.

  20. A-Train Data Depot (ATDD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter M.; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Savtchenko, Andrey; Kummerer, Robert; Gopolan, Arun

    2008-01-01

    ATDD is a web based tool which provides collocated data and display products for a number of A-train instruments Cloudsat, Calipso, OMI, AIRS, MODIS, MLS, POLDER-3, and ECWMF model data. Products provided include Clouds, Aerosols, Water Vapor, Temperatures and trace gases. All input data is online and in HDF4, HDF5 format. Display products include curtain images, horizontal strips, line plot overlays, and GE kmz files. Sample products are shown for two type of events. Hurricane event, Norbert, Oct 8, 2008 and a dust storm event over the Arabian Sea, Nov 13-14, 2008.

  1. Identification of new phytoconstituents and antimicrobial activity in stem bark of Mangifera indica (L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruchi; Singh, S K; Maharia, R S; Garg, A N

    2015-02-01

    Mangifera indica, commonly called mango or amra belonging to a family of Anacardiaceae, is an important medicinal plant widely used in a variety of Ayurvedic preparations. Extract of its bark, leaves, flowers and kernels are being extensively used for curing various chronic diseases. Mango wood is used in yagya as base fire through which medicated smoke is generated. Three new compounds have been isolated from methanolic and hexane extracts of stem bark: 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, mono(2-ethylhexyl)ester and 9,12-tetradecadiene-1-ol-acetate from the hexane extract and 3-chloro-N-(2-phenylethyl) propanamide from the methanolic extract. These were first separated by thin layer chromatography and later in a silica gel column and identified by characteristic infrared bands corresponding to respective functional groups. The compounds were further confirmed on the basis of GC-MS fragmentation pattern after comparing the data with NIST mass spectral database. All three compounds exhibited antimicrobial activity due to triterpenoids and flavonoids. Elemental analyses by INAA show it to be enriched in essential nutrient elements such as Ca, Fe, K, Mn and Zn which all play an important role in enzymatic processes.

  2. Identification of new phytoconstituents and antimicrobial activity in stem bark of Mangifera indica (L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruchi; Singh, S K; Maharia, R S; Garg, A N

    2015-02-01

    Mangifera indica, commonly called mango or amra belonging to a family of Anacardiaceae, is an important medicinal plant widely used in a variety of Ayurvedic preparations. Extract of its bark, leaves, flowers and kernels are being extensively used for curing various chronic diseases. Mango wood is used in yagya as base fire through which medicated smoke is generated. Three new compounds have been isolated from methanolic and hexane extracts of stem bark: 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, mono(2-ethylhexyl)ester and 9,12-tetradecadiene-1-ol-acetate from the hexane extract and 3-chloro-N-(2-phenylethyl) propanamide from the methanolic extract. These were first separated by thin layer chromatography and later in a silica gel column and identified by characteristic infrared bands corresponding to respective functional groups. The compounds were further confirmed on the basis of GC-MS fragmentation pattern after comparing the data with NIST mass spectral database. All three compounds exhibited antimicrobial activity due to triterpenoids and flavonoids. Elemental analyses by INAA show it to be enriched in essential nutrient elements such as Ca, Fe, K, Mn and Zn which all play an important role in enzymatic processes. PMID:25555263

  3. [Autopsy of a common error: the introduction of curare in Europe by W. Raleigh].

    PubMed

    Lienhart, A

    2009-04-01

    One of the most erroneous and repeated assertion in the history of pharmacology for anaesthetists is to say that "the curare was introduced in Europe by Sir Walter Raleigh under the name of ourari". On the contrary, the names to be reminded are: Lawrence Keymis for the first citation of the word ourari, José Gumilla for the word curare and the description of its effects, Charles-Marie de La Condamine for the import of the first known samples. The mistake was initiated by Alexander von Humboldt and developed by the physiologist Münter, a student of Johannes Müller, quoted by Claude Bernard. The repetition of this error was facilitated by the world diffusion of Claude Bernard's work.

  4. [Saugrain's censuses: genesis of a hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Hussenet, J

    1996-01-01

    Many historians of population have tried to determine the origins of the population statistics published in the Dénombrement du Royaume (1709) and in the Nouveau Dénombrement du Royaume (1720) by Claude Saugrain. J. Hussenet provides new developments; his main document is a manuscript kept in the Senate arkivs listing, at the time of Regency, more than 38,000 french settlements classified. The Dictionnaire géographique du Royaume de France seems to be the copy of a much older book commissioned by the Contrôle général des Finances. Claude Saugrain may have used it for his publication of 1709 and to a smaller extent for the one of 1720. A close examination of this document shows that the Contrôle général concern was to evaluate rather count the population.

  5. [52th Commemoration of French Journal of Plastic Aesthetic Surgery (1956-2007). Fifty-four years of editorial; five Editors-in-chief].

    PubMed

    Cariou, J-L

    2007-08-01

    The french Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (SOF.CPRE) is born December 3th 1952. Initially without "aesthetic", this "key-word" is agreed in 1983 and the symbols are advanced since: SFCPR, SFCPRE, SOF.CPRE. Its official organ, formerly included in Annales de chirurgie (1954-1955), become Annales de chirurgie plastique in 1956, Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique in 1983 and finally Annales de chirurgie plastique esthétique (ACPE) in 1992. Since the origin, five Editors-in-chief succeded: Claude Dufourmentel, Raymond Vilain, Jean-Pierre Lalardrie, Claude Lê-Quang, Jean-Luc Cariou. Four of them are alive, Raymond Vilain is dead. The author relate here the natural story of these five editors who had all a triple route: personnal, surgical and editorial.

  6. The Gates, 1979-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    One art critic called it pure Despite the mixed reviews of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's temporary art installation in New York's Central Park, the public reaction to The Gates was largely positive.The Gates consisted of 7,500 orange PVC frames straddling the park's walkways that varied in widths from 5 1/2 feet to 18 feet. Eight-foot-long ripstop…

  7. Solar Sea Power Plants (SSPP): A critical review and survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of technical and economic matters relating to the eventual success or failure of the SSPP concept is presented, with emphasis on the pollution and energy problems which the SSPP would serve to eliminate. Factors discussed include cost, mariculture possibilities, siting, legal limitations, design materials, mooring and anchoring, and the human element involved. Several alternative power systems are considered for incorporation into SSPP design, such as Nitinol power, Claude cycle, and closed cycle engine systems.

  8. [The ethics of animal experimentation].

    PubMed

    Goffi, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    The paper starts with a short definition of animal experimentation, then three main approaches to the practice are considered: unconditional approval (as advocated by Claude Bernard), conditional and restricted approval (as advocated by Peter Singer) and strict prohibition (as advocated by Tom Regan and Gary Francione). It is argued that what is actually approved or condemned in animal experimentation is the value of the scientific enterprise.

  9. [Alexis Carrell: the mystification ...].

    PubMed

    Vanderpooten, C

    1996-01-01

    Alexis Carrel is died in 1944. A half-century later, the most we know about his life comes from his widow. Pupil of the Jesuits, faith lost with Claude Bernard, recovered thanks to his wife, papers lefts to the Jesuits ..., all is well. Too beautiful edifying story to be true ... Details show that mystification trouble is in it. Who was, what thought exactly Carrel? Light may be shed only by an exhaustive study of his manuscripts and letters.

  10. Painting a Data-Rich Picture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Lorna; Katz, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Using data for school reform is like painting a series of pictures--pictures that are subtle and capture the nuances of the subject. This is a far cry from drawing stick figures or paint-by-numbers. Imagine the experiences of the French painter Claude Monet as he wandered through his garden at Giverny at different times of the day and year,…

  11. A Course Connecting Astronomy to Art, History, and Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Don

    2015-10-01

    For the past 20 years the author has taught an Honors College course combining astronomy and the humanities. The purpose of this note is to give examples of methods that can be adapted to classroom use for topics including night sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Claude Monet, historical events influenced by astronomical factors, and literary references to the sky by authors including Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Walt Whitman.

  12. STS-46 crewmembers participate in Fixed Base (FB) SMS training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Andrew M. Allen hands Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman checklists from middeck locker MF43E during training session in JSC's fixed base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. European Space Agency (ESA) MS Claude Nicollier outfitted with communications kit assembly headset (HDST) and equipment looks beyond Hoffman to the opposite side of the middeck.

  13. [Hommage to M.L. Girard: gestation and birth of biochemistry in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dreux, C

    1999-01-01

    Prof Claude Dreux pays hommage to Prof Maurice-Louis Girard and relates the gestation and the birth of biochemistry in hospitals. He successively evokes Hippocrates, Galen, Paracelsius, Robert Boyle, Nicolas Vauquelin, J.J. Von Scherer, J.F. Zeller, G.H. Esbach, Apollinaire Bouchardat, Georges Deniges, Paul Yvon, Ambard, Loiseleur, Leon Grimbert, Paul Fleury, Jean-Emile Courtois and last but not the least Maurice-Louis Girard. PMID:11625655

  14. Plant anesthesia supports similarities between animals and plants

    PubMed Central

    Grémiaux, Alexandre; Yokawa, Ken; Mancuso, Stefano; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    The French scientist Claude Bernard (1813–1878) is famous for his discoveries in physiology and for introducing rigorous experimental methods to medicine and biology. One of his major technical innovations was the use of chemicals in order to disrupt normal physiological function to test hypotheses. But less known is his conviction that the physiological functions of all living organisms rely on the same underlying principles. He hypothesized that similarly to animals, plants are also able to sense changes in their environment. He called this ability “sensitivity.” In order to test his ideas, he performed anesthesia on plants and the results of these experiments were presented in 1878 in “Leçonssur les phénomènes de la vie communs aux animaux et aux végétaux.”1 The phenomena described by Claude Bernard more than a century ago are not fully understood yet. Here, we present a short overview of anesthetic effects in animals and we discuss how anesthesia affects plant movements, seed germination, and photosynthesis. Surprisingly, these phenomena may have ecological relevance, since stressed plants generate anesthetics such as ethylene and ether. Finally, we discuss Claude Bernard's interpretations and conclusions in the perspective of modern plant sciences. PMID:24476640

  15. Chandra Observatory Uncovers Hot Stars In The Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    their type," said Norbert S. Schulz, MIT research scientist at the Chandra X-ray Center, who leads the Orion Project. "And by extreme, we mean temperatures which are in some cases well above 60 million degrees." The hottest massive star known so far has been around 25 million degrees. The great Orion Nebula harbors the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), a loose association of around 2,000 mostly very young stars of a wide range of mass confined within a radius of less than 10 light years. The Orion Trapezium Cluster is a younger subgroup of stars at the core of the ONC confined within a radius of about 1.5 light years. Its median age is around 300,000 years. The constant bright light of the Trapezium and its surrounding stars at the heart of the Orion nebula (M42) are visible to the naked eye on clear nights. In X-rays, these young stars are constantly active and changing in brightness, sometimes within half a day, sometimes over weeks. "Never before Chandra have we seen images of stellar activity with such brilliance," said Joel Kastner, professor at the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. "Here the combination of very high angular resolution, with high quality spectra that Chandra offers, clearly pays off." The observation was performed using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and the X-ray spectra were recorded with the spectroscopic array of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The ACIS detector is a sophisticated version of the CCD detectors commonly used in video cameras or digital cameras. The orion stars are so bright in X-rays that they easily saturate the ccds. Here the team used the gratings as a blocking filter. Orion Trapezium - X-ray & Optical JPEG, TIFF, PS X-ray contours of the Chandra observation overlaid onto the optical Hubble image (courtesy of J. Bally, CASA Colorado). The field of view is 30"x30". Besides the bright main Trapezium stars, which were found to be extremely

  16. Isolation and characterization of a β-propeller gene containing phosphobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain KPS-11 for growth promotion of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Muhammad Kashif; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Naqqash, Tahir; Shahid, Muhammad; Van Elsas, Jan D.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate-solubilizing and phytate-mineralizing bacteria collectively termed as phosphobacteria provide a sustainable approach for managing P-deficiency in agricultural soils by supplying inexpensive phosphate to plants. A phosphobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain KPS-11 (Genbank accession no. KP006655) was isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) rhizosphere and characterized for potato plant growth promoting potential. The strain utilized both Ca-phosphate and Na-phytate in vitro and produced 6.48 μg mL-1 indole-3-acetic acid in tryptophan supplemented medium. P-solubilization after 240 h was 66.4 μg mL-1 alongwith the production of 19.3 μg mL-1 gluconic acid and 5.3 μg mL-1 malic acid. The extracellular phytase activity was higher (4.3 × 10-10 kat mg-1 protein) than the cell-associated phytase activity (1.6 × 10-10 kat mg-1 protein). B. subtilis strain KPS-11 utilized 40 carbon sources and showed resistance against 20 chemicals in GENIII micro-plate system demonstrating its metabolic potential. Phytase-encoding gene β-propeller (BPP) showed 92% amino acid similarity to BPP from B. subtilis (accession no.WP_014114128.1) and 83% structural similarity to BPP from B. subtilis (accession no 3AMR_A). Potato inoculation with B. subtilis strain KPS-11 increased the root/shoot length and root/shoot weight of potato as compared to non-inoculated control plants. Moreover, rifampicin-resistant derivative of KPS-11 were able to survive in the rhizosphere and on the roots of potato up to 60 days showing its colonization potential. The study indicates that B. subtilis strain KPS-11 can be a potential candidate for development of potato inoculum in P-deficient soils. PMID:26106383

  17. Isolation and characterization of a β-propeller gene containing phosphobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain KPS-11 for growth promotion of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad Kashif; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Naqqash, Tahir; Shahid, Muhammad; Van Elsas, Jan D

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate-solubilizing and phytate-mineralizing bacteria collectively termed as phosphobacteria provide a sustainable approach for managing P-deficiency in agricultural soils by supplying inexpensive phosphate to plants. A phosphobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain KPS-11 (Genbank accession no. KP006655) was isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) rhizosphere and characterized for potato plant growth promoting potential. The strain utilized both Ca-phosphate and Na-phytate in vitro and produced 6.48 μg mL(-1) indole-3-acetic acid in tryptophan supplemented medium. P-solubilization after 240 h was 66.4 μg mL(-1) alongwith the production of 19.3 μg mL(-1) gluconic acid and 5.3 μg mL(-1) malic acid. The extracellular phytase activity was higher (4.3 × 10(-10) kat mg(-1) protein) than the cell-associated phytase activity (1.6 × 10(-10) kat mg(-1) protein). B. subtilis strain KPS-11 utilized 40 carbon sources and showed resistance against 20 chemicals in GENIII micro-plate system demonstrating its metabolic potential. Phytase-encoding gene β-propeller (BPP) showed 92% amino acid similarity to BPP from B. subtilis (accession no.WP_014114128.1) and 83% structural similarity to BPP from B. subtilis (accession no 3AMR_A). Potato inoculation with B. subtilis strain KPS-11 increased the root/shoot length and root/shoot weight of potato as compared to non-inoculated control plants. Moreover, rifampicin-resistant derivative of KPS-11 were able to survive in the rhizosphere and on the roots of potato up to 60 days showing its colonization potential. The study indicates that B. subtilis strain KPS-11 can be a potential candidate for development of potato inoculum in P-deficient soils.

  18. An assessment of the costs and benefits of interventions aimed at improving rural community water supplies in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R; Pond, Kathy; Jagals, Paul; Cameron, John

    2009-06-01

    We report a cost benefit analyses (CBA) for water interventions in rural populations of developed country sub-regions. A Bayesian belief network was used to estimate the cost benefit ratio using Monte Carlo simulation. Where possible we used input data from recently published primary research or systematic reviews. Otherwise variables were derived from previous work in the peer-reviewed or grey literature. For these analyses we considered the situation of people with small and very small community supplies that may not be adequately managed. For the three developed country sub-regions Amr-A (America region A), Eur-A (European region A) and Wpr-A (Western Pacific region A), we estimate the costs of acute diarrhoeal illness associated with small community supplies to be U$4671 million (95% CI 1721-9592), the capital costs of intervention to be USD 13703 million (95% CI 6670-20735), additional annual maintenance to be USD 804 million (95%CI 359-1247) and the CB ratio to be 2.78 (95%CI 0.86-6.5). However, we also estimated the cost of post infectious irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) following drinking water-associated acute gastroenteritis to be USD 11896 million (95%CI 3118-22657). When the benefits of reduced IBS are added to the analysis the CB ratio increases to 9.87 (95%CI 3.34-20.49). The most important driver of uncertainty was the estimate of the cost of illness. However, there are very few good estimates of costs in improving management of small rural supplies in the literature. Investments in drinking-water provision in rural settings are highly cost beneficial in the developed world. In the developed world, the CB ratio is substantially positive especially once the impact of IBS is included.

  19. Seasonal variability of inflow and outflow regimes in the Gulf of Naples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianelli, Daniela; Iermano, Ilaria; Mozzillo, Pasquale; Uttieri, Marco; Zambianchi, Enrico; Buonocore, Berardino; Falco, Pierpaolo; De Luca, Luigi; Giordano, Alberto; Zambardino, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    Since 2004 the Department of Environmental Sciences of the Parthenope University manages, on behalf of AMRA (the former Competence Center for the Analysis of Environmental Risks of the Campania Region), an HF radar system composed of three transceiving stations located along the Gulf's coasts, which provide hourly data of surface currents over the whole Gulf area with 1 km of resolution. The radar system is part of a meteo-marine monitoring network; recently, in the framework of the EU-funded MED TOSCA (Tracking Oil Spills and Coastal Awareness Network) project, a modeling component was added to the network, based on the ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System) code. A one year-long HF radar time series and ROMS outputs of surface currents are utilized to look into the seasonal variability of current patterns in the Gulf of Naples. In particular, we focus on the net water inflow and outflow, i.e. on the exchange between the interior of the Gulf and the neighbouring Tyrrhenian Sea. This is done by computing the average surface current on a transect between the islands of Capri in the South and of Nisida in the North, which is considered as the boundary between the inner gulf and the open sea. First, a comparison between wind and HF radar data shows the crucial importance of the surface forcing on the upper circulation, dominated by breeze in late spring and summer and by more stable, offshore-oriented winds in fall and winter. Then, the analysis of the zonal component of currents allows to assess the existence of two different in-/outflow regimes associated with the above wind seasons: spring and summer show a tendency to stagnation inside the Gulf, whereas winter is characterized by a very effective water renewal mechanism. Results of ROMS simulations show a good agreement with such patterns.

  20. Felt stigma and obesity: introducing the generalized other.

    PubMed

    Barlösius, Eva; Philipps, Axel

    2015-04-01

    People with a big body are tainted in western societies. Although most research on obesity occurs in the medical context, few studies investigate characteristics and effects of feelings and fears related to the fat stigma in the absence of overt discrimination. By linking Norbert Elias's and George H. Mead's theoretical frameworks, this paper offers a different approach to understanding and investigating felt stigma. The study is based on secondary data (25 semistructured interviews with children and adolescents). It explores internalized societal perspectives on overweight and obesity and inquires into the way in which interviewees handle the blame frame of personal responsibility during their interview. The preliminary findings suggest that specific forms of managing one's self-presentation in interviews indicate felt stigma. Consequently, the paper argues for an analytical approach that extends the focus on the content of interviews to include its dynamics.

  1. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity. PMID:27144253

  2. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity.

  3. NOSS science working group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The members of the NOSS Science Working Group are John Apel, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratories/NOAA; Tim Barnett, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Francis Bretherton (chairman), National Center for Atmospheric Research; Otis Brown, University of Miami; Joost Businger, University of Washington; Garrett Campbell, NCAR; Mark Cane, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Robert Edwards, National Marine Fisheries Service/NOAA; James Mueller, Naval Postgraduate School; Peter Niiler, Oregon State University; James J. O'Brien, Florida State University; Norman Phillips, National Meteorological Center/NOAA; Owen Phillips, The Johns Hopkins University; Stephen Piacsek, NSTL Station, NORDA; Trevor Platt, Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Stephen Pond, University of British Columbia; Stanley Ruttenberg (executive secretary), NCAR; William Schmitz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Jerry Schubel, State University of New York; Robert Stewart, Scripps; Norbert Untersteiner, NOAA; and Alan Weinstein, Naval Environmental Prediction Research Facility.

  4. Felt stigma and obesity: introducing the generalized other.

    PubMed

    Barlösius, Eva; Philipps, Axel

    2015-04-01

    People with a big body are tainted in western societies. Although most research on obesity occurs in the medical context, few studies investigate characteristics and effects of feelings and fears related to the fat stigma in the absence of overt discrimination. By linking Norbert Elias's and George H. Mead's theoretical frameworks, this paper offers a different approach to understanding and investigating felt stigma. The study is based on secondary data (25 semistructured interviews with children and adolescents). It explores internalized societal perspectives on overweight and obesity and inquires into the way in which interviewees handle the blame frame of personal responsibility during their interview. The preliminary findings suggest that specific forms of managing one's self-presentation in interviews indicate felt stigma. Consequently, the paper argues for an analytical approach that extends the focus on the content of interviews to include its dynamics. PMID:25658623

  5. Jagd nach dem O'Conell-Effekt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmann, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    In the present paper, I focus on the O'Connell effect of the WUMa variable V502 Cyg, with the main aim of showing it in the lightcurve. 166 observations were collected in V and B band (100 and 66 measurements, respectively) from my private observatory in Kästenberg, Austria, Ossiacher Tauern, at an elevation of 890 m. All data were acquired with an Apo 130/1200 and an Apogee Alta U16M CCD camera. Photometric colour band and narrowband data were collected simultaneously and evaluated. The combination of photometric data with data for deep-sky imaging I have termed "pretty-picture-photometry". This combination of photometric measurements with colour and narrowband data is presented here in the case of V502 Cyg in its surrounding deep-sky field. Norbert Reichman is member of the BAV.

  6. Philosophical Approaches towards Sciences of Life in Early Cybernetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnini, Leone

    2008-07-01

    The article focuses on the different conceptual and philosophical approaches towards the sciences of life operating in the backstage of Early Cybernetics. After a short reconstruction of the main steps characterizing the origins of Cybernetics, from 1940 until 1948, the paper examines the complementary conceptual views between Norbert Wiener and John von Neumann, as a "fuzzy thinking" versus a "logical thinking", and the marked difference between the "methodological individualism" shared by both of them versus the "methodological collectivism" of most of the numerous scientists of life and society attending the Macy Conferences on Cybernetics. The main thesis sustained here is that these different approaches, quite invisible to the participants, were different, maybe even opposite, but they could provoke clashes, as well as cooperate in a synergic way.

  7. Social scientists in public health: a fuzzy approach.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Juliana Luporini; Stephan, Celso; Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to describe and analyze the presence of social scientists, anthropologists, sociologists and political scientists in the field of public health. A survey by the Lattes Curriculum and sites of Medical Colleges, Institutes of Health Research Collective, seeking professionals who work in healthcare and have done some stage of their training in the areas of social sciences. In confluence with Norbert Elias' concepts of social networks and configuration of interdependence it was used fuzzy logic, and the tool free statistical software R version 2.12.0 which enabled a graphic representation of social scientists interdependence in the field of social sciences-health-social sciences. A total of 238 professionals were ready in 6 distinct clusters according to the distance or closer of each professional in relation to public health and social sciences. The work was shown with great analytical and graphical representation possibilities for social sciences of health, in using this innovative quantitative methodology.

  8. STS-75 Flight Day 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-75 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Andrew Allen, Pilot Scott Horowitz, Payload Cmdr. Franklin Chang-Diaz, Payload Specialist Umberto Guidoni (Italy), and Mission Specialists Jeffrey Hoffman, Maurizio Cheli (ESA) and Claude Nicollier (ESA), are shown performing several of the United States Microgravity Payload-3 (USMP-3) experiments. There is an in-orbit interview by several of the astronauts with newspaper reporters. An announcement is made by Mission Control that Cmdr. Allen has become the first American Astronaut to log 1000 flight hours in space, with Payload Cmdr. Franklin Chang-Diaz coming in second.

  9. STS-46 ESA MS Nicollier and PLC Hoffman pose on OV-104's aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier (left) and MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman pose in front of the onorbit station controls on the aft flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The overhead windows W7 and W8 appear above their heads and the aft flight deck viewing windows W9 and W10 behind them. Hoffman and Nicollier have been training together for a dozen years at JSC. Hoffman was an astronaut candidate in 1978 and Nicollier accompanied a group of trainees in 1980. Note the partially devoured chocolate Space Shuttle floating near the two.

  10. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.

    1998-04-01

    The past few years have seen remarkable developments in the ability to control atomic motion by optical techniques. Among the key tools that have been developed for this purpose are the techniques of laser cooling, the significance of which was recognized by the award of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics to Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, and William Phillips. These techniques have made it possible to cool atoms to temperatures lower than have been produced in any other physical system - around 10(-8) degrees Kelvin above absolute zero - and to confine those in traps for extended periods of observation.

  11. STS-103 Flight Day Highlights and Crew Activity Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The crew of Discovery, Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale, John M. Grunsfeld, Claude Nicollier, and Jean-Francois Clervoy are seen executing various activities. Live footage of Clervoy powering up the robotic arm is seen. While Clervoy powers the robotic arm, Brown and Kelly set up the tools for the various different space walks scheduled, Grunsfeld and Nicollier check out the space suits, and Smith and Foale tend to the space walk tools. Foale, Brown, Kelly and Clervoy are also shown participating in a series of interviews.

  12. STS-103 Crew Activity Report/Flight Day 1 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of the astronauts sitting around the table with the traditional cake is presented. The crew of Discovery, Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale, John M. Grunsfeld, Claude Nicollier, and Jean-Francois Clervoy are seen executing various activities including suit-up, walkout to the Astro-Van, and strap-in into the shuttle. Also presented are beautiful panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. During this night launch, footage of the main engine start, ignition of the boosters, liftoff of Discovery, and separation of the solid rocket boosters are seen.

  13. STS-46 ESA MS Nicollier conducts IFM on OV-104's waste collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier, wearing goggles, face mask, and rubber gloves, reviews inflight maintenance (IFM) checklist procedures before starting waste collection system (WCS) fan separator repair. One of two fan separators used to transfer waster water from the waste management compartment (WMC) to the waste water tank has failed. The suspected accumulation of water in the separator was believed to have occurred during a test dumping of waste water at a lower than normal pressure to evaluate the performance of new nozzles. The WMC is located on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104.

  14. F.S.V.B. Volleyball

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-07

    22me assemblée des délégués de la Fédération Suisse de Volley Ball (F.S.V.B.), en présence entre autres de Claude Delay, représentant de la société fédérale de gymnastique et Hans Gauer, représentant de l'association suisse de gymnastique féminine. Annonce d'une démonstration d'un mini match de volley ball à Meyrin dans l'après-midi.

  15. [Boulduc's dynasty, apothecaries in Paris in XVIIth an XVIIIth centuries (following the article published in Revue d'histoire de la pharmacie, 2001, no. 331, p. 339-354)].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Like his father Simon Boulduc, Gilles-François Boulduc worked as a demonstrator in chemistry at the Jardin Royal. He was the apothecary of King Louis XIV and King Louis XV, a member of the Académie Royale des Sciences. In addition he was appointed alderman of the town of Paris. He worked in Paris rue des Boucheries and went into partnership with another apothecary, Claude Pia. He was also the drug supplier of the Duke de Saint-Simon who quoted him several times as a Royal apothecary in his Mémoires. Gilles-François Boulduc's main chemistry research work is presented in this article.

  16. Taking a geometric look at the socio-political functioning schemes of the living. Catastrophe theory and theoretical sociology.

    PubMed

    Morier, Clément

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this communication is to consider morphological processes in sociology, mainly through the study of the stability of forms of sociality. At the same time, it aims to study the regulation of constraints, related to an increasingly conflictual environment, through political organization. We use a specific theoretical framework: the catastrophe theory developed by René Thom in topology, further developed by Claude Bruter from a physics point of view, and reworked by Jacques Viret in biology. The idea is to show the existence of archetypal processes organizing social forms. PMID:23943093

  17. The loose tether forms a faint diagonal line in this scene recorded on a later fly-by.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The loose tether forms a faint diagonal line in this scene recorded on a later fly-by. On February 25, 1996, the crew deployed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS), which later broke free. The seven member crew was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 22, 1996 and landed on March 9, 1996. Crew members were Andrew M. Allen, mission commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and Maurizio Cheli, European Space Agency (ESA); Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, ESA, all mission specialists; along with payload specialist Umberto Guidioni of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  18. Taking a geometric look at the socio-political functioning schemes of the living. Catastrophe theory and theoretical sociology.

    PubMed

    Morier, Clément

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this communication is to consider morphological processes in sociology, mainly through the study of the stability of forms of sociality. At the same time, it aims to study the regulation of constraints, related to an increasingly conflictual environment, through political organization. We use a specific theoretical framework: the catastrophe theory developed by René Thom in topology, further developed by Claude Bruter from a physics point of view, and reworked by Jacques Viret in biology. The idea is to show the existence of archetypal processes organizing social forms.

  19. Surgical Position, Cause of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Dissection, Presenting as Pourfour Du Petit Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Villalba Martinez, Gloria; Navalpotro Gomez, Irene; Serrano Perez, Laura; Gonzalez Ortiz, Sofia; Fernández-Candil, Juan L; Steinhauer, Eva Giralt

    2015-01-01

    Dissection of the internal carotid artery is a rare cause of stroke overall, but causes 22% of strokes in younger patients. A common clinical presentation is as Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. We report a craniotomy with 30 degrees rotation of the neck (standard position) in a patient with no major risk factors for carotid dissection, who showed a Pourfour du Petit syndrome due to a dissection of the internal carotid artery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which a common surgical position causes an internal carotid artery dissection in a patient without relevant risk factors. The presentation with Pourfour du Petit syndrome is extremely unusual.

  20. STS-46 crewmembers handle water hoses during fire training at JSC's Fire Pit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers, directing the spray of two water hoses, approach a blaze in JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Manning the hose in the foreground are Commander Loren J. Shriver (left) and Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba. Holding a second hose are European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz who is aiming nozzle at the fire. Between the water hoses is a fire fighting training instructor. In the distance JSC's water tower and building facilities can be seen.

  1. Physics in the Art Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Daniel A.; Bailey, Brenae L.

    2003-02-01

    Parisian artist Paul Signac met the impressionists Claude Monet and Georges Seurat in 1884. Their influence spurred his work in pointillism (or, where the juxtaposition of small dots of color in conjunction with the limited resolving power of the human eye lead to the impression of color coalescence).1-4 To stimulate a cross-disciplinary appreciation of science and art, we used the University of Wyoming Art Museum's Signac painting "Barques de Pêche à Marseilles" (see Fig. 1) to explore diffraction theory and the anatomical limitations to our vision during an optics exercise done in the museum.

  2. A remote camera at Launch Pad 39B, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), recorded this profile view of

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 LAUNCH VIEW --- A remote camera at Launch Pad 39B, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), recorded this profile view of the Space Shuttle Columbia as it cleared the tower to begin the mission. The liftoff occurred on schedule at 3:18:00 p.m. (EST), February 22, 1996. Onboard Columbia for the scheduled two-week mission were astronauts Andrew M. Allen, commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and astronauts Maurizio Cheli, Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, along with payload specialist Umberto Guidioni. Cheli and Nicollier represent the European Space Agency (ESA), while Guidioni represents the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  3. The Space Shuttle Columbia clears the tower to begin the mission. The liftoff occurred on schedule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 LAUNCH VIEW --- The Space Shuttle Columbia clears the tower to begin the mission. The liftoff occurred on schedule at 3:18:00 p.m. (EST), February 22, 1996. Visible at left is the White Room on the orbiter access arm through which the flight crew had entered the orbiter. Onboard Columbia for the scheduled two-week mission were astronauts Andrew M. Allen, commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and astronauts Maurizio Cheli, Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, along with payload specialist Umberto Guidioni. Cheli and Nicollier represent the European Space Agency (ESA), while Guidioni represents the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  4. Three before their time: neuroscientists whose ideas were ignored by their contemporaries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Charles G

    2009-01-01

    I discuss three examples of neuroscientists whose ideas were ignored by their contemporaries but were accepted as major insights decades or even centuries later. The first is Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) whose ideas on the functions of the cerebral cortex were amazingly prescient. The second is Claude Bernard (1813-1878) whose maxim that the constancy of the internal environment is the condition for the free life was not understood for about 50 years when it came to dominate the development of modern physiology. The third is Joseph Altman (1925-) who overturned the traditional dogma that no new neurons are made in the adult mammalian brain and was vindicated several decades later.

  5. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    SciTech Connect

    Link, H

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude`s efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  6. New Revolutionary Possibilities in Geodesy Providing the Discoveries Awarded for Physics in 2005 and 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaric, N.; Solaric, M.; Svehla, D.

    2012-03-01

    Nobel Prize for Physics in the year 2005 was awarded to Roy J. Glauber, John L. Hall and Theodor W. Hänsch in recognition of their contribution in the field of optics. Nobel Prize for physics in 1997 was awarded to Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips for the discovery and development of the method by means of which the atoms are cooled down and trapped by laser light. The improvements that were suggested by Theodor W. Hänsch and John L. Hall supported by the discoveries made by Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William Phillips offer new revolutionary possibilities for significant improvement of measuring accuracy in geodesy and also in many other fields of science and application. By means of optical clocks it will be possible to measure time even more precisely than by atomic clocks, providing thus more precise determination of navigational satellite orbits, and consequently the positions of points on the Earth's surface. It also opens the possibility of determining the difference of gravitational potential between the points on the Earth's surface applying thereby the theory of relativity by Einstein. In this way it will be possible to connect the heights between the continents by means of direct measurements, and also to improve the connection of levelling networks between individual countries on the continents. More precise distance measurements will also bi provided.

  7. [The Helvetius dynasty].

    PubMed

    Van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2014-01-01

    The Helvetius dynasty originates from the Principality of Anhalt, in Germany. George Vigelius, one of its ancestors, was born in the Palatinate (Germany) and studied theology in the town of Basel (Switzerland), after which he was given the surname Swietser. In 1649, his eldest son, Johann Friedrich Swietser, moved to the United Provinces and changed his name into Johan Frederik Helvétius. In 1656, he took his doctorate of medicine at the university of Harderwyck Guelderland). He settled in Amsterdam and moved later to The Hague, where he had a lightning career. Three of his four sons studied medicine in Leyden: Jean-Balthasar, Philippe-Maximilien, and Joseph-Jean. Jean-Adrien, the second son of Johann-Friedrich, settled in Paris and took his doctorate of medicine at the university of Reims, using the pseudonym of Christian-Lebrecht Helvétius. He had a prosperous career. He was the father of Jean-Claude-Adrien Helvétius, who became also a successful physician and first physician to the queen of France. His grandson was Claude-Adrien Helvétius, who became a leading philosopher and writer. PMID:25962212

  8. Physiological regulation through learnt control of appetites by contingencies among signals from external and internal environments.

    PubMed

    Booth, David A

    2008-11-01

    As reviewed by [Cooper, S. J. (2008). From Claude Bernard to Walter Cannon: emergence of the concept of homeostasis. Appetite 51, 419-27.] Claude Bernard's idea of stabilisation of bodily states, as realised in Walter B. Cannon's conception of homeostasis, took mathematical form during the 1940s in the principle that externally originating disturbance of a physiological parameter can feed an informative signal around the brain to trigger counteractive processes--a corrective mechanism known as negative feedback, in practice reliant on feedforward. Three decades later, enough was known of the physiology and psychology of eating and drinking for calculations to show how experimentally demonstrated mechanisms of feedforward that had been learnt from negative feedback combine to regulate exchanges of water and energy between the body and the surroundings. Subsequent systemic physiology, molecular neuroscience and experimental psychology, however, have been traduced by a misconception that learnt controls of intake are 'non-homeostatic', the myth of biological 'set points' and an historic failure to address evidence for the ingestion-adapting information-processing mechanisms on which an operationally integrative theory of eating and drinking relies.

  9. [Genealogical study of the Pijart dynasty, goldsmiths or apothecaries in Paris in the 16th and 17th centuries].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The Pijart dynasty, established in Paris during the 16th and 17th centuries, included apothecaries and goldsmiths who had a common ancestor, Michel Pijart, warden of the goldsmith's guild (garde de l'orfèvrerie) in 1507. He was married to Jehanne Daumont and died 23rd July 1524. This couple had four sons, all goldsmiths, Pierre, Michel, Jehan and Nicolas. Pierre married twice. His first wife, Philippe Dusseau, was the sister of a famous apothecary. Only their eldest son, François, chose the profession of apothecary; the other three, Jacques, Jehan and Philibert, all followed their father's profession. By his second marriage to Marie de Mézières, Pierre had two sons, Claude the elder and Claude the younger, who both became goldsmiths. Thus, the goldsmith's trade became the favoured profession of the Pijart family. Professional endogamy prevailed in this dynasty, after the fashion of merchants belonging to the six most prestigious guilds (Six-Corps de métiers). Goldsmiths and apothecaries retained strong family ties, demonstrated by family reunions (baptisms, betrothals, etc.). It is undisputable that the renown of this dynasty is based on the fame of its goldsmiths. However, through marriage, the Pijart's developed links with other families of apothecaries, of which the most outstanding were the Boulduc's. PMID:18348497

  10. Physiological regulation through learnt control of appetites by contingencies among signals from external and internal environments.

    PubMed

    Booth, David A

    2008-11-01

    As reviewed by [Cooper, S. J. (2008). From Claude Bernard to Walter Cannon: emergence of the concept of homeostasis. Appetite 51, 419-27.] Claude Bernard's idea of stabilisation of bodily states, as realised in Walter B. Cannon's conception of homeostasis, took mathematical form during the 1940s in the principle that externally originating disturbance of a physiological parameter can feed an informative signal around the brain to trigger counteractive processes--a corrective mechanism known as negative feedback, in practice reliant on feedforward. Three decades later, enough was known of the physiology and psychology of eating and drinking for calculations to show how experimentally demonstrated mechanisms of feedforward that had been learnt from negative feedback combine to regulate exchanges of water and energy between the body and the surroundings. Subsequent systemic physiology, molecular neuroscience and experimental psychology, however, have been traduced by a misconception that learnt controls of intake are 'non-homeostatic', the myth of biological 'set points' and an historic failure to address evidence for the ingestion-adapting information-processing mechanisms on which an operationally integrative theory of eating and drinking relies. PMID:18640162

  11. Feasibility of MR-Based Body Composition Analysis in Large Scale Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    West, Janne; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Romu, Thobias; Collins, Rory; Garratt, Steve; Bell, Jimmy D.; Borga, Magnus; Thomas, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Quantitative and accurate measurements of fat and muscle in the body are important for prevention and diagnosis of diseases related to obesity and muscle degeneration. Manually segmenting muscle and fat compartments in MR body-images is laborious and time-consuming, hindering implementation in large cohorts. In the present study, the feasibility and success-rate of a Dixon-based MR scan followed by an intensity-normalised, non-rigid, multi-atlas based segmentation was investigated in a cohort of 3,000 subjects. Materials and Methods 3,000 participants in the in-depth phenotyping arm of the UK Biobank imaging study underwent a comprehensive MR examination. All subjects were scanned using a 1.5 T MR-scanner with the dual-echo Dixon Vibe protocol, covering neck to knees. Subjects were scanned with six slabs in supine position, without localizer. Automated body composition analysis was performed using the AMRA Profiler™ system, to segment and quantify visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT) and thigh muscles. Technical quality assurance was performed and a standard set of acceptance/rejection criteria was established. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all volume measurements and quality assurance metrics. Results Of the 3,000 subjects, 2,995 (99.83%) were analysable for body fat, 2,828 (94.27%) were analysable when body fat and one thigh was included, and 2,775 (92.50%) were fully analysable for body fat and both thigh muscles. Reasons for not being able to analyse datasets were mainly due to missing slabs in the acquisition, or patient positioned so that large parts of the volume was outside of the field-of-view. Discussion and Conclusions In conclusion, this study showed that the rapid UK Biobank MR-protocol was well tolerated by most subjects and sufficiently robust to achieve very high success-rate for body composition analysis. This research has been conducted using the UK Biobank Resource. PMID:27662190

  12. Phylogeny and photoheterotrophy in the acidophilic phototrophic purple bacterium Rhodoblastus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Kempher, Megan L; Madigan, Michael T

    2012-07-01

    Norbert Pfennig isolated the first acidophilic purple bacterium over 40 years ago and named the organism Rhodopseudomonas acidophila (now Rhodoblastusacidophilus). Since the original work of Pfennig, no systematic study has been conducted on the phylogeny and carbon nutrition of a collection of strains of Rbl. acidophilus. We have isolated six new strains of Rbl. acidophilus from a Canadian peat bog. These strains, three of the original Pfennig strains and two additional putative R. acidophilus strains isolated several years ago in this laboratory,were characterized as to their pigments, phylogeny, and carbon sources supporting photoheterotrophic growth. Phototrophic cultures were either purple or orange in color,and the color of a particular strain was linked to phylogeny. As for the Pfennig strains of Rbl. acidophilus, all new strains grew photoheterotrophically at pH 5 on a variety of organic and fatty acids. However, in addition to methanol and ethanol, the new strains as well as the Pfennig strains grew on several other primary alcohols, results not reported in the original species description. Our work shows that some phylogenetic and physiological diversity exists within the species Rbl. acidophilus and supports the observation that few species of acidophilic purple bacteria appear to exist in nature.

  13. Demographische Entwicklung in der Metropolregion Berlin-Brandenburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Wolf; Bluth, Friedrich

    〝Denn eins ist sicher: Die Rente.`` Der vielzitierte Satz des früheren Arbeits- und Sozialministers Norbert Blüm klingt heute vielen wie Hohn. Der Altersaufbau der deutschen Bevölkerung erinnert grafisch immer mehr an einen Baum auf dünnem Stämmchen als an eine Pyramide. Angesichts dessen rücken demographische Entwicklungen mehr und mehr in den Fokus der Öffentlichkeit. Besonders die neuen Bundesländer sind massiv von Abwanderung und einem nie dagewesenen Geburtenrückgang betroffen.DIPL.-GEOGR. UTE C. BAUERsprach mitFRIEDRICH BLUTHundWOLF BEYERüber die Besonderheiten der demographischen Prozesse in Berlin und Brandenburg. Beyer leitete bis Anfang 2004 das brandenburgische Referat für Raumbeobachtung. Seine Aufgabe bestand darin, Planungsgrundlagen für die Gemeinsame Landesplanung Berlin-Brandenburg(GL) zu schaffen. Dazu zählen auch Bevölkerungsprognosen für die Kreise und Städte Brandenburgs. Bluth ist in der Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung Berlin beschäftigt und leitet dort die Gruppe 〝Stadtwissen, Stadtentwicklungsmonitoring, Bevölkerungsprognose.``

  14. Diurnal behaviour of some salivary parameters in patients with diabetes mellitus (flow rate, pH, thiocianat, LDH activity)--note II.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, S; Bădiţă, D; Artino, M; Dragomir, M; Huidovici, E; Niţă, V; Chiţoi, E

    1998-01-01

    The study was performed on 31 diabetic patients of both sexes, divided in 2 groups: group I--17 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) and group II--14 patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) and compared with a control group of 16 non-diabetic subjects. Mixed saliva was sampled without stimulation during 2 periods of the day: 07:30-08:00 before breakfast and 17:30-18:00 before dinner. We determined: salivary flow rate, pH with Merck indicator and, after homogenization, the thiocianat with the FeCl3 method and LDH activity (the Norbert method adapted in our laboratory for saliva). Our study showed the same diurnal changes in flow rate and salivary pH in both diabetic and control groups: minimal values in the morning and maximal ones in the afternoon. In non-smoking diabetic patients the salivary thiocianat had maximal values in the morning and minimal ones in the afternoon; similar behaviour, but less obvious was observed in smoking diabetic patients and in the control group regardless of the smoking habit. LDH activity showed unsignificant diurnal variations in the diabetic patients. In the control group we found a significant decrease of LDH activity in the afternoon. The discussion is about the implication of these salivary parameters in the pathology of oral cavity: gingivitis, periodontitis and caries in diabetic patients.

  15. Gregory Bateson and the mathematicians: from interdisciplinary interaction to societal functions.

    PubMed

    Heims, S P

    1977-04-01

    An instance of fruitful cross-disciplinary contacts is examined in detail. The ideas involved include (1) the double-blind hypothesis for schizophrenia, (2) the critique of game theory from the viewpoint of anthropology and psychiatry, and (3) the application of concepts of communication theory and theory of logical types to an interpretation of psychoanalytic practice. The protagonists of the interchange are Gregory Bateson and the two mathematicians Norbert Wiener and John von Neumann; the date, March 1946. This interchange and its sequels are described. While the interchanges between Bateson and Wiener were fruitful, those between Bateson and von Neumann were much less so. The latter two held conflicting premises concerning what is significant in science; Bateson's and Wiener's were compatible. In 1946, Wiener suggested that information and communication might be appropriate central concepts for psychoanalytic theory--a vague general idea which Bateson (with Ruesch) related to contemporary clinical practice. For Bateson, Wiener, and von Neumann, the cross-disciplinary interactions foreshadowed a shift in activities and new roles in society, to which the post World War II period was conducive. Von Neumann became a high-level government advisor; Wiener, an interpreter of science and technology for the general public; and Bateson a counter-culture figure. PMID:325068

  16. The ontological status of western science and medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces the revolutionary changes that have transformed the ontological status of western physics and biology over the last thirty years, so as to show in detail how they have moved towards the perspective of the Vedic sciences. From this it appears that Ayurveda's more holistic approach is no longer in opposition to the views of physics and biology. In physics, experimental verification of phenomena associated with quantum correlations have forced scientists to accept that the macroscopic world is not strongly objective: traditional western scientific ontology stands rejected. One consequence is that the world is not necessarily reductionist i.e. based solely on the properties of its tiniest constituents. In biology, the 1930's discovery of homeostasis has reached a natural climax: the feedback instabilities, identified by Norbert Wiener as inevitably accompanying control processes, are now recognized to be states of optimal regulation, where organisms centre their function. The non-reductive properties of these states clearly distinguish the theory of control from previous physical theories; they now occupy the centre-stage of life. Possibly against expectation, their non-reductive nature makes their physics holistic: western biology seems to have broken free of reductionist physics. When Ayurveda and bioscience are compared in light of these little appreciated advances in fundamental science, the supposed differences between them are vastly reduced – they practically dissolve. Instead of being poles apart, the ontologies of western science and Ayurveda seem to have become almost identical. PMID:23125507

  17. Polynomial chaos theory for performance evaluation of ATR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Michael D.; Bateman, Alec J.

    2010-04-01

    The development of a more unified theory of automatic target recognition (ATR) has received considerable attention over the last several years from individual researchers, working groups, and workshops. One of the major benefits expected to accrue from such a theory is an ability to analytically derive performance metrics that accurately predict real-world behavior. Numerous sources of uncertainty affect the actual performance of an ATR system, so direct calculation has been limited in practice to a few special cases because of the practical difficulties of manipulating arbitrary probability distributions over high dimensional spaces. This paper introduces an alternative approach for evaluating ATR performance based on a generalization of NorbertWiener's polynomial chaos theory. Through this theory, random quantities are expressed not in terms of joint distribution functions but as convergent orthogonal series over a shared random basis. This form can be used to represent any finite-variance distribution and can greatly simplify the propagation of uncertainties through complex systems and algorithms. The paper presents an overview of the relevant theory and, as an example application, a discussion of how it can be applied to model the distribution of position errors from target tracking algorithms.

  18. Modulation theory, dispersive shock waves and Gerald Beresford Whitham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minzoni, A. A.; Smyth, Noel F.

    2016-10-01

    Gerald Beresford (GB) Whitham, FRS, (13th December, 1927-26th January, 2014) was one of the leading applied mathematicians of the twentieth century whose work over forty years had a profound, formative impact on research on wave motion across a broad range of areas. Many of the ideas and techniques he developed have now become the standard tools used to analyse and understand wave motion, as the papers of this special issue of Physica D testify. Many of the techniques pioneered by GB Whitham have spread beyond wave propagation into other applied mathematics areas, such as reaction-diffusion, and even into theoretical physics and pure mathematics, in which Whitham modulation theory is an active area of research. GB Whitham's classic textbook Linear and Nonlinear Waves, published in 1974, is still the standard reference for the applied mathematics of wave motion. In honour of his scientific achievements, GB Whitham was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1959 and a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1965. He was awarded the Norbert Wiener Prize for Applied Mathematics in 1980.

  19. Introduction. Time and medicine.

    PubMed

    Kern, S

    2000-01-01

    Although historians work with the record of events in public time, they have not developed an explicit understanding of lived time. To set the stage for the other essays in this issue of Annals, this introductory essay explores how an understanding of lived or "private" time began to emerge in the early 20th century in the works of that era's major thinkers: Henri Bergson's philosophy of duration, Emile Durkheim's social time, Sigmund Freud's five psychoanalytic temporal narratives, and Eugene Minkowski's exploration of lived time. This essay then considers the reaction against the burden of history that began with the great 19th-century historicizers: Comte, Hegel, Marx, Darwin, and Spencer. It reflects on the effort, beginning in those years, of modern artists and intellectuals to focus on the personal past in place of the overbearing burden of the historical past. New ways of experiencing the present, made possible by new communication technologies, including the telephone and telegraph, have centered on the experience of simultaneity. Norbert Wiener's cybernetics, Marshall McLuhan's globalism, and the Internet have further transformed how both the medical and lay communities experience past, present, and future, as well as near and far. The discussion concludes with consideration of Eurotransplant, an Internet-based information and action network used by physicians to coordinate organ transplantation; it is a system that integrates cybernetics, globalism, and the Internet in an everyday, real drama of the electronic age of simultaneity. PMID:10627248

  20. Quantum Error Correction: Optimal, Robust, or Adaptive? Or, Where is The Quantum Flyball Governor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosut, Robert; Grace, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    In The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society (1950), Norbert Wiener introduces feedback control in this way: ``This control of a machine on the basis of its actual performance rather than its expected performance is known as feedback ... It is the function of control ... to produce a temporary and local reversal of the normal direction of entropy.'' The classic classroom example of feedback control is the all-mechanical flyball governor used by James Watt in the 18th century to regulate the speed of rotating steam engines. What is it that is so compelling about this apparatus? First, it is easy to understand how it regulates the speed of a rotating steam engine. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, it is a part of the device itself. A naive observer would not distinguish this mechanical piece from all the rest. So it is natural to ask, where is the all-quantum device which is self regulating, ie, the Quantum Flyball Governor? Is the goal of quantum error correction (QEC) to design such a device? Devloping the computational and mathematical tools to design this device is the topic of this talk.

  1. Zeit im Wandel der Zeit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aichelburg, P. C.

    Contents: Einleitung(P. C. Aichelburg). 1. Über Zeit, Bewegung und Veränderung (Aristoteles). 2. Ewigkeit und Zeit (Plotin). 3. Was ist die Zeit? (Augustinus). 4. Von der Zeit (Immanuel Kant). 5. Newtons Ansichten über Zeit, Raum und Bewegung (Ernst Mach). 6. Über die mechanische Erklärung irreversibler Vorgänge (Ludwig Boltzmann). 7. Das Maß der Zeit (Henri Poincaré). 8. Dauer und Intuition (Henri Bergson). 9. Die Geschichte des Unendlichkeitsproblems (Bertrand Russell). 10. Raum und Zeit (Hermann Minkowski). 11. Der Unterschied von Zeit und Raum (Hans Reichenbach). 12. Newtonscher und Bergsonscher Zeitbegriff (Norbert Wiener). 13. Die Bildung des Zeitbegriffs beim Kinde (JeanPiaget).14. Eine Bemerkung über die Beziehungen zwischen Relativitätstheorie und der idealistischen Philosophie (Kurt Gödel). 15. Der zweite Hauptsatz und der Unterschied von Vergangenheit und Zukunft (Carl Friedrich v. Weizsäcker). 16. Zeit als physikalischer Begriff (Friedrich Hund). 17. Zeitmessung und Zeitbegriff in der Astronomie (Otto Heckmann). 18. Kann die Zeit rückwärts gehen? (Martin Gardner). 19. Zeit und Zeiten (Ilya Prigogine, Isabelle Stengers). 20. Zeit als dynamische Größe in der Relativitätstheorie (P. C. Aichelburg).

  2. Credit and civilization.

    PubMed

    Newton, Tim

    2003-09-01

    This paper analyses financial credit in order to re-examine the work of Norbert Elias, particularly his association of interdependency complexity with social discipline, and his approach to contradiction. Following a discussion of these issues, the paper examines Elias's writing on money and explores the emergence of financial credit networks in early modern England. Attention is paid to credit networks and social discipline, to credit and the state, and to the contradictory images associated with the transition to modern cash economies. From one perspective, early modern credit networks might be read as a confirmation of Elias, particularly his argument that interdependency complexity, changing power balances and self-restraint are interwoven. Yet the development of modern cash money raises questions, not just in relation to Elias's treatment of money, but also with regard to his assumptions about social discipline and his approach to ambivalence and contradiction. Drawing on the foregoing discussion, the paper argues that the relation between interdependency complexity and social discipline is contingent and variable, and that interdependency complexity may simultaneously encourage contradictory processes, such as those of civilizing and barbarity.

  3. Gregory Bateson and the mathematicians: from interdisciplinary interaction to societal functions.

    PubMed

    Heims, S P

    1977-04-01

    An instance of fruitful cross-disciplinary contacts is examined in detail. The ideas involved include (1) the double-blind hypothesis for schizophrenia, (2) the critique of game theory from the viewpoint of anthropology and psychiatry, and (3) the application of concepts of communication theory and theory of logical types to an interpretation of psychoanalytic practice. The protagonists of the interchange are Gregory Bateson and the two mathematicians Norbert Wiener and John von Neumann; the date, March 1946. This interchange and its sequels are described. While the interchanges between Bateson and Wiener were fruitful, those between Bateson and von Neumann were much less so. The latter two held conflicting premises concerning what is significant in science; Bateson's and Wiener's were compatible. In 1946, Wiener suggested that information and communication might be appropriate central concepts for psychoanalytic theory--a vague general idea which Bateson (with Ruesch) related to contemporary clinical practice. For Bateson, Wiener, and von Neumann, the cross-disciplinary interactions foreshadowed a shift in activities and new roles in society, to which the post World War II period was conducive. Von Neumann became a high-level government advisor; Wiener, an interpreter of science and technology for the general public; and Bateson a counter-culture figure.

  4. The ontological status of western science and medicine.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Alex

    2012-07-01

    This paper traces the revolutionary changes that have transformed the ontological status of western physics and biology over the last thirty years, so as to show in detail how they have moved towards the perspective of the Vedic sciences. From this it appears that Ayurveda's more holistic approach is no longer in opposition to the views of physics and biology. In physics, experimental verification of phenomena associated with quantum correlations have forced scientists to accept that the macroscopic world is not strongly objective: traditional western scientific ontology stands rejected. One consequence is that the world is not necessarily reductionist i.e. based solely on the properties of its tiniest constituents. In biology, the 1930's discovery of homeostasis has reached a natural climax: the feedback instabilities, identified by Norbert Wiener as inevitably accompanying control processes, are now recognized to be states of optimal regulation, where organisms centre their function. The non-reductive properties of these states clearly distinguish the theory of control from previous physical theories; they now occupy the centre-stage of life. Possibly against expectation, their non-reductive nature makes their physics holistic: western biology seems to have broken free of reductionist physics. When Ayurveda and bioscience are compared in light of these little appreciated advances in fundamental science, the supposed differences between them are vastly reduced - they practically dissolve. Instead of being poles apart, the ontologies of western science and Ayurveda seem to have become almost identical. PMID:23125507

  5. Transcending disciplines: Scientific styles in studies of the brain in mid-twentieth century America.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Tara H

    2012-06-01

    Much scholarship in the history of cybernetics has focused on the far-reaching cultural dimensions of the movement. What has garnered less attention are efforts by cyberneticians such as Warren McCulloch and Norbert Wiener to transform scientific practice in an array of disciplines in the biomedical sciences, and the complex ways these efforts were received by members of traditional disciplines. In a quest for scientific unity that had a decidedly imperialistic flavour, cyberneticians sought to apply practices common in the exact sciences-mainly theoretical modeling-to problems in disciplines that were traditionally defined by highly empirical practices, such as neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. Their efforts were met with mixed, often critical responses. This paper attempts to make sense of such dynamics by exploring the notion of a scientific style and its usefulness in accounting for the contrasts in scientific practice in brain research and in cybernetics during the 1940s. Focusing on two key institutional contexts of brain research and the role of the Rockefeller and Macy Foundations in directing brain research and cybernetics, the paper argues that the conflicts between these fields were not simply about experiment vs. theory but turned more closely on the questions that defined each area and the language used to elaborate answers.

  6. Transcending disciplines: Scientific styles in studies of the brain in mid-twentieth century America.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Tara H

    2012-06-01

    Much scholarship in the history of cybernetics has focused on the far-reaching cultural dimensions of the movement. What has garnered less attention are efforts by cyberneticians such as Warren McCulloch and Norbert Wiener to transform scientific practice in an array of disciplines in the biomedical sciences, and the complex ways these efforts were received by members of traditional disciplines. In a quest for scientific unity that had a decidedly imperialistic flavour, cyberneticians sought to apply practices common in the exact sciences-mainly theoretical modeling-to problems in disciplines that were traditionally defined by highly empirical practices, such as neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. Their efforts were met with mixed, often critical responses. This paper attempts to make sense of such dynamics by exploring the notion of a scientific style and its usefulness in accounting for the contrasts in scientific practice in brain research and in cybernetics during the 1940s. Focusing on two key institutional contexts of brain research and the role of the Rockefeller and Macy Foundations in directing brain research and cybernetics, the paper argues that the conflicts between these fields were not simply about experiment vs. theory but turned more closely on the questions that defined each area and the language used to elaborate answers. PMID:22520204

  7. Nurses' daily life: gender relations from the time spent in hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Audrey Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the everyday life of nurses through the sexual work division as well as through interdependence relations and the time in hospital. Method: quanti-qualitative study, based on the Time Use Survey and in Norbert Elias's Configuration Theory of Interdependencies. Daily shifts distribution record, directed by 42 participants - with self-confrontation - by interviews which drew dialogues on subjective aspects of the everyday experiences related to use of time, based on a job at a university hospital. The theoretical intake that founded data analysis was based on concepts of conflicts of interest, power struggles, sexual work division and polychronic-monochronic concepts - whether the work environment demands multitasking nurses or not. Results: time records allowed to observe differences between the groups studied, useful to identify conflicts, tensions, power struggles and gender inequalities in interviewees' everyday affairs that do not only affect physical and mental health, but also their way of life. Conclusion: the analytical path pointed out the need for public policies that promote equity in gender relations, keeping at sight the exercise of plural discourses and tolerant stances capable to respect differences between individual and collective time. PMID:26487146

  8. Growing Evidence about the Relationship between Vessel Dissection and Scuba Diving.

    PubMed

    Brajkovic, Simona; Riboldi, Giulietta; Govoni, Alessandra; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Carotid and vertebral artery dissection are relatively frequent and risky conditions. In the last decade, different patients with extracranial (and in 1 case also intracranial) dissections associated with the practice of scuba diving were reported. The connection between the two conditions has not been fully explained so far. In the present article, we report the case of a patient presenting with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome and homolateral XII cranial nerve palsy, manifesting a few days after diving in the cold water of a lake. The patient ended up having internal carotid artery dissection associated with the formation of a pseudoaneurysm. Here, we offer a summary of all cases reported in the literature about scuba diving and arterial dissection, and provide a critical discussion about which scuba diving-related factors can trigger the dissection of cervical vessels.

  9. [The three lives of the Count de Bonneval, alias Osman Pasha (1675-1747)].

    PubMed

    Fabre, André-Julien

    2008-12-01

    Count Claude-Alexandre de Bonneval (1675-1747), had a unusual existence: he had three consecutive lives: as an Officer in the Royal Guard of Louis XIV, as Major-General with Prince Emmanuel of Savoy and, finally, as Ottoman Pasha in Constantinople. He was a man of multiple facets: soldier and political adviser, swordsman and world traveller, friend of Casanova, Fenelon, Montesquieu and Leibniz. He was also an inveterate transgressor of every rule and, in the end, a renegade apostate. Many explanations have been offered for his astounding life: plain aristocratic frivolity, emotional instability, and possibly, in reference to a permanent quest for new adventures, countries or religions, a touch of transformism. Obviously, Bonneval concealed, behind a flamboyant personality, some sort of psychiatric fragility which might suggest, in retrospect, a "paranoid syndrome" but, certainly, no trace of what is common in psychopathic patients, a weariness of life. Bonneval loved each one of his three lives and the feeling was mutual.

  10. Microdebrider cavitation and transcervical removal of parapharyngeal schwannomas approaching the skull base.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Piero; Paderno, Alberto; Farina, Davide; Piazza, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    Removal of parapharyngeal space (PPS) schwannomas approaching the skull base through a purely transcervical approach requires adequate visualization of the surgical field to obtain complete resection with minimal sequelae. This is a retrospective series of four patients undergoing transcervical removal of sympathetic chain PPS schwannomas abutting the skull base by an intracapsular microdebrider tumor cavitation. Radiologic data, complications, functional outcomes, and follow-up status were considered. MRI was suggestive of PPS schwannoma in all cases, and correctly predicted the nerve of origin in three out of four cases. All patients developed postoperative Claude Bernard-Horner and first-bite syndromes. One patient also presented temporary neuropraxia of the IX cranial nerve, and another of the IX and X cranial nerves. Microdebrider cavitation of sympathetic chain PPS schwannoma abutting the skull base proved to be a reliable technique allowing good visualization of adjacent neural and vascular structures through a purely transcervical approach, while maintaining a low complication rate.

  11. Mission Specialist Smith is suited and ready for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith signals he is suited up and ready for launch. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists C. Michel Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  12. Mission Specialist Foale gets help suiting up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michel Foale (Ph.D.) smiles as his launch and entry suit is checked by a suit techician during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  13. STS-103 Commander Brown arrives at KSC for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. smiles on his arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, for pre-launch preparations on mission STS-103 aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 11 at 12:13 a.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 20, at 9:21 p.m. EST.

  14. STS-103 MS Nicollier arrives at SLF aboard a T-38 jet for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, smiles after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Also participating are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with the European Space Agency. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Discovery.

  15. STS-103 crew have breakfast before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-103 crew are all smiles as they gather for breakfast before suiting up for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Steven L. Smith. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. The mission is expected to last about 8 days and 21 hours. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  16. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-08-01

    Introduction Gordon Fraser; Part I. Matter and the Universe: 1. Cosmology Wendy Freedman and Rocky Kolb; 2. Gravity Ronald Adler; 3. Astrophysics Arnon Dar; 4. Particles and the standard model Chris Quigg; 5. Superstrings Michael Green; Part II. Quantum Matter: 6. Atoms and photons Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Jean Dalibard; 7. The quantum world of ultra-cold atoms Christopher Foot and William Phillips; 8. Superfluidity Henry Hall; 9. Quantum phase transitions Subir Sachdev; Part III. Quanta in Action: 10. Quantum entanglement Anton Zeilinger; 11. Quanta, ciphers and computers Artur Ekert; 12. Small-scale structure and nanoscience Yoseph Imry; Part IV. Calculation and Computation: 13. Nonlinearity Henry Abarbanel; 14. Complexity Antonio Politi; 15. Collaborative physics, e-science and the grid Tony Hey and Anne Trefethen; Part V. Science in Action: 16. Biophysics Cyrus Safinya; 17. Medical physics Nicolaj Pavel; 18. Physics and materials Robert Cahn; 19. Physics and society Ugo Amaldi.

  17. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2006-04-01

    Introduction Gordon Fraser; Part I. Matter and the Universe: 1. Cosmology Wendy Freedman and Rocky Kolb; 2. Gravity Ronald Adler; 3. Astrophysics Arnon Dar; 4. Particles and the standard model Chris Quigg; 5. Superstrings Michael Green; Part II. Quantum Matter: 6. Atoms and photons Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Jean Dalibard; 7. The quantum world of ultra-cold atoms Christopher Foot and William Phillips; 8. Superfluidity Henry Hall; 9. Quantum phase transitions Subir Sachdev; Part III. Quanta in Action: 10. Quantum entanglement Anton Zeilinger; 11. Quanta, ciphers and computers Artur Ekert; 12. Small-scale structure and nanoscience Yoseph Imry; Part IV. Calculation and Computation: 13. Nonlinearity Henry Abarbanel; 14. Complexity Antonio Politi; 15. Collaborative physics, e-science and the grid Tony Hey and Anne Trefethen; Part V. Science in Action: 16. Biophysics Cyrus Safinya; 17. Medical physics Nicolaj Pavel; 18. Physics and materials Robert Cahn; 19. Physics and society Ugo Amaldi.

  18. Nonlinear Cochlear Signal Processing and Phoneme Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jont B.; Régnier, Marion; Phatak, Sandeep; Li, Feipeng

    2009-02-01

    The most important communication signal is human speech. It is helpful to think of speech communication in terms of Claude Shannon's information theory channel model. When thus viewed, it immediately becomes clear that the most complex part of speech communication channel is in auditory system (the receiver). In my opinion, even after years of work, relatively little is know about how the human auditory system decodes speech. Given cochlear damaged, speech scores are greatly reduced, even with tiny amounts of noise. The exact reasons for this SNR-loss presently remain unclear, but I speculate that the source of this must be cochlear outer hair cell temporal processing, not central processing. Specifically, "temporal edge enhancement" of the speech signal and forward masking could easily be modified in such ears, leading to SNR-Loss. What ever the reason, SNR-Loss is the key problem that needs to be fully researched.

  19. [THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION IN MEDICINE OF THE LAST QUARTER OF XIX-FIRST HALF OF XX CENTURIES. REPORT II. THE OUTSET OF REVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCE].

    PubMed

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N

    2015-01-01

    The article affirms that onset of revision of picture of analyzed reality, methodological approaches to studying of vital activity of human organism and philosophical basics of medical science refers to 1878 and is related to publishing of "The course of general physiology" by French physiologist Claude Bernard. The implemented analysis of the text of this work permit to establish that C. Bernard undertook an attempt to introduce conception of human organism as a processing system being self-reproduced as. a result of interaction with environment due to mechanisms of self-regulation. The necessity was substantiated to make experiment the leading method of cognition of vital activity. The living wholeness (organism, cell) was proposed to be an object of experimentation. In this living wholeness its natural capacities to self-regulation of main vital processes can be preserved at its maximum. The new senses were introduced into ontological categories of thing, process, causality, portion and whole.

  20. Messier, Copernicus, Flamsteed: The SAF Rare-Book Collection in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2014-01-01

    The historic books belonging to the Société Astronomique de France, founded by Camille Flammarion in 1887, are located partly in Paris and partly at the Flammarion site in Juvisy, a Paris suburb. Their holdings include first editions of Copernicus's De Revolutionibus and of Flamsteed's star atlas, as well as Messier's own copy of his 1783 and 1784 papers with his handwritten comments and additions. I will describe the fruitless search for a Bevis atlas and the circumstances that led me to inspect these treasures. I thank David Valls-Gabaud and Philippe Morel of the Société Astronomique de France for their hospitality in Paris, Jean-Claude Pecker, and Owen Gingerich for his prior work on Messier's catalogue.

  1. Growing Evidence about the Relationship between Vessel Dissection and Scuba Diving.

    PubMed

    Brajkovic, Simona; Riboldi, Giulietta; Govoni, Alessandra; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Carotid and vertebral artery dissection are relatively frequent and risky conditions. In the last decade, different patients with extracranial (and in 1 case also intracranial) dissections associated with the practice of scuba diving were reported. The connection between the two conditions has not been fully explained so far. In the present article, we report the case of a patient presenting with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome and homolateral XII cranial nerve palsy, manifesting a few days after diving in the cold water of a lake. The patient ended up having internal carotid artery dissection associated with the formation of a pseudoaneurysm. Here, we offer a summary of all cases reported in the literature about scuba diving and arterial dissection, and provide a critical discussion about which scuba diving-related factors can trigger the dissection of cervical vessels. PMID:24163671

  2. Cosmic Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; Mallik, D. C. V.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    2008-07-01

    1. Astronomy in ancient and medieval China Joseph Needham; 2. Indian astronomy: an historical perspective B. V. Subbarayappa; 3. Making of astronomy in ancient India Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya; 4. The impact of astronomy on the development of western science Jean-Claude Pecker; 5. Man and the Universe Hubert Reeves; 6. Understanding the Universe - challenges and directions in modern observational astronomy Harlan Smith, Jr: 7. Frontiers in cosmology Fred Hoyle; 8. Did the Universe originate in a big bang? Jayant Narlikar; 9. The dark matter problem Bernard Carr; 10. Geometry and the Universe C. V. Vishveshwara; 11. The origin and evolution of life Cyril Ponnamperuma; 12. The anthropic principle: self selection as an adjunct to natural selection Brandon Carter; 13. Astrology and science: an examination of the evidence Ivan Kelly, Roger Culver and Peter Loptson; 14. Astronomy and science fiction Allen Janis.

  3. An analysis of concert saxophone vibrato through the examination of recordings by eight prominent soloists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinninger, Thomas

    This study examines concert saxophone vibrato through the analysis of several recordings of standard repertoire by prominent soloists. The vibrato of Vincent Abato, Arno Bornkamp, Claude Delangle, Jean-Marie Londeix, Marcel Mule, Otis Murphy, Sigurd Rascher, and Eugene Rousseau is analyzed with regards to rate, extent, shape, and discretionary use. Examination of these parameters was conducted through both general observation and precise measurements with the aid of a spectrogram. Statistical analyses of the results provide tendencies for overall vibrato use, as well as the effects of certain musical attributes (note length, tempo, dynamic, range) on vibrato. The results of this analysis are also compared among each soloist and against pre-existing theories or findings in vibrato research.

  4. [Hatred of foreigners and purity--current aspects of an illusion. Social psychological and psychoanalytic considerations].

    PubMed

    Heim, R

    1992-08-01

    This study draws upon both Carlo Ginzburg's procedures for establishing and preserving (historical) evidence and Claude Lévi-Strauss' structuralist approach with its analysis of "primitive" mythologies to demonstrate that binary coding of the social domain is an all-pervasive structural principle. Heim's intention in this is to show that (present-day) xenophobia and racism are the products of a phantasm centering around the division of the world into pure and impure. The author brings into alignment collective fantasies about the homogeneity of the "body politic" with a form of primary narcissism which, if it is to preserve the illusion of original purity, is forced to externalize instinctual urges experienced as heterogeneous and unpleasurable and project them onto "foreigners" and things foreign.

  5. [Training process of the social representations on transsexuality among health professionals: possible ways to overcome prejudice].

    PubMed

    Santos, Adelyany Batista dos; Shimizu, Helena Eri; Merchan-Hamann, Edgar

    2014-11-01

    The scope of this paper is to identify and analyze the structure of social representations of health professionals about transsexuality. The theoretical and methodological benchmark used was the structural approach to social representations developed by Jean-Claude Abric. 128 health professionals from 22 health units in the State Health Department of the Federal District of Brasília were interviewed. Data collection consisted of the application of a semi-structured questionnaire based on the technique of free association with the key word "transsexuality." The data were processed using EVOC 2000 software. The profile of the subjects reveals the predominance of female participants and professionals in the field of nursing. The terms "sex change" and "prejudice" seem to feature as the central nucleus, and "transformation," "option," "respect" and "acceptance" are the peripheral systems of representation.

  6. Cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to aspergillus granuloma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brenet, Esteban; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille; N'guyen, Yohan; Litré, Claude-Fabien

    2016-10-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare but serious complication of sphenoid aspergillosis. The rarity of this pathology makes its diagnostic very difficult on a clinical, biological and radiological sense. The authors present a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with ipsilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis secondary to a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host, responsible of a cavernous syndrome associated to a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. One year after surgery, the patient is still asymptomatic without recurrence. Diagnostic modalities are detailed and several management of this pathology are compared. Surgery is essential in a diagnostic and therapeutic sense. There is no evidence of the interest of adjuvant therapies such as antibiotic and anticoagulation. Concerning the antifungal treatment, the attitude towards a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host is unclear. PMID:26860234

  7. STS-103 crew poses for photographers at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew poses for photographers after landing at at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing (left to right) in front of the T-38 jets that brought them are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with the European Space Agency, Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Discovery.

  8. An Englishman abroad: Charles Blagden's visit to Paris in 1783.

    PubMed

    Fauque, Danielle M E

    2008-12-20

    Once the preliminaries of peace had been signed in January 1783, after the war of American independence, exchanges between British and French men of science resumed their normal course. On a visit to Paris in 1783, the francophile Charles Blagden (with the encouragement of Joseph Banks) made a number of contacts that fostered relations between the Royal Society and the Académie royale des sciences. In the course of this and several subsequent visits to France, Blagden became especially intimate with the chemist Claude-Louis Berthollet. His correspondence, now in the Royal Society, is a rich source for our understanding of some of the leading scientific debates of the day, in particular concerning the nature of water, which forms the main subject of this article.

  9. Let it burn: distinguishing inflammable airs 1766-1790.

    PubMed

    Tomory, Leslie

    2009-11-01

    The issue of the number of species of inflammable air was debated particularly in the period 1777-1786. The work of Henry Cavendish in 1766 and Alessandro Volta in 1777 in characterising two species of inflammable air set the stage for the work of other chemists, particularly in Paris, as they debated this question, mostly concerning heavy inflammable air. Different ways of generating gases were discovered up to 1783, when the synthesis of water and the proposal of carbon as an element created a framework for the question to be answered. In 1785-1786, Claude-Louis Berthollet reported the composition of heavy inflammable air and volatile alkali, while Philippe Gengembre analysed phosphorated hydrogen and hepatic air. In the end, it was the new chemical nomenclature of 1787 that spread their results widely. PMID:20506705

  10. Mendelevium: The Way It Was

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-05

    A reel of black & white film shot nearly 60 years ago has surfaced at Berkeley Lab, depicting the discovery of Mendelevium - or Element 101 - as reenacted by some of the legendary scientists who did the actual work at that time. Since the 1940s, Berkeley Lab scientists were locked in a race to synthesize new elements, and more often than not, they came out winners. Sixteen elements, most of them in the actinide series at the bottom of the periodic table, were discovered and synthesized by its researchers. Retired Berkeley Lab physicist Claude Lyneis found the reel in a box of dusty and deteriorating films slated for disposal. Using digital editing skills he acquired to make videos of his son's lacrosse team, Lyneis has produced and narrated an excerpt of this nearly-lost footage. It is an entertaining and informative look at the pioneering physics performed at UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's hillside campus.

  11. Cosmic Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; Mallik, D. C. V.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    1989-09-01

    1. Astronomy in ancient and medieval China Joseph Needham; 2. Indian astronomy: an historical perspective B. V. Subbarayappa; 3. Making of astronomy in ancient India Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya; 4. The impact of astronomy on the development of western science Jean-Claude Pecker; 5. Man and the Universe Hubert Reeves; 6. Understanding the Universe - challenges and directions in modern observational astronomy Harlan Smith, Jr: 7. Frontiers in cosmology Fred Hoyle; 8. Did the Universe originate in a big bang? Jayant Narlikar; 9. The dark matter problem Bernard Carr; 10. Geometry and the Universe C. V. Vishveshwara; 11. The origin and evolution of life Cyril Ponnamperuma; 12. The anthropic principle: self selection as an adjunct to natural selection Brandon Carter; 13. Astrology and science: an examination of the evidence Ivan Kelly, Roger Culver and Peter Loptson; 14. Astronomy and science fiction Allen Janis.

  12. Beautiful Surfaces. Style and Substance in Florentius Schuyl's Illustrations for Descartes' Treatise on Man.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that the Cartesian bête-machine is the invention of René Descartes (1596-1650) is rarely contested. Close examination of Descartes' texts proves that this is a concept founded not on the basis of his own writings, but a subsequent critical interpretation, which developed and began to dominate his work after his death. Descartes' Treatise on Man, published posthumously in two rival editions, Florentius Schuyl's Latin translation De Homine (1662), and Claude Clerselier's Traité de l'homme, has proved particularly problematic. The surviving manuscript copies of the Treatise on Man left no illustrations, leaving both editors the daunting task of producing a set of images to accompany and clarify the fragmented text. In this intriguing case, the images can be seen to have spoken louder than the text which they illustrated. This paper assesses Schuyl's choice to represent Descartes' Man in a highly stylized manner, without superimposing Clerselier's intentions onto De Homine.

  13. F.S.V.B. Volleyball

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    22me assemblée des délégués de la Fédération Suisse de Volley Ball (F.S.V.B.), en présence entre autres de Claude Delay, représentant de la société fédérale de gymnastique et Hans Gauer, représentant de l'association suisse de gymnastique féminine. Annonce d'une démonstration d'un mini match de volley ball à Meyrin dans l'après-midi.

  14. Introduction à L'Etude de la Médecine Expérimentale. Surgical revolution. Part I.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Claude Bernard (1813-1878), the most distinguished French physiologist of the 19th century, made incomparable contributions to the world of medicine of his times and even to ours. Bernard believed in scientific determinism and created the term milieu interieur as a manner to better understand experimental medicine and to present a new way of explaining the function of the living organism. Bernard dealt with innovative developments in the glycogenetic function of the liver, extrahepatic glycogenesis, the role of pancreatic juice in the digestion of fats, vasomotor nervous system discoveries, and other important physiological advances. In 1865, Bernard's most extraordinary book on the philosophy and understanding of experimental medicine appeared. This book represented Bernard's unique contribution to the progress of medical and surgical research. Because of the enormous implications of this work on the advancement of surgical research, which were subsequently applied to clinical surgical practice, we propose that this book created a surgical revolution.

  15. STS-46 Atlantis, OV-104, crew participates in fire training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers participate in fire fighting and fire training exercises in JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Lined up along fire hoses and spraying water at the blazing fire pit are: (front to back in the foreground) European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier, directing the hose nozzle, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman, MS Marsha S. Ivins (pink cap), and MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz; and (front to back in the background) Commander Loren J. Shriver, Pilot Andrew M. Allen, backup Italian Payload Specialist Umberto Guidoni, and Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba. A fire fighter training instructor stands between the two lines of crewmembers and the two hoses.

  16. Beautiful Surfaces. Style and Substance in Florentius Schuyl's Illustrations for Descartes' Treatise on Man.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that the Cartesian bête-machine is the invention of René Descartes (1596-1650) is rarely contested. Close examination of Descartes' texts proves that this is a concept founded not on the basis of his own writings, but a subsequent critical interpretation, which developed and began to dominate his work after his death. Descartes' Treatise on Man, published posthumously in two rival editions, Florentius Schuyl's Latin translation De Homine (1662), and Claude Clerselier's Traité de l'homme, has proved particularly problematic. The surviving manuscript copies of the Treatise on Man left no illustrations, leaving both editors the daunting task of producing a set of images to accompany and clarify the fragmented text. In this intriguing case, the images can be seen to have spoken louder than the text which they illustrated. This paper assesses Schuyl's choice to represent Descartes' Man in a highly stylized manner, without superimposing Clerselier's intentions onto De Homine. PMID:27356337

  17. Mendelevium: The Way It Was

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A reel of black & white film shot nearly 60 years ago has surfaced at Berkeley Lab, depicting the discovery of Mendelevium - or Element 101 - as reenacted by some of the legendary scientists who did the actual work at that time. Since the 1940s, Berkeley Lab scientists were locked in a race to synthesize new elements, and more often than not, they came out winners. Sixteen elements, most of them in the actinide series at the bottom of the periodic table, were discovered and synthesized by its researchers. Retired Berkeley Lab physicist Claude Lyneis found the reel in a box of dusty and deteriorating films slated for disposal. Using digital editing skills he acquired to make videos of his son's lacrosse team, Lyneis has produced and narrated an excerpt of this nearly-lost footage. It is an entertaining and informative look at the pioneering physics performed at UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's hillside campus.

  18. Forces and Motion: Dynamics of the Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In this 'Lift off to Learning' series, Loren Shriver, commander of STS 46, and the other members of the mission (Claude Nicollier, Marsha Ivins, Andrew Allen, Jeffrey Hoffman, Franklin Chiang-Diaz, and Franco Maerba) use computer graphics, and physical experiments to explain how the tethered satellite to be deployed during their mission will be raised, how it works, the influence of the Shuttle on the satellite and the satellite's influence on the Shuttle's orbit, the gravitational effects, and other effects concerning the Theoretical Physics used to plan this mission (gravity gradient force, center of mass, angular momentum, centrifugal force, and coriolis effect). This video ends with a discussion of the technology transfer and utilization of this tethered satellite concept and design.

  19. Evaluating a health information resource in a health system.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Wendy F; Einbinder, Laura; Attridge, Elaine; Lord, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to offer the broadest scope of quality information resources, libraries are often faced with decisions related to the sources they provide based on the quality and cost of each resource. However, there lacks a framework to evaluate these resources to maximize the value of services offered to library users. The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library collaborated with the Department of Health Evaluation Sciences to undertake a comprehensive evaluation project to begin to establish such a framework. The long term goals are to: 1) determine cost effectiveness of services provided on an ongoing basis to provide objective basis for pursuing or renewing licenses, 2) evaluate licensed health care information services/databases under consideration and 3) create a process for ongoing evaluation. This abstract reports the results of the first demonstration evaluation of an information resource, MDConsult, as a model for future evaluation studies in a library setting. PMID:14728323

  20. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology.

    PubMed

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C; Throop, C Jason

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education.

  1. Noteworthy Chemistry of Chloroform.

    PubMed

    Alston, Theodore A

    2016-07-01

    Inhaled chloroform anesthesia was introduced in 1847. Soon thereafter, the chemical reactivity of aerobically heated chloroform permitted John Snow and Claude Bernard to do seminal experiments in the assay of drug levels and drug metabolism. However, it was not widely appreciated until a clinical mishap in 1899 that thermal decomposition generated significant levels of toxic phosgene from air-polluting quantities of chloroform in poorly ventilated operating rooms that were illuminated by flames. Phosgene is also generated metabolically from chloroform. A clue appeared in the 1950s when subanesthetic traces of inhaled chloroform proved accidentally lethal to strains of male mice spontaneously expressing high levels of chloroform-metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, in microbial experiments of 1967, the reactive chloroform molecule was inadvertently discovered to selectively inactivate vitamin B12-dependent enzymes. Chloroform can also activate enzymes. As a solvent, it was serendipitously found in 1903 to activate what is now known as plasminogen to plasmin. PMID:27480474

  2. [Paul Bert, scientist and politician].

    PubMed

    Rostène, William

    2006-01-01

    Paul Bert worked with Claude Bernard, one of the leading physiologists of the 19th century. In his laboratory at the Collège de France in Paris, Paul Bert carried out fascinating experiments in particular on respiratory processes, leading him to publish "La pression barométrique" in 1878. In this book are recalled his discovery of oxygen pressure decrease with altitude, divers diseases, the improved safety protocols in hyperbaric conditions, and the first development of gas anaesthetics for surgery. He was the third President of the Société de Biologie. Paul Bert was also a politician with strong convictions. Minister of Education under Gambetta's short term government, he initiated the fight for social equality and secular education and became one of the most prestigious figures of the developing socialist party. He received many distinctions and was given a state funeral.

  3. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory.

  4. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed.

  5. STS-103 Crew at Breakfast, Suiting, Departing O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) team is preparing for NASA's third scheduled service call to Hubble. This mission, STS-103, will launch from Kennedy Space Center aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven flight crew members for STS-103 are: Commander Curtis L. Brown (his sixth flight), Pilot Scott J. Kelly and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Jean-Francois Clervoy (his third flight) will join space walkers Steven L. Smith (his third flight), C. Michael Foale (his fifth flight), John M. Grunsfeld (his third flight) and ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier (his fourth flight). This current video presents a live footage of the seven STS-103 crewmembers eating breakfast, suiting, and departing the O&C (Operations and Checkout) before the 6:50 p.m. lift-off.

  6. STS-75 Mission Highlight Resource Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The flight crew of the STS-75 mission, Cmdr. Andrew M. Allen, Pilot Scott J. Horowitz, Payload Cmdr. Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialists Maurizio Cheli, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, and Claude Nicollier, and Payload Specialist Umberto Guidoni, present a video over-view of their mission. Images include: pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew can be seen being readied in the white room' for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB). Also included are views of activities inside the Firing Control Room at KSC.

  7. Shock at the millennium II. Walter B. Cannon and Lawrence J. Henderson.

    PubMed

    Chambers, N K; Buchman, T G

    2001-10-01

    Walter B. Cannon and Lawrence J. Henderson, students of shock in the early twentieth century, were contemporaries for four decades in the Harvard Department of Physiology. While their discoveries continue to have important clinical applications, both men established complementary methods of scientific investigation and description. Both men were inspired by Claude Bernard, hewing to his principle of the stability of the milieu intérieur. Cannon, the traditional experimentalist, employed a reductionist approach by holding constant the confounding variables of his experiments; in contrast, Henderson, the strategist of theoretical analysis, deduced patterns and relationships from less constrained models, focusing on complexity using mathematics and graphs. In delineation, Cannon described mechanisms; Henderson described the organization of systems. Cannon's emphasis on homeostasis with the identification of feedback arcs dominated shock research for the balance of the twentieth century. Henderson's perspective designating the importance of organization to those restorative mechanisms could well reemerge to dominate the twenty-first.

  8. Hearing Science in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and France

    PubMed Central

    Gouk, Penelope; Sykes, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Benjamin Martin, the English natural philosopher, and Claude-Nicolas Le Cat, the French surgeon, both published important work on auditory physiology and function in the mid-eighteenth century. Despite their different backgrounds, there was consensus between the two scholars on key principles of hearing research, most notably the importance of the inner ear in relation to auditory perception. Martin's work (1755 [1763?]) drew directly on the surgical work of Le Cat (1741) to demonstrate the importance of the auditory mechanism in listening processes. Le Cat's interest in the ear, however, came in turn from his interest in surgical anatomy. Martin used Le Cat's elegant designs as a tool for the vivid communication of auditory function to a popular, fee-paying audience. The meeting of two very different minds through intellectual agreement and material transfer demonstrates the way in which principles of hearing science were established in the Enlightenment period. PMID:20634220

  9. Whether weather affects music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen L.; Williams, Paul D.

    2012-09-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London [Richardson, 2012]. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for artists Claude Monet, John Constable, and William Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies [e.g., Baker and Thornes, 2006].

  10. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C.; Throop, C. Jason

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education. PMID:20706551

  11. [A brief history of the anatomy and physiology of a mysterious and hidden gland called the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    Because of its retrogastric location and appearance, which is similar to mesenteric fat, for centuries the pancreas has been a mysterious, hidden organ that has received little attention. However, its importance was intuited and described by Herophilus, Ruphos of Ephesus and Galen. This gland began to appearin distinct medical treatises from the 16th century. There are two important scientists in the history of the pancreas. The fist, Johann Georg Wirsung, described the main pancreatic duct in 1642, a date considered by many to be the start of Pancreatology. The second, Claude Bernard, described pancreatic exocrine function between 1849 and 1856 and is considered the father of pancreatic physiology. Besides these two outstanding figures, there is a constellation of personalities who contributed to improving knowledge of this enigmatic gland with the results of their studies. The aim of this article is to call attention to some of the most notable findings that have enhanced knowledge of this gland over the years.

  12. [Adélaïde Hautval (1906-1988): An exemplary medical personality].

    PubMed

    Halioua, Bruno; Hauptmann, Georges

    2015-12-01

    Adélaïde Hautval (1906-1988), psychiatrist, was arrested in April 1942 having defended a Jewish family abused by German soldiers. She was imprisoned in Bourges and in several camps in France (Pithiviers, Beaune-la-Rolande, Orléans, Romainville) before being deported as a "Friend of the Jews" at Auschwitz in the convoy of 23 January 1943, said 31,000 convoy with 229 other resistant women, Marie-Claude Vaillant-Couturier, Charlotte Delbo, Danielle Casanova. She refused to participate in the "medical" experience of Nazi doctors Clauberg, Schumann, Wirths and Mengele at Birkenau. She was then deported to Ravensbrück. During her deportation, she illustrated her dedication in the medical management of the deportees. She testified repeatedly on her experience of remote doctor. Hautval Adélaïde was the first French woman doctor named Righteous among the Nations in 1965. PMID:26411305

  13. RETRACTED: Impacts of past climate variability on marine ecosystems: Lessons from sediment records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeis, Kay-Christian; Finney, Bruce P.; Ganeshram, Raja; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Poulsen, Bo; Struck, Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and Author. Please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). Reason: Paragraph 3.3 of this article contains text (verbatim) that had already appeared in a book chapter "Variability from scales in marine sediments and other historical records" by David B. Field, Tim R. Baumgartner, Vicente Ferreira, Dimitri Gutierrez, Hector Lozano-Montes, Renato Salvatteci and Andy Soutar. The book is entitled "Climate Change and Small Pelagic Fish", 2009, edited by Dave Checkley, Claude Roy, Jurgen Alheit, and Yoshioki Oozeki (Cambridge University Press; 2009).The authors would like to apologize for this administrative error on their part.

  14. [THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION IN MEDICINE OF THE LAST QUARTER OF XIX-FIRST HALF OF XX CENTURIES. REPORT II. THE OUTSET OF REVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCE].

    PubMed

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N

    2015-01-01

    The article affirms that onset of revision of picture of analyzed reality, methodological approaches to studying of vital activity of human organism and philosophical basics of medical science refers to 1878 and is related to publishing of "The course of general physiology" by French physiologist Claude Bernard. The implemented analysis of the text of this work permit to establish that C. Bernard undertook an attempt to introduce conception of human organism as a processing system being self-reproduced as. a result of interaction with environment due to mechanisms of self-regulation. The necessity was substantiated to make experiment the leading method of cognition of vital activity. The living wholeness (organism, cell) was proposed to be an object of experimentation. In this living wholeness its natural capacities to self-regulation of main vital processes can be preserved at its maximum. The new senses were introduced into ontological categories of thing, process, causality, portion and whole. PMID:26399073

  15. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology.

    PubMed

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C; Throop, C Jason

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education. PMID:20706551

  16. Shock at the millennium II. Walter B. Cannon and Lawrence J. Henderson.

    PubMed

    Chambers, N K; Buchman, T G

    2001-10-01

    Walter B. Cannon and Lawrence J. Henderson, students of shock in the early twentieth century, were contemporaries for four decades in the Harvard Department of Physiology. While their discoveries continue to have important clinical applications, both men established complementary methods of scientific investigation and description. Both men were inspired by Claude Bernard, hewing to his principle of the stability of the milieu intérieur. Cannon, the traditional experimentalist, employed a reductionist approach by holding constant the confounding variables of his experiments; in contrast, Henderson, the strategist of theoretical analysis, deduced patterns and relationships from less constrained models, focusing on complexity using mathematics and graphs. In delineation, Cannon described mechanisms; Henderson described the organization of systems. Cannon's emphasis on homeostasis with the identification of feedback arcs dominated shock research for the balance of the twentieth century. Henderson's perspective designating the importance of organization to those restorative mechanisms could well reemerge to dominate the twenty-first. PMID:11580110

  17. The STS-103 crew address family and friends at Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew address family and friends at Launch Pad 39B. From left to right are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France , Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Steven L. Smith. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. In the background is Space Shuttle Discovery, alongside the lighted Fixed Service Structure. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. The mission is expected to last about 8 days and 21 hours. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:25 p.m. EST.

  18. [Adélaïde Hautval (1906-1988): An exemplary medical personality].

    PubMed

    Halioua, Bruno; Hauptmann, Georges

    2015-12-01

    Adélaïde Hautval (1906-1988), psychiatrist, was arrested in April 1942 having defended a Jewish family abused by German soldiers. She was imprisoned in Bourges and in several camps in France (Pithiviers, Beaune-la-Rolande, Orléans, Romainville) before being deported as a "Friend of the Jews" at Auschwitz in the convoy of 23 January 1943, said 31,000 convoy with 229 other resistant women, Marie-Claude Vaillant-Couturier, Charlotte Delbo, Danielle Casanova. She refused to participate in the "medical" experience of Nazi doctors Clauberg, Schumann, Wirths and Mengele at Birkenau. She was then deported to Ravensbrück. During her deportation, she illustrated her dedication in the medical management of the deportees. She testified repeatedly on her experience of remote doctor. Hautval Adélaïde was the first French woman doctor named Righteous among the Nations in 1965.

  19. An introduction to the medical epistemology of Georges Canguilhem: moving beyond Michel Foucault.

    PubMed

    Spicker, S F

    1987-11-01

    Although American philosophers and physicians are generally familiar with the writings of Claude Bernard (1813-1878), especially his Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), the medical epistemology of Georges Canguilhem, born in 1904, is virtually unknown in English speaking nations. Although indebted to Bernard for his conception of the methods to be employed in the acquisition of medical knowledge, Canguilhem radically reformulates Bernard's concepts of 'disease', 'health', 'illness', and 'pathology'. Contemporary exhortations to medical professionals and medical students that they "pay more attention to the whole patient" take on significance in working through the writings of Canguilhem; of crucial importance is the relation that obtains between a patient's unique symptomatology and the proper drug regiment that is required.

  20. List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J

  1. 3D seismic imaging of an active, normal fault zone in southern Apennines (Italy): Clues on fluid-driven microearthquake fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, O.; Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.

    2012-12-01

    We have reconstructed a 3D detailed image of the crustal volume embedding the active normal fault system in southern Apennines (Italy). It is obtained by the inversion of P and S first arrival times from microearthquakes recorded in the area. The issues of data quality and the implementation of robust tomographic inversion strategy have been addressed to improve the resolution of the seismic image. The arrival times measurements are enhanced by applying techniques based on polarization filtering and refined re-picking. Data inversion has been performed by using a delay-time 3D tomographic method for the joint determination of source locations and velocity model. The dataset consists of 1311 events with magnitude ranging between [0.1, 3.2], recorded from August 2005 to April 2011 by 42 stations operated by the consortium AMRA scarl and INGV. We used a multi-scale inversion approach, in order to first estimate the large wavelength components of the velocity model and then to progressively introduce smaller scale components. P- and S-wave velocity models show a strong lateral variation along a direction orthogonal to the Apeninic chain, between 0-15 km depth. This variation defines two geological formations which are characterized by relatively low and high P-wave velocities. The sharpest lateral transition occurs in the NE direction: it is well correlated with the location of the NW-SE oriented, primary normal fault associated with the 1980, Ms 6.9 earthquake, which cuts at SW the outcrops of the carbonatic Campanian platform, and separates at NE the older Mesozoic limestone formations from the younger Pliocene-Quaternary basin deposits. The main lithological formations, as identified in the referenced active seismic CROP04 profile, can be recognized in the inferred velocity model. In particular, the structural feature associated with the uplift of the Apulian Platform is well detected by the high P-velocity anomaly ranging between 6.0-6.8 km/s. The thickening of the

  2. Feasibility study of a nation-wide Early Warning System: the application of the EEW software PRESTo on the Italian Strong Motion Network (RAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, Aldo; Picozzi, Matteo; Elia, Luca; Martino, Claudio; Brondi, Piero; Colombelli, Simona; Emolo, Antonio; Festa, Gaetano; Marcucci, Sandro

    2014-05-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a huge progress in the development, implementation and testing of Earthquakes Early Warning Systems (EEWS) worldwide, as the result of a joint effort of the seismological and earthquake engineering communities to set up robust and efficient methodologies for the real-time seismic risk mitigation. The leading experience of the operational early warning system implemented by the Japan Meteorological Agency showed the effectiveness of a combined onsite and network-based approach to rapidly broadcast the rapid warning after a potential damaging earthquake. At the nation-wide scale, the Japanese system makes use of real-time data streamed by the extremely dense accelerograph array (about 1000 seismic instruments) deployed across Japan. With more than 750 accelerometric stations installed over all the active seismic zones, target cities and strategic infrastructures, Italy has the potential for a nation-wide early warning system, although the communication network and data sharing must be expanded and improved. A significant number of these stations are nodes of the RAN (Italian Accelerometric Network) managed by the Italian national emergency management department (Dipartimento della Protezione Civile, DPC), whose data are used for emergency response services. In the framework of the REAKT-Strategies and tools for Real Time Earthquake RisK ReducTion FP7 European project, the AMRA-RISSCLab group is engaged in a feasibility study on the implementation of the EEW software PRESTo earthquake early warning platforms on the Italian accelerometric network (RAN) PRESTo (PRobabilistic and Evolutionary early warning SysTem) is a highly configurable and easily portable platform for Earthquake Early Warning. The system processes the live accelerometric streams from the stations of a seismic network to promptly provide probabilistic and evolutionary estimates of location and magnitude of detected earthquakes while they are occurring, as well as

  3. Feasibility study on earthquake early warning application to schools: the example of the ITIS 'E. Majorana', Somma Vesuviana, Naples (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emolo, Antonio; Zollo, Aldo; Picozzi, Matteo; Martino, Claudio; Elia, Luca; Verderame, Gerardo; De Risi, Maria Teresa; Ricci, Paolo; Lombardi, Anna; Bindi, Dino; Parolai, Stefano; Boxberger, Tobias; Miranda, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    One of the main objective of the WP7 (Strategic Applications and Capacity Building) in the framework of the REAKT-Strategies and tools for Real Time Earthquake RisK ReducTion FP7 European project, is to evaluate the effectiveness of EEW and real-time risk assessment procedures in reducing seismic risk to various industrial partners and end-users. In the context of the REAKT project, the AMRA-RISSCLab group is engaged in a feasibility study on the application of earthquake early-warning procedures in two high schools located in the Irpinia region (South Italy), an area that in the 1980 was struck by a magnitude 6.9 earthquake. In this work we report on the activities carried out during the last 24 Months at the school ITIS 'E. Majorana', located in Somma Vesuviana, a village in the neighbourhood of Naples. In order to perform a continuous seismic monitoring of the site, which includes a rather complex structure building, 5 accelerometric stations have been installed in different part of the school. In particular, a 24-bit ADC (Sigma/Delta) Agecodagis-Kefren data-logger has been installed with a Guralp CMG-5TC accelerometer with a 0.25g full-scale in the school courtyard, while 4 SOSEWIN sensors have been also installed at different locations within the building. Commercial ADSL lines provide transmission of real-time data to the EEW centre. Data streams are now acquired in real-time in the PRESToPlus (regional and on-site, threshold-based early-warning) software platform [1]. The recent December 29, 2013 M 5.1 Monti del Matese Earthquake, gave us the unique opportunity to use real strong motion data to test the performance of threshold-based early warning method at the school. The on-site method [2] aims to define alert levels at the monitored site. In particular, at each station the characteristic P-waves period (τc) and the peak displacement (Pd) are measured on the initial P-wave signal. They are compared with threshold values, previously established through an

  4. Signal processing with neural networks: throwing off the yoke of linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1991-11-01

    During the 1930s and 1940s Norbert Wiener and others invented the core concepts of linear signal processing. These ideas quickly became popular and played a significant role in the Allies' victory in World War II. During and after the war, linear signal processing theory was greatly expanded and began to take on the character of an imposing monolith. By the mid- 1940s, Wiener (and others, such as Dennis Gabor) came to recognize that linear signal processing theory, while interesting and very useful, was only a piece of a much larger picture. In 1946 and 1958 Gabor and Wiener, respectively, attempted to address the whole picture. While they were not completely successful, they did implicitly set an agenda for a more general approach to signal processing. Although a few others have, from time to time, addressed this agenda; in terms of the signal processing community as a whole it still remains lost in the shadow of the ever-growing monolith of linear signal processing theory. The thesis of this paper is that it is now time to get on with the Wiener and Gabor agenda. It is time to make general signal processing the mainstream focus of the subject. It is argued here that the best way to do this is to abandon the transfer function/Fourier analysis/z-transform approach of the current linear signal processing regime and replace it with a much more natural intellectual framework for general signal processing--the framework offered by neurocomputing. A potential benefit of this refocusing of the field is that the detailed engineering might soon be left to machines, while human technologists will be able to concentrate on the art of signal sculpting.

  5. Interrelationships between information and energy using knowledge management tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizcano, D.; Martínez, A. María

    2014-10-01

    Edward Fredkin was an enthusiastic advocate of information-based theoretical physics, who, in the early 1980s, proposed a new theory of physics based on the idea that the universe is ultimately composed of software. According to Fredkin, reality should be considered as being composed not of particles, matter and forces or energy but of bits of data or information modified according to computational rules. Fredkin went on to demonstrate that, while energy is necessary for storing and retrieving information, it can be arbitrarily reduced in order to carry out any particular instance of information processing, and this operation does not have a lower bound. This implies that it is information rather than matter or energy that should be considered at the ultimate fundamental constituent of reality. This possibility had already been suggested by other scientists. Norbert Wiener heralded a fundamental shift from energy to information and suggested that the universe was founded essentially on the transformation of information, not energy. However, Konrad Zuse was the first, back in 1967, to defend the idea that a digital computer is computing the universe. Richard P. Feynman showed this possibility in a similar light in his reflections on how information related to matter and energy. Other pioneering research on the theory of digital physics was published by Kantor in 1977 and more recently by Stephen Wolfram in 2002, who thereby joined the host of voices upholding that it is patterns of information, not matter and energy, that constitute the cornerstones of reality. In this paper, we introduce the use of knowledge management tools for the purpose of analysing this topic.

  6. Interrelationships between information and energy using knowledge management tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lizcano, D. E-mail: mariaaurora.martinez@udima.es; Martínez, A. María E-mail: mariaaurora.martinez@udima.es

    2014-10-06

    Edward Fredkin was an enthusiastic advocate of information-based theoretical physics, who, in the early 1980s, proposed a new theory of physics based on the idea that the universe is ultimately composed of software. According to Fredkin, reality should be considered as being composed not of particles, matter and forces or energy but of bits of data or information modified according to computational rules. Fredkin went on to demonstrate that, while energy is necessary for storing and retrieving information, it can be arbitrarily reduced in order to carry out any particular instance of information processing, and this operation does not have a lower bound. This implies that it is information rather than matter or energy that should be considered at the ultimate fundamental constituent of reality. This possibility had already been suggested by other scientists. Norbert Wiener heralded a fundamental shift from energy to information and suggested that the universe was founded essentially on the transformation of information, not energy. However, Konrad Zuse was the first, back in 1967, to defend the idea that a digital computer is computing the universe. Richard P. Feynman showed this possibility in a similar light in his reflections on how information related to matter and energy. Other pioneering research on the theory of digital physics was published by Kantor in 1977 and more recently by Stephen Wolfram in 2002, who thereby joined the host of voices upholding that it is patterns of information, not matter and energy, that constitute the cornerstones of reality. In this paper, we introduce the use of knowledge management tools for the purpose of analysing this topic.

  7. Linear and quadratic models of point process systems: contributions of patterned input to output.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, K A; Rosenberg, J R

    2012-08-01

    In the 1880's Volterra characterised a nonlinear system using a functional series connecting continuous input and continuous output. Norbert Wiener, in the 1940's, circumvented problems associated with the application of Volterra series to physical problems by deriving from it a new series of terms that are mutually uncorrelated with respect to Gaussian processes. Subsequently, Brillinger, in the 1970's, introduced a point-process analogue of Volterra's series connecting point-process inputs to the instantaneous rate of point-process output. We derive here a new series from this analogue in which its terms are mutually uncorrelated with respect to Poisson processes. This new series expresses how patterned input in a spike train, represented by third-order cross-cumulants, is converted into the instantaneous rate of an output point-process. Given experimental records of suitable duration, the contribution of arbitrary patterned input to an output process can, in principle, be determined. Solutions for linear and quadratic point-process models with one and two inputs and a single output are investigated. Our theoretical results are applied to isolated muscle spindle data in which the spike trains from the primary and secondary endings from the same muscle spindle are recorded in response to stimulation of one and then two static fusimotor axons in the absence and presence of a random length change imposed on the parent muscle. For a fixed mean rate of input spikes, the analysis of the experimental data makes explicit which patterns of two input spikes contribute to an output spike.

  8. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements and the Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Moissl, R.; Gruen, E.

    2007-12-01

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft flew twice through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During the ring passages, the Galileo impact-ionization dust detector counted a few thousand impacts but only about 100 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. The instrument verified the outward extension of the gossamer ring beyond Thebe's orbit and measured a major reduction in particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring material is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2007). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. Finally, Galileo also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. Recent modelling (Hamilton & Krueger, Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically

  9. Water security and societal impacts of tropical cyclones in northwestern Mexico, 1970-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C. A.; Farfan, L.

    2012-12-01

    Mexico.Norbert Impacts in Alamos, Sonora, 12 Oct. 2008

  10. On small things in water moving around: Purcell's contributions to biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Howard

    2012-02-01

    I went to see Purcell after finishing my course work for the Ph.D. (1961) to ask whether I might join his group. ``But I don't have any graduate students,`` he said. ``Why is that?'' I asked. ``I can't think of anything to do,'' he replied. That was a wipe out. After I had finished my Ph.D. with Ramsey on the hydrogen maser (1964), Ed and I came up with an idea that led to work on sedimentation field-flow fractionation (PNAS 1967). We had hoped this method would be useful for biology, but problems of adsorption of proteins to surfaces stood in the way. Then I moved over to the biology department and got interested in the motile behavior of bacteria (1968). Here was a subject that I thought Ed would really enjoy. There were wonderful movies made by Norbert Pfennig of experiments done by Theodor Engelmann in the 1880's. We found a 16-mm projector and looked at these movies on Ed's office wall. Ed's first comment proved seminal, ''How can such a small cell swim in a straight line?'' We thought about how cells count molecules in their environment and wrote ``Physics of chemoreception,'' (Biophys. J.,1977). In the meantime, Ed gave a memorable lecture at Viki Weisskopf's retirement symposium, his classic ``Life at low Reynolds number'' (Am. J. Phys. 1977). Ed really wanted to understand what it would be like to swim like a bacterium! He wasn't very interested in what the literature had to say about such a problem, he wanted to think it through for himself. My role was straight man. I very much enjoyed the ride.

  11. The Poster: A Petrologic Exercise For The Resource-Challenged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.

    2003-12-01

    The scientific poster is a common format for transmitting information and can be used as a petrologic exercise that may be particularly beneficial for those programs with limited resources. For example, the Saint Norbert College geology program was founded in 1987 and a traditional geology major established in 1994. We have high quality petrographic microscopes and excellent on-campus computing resources but otherwise lack common facilities such as a rock preparation room and instrumentation for obtaining research quality geochemical data such as XRF or SEM. The petrology poster exercise is designed to mimic the formative stages of a research project from fieldwork through geochemical analysis. A background literature search on a regional rock assemblage, usually suggested by the instructor, is conducted by the students. A specific petrologic aspect, such as the troctolitic portion of the Duluth Complex, is selected for investigation. Fieldwork consists of detailed outcrop and handsample descriptions, with approximately ten samples collected for thin section analysis. Geochemical data is culled from the literature by the instructor and computer modeled by the students using standard petrologic modeling programs such as IGPET. Having characterized the rock in detail, the students make interpretations of their data and more importantly, formulate research questions for future investigation. The final poster summarizes a student's work and is presented to their peers for critique. The goal of this semester-long exercise is to provide a near-professional research experience to the students for limited costs (i.e. site field trip and professional preparation of the thin sections). Additional benefits include: in-depth instruction related to writing an abstract, enhanced computer graphic skills related to poster construction, and a final product that makes an excellent springboard to a senior thesis.

  12. Radio Telescopes Reveal Youngest Stellar Corpse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers using a global combination of radio telescopes to study a stellar explosion some 30 million light-years from Earth have likely discovered either the youngest black hole or the youngest neutron star known in the Universe. Their discovery also marks the first time that a black hole or neutron star has been found associated with a supernova that has been seen to explode since the invention of the telescope nearly 400 years ago. M51 An artist's impression of Supernova 1986J. The newly discovered nebula around the black hole or neutron star in the center is shown in blue, and is in the center of the expanding, fragmented shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion, which is shown in red. CREDIT: Norbert Bartel and Michael F. Bietenholz, York University; Artist: G. Arguner (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Artist's Conception (above image, 836K) Galaxy and Supernova (47K) A VLA image (left) of the galaxy NGC 891, showing the bright supernova explosion below the galaxy's center. At right, a closer view of the supernova, made with a global array of radio telescopes. CREDIT: Miguel A. Perez-Torres, Antxon Alberdi and Lucas Lara, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia - CSIC, Spain, Jon Marcaide and Jose C. Guirado, Universidad de Valencia, Spain Franco Mantovani, IRA-CNR, Italy, Eduardo Ros, MPIfR, Germany, and Kurt W. Weiler, Naval Research Laboratory, USA Multi-Frequency Closeup View (201K) Blue and white area shows the nebula surrounding the black hole or neutron star lurking in the center of the supernova. This nebula is apparent at a higher radio frequency (15 GHz). The red and also the contours show the distorted, expanding shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion. This shell is seen at a lower radio frequency (5 GHz). CREDIT: Michael F. Bietenholz and Norbert Bartel, York University, Michael Rupen, NRAO, NRAO/AUI/NSF A supernova is the explosion of a massive star after it exhausts its supply of nuclear fuel and

  13. STS-103 Mission Specialist Nicollier and his wife DEPART PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and his wife, Susana, beam at the camera on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  14. STS-103 Mission Specialist Foale and his family DEPART PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) holds one of his children on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla., as his wife, Rhonda, looks on. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  15. STS-103 Payload Commander Smith and his wife DEPART PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Payload Commander Steven L. Smith and his wife, Peggy, smile for the camera on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  16. STS-103 crew members and their families pose for a portrait before DEPARTing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew pose for a group portrait with their families and loved ones on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. They are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. From left to right, the crew members are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, and Steven L. Smith; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  17. STS-103 Pilot Kelly and MS Clervoy and Smith DEPART PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly holds his daughter as he talks to Mission Specialists and fellow crew members Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Steven L. Smith on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  18. STS-103 Landing of Discovery at KSC's SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery drops out of the darkness onto runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling more than 3,267,000 miles on a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronauts Curtis L. Brown Jr., Commander; Scott J. Kelly, Pilot; and Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, all Mission Specialists, spent the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  19. STS-103: Flight Day 6 Highlights and Crew Activities Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Discovery's astronauts (Mission Commander, Curtis L. Brown; Pilot, Scott J. Kelly; Mission Specialists, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale, and John M. Grunsfeld; and (ESA) Mission Specialists, Claude Nicollier and Jean-Francois Clervoy) deliver a Christmas present to the world, putting the Hubble Space Telescope back into service after 24 hours and 33 minutes of repairs and upgrades that make the orbital observatory more capable than ever. European Space Agency Astronaut Jean-Francois Clervoy uses the shuttle's robot arm to release the telescope at 5:03 p.m. CST, then places the arm into an upright salute as Commander Curt Brown fires Discovery's steering jets to begin separating from the telescope. The telescope's re-deployment takes place at an altitude of 370 statute miles as the two spacecraft fly over the South Pacific's coral sea northeast of Australia. At 5:39 CST, Brown executes a second steering jet burn, lowering Discovery's orbit slightly, so that it will begin orbiting faster than the telescope and move away at just under 6 statute miles per orbit. Afterward, each of the seven astronauts on board calls down holiday wishes from space in several languages.

  20. STS-103 Pilot Kelly and Commander Brown look over Discovery after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly (left) and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (right) look at the tiles on orbiter Discovery. They and other crew members Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Jean-Francois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  1. STS-103 Commander Brown and his fiancee DEPART PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and his fiancee, Ann Brickert, smile for the camera on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  2. STS-103 MS Clervoy and Commander Brown look over Discovery after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France (left), with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (right) look over the orbiter Discovery. They and other crew members Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland (also with ESA), completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  3. STS-103 crew looks over Discovery after a night-time landing at the SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-103 crew looks over the orbiter Discovery. In the foreground, from left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.); behind them, from left, are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. The remaining crew member (not shown) is Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). The crew of seven completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  4. STS-103 crew poses for a photo in front of Discovery after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-103 crew poses in front of the orbiter Discovery. Standing left to right are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Steven L. Smith. The crew of seven completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  5. STS-103 Mission Specialist Grunsfeld and his family DEPART PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), with his wife, Carol, and their children, smiles for the camera on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  6. STS-103 MS Clervoy and Nicollier and Commander Brown look over Discovery after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency, listen to a comment by Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. while looking over the orbiter Discovery. Other members of the crew are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). The crew of seven completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  7. STS-103 Mission Specialist Clervoy DEPARTs PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France exhibits his holiday spirit on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  8. STS-103 Commander Brown DEPARTs PAFB for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Amidst a flurry of activity, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. disembarks from the bus which brought him to the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The STS-103 crew and their families are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The other STS-103 crew members are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  9. Dynamical systems theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awrejcewicz, Jan

    2006-08-01

    The 7th International Conference devoted to "Dynamical Systems-Theory and Applications" hold in 8-11 December, 2003 in Łódź, Poland, and it was organized by the staff of Department of Automatics and Biomechanics of the Technical University of Łódź. It was financially supported by the Rector of the Technical University of Łódź and the Department of Education and Physical Culture of the Łódź City Hall. The members of the International Scientific Committee included: Igor V. Andrianov (Dniepropetrovsk), Jan Awrejcewicz (Łódź), Iliya Blekhman (Sankt Petersburg), Roman Bogacz (Warszawa), Dick van Campen (Eindhoven), Zbigniew Engel (Kraków), Lothar Gaul (Stuttgart), Józef Giergiel (Kraków), Michał Kleiber (Warszawa), Vadim A. Krysko (Saratov), Włodzimierz Kurnik (Warszawa), Claude-Henri Lamarque (Lyon), Leonid I. Manevitch (Moscow), Jan Osiecki (Warszawa), Wiesaw Ostachowicz (Gdańsk), Ladislav Pust (Prague), Giuseppe Rega (Rome), Tsuneo Someya (Tokyo), Zbigniew Starczewski (Warszawa), Eugeniusz Świtoński (Gliwice), Andrzej Tylikowski (Warszawa), Tadeusz Uhl (Kraków), Aleksander F. Vakakis (Illinois), Józef Wojnarowski (Gliwice).

  10. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    SciTech Connect

    Link, H.

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude's efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Hal

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the U.S. Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat- and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude's efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation.

  12. CLIC proteins, ezrin, radixin, moesin and the coupling of membranes to the actin cytoskeleton: a smoking gun?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lele; Phang, Juanita M; Yu, Jiang; Harrop, Stephen J; Sokolova, Anna V; Duff, Anthony P; Wilk, Krystyna E; Alkhamici, Heba; Breit, Samuel N; Valenzuela, Stella M; Brown, Louise J; Curmi, Paul M G

    2014-02-01

    The CLIC proteins are a highly conserved family of metazoan proteins with the unusual ability to adopt both soluble and integral membrane forms. The physiological functions of CLIC proteins may include enzymatic activity in the soluble form and anion channel activity in the integral membrane form. CLIC proteins are associated with the ERM proteins: ezrin, radixin and moesin. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between membranes and the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Both CLIC and ERM proteins are controlled by Rho family small GTPases. CLIC proteins, ERM and Rho GTPases act in a concerted manner to control active membrane processes including the maintenance of microvillar structures, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. All of these processes involve the interaction of membranes with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton. The relationships between Rho GTPases, CLIC proteins, ERM proteins and the membrane:actin cytoskeleton interface are reviewed. Speculative models are proposed involving the formation of localised multi-protein complexes on the membrane surface that assemble via multiple weak interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé.

  13. STS-61 crew utilizing Virtual Reality in training for HST repair mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Jeffrey A. Hoffman, one of four crewmembers for STS-61 that will conduct scheduled spacewalks during the flight, wears a special helmet and gloves designed to assist in proper positioning near the telescope while on the end of the robot arm. Crewmembers are utilizing a new virtual reality training aid which assists in refining positioning patterns for Space Shuttle Endeavour's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) (36890); Astronaut Claude Nicollier looks at a computer display of the Shuttle's robot arm movements as Thomas D. Akers and Kathryn C. Thornton, mission specialists look on. Nicollier will be responsible for maneuvering the astronauts while they stand in a foot restraint on the end of the RMS arm (36891,36894); Hoffman wears a special helmet and gloves designed to assist in proper positioning near the telescope while on the end of the robot arm (35892); Nicollier looks at a computer display of the Shuttle's robot arm movements as Akers looks on (36893); While (l-r) Astron

  14. A physiologist's view of homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of "constancy" of the internal environment in an explicit and concrete way. In the 1960s, homeostatic regulatory mechanisms in physiology began to be described as discrete processes following the application of engineering control system analysis to physiological systems. Unfortunately, many undergraduate texts continue to highlight abstract aspects of the concept rather than emphasizing a general model that can be specifically and comprehensively applied to all homeostatic mechanisms. As a result, students and instructors alike often fail to develop a clear, concise model with which to think about such systems. In this article, we present a standard model for homeostatic mechanisms to be used at the undergraduate level. We discuss common sources of confusion ("sticky points") that arise from inconsistencies in vocabulary and illustrations found in popular undergraduate texts. Finally, we propose a simplified model and vocabulary set for helping undergraduate students build effective mental models of homeostatic regulation in physiological systems. PMID:26628646

  15. [Retrospective bacteriological study of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pangon, B; Michon, C; Bizet, C; Perronne, C; Katlama, C; Marche, C; Lévy-Frébault, V; Buré, A

    1988-05-21

    The main species of mycobacteria isolated in 62 of the 316 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients admitted to the Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris, between January, 1983 and October, 1986 were studied retrospectively according to their site of isolation and their pathogenic role. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated in 19 cases (from pulmonary specimens in 17 cases); this species was present in 59 percent of our African patients as against 20 percent of our European patients. M. avium intracellulare was isolated in 33 cases (17 from blood, 12 from the lung and 11 from the gastrointestinal tract) and was found in 55 p. 100 of our European patients. Other species that were isolated less frequently were M. xenopi (5 cases), M. kansasii (3 cases), M. aurum, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. gordonae, M. simiae and M. terrae (1 case each). Post mortem specimens obtained from 110 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients were cultivated during the same period. In 20 patients, at least one specimen was positive for a mycobacterium: M. tuberculosis in 2 cases, M. avium intracellulare in 18 cases. Twenty-nine of the 33 patients in whom M. avium intracellulare was isolated were considered a posteriori as being infected by this organism. The therapeutic approach varies according to the species involved. No treatment seems to be truly effective against M. avium intracellulare. Pending the results of cultures, no direct bacteriological examination can provide information on the mycobacterial species concerned; however, a conventional antituberculosis treatment may be instituted, particularly in patients from Africa or Haiti.

  16. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore in AD 2016: An update.

    PubMed

    Biasutto, Lucia; Azzolini, Michele; Szabò, Ildikò; Zoratti, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 30years the mitochondrial permeability transition - the permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane due to the opening of a wide pore - has progressed from being considered a curious artifact induced in isolated mitochondria by Ca(2+) and phosphate to a key cell-death-inducing process in several major pathologies. Its relevance is by now universally acknowledged and a pharmacology targeting the phenomenon is being developed. The molecular nature of the pore remains to this day uncertain, but progress has recently been made with the identification of the FOF1 ATP synthase as the probable proteic substrate. Researchers sharing this conviction are however divided into two camps: these believing that only the ATP synthase dimers or oligomers can form the pore, presumably in the contact region between monomers, and those who consider that the ring-forming c subunits in the FO sector actually constitute the walls of the pore. The latest development is the emergence of a new candidate: Spastic Paraplegia 7 (SPG7), a mitochondrial AAA-type membrane protease which forms a 6-stave barrel. This review summarizes recent developments of research on the pathophysiological relevance and on the molecular nature of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26902508

  17. The mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in health and disease: To carry or not to carry?

    PubMed

    Bender, Tom; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in energy metabolism, hosting the machinery for oxidative phosphorylation, the most efficient cellular pathway for generating ATP. A major checkpoint in this process is the transport of pyruvate produced by cytosolic glycolysis into the mitochondrial matrix, which is accomplished by the recently identified mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC). As the gatekeeper for pyruvate entry into mitochondria, the MPC is thought to be of fundamental importance in establishing the metabolic programming of a cell. This is especially relevant in the context of the aerobic glycolysis, also known as the Warburg effect, which is a hallmark in many types of cancer, and MPC loss of function promotes cancer growth. Moreover, mitochondrial pyruvate uptake is needed for efficient hepatic gluconeogenesis and the regulation of blood glucose levels. In this review we discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the MPC, and we argue that it may offer a promising target in diseases like cancer and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  18. STS-103 perfect night-time landing for Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The orbiter Discovery looks like a blue ghost as it drops from the darkness onto lighted runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. After traveling more than 3,267,000 miles on a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, the orbiter touches down at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Aboard are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who spent the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  19. A curious experiment: the paradigm switch from observation and speculation to experimentation, in the understanding of neuromuscular function and disease.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2002-08-01

    The four-link chain of the motor unit represents the contemporary end-point of some two millennia of evolving knowledge in neuroscience. The paradigm shift in neuromuscular epistemology occurred in the mid-17th century. In 1666, the newly graduated Dutch doctor, Jan Swammerdam (1637-1680) published his former investigations of dissected nerve-muscle preparations. These experiments comprised the quantum leap from observation and speculation, to that of experimentation in the field of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. In what he termed 'A Curious Experiment' he also described the phenomenon of intrinsic muscle excitability - "I cannot observe that the muscle in the living animal ever absolutely ceases from all motion". Eighty years later (1752), von Haller demonstrated experimentally that irritability (contractility) was an intrinsic property of all muscular tissue; and distinguished between the sensibility of nerve impulses and the irritability of muscular contraction. This experimental progression from Swammerdam to von Haller culminated in 1850, when Claude Bernard's studies in experimental pharmacology confirmed that muscle was a functional unit, independent of any electrical innervation via its supplying nerve. This account comprises an audit of Swammerdam's work in the perspective of neuromuscular knowledge.

  20. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew look at some of the equipment to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  1. STS-103 Mission Specialist Smith suits up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After donning his launch and entry suit, sts-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith shows a positive attitude over the second launch attempt for Space Shuttle Discovery. The previous launch attempt on Dec. 17 was scrubbed about 8:52 p.m. due to numerous violations of weather launch commit criteria at KSC. Smith and other crew members Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France are scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST.

  2. STS-103 M.S. John Grunsfeld during TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) gets ready to take the wheel of a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  3. STS-103 Pilot Scott Kelly and MS John Grunsfeld try on oxygen masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly (left) and Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (right) try on oxygen masks during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  4. STS-103 M.S. Steven Smith during TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith gets ready to practice driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  5. The STS-103 crew exit the O&C Building on way to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew smile and wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building enroute to Launch Pad 39B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (front row) Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., (second row) Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, (third row) C. Michael Foale (Ph. D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and bringing up the rear, Steven L. Smith. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  6. The STS-103 crew head for Astrovan and trip to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew smile and wave to onlookers as they head toward the 'Astrovan' at right that will carry them to Launch Pad 39B for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (front row) Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., (second row) Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, (third row) C. Michael Foale (Ph. D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and bringing up the rear, Steven L. Smith. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  7. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, William D.

    1998-05-01

    Laser cooling was proposed in 1975 and first demonstrated for trapped ions in 1978, but the effective laser cooling of neutral atoms took longer, in part because neutrals are so hard to trap. Laser deceleration and cooling of an atomic beam came in the early 1980s, followed by magnetic trapping of atoms in 1985. In 1988 we discovered that laser cooling results in temperatures far lower than expected from the then-accepted theory. The new understanding, developed in the groups of Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Steve Chu, of the physical process of laser cooling has allowed us to achieve temperatures below a microkelvin. Today, laser cooling and trapping is being used for applications ranging from atomic clocks to Bose-Einstein condensation. This talk is an adaptation of the Nobel Lecture given in Stockholm, December 1997. Special thanks go to my colleagues at NIST and to the entire laser cooling community. This work was supported by NIST and by the ONR.

  8. Quantum Mechanics, Volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; Diu, Bernard; Laloe, Frank

    1986-06-01

    Beginning students of quantum mechanics frequently experience difficulties separating essential underlying principles from the specific examples to which these principles have been historically applied. Nobel-Prize-winner Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and his colleagues have written this book to eliminate precisely these difficulties. Fourteen chapters provide a clarity of organization, careful attention to pedagogical details, and a wealth of topics and examples which make this work a textbook as well as a timeless reference, allowing to tailor courses to meet students' specific needs. Each chapter starts with a clear exposition of the problem which is then treated, and logically develops the physical and mathematical concept. These chapters emphasize the underlying principles of the material, undiluted by extensive references to applications and practical examples which are put into complementary sections. The book begins with a qualitative introduction to quantum mechanical ideas using simple optical analogies and continues with a systematic and thorough presentation of the mathematical tools and postulates of quantum mechanics as well as a discussion of their physical content. Applications follow, starting with the simplest ones like e.g. the harmonic oscillator, and becoming gradually more complicated (the hydrogen atom, approximation methods, etc.). The complementary sections each expand this basic knowledge, supplying a wide range of applications and related topics as well as detailed expositions of a large number of special problems and more advanced topics, integrated as an essential portion of the text.

  9. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bedřich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music.

  10. A History of Chemistry (by Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent and Isabelle Stengers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1998-06-01

    translated by Deborah van Dam. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA and London, 1997. 305 pp. Illustrations. 16.3 x 24.0 cm. ISBN 0-674-39659-6. $35.00, £23.50. Another history of chemistry? When I studied the subject in 1950 in the late Claude K. Deischer's class at the University of Pennsylvania, our text was Frank J. Moore's A History of Chemistry (1918; 3rd ed., 1939), one of the few books, all written by practicing chemists, then available in English. Now, paradoxically, at a time when such classes are no longer a standard part of the usual undergraduate curriculum, we are treated to a plethora of histories, most written by professional historians of science. In two recent years alone four histories have appeared: David M. Knight's Ideas in Chemistry: A History of the Science (Rutgers University Press, 1992), William H. Brock's The History of Chemistry (Chapman & Hall, 1992), William H. Brock's The Norton History of Chemistry (Norton, 1993), and Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent and Isabelle Stengers's Histoire de la Chimie (Editions de la Decuoverte, 1993). The book under review here is a felicitous English translation of the last-named volume.

  11. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the STS-103 crew look over equipment to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew, taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  12. [Heat and Fever in ancient Greek physiology].

    PubMed

    Yeo, In-Sok

    2009-12-01

    This paper aims at clarifying the relationship of physiological heat and pathological heat(fever) using the theoretical scheme of Georges Canguilhem as is argued in his famous book The Normal and the Pathologic. Ancient authors had presented various views on the innate heat and pathological heat. Some argued that there is only pathological heat while others, like Galen, distinguished two different kinds of heat. Galen was the first medial author who had the clear notion of the relationship between the normal heat and the pathological heat. He conceptualized their difference as the heat conforming to nature (kata phusin) and the heat against nature (para phusin). However, the Peripatetic authors, such as ps-Alexander Aphrodisias, who laid more emphasis on physiology tended to regard pathology in continuation with physiology as Claude Bernard attempted to do it. Therefore, Canguilhem's theoretical scheme turns out to be very useful in analysing the relationship of normal heat and pathological heat as is manifested in ancient Greek physiology.

  13. Living Together Apart in France and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claude; Cherlin, Andrew; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    Union formation involves a number of stages, as does union dissolution, and new couples often spend an initial period in a non-cohabiting intimate relationship. Yet while certain couples never share the same dwelling, “living apart together”1 has not developed widely as a long-term lifestyle option. Claude Martin in France, and Andrew Cherlin and Caitlin Cross-Barnet in the United States have studied a symmetrical phenomenon, that of couples who continue to live together while considering themselves to be separated. In this article, they draw together their analyses to describe an arrangement which, while marginal, reveals situations where residential separation is not possible, either because of the need to keep up appearances, often for the children’s sake, or because total separation is too frightening or living in separate homes is unaffordable. Beyond the differences between the two countries and the two survey fields, the authors analyse the ways in which persons who “live together apart” describe their loveless relationship that has led to explicit conjugal separation within a shared home. PMID:25170338

  14. A medley of midbrain maladies: a brief review of midbrain anatomy and syndromology for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen; Hathout, Gasser M

    2012-01-01

    The midbrain represents the uppermost portion of the brainstem, containing numerous important nuclei and white matter tracts, most of which are involved in motor control, as well as the auditory and visual pathways. Notable midbrain nuclei include the superior and inferior colliculus nuclei, red nucleus, substantia nigra, oculomotor nuclear complex, and trochlear nucleus. In addition, white matter tracts include the brachium conjunctivum, medial and lateral lemniscus, spinothalamic tracts, and the fiber tracts within the cerebral peduncles. Although neurologically vital, many of these small midbrain nuclei and white matter tracts are not easily individually identified on neuroimaging. However, given their diverse functions, midbrain pathology often leads to distinct clinical syndromes. A review and understanding of the location and relationships between the different midbrain nuclei and fiber tracts will allow more precise correlation of radiologic findings with patient pathology and symptomatology. Particular syndromes associated with midbrain pathology include the Weber, Claude, Benedikt, Nothnagel, and Parinaud syndromes. The oculomotor and trochlear cranial nerves also reside at this level. An understanding of their functions as well as their projected courses from the midbrain towards the eye allows identification of distinct locations which are particularly vulnerable to pathology.

  15. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, some of the STS-103 crew look over lubrication devices to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  16. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew get instructions on use of rib clamps for the Shield Shell Replacement Fabric (SSRF) task on repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  17. The history of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Martial G

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of cardiac catheterization has occurred over at least four centuries. One of the first major steps was the description of the circulation of the blood by William Harvey in 1628. The next milestone was the measurement of arterial pressure by Stephen Hales, one century later. However, the 19th century represented the golden age of cardiovascular physiology, highlighted by the achievements of Carl Ludwig, Etienne-Jules Marey and Claude Bernard, among others. Human cardiac catheterization developed during the 20th century. The first right heart catheterization in a human was performed by Werner Forssmann on himself in 1929. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization was introduced by André Cournand and Dickinson Richards in the early 1940s, and selective coronary angiography was described by Mason Sones in the early 1960s. More recently, with the advent of catheter-based interventions, pioneered by Andreas Gruentzig in the late 1970s, there has been considerable progress in the refinement and expansion of these techniques. Currently, the Sones technique is used only infrequently, and coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention rely mainly on percutaneous femoral and percutaneous radial artery approaches. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Montreal Heart Institute, it seems appropriate to highlight the contribution of this institution in these two areas. PMID:16234881

  18. Vascular access: an historical perspective from Sir William Harvey to the 1956 Nobel prize to André F. Cournand, Werner Forssmann, and Dickinson W. Richards.

    PubMed

    Sette, Piersandro; Dorizzi, Romolo M; Azzini, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Harvey (1578-1657), who had many precursors, discovered blood circulation in 1628 after a significant number of anatomic dissection of cadavers; his studies were continued by Sir Christopher Wren and Daniel Johann Major. The first central vein catheterization was performed on a horse by Stephen Hales, an English Vicar. In 1844, a century later, the French biologist Claude Bernard attempted the first carotid artery cannulation and repeated the procedure in the jugular vein, again on a horse. He was first to report the complications now well known to be associated with this maneuver. In 1929 Werner Forssmann tried cardiac catheterization on himself, but could not investigate the procedure further since his findings were rejected and ridiculed by colleagues. His work was continued by André Frédéric Cournand and Dickinson Woodruff Richards Jr in the United States. In 1956 the three physicians shared the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their studies on vascular and cardiac systems. The genius and the perseverance of the three physicians paved the way towards peripheral and central catheter vein placement, one of the most frequently performed maneuvers in hospitals. Its history still remains unknown to most and deserves a short description. PMID:21983826

  19. [Neural control of the peripheral circulation and blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Estañol, Bruno; Porras-Betancourt, Manuel; Sánchez-Torres, Gustavo; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Infante, Oscar; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio

    2009-12-01

    In the XIX century Claude Bernard discovered the action of the nervous system on the peripheral circulation. In the first half of the XX century Ewald Hering discovered the baro-receptor and the reflex control of the heart rate and blood pressure. Cowley and Guyton demonstrated that sino-aortic denervation induces persistent changes in the blood pressure in the dog. The autonomic nervous system is mainly responsible for the regulation of the circulation and blood pressure in the short term on a beat to beat basis. It controls the vasomotor tone, the heart rate and the cardiac output. With the advent of non invasive methods that measure the blood pressure on a beat to beat basis (Finapres) and with the methods of measurement of the variability of the blood pressure in the frequency domain (spectral analysis) we can currently measure many variables including heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, peripheral resistances and the baroreceptor sensitivity and make some inferences about their control mechanisms. These variables can be measured at rest in the supine position, standing up, during rhythmic breathing and during the Valsalva maneuver. In this article we present a review of the neural control of the blood pressure and heart rate.

  20. [Homage to Pedro Planas].

    PubMed

    Canalda, K

    1990-12-01

    It has been known since the time of Claude Bernard that the "function makes the organ" and ensures its development. However, it took Planas to discover that the masticatory function is the principal factor related to the development of the jaw! Nonetheless, this function only attains its objective if it is physiologically normal, grinding of food taking place by alternative laterality, which can only occur according to Gysi with a balanced occlusion, in conformity with Hanau's rules: opening-closing type mastication as a result of another type of occlusion leads to maxillo-alveolar sub-development and lack of sufficient space. Neuro-Occlusal Rehabilitation (N.O.R.) attempts to detect the type of mastication and occlusion at an early age, to correct it as from the age of 3 years by selective grinding in order to establish alternative laterality: true prophylaxis. If the grinding function is not adequate because it has been corrected too late, Planas appliances are used. Post-orthodontic stability is remarkable as the treatment uses natural and normal means of development.

  1. Cato Guldberg and Peter Waage, the history of the Law of Mass Action, and its relevance to clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Robin E; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2016-01-01

    We have traced the historical link between the Law of Mass Action and clinical pharmacology. The Law evolved from the work of the French chemist Claude Louis Berthollet, was first formulated by Cato Guldberg and Peter Waage in 1864 and later clarified by the Dutch chemist Jacobus van 't Hoff in 1877. It has profoundly influenced our qualitative and quantitative understanding of a number of physiological and pharmacological phenomena. According to the Law of Mass Action, the velocity of a chemical reaction depends on the concentrations of the reactants. At equilibrium the concentrations of the chemicals involved bear a constant relation to each other, described by the equilibrium constant, K. The Law of Mass Action is relevant to various physiological and pharmacological concepts, including concentration-effect curves, dose-response curves, and ligand-receptor binding curves, all of which are important in describing the pharmacological actions of medications, the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which describes the binding of medications to proteins, activation curves for transmembrane ion transport, enzyme inhibition and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, which describes the relation between pH, as a measure of acidity and the concentrations of the contributory acids and bases. Guldberg and Waage recognized the importance of dynamic equilibrium, while others failed to do so. Their ideas, over 150 years old, are embedded in and still relevant to clinical pharmacology. Here we explain the ideas and in a subsequent paper show how they are relevant to understanding adverse drug reactions.

  2. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    SciTech Connect

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S.; Baguer, G. M. Gistau

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  3. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Historical highlights, status, and forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, G.L.; Avery, W.H.; Francis, E.J.; Richards, D.

    1983-07-01

    In 1881, d'Arsonval conceived the closed-Rankine-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system in which a working fluid is vaporized by heat exchange with cold water drawn from a 700-1200 m depth. In 1930, Claude demonstrated an open-cycle process in Cuba. Surface water was flash-vaporized at 3 kPa to drive a turbine directly (no secondary working fluid) and then was condensed by direct contact with water drawn from a 700-m depth through a 1.6m-diam, 1.75-km-long cold-water pipe (CWP). From a delta T of 14/sup 0/C his undersized turbine generated 22 kW. In 1956 a French team designed a 3.5-MW (net) open-cycle plant for installation off Abidjan on the Ivory Coast of Africa and demonstrated the necessary CWP deployment. The at-sea demonstrations by Mini-OTEC and OTEC-1 and other recent advances in OTEC technology summarized herein represent great progress. All of the types of plants proposed for the DOE's PON program may be worthy of development; certainly work on a grazing plant is needed. Our estimates indicate that the U.S. goals established by Public Law 96-310 leading to 10 GW of OTEC power and energy product equivalents by 1999 are achievable, provided that adequate federal financial incentives are retained to assure the building of the first few plants.

  4. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore in AD 2016: An update.

    PubMed

    Biasutto, Lucia; Azzolini, Michele; Szabò, Ildikò; Zoratti, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 30years the mitochondrial permeability transition - the permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane due to the opening of a wide pore - has progressed from being considered a curious artifact induced in isolated mitochondria by Ca(2+) and phosphate to a key cell-death-inducing process in several major pathologies. Its relevance is by now universally acknowledged and a pharmacology targeting the phenomenon is being developed. The molecular nature of the pore remains to this day uncertain, but progress has recently been made with the identification of the FOF1 ATP synthase as the probable proteic substrate. Researchers sharing this conviction are however divided into two camps: these believing that only the ATP synthase dimers or oligomers can form the pore, presumably in the contact region between monomers, and those who consider that the ring-forming c subunits in the FO sector actually constitute the walls of the pore. The latest development is the emergence of a new candidate: Spastic Paraplegia 7 (SPG7), a mitochondrial AAA-type membrane protease which forms a 6-stave barrel. This review summarizes recent developments of research on the pathophysiological relevance and on the molecular nature of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  5. Is robustness of stochastic uncertain systems related to information theory and statistical mechanics? (Keynote Address)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, Charalambos D.; Kyprianou, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Fifty years ago, when Claude Shannon was developing the Mathematical Theory of Communications, for reliable data transmission, which evolved into the subject of information theory, another discipline was developing dealing with Feedback Control of Dynamical System, which evolved into a scientific subject dealing with decision, stability, and optimization. More recently, a separate discipline dealing with robustness of uncertain systems was born in response to the codification of high performance and reliability in the presence of modeling uncertainties. In principle, robustness in dynamical systems is captured through power dissipation via induced norms and dynamic games, while reliable data transmission is captured through measures of information via entropy, relative entropy, and certain laws of Large Deviations theory. The main ingredient in Large Deviations is the rate functional (or action functional in the classical mechanics terminology), often identified through the Cramer or Legendre-Fenchel Transform. On the other hand, robustness of stochastic uncertain systems is currently under development, using information theoretic as well as statistical mechanics concepts, such as, partition functions, free energy, relative entropy, and entropy rate functional. This lecture will summarize certain connections between fundamental concepts of robustness, information theory, and statistical mechanics, and possibly make future projections into the convergence of these disciplines.

  6. The STS-103 crew pose for photographers following Terminal Countdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew pose for photographers following Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) emergency egress training on the small armored personnel carrier behind them. Standing left to right are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, their trainer on the carrier Capt. George Hoggard of the KSC/CCAS Fire Department, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  7. STS-103 crew pose at 195-foot level of Fixed Service Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew take a break from Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing from left to right are Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency; Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  8. STS-103 crew practices driving personnel carrier during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency, practices driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Riding on the front is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. Behind him is Pilot Scott J. Kelly; at right (with earphones) is Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency, and at the rear Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  9. STS-103 crew practices driving personnel carrier, part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (far right) practices driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. At far left is Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  10. STS-103 crew practices driving personnel carrier during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) emergency egress training, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. practices driving a small armored personnel carrier. Riding on the front is Capt. George Hoggard, a trainer with the KSC/CCAS Fire Department. In the carrier behind Brown is (left to right) Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  11. [Protoplasm, coagulation and colloids : Forgotten chapter in the research history of anesthesia between Zeitgeist and paradigm].

    PubMed

    Perouansky, M

    2015-05-01

    The historically most important mechanistic theories attributed the fundamental cause of anesthesia to interactions betweeen anesthetics and proteins as early as the 1870s. According to the underlying thought, the resulting changes in the consistency of cellular protoplasm were the cause of the anesthetized state of the whole organism.These protoplasm coagulation theories, as they were collectively referred to, brought the contemporary enthusiasm for protoplasm, the rapid advances in colloid chemistry and the unified theory of narcosis proclamed by Claude Bernard under a unified mechanistic theory that reflected the Zeitgeist of the epoch.This research effort, on the intersection of the developing disciplines of cellular biology and colloid chemistry, lasted for almost a century. It involved scientists of worldwide reputation and resulted in a number of elegant theories. Contrary to widespread opinion, proteins and not lipids were recognized and investigated first as the critical molecular target of anesthetics more than a century prior to their much publicized rediscovery in 1984.The protoplasm coagulation theories of anesthesia were pursued after the First World War across ideological trenches by scientists in Europe, the Soviet Union and the United States. They united research in anesthesia with research of fundamental cell biology.In contrast to the much less fruitful lipid theories, protoplasm coagulation theories are largely forgotten without leaving a trace in contemporary discussions of the history of anesthesia. For many tyears, however, they constituted an essential part of fundamental anesthetic research and must therefore be mentioned in any historical review.

  12. Determinism and probability in the development of the cell theory.

    PubMed

    Duchesneau, François

    2012-09-01

    A return to Claude Bernard's original use of the concept of 'determinism' displays the fact that natural laws were presumed to rule over all natural processes. In a more restricted sense, the term boiled down to a mere presupposition of constant determinant causes for those processes, leaving aside any particular ontological principle, even stochastic. The history of the cell theory until around 1900 was dominated by a twofold conception of determinant causes. Along a reductionist trend, cells' structures and processes were supposed to be accounted for through their analysis into detailed partial mechanisms. But a more holistic approach tended to subsume those analytic means and the mechanism involved under a program of global functional determinations. When mitotic and meiotic sequences in nuclear replication were being unveiled and that neo-Mendelian genetics was being grafted onto cytology and embryology, a conception of strict determinism at the nuclear level, principally represented by Wilhelm Roux and August Weismann, would seem to rule unilaterally over the mosaic interpretation of the cleavage of blastomeres. But, as shown by E.B. Wilson, in developmental processes there occur contingent outcomes of cell division which observations and experiments reveal. This induces the need to admit 'epigenetic' determinants and relativize the presumed 'preformation' of thedevelopmental phases by making room for an emergent order which the accidental circumstances of gene replication would trigger on. PMID:22542690

  13. Monet's painting under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Dredge, Paula; Wuhrer, Richard; Phillips, Matthew R

    2003-04-01

    An oil painting by Claude Monet, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile 1887 (collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales), was examined to determine both the identity of the pigments used by the artist in this painting and his technique of mixing colors and laying paint on the canvas. The extremely complex construction of the painting was revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), and X-ray mapping (XRM) analysis of cross sections of paint flakes excised from damaged regions of Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile. Nine different pigments were found on the painting. Many of the identified colors were modern pigments that became available only late in the 19th century as a result of scientific advances in pigment chemistry. Although similar colors were available in a natural mineral form, they lacked the vivid color of their manufactured counterparts. The use of these new synthetic metallic oxide colors by Monet accounts for the brilliance of his paintings. In addition, a separation between successive paint layers was observed in some areas of paint chip cross sections, indicating that oil-based paint was applied to paint that had dried, and consequently, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile was painted over a long period of time. This observation is contrary to the general perception of Monet's technique of painting freely and quickly. PMID:12639239

  14. Famous ENT surgeons of the past.

    PubMed

    Brain, D

    1987-09-01

    History teaches us that the development of medicine and surgery, like most human activities, has not been a steady uniform process, but has occurred mainly in a series of dramatic forward spurts separated by long periods of relative inertia. We are certainly living through such an active phase today with evidence of rapid technological change all around us, and there is a tendency to believe that the rate of progress has never been greater; but this is, however, a misconception, as the golden age of medical history was a period of not much more than a decade in the middle of the nineteenth century when the whole face of medicine and surgery was completely transformed by at least seven enormous developments, each of which was dominated by a man (in one case a woman) of genius. It was then that Claud Bernard (Fig. 1) completely transformed and advanced the whole science of physiology, while another Frenchman, Louis Pasteur (Fig. 2) established the principles of practical bacteriology, and a German, Virchow (Fig. 3) founded the speciality of histopathology. By applying the discoveries of Pasteur, Lister (Fig. 4) in Edinburgh, and later in London, developed the whole concept of antiseptic surgery which rapidly led to the aseptic surgery of today. This, together with the simultaneous introduction of anaesthesia, has completely transformed the practise of surgery.

  15. [Ethical principles in human scientific research].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1994-07-01

    Hippocrates was the first physician to use the scientific method to find rational and not religious or mythic causes, for the etiology of diseases. Hippocrates and Aristoteles did not dare to dissect the human body. Afterwards however, many scientists such as Herophilus, Erasitastrus, Vesalus and Fallopio, performed experiments in human beings using vivisection. According to that age's ideas, there was no cruelty in performing vivisection in criminals, since useful knowledge for the progress of medicine and relief of diseases was obtained. Only during the nineteenth century and with Claude Bernard (1865), the ethical principles of systematic scientific research in humans were defined. These principles were violated by nazi physicians during Hitler's dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945). As a response to these horrors, the Ethical Codes of Nuremberg (1947) and Geneva (1948), that reestablished all the strength of Hippocratic principles, were dictated. The Nuremberg rules enact that a research subject must give a voluntary consent, that the experiment must by necessary and exempt of death risk, that the research must be qualified and that the experiment must be discontinued if there is a risk for the subject. The Geneva statement is a modernized hippocratic oath that protects patient's life above all. These classical rules, in force at the present time, are the essential guides that must be applied by physicians and researchers.

  16. Radiative transfer and type Ia supernovae spectra analysis in the context of supernovae factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongard, Sebastien

    This co-supervised dissertation was conducted in collaboration between The University of Oklahoma City (USA) and University Claude Bernard of Lyon (France). It addresses the radiative transfer issue in type Ia supernovae expanding envelopes, in the context of the SupernovaFactory. We used the multi-purpose radiative transfer code phoenix, developed by P. Hauschildt, F. Allard and E. Baron to produce a grid of synthetic spectra sampling dates from 10 to 25 days after explosion and bolometric magnitudes from -18.0 to -19.7. We also developed an adaptive grid scheme in order to stabilize phoenix convergence. We showed the spectrum formation in SNeIa around maximum light to be a multi- layered process involving regions from 5000 km per s to 20000 km per s, interacting not only through scattering but also through pure emission. This new understanding allowed us to introduce a new spectral indicators we called RSiSu, which can be used to measure SNeIa blue magnitudes with a precision comparable to the stretch factor. This makes it possible to independently constraint the evolutionary effect on SNeIa that are of crucial importance for high z surveys.

  17. A Analytical and a Numerical Study in Field Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olynyk, Kirk Oliver

    In Chapter I. the low-energy sensitivity of the Weinberg-Salem model to a strongly interacting Higgs-boson sector is investigated. In order to catalog all possible heavy Higgs boson effects, a gauged nonlinear (sigma)-model is used, in which the Higgs mass of the linear theory (M(,H)), assumes the role of a cutoff. Radiative corrections to several experimental observables are calculated. However, the effects are small; the leading sensitivities are proportional to g('2)ln(M(,H)). Chapter II. is a report on a collaboration with Claude Bernard and Terry Draper, in which we calculate hadron masses and magnetic moments in the quenched approximation to lattice QCD, using Monte Carlo and Gauss-Seidel methods. For the mass computation, we have quite good statistics; in addition, our lattice is long enough in the "time" direction to make a rather clear separation of the lowest lying hadrons from their radial excitations. We find mass ratios which are far from experimental values; there is evidence that this may be due to the small spatial size of the lattice (which, however, is as large or larger than that used in most previous computations). Semi-quantitative explanations of spatial volume and time-length effects are given. For the magnetic moments, the situation is somewhat better, presumably because the moment calculation is really a qualitative test of the constituent quark model.

  18. Color consilience: color through the lens of art practice, history, philosophy, and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Conway, Bevil R

    2012-03-01

    Paintings can be interpreted as the product of the complex neural machinery that translates physical light signals into behavior, experience, and emotion. The brain mechanisms responsible for vision and perception have been sculpted during evolution and further modified by cultural exposure and development. By closely examining artists' paintings and practices, we can discover hints to how the brain works, and achieve insight into the discoveries and inventions of artists and their impact on culture. Here, I focus on an integral aspect of color, color contrast, which poses a challenge for artists: a mark situated on an otherwise blank canvas will appear a different color in the context of the finished painting. How do artists account for this change in color during the production of a painting? In the broader context of neural and philosophical considerations of color, I discuss the practices of three modern masters, Henri Matisse, Paul Cézanne, and Claude Monet, and suggest that the strategies they developed not only capitalized on the neural mechanisms of color, but also influenced the trajectory of western art history.

  19. The role of vanadium in the management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brichard, S M; Henquin, J C

    1995-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin secretion and a resistance of target tissues to the action of insulin, in proportions that vary with the type of the disease. The shortage of insulin can be corrected by administration of exogenous insulin or stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells with sulphonylureas. However, insulin resistance remains a major therapeutic problem. Here, Sonia Brichard and Jean-Claude Henquin review the recent discoveries that indicate a possible role for vanadium in management of the disease. In vitro, vanadium salts mimic most effects of insulin on the main target tissues of the hormone, and in vivo they induce a sustained fall in blood glucose levels in insulin-deficient diabetic rats, and improve glucose homeostasis in obese, insulin-resistant diabetic rodents. Recent short-term clinical trials with vanadium salts also seem promising in type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients in whom liver and peripheral insulin resistance was attenuated, indicating the therapeutic potential of vanadium salts, pending demonstration of their long-term innocuity.

  20. [Clause Pouteau (1725-1775), surgeon at the l'Hôtel-Dieu de Lyon: his "asepsis" using water, fire and ligne propre].

    PubMed

    Fischer, L; Touil, K

    1998-01-01

    Claude Pouteau, Hôtel-Dieu de Lyon's surgeon (1725-1775), did not improve surgical teaching, as Mareschal or Lapeyronie did with their reforming law. But he is reminiscent of an extremely skilful surgeon, always having a remarkable high rate of recoveries. For instance when it came to operate on bladder with a perineal approach (vesical cut), only three patients died out of one hundred and twenty operations. One century before Semmelweiss and more earlier than Pasteur, Pouteau thought that hospital-gangrene was not only caused by air miasma but also by direct contact, which could be indebted dirty instruments or hands, or hospital-made bandages. So he advised impeccably cleanliness for surgical students. According to his mind, soap was inadequate for cleaning hospital linen. Those must be pull out of neat material fitted by clean hands out of hospitals. It shall be supplied every day and never gathered inside. In order to keep clear of gangrene, the patient will not wait too long inside hospital. In case of bleeding, cautery must preferable to ligature for Pouteau "We can do without the bitter sadness of seeing a lighter wound become a lethal or incurable one ..." (Posthumous works, vol. III, p. 237-238).

  1. Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

  2. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT in PHSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew check out the Flight Support System (FSS)from above and below. The FSS is part of the primary payload on the mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew comprises Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  3. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlig, K.; Decker, L.

    2014-01-01

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future.

  4. Gay re-readings of the Harlem Renaissance poets.

    PubMed

    Woods, G

    1993-01-01

    In the light of the long-established fact of their homosexuality or bisexuality, it is high time for the cluster of "Negro Renaissance" poets, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Bruce Nugent, to be reappraised by and for gay readers. This paper seeks to develop gay reading strategies in relation to the poems of these writers, in order to reveal for contemporary readers likely subtexts which, at the time of their writing, were publicly read as bearing on race alone. It is often possible to read a particular poem as referring (in images such as that of the social outcast) to either racial or sexual oppression, interchangeably; and possibly, therefore, to both at once, by way of an implicit comparison. Likewise, poems on miscegenation can just as well be read, via the theme of forbidden love, as referring to homosexuality. The fact that most published critical readings deal only with the racial issue does not invalidate the likelihood that the poem can be, and indeed requires to be, read as referring, also, to sexuality. Gay readings emerge, then, not merely from these writers' representations of attractive men and boys, but also in the midst of their most famously anti-racist themes.

  5. Neuromuscular block

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them especially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are especially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of especial interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:16402115

  6. Milestones in the history of diabetes mellitus: The main contributors

    PubMed Central

    Karamanou, Marianna; Protogerou, Athanase; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Androutsos, George; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases involving carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. It is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia which results from defects in insulin secretion, or action or both. Diabetes mellitus has been known since antiquity. Descriptions have been found in the Egyptian papyri, in ancient Indian and Chinese medical literature, as well as, in the work of ancient Greek and Arab physicians. In the 2nd century AD Aretaeus of Cappadocia provided the first accurate description of diabetes, coining the term diabetes, while in 17th century Thomas Willis added the term mellitus to the disease, in an attempt to describe the extremely sweet taste of the urine. The important work of the 19th century French physiologist Claude Bernard, on the glycogenic action of the liver, paved the way for further progress in the study of the disease. In 1889, Oskar Minkowski and Joseph von Mering performed their famous experiment of removing the pancreas from a dog and producing severe and fatal diabetes. In 1921, Frederick Banting and Charles Best extended Minkowski’s and Mering’s experiment. They isolated insulin from pancreatic islets and administrated to patients suffering from type 1 diabetes, saving thus the lives of millions and inaugurating a new era in diabetes treatment. PMID:26788261

  7. Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

  8. The French Ambassador in Firing Room to watch launch.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On hand in the Firing Room to watch the launch of STS-103 are (left to right) Joseph Rothenberg, associate administrator, Office of Space Flight; JoAnn Morgan, associate director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades; and Francois Bujon de L'Estang, ambassador of France. Behind the ambassador is his wife, Madam de L'Estang. One of the STS-103 crew, Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy, is from France, and a member of the European Space Agency (ESA). Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. , Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland (also with ESA). The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 19 at 7:50 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 7-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST

  9. The French Ambassador in Firing Room to watch launch.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Firing Room (left to right) Joseph Rothenberg, associate administrator, Office of Space Flight; JoAnn Morgan, associate director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades; and Madam de L'Estang and Francois Bujon de L'Estang, ambassador of France, wait for the launch of STS-103. One of the STS-103 crew, Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy, is from France, and a member of the European Space Agency (ESA). Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. , Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland (also with ESA). The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 19 at 7:50 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 7-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST.

  10. [The formative role of the laboratory in teaching the science of physiology].

    PubMed

    Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda; Urrutia Aguilar, María Esther

    2014-12-01

    Physiology teaching began with Claudius Galenus (c. 126-199 AD), known as Galen, who is considered the initiator of experimental physiology. This discipline was consolidated in the XIX century with the discoveries of Claude Bernard, which influenced the way of teaching this discipline in universities, independently from Anatomy. In Mexico, physiology teaching started in 1580. It was at the beginning of the XIX century when Valentín Gómez Farías created the professorship in Medical Sciences and Daniel Vergara Lope carried out its consolidation when he implemented a lab course. Doctor José Joaquín Izquierdo established that this subject ought to be taught by teachers with experience in research. Undoubtedly, formative physiology teaching carried out in labs must strengthen the application of method and scientific methodology in students. In this symposium, we put forward that the change in physiology teaching must promote multidisciplinary research in students, who will formulate a research question and develop an experimental model that will let them integrate their basic knowledge of physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, and functional anatomy under the supervision of a research teacher.

  11. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlig, K.; Decker, L.

    2014-01-29

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future.

  12. The accentuation principle of figure-ground segregation and the downbeat illusion.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Sirigu, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Pinna and Sirigu (2011) demonstrated a new principle of grouping, called the accentuation principle, stating that, all else being equal, elements tend to group in the same oriented direction of the discontinuous element placed within a whole set of continuous/homogeneous components. The discontinuous element behaves like an accent, i.e. a visual emphasis within the wholeness of components as shown in the next section. In this work, the accentuation principle has been extended to new visual domains. In particular, it is shown how this principle affects shape perception. Moreover several visual object attributes are also highlighted, among which orientation, spatial position, inner dynamics and apparent motion that determine the so-called organic segmentation and furthermore tend to induce figure-ground segregation. On the basis of the results of experimental phenomenology, the accentuation can be considered as a complex principle ruling grouping, figure-ground segregation, shape and meaning formation. Through a new musical illusion of downbeat, it is also demonstrated that this principle influences perceptual organization not only in space but also in time and, thus, in both visual and musical domains. This illusion can be heard in eight measures of Pagodes, a solo piano music by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), where a strong physical-perceptual discrepancy in terms of upbeats and downbeats inversion is strongly perceived in both staves. PMID:27343861

  13. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith (right) and other members of the crew look over new Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) intended for the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew, taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with the MLI. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  14. Developing computer-based training programs for basic mammalian histology: Didactic versus discovery-based design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Henry Joel

    Educators have long tried to understand what stimulates students to learn. The Swiss psychologist and zoologist, Jean Claude Piaget, suggested that students are stimulated to learn when they attempt to resolve confusion. He reasoned that students try to explain the world with the knowledge they have acquired in life. When they find their own explanations to be inadequate to explain phenomena, students find themselves in a temporary state of confusion. This prompts students to seek more plausible explanations. At this point, students are primed for learning (Piaget 1964). The Piagetian approach described above is called learning by discovery. To promote discovery learning, a teacher must first allow the student to recognize his misconception and then provide a plausible explanation to replace that misconception (Chinn and Brewer 1993). One application of this method is found in the various learning cycles, which have been demonstrated to be effective means for teaching science (Renner and Lawson 1973, Lawson 1986, Marek and Methven 1991, and Glasson & Lalik 1993). In contrast to the learning cycle, tutorial computer programs are generally not designed to correct student misconceptions, but rather follow a passive, didactic method of teaching. In the didactic or expositional method, the student is told about a phenomenon, but is neither encouraged to explore it, nor explain it in his own terms (Schneider and Renner 1980).

  15. [Stress and allostasis: problems, outlooks and relationships].

    PubMed

    Kupriianov, R V; Zhdanov, R I

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of stress and allostasis are discussed in the paper in their interrelation and interpenetration. General adaptation syndrome is considered in the historical aspect of Claude Bernard's, William Cannon's and Hans Selye's contributions to the field, and from the standpoint of an interdisciplinary approach. Key challenges and contradictions of the stress concept are disclosed and discussed. First, the terminology ones, since this term might be understood as stress response, stressor, state of the organism and even the consequences of stress itself. Second, it is ambivalent and contradictory nature of the stress response. From the perception of stress as a reaction to the strong negative impact of environment, researchers became to divide stress onto two types: distress as a non-specific basis of disease, and eustress as a favorable factor that extends the adaptability of human organism. The third problem is connected to the interdisciplinary nature of the stress response, the effects of which being manifested in, at least, four areas: physiology, behavior, subjective experience, and cognitive functions. Particularily, physiologists are very often ignored of a role of cognitive factors in their stress research. The authors in terms of the allostasis theory, more complex adaptation process than homeostasis, resolve contradictories of stress conception observed. The paper proposes a model of allostatic states to describe distress and eustress phenomena.

  16. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago. PMID:26847252

  17. Reduced density matrix approach to calculation of electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Jiang, Shidong; Nayakkankuppam, Madhu; Overton, Michael L.; Percus, Jerome K.

    1998-11-01

    The possibility of using the one-body and two-body reduced density matrices, rather than the many-body wavefunction, as the fundamental object of study for electronic structure calculations was actively explored in the 1960's and 1970's [1]-[3], but interest has waned since. In this approach the calculation of ground-state properties is reduced to a linear optimization problem subject to the representability conditions for the density matrices, which are a mixture of linear equalities and bounds on eigenvalues. We will review this approach, present a new family of representability conditions, and discuss our experience in using present-day methods for semi-definite programming for this application. [1] A. J. Coleman: Structure of fermion density matrices. Rev. Mod. Phys. 35 (1963) 668--689. [2] Claude Garrod and Jerome K. Percus: Reduction of the N-particle variational problem. J. Math. Phys. 5 (1964) 1756--1776. [3] M. Rosina and C. Garrod: The variational calculation of reduced density matrices. J. Comput. Phys. 18 (1975) 300--310.

  18. Evolution of concepts of stress.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Kopin, Irwin J

    2007-06-01

    This essay describes the evolution of stress as a medical scientific idea. Claude Bernard, Walter B. Cannon and Hans Selye provided key founding concepts for the current view. Bernard introduced the idea of the internal environment bathing cells - the milieu intérieur - maintained by continual compensatory changes of bodily functions. Cannon coined the word, "homeostasis," referring to a set of acceptable ranges of values for internal variables. Cannon taught that threats to homeostasis evoke activation of the sympathoadrenal system as a functional unit. Selye defined stress as a state characterized by a uniform response pattern, regardless of the particular stressor, that could lead to long-term pathologic changes. "Allostasis" was introduced as a concept in recognition that there is no single ideal set of steady-state conditions in life; instead, setpoints and other response criteria change continuously. Stress is now viewed neither as a perturbation nor a stereotyped response pattern but as a condition characterized by a perceived discrepancy between information about a monitored variable and criteria for eliciting patterned effector responses. Different stressors elicit different patterns of activation of the sympathetic nervous, adrenomedullary hormonal, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and other effectors, closing negative feedback loops. This systems concept of stress yields predictions that observation or experimentation can test and that are applicable to normal physiology and to a variety of acute and chronic disorders.

  19. The discovery and rediscovery of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sternbach, George L; Varon, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    The therapeutic use of oxygen was pioneered in the early 20(th) century by the respiratory physiologist John Scott Haldane. His work followed Claude Bernard's description of the toxic effects of carbon monoxide. Haldane, having also observed the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning, became aware of the therapeutic benefits of oxygen in this condition. He was also an advocate of oxygen as a therapeutic agent in other respiratory illness, and made efforts to define how the gas could best be administered. The history of identification of oxygen as a chemical element is convoluted. In the 17(th) century, the controversial John Mayow suggested that only a portion of air was necessary for sustaining life. Mayow's work was largely overlooked during his lifetime, and his insight was subsequently eclipsed by the phlogiston theory, an erroneous concept widely believed for nearly a century after his death. This theory was ultimately disproved by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Although the point of primacy is somewhat contentious, Priestley shares the distinction of discovering elemental oxygen with Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier, the French chemist, and Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the Swedish apothecary. PMID:15707822

  20. Vascular access: an historical perspective from Sir William Harvey to the 1956 Nobel prize to André F. Cournand, Werner Forssmann, and Dickinson W. Richards.

    PubMed

    Sette, Piersandro; Dorizzi, Romolo M; Azzini, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Harvey (1578-1657), who had many precursors, discovered blood circulation in 1628 after a significant number of anatomic dissection of cadavers; his studies were continued by Sir Christopher Wren and Daniel Johann Major. The first central vein catheterization was performed on a horse by Stephen Hales, an English Vicar. In 1844, a century later, the French biologist Claude Bernard attempted the first carotid artery cannulation and repeated the procedure in the jugular vein, again on a horse. He was first to report the complications now well known to be associated with this maneuver. In 1929 Werner Forssmann tried cardiac catheterization on himself, but could not investigate the procedure further since his findings were rejected and ridiculed by colleagues. His work was continued by André Frédéric Cournand and Dickinson Woodruff Richards Jr in the United States. In 1956 the three physicians shared the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their studies on vascular and cardiac systems. The genius and the perseverance of the three physicians paved the way towards peripheral and central catheter vein placement, one of the most frequently performed maneuvers in hospitals. Its history still remains unknown to most and deserves a short description.

  1. STS-103 M.S. Michael Foale during TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) is ready to take his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith , John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  2. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) and Pilot Scott J. Kelly look at a replacement computer for the Hubble Space Telescope. The payload hardware is in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. Other members of the crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with the new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  3. [On the evolution of scientific thought].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde Torres, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The Nominalists of the XIV century, precursors of modern science, thought that science's object was not the general, vague and indeterminate but the particular, which is real and can be known directly. About the middle of the XVII Century the bases of the modern science became established thanks to a revolution fomented essentially by Galileo, Bacon and Descartes. During the XVIII Century, parallel to the development of the great current of English Empiricism, a movement of scientific renewal also arose in continental Europe following the discipline of the Dutch Physicians and of Boerhaave. In the XIX Century, Claude Bernard dominated the scientific medicine but his rigorous determinism impeded him from taking into account the immense and unforeseeable field of the random. Nowadays, we approach natural science and medicine, from particular groups of facts; that is, from the responses of Nature to specific questions, but not from the general laws. Furthermore, in recent epistemology, the concept that experimental data are not pure facts, but rather, facts interpreted within a hermeneutical context has been established. Finally a general tendency to retrieve philosophical questions concerning the understanding of essence and existence can frequently be seen in scientific inquiry. In the light of the evolution of medical thought, it is possible to establish the position of scientific medicine within the movement of ideas dominating in our time.

  4. Biochemistry and physiology within the framework of the extended synthesis of evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Angelo; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Functional biologists, like Claude Bernard, ask "How?", meaning that they investigate the mechanisms underlying the emergence of biological functions (proximal causes), while evolutionary biologists, like Charles Darwin, asks "Why?", meaning that they search the causes of adaptation, survival and evolution (remote causes). Are these divergent views on what is life? The epistemological role of functional biology (molecular biology, but also biochemistry, physiology, cell biology and so forth) appears essential, for its capacity to identify several mechanisms of natural selection of new characters, individuals and populations. Nevertheless, several issues remain unsolved, such as orphan metabolic activities, i.e., adaptive functions still missing the identification of the underlying genes and proteins, and orphan genes, i.e., genes that bear no signature of evolutionary history, yet provide an organism with improved adaptation to environmental changes. In the framework of the Extended Synthesis, we suggest that the adaptive roles of any known function/structure are reappraised in terms of their capacity to warrant constancy of the internal environment (homeostasis), a concept that encompasses both proximal and remote causes.

  5. Monet's Painting under the Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, Paula; Wuhrer, Richard; Phillips, Matthew R.

    2003-04-01

    An oil painting by Claude Monet, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile 1887 (collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales), was examined to determine both the identity of the pigments used by the artist in this painting and his technique of mixing colors and laying paint on the canvas. The extremely complex construction of the painting was revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), and X-ray mapping (XRM) analysis of cross sections of paint flakes excised from damaged regions of Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile. Nine different pigments were found on the painting. Many of the identified colors were modern pigments that became available only late in the 19th century as a result of scientific advances in pigment chemistry. Although similar colors were available in a natural mineral form, they lacked the vivid color of their manufactured counterparts. The use of these new synthetic metallic oxide colors by Monet accounts for the brilliance of his paintings. In addition, a separation between successive paint layers was observed in some areas of paint chip cross sections, indicating that oil-based paint was applied to paint that had dried, and consequently, Port-Goulphar, Belle-Ile was painted over a long period of time. This observation is contrary to the general perception of Monet's technique of painting freely and quickly.

  6. Astronomical Dating of Monet's Paintings on the Normandy Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Claude Monet (1840-1926) is famous for landscapes accurately capturing the changing nature of seas and skies. Monet created almost two thousand paintings during his long career, and several hundred of these works depict the skies above the spectacular cliffs, arches, rocks, harbors, and beaches on the Normandy coast. Our Texas State University group made a research trip to Normandy in the summer of 2012 and found dozens of the locations where Monet set up his easel. Astronomical considerations of daylight, twilight, night skies, and tides can be used to enhance our understanding of the artist's creative process. Monet himself said, “I need the Sun or the cloudy weather to coincide again with the tide, which must be low or high in accordance with my motifs.” Astronomical methods can be used to help in dating these works, many of which have uncertain dates in the existing catalogues and literature about Monet in Normandy. Analysis using the direction of sunlight and the direction of shadows, combined with calculations of lunar phases and tide levels, meteorological records, and the artist's letters, enables us to determine the exact date and the precise time, accurate to the minute, when Monet observed the sky that inspired a painting.

  7. Developing a quality assurance program for online services.

    PubMed

    Humphries, A W; Naisawald, G V

    1991-07-01

    A quality assurance (QA) program provides not only a mechanism for establishing training and competency standards, but also a method for continuously monitoring current service practices to correct shortcomings. The typical QA cycle includes these basic steps: select subject for review, establish measurable standards, evaluate existing services using the standards, identify problems, implement solutions, and reevaluate services. The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library (CMHSL) developed a quality assurance program for online services designed to evaluate services against specific criteria identified by research studies as being important to customer satisfaction. These criteria include reliability, responsiveness, approachability, communication, and physical factors. The application of these criteria to the library's existing online services in the quality review process is discussed with specific examples of the problems identified in each service area, as well as the solutions implemented to correct deficiencies. The application of the QA cycle to an online services program serves as a model of possible interventions. The use of QA principles to enhance online service quality can be extended to other library service areas.

  8. APS at 125: a look back at the founding of the American Physiological Society.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kathy L

    2013-03-01

    Early efforts in physiological research in the United States were produced by lone investigators working in laboratories funded by their own medical practices. In Europe, however, Claude Bernard and Carl Ludwig produced a new model of scientific research laboratories funded by the state that sought to develop the pursuit of biomedical research as an occupation. American physicians such as Henry Pickering Bowditch and S. Weir Mitchell were exposed to this new "research ethic" during their international studies and brought this new perspective home to America. Along with H. Newell Martin, these men began training professional physiologists who would assume new research positions in academic institutions. In 1887, Bowditch, Mitchell, and H. Newell Martin proposed the formation of a new society for these professional physiologists, the American Physiological Society (APS). Seventeen of the original twenty-eight members met on December 30, 1887, in New York City, NY, to establish APS. From these humble beginnings, APS evolved to become a force for change in American biomedical science.

  9. Narrating consciousness: language, media and embodiment.

    PubMed

    Hayles, N Katherine; Pulizzi, James J

    2010-01-01

    Although there has long been a division in studies of consciousness between a focus on neuronal processes or conversely an emphasis on the ruminations of a conscious self, the long-standing split between mechanism and meaning within the brain was mirrored by a split without, between information as a technical term and the meanings that messages are commonly thought to convey. How to heal this breach has posed formidable problems to researchers. Working through the history of cybernetics, one of the historical sites where Claude Shannon's information theory quickly became received doctrine, we argue that the cybernetic program as it developed through second-order cybernetics and autopoietic theory remains incomplete. In this article, we return to fundamental questions about pattern and noise, context and meaning, to forge connections between consciousness, narrative and media. The thrust of our project is to reintroduce context and narrative as crucial factors in the processes of meaning-making. The project proceeds along two fronts: advancing a theoretical framework within which context plays its property central role; and demonstrating the importance of context by analyzing two fictions, Stanislaw Lem's "His Master's Voice" and Joseph McElroy's "Plus," in which context has been deformed by being wrenched away from normal human environments, with radical consequences for processes of meaning-making.

  10. UCPs, at the interface between bioenergetics and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bouillaud, Frédéric; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Ricquier, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The first member of the uncoupling protein (UCP) family, brown adipose tissue uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), was identified in 1976. Twenty years later, two closely related proteins, UCP2 and UCP3, were described in mammals. Homologs of these proteins exist in other organisms, including plants. Uncoupling refers to a deterioration of energy conservation between substrate oxidation and ADP phosphorylation. Complete energy conservation loss would be fatal but fine-tuning can be beneficial for processes such as thermogenesis, redox control, and prevention of mitochondrial ROS release. The coupled/uncoupled state of mitochondria is related to the permeability of the inner membrane and the proton transport mediated by activated UCPs underlies the uncoupling activity of these proteins. Proton transport by UCP1 is activated by fatty acids and this ensures thermogenesis. In vivo in absence of this activation UCP1 remains inhibited with no transport activity. A similar situation now seems unlikely for UCP2 and UCP3 and while activation of their proton transport has been described its physiological relevance remains uncertain and their influence can be envisaged as a result of another transport pathway that takes place in the absence of activation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27091404

  11. Stress in biology and medicine, role in aging.

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J

    2015-09-01

    In this review, we present a short description of the history of stress in the medical literature followed by a recapitulation of its mechanisms, from the cellular to the organismal level and its role in aging. The medical importance of stress was first taken up as a subject of experimental medicine by physiologists, starting from Claude Bernard's concept of the stability of the "milieu intérieur", altered by stress, followed by others, culminating recently by the elucidation of its mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level. These studies showed that oxidative stress is one of the most important and most frequent form of biological aggression. Its accumulation over time is important for the burnout syndrome and for neuronal aging. There is however a positive side to it also, redox signaling plays an important role in the functional coordination of cellular activities. These mechanisms, still to be more completely evaluated, have to be taken in account for planning efficient protective therapeutic interventions. PMID:26321500

  12. Sir Michael Foster MD FRS (1836-1907): the rise of the British school of physiology.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2008-11-01

    In 1867 William Sharpey (1802-80), Professor of General Anatomy and Physiology at University College, London, appointed Michael Foster to the unique post of Teacher of Practical Physiology; in Britain the study of experimental physiology was dormant. In 1870 Foster accepted a Praelectorship in Physiology at Trinity College, Cambridge, and soon established a school of physiology. He was the first Cambridge Professor of Physiology (1883-1903). Foster, a great teacher, had a remarkable ability to attract talented students and to inspire them to undertake research. He himself took inspiration from the scientific philosophy of Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95) and of Claude Bernard (1813-78). Foster was active in the foundation of the Physiological Society (1876), and founded and edited the Journal of Physiology (1878). He was interested in the scientific training of medical students and wrote a highly lauded Text Book of Physiology (1877). Physiology became a profession in its own right and British physiologists were in the vanguard of research.

  13. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago.

  14. Developing a quality assurance program for online services.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, A W; Naisawald, G V

    1991-01-01

    A quality assurance (QA) program provides not only a mechanism for establishing training and competency standards, but also a method for continuously monitoring current service practices to correct shortcomings. The typical QA cycle includes these basic steps: select subject for review, establish measurable standards, evaluate existing services using the standards, identify problems, implement solutions, and reevaluate services. The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library (CMHSL) developed a quality assurance program for online services designed to evaluate services against specific criteria identified by research studies as being important to customer satisfaction. These criteria include reliability, responsiveness, approachability, communication, and physical factors. The application of these criteria to the library's existing online services in the quality review process is discussed with specific examples of the problems identified in each service area, as well as the solutions implemented to correct deficiencies. The application of the QA cycle to an online services program serves as a model of possible interventions. The use of QA principles to enhance online service quality can be extended to other library service areas. PMID:1909197

  15. Epidemiology: second-rate science?

    PubMed

    Parascandola, M

    1998-01-01

    In recent years epidemiology has come under increasing criticism in regulatory and public arenas for being "unscientific." The tobacco industry has taken advantage of this, insisting for decades that evidence linking cigarettes and lung cancer falls short of proof. Moreover, many epidemiologists remain unduly skeptical and self-conscious about the status of their own causal claims. This situation persists in part because of a widespread belief that only the laboratory can provide evidence sufficient for scientific proof. Adherents of this view erroneously believe that there is no element of uncertainty or inductive inference in the "direct observation" of the laboratory researcher and that epidemiology provides mere "circumstantial" evidence. The historical roots of this attitude can be traced to philosopher John Stuart Mill and physiologist Claude Bernard and their influence on modern experimental thinking. The author uses the debate over cigarettes and lung cancer to examine ideas of proof in medical science and public health, concluding that inductive inference from a limited sample to a larger population is an element in all empirical science.

  16. Stress and other environmental factors affecting fertility in men and women: overview.

    PubMed Central

    Negro-Vilar, A

    1993-01-01

    To understand how environmental factors contribute to fertility or infertility in humans, it is first necessary to define environment. A view that will guide this review is that environment represents the "external milieu," analogous to the well-defined concept of "internal milieu" first introduced by Claude Bernard. Within this context, the environment provides both positive and adverse influences on reproductive health and development. Environmental factors can then be classified into categories such as physical, chemical, biological, behavioral, and socioeconomic. In many circumstances, multiple environmental factors may contribute to adversely modify human health. It has been suspected and in some cases demonstrated that stress can adversely affect reproductive function. Both animal and human data support this contention; however, the human data are clear in extreme situations (e.g., inmates of concentration camps) but less so under less drastic conditions. In recent years many advances have been made concerning the neurochemical mechanisms that mediate the effects of stress on reproductive functions and on the identification of "stress hormones" that may not only be involved in the stress response but also serve as biochemical markers to identify and correlate stress with different fertility parameters. Nutrition also plays an important role in infertility, and undernutrition or nutrition disorders are associated with stress in infertility. Environmental factors are often invoked as contributing to many cases of unexplained infertility. However, the direct causal relationship between those factors and the ensuing infertility of the couple are seldom well established and remain largely anecdotal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8243408

  17. Exploring molecular biology. An older surgeon looks at a new universe.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P

    1995-08-01

    The rapidity and the magnitude of progress in molecular biology slipped by many of us practicing surgeons. Although articles about molecular medicine appear regularly in our surgical literature, for many of us, their content is rather mysterious. The articles often end with a glossary, because most readers do not understand the language. In November 1993, the entire issue of the Archives of Surgery was devoted to molecular medicine. In an editorial, Claude Organ, Jr, MD, a member of this association, encouraged the surgeon to "cohabit" with the molecular scientist. Many university departments of surgery have professors who are both surgeons and molecular biologists. Ed Passaro, MD, also a member of this association, observed in 1992 that most surgeons had overlooked this new field and needed to learn about it to play a role in applying it to clinical medicine. That means knowing what new tests and treatments are available and how to apply them. It means being able to counsel patients. Also, it is important for knowledgeable surgeons to serve on the regular hospital committees that will oversee these new tests and treatments, and to offer their unique judgment in assessing risk, reward, and ethical implications.

  18. A physiologist's view of homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of "constancy" of the internal environment in an explicit and concrete way. In the 1960s, homeostatic regulatory mechanisms in physiology began to be described as discrete processes following the application of engineering control system analysis to physiological systems. Unfortunately, many undergraduate texts continue to highlight abstract aspects of the concept rather than emphasizing a general model that can be specifically and comprehensively applied to all homeostatic mechanisms. As a result, students and instructors alike often fail to develop a clear, concise model with which to think about such systems. In this article, we present a standard model for homeostatic mechanisms to be used at the undergraduate level. We discuss common sources of confusion ("sticky points") that arise from inconsistencies in vocabulary and illustrations found in popular undergraduate texts. Finally, we propose a simplified model and vocabulary set for helping undergraduate students build effective mental models of homeostatic regulation in physiological systems.

  19. Patent Reform Proposals Raise the Stakes for Researchers, Manufacturers of Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Kravetz, Shayna B.; Frei, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    When the founding fathers provided for patents in the American Constitution, they could hardly have envisioned the 21st-century demands the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office (PTO) face today. The PTO is an institution that is, by definition, concerned with the new—one essential element of a patent is novelty; however, it is also struggling to fit the needs of modern biotech research and development within a framework conceived by the young American government in the 18th century. In their new book Biotechnology and the Patent System (AEI Press, Washington, DC, 2007), Claude Barfield, PhD, and John Calfee, PhD, both Resident Scholars at the American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, discuss reforms being considered by legislators, lawyers, and members of the biotechnology industry that could modernize the patent system and make it work for all the stakeholders. The proposed reforms include changing the way patent applications are filed and pursued, limiting encumbrances that slow the application process, providing more funding to the PTO to speed consideration of applications, granting interested parties the right to intervene while a patent application is being considered, and limiting the administrative and economic burdens associated with the mushrooming numbers of patents for each product or process. PMID:25126213

  20. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of liquid planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    This is the 50th anniversary of Ed Lorenz brilliant paper "Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow.'' Lorenz's work, along with many other founders' efforts, gave rise to the study of nonlinear dynamics. That field has allowed us to move beyond simple linear characterizations of nature, and to open up a deeper understanding of the Earth, other planets, and stars. Of the many things that make the Earth a habitable home, one is the existence of a planetary magnetic field generated in our liquid iron outer core. The generation process is known to be strongly nonlinear, and thereby almost certainly turbulent. Yet it is not a simple homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, but is instead heavily modified by rotation and magnetic forces. We attempt to better understand the Earth's core using a three-meter liquid sodium laboratory model of the core. Our work in sodium in this system has just begun. The system exhibits a variety of behaviors with at least twelve different states, drawing different amounts of power, and causing varying levels of magnetic field amplification. In some states, rotation and magnetic fields cause the dynamics to simplify relative to more general turbulent flows in comparable conditions. Acknowledgements: I gratefully acknowledge my collaborators Daniel Zimmerman, Santiago Triana, Donald Martin, Nolan Balew, Henri-Claude Nataf, and Barbara Brawn-Cinani, and funding from the National Science Foundation Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Geophysics programs.

  1. Exploring molecular biology. An older surgeon looks at a new universe.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P

    1995-08-01

    The rapidity and the magnitude of progress in molecular biology slipped by many of us practicing surgeons. Although articles about molecular medicine appear regularly in our surgical literature, for many of us, their content is rather mysterious. The articles often end with a glossary, because most readers do not understand the language. In November 1993, the entire issue of the Archives of Surgery was devoted to molecular medicine. In an editorial, Claude Organ, Jr, MD, a member of this association, encouraged the surgeon to "cohabit" with the molecular scientist. Many university departments of surgery have professors who are both surgeons and molecular biologists. Ed Passaro, MD, also a member of this association, observed in 1992 that most surgeons had overlooked this new field and needed to learn about it to play a role in applying it to clinical medicine. That means knowing what new tests and treatments are available and how to apply them. It means being able to counsel patients. Also, it is important for knowledgeable surgeons to serve on the regular hospital committees that will oversee these new tests and treatments, and to offer their unique judgment in assessing risk, reward, and ethical implications. PMID:7632139

  2. Between phrén and psyché: Gabriele Buccola and his contribution to the birth of experimental psychology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Degni, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    The institution in 1880 of a laboratory of experimental psychology in the San Lazzaro Mental Hospital of Reggio Emilia, directed by Augusto Tamburini, marks a fundamental stage for the birth of scientific psychology in Italy. It was in this laboratory that the Sicilian psychiatrist Gabriele Buccola worked, carrying out reaction-time experiments in a broad and systematic way on "sane" and mentally ill individuals. In so doing, he was following Claude Bernard's lesson--which was advocated also by Comte, Taine, and Ribot, as in Italy by Livi and Tamburini-- according to which mental functions are to be studied in both normal and pathological conditions. With these experiments, Buccola highlighted the way in which reaction time is tied to "attention," how it is altered by mental illness, and how there are various "modifiers" that influence the results. He also shows how the measurement of this "time" represents an important instrument for the differential diagnosis of several mental pathologies. Buccola's work, which is implemented in the first volume of experimental psychology written in Italy, demonstrates how psychology, which in the second half of the nineteenth century aspired to become an autonomous science, developed in Italy from the root of psychiatry, on the common ground of evolutionary positivism. PMID:19569446

  3. Space polypropulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, B. J.; Griffin, D. K.; Bingham, R.; Campbell, R. N.; Forbes, A.; Michaelis, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Hybrid space propulsion has been a feature of most space missions. Only the very early rocket propulsion experiments like the V2, employed a single form of propulsion. By the late fifties multi-staging was routine and the Space Shuttle employs three different kinds of fuel and rocket engines. During the development of chemical rockets, other forms of propulsion were being slowly tested, both theoretically and, relatively slowly, in practice. Rail and gas guns, ion engines, "slingshot" gravity assist, nuclear and solar power, tethers, solar sails have all seen some real applications. Yet the earliest type of non-chemical space propulsion to be thought of has never been attempted in space: laser and photon propulsion. The ideas of Eugen Saenger, Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz, Leik Myrabo, Claude Phipps and Robert Forward remain Earth-bound. In this paper we summarize the various forms of nonchemical propulsion and their results. We point out that missions beyond Saturn would benefit from a change of attitude to laser-propulsion as well as consideration of hybrid "polypropulsion" - which is to say using all the rocket "tools" available rather than possibly not the most appropriate. We conclude with three practical examples, two for the next decades and one for the next century; disposal of nuclear waste in space; a grand tour of the Jovian and Saturnian moons - with Huygens or Lunoxod type, landers; and eventually mankind's greatest space dream: robotic exploration of neighbouring planetary systems.

  4. Chess as a Behavioral Model for Cognitive Skill Research: Review of Blindfold Chess by Eliot Hearst and John Knott

    PubMed Central

    Mechner, Francis

    2010-01-01

    This multifaceted work on chess played without sight of the pieces is a sophisticated psychologist's examination of this topic and of chess skill in general, including a detailed and comprehensive historical account. This review builds on Hearst and Knott's assertion that chess can provide a uniquely useful model for research on several issues in the area of cognitive skill and imagery. A key issue is the relationship between viewing a stimulus and mental imagery in the light of blindfold chess masters' consistent reports that they do not use or have images. This review also proposes a methodology for measuring and quantifying an individual's skill shortfall from a theoretical maximum. This methodology, based on a 1951 proposal by Claude Shannon, is applicable to any choice situation in which all the available choices are known. The proposed “Proficiency” measure reflects the equivalent number of “yes–no” questions that would have been required to arrive at a best choice, considering also the time consumed. As the measure provides a valid and nonarbitrary way to compare different skills and the effects of different independent variables on a given skill, it may have a wide range of applications in cognitive skill research, skill training, and education.

  5. Evolution of concepts of stress.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Kopin, Irwin J

    2007-06-01

    This essay describes the evolution of stress as a medical scientific idea. Claude Bernard, Walter B. Cannon and Hans Selye provided key founding concepts for the current view. Bernard introduced the idea of the internal environment bathing cells - the milieu intérieur - maintained by continual compensatory changes of bodily functions. Cannon coined the word, "homeostasis," referring to a set of acceptable ranges of values for internal variables. Cannon taught that threats to homeostasis evoke activation of the sympathoadrenal system as a functional unit. Selye defined stress as a state characterized by a uniform response pattern, regardless of the particular stressor, that could lead to long-term pathologic changes. "Allostasis" was introduced as a concept in recognition that there is no single ideal set of steady-state conditions in life; instead, setpoints and other response criteria change continuously. Stress is now viewed neither as a perturbation nor a stereotyped response pattern but as a condition characterized by a perceived discrepancy between information about a monitored variable and criteria for eliciting patterned effector responses. Different stressors elicit different patterns of activation of the sympathetic nervous, adrenomedullary hormonal, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and other effectors, closing negative feedback loops. This systems concept of stress yields predictions that observation or experimentation can test and that are applicable to normal physiology and to a variety of acute and chronic disorders. PMID:17514579

  6. [On the evolution of scientific thought].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde Torres, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The Nominalists of the XIV century, precursors of modern science, thought that science's object was not the general, vague and indeterminate but the particular, which is real and can be known directly. About the middle of the XVII Century the bases of the modern science became established thanks to a revolution fomented essentially by Galileo, Bacon and Descartes. During the XVIII Century, parallel to the development of the great current of English Empiricism, a movement of scientific renewal also arose in continental Europe following the discipline of the Dutch Physicians and of Boerhaave. In the XIX Century, Claude Bernard dominated the scientific medicine but his rigorous determinism impeded him from taking into account the immense and unforeseeable field of the random. Nowadays, we approach natural science and medicine, from particular groups of facts; that is, from the responses of Nature to specific questions, but not from the general laws. Furthermore, in recent epistemology, the concept that experimental data are not pure facts, but rather, facts interpreted within a hermeneutical context has been established. Finally a general tendency to retrieve philosophical questions concerning the understanding of essence and existence can frequently be seen in scientific inquiry. In the light of the evolution of medical thought, it is possible to establish the position of scientific medicine within the movement of ideas dominating in our time. PMID:26296626

  7. [Programmed cell death: history and future of a concept].

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Cell death was observed and understood since the 19th century, but there was no experimental examination until the mid-20th century. Beginning in the 1960's, several laboratories demonstrated that cell death was biologically controlled (programmed) and that the morphology was common and not readily explained (apoptosis). By 1990 the genetic basis of programmed cell death had been established and the first components of the cell death machinery (caspase 3, bcl-2 and Fas) had been identified, sequenced, and recognized as highly conserved in evolution. The rapid development of the field has given us substantial understanding of how cell death is achieved. However, capitalizing on our knowledge for therapeutic purposes requires us to learn much more about how a cell commits to death, as well as recognizing that apoptosis may be the most common and efficient means of death, but that there are alternative pathways that can result in cell death even when the conventional pathway is blocked. Interestingly enough, many of the arguments and missteps in the history of the field were anticipated by Claude Bernard, and his warnings and recommendations remain valid today.

  8. Web-based Teaching Radio Interferometer for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    Practical training for the future use of the African VLBI Network (AVN) or any VLBI experiment starts by understanding the basic principles of radio observations and radio interferometry. The aim of this project is to build a basic interferometer that could be used remotely via a web interface from any country on the African continent. This should turn out as a much less expensive and much more efficient way to train AVN researchers from SKA partner countries to the principles of radio astronomy and to interferometric data analysis. The idea is based on the very successful EUHOU (European Hands-On Universe) already very successful in Europe. The former EUHOU manager, Dr Yannick Liebert, arrived for a 3 years postdoc with Prof Claude Carignan at the University of Cape Town to implement the same project on the African continent (AHI: African Hands-on Interferometry). Besides the use of AHI for the AVN researchers, this web-based system could be used be any undergraduate program on radio astronomical techniques across the African continent as the EUHOU is used all across Europe.

  9. Laws, leaders, and legends of the modern National Library of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kent A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper is an expanded version of the 2007 Joseph Leiter National Library of Medicine (NLM)/Medical Library Association Lecture presented at MLA ‘07, the Medical Library Association annual meeting in Philadelphia in May 2007. It presents an historical accounting of four major pieces of legislation, beginning with the NLM Act of 1956 up through the creation of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Brief Description: The transition from the United States Armed Forces Medical Library to the United States National Library of Medicine in 1956 was a major turning point in NLM's history, scope, and direction. The succeeding landmark legislative achievements—namely, the 1965 Medical Library Assistance Act, the 1968 Joint Resolution forming the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, and the 1988 authorization for the National Center for Biotechnology Information— transformed the library into a major biomedical communications institution and a leader and supporter of an effective national network of libraries of medicine. The leaders of the library and its major advocates—including Dr. Michael DeBakey, Senator Lister Hill, and Senator Claude Pepper—together contributed to the creation of the modern NLM. PMID:18379667

  10. INVITED SPEAKERS Invited Speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Alain AspectPalaiseau Markus AspelmeyerVienna Vanderlei BagnatoSão Paulo Victor BalykinMoscow Kristian BaumannZürich Jim BergquistNIST, Boulder Frédéric ChevyENS, Paris John CloseCanberra Claude Cohen-TannoudjiENS, Paris Jean DalibardENS, Paris Eugene DemlerHarvard Michael DoserCERN Markus DrescherHamburg Francesca FerlainoInnsbruck Victor FlambaumSydney Chiara FortFlorence Elisabeth GiacobinoENS, Paris Philippe GrangierPalaiseau Chris GreeneJILA, Boulder Markus GreinerHarvard Eric HesselsToronto Hidetoshi KatoriTokyo Wolfgang KetterleMIT Michael KohlCambridge Wu-Ming LiuBeijing Francesco MinardiFlorence Holger MüllerBerkeley Karim MurrGarching Hanns-Christoph NägerlInnsbruck Jeremy O'BrienBristol Silke OspelkausJILA, Boulder Krzysztof PachuckiWarsaw Bill PhillipsGaithersburg Randolf PohlGarching Eugene PolzikCopenhagen Cindy RegalJILA, Boulder Jakob ReichelENS, Paris Helmut RitschInnsbruck Christian RoosInnsbruck Mark SaffmanWisconsin Christophe SalomonENS, Paris Gora ShlyapnikovOrsay Richard TaiebParis Masahito UedaTokyo Chris ValeMelbourne Andreas WallraffZürich Matthias WeidemüllerHeidelberg Martin WeitzBonn Artur WideraBonn David WinelandNIST, Boulder

  11. Does Stereotype Threat Affect Post-Course Scores on the Astronomy Diagnostic Test?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, G. L.; Hufnagel, B.; Landato, J. M.; Hodari, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    During the 1990s, Claude Steele and others demonstrated that women mathematics students under-performed while men over-performed on selected GRE questions when told that the exam could differentiate by gender. Stereotype threat is triggered for these women when they fear someone else may negatively stereotype them, and therefore, their performance is affected. In a limited study involving 229 students, we investigated the effect of stereotype threat on performance on the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT). The ADT was administered as a pre-test in four introductory astronomy classes intended for non-science majors. The same professors taught pairs of classes at the University of Maryland, a large research institution, and W. R. Harper College, a small liberal arts school. The classes were treated the same until the final day before the post-course ADT was given. One "threatened" class at each campus was told that gender mattered so they should be sure to include it on the ADT. The "control" classes were told that gender does not matter. The results show no stereotype threat effect on the women in these introductory classes. The university men did slightly over-perform at low statistical significance. As Steele suggested, students must identify with a subject in order to strongly invoke a stereotype threat. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 to GLD, DGE-97014489 to BH, and DGE-9714452 for AKH.

  12. The discovery and rediscovery of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sternbach, George L; Varon, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    The therapeutic use of oxygen was pioneered in the early 20(th) century by the respiratory physiologist John Scott Haldane. His work followed Claude Bernard's description of the toxic effects of carbon monoxide. Haldane, having also observed the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning, became aware of the therapeutic benefits of oxygen in this condition. He was also an advocate of oxygen as a therapeutic agent in other respiratory illness, and made efforts to define how the gas could best be administered. The history of identification of oxygen as a chemical element is convoluted. In the 17(th) century, the controversial John Mayow suggested that only a portion of air was necessary for sustaining life. Mayow's work was largely overlooked during his lifetime, and his insight was subsequently eclipsed by the phlogiston theory, an erroneous concept widely believed for nearly a century after his death. This theory was ultimately disproved by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Although the point of primacy is somewhat contentious, Priestley shares the distinction of discovering elemental oxygen with Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier, the French chemist, and Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the Swedish apothecary.

  13. Gay re-readings of the Harlem Renaissance poets.

    PubMed

    Woods, G

    1993-01-01

    In the light of the long-established fact of their homosexuality or bisexuality, it is high time for the cluster of "Negro Renaissance" poets, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Bruce Nugent, to be reappraised by and for gay readers. This paper seeks to develop gay reading strategies in relation to the poems of these writers, in order to reveal for contemporary readers likely subtexts which, at the time of their writing, were publicly read as bearing on race alone. It is often possible to read a particular poem as referring (in images such as that of the social outcast) to either racial or sexual oppression, interchangeably; and possibly, therefore, to both at once, by way of an implicit comparison. Likewise, poems on miscegenation can just as well be read, via the theme of forbidden love, as referring to homosexuality. The fact that most published critical readings deal only with the racial issue does not invalidate the likelihood that the poem can be, and indeed requires to be, read as referring, also, to sexuality. Gay readings emerge, then, not merely from these writers' representations of attractive men and boys, but also in the midst of their most famously anti-racist themes. PMID:8113612

  14. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S.; Baguer, G. M. Gistau

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  15. STS-75 liftoff - right side view from across marsh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A smooth countdown culminates in an on-time liftoff as the Space Shuttle Columbia climbs skyward atop a column of flame. The launch from Pad 39B occurred at 3:18:00 P.M. EST, February 22, 1996. Aboard for Mission STS-75 is an international crew headed by Mission Commander Andrew M. Allen; Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz is pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz is payload commander. Serving as mission specialists are Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Maurizio Cheli and Claude Nicollier. Cheli, from Italy, and Nicollier, from Switzerland, both represent the European Space Agency (ESA). Assigned as payload specialist is Italian Umberto Guidoni, who represents the Italian Space Agency (ASI). During a mission scheduled to last nearly 14 days the flightg crew will be working with two primary parylods: the U.S./Italian Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R), which is being re-flown, and the U.S. Microgravity Payload (USMP-3), making its third spaceflight. Mission STS-75 marks the second Shuttle flight of 1996 and the 75th Shuttle launch overall.

  16. STS-75 liftoff - right side view from Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A smooth countdown culminates in an on-time liftoff as the Space Shuttle Columbia climbs skyward atop a column of flame. The launch from Pad 39B occurred at 3:18:00 P.M. EST, February 22, 1996. Aboard for Mission STS-75 is an international crew headed by Mission Commander Andrew M. Allen; Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz is pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz is payload commander. Serving as mission specialists are Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Maurizio Cheli and Claude Nicollier. Cheli, from Italy, and Nicollier, from Switzerland, both represent the European Space Agency (ESA). Assigned as payload specialist is Italian Umberto Guidoni, who represents the Italian Space Agency (ASI). During a mission scheduled to last nearly 14 days the flightg crew will be working with two primary parylods: the U.S./Italian Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R), which is being re-flown, and the U.S. Microgravity Payload (USMP-3), making its third spaceflight. Mission STS-75 marks the second Shuttle flight of 1996 and the 75th Shuttle launch overall.

  17. "The Civil Rights Movement of the 1990s?": The anti-abortion movement and the struggle for racial justice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    In 1964, Claude and Jeanne Nolen, who were white, joined an interracial NAACP team intent on desegregating local restaurants in Austin, Texas as a test of the recently passed Civil Rights ACt. Twenty-five years later, the Nolens pleaded "no contest" in a courtroom for their continued social activism. This time the issue was not racial segregation, but rather criminal trespassing for blockading abortion clinics with Operation Rescue. The Nolens served prison sentences for direct action protests that they believe stemmed from the same commitment to Christianity and social justice as the civil rights movements. Despite its relationship to political and cultural conservatism, the anti-abortion movement since Roe v. Wade (1973) was also a product of the progressive social movements of the turbulent sixties. Utilizing oral history interviews and organizational literature, the article explores the historical context of the anti-abortion movement, specifically how the lengthy struggle for racial justice shaped the rhetoric, tactics, and ideology of the anti-abortion activists. Even after political conservatives dominated the movement in the 1980s, the successes and failures of the sixties provided a cultural lens through which grassroots anti-abortion activists forged what was arguably the largest movement of civil disobedience in American history.

  18. A distributed control approach for power and energy management in a notional shipboard power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qunying

    The main goal of this thesis is to present a power control module (PCON) based approach for power and energy management and to examine its control capability in shipboard power system (SPS). The proposed control scheme is implemented in a notional medium voltage direct current (MVDC) integrated power system (IPS) for electric ship. To realize the control functions such as ship mode selection, generator launch schedule, blackout monitoring, and fault ride-through, a PCON based distributed power and energy management system (PEMS) is developed. The control scheme is proposed as two-layer hierarchical architecture with system level on the top as the supervisory control and zonal level on the bottom as the decentralized control, which is based on the zonal distribution characteristic of the notional MVDC IPS that was proposed as one of the approaches for Next Generation Integrated Power System (NGIPS) by Norbert Doerry. Several types of modules with different functionalities are used to derive the control scheme in detail for the notional MVDC IPS. Those modules include the power generation module (PGM) that controls the function of generators, the power conversion module (PCM) that controls the functions of DC/DC or DC/AC converters, etc. Among them, the power control module (PCON) plays a critical role in the PEMS. It is the core of the control process. PCONs in the PEMS interact with all the other modules, such as power propulsion module (PPM), energy storage module (ESM), load shedding module (LSHED), and human machine interface (HMI) to realize the control algorithm in PEMS. The proposed control scheme is implemented in real time using the real time digital simulator (RTDS) to verify its validity. To achieve this, a system level energy storage module (SESM) and a zonal level energy storage module (ZESM) are developed in RTDS to cooperate with PCONs to realize the control functionalities. In addition, a load shedding module which takes into account the reliability

  19. ESPAS: the European e-science platform to access near-Earth space data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belehaki, A.; Hapgood, M. A.; Ritschel, B.; Manola, N.

    2013-12-01

    Lebesis, Bruno Zolesi, Tatjana Gerzen, Ingemar Häggström, Anna Charisi, Ivan Galkin, Jurgen Watermann, Matthew Angling, Timo Asikainen, Alan Aylward, Henrike Barkmann, Peter Bergqvist, Andrew Bushell, Fabien Darrouzet, Dimitris Dialetis, Carl-Fredrik Enell, Daniel Heynderickx, Norbert Jakowski, Magnar Johnsen, Jean Lilensten, Ian McCrea, Kalevi Mursula, Bogdan Nicula, Michael Pezzopane, Viviane Pierrard, Bodo Reinisch, Bernd Ritschel, Luca Spogli, Iwona Stanislawska, Claudia Stolle, Eija Tanskanen, Ioanna Tsagouri, Esa Turunen, Thomas Ulich, Matthew Wild, Tim Yeoman

  20. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the significance of planetary shadowing in shaping Jupiter's gossamer ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Gruen, Eberhard

    particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Recent modelling (Hamilton & Kr¨ger, u Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically, driving grains out into the Thebe Extension and matching the Galileo in-situ dust measurements.

  1. Astrometry and early astrophysics at Kuffner Observatory in the late 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habison, Peter

    The astronomer and mathematician Norbert Herz encouraged Moriz von Kuffner, owner of the beer brewery in Ottakring, to finance a private scientific observatory in the western parts of Vienna. In the years 1884-87 the Kuffner Observatory was built at the Gallitzinberg in Wien-Ottakring. It was an example of enlighted patronage and noted at the time for its rapid acquisition of new instruments and by increasing international recognition. It contained the largest heliometer in the world and the largest meridian circle in the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. Of the many scientists who worked here we mention Leo de Ball, Gustav Eberhard, Johannes Hartmann and we should not forget Karl Schwarzschild. Here in Vienna he published papers on celestial mechanics, measuring techniques, optics and his fundamental papers concerning photographic photometry, in particular the quantitative determination of the departure of the reciprocity law. The telescope and the associated camera with which he carried out his measurements are still in existence at the observatory. The observatory houses important astronomical instruments from the 19th century. All telescopes were made by Repsold und Söhne in Hamburg, and Steinheil in Munich. These two German companies were best renowned for quality and precision in high standard astronomical instruments. The Great Refractor (270/3500 mm) is still the third largest refractor in Austria. It was installed at the observatory in 1886 and was used together with the Schwarzschild Refractor for early astrophysical work including photography. It is this double refractor, where Schwarzschild carried out his measurements on photographic photometry. The Meridian Circle (132/1500 mm) was the largest meridian passage instrument of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Today it is the largest meridian circle in Austria and still one of the largest in Europe. The telescope is equipped with one of the first impersonal micrometers of that time. First observations were carried

  2. Current Events via Electronic Media: An Instructional Tool in a General Education Geology Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.

    2008-12-01

    St. Norbert College (SNC) is a liberal arts college in the Green Bay Metropolitan area with an enrollment of approximately 2100 students. All students are required to take one science course with a laboratory component as part of the general education program. Approximately 40% of all SNC students take introductory geology. Class size for this course is approximately 35 students. Each faculty member teaches one section per semester in a smart classroom A synthesis of current events via electronic media is an excellent pedagogical tool for the introductory geology course. An on-going informal survey of my introductory geology class indicates that between 75- 85% of all students in the class, mostly freshman and sophomores, do not follow the news on a regular basis in any format, i.e. print, internet, or television. Consequently, most are unaware of current scientific topics, events, trends, and relevancy. To address this issue, and develop a positive habit of the mind, a technique called In-the-News-Making-News (INMN) is employed. Each class period begins with a scientifically-related (mostly geology) online news article displayed on an overhead screen. The articles are drawn from a variety of sources that include international sites such as the BBC and CBC; national sites such as PBS, New York Times, and CNN; and local sites such as the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Green Bay Press Gazette. After perusing the article, additional information is often acquired by "Google" to help supplement and clarify the original article. An interactive discussion follows. Topics that are typically covered include: global climate change, basic scientific and technological discoveries, paleontology/evolution, natural disasters, mineral/ energy/ water resources, funding for science, space exploration, and other. Ancillary areas that are often touched on in the conversation include ethics, politics, economics, philosophy, education, geography, culture, or other. INMN addresses

  3. The Laschamp and the Other Recent Events - Excursions or Reversals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    The Laschamp event discovered by Norbert Bonhommet in lava flows of Massif Central (France) is the youngest and the most studied field excursion. Its geomagnetic origin has been controversial due to the existence of self-reversal processes. Taking advantage of new dated sites, we have studied 21 units including 12 new localities and found no new site with intermediate or reverse polarity was found. Ten sites have a normal polarity and all sites studied at Olby, Louchadière and Royat display intermediate but scattered directions. We confirm that reverse polarity flows are affected by self-reversals but we found that this is also the case for normal flows. A direct consequence is that self-reversals cannot be taken as responsible for the reverse directions but they likely contribute to generate dispersion. Thus despite complex magnetization, the geomagnetic origin of the Laschamp in the Chaîne des Puys is not questioned. The volcanic pole positions (VGPs) clearly indicate that the Laschamp event is associated with full reversed directions. The compilation of the most detailed records of excursions that occuured during the Brunhes and Matuyama chron shows that this situation is almost systematic. In all cases, at least one virtual geomagnetic pole (VGPs) is able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a

  4. A Galactic Fossil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    How old are the oldest stars? Using ESO's VLT, astronomers recently measured the age of a star located in our Galaxy. The star, a real fossil, is found to be 13.2 billion years old, not very far from the 13.7 billion years age of the Universe. The star, HE 1523-0901, was clearly born at the dawn of time. "Surprisingly, it is very hard to pin down the age of a star", the lead author of the paper reporting the results, Anna Frebel, explains. "This requires measuring very precisely the abundance of the radioactive elements thorium or uranium, a feat only the largest telescopes such as ESO's VLT can achieve." ESO PR Photo 23a/07 ESO PR Photo 23a/07 The 'Cosmic Clock' This technique is analogous to the carbon-14 dating method that has been so successful in archaeology over time spans of up to a few tens of thousands of years. In astronomy, however, this technique must obviously be applied to vastly longer timescales. For the method to work well, the right choice of radioactive isotope is critical. Unlike other, stable elements that formed at the same time, the abundance of a radioactive (unstable) isotope decreases all the time. The faster the decay, the less there will be left of the radioactive isotope after a certain time, so the greater will be the abundance difference when compared to a stable isotope, and the more accurate is the resulting age. Yet, for the clock to remain useful, the radioactive element must not decay too fast - there must still be enough left of it to allow an accurate measurement, even after several billion years. "Actual age measurements are restricted to the very rare objects that display huge amounts of the radioactive elements thorium or uranium," says Norbert Christlieb, co-author of the report. ESO PR Photo 23b/07 ESO PR Photo 23b/07 Uranium Line in the Spectrum of an Old Star Large amounts of these elements have been found in the star HE 1523-0901, an old, relatively bright star that was discovered within the Hamburg/ESO survey [1]. The

  5. The surprising magnetic topology of τ Sco: fossil remnant or dynamo output?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Howarth, I. D.; Jardine, M. M.; Petit, P.; Catala, C.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bouret, J.-C.; Alecian, E.; Barnes, J. R.; Forveille, T.; Paletou, F.; Manset, N.

    2006-08-01

    conclude that its magnetic field is most probably a fossil remnant from the star formation stage. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: donati@ast.obs-mip.fr (J-FD); idh@star.ucl.ac.uk (IDH); mmj@st-andrews.ac.uk (MMJ); petit@ast.obs-mip.fr (PP); claude.catala@obspm.fr (CC); jlandstr@uwo.ca (JDL); jean-claude.bouret@oamp.fr (J-CB); evelyne.alecian@obspm.fr (EA); jrb3@st-andrews.ac.uk (JRB); forveill@cfht.hawaii.edu (TF); fpaletou@ast.obs-mip.fr (FP); manset@cfht.hawaii.edu (NM)

  6. European astronauts set for Hubble challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    Swiss-born Claude Nicollier will become the first European to make a "spacewalk" from the Space Shuttle. Frenchman Jean-François Clervoy, chief operator of the Shuttle's robotic arm, will capture the telescope and release it once work has been completed. The mission's main objective is to replace Hubble's failed pointing system, which allows astronomers to aim the telescope very precisely at stars, planets and other distant astronomical objects. During 10 days in orbit, astronauts will undertake four "spacewalks" to update and renew equipment. Nicollier will achieve the ambition of a lifetime when he exits the airlock at the beginning of the mission's second major spacewalk in the early hours of 16 December on his first six-hour stint carrying out repairs on the two-storey high Hubble telescope. The opportunity for one of its astronaut to make two spacewalks during the mission is important for ESA. "It is a question of building up experience. We have had EVAs (Extra Vehicular Activities) from Mir but this will be the first time a European has had the opportunity to go from the Shuttle," said Nicollier. Nicollier is on his fourth flight into space. Among them he took part in the first Hubble servicing mission in 1993, controlling the Shuttle's robotic arm while astronauts outside performed repairs to the telescope. This time Clervoy, on his third flight, will have that lead role in the operation of the robotic arm. About 48 hours after launch, Clervoy will take the controls, extend the Shuttle's arm and gently attach it to a fixture on Hubble as the two hurtle round the Earth in tandem at speeds of 27,000 km an hour. There is no room for mistakes as he performs a task in real time that he has practised for many hours in simulations on the ground. After attaching the arm, he will slowly guide the 12-ton telescope to its repair berth at the rear of the Shuttle's payload bay. Clervoy flew in space for the first time on the Space Shuttle Atlantis in November 1994 and

  7. Hubble Space Telescope Servicing begins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    The day's work began when astronauts Story Musgrave and Jeff Hoffman stepped out into the cargo bay at 9h41 pm CST, Saturday (4h41 am CET, Sunday). They immediately set to work replacing two gyroscope assemblies, known as the Rate Sensor Units, two associated electronics boxes, called Electronic Control Units, and eight electrical fuse plugs. The work was completed ahead of schedule, but the astronauts had trouble closing the doors of the compartment housing the gyros and took over an hour to get them shut. The astronauts also prepared equipment for the replacement of the solar arrays. "The feeling down here is one of great satisfaction for a tremendous job today" said spacecraft communicator Greg Harbaugh in mission control. "We are very proud of the work that you all did and we are very confident in the continued success of the mission. Everything is going great and tomorrow is going to be another great day". ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier played a vital role during the spacewalk moving the astronauts and their equipment around the cargo bay with the shuttle's robot arm. The Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission features more robot arm operations than any other shuttle flight. The telescope's left-hand solar array was rolled up successfully at 6h24 am CST (1h24 pm CET). The 11-tonne observatory was rotated 180 degrees on its turntable before commands were sent to retract the second array at 8h23 am CST (3h23 pm CET). The crew stopped the retraction when it appeared the system may have jammed. Mission control instructed the crew to jettison the array, a procedure that they have trained for. Tomorrow astronauts Kathy Thornton and Tom Akers will make a six-hour spacewalk to jettison the troublesome wing, store the other in the cargo bay, and install two new panels supplied by ESA. The second set of arrays feature thermal shields and a modified thermal compensation system to prevent the flexing that affected the first pair. The Hubble Space Telescope was plucked

  8. Hubble refurbished and ready for release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    ) tomorrow morning. The telescope's aperture door will open just prior to the release. ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier will operate the shuttle's robot arm during the deployment, as he has throughout the lengthy spacewalks and the retrieval of the telescope. This mission has seen more arm operations than any other. Milt Heflin, NASA's lead flight director for the mission, paid tribute to Nicollier at a news conference today. "Claude was magnificent arm driver" he said. "The arm was surgically put in place every time. Folks can be very proud of him". Endeavour is scheduled to return to Earth Monday 13 December.

  9. HST's 10th anniversary, ESA and Hubble : changing our vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    With the astronauts who took part in the most recent Servicing Mission (SM3A) in attendance, ESA is taking the opportunity to give a - first - complete overview of Europe's major contribution to the HST mission. It will also review the first ten years of operations and the outstanding results that have "changed our vision" of the cosmos. A new fully European outreach initiative - the "European Space Agency Hubble Information Centre" - will be presented and officially launched; it has been set up by ESA to provide information on Hubble from a European perspective. A public conference will take place in the afternoon to celebrate Hubble's achievements midway through its life. Ten years of outstanding performance Launched on 24 April 1990, Hubble is now midway through its operating life and it is considered one of the most successful space science missions ever. So far more than 10,000 scientific papers based on Hubble results have been published and European scientists have contributed to more than 25% of these. Not only has Hubble produced a rich harvest of scientific results, it has impressed the man in the street with its beautiful images of the sky. Thousands of headlines all over the world have given direct proof of the public's great interest in the mission - 'The deepest images ever', 'The sharpest view of the Universe', 'Measurements of the earliest galaxies' and many others, all reflecting Hubble's performance as a top-class observatory. The Servicing Missions that keep the observatory and its instruments in prime condition are one of the innovative ideas behind Hubble. Astronauts have serviced Hubble three times, and ESA astronauts have taken part in two of these missions. Claude Nicollier (CH) worked with American colleagues on the First Servicing Mission, when Hubble's initial optical problems were repaired. On the latest, Servicing Mission 3A, both Claude Nicollier and Jean-François Clervoy (F) were members of the crew. Over the next 10 years European

  10. A Glimpse of the Young Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    metal-deficient stars that is currently being carried out at Hamburger Sternwarte [4]. Over a period of more than 10 years, a large collection of photographic pictures of the southern sky were obtained with the ESO 1-m Schmidt Telescope, a wide-angle telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile that has now been decommissioned. Thanks to a large glass prism in the front of the telescope, every object in the observed sky field - stars as well as galaxies - was imaged as a small spectrum, providing a first rough idea about its type and composition. The main aim of this "Hamburg/ESO survey" (with Dieter Reimers , Associate Director of the Hamburger Sternwarte, as Principal Investigator and Lutz Wisotzki , now at Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, Germany, as Project Scientist) was to find quasars (particularly active centres of galaxies), a task that was accomplished most successfully, cf. e.g., ESO PR 10/97 and ESO PR 08/00 (Report F). A very welcome by-product of this survey has been a rich harvest of very metal-poor stars . This part of the project is led by Norbert Christlieb , also from the Hamburg Observatory, and now on sabbatical leave at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics of the Australian National University (Canberra, Australia). Using fast computers and advanced pattern-recognition software to analyze the photographic exposures and thus to sift through millions of registered stellar spectra, about 8000 candidates for very metal-poor stars were found. These stars are now being scrutinized spectroscopically one-by-one with many medium-sized telescopes all over the world. Confirmed candidates are then observed with the largest telescopes in the world in order to obtain very detailed spectra (of high spectral resolution), which allow the astronomers to determine their chemical composition accurately. The very metal-deficient star HE 0107-5240 ESO PR Photo 25a/02 ESO PR Photo 25a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 458 pix - 86k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 915

  11. STS-103 crew is greeted after exiting the Crew Hatch Access Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As he exits the Crew Hatch Access Vehicle, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. is greeted with a handshake by Joseph Rothenberg, associate administrator, Office of Space Flight. Descending the stairs behind Brown are (left to right) Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Pilot Scott J. Kelly. At right, applauding the astronauts return are Earle Huckins, deputy associate administrator, Office of Space Science, and Roy Bridges, director, Kennedy Space Center. Others in the crew (not shown) are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who are with the European Space Agency. The crew of seven completed a successful eight-day mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, spending the Christmas holiday in space in order to accomplish their mission before the end of 1999. During the mission, Discovery's four space-walking astronauts, Smith, Foale, Grunsfeld and Nicollier, spent 24 hours and 33 minutes upgrading and refurbishing Hubble, making it more capable than ever to renew its observations of the universe. Mission objectives included replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Hubble was released from the end of Discovery's robot arm on Christmas Day. Main gear touchdown was at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown occurred at 7:00:58 EST and wheel stop at 7:01:34 EST. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery. The landing was the 20th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 13th night landing in Shuttle program history.

  12. Stephen Hales: the contributions of an Enlightenment physiologist to the study of the kidney in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2016-02-01

    Stephen Hales (1677-1761) was an English clergyman who made major contributions to a wide range of scientific topics such as botany, chemistry, pneumatics, and physiology. Early in his career he developed a keen interest in medicine through his association with his younger physician friend at Cambridge, William Stukeley (1687-1765), with whom he dissected animals and attended experiments in the laboratory of Isaac Newton. His fame as a scientist grew and by the end of his life he had achieved an international reputation as a major scientist of the Enlightenment. He is best known for his 1733 Statical Essays, in the second part of which he describes his studies in animal physiology. Most famous amongst those are his assessments of the force of the blood, which he measured in horses and dogs. Less well known and often unrecognized are his studies on the kidney in health and disease, which are the focus of this review. Amongst others Hales described the effects of hemorrhagic shock which he observed as he bled his animals while measuring their blood pressure; he then studied the effect of increasing saline perfusion pressures on the renal secretion of urine; and delved into biochemistry in exploring the composition of and solutions to dissolve bladder stones. His 1733 statement in the introduction to his hemodynamic studies that the healthy State of the Animal principally consists, in the maintaining of a due Equilibrium between the body solids and fluids literally predicts the milieu intrieur that would ultimately be formulated in 1854 by Claude Bernard (1813-1878).

  13. ICAP 2010 COMMITTEES ICAP 2010 Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Co-Chairs Peter Hannaford, Hans Bachor Program Committee Hans BachorAustralia Sergei BagayevRussia Vanderlei BagnatoBrazil Rainer BlattAustria Nir DavidsonIsrael Gordon DrakeCanada Wolfgang ErtmerGermany Phillip GouldUSA Peter HannafordAustralia Ed HindsUK Massimo InguscioItaly Wonho JheKorea Hidetoshi KatoriJapan Daniel KleppnerUSA Michéle LeducFrance Maciej LewensteinSpain Margaret MurnaneUSA Eugene PolzikDenmark Gerhard RempeGermany Monika Ritsch-MarteAustria Sando StringariItaly Vladan VuleticUSA Xinye XuChina Local Organising Committee Hans BachorAustralian National University, Canberra Ken BaldwinAustralian National University, Canberra Peter DrummondSwinburne University of Technology, Melbourne Peter HannafordSwinburne University of Technology, Melbourne Andre LuitenUniversity of Western Australia, Perth Russell McLeanSwinburne University of Technology, Melbourne Halina Rubinsztein-DunlopUniversity of Queensland, Brisbane Robert SangGriffith University, Brisbane Robert ScholtenUniversity of Melbourne Andrew WilsonUniversity of Otago, New Zealand International Advisory Committee Ennio ArimondoItaly Vanderlei BagnatoBrazil Victor BalykinRussia Rainer BlattAustria Claude Cohen-TannoudjiFrance Robin CôtéUSA Gordon DrakeCanada Norval FortsonUSA Theodore HänschGermany Serge HarocheFrance Ed HindsUK Massimo InguscioItaly Wolfgang KetterleUSA Daniel KleppnerUSA Bill PhillipsUSA Lev PitaevskiiRussia David PritchardUSA Fujio ShimizuJapan Winthrop SmithUSA Jook WalravenThe Netherlands David WinelandUSA Tsutomu YabuzakiJapan

  14. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Perspective and status

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A.; Hillis, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the thermal gradient between the warm surface waters and the deep cold waters of tropical oceans was first proposed by J. A. d'Arsonval in 1881 and tried unsuccessfully be George Claude in 1930. Interest in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) and other renewable energy sources revived in the 1970s as a result of oil embargoes. At that time, the emphasis was on large floating plants miles from shore producing 250--400 MW for maintained grids. When the problems of such plants became better understood and the price of oil reversed its upward trend, the emphasis shifted to smaller (10 MW) shore-based plants on tropical islands. Such plants would be especially attractive if they produce fresh water as a by-product. During the past 15 years, major progress has been made in converting OTEC unknowns into knowns. Mini-OTEC proved the closed-cycle concept. Cost-effective heat-exchanger concepts were identified. An effective biofouling control technique was discovered. Aluminum was determined to be promising for OTEC heat exchangers. Heat-transfer augmentation techniques were identified, which promised a reduction on heat-exchanger size and cost. Fresh water was produced by an OTEC open-cycle flash evaporator, using the heat energy in the seawater itself. The current R D emphasis is on the design and construction of a test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the open-cycle process. The 10 MW shore-based, closed-cycle plant can be built with today's technology; with the incorporation of a flash evaporator, it will produce fresh water as well as electrical power -- both valuable commodities on many tropical islands. The open-cycle process has unknowns that require solution before the technical feasibility can be demonstrated. The economic viability of either cycle depends on reducing the capital costs of OTEC plants and on future trends in the costs of conventional energy sources. 7 refs.

  15. STS-103 crew take part in CEIT in OPF 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members check out equipment to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. They are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC. From left are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Steven L. Smith. Other crew members at KSC for the CEIT are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a 'call-up' due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review.

  16. [From Nebuchadnezzar to the randomized controlled trial--milestones in the development of clinical research].

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Lysy, Joseph; Gropp, Cornelius

    2011-08-01

    The first clinical experiment is described in the bible: The prophet Daniel is reported being nourished during ten days by seeds and water only, in order to check if his physical state would deteriorate as a result of this minimal nutrition. In the 15th century, French surgeon Ambroise Parí experimented with a mixture of turpentine, egg protein and rose oil to treat combat wounds, which is thought to be the first clinical study to be reported. In the 19th century British scientist James Lind designed the first controlled prospective study with parallel groups, proving that ingesting citrus fruit prevents scurvy. A short time afterwards British scientist John Haygarth was the first to use a placebo drug in a clinical study. Important work on placebo was conducted by the American scientists Austin Flint and later by Henry K. Beecher, who showed that placebo itself has biological properties. The importance of comparative studies was first understood by French psychologist CLaude Bernard. He is considered the founder of the modern scientific method based on observation, analysis of data and examination of hypotheses. Bernard's work was based on the work of fellow Frenchman Pierre Charles Alexandre Louis, who is justly considered a founding father of modern epidemiology, and who was the first to use statistics in clinical experiments. Random distributions in clinical studies were reported even before this time, for instance in the work of the Flemish physician Johannes Baptista van Helmont. Danish Nobel prize winner Johannes Fibiger pioneered the use of selection bias in his work with diphtheria serum. PMID:21939122

  17. A multi-disciplinary approach to the origins of music: perspectives from anthropology, archaeology, cognition and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Morley, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological evidence for musical activities pre-dates even the earliest-known cave art and it remains the case that no human culture has yet been encountered that does not practise some recognisably musical activity. Yet the human abilities to make and appreciate music have been described as "amongst the most mysterious with which [we are] endowed" (Charles Darwin, 1872) and music itself as "the supreme mystery of the science of man" (Claude Levi-Strauss, 1970). Like language, music has been the subject of keen investigation across a great diversity of fields, from neuroscience and psychology, to ethnography, to studies of its structures in its own dedicated field, musicology; unlike the evolution of human language abilities, it is only recently that the origins of musical capacities have begun to receive dedicated attention. It is increasingly clear that human musical abilities are fundamentally related to other important human abilities, yet much remains mysterious about this ubiquitous human phenomenon, not least its prehistoric origins. It is evident that no single field of investigation can address the wide range of issues relevant to answering the question of music's origins. This review brings together evidence from a wide range of anthropological and human sciences, including palaeoanthropology, archaeology, neuroscience, primatology and developmental psychology, in an attempt to elucidate the nature of the foundations of music, how they have evolved, and how they are related to capabilities underlying other important human behaviours. It is proposed that at their most fundamental level musical behaviours (including both vocalisation and dance) are forms of deliberate metrically-organised gesture, and constitute a specialised use of systems dedicated to the expression and comprehension of social and emotional information between individuals. The abilities underlying these behaviours are selectively advantageous themselves; in addition, various mechanisms

  18. HIV type 1 diversity in northern Paris, France.

    PubMed

    Simon, F; Loussert-Ajaka, I; Damond, F; Saragosti, S; Barin, F; Brun-Vézinet, F

    1996-10-10

    During a 6-month period, we studied the diversity of HIV-1 subtypes in 392 adult patients seen in Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, northern Paris, France. All the samples were serotyped and a subset was genotyped by means of HMA. Serotyping was performed with a new peptide subtype-specific EIA (SSEIA), based on in vitro competition for antibody binding between the representative V3 peptides of the different clades (A to E). HMA with plasmids from clades A to H gave unambiguous results on 105 of the 116 samples tested. The agreement between SSEIA and HMA was 36/41 for subtype B, 2/2 for subtype D, and 4/5 for subtype E. We found a discrepancy in the results between clade A and C: the patients with sera reacting to peptide C were confirmed by HMA as being infected by clade A strains. Three patients reactive with peptide A were infected by a subtype F. These results indicate that peptide cross-reactivity, even in the SSEIA format, hinders serotyping. In 11 samples, all from African patients, the subtype remained indeterminate because PCR or HMA failed. Caucasian patients (n = 223) were mainly infected by subtype B. HMA and/or SSEIA revealed non-subtype B infection in 14 Caucasians, who were infected by the sexual route overseas or in France. Patients originating from other countries (mainly in Africa) exhibited a broad strain diversity, with most of the different subtypes so far described being represented. This study confirms the frequency of subtype B strains in Caucasians living in France, but emphasizes the emergence of the different HIV-1 subtypes in Paris, together with the extent of strain trafficking. Discordances between serotype and genotype assays confirm that both tests require additional development.

  19. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied mostly on data from the (e, e' p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for 40Ca as compared to local ones but change the l-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e' p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly described, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum protons obtained at Jefferson Lab. The nonlocal DOM allows a complete description of experimental data both above (up to 200 MeV) and below the Fermi energy in 40Ca. It is further demonstrated that elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering data constrain the spectral strength in the continuum of orbits that are nominally bound in the independent-particle model. Extension of this analysis to 48Ca allows a prediction of the neutron skin of this nucleus that is larger than most predictions made so far.

  20. STS-103 crew practice emergency egress in the slidewire basket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the slidewire basket on Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) gets ready to pull the lever, which will release the basket. With Foale are fellow crew members Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). The baskets are part of the emergency egress system for persons in the Shuttle vehicle or on the Rotating Service Structure. Seven slidewires extend from the orbiter access arm, with a netted, flatbottom basket suspended from each wire. The STS-103 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities in preparation for launch. The other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  1. STS-103 crew practice emergency egress in the slidewire basket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the slidewire basket on Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith reaches for the lever that will release the basket. With Smith is fellow crew member Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. The baskets are part of the emergency egress system for persons in the Shuttle vehicle or on the Rotating Service Structure. Seven slidewires extend from the orbiter access arm, with a netted, flatbottom basket suspended from each wire. The STS-103 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities in preparation for launch. The other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland. Clervoy and Nicollier are with the European Space Agency. The TCDT provides the crew with the emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  2. Calcium regulation of mitochondrial carriers.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Araceli; Contreras, Laura; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial function is regulated by calcium. In addition to the long known effects of matrix Ca(2+), regulation of metabolite transport by extramitochondrial Ca(2+) represents an alternative Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism to regulate mitochondrial function. The Ca(2+) regulated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs) are well suited for that role, as they contain long N-terminal extensions harboring EF-hand Ca(2+) binding domains facing the intermembrane space. They fall in two groups, the aspartate/glutamate exchangers, AGCs, major components of the NADH malate aspartate shuttle (MAS) and urea cycle, and the ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi exchangers or short CaMCs (APCs or SCaMCs). The AGCs are activated by relatively low Ca(2+) levels only slightly higher than resting Ca(2+), whereas all SCaMCs studied so far require strong Ca(2+) signals, above micromolar, for activation. In addition, AGCs are not strictly Ca(2+) dependent, being active even in Ca(2+)-free conditions. Thus, AGCs are well suited to respond to small Ca(2+) signals and that do not reach mitochondria. In contrast, ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi carriers are inactive in Ca(2+) free conditions and activation requires Ca(2+) signals that will also activate the calcium uniporter (MCU). By changing the net content of adenine nucleotides of the matrix upon activation, SCaMCs regulate the activity of the permeability transition pore, and the Ca(2+) retention capacity of mitochondria (CRC), two functions synergizing with those of the MCU. The different Ca(2+) activation properties of the two CaMCs are discussed in relation to their newly obtained structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27033520

  3. [By way of a synthesis of its conceptual evolution towards scientific medicine].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, A

    1999-01-01

    A historic outline of the evolution of medical thought toward scientific medicine is presented. Galen from Pergamon, one of science's first philosophers, wrote an Institutio logica, which can be considered as an introduction to the scientific method. Later, the Nominalists of the XIV century, precursors of modern science, thought that science's object was not the general, vague and indeterminate, but the particular, which is real and can be known directly. About the middle of the XVII Century the bases of the modern science became established thanks to a revolution formented essentially by Galileo, Bacon and Descartes. During the XVIII Century, parallel to the development of the great current of English Empiricism, a movement of scientific renewal also arose in continental Europe following the discipline of the Dutch Physicians and of Boerhaave. In the last century, Claude Bernard dominated scientific medicine, but his rigorous determinism impeded him from taking into account the immense and unforeseeable field of the random. Nowadays, we approach natural science and medicine from particular groups of facts, that is, from the responses of Nature to specific questions, but not from general laws. Furthermore, in recent epistemology, the concept that experimental data are not pure facts, but rather, facts interpreted within a hermeneutical context has been established. Finally, a general tendency to retrieve philosophical questions concerning the understanding of essence and existence can frequently be seen in scientific inquiry. In the light of the evolution of medical thought, it is possible to establish the position of scientific medicine within the movement of ideas dominating in our time.

  4. Abstracts and reviews.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, G H; Wollman, L; Woltmann, A G

    1966-09-01

    Abstract Eric Berne, M.D.: Games People Play. Grove Press, New York, 1964. 192 pages. Price $5.00. Reviewed by Hugo G. Beigel Finkle, Alex M., Ph.D., M.D. and Prian, Dimitry F. Sexual Potency in Elderly Men before and after Prostatectomy. J.A.M.A., 196: 2, April, 1966. Reviewed by H. George Liebman Calvin C. Hernton: Sex and Racism In America. Grove Press, Inc. Black Cat Edition No. 113 (Paperback), 1966, 180 pp. Price $.95. Reviewed by Gus Woltmann Hans Lehfeldt, M.D., Ernest W. Kulka, M.D., H. George Liebman, M.D.: Comparative Study of Uterine Contraceptive Devices. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 26: 5, 1965, pp. 679-688. Lawrence Lipton. The Erotic Revolution. Sherbourne Press, Los Angeles, 1965. 322 pp., Price $7.50. Masters, William H., M.D. and Johnson, Virginia E. Human Sexual Response. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1966. 366 pages. Price $.10.00. Reviewed by Hans Lehfeldt Douglas P. Murphy, M.D. and Editha F. Torrano, M.D. Male Fertility in 3620 Childless Couples. Fertility and Sterility, 16: 3, May-June, 1965. Reviewed by Leo Wollman, M.D. Edwin M. Schur, Editor: The Family and the Sexual Revolution, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 1964. 427 pgs. Weldon, Virginia F., M.D., Blizzard, Robert M., M.D., and Migeon, Claude, M.D. Newborn Girls Misdiagnosed as Bilaterally Chryptorchid Males. The New England Journal of Medicine, April 14, 1966. Reviewed by H. George Liebman.

  5. Glutamine transporters in mammalian cells and their functions in physiology and cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-10-01

    The SLC (solute carrier)-type transporters (~400 in number) in mammalian cells consist of 52 distinct gene families, grouped solely based on the amino acid sequence (primary structure) of the transporter proteins and not on their transport function. Among them are the transporters for amino acids. Fourteen of them, capable of transporting glutamine across the plasma membrane, are found in four families: SLC1, SLC6, SLC7, and SLC38. However, it is generally thought that the members of the SLC38 family are the principal transporters for glutamine. Some of the glutamine transporters are obligatory exchangers whereas some function as active transporters in one direction. While most glutamine transporters mediate the influx of the amino acid into cells, some actually mediate the efflux of the amino acid out of the cells. Glutamine transporters play important roles in a variety of tissues, including the liver, brain, kidney, and placenta, as clearly evident from the biological and biochemical phenotypes resulting from the deletion of specific glutamine transporters in mice. Owing to the obligatory role of glutamine in growth and proliferation of tumor cells, there is increasing attention on glutamine transporters in cancer biology as potential drug targets for cancer treatment. Selective blockers of certain glutamine transporters might be effective in preventing the entry of glutamine and other important amino acids into tumor cells, thus essentially starving these cells to death. This could represent the beginning of a new era in the discovery of novel anticancer drugs with a previously unexplored mode of action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  6. [Alternatives to animal experimentation v.s. animal rights terrorism].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Tsutomu Miki

    2008-05-01

    Systematic modern animal experimentation was established by Bernard Claude who wrote "An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine" in 1865. At this point, the public was already asking that the pain and distress of experimental animals be reduced. For this, scientists, William Russell and Rex Burch in 1959 proposed the principles of alternatives to animal experimentation, the "3Rs". Since that time, animal welfare advocates have promoted the 3Rs concept in biomedical research communities. However, cruel animal experiments have continued and there are reports of radical extremists showing their opposition by invasion, arson, theft and even bombing of institutions involved, resulting in killing of the animals. SHAC, one extremist group believed to be animal welfare activitists was recognized as a terrorist group after the 9.11 tragedy in USA and the government viewed their activities very seriously. In 2001, British animal extremists invaded Japanese universities and stole laboratory resources; one individual was arrested and sentenced to prison for three years; Japanese who assisted in the incident were arrested and one was sentenced for one year. In 2006, SHAC USA members were prosecuted and sentenced for up to 6 years for their terrorism activities including arson. We need to consider the background of these activities which are financially supported by animal welfare advocates. The way we, as scientists who conduct such experiments can respond is by promoting alternatives to this experimentation. In Japan, the animal welfare law was revised in 2005 stressing the importance of 3Rs in scientific activities with animals. The promotion of 3Rs should be strengthened in the pharmaceutical community.

  7. [Homage to Doctor Theodore Vetter (1916-2004). President of the French Society of the History of Medicine from 1976 to 1978].

    PubMed

    Le Minor, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Théodore Vetter (Strasbourg, 1916, June 19th - 2004, July 8th) was qualified as a medical doctor in medicine in 1948 in Strasbourg, and then followed complementary courses in medical biology in Paris. He realized most of his career as an adviser for medical research in pharmaceutical industry. He presented an early talent for drawing and graphic arts, encouraged by Georges Ritleng (1875-1972), headmaster of the School of decorative arts in Strasbourg. One expression of the artistic gift of Th. Vetter consisted in design and making of ex-libris, field in which he acquired an international reputation. In total, he realized about two hundred ex-libris, mostly for physicians. Also attracted by the history of medicine, he became a member of the Société Française d'Histoire de la Médecine; he was general secretary from 1965 to 1970, then he became vice-president and president from 1976 to 1978. He was the author of about a hundred works concerning the history of medicine; all were characterized by a great rigour and by the direct use of original sources. Among his main works, his studies on the oculist Jacques Daviel (1693-1762), popularizer of the surgery of cataract, on the surgeon Claude Nicolas Le Cat (1700-1768), on the birth of pathology, a commented edition of the complete works of Hippocrates, translated by M.P.E. Littré (1801-1881), and numerous papers on the history of medicine in Strasbourg and Alsace.

  8. Stephen Hales: the contributions of an Enlightenment physiologist to the study of the kidney in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2016-02-01

    Stephen Hales (1677-1761) was an English clergyman who made major contributions to a wide range of scientific topics such as botany, chemistry, pneumatics, and physiology. Early in his career he developed a keen interest in medicine through his association with his younger physician friend at Cambridge, William Stukeley (1687-1765), with whom he dissected animals and attended experiments in the laboratory of Isaac Newton. His fame as a scientist grew and by the end of his life he had achieved an international reputation as a major scientist of the Enlightenment. He is best known for his 1733 Statical Essays, in the second part of which he describes his studies in animal physiology. Most famous amongst those are his assessments of the force of the blood, which he measured in horses and dogs. Less well known and often unrecognized are his studies on the kidney in health and disease, which are the focus of this review. Amongst others Hales described the effects of hemorrhagic shock which he observed as he bled his animals while measuring their blood pressure; he then studied the effect of increasing saline perfusion pressures on the renal secretion of urine; and delved into biochemistry in exploring the composition of and solutions to dissolve bladder stones. His 1733 statement in the introduction to his hemodynamic studies that the healthy State of the Animal principally consists, in the maintaining of a due Equilibrium between the body solids and fluids literally predicts the milieu intrieur that would ultimately be formulated in 1854 by Claude Bernard (1813-1878). PMID:26913873

  9. STS-103 crew pose in front of Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TDCT) activities at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew pose in front of the flame trench, which is situated underneath the Mobile Launcher Platform holding Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with ESA, and Steven L. Smith. One of the solid rocket boosters and the external tank that are attached to Discovery can be seen in the photo. The flame trench is made of concrete and refractory brick, and contains an orbiter flame deflector on one side and solid rocket booster flame deflector on the other. The deflectors protect the flame trench floor and pad surface from the intense heat of launch. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  10. Vitalism and the resistance to experimentation on life in the eighteenth century.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Charles T

    2013-01-01

    There is a familiar opposition between a 'Scientific Revolution' ethos and practice of experimentation, including experimentation on life, and a 'vitalist' reaction to this outlook. The former is often allied with different forms of mechanism - if all of Nature obeys mechanical laws, including living bodies, 'iatromechanism' should encounter no obstructions in investigating the particularities of animal-machines - or with more chimiatric theories of life and matter, as in the 'Oxford Physiologists'. The latter reaction also comes in different, perhaps irreducibly heterogeneous forms, ranging from metaphysical and ethical objections to the destruction of life, as in Margaret Cavendish, to more epistemological objections against the usage of instruments, the 'anatomical' outlook and experimentation, e.g. in Locke and Sydenham. But I will mainly focus on a third anti-interventionist argument, which I call 'vitalist' since it is often articulated in the writings of the so-called Montpellier Vitalists, including their medical articles for the Encyclopédie. The vitalist argument against experimentation on life is subtly different from the metaphysical, ethical and epistemological arguments, although at times it may borrow from any of them. It expresses a Hippocratic sensibility - understood as an artifact of early modernity, not as some atemporal trait of medical thought - in which Life resists the experimenter, or conversely, for the experimenter to grasp something about Life, it will have to be without torturing or radically intervening in it. I suggest that this view does not have to imply that Nature is something mysterious or sacred; nor does the vitalist have to attack experimentation on life in the name of some 'vital force' - which makes it less surprising to find a vivisectionist like Claude Bernard sounding so close to the vitalists.

  11. Anatomist and the pioneer of radiology Étienne Destot--95th anniversary of his death.

    PubMed

    Báča, Václav; Kachlík, David; Báčová, Tereza; Bartoška, Radek; Marvan, Jiří; Douša, Pavel; Secrest, Thomas; Džupa, Valér

    2014-04-01

    Destot was a leading pioneer in radiology, a pupil of Ollier, an anatomist, and researcher who followed in the experimental medicine tradition of Claude Bérnard. This work is an extensive, in depth, look at the life and work of Étienne Destot. On February 5, 1896, he began performing X-ray examinations, less than two months after Roentgen's discovery! His pioneering work described a space bordered by the hamate, capitate, triquetrum, and lunate; this space is now known as Destot's space. Tanton stated that Destot was the first to reveal the mechanism of fractures of the posterior margin of the distal tibia and to emphasize their clinical relevance; in honor of this contribution, Tanton named such a fracture the “fracture of Destot.” Moreover, Destot is credited with being the first physician to use the term “pilon” in the orthopedic literature. He first described fractures of the scaphoid in 1905. He also described superficial hematomas, Destot's sign, located above the inguinal ligament or in the scrotum or thigh. Such hematomas are indicative of pelvic fractures. Destot is credited with inventing or improving many pieces of medical equipment (e.g., Lambotte's screw plates, anastomotic boutons for the digestive tube, monopolar endocavital radiological tubes). He was also active in developing technical aspects of equipment (e.g., radioscopic examination of the heart, a prototype of the mobile radiological laboratory). Étienne Destot is best known as a radiologist; however, his influence extends well beyond this field. He was an anatomist and surgeon, the founder of radiology in Lyon, prosector, physician, electrician, researcher, and artist.

  12. French roots of French neo-lamarckisms, 1879-1985.

    PubMed

    Loison, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    This essay attempts to describe the neo-Lamarckian atmosphere that was dominant in French biology for more than a century. Firstly, we demonstrate that there were not one but at least two French neo-Lamarckian traditions. This implies, therefore, that it is possible to propose a clear definition of a (neo)Lamarckian conception, and by using it, to distinguish these two traditions. We will see that these two conceptions were not dominant at the same time. The first French neo-Lamarckism (1879-1931) was structured by a very mechanic view of natural processes. The main representatives of this first period were scientists such as Alfred Giard (1846-1908), Gaston Bonnier (1853-1922) and Félix Le Dantec (1869-1917). The second Lamarckism - much more vitalist in its inspiration - started to develop under the supervision of people such as Albert Vandel (1894-1980) and Pierre-Paul Grassé (1895-1985). Secondly, this essay suggests that the philosophical inclinations of these neo-Lamarckisms reactivated a very ancient and strong dichotomy of French thought. One part of this dichotomy is a material, physicalist tradition, which started with René Descartes but developed extensively during the 18th and 19th centuries. The other is a spiritual and vitalist reaction to the first one, which also had a very long history, though it is most closely associated with the work of Henri Bergson. Through Claude Bernard, the first neo-Lamarckians tried to construct a mechanical and determinist form of evolutionary theory which was, in effect, a Cartesian theory. The second wave of neo-Lamarckians wanted to reconsider the autonomy and reactivity of life forms, in contrast to purely physical systems.

  13. RU-486: a continuing saga.

    PubMed

    1988-12-01

    A month after the approved marketing of RU-486 in France as a nonsurgical option for abortion, the company Roussel-Ulcaf withdrew the product in response to boycott threats and threats to company officials and their families. The government of France approved the drug on an experimental basis under the name of Mifepristone; the conditions of the approval were that the drug had to be used within the 1st 49 days after the 1st day of last menstruation and had to be administered under medical supervision at a hospital with the expertise to perform an abortion. Following trials in France, China, and the United Kingdom, RU-486, when administered in a single dose of 3 pills, was observed to have a 95% success and to be very safe. The international boycott and personal threats propelled a convention of more than 1,000 physicians in the World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Rio de Janeiro to sign a petition that advocated to Roussel-Uclaf the importance of insuring "that women have access to the benefits of scientific progress." The World Health Organization regretted the withdrawal of the drug as 1 off-shoot of the decision would be that developing companies would not be able to run clinical trials on RU-486. Shortly after the company's decision to remove the drug, the French Minister of Health, Claude Evin, ordered a continuation of experimental trials of RU-486. While no US companies have demonstrated interest in the drug, boycotts and threats exacerbate product liability coverage problems. However, should it prove effective in treating breast cancer, endometriosis or ectopic pregnancy, RU-486 may begin to increase in distribution and use. PMID:12342356

  14. [Hypospadia and infertility of Henry II of France (1519-1559)].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Al-Shajlawi, S; Sohn, M

    2014-03-01

    Henry II (1519-1559) of France was the second son of Francis I (1494-1547) and Claude de France (1498-1524) born in 1519 in St. Germain-en-Laye. After his older brother's and his father's death in 1547, he was anointed the French king in Reims. In 1533 already, as a 14-year-old boy, for reasons of state, he was married to the same aged Catherine de Medici (1519-1589), as her uncle was Pope Clement VII (1478-1534). The marriage remained childless for 11 years since Henry, due to a distinct hypospadia and a completely sexually inexperienced wife was unable to conceive children with her. His existing liaison to Diane de Poitiers (1499-1566) - a 19-year-older maid of honor of his father Francis I from 1537 until his death - influenced his sexual life immensely.The blame for the childless marriage was placed primarily on his wife, as Henry had become father of an illegitimate daughter with a mistress. Catherine then underwent all possible medical and alchemical procedures to finally give birth to the hoped Dauphin. Ironically, her rival for the favor of her husband, Diane de Poitiers was one of her greatest allies. She made clear that the cause lay with Henry and not with his wife. This was confirmed by the added solid physician Jean Fernel (1497-1558). His treatment of Henry and the simultaneous training of the unexperienced Catherine by Diane de Poitiers led to success.The result was the birth of Francis II (1544-1560) in 1544, the first of 10 children in 12 years. Thus, the dynasty was saved. After the death of Henry in a tragic tournament accident in 1559, three of his sons became kings of France. But the line of Valois remained without further descendants and was continued by Henry IV, the first Bourbon king in 1589. PMID:24585117

  15. [From Nebuchadnezzar to the randomized controlled trial--milestones in the development of clinical research].

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Lysy, Joseph; Gropp, Cornelius

    2011-08-01

    The first clinical experiment is described in the bible: The prophet Daniel is reported being nourished during ten days by seeds and water only, in order to check if his physical state would deteriorate as a result of this minimal nutrition. In the 15th century, French surgeon Ambroise Parí experimented with a mixture of turpentine, egg protein and rose oil to treat combat wounds, which is thought to be the first clinical study to be reported. In the 19th century British scientist James Lind designed the first controlled prospective study with parallel groups, proving that ingesting citrus fruit prevents scurvy. A short time afterwards British scientist John Haygarth was the first to use a placebo drug in a clinical study. Important work on placebo was conducted by the American scientists Austin Flint and later by Henry K. Beecher, who showed that placebo itself has biological properties. The importance of comparative studies was first understood by French psychologist CLaude Bernard. He is considered the founder of the modern scientific method based on observation, analysis of data and examination of hypotheses. Bernard's work was based on the work of fellow Frenchman Pierre Charles Alexandre Louis, who is justly considered a founding father of modern epidemiology, and who was the first to use statistics in clinical experiments. Random distributions in clinical studies were reported even before this time, for instance in the work of the Flemish physician Johannes Baptista van Helmont. Danish Nobel prize winner Johannes Fibiger pioneered the use of selection bias in his work with diphtheria serum.

  16. What do we do, if some of the MICE magnets can't be kept cold using the two-stage coolers?

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2011-01-26

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have not been encouraging in terms of keeping the magnets cold using three 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) coolers. The spectrometer solenoids are being rebuilt with additional cooling capacity at 4.2 K. It is hoped that there will be sufficient 4.2 K cooling to keep the magnets cold. The spectrometer solenoids can be kept cold using liquid helium (up to a boil-off of 20 liters per day). This option does not apply for the other magnets in the MICE cooling channel, because there is not enough liquid helium storage within the magnet cold mass. It is important that the MICE collaboration ask the question, “How do we keep the MICE cooling channel magnets cold, if there isn’t sufficient cooling from the 4.2 K coolers?” This report discusses the cooling requirements at both 40 K and 4.2 K for all three types of MICE cooling channel magnets. This report discusses the steps that must be taken in the magnet fabrication to permit the magnets to be cooled using a small (20 to 40 W) external 4.2 K Claude cycle refrigerator. One must also ask the question as to whether there is enough excess capacity in the decay solenoid refrigerator to cool some of the MICE magnets. A plan for cooling the magnets using a Linde 1400 series refrigerator is presented. A plan for increasing the 4.4 K refrigeration from the existing decay solenoid refrigerator is also presented.

  17. Birth of modern psychiatry and the death of alienism: the legacy of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Moulin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    At the time of Jean-Martin Charcot, Paris--the main center for studies on the nervous system and its disorders--was home to critical exchanges between the developing discipline of neurology and psychiatry. Contrary to the commonly held view, and in spite of an established tradition concerning mental diseases, emerging neurology had a much stronger influence on psychiatry ('alienism') than the reverse. This was largely due to the school built up by Jean-Martin Charcot himself, which was organized around the study and management of hysteria. Although Charcot always claimed to be uninterested in mental medicine, he stimulated the development of an original scientific approach to nervous system conditions, based on Claude Bernard's method, along with structured academic teaching. Conversely, alienism paradoxically remained stuck in organicism, after Antoine Bayle's report in 1822 of 'arachnitis' as the substratum of general paresis of the insane. Contrary to alienism, the young neurological school was capable of self-criticism, and progressively highlighted mental factors in hysteria. This led to the paradox that neurologists were active in a disease with no organic cerebral lesion, while alienists were postulating brain lesions in all mental disorders. Pushed by Charcot, the academic evolution led to the launch of a faculty chair of mental and brain diseases in 1875, which was taken over for nearly half a century by his direct pupils Benjamin Ball, Alix Joffroy and Gilbert Ballet, who held the position until 1916, supporting the development of modern psychiatry in general hospitals, while alienism progressively disappeared at the turn of the century.

  18. An evolution in student-centered teaching.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Barbara E

    2016-09-01

    The American Physiological Society (APS) Teaching Section annually honors an educator through its Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture at the Experimental Biology meeting. Since I knew about my selection for almost a year, I had a long time to think about what I wanted to say and how I wanted to say it. The theme of my presentation was "nothing in education makes sense except in the light of student learning." My presentation began with a video of my "And, But, Therefore" description of my educational scholarship (see Randy Olson Great Challenges Day at TEDMED 2013, Ref. 10). "Physiology is the basic foundation of all the health professions AND physiology can be hard for students to figure out BUT many physiology courses expect students to memorize a large number of facts; THEREFORE, my scholarship is to help students learn physiology better for the long-term with various types of student-centered learning opportunities." To stress the goal of student-centered learning, my brief video was followed by a 2-min video of one of my students describing her experiences with student-centered learning in one of my two-semester Advanced Human Physiology classes. Since I have been convinced that Randy Olson is an expert on science communication (11), the rest of my presentation was the story about how I have evolved from a sage-on-the-stage lecturer into a student-centered learning facilitator. I have chosen Olson's "And, But, Therefore" approach to narrative for this written version of key aspects of the presentation. PMID:27445274

  19. STS-103 crew exit O&C Building to head for launch pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Wearing their launch suits, the STS-103 crew exit the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC, heading for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and more Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) actvities. In front (left to right) are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; in the second row are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA); in the third row are C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, also with ESA; and at the rear is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  20. STS-103 crew instructed about bunker equipment at Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside a bunker at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew are instructed about use of the equipment. From left (in their astronaut uniforms) are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Pilot Steven J. Kelly. Not shown in the photo is Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are both with the European Space Agency. As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  1. One of the origins of modernity and naturalism of French literature in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan-Kyu; Lee, Na-Mi

    2013-04-01

    Authors studied how Claude Bernard, the first founder of experimental medicine, contributed significantly to establishment of modernism and influenced European modern culture. Authors first studied his views on modernity, comparing with Descartes and Magendie, and on the similarity between "Experimental medicine" and the European literature in the 19th century. Bernard was not exclusively against vitalism, but the dogmatic misuse of vitalism. His objective thinking could be a useful model for the authors, who considered science to be an origin of modernity in literature of naturalism. Especially, Emile Zola was strongly influenced by Bernard's "An introduction to the study of Experimental medicine" and published "Experimental novel," a manifesto of naturalism. Although Bernard's experimental methodology and determinism deeply influenced modern European culture, the relationship between his Experimental medicine and modernism have not been fully investigated yet. His experimental medicine also needs to be discussed from the ecological viewpoints. His anthropo-centrism was unique since he emphasized any human theory could not surpass the principle of nature. Conventional anthropo-centrism claims that human beings are superior enough to own and govern the nature. And Bernard's the necessary determinism contains the ecological principle that all life forms and inanimate objects are organically related and intertwined to each other, irrespectively of their usefulness for the human beings. Although there were some ethical debates related to his medical experiments on living bodies of animal, his strict principle to perform experiments only after animal or human body died was worth considering as an effort to sustain ecological viewpoints. He was also unique in terms of being realistic and candid about his situation which was limited by the 19th century's scientific and medical development. In conclusion, the significance of convergence of literature and medical science

  2. The short history of gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Sródka, A

    2003-12-01

    In this paper research on the stomach and bowel physiology is presented in a historical perspective. The author tries to show how digestive processes were interpreted by the ancients and how they tried to adjust them to the dominating humoral theory of disease. It is pointed out that the breakthrough which created a new way of understanding of the function of the digestive system was made by Andreas Vesalius and his modern model of anatomy. The meaning of acceptance of chemical processes in digestion by iatrochemics representatives in XVII century is shown. Physiological research in XIX century, which decided about a rapid development of physiology, especially the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract, is discussed. Experiments were performed by all main representatives of this discipline: Claude Bernard, Jan Ewangelista Purkyne, Rudolph Heidenhain and especially Ivan Pavlov, who, thanks to the discoveries in the secretion physiology, explained basic functions of the central nervous system. The XX century was dominated by the research showing the important role of the endocrine system and biological agents in the regulation of secretion and motility of the digestive system. The following discoveries are discussed: Ernest Sterling (secretin), John Edkins (gastrin) and André Latarjet and Lester Dragstedt (acetylcholine). It is underlined that Polish scientists play an important role in the development of the gastroenterological science--among others, Walery Jaworski, who made a historical suggestion about the role of the spiral bacteria in etiopathogenesis of the peptic ulcer, Leon Popielski, who stated the stimulating influence of histamine on the stomach acid secretion, Julian Walawski, who discovered enterogastrons--hormones decreasing secretion. As a supplement, there is the list of achievements in the field of the physiology and pathology of the gastrointestinal tract awarded with Nobel Prize and the list of most important Polish papers in this field. PMID

  3. Multimedia Bootcamp: a health sciences library provides basic training to promote faculty technology integration

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Ellen C

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown a backlash against the enthusiastic promotion of technological solutions as replacements for traditional educational content delivery. Many institutions, including the University of Virginia, have committed staff and resources to supporting state-of-the-art, showpiece educational technology projects. However, the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library has taken the approach of helping Health Sciences faculty be more comfortable using technology in incremental ways for instruction and research presentations. In July 2004, to raise awareness of self-service multimedia resources for instructional and professional development needs, the Library conducted a "Multimedia Bootcamp" for nine Health Sciences faculty and fellows. Methods Case study. Results Program stewardship by a single Library faculty member contributed to the delivery of an integrated learning experience. The amount of time required to attend the sessions and complete homework was the maximum fellows had to devote to such pursuits. The benefit of introducing technology unfamiliar to most fellows allowed program instructors to start everyone at the same baseline while not appearing to pass judgment on the technology literacy skills of faculty. The combination of wrapping the program in the trappings of a fellowship and selecting fellows who could commit to a majority of scheduled sessions yielded strong commitment from participants as evidenced by high attendance and a 100% rate of assignment completion. Response rates to follow-up evaluation requests, as well as continued use of Media Studio resources and Library expertise for projects begun or conceived during Bootcamp, bode well for the long-term success of this program. Conclusion An incremental approach to integrating technology with current practices in instruction and presentation provided a supportive yet energizing environment for Health Sciences faculty. Keys to this program were its faculty focus, traditional

  4. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Perspective and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Anthony; Hillis, David L.

    The use of the thermal gradient between the warm surface waters and the deep cold waters of tropical oceans was first proposed by J. A. d'Arsonval in 1881 and tried unsuccessfully by George Claude in 1930. Interest in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) and other renewable energy sources revived in the 1970s as a result of oil embargoes. At that time, the emphasis was on large floating plants miles from shore producing 250 to 400 MW for maintained grids. When the problems of such plants became better understood and the price of oil reversed its upward trend, the emphasis shifted to smaller (10 MW) shore based plants on tropical islands. Such plants would be especially attractive if they produce fresh water as a by-product. During the past 15 years, major progress has been made in converting OTEC unknowns into knowns. Mini-OTEC proved the closed cycle concept. Cost effective heat exchanger concepts were identified. An effective biofouling control technique was discovered. Aluminum was determined to be promising for OTEC heat exchangers. Heat transfer augmentation techniques were identified, which promised a reduction on heat exchanger size and cost. Fresh water was produced by an OTEC open cycle flash evaporator, using the heat energy in the seawater itself. The current R and D emphasis is on the design and construction of a test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the open cycle process. The 10 MW shore-based, closed cycle plant can be built with today's technology; with the incorporation of a flash evaporator, it will produce fresh water as well as electrical power; both valuable commodities on many tropical islands. The open cycle process has unknowns that require solution before the technical feasibility can be demonstrated. The economic viability of either cycle depends on reducing the capital costs of OTEC plants and on future trends in the costs of conventional energy sources.

  5. [The Vitruvian Man: an anatomical drawing for proportions by Leonardo Da Vinci].

    PubMed

    Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to find out and to analyse the text by Vitruvius which inspired the famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci (circa 1490) kept in the Galleria dell'Accademia, in Venezia, Italy: the man inscribed in one circle and in one square. The book "de Architectura" by Vitruvius Marcus Pollio was printed several times since the Renaissance when both the roman architecture of antiquity and this text became very popular. From a French translation by Claude Perrault in 1864, it became easy to find a French translation with the original text in Latin (Paris, 2003, Les Belles Lettres, French text by Pierre Gros). The drawing by Leonardo da Vinci illustrates with great accuracy and fidelity the quotation of Vitruvius (with the exception of two of the 12 main relationships). The genius of Leonardo da Vinci was to keep only one trunk, head and neck for two pairs of limbs: scapular and pelvic; to make the circle tangent to the lower edge of the square; to adjust a few features of the quotation for the equilibrium of the whole figure; and of course to bring his incredible skill as a drawer (one of the best of his century). The drawing was made on a sheet of paper 344x245mm, in black ink which became dark brown with time; several lines complete the figure above and below; a short caption and a horizontal scale appear just under the drawing. The celebrity of the drawing, a symbol of the Renaissance, of the equilibrium of man and mankind, of the universality of the artists and intellectuals of the time (Humanism) made it iconic and it has been constantly reproduced and adapted especially for advertisement and logos, not only in the medical field.

  6. STS-103 crew learn about use of slideware basket at Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the slidewire area of Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew listen to use of the emergency egress equipment. From left are the trainer, with crew members Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Pilot Steven J. Kelly, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and (kneeling) Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. Clervoy and Nicollier are both with the European Space Agency. As a preparation for launch, the crew have been participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  7. The short history of gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Sródka, A

    2003-12-01

    In this paper research on the stomach and bowel physiology is presented in a historical perspective. The author tries to show how digestive processes were interpreted by the ancients and how they tried to adjust them to the dominating humoral theory of disease. It is pointed out that the breakthrough which created a new way of understanding of the function of the digestive system was made by Andreas Vesalius and his modern model of anatomy. The meaning of acceptance of chemical processes in digestion by iatrochemics representatives in XVII century is shown. Physiological research in XIX century, which decided about a rapid development of physiology, especially the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract, is discussed. Experiments were performed by all main representatives of this discipline: Claude Bernard, Jan Ewangelista Purkyne, Rudolph Heidenhain and especially Ivan Pavlov, who, thanks to the discoveries in the secretion physiology, explained basic functions of the central nervous system. The XX century was dominated by the research showing the important role of the endocrine system and biological agents in the regulation of secretion and motility of the digestive system. The following discoveries are discussed: Ernest Sterling (secretin), John Edkins (gastrin) and André Latarjet and Lester Dragstedt (acetylcholine). It is underlined that Polish scientists play an important role in the development of the gastroenterological science--among others, Walery Jaworski, who made a historical suggestion about the role of the spiral bacteria in etiopathogenesis of the peptic ulcer, Leon Popielski, who stated the stimulating influence of histamine on the stomach acid secretion, Julian Walawski, who discovered enterogastrons--hormones decreasing secretion. As a supplement, there is the list of achievements in the field of the physiology and pathology of the gastrointestinal tract awarded with Nobel Prize and the list of most important Polish papers in this field.

  8. Galileo and Music: A Family Affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, D.

    2011-06-01

    According to Viviani, Galileo's first biographer, the scientist was an excellent keyboard and lute player. In turn Vincenzo Galilei, father of the illustrious scientist, had been one of the most influential music theorist of his age and also a great composer and virtuoso of the lute. Galileo and his brother Michelangelo, born in 1575, inherited Vincenzo's duel skills, both in theory and practical music: Galileo's correspondences show indeed his competence in the music and in the lute playing; Michelagnolo, after being educated in part in Galileo's house in Padua, transferred to Germany in Munich, where he became a court lute player. Nevertheless, Galileo helped for the rest of his life not only his brother but also his nephews, as documented in dozen of family letters quite important to establish the central role of the music in Galileo's everyday life, a fact almost ignored by most modern biographers. The importance of music in Galileo's output and life has been first outlined by the historian of sciences Stillman Drake and by the musicologist Claude Palisca. After their studies starting in the 1960s there is a great belief that Vincenzo influenced his son Galileo, directing him towards experimentation. The aim of this paper, following the reconstruction of Galileo's soundscape proposed by Pierluigi Petrobelli, is to reexamine the surviving historical accounts on the musical passion and talent of Galileo and his family in the several houses where they performed music (in Florence, Padua, Munich, etc.) in particular on the lute, the instrument that was an important experimental tool for the scientist.

  9. The transport mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier.

    PubMed

    Kunji, Edmund R S; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; King, Martin S; Majd, Homa; Ashton, Valerie L; Cerson, Elizabeth; Springett, Roger; Kibalchenko, Mikhail; Tavoulari, Sotiria; Crichton, Paul G; Ruprecht, Jonathan J

    2016-10-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier imports ADP from the cytosol and exports ATP from the mitochondrial matrix, which are key transport steps for oxidative phosphorylation in eukaryotic organisms. The transport protein belongs to the mitochondrial carrier family, a large transporter family in the inner membrane of mitochondria. It is one of the best studied members of the family and serves as a paradigm for the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial carriers. Structurally, the carrier consists of three homologous domains, each composed of two transmembrane α-helices linked with a loop and short α-helix on the matrix side. The transporter cycles between a cytoplasmic and matrix state in which a central substrate binding site is alternately accessible to these compartments for binding of ADP or ATP. On both the cytoplasmic and matrix side of the carrier are networks consisting of three salt bridges each. In the cytoplasmic state, the matrix salt bridge network is formed and the cytoplasmic network is disrupted, opening the central substrate binding site to the intermembrane space and cytosol, whereas the converse occurs in the matrix state. In the transport cycle, tighter substrate binding in the intermediate states allows the interconversion of conformations by lowering the energy barrier for disruption and formation of these networks, opening and closing the carrier to either side of the membrane in an alternating way. Conversion between cytoplasmic and matrix states might require the simultaneous rotation of three domains around a central translocation pathway, constituting a unique mechanism among transport proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  10. An evolution in student-centered teaching.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Barbara E

    2016-09-01

    The American Physiological Society (APS) Teaching Section annually honors an educator through its Claude Bernard Distinguished Lecture at the Experimental Biology meeting. Since I knew about my selection for almost a year, I had a long time to think about what I wanted to say and how I wanted to say it. The theme of my presentation was "nothing in education makes sense except in the light of student learning." My presentation began with a video of my "And, But, Therefore" description of my educational scholarship (see Randy Olson Great Challenges Day at TEDMED 2013, Ref. 10). "Physiology is the basic foundation of all the health professions AND physiology can be hard for students to figure out BUT many physiology courses expect students to memorize a large number of facts; THEREFORE, my scholarship is to help students learn physiology better for the long-term with various types of student-centered learning opportunities." To stress the goal of student-centered learning, my brief video was followed by a 2-min video of one of my students describing her experiences with student-centered learning in one of my two-semester Advanced Human Physiology classes. Since I have been convinced that Randy Olson is an expert on science communication (11), the rest of my presentation was the story about how I have evolved from a sage-on-the-stage lecturer into a student-centered learning facilitator. I have chosen Olson's "And, But, Therefore" approach to narrative for this written version of key aspects of the presentation.

  11. Calcium regulation of mitochondrial carriers.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Araceli; Contreras, Laura; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial function is regulated by calcium. In addition to the long known effects of matrix Ca(2+), regulation of metabolite transport by extramitochondrial Ca(2+) represents an alternative Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism to regulate mitochondrial function. The Ca(2+) regulated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs) are well suited for that role, as they contain long N-terminal extensions harboring EF-hand Ca(2+) binding domains facing the intermembrane space. They fall in two groups, the aspartate/glutamate exchangers, AGCs, major components of the NADH malate aspartate shuttle (MAS) and urea cycle, and the ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi exchangers or short CaMCs (APCs or SCaMCs). The AGCs are activated by relatively low Ca(2+) levels only slightly higher than resting Ca(2+), whereas all SCaMCs studied so far require strong Ca(2+) signals, above micromolar, for activation. In addition, AGCs are not strictly Ca(2+) dependent, being active even in Ca(2+)-free conditions. Thus, AGCs are well suited to respond to small Ca(2+) signals and that do not reach mitochondria. In contrast, ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi carriers are inactive in Ca(2+) free conditions and activation requires Ca(2+) signals that will also activate the calcium uniporter (MCU). By changing the net content of adenine nucleotides of the matrix upon activation, SCaMCs regulate the activity of the permeability transition pore, and the Ca(2+) retention capacity of mitochondria (CRC), two functions synergizing with those of the MCU. The different Ca(2+) activation properties of the two CaMCs are discussed in relation to their newly obtained structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  12. Le Laboratoire de Mécanique Appliquée Raymond Chaléat a 40 ans !

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comité D'Organisation Du Colloque Ime 2002, Le

    2002-12-01

    Le LMARC a été créé par Raymond Chaléat dans les locaux de l'École Nationale d'Horlogerie (a présent Lycée Technique Jules Haag).L'équipe de recherche était alors constituée de 2 enseignants-chercheurs (Raymond Chaléat et Gérard Lallement) et d'un technicien (Bernard Prêtre). Les travaux de recherche se situaient naturellement dans le domaine de la chronométrie et en particulier dans la mécanique non linéaire analytique inhérente à la montre en fonctionnement. En effet, Raymond Chaléat fut l'élève, puis le collaborateur du Professeur Jules Haag, mathématicien et mécanicien, lui-même élève de Poincarré.Le LMARC a étendu ses activités avec l'arrivée de Claude Oudet, puis de Claude Oytana à la rhéologie des matériaux solides qui est devenue plus tard l'Équipe Propriétés Mécaniques des Matériaux. En parallèle, G. Lallement a créé une équipe Vibrations devenue à ce jour Dynamique des Structures. À ce jour, le Laboratoire compte plus de 110 personnes dont 40 doctorants.Il a depuis diversifié ses activités avec 3 nouvelles équipes tournées vers la Modélisation et la Mise en Forme des Matériaux, les Micromachines et la Biomécanique et les Mécanismes. Il a su également prendre toute sa place au sein de l'Institut des Microtechniques de Franche-Comté en contribuant à plusieurs thèmes.Notre Laboratoire a été l'un des premiers laboratoires associé au CNRS (4ème) et a toujours été rattaché à l'Université de Franche-Comté (Présidence par C. Oytana de 1996 a 2001) par l'entremise de I'UFR Sciences et Techniques. Il a toujours maintenu des liens forts avec I'ENSMM (École Nationale Supérieure de Mécanique et des Microtechniques) d'une part par ses enseignants-chercheurs et d'autre part deux de ses directeurs, Raymond Chaléat et actuellement Jean-Claude Gelin.En plus de ses relations constantes avec l'industrie régionale, le LMARC a développé des actions contractuelles avec de grands groupes tels que EDF

  13. Foreword

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.; Soummer, R.

    very short explanation of how the reports are ordered is given here. The Journées of 2003 started with the delocalized lectures (delocalized means here “not in Paris”!) of the Collège de France, of Antoine Labeyrie who wrote a report on Removal of coronagraphy residues with an adaptive hologram. Three invited seminars follow: Olivier Guyon (Pupil remapping techniques), Daniel Rouan (Ultra-nulling interferometers), and Kjetil Dohlen (Phase masks in astronomy). An illustration from Daniel Rouan's talk on the properties of Prouhet-Thué-Morse series was also selected for the cover figure of this edition. These papers are followed by the courses and communications given during the 4 days of the school, in a slightly different order of their presentation. The first two days were on atmospheric turbulence and adaptive optics for coronagraphy, and also coronagraphic space projects. Steve Ridgway gives a general introduction to the problem (Astronomy with high contrast imaging). This is followed by a presentation on Fourier and Statistical Optics: Shaped and Apodized apertures (Claude Aime), The effect of a coronagraph on the statistics of adaptive optics pinned speckles (Claude Aime and Rémi Soummer). A general introduction to the problem of atmospheric turbulence is made by Julien Borgnino. A presentation of the Concordia site with emphasis on its advantages for high contrast imaging is given by Eric Fossat. Several presentations relative to numerical simulations of Adaptive Optics and coronagraphy follow: Marcel Carbillet (AO for very high contrast imaging), Lyu Abe and Anthony Boccaletti share two presentations on Numerical simulations for coronagraphy. These presentations are followed by reports on experiments: Sandrine Thomas (SAM-the SOAR adaptive module), Pierre Baudoz (Cryogenic IR test of the 4QPM coronagraph), Anthony Boccaletti (Coronagraphy with JWST in the thermal IR). Pierre Bourget (Hg-Mask Coronagraph) ends this part with a coronagraph using a mercury

  14. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-03-27

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I think the amount of

  15. Neutron Stars Join The Black Hole Jet Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed an X-ray jet blasting away from a neutron star in a binary system. This discovery may help astronomers understand how neutron stars as well as black holes can generate powerful beams of relativistic particles. The jet was found in Circinus X-1, a system where a neutron star is in orbit around a star several times the mass of the Sun, about 20,000 light years from Earth. A neutron star is an extremely dense remnant of an exploded star consisting of tightly packed neutrons. Many jets have been found originating near black holes - both the supermassive and stellar-mass variety - but the Circinus X-1 jet is the first extended X-ray jet associated with a neutron star in a binary system. This detection shows that the unusual properties of black holes - such as presence of an event horizon and the lack of an actual surface - may not be required to form powerful jets. "Gravity appears to be the key to creating these jets, not some trick of the event horizon," said Sebastian Heinz of the University of Wisconsin at Madison, who led the study. The discovery of this jet with Chandra also reveals how efficient neutron stars can be as cosmic power factories. Heinz and his colleagues estimate that a surprisingly high percentage of the energy available from material falling onto the neutron star is converted into powering the jet. "In terms of energy efficiency across the Universe, this result shows that neutron stars are near the top of the list," said Norbert Schulz, a coauthor from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. "This jet is almost as efficient as one from a black hole." The Chandra results also help to explain the origin of diffuse lobes of radio emission previously detected around Circinus X-1. The team found the X-ray jets of high-energy particles are powerful enough to create and maintain these balloons of radio-emitting gas. "We've seen enormous radio clouds around supermassive black holes at the

  16. IN MEMORIAM: Hermann Anton Haus, 1925 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    Photograph Hermann Anton Haus, an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), was to have been a Keynote Speaker at the Fluctuations and Noise in Photonics and Quantum Optics Conference, from which the papers in this special issue derive. Sadly, on May 21, 2003 - less than two weeks before the conference - Professor Haus succumbed to a heart attack after arriving home in Lexington, Massachusetts, from his regular, 15-mile commute by bicycle from MIT. He was 77. Throughout his lengthy and illustrious career, Professor Haus had repeatedly and very successfully addressed problems of fluctuations and noise, with special focus on the fundamental issues that arise in quantum optics. To honour Professor Haus' legacy to our technical community, this special issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is dedicated to his memory. Professor Haus was born in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in the former Yugoslavia, on 8 August 1925. After attending the Technische Hochschule, Graz, and the Technische Hochschule, Wien, in Austria, he received his Bachelor of Science degree from Union College in Schenectady, New York in 1949. In 1951, he graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, and came to MIT, where he earned his Doctorate of Science and joined the faculty in 1954. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1958, to Professor in 1962, and to Elihu Thomson Professor in 1973. In 1986, he was conferred the honour of Institute Professor. Professor Haus had a lifelong fascination with noise. While still an undergraduate at Union College, he became aware of Norbert Wiener's theories of statistical phenomena - the new mathematics needed to understand and quantify the random fluctuations we refer to as noise. So it was that noise theory formed the core of Professor Haus' research during the 1950s: noise in electron beams, noise in microwave amplifiers, and noise in amplifier cascades. Two of

  17. PREFACE: Loops 11: Non-Perturbative / Background Independent Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.; Barbero G, J. Fernando; Garay, Luis J.; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.; Olmedo, Javier

    2012-05-01

    only was it a showroom for the research currently being carried out by many groups throughout the world, but there was also a permanent look towards the future. During these days, the CSIC Campus witnessed many scientific conversations triggered by the interaction amongst the people and groups that participated in LOOPS'11 Madrid and which, in many cases, will crystallise into new results and advances in the field. The conference would not have been possible without the generous help of a number of national and international institutions. The organizers would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación), the Spanish Research Council, CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientĺficas), The BBVA Foundation (Fundación BBVA), The CONSOLIDER-CPAN project, the Spanish Society for Gravitation and Relativity (SEGRE), The Universidad Carlos III of Madrid (UC3M), and the European Science Foundation (ESF). The ESF, through the Quantum Gravity and Quantum Geometry network, provided full support for a number of young participants that have contributed to these proceedings: Dario Benedetti (Albert Einstein Institute, Potsdam, Germany), Norbert Bodendorfer (Institute for Theoretical Physics III, FAU Erlangen Nürnberg, Germany), Mariam Bouhmadi López (CENTRA, Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofĺsica, Lisbon), Timothy Budd (Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, The Netherlands), Miguel Campiglia (Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Penn State University, USA), Gianluca Delfino (School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK), Maite Dupuis (Institute for Theoretical Physics III, FAU Erlangen Nürnberg, Germany), Michał Dziendzikowski (Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw University, Poland), Muxin Han (Centre de Physique Théorique de Luminy, Marseille, France), Philipp Höhn (Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, The

  18. How Much Mass Makes a Black Hole? - Astronomers Challenge Current Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    exploded and left a magnetar remnant must have had a shorter life than the surviving stars in the cluster. "Because the lifespan of a star is directly linked to its mass - the heavier a star, the shorter its life - if we can measure the mass of any one surviving star, we know for sure that the shorter-lived star that became the magnetar must have been even more massive," says co-author and team leader Simon Clark. "This is of great significance since there is no accepted theory for how such extremely magnetic objects are formed." The astronomers therefore studied the stars that belong to the eclipsing double system W13 in Westerlund 1 using the fact that, in such a system, masses can be directly determined from the motions of the stars. By comparison with these stars, they found that the star that became the magnetar must have been at least 40 times the mass of the Sun. This proves for the first time that magnetars can evolve from stars so massive we would normally expect them to form black holes. The previous assumption was that stars with initial masses between about 10 and 25 solar masses would form neutron stars and those above 25 solar masses would produce black holes. "These stars must get rid of more than nine tenths of their mass before exploding as a supernova, or they would otherwise have created a black hole instead," says co-author Ignacio Negueruela. "Such huge mass losses before the explosion present great challenges to current theories of stellar evolution." "This therefore raises the thorny question of just how massive a star has to be to collapse to form a black hole if stars over 40 times as heavy as our Sun cannot manage this feat," concludes co-author Norbert Langer. The formation mechanism preferred by the astronomers postulates that the star that became the magnetar - the progenitor - was born with a stellar companion. As both stars evolved they would begin to interact, with energy derived from their orbital motion expended in ejecting the requisite

  19. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    leave the system.) (Paper 95PA01743,SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surfacetemperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments, UwePflaumann, Josette Duprat, Claude Pujol, and Laurent D. Labeyrie).Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; Payment mustaccompany order.

  20. Elaboration d'un composite conducteur a base de polypyrrole et de nanofibres de cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bideau, Benoit

    Le projet de production de nanocellulose à grande échelle par l'équipe de recherche du professeur Claude Daneault, ne pourra se faire sans avoir démontré sa quelconque utilité sur le marché économique. C'est dans cette optique que s'est articulé mon travail afin de mettre en avant une des voix de valorisation de ces nanocelluloses. Nous avons travaillé plus précisément sur le développement d'un nanocomposite conducteur biodégradable. Nous nous sommes proposé dans ce travail de développer une technique simple et écologique permettant la conception d'un matériau composite conducteur. Nous avons étudié l'influence des nanofibres de cellulose, du pyrrole, de la température, de la durée de polymérisation et l'ajout d'additifs dans le matériau composite. L'étude de ces paramètres nous a permis de déterminer les meilleures conditions pour le développement d'un film composite conducteur avec des propriétés mécaniques acceptables. L'ajout de ce renfort (nanofibres), au sein de la matrice de polypyrrole a permis d'obtenir des films intéressants, de part leurs propriétés mécaniques, électriques et de leur caractère biodégradable. Des comparaisons ont été effectuées avec des fibres oxydées, afin d'étudier l'apport des nanofibres de cellulose au composite. Notre étude a ensuite été élargie à l'ajout d'additifs dans les matériaux conducteurs afin d'améliorer certaines propriétés du composite. L'objectif de ce travail visait l'étude de l'incorporation des nanofibres de cellulose dans une matrice de polypyrrole en vue de son utilisation en tant que matériau conducteur biodégradable pour des applications dans le domaine énergétique. Mots Clés: Nanocellulose, polypyrrole, composite, conducteur, biodégradable, propriétés mécaniques, additifs.

  1. Édouard Manet's Tabes Dorsalis: From Painful Ataxia to Phantom Limb.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tatu, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    . Having become bedridden, he had to be amputated of one leg, which was developing gangrene probably associated with ergot overuse. While he died shortly thereafter, we have some witness anecdotes suggesting that he experienced a phantom limb: when Claude Monet (1840-1926) visited him and sat down on his bed, Manet violently shouted at him that he was just sitting on his (absent) leg, which provoked terrible pains. With its facts and mysteries, the subtle interaction between Manet's illness and his work output remains one of the most intriguing stories in neurology of art. PMID:27434214

  2. Surgery of the head and 70-day brain surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William C

    2003-09-01

    In 1917, the Sugeon General of the United States Army, William Gorgas, learned that almost 15% of the casualties on the Western Front sustained intracranial injuries. Soon after the United States declared war in April 1917, the Council of National Defense established a General Medical Board and attached a brain surgery subsection to its Committee of Ophthalmology. Postcards were sent to experts around the country, asking for the names of individuals who had specialty training or practice in brain surgery. In August, Gorgas assumed control of this subsection and created a Division of Surgery of the Head in the American Army Medical Department, with additional sections for plastic surgery, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. He needed almost 300 brain surgeons; he received 50 names. As Harvey Cushing, Gilbert Horrax, and others went to France, neurosurgeons at home trained student officers. Schools were established in Philadelphia (Charles Frazier), Chicago (Dean Lewis), New York City (Charles Elsberg), St. Louis (Ernest Sachs), and Camp Greenleaf in Georgia (Claude Coleman), with 10-week intensive courses for selected candidates. Basic science and x-ray classes and operative clinics addressed most aspects of neurosurgical care. An army manual outlined clinical diagnoses and surgical techniques. Lewis H. Weed established a laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital, staffed by volunteers such as K.D. Blackfan and W.E. Dandy, to investigate infections of the central nervous system. By the time of the armistice, Gorgas had his complement of brain surgeons. The newly trained brain surgeons and their mentors gradually made their way to the Western Front during the summer of 1918. Plans for a neurosurgical school in France were quickly discarded as the American Army Medical Department changed the specialized assignments to front-line general surgical care. Some of the 190 brain surgeons in the American Expeditionary Forces, notably Gilbert Horrax, Charles E. Dowman, and Charles

  3. Memories of Maurice Jacob (1933-2007) Proceedings of the Maurice Jacob Memorial Meeting (CERN, 11 September 2007) Memories of Maurice Jacob (1933-2007) Proceedings of the Maurice Jacob Memorial Meeting (CERN, 11 September 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-07-01

    Maurice Jacob passed away unexpectedly on 2 May 2007. Soon after the terrible news arrived, it was thought appropriate to organize a memorial meeting at CERN. The meeting took place on 11 September 2007, and a large number of friends and colleagues participated in the event. The idea was to have brief presentations on the many scientific activities in which Maurice had been engaged, to provide a sketch of his personal trajectory. We also had spontaneous anecdotes and recollections from the audience which, unfortunately, did not make it into this special issue but enriched all of us present. The meeting took place in an afternoon, hence we were faced with the difficult task of selecting from the many presentations that could have been made by his colleagues and collaborators. The end results are the papers contained in this special issue. They provide a short overview of the breadth and depth of Maurice's physics, on the one hand, and of his deep commitment to European and world physics and to the interface between science and society, on the other hand. The first two talks were given by his fellow students and life-long friends Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Robert Pick. These were mostly personal recollections, less focussed on scientific issues per se but reminding us how Maurice grew into the renowned scientist he later became. Cecilia Jarlskog, a longtime collaborator and friend, provided us with a beautiful view of the wonderfully multifaceted activities Maurice was able to accomplish. Peter Landshoff also spoke about his more than 35 years of personal and scientific interaction with Maurice. The talks presented during the second part of the meeting went a bit more into the technical details of the wide spectrum of scientific activities pursued by Maurice. We had contributions by Helmut Satz (whose transparencies were kindly presented by Urs Wiedemann) and Ulrich Heinz, with the closing talk presented by John Ellis. We have lost a great friend and an excellent

  4. Listening to the Shepard-Risset Glissando: the Relationship between Emotional Response, Disruption of Equilibrium, and Personality.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Eveline; Orcalli, Angelo; Fabbro, Franco; Crescentini, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The endless scale illusion, obtained by cyclically repeating a chromatic scale made up of Shepard tones, has been used in a variety of musical works. Music psychology and neuroscience has been interested in this particular psychoacoustic phenomenon mainly for studying the cognitive processes of pitch perception involved. In the present study, we investigated the emotional states induced by the Shepard-Risset glissando, a variant of the Shepard scale. For this purpose we chose three musical stimuli: a Matlab-generated Shepard Risset glissando, Jean-Claude Risset's Computer Suite from Little Boy, which presents a Shepard-Risset glissando integrated in the aesthetic context of a composition, and an ordinary orchestral glissando taken from the opening of Iannis Xenakis's Metastasis. Seventy-three volunteers completed a listening experiment during which they rated their emotional response to these stimuli on a seven-point Likert scale and indicated whether they had experienced a disruption of equilibrium. Personality was also measured with the Five-Factor Model of personality traits. The results show that negative emotions were most strongly evoked during listening to each of the stimuli. We also found that the Shepard-Risset glissando illusion, both within the aesthetic context of a musical composition and on its own, was capable of evoking disruption of equilibrium, frequently leading to the associated feeling of falling. Moreover, generally for the Shepard-Risset glissando illusion, higher negative emotional ratings were given by individuals who had experienced a feeling of disturbance of equilibrium relative to those who had not had this experience. Finally, we found a complex pattern of relationships between personality and the subjective experience of the glissando. Openness to experience correlated positively with positive emotion ratings for the Computer Suite, while agreeableness correlated negatively with positive emotion ratings for the Matlab stimulus

  5. Listening to the Shepard-Risset Glissando: the Relationship between Emotional Response, Disruption of Equilibrium, and Personality

    PubMed Central

    Vernooij, Eveline; Orcalli, Angelo; Fabbro, Franco; Crescentini, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The endless scale illusion, obtained by cyclically repeating a chromatic scale made up of Shepard tones, has been used in a variety of musical works. Music psychology and neuroscience has been interested in this particular psychoacoustic phenomenon mainly for studying the cognitive processes of pitch perception involved. In the present study, we investigated the emotional states induced by the Shepard-Risset glissando, a variant of the Shepard scale. For this purpose we chose three musical stimuli: a Matlab-generated Shepard Risset glissando, Jean-Claude Risset's Computer Suite from Little Boy, which presents a Shepard-Risset glissando integrated in the aesthetic context of a composition, and an ordinary orchestral glissando taken from the opening of Iannis Xenakis's Metastasis. Seventy-three volunteers completed a listening experiment during which they rated their emotional response to these stimuli on a seven-point Likert scale and indicated whether they had experienced a disruption of equilibrium. Personality was also measured with the Five-Factor Model of personality traits. The results show that negative emotions were most strongly evoked during listening to each of the stimuli. We also found that the Shepard-Risset glissando illusion, both within the aesthetic context of a musical composition and on its own, was capable of evoking disruption of equilibrium, frequently leading to the associated feeling of falling. Moreover, generally for the Shepard-Risset glissando illusion, higher negative emotional ratings were given by individuals who had experienced a feeling of disturbance of equilibrium relative to those who had not had this experience. Finally, we found a complex pattern of relationships between personality and the subjective experience of the glissando. Openness to experience correlated positively with positive emotion ratings for the Computer Suite, while agreeableness correlated negatively with positive emotion ratings for the Matlab stimulus

  6. Surgery of the head and 70-day brain surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William C

    2003-09-01

    In 1917, the Sugeon General of the United States Army, William Gorgas, learned that almost 15% of the casualties on the Western Front sustained intracranial injuries. Soon after the United States declared war in April 1917, the Council of National Defense established a General Medical Board and attached a brain surgery subsection to its Committee of Ophthalmology. Postcards were sent to experts around the country, asking for the names of individuals who had specialty training or practice in brain surgery. In August, Gorgas assumed control of this subsection and created a Division of Surgery of the Head in the American Army Medical Department, with additional sections for plastic surgery, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. He needed almost 300 brain surgeons; he received 50 names. As Harvey Cushing, Gilbert Horrax, and others went to France, neurosurgeons at home trained student officers. Schools were established in Philadelphia (Charles Frazier), Chicago (Dean Lewis), New York City (Charles Elsberg), St. Louis (Ernest Sachs), and Camp Greenleaf in Georgia (Claude Coleman), with 10-week intensive courses for selected candidates. Basic science and x-ray classes and operative clinics addressed most aspects of neurosurgical care. An army manual outlined clinical diagnoses and surgical techniques. Lewis H. Weed established a laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital, staffed by volunteers such as K.D. Blackfan and W.E. Dandy, to investigate infections of the central nervous system. By the time of the armistice, Gorgas had his complement of brain surgeons. The newly trained brain surgeons and their mentors gradually made their way to the Western Front during the summer of 1918. Plans for a neurosurgical school in France were quickly discarded as the American Army Medical Department changed the specialized assignments to front-line general surgical care. Some of the 190 brain surgeons in the American Expeditionary Forces, notably Gilbert Horrax, Charles E. Dowman, and Charles

  7. The 2016 Transit of Mercury Observed from Major Solar Telescopes and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Schneider, Glenn; Gary, Dale; Chen, Bin; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Reardon, Kevin P.; Dantowitz, Ronald; Kopp, Greg A.

    2016-10-01

    We report observations from the ground and space of the 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury. We build on our explanation of the black-drop effect in transits of Venus based on spacecraft observations of the 1999 transit of Mercury (Schneider, Pasachoff, and Golub, Icarus 168, 249, 2004). In 2016, we used the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory with active optics to observe Mercury's transit at high spatial resolution. We again saw a small black-drop effect as 3rd contact neared, confirming the data that led to our earlier explanation as a confluence of the point-spread function and the extreme solar limb darkening (Pasachoff, Schneider, and Golub, in IAU Colloq. 196, 2004). We again used IBIS on the Dunn Solar Telescope of the Sacramento Peak Observatory, as A. Potter continued his observations, previously made at the 2006 transit of Mercury, at both telescopes of the sodium exosphere of Mercury (Potter, Killen, Reardon, and Bida, Icarus 226, 172, 2013). We imaged the transit with IBIS as well as with two RED Epic IMAX-quality cameras alongside it, one with a narrow passband. We show animations of our high-resolution ground-based observations along with observations from XRT on JAXA's Hinode and from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. Further, we report on the limit of the transit change in the Total Solar Irradiance, continuing our interest from the transit of Venus TSI (Schneider, Pasachoff, and Willson, ApJ 641, 565, 2006; Pasachoff, Schneider, and Willson, AAS 2005), using NASA's SORCE/TIM and the Air Force's TCTE/TIM. See http://transitofvenus.info and http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu.Acknowledgments: We were glad for the collaboration at Big Bear of Claude Plymate and his colleagues of the staff of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. We also appreciate the collaboration on the transit studies of Robert Lucas (Sydney, Australia) and Evan Zucker (San Diego, California). JMP appreciates the sabbatical hospitality of the Division of Geosciences and

  8. Quantifying the impact of daily and seasonal variation in sap pH on xylem dissolved inorganic carbon estimates in plum trees.

    PubMed

    Erda, F G; Bloemen, J; Steppe, K

    2014-01-01

    In studies on internal CO2 transport, average xylem sap pH (pH(x)) is one of the factors used for calculation of the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon in the xylem sap ([CO2 *]). Lack of detailed pH(x) measurements at high temporal resolution could be a potential source of error when evaluating [CO2*] dynamics. In this experiment, we performed continuous measurements of CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and stem temperature (T(stem)), complemented with pH(x) measurements at 30-min intervals during the day at various stages of the growing season (Day of the Year (DOY): 86 (late winter), 128 (mid-spring) and 155 (early summer)) on a plum tree (Prunus domestica L. cv. Reine Claude d'Oullins). We used the recorded pH(x) to calculate [CO2*] based on T(stem) and the corresponding measured [CO2]. No statistically significant difference was found between mean [CO2*] calculated with instantaneous pH(x) and daily average pH(x). However, using an average pH(x) value from a different part of the growing season than the measurements of [CO2] and T(stem) to estimate [CO2*] led to a statistically significant error. The error varied between 3.25 ± 0.01% under-estimation and 3.97 ± 0.01% over-estimation, relative to the true [CO2*] data. Measured pH(x) did not show a significant daily variation, unlike [CO2], which increased during the day and declined at night. As the growing season progressed, daily average [CO2] (3.4%, 5.3%, 7.4%) increased and average pH(x) (5.43, 5.29, 5.20) decreased. Increase in [CO2] will increase its solubility in xylem sap according to Henry's law, and the dissociation of [CO2*] will negatively affect pH(x). Our results are the first quantifying the error in [CO2*] due to the interaction between [CO2] and pH(x) on a seasonal time scale. We found significant changes in pH(x) across the growing season, but overall the effect on the calculation of [CO2*] remained within an error range of 4%. However, it is possible that the error could be more

  9. From tangles to tau protein.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, K; Novak, M

    2006-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer couldn't have chosen a name more appropriate than neurofibrillary tangles when one hundred years ago (Alzheimer, 1906) he presented this histopathological hallmark of the progressive dementing disorder, which got named after him as Alzheimer disease. Both, the structure and as well as the molecular composition of neurofibrillary tangles have baffled neuroscientists for many years. It was not till 1963 when with the help of the electron microscope the tangles were found to be made up of paired helical filaments (PHF). It took another 23 years before microtubule associated protein tau was immunohistochemically identified as the part of neurofibrillary tangles (Grundke-lqbal, 1986 a). The same year it was shown that tau protein in Alzheimer disease brain was abnormally hyperphosphorylated (Grundke-Iqbal, 1986 b). In 1988 Michal Novak, Cesar Milstein and Claude Wischik produced monoclonal antibody that was able to recognize then unknown protein in PHF. The antibody (MN423) allowed its isolation and let to full molecular characterization as protein tau. These studies provided molecular proof that tau protein was the major and an integral component of the PHF (Wischik et al, 1988 a, b, Goedert et al, 1988, Novak et al, 1989, 1991). Over the years the significance of tau pathology for the neurodegenerative diseases was discussed and often questioned. However, detailed studies of the maturation and distribution of NFTs, showing correlation with degree of cognitive decline and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (Braak and Braak, 1991), together with discovery of tau gene mutations causing fronto-temporal dementia in many families (Hutton et al, 1998) promoted tau as the major pathogenic force in neurodegenerative cascade. Further studies focused on tau dysfunctions revealed truncation and phosphorylation as two major posttranslational modifications responsible for toxic gain of function as an underlying cause of tauopathies including Alzheimer

  10. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2011-03-01

    the conference. Finally, the chairs would like to express their thanks to all the participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the conference. Masahiko Takahashi and Kiyoshi Ueda International Advisory Board Lorenzo Avaldi (Italy)Klaus Bartschat (USA) Azzedine Lahmam-Bennani (France)Jamal Berakdar (Germany) Nora Berrah (USA)Igor Bray (Australia) XiangJun Chen (China)Claude Dal Cappello (France) Reinhard Dörner (Germany)Alexander Dorn (Germany) Danielle Dowek (France)Alexey Grum-Grzhimailo (Russia) Noriyuki Kouchi (Japan)Birgit Lohmann (Australia) Don Madison (USA)Fernando Martin (Spain) Andrew Murray (England)Bernard Piraux (Belgium) Roberto Rivarola (Argentina)Emma Sokell (Ireland) Giovanni Stefani (Italy) Conference photograph

  11. Hubble space telescope servicing mission joint ESA/BAE UK technical press briefing Wednesday 10 March 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-02-01

    On Wednesday 10 March 1993 astronauts from ESA and NASA will be at British Aerospace Space Systems Limited, Filton, Bristol, UK, training on the replacement set of solar arrays which they are scheduled to fit to the Hubble Space Telescope at year end. You are invited to attend a technical briefing on that day, which will be given by senior representatives of the European Space Agency and British Aerospace. The briefing will include details of the design modifications and status of the solar arrays, together with a brief overview of the scientific results already achieved by the teams of astronomers using the telescope. There will be an opportunity for interviews with the mission specialists in the crew of NASA's Space Shuttle flight STS-61, who will be carrying out the servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope in a series of "Extra-Vehicular Activities - EVA' (space-walks). Five astronauts are expected : Story Musgrave, Colonel Tom Akers, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Kathryn C. Thornton from NASA and Claude Nicollier from ESA. There will also be a chance to view the solar arrays in the British Aerospace clean room area where the astronauts are working on their familiarisation programme. The briefing will take place on Wednesday 10 March 1993 at British Aerospace Space Systems, Filton, Bristol, UK (on the northern outskirts of the city of Bristol). The event will begin at 10h30 a.m. and end with a buffet lunch running from approximately 01h30 p.m. to 02h30 p.m. In order to assists with arrangements for travel to and from bristol, British Aerospace proposes to run a free coach from and to London Victoria Coach Station - if there proves to be sufficient press interest. This coach would depart from London at approximately 07h50 a.m. and arrive back at around 05h30 p.m. Further details will be available on request when numbers are known. In order to gain access to the site and the briefing it is essential that all attendees are expected and their names are provided in

  12. Notes on Nambiquara demography.

    PubMed

    Price, D

    1994-03-01

    Total population, fertility, and differential mortality are described for the Nambiquara of western Mato Grosso, Brazil. The Nambiquara are hunters and subsistence farmers of maize and manioc. Communities are scattered clusters of 30 individuals, led by political "brothers." Dravidian kinship and cross-cousin marriages predominate in exogamous marriages. Western contact occurred after 1910 with the arrival of the telegraph line. Missionary contact was during the 1920s, and Claude Levi-Strauss visited in 1938. The rubber industry dominated during the 1940s and 1950s, and a road built in 1960 brought contact with the world economic community. An Indian post was established in 1943, and demographic data was collected through this center. The author recorded births and deaths in 1969-70, and again in 1973, 1977, 1980, and 1986. This data was supplemented by reports from others between 1974-76, 1982, 1985. Data was considered of acceptable quality between 1976 and 1986. There are three districts: Campo, with Western contact for 60-70 years; the Guapore, isolated until the 1960s or 1970s; and the North people, with the most devastating Western contact due to the telegraph lines. Evidence during the study period showed that the Nambiquara tended to follow traditional customs in social life and had few economic ties to the outside world. High estimates at the turn of the century placed the population totals at 20,000, but in 1970 the total population count averaged around 575 to 600, with reasonable estimates for the precontact society at 6000. Although the population is scattered, the language is the same. The death rate has been estimated at 60/1000 between 1969-74 and 53/1000 between 1943-65. The birth rate was 45/1000 in 1975/76. The population was declining at 1% per year. Between 1965 and 1985, the population began increasing. The average yearly birth rate between 1975-85 was estimated at 55.7/1000 for the whole sample, 44.1 for the Campo, 74.8 for the Guapore, and

  13. Édouard Manet's Tabes Dorsalis: From Painful Ataxia to Phantom Limb.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tatu, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    . Having become bedridden, he had to be amputated of one leg, which was developing gangrene probably associated with ergot overuse. While he died shortly thereafter, we have some witness anecdotes suggesting that he experienced a phantom limb: when Claude Monet (1840-1926) visited him and sat down on his bed, Manet violently shouted at him that he was just sitting on his (absent) leg, which provoked terrible pains. With its facts and mysteries, the subtle interaction between Manet's illness and his work output remains one of the most intriguing stories in neurology of art.

  14. The weak magnetic field of the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouret, J.-C.; Donati, J.-F.; Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Marcolino, W.; Lanz, T.; Howarth, I. D.

    2008-09-01

    . E-mail: jean-claude.bouret@oamp.fr

  15. PREFACE: Nanosafe 2012: International Conferences on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardif, François

    2013-04-01

    , FR) Co-chair: Georgios KATALAGARIANAKIS (EC, BE) Mélanie AUFFAN (CEREGE, FR) Jorge BOCZKOWSKI (INSERM, FR) Jean-Yves BOTTERO (CEREGE, FR) Jacques BOUILLARD (INERIS, FR) Derk BROUWER (TNO, NL) Marie CARRIERE (CEA, FR) Claude EMOND (U. MONTREAL, CA) Cassandra ENGEMAN (UCSB, USA) Eric GAFFET (CNRS, FR) François GENSDARMES (IRSN, FR) Alexei GRINBAUM (CEA, FR) Antje GROBE (U.STUTTGART, DE) Peter HOET (KUL, BE) Eric QUEMENEUR (CEA, FR) Olivier LE BIHAN (INERIS, FR) Robert MUIR (NANEUM, UK) Tinh NGUYEN (NIST, USA) Bernd NOWACK (EMPA, CH) Günter OBERDÖRSTER (U. ROCHESTER, USA) David PUI (U. MINNESOTA, USA) Michael RIEDIKER (IST, CH) Yves SAMSON (CEA, FR) Ken TAKEDA (U. TOKYO, JP) Olivier WITSCHGER (INRS, FR) The PDF contains a list of sponsor logos, the conference programme and planning documents.

  16. Medicine in the Encyclopédie (1751-1780) of Diderot and d'Alembert.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Natale G; Bisaccia, Carmela; Cirillo, Massimo; Richet, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    On July 1, 1751, the royal Parisian printer Le Breton published the first volume of the Encyclopédie of Diderot and d'Alembert, a rational dictionary, in folio and in alphabetical order, sold by subscription. The whole work was completed in 1780 (a total of 35 volumes, of which 12 were of illustrations, 4 of supplements and 2 of indices). In 1782 it was followed by the Encyclopédie méthodique, printed by Panckoucke, which ended in 1832 with volume number 166. The frontispiece of the first volume, designed by Charles-Nicolas Cochin Jr. and engraved by Benoît-Louis Prévost showed the columns of an Ionic temple where the Truth appears between Reason and Philosophy. Reason is shown trying to break the veil of Truth, and Philosophy trying to embellish it. Below are the philosophers, their eyes fixed on Truth. Theology is on his knees with his back facing Truth, and seems to receive light from the top. The subsequent chain of figures depicts Memory, Ancient History, Modern History, Geometry, Astronomy and Physics. Below are Optics, Botany, Chemistry and Agriculture. On the bottom line one finds the representatives of arts and professions derived from science. In a 42-page preface ("Discours préliminaire") d'Alembert discussed the path to new knowledge as one "based on what we receive through senses. Ideas depend on senses." The medical collaborators were, or became, famous. Medicine was considered to be rooted in experiment, in patients and in measurements. Functions started to be described with numbers. It was the birth of determinism which was later reinforced by Magendie and Claude Bernard. Albrecht Haller, president of the Academy of Science at Göttingen, as well as a member of all European academies, wrote seminal entries. New accurate definitions appeared for life, disease, death, infections, plague, epidemics, hygiene, fevers and edema. Semiology, the study of signs, became the visible explanation of deranged function, diagnosis and prognosis.

  17. [Marcus Aurelius Antonius (121-180AD), philosopher and Roman emperor, and Galen's plague].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín

    2012-11-01

    The study of the aetiologies of diseases in Ancient Times is usually a speculative intellectual exercise. When some authors attribute a specific aetiology to an old disease, there is a great risk of committing a methodological error, known as presentism by the modern historiography. The authority of the investigator, more than the weight of the scientific truth, is usually the reason why the diagnosis has remained over the years. The great epidemic of the years 164-165AD and afterwards, could have been smallpox (haemorrhagic form). Claude Galen, the famous doctor, described the symptoms in several books of his great Opera Omnia. For this reason, it is currently known among the scholars as Galen's plague. The epidemic was described for the first time in Seleucia (Mesopotamia). Until now, the actual geographic origin is unknown. We propose here that the beginning might be the kingdom of the old Han dynasty (now the Chinese Popular Republic). The epidemic swept the Roman Empire, from the east to the west, and from the southern to the northern borders. An immediate consequence of the infection was a high morbidity and mortality. In this sense, Galen's epidemic was one of the many factors that caused the fall and destruction of the Roman Empire. On the other hand, there is a general agreement among historians, biographers and researchers that the philosopher emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180AD was affected by the infection in the epidemic wave of 164-165AD. The death of Marcus Aurelius occurred on March 17 in the year 180AD, in Vindobonne, or perhaps Sirminium (near to Vienna). Many authors propose that the cause of the emperor's death was the same epidemic. We consider that it is not possible to demonstrate any of those speculative diagnoses. Finally, the epidemic of 189-190AD, that we have named of Commodus, was probably a different disease to the Galen's plague. There were several kinds of animals affected (anthropozoonoses). In this sense, this infection

  18. From tangles to tau protein.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, K; Novak, M

    2006-01-01

    Alois Alzheimer couldn't have chosen a name more appropriate than neurofibrillary tangles when one hundred years ago (Alzheimer, 1906) he presented this histopathological hallmark of the progressive dementing disorder, which got named after him as Alzheimer disease. Both, the structure and as well as the molecular composition of neurofibrillary tangles have baffled neuroscientists for many years. It was not till 1963 when with the help of the electron microscope the tangles were found to be made up of paired helical filaments (PHF). It took another 23 years before microtubule associated protein tau was immunohistochemically identified as the part of neurofibrillary tangles (Grundke-lqbal, 1986 a). The same year it was shown that tau protein in Alzheimer disease brain was abnormally hyperphosphorylated (Grundke-Iqbal, 1986 b). In 1988 Michal Novak, Cesar Milstein and Claude Wischik produced monoclonal antibody that was able to recognize then unknown protein in PHF. The antibody (MN423) allowed its isolation and let to full molecular characterization as protein tau. These studies provided molecular proof that tau protein was the major and an integral component of the PHF (Wischik et al, 1988 a, b, Goedert et al, 1988, Novak et al, 1989, 1991). Over the years the significance of tau pathology for the neurodegenerative diseases was discussed and often questioned. However, detailed studies of the maturation and distribution of NFTs, showing correlation with degree of cognitive decline and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (Braak and Braak, 1991), together with discovery of tau gene mutations causing fronto-temporal dementia in many families (Hutton et al, 1998) promoted tau as the major pathogenic force in neurodegenerative cascade. Further studies focused on tau dysfunctions revealed truncation and phosphorylation as two major posttranslational modifications responsible for toxic gain of function as an underlying cause of tauopathies including Alzheimer

  19. Crew of Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission visits Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    The Hubble Space telescope servicing mission in December (STS-61) was a great success and the fully refurbished orbiting telescope produced absolutely remarkable first results just two weeks ago. The 7-member crew who carried out the mission will soon be in Europe to share their experience with the Press, ESA space specialists and the European space community. Public conferences will also be held in Switzerland, the home country of ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier. The visit of the STS-61 crew is scheduled as follows: Friday 11 February, 1994 - ESA Paris, France Presentation and Press Conference Location: ESA, 8/10 Rue Mario Nikis, 75015 Paris time: 16:00 hrs - 17:30 hrs contact: ESA, Public Relations Office Tel. (+33) 1 42 73 71 55 Fax. (+33) 1 42 73 76 90 Monday 14 February, 1994 - British Aerospace, Bristol, United Kingdom Presentation and Press Conference Location: British Aerospace, FPC 333, Filton, Bristol BS12 7QW time: 10:00 hrs - 12:00 hrs contact: BAe, Public Relations Tel. (+44) 272 36 33 69 Tel. (+44) 272 36 33 68 Tuesday 15 February, 1994 - ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk, the Netherlands Presentation and Press Conference Location: Noordwijk Space Expo, Keplerlaan 3, 2201 AZ Noordwijk, the Netherlands time: 09:30 hrs - 12:00 hrs contact: ESTEC Public Relations Office Tel. (+31) 1719 8 3006 Fax. (+31) 1719 17 400 Wednesday 16 February, 1944 - ESO, Garching - Munich, Germany Presentation and Press Conference Location: European Southern Observatory, Karl- Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching -Munich, Germany time: to be decided contact: ESO Information Service Tel. (+49) 89 32 006 276 Fax. (+49) 89 320 23 62 Thursday 17 February, 1994 - Bern, Switzerland a. Presentation and Press Conference Location: Hotel Bern, Zeughausgasse 9, 3001 Bern, Switzerland time: 09:30 hrs contact: Press & Information Service of the Federal Dept. for Education & Sciences Tel. (+41) 31 322 80 34 Fax. (+41) 31 312 30 15 b. Public conference Location: University of Bern, Institute of Physics

  20. [Marcus Aurelius Antonius (121-180AD), philosopher and Roman emperor, and Galen's plague].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín

    2012-11-01

    The study of the aetiologies of diseases in Ancient Times is usually a speculative intellectual exercise. When some authors attribute a specific aetiology to an old disease, there is a great risk of committing a methodological error, known as presentism by the modern historiography. The authority of the investigator, more than the weight of the scientific truth, is usually the reason why the diagnosis has remained over the years. The great epidemic of the years 164-165AD and afterwards, could have been smallpox (haemorrhagic form). Claude Galen, the famous doctor, described the symptoms in several books of his great Opera Omnia. For this reason, it is currently known among the scholars as Galen's plague. The epidemic was described for the first time in Seleucia (Mesopotamia). Until now, the actual geographic origin is unknown. We propose here that the beginning might be the kingdom of the old Han dynasty (now the Chinese Popular Republic). The epidemic swept the Roman Empire, from the east to the west, and from the southern to the northern borders. An immediate consequence of the infection was a high morbidity and mortality. In this sense, Galen's epidemic was one of the many factors that caused the fall and destruction of the Roman Empire. On the other hand, there is a general agreement among historians, biographers and researchers that the philosopher emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121-180AD was affected by the infection in the epidemic wave of 164-165AD. The death of Marcus Aurelius occurred on March 17 in the year 180AD, in Vindobonne, or perhaps Sirminium (near to Vienna). Many authors propose that the cause of the emperor's death was the same epidemic. We consider that it is not possible to demonstrate any of those speculative diagnoses. Finally, the epidemic of 189-190AD, that we have named of Commodus, was probably a different disease to the Galen's plague. There were several kinds of animals affected (anthropozoonoses). In this sense, this infection