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Sample records for clay host rocks

  1. Evaluating the geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage of the near-field host clay rock using a THC model and the diffuse double layer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Liu, H.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Houseworth, J. E.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    One advantage of emplacing nuclear waste in a clay formation is the potential self-sealing capability due to clay swelling. The swelling properties of the near-field host clay rock can be altered due to geochemical factors, including changes in groundwater geochemistry, proportions of exchangeable cations, and swelling clay mineral abundances. The clay host rock can also undergo geochemical changes due to the interaction with the engineered barrier system (EBS) materials. In this paper, coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) models are linked with a swelling model based on diffuse double layer (DDL) theory and changes in the swelling properties of clay host rocks in the near field area are evaluated. Findings based on THC simulations using the reaction-transport code TOUGHREACT include: 1) Significant changes in the swelling pressure could be expected depending on various hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions. The change of hydration rate of the EBS (via the adjustment of tortuosity) could have significant effect on the swelling pressure. 2) Geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage only occurs in the near-field area, within a few meters from the EBS interface. 3) Swelling/shrinkage induced porosity change is generally much smaller than that caused by mineral precipitation/dissolution. 4) The geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage of host clay rock is the combined effect of variation in the pore water geochemistry, exchangeable cations, and smectite abundance. Neglecting any of these three latter factors might lead to a miscalculation of the geochemically-induced swelling pressure.

  2. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  3. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale

  4. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  5. Processes and controls in swelling anhydritic clay rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Referring to the swelling of anhydritic clay rocks in tunneling, Leopold Müller-Salzburg noted in the third volume on tunneling of his fundamental text book on rock engineering that "a truly coherent explanation of these phenomena is still owing" (Müller-Salzburg 1978, p. 306). This valuation is still true after more than three decades of research in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of such rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical controls of the swelling. In this contribution, a review of processes in swelling anhydritic clay rocks and of associated controls is presented. Also numerical models that aim at simulating the swelling processes and controls are included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-oriented work in this review, the presentation intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical engineering projects. Keywords: swelling; anhydritic clay rocks; review

  6. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  7. The evolution of clay rock/cement interfaces in a cementitious repository for low- and intermediate level radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs

    In Switzerland, deep geological storage in clay rich host rocks is the preferred option for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. For these waste types cementitious materials are used for tunnel support and backfill, waste containers and waste matrixes. The different geochemical characteristics of clay and cementitious materials may induce mineralogical and pore water changes which might affect the barrier functionality of host rocks and concretes. We present numerical reactive transport calculations that systematically compare the geochemical evolution at cement/clay interfaces for the proposed host rocks in Switzerland for different transport scenarios. We developed a consistent set of thermodynamic data, simultaneously valid for cementitious (concrete) and clay materials. With our setup we successfully reproduced mineralogies, water contents and pore water compositions of the proposed host rocks and of a reference concrete. Our calculations show that the effects of geochemical gradients between concrete and clay materials are very similar for all investigated host rocks. The mineralogical changes at material interfaces are restricted to narrow zones for all host rocks. The extent of strong pH increase in the host rocks is limited, although a slight increase of pH over greater distances seems possible in advective transport scenarios. Our diffusive and partially also the advective calculations show massive porosity changes due to precipitation/dissolution of mineral phases near the interface, in line with many other reported transport calculations on cement/clay interactions. For all investigated transport scenarios the degradation of concrete materials in emplacement caverns due to diffusive and advective transport of clay pore water into the caverns is limited to narrow zones. A specific effort has been made to improve the geochemical setup and the extensive use of solid solution phases demonstrated the successful application of a thermodynamically

  8. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  9. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present. PMID:27739431

  10. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-10-01

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present.

  11. Swelling and osmotic flow in a potential host rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horseman, S. T.; Harrington, J. F.; Noy, D. J.

    material. When immersed in distilled water, the cube swelled preferentially in a direction normal to bedding. Swelling was accompanied by visible opening of cracks. Volumetric strains of the clayshale during the swelling test were of the same order of magnitude as those during permeability testing. The presence of dilated cracks could explain the low membrane efficiency, since the dissociated ions of the salt would be able to diffuse through the crack network relatively unimpeded by electrostatic interactions with the clay mineral surfaces. The high compressibility and low membrane efficiency revealed by these experiments may be a consequence of fabric damage during sampling and specimen preparation or may actually be representative of the rock characteristics within the engineering disturbed zone (EDZ) of the tunnel niches. It is entirely possible that undisturbed rock remote from the excavations displays significantly lower compressibility and higher membrane efficiency. Even though the clayshale membrane in these experiments is inefficient, the results clearly demonstrate that Opalinus Clay is capable of supporting an osmotic flow of water. This has important implications in the specification, operation and interpretation of borehole tests aimed at the hydrogeological characterisation of this potential host rock. In addition the osmotic coupling term modifies the effective diffusion coefficient which should be accounted for when undertaking safety assessments.

  12. Discrete fracture hydromechanical model for the disturbed rock zone in a clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, D.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) fracture damage model, TOUGH-RBSN, to investigate the behavior of fracture generation and evolution in rock in the presence of perturbations to THM conditions. This model combines the capabilities of the TOUGH2 simulator to represent thermal-hydrological processes with a rigid-body-spring-network (RBSN) model, a type of discrete modeling, to treat geomechanical and fracture-damage processes. In particular, the development and evolution of fractures in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) of a clay rock, with application to high-level nuclear waste disposal, is a focus for this model development. Previously, the TOUGH-RBSN approach has been used to model fracture damage under tensile conditions as a result of desiccation shrinkage. The next phase of model testing will be application to the HG-A test being conducted at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. This test is being conducted in a 13-m long, 1-m diameter microtunnel in the Opalinus clay rock in which a test section at the far end of the microtunnel is isolated using a packer. The test is specifically targeted to observe how fluids injected into the test section penetrate into the rock, with particular emphasis on the EDZ. The HG-A microtunnel was excavated in 2005 and subsequent mapping of the tunnel surface shows preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts along zones where bedding planes are tangential to the tunnel wall and where faults intercept the tunnel. It appears that the EDZ fracture damage can be attributed to both tensile and shear fracturing mechanisms. A series of injection tests with water and gas have been performed which also show preferential invasion of the fluid pressure along the observed damage zones, as well as fracture self-sealing over time. The TOUGH-RBSN approach has been successfully applied to modeling fracture driven by predominately tensile loading, whereas only

  13. Detection and cultivation of indigenous microorganisms in Mesozoic claystone core samples from the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mont Terri Rock Laboratory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclaire, L.; McKenzie, J. A.; Schwyn, B.; Bossart, P.

    Although microorganisms have been isolated from various deep-subsurface environments, the persistence of microbial activity in claystones buried to great depths and on geological time scales has been poorly studied. The presence of in-situ microbial life in the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mesozoic claystone, 170 million years old) at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Canton Jura, Switzerland was investigated. Opalinus Clay is a host rock candidate for a radioactive waste repository. Particle tracer tests demonstrated the uncontaminated nature of the cored samples, showing their suitability for microbiological investigations. To determine whether microorganisms are a consistent and characteristic component of the Opalinus Clay Formation, two approaches were used: (i) the cultivation of indigenous micoorganisms focusing mainly on the cultivation of sulfate-reducing bacteria, and (ii) the direct detection of molecular biomarkers of bacteria. The goal of the first set of experiments was to assess the presence of cultivable microorganisms within the Opalinus Clay Formation. After few months of incubation, the number of cell ranged from 0.1 to 2 × 10 3 cells ml -1 media. The microorganisms were actively growing as confirmed by the observation of dividing cells, and detection of traces of sulfide. To avoid cultivation bias, quantification of molecular biomarkers (phospholipid fatty acids) was used to assess the presence of autochthonous microorganisms. These molecules are good indicators of the presence of living cells. The Opalinus Clay contained on average 64 ng of PLFA g -1 dry claystone. The detected microbial community comprises mainly Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria as indicated by the ratio of iso/anteiso phospholipids (about 2) and the detection of large amount of β-hydroxy substituted fatty acids. The PLFA composition reveals the presence of specific functional groups of microorganisms in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus, and

  14. Compressional wave dispersion due to rock matrix stiffening by clay squirt flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Jing; Zhao, Jianguo; Carcione, José M.; Huang, Xingxing

    2016-06-01

    The standard Biot-Gassmann theory of poroelasticity fails to explain strong compressional wave velocity dispersion experimentally observed in 12 tight siltstone with clay-filled pores. In order to analyze and understand the results, we developed a new double-porosity model of clay squirt flow where wave-induced local fluid flow occurs between the micropores in clay aggregates and intergranular macropores. The model is validated based on the combined study of ultrasonic experiments on specimens at different saturation conditions and theoretical predictions. The presence of a sub-pore-scale structure of clay micropores contained in intergranular macropores, where the fluid does not have enough time to achieve mechanical equilibrium at ultrasonic frequencies and thus stiffens the rock matrix, provides a suitable explanation of the experimental data. Moreover, the model provides a new bound for estimating the compressional wave velocity of tight rocks saturated with two immiscible liquids. The theoretical predictions indicate that the velocity variation between gas- and liquid-saturated specimens is predominantly induced by the clay squirt stiffening effect on the rock matrix and not by fluid substitution. The effect contributes more than 90% to the variation in the porosity range of 0-5%. Thus, clay squirt flow dominates the relationships between compressional wave velocity and pore fluid in tight rocks.

  15. Thermal impact on host rock of geologic repository; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Ching-Hua

    1986-03-01

    The initial stress of rock was estimated and analyzed based on the geological survey information collected during the site visits. Change in stress and its distribution in the rock due to excavation was investigated and predicted according to the repository geometry. Thermal effects on the magnitude and distribution of stress in rock was also investigated and predicted according to the repository geometry. Thermal effects on the magnitude and distribution of rock stresses were investigated under two different temperature conditions. Emphasis was placed on the development of fractures due to stress concentration at or near the repository openings. Permeability characteristics of host rock were evaluated at three temperature levels. Series of permeability tests were conducted for determining the thermal effect on the hydrological characteristics of rock. The following goals were achieved from this investigation: (1) Better understanding of stress changes in host rock due to repository excavation and thermal impact. (2) Better understanding of the development of rock fractures and its effect on the hydrological characteristics of host rock. (3) To provide the technical information obtained from this study to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Wastes Management (OCRWM) with a hope that it may assist OCRWM in the decision making of selecting a repository site. Due to limited time for this research, only one type of host media, granite, was included in the study.

  16. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. PMID:26542073

  17. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills.

  18. Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

    2004-06-20

    The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

  19. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  20. Swelling of Clay-Sulfate Rocks: A Review of Processes and Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, Christoph; Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunnel engineering, causing serious damage to tunnels and producing high additional costs during tunnel construction and operation. The swelling problem is also known from other geotechnical fields, such as road and bridge construction, and in conjunction with geothermal drillings. The planning of counter measures that would stop or minimize the swelling is extremely difficult, and it is currently impossible to predict the swelling behavior of an actual geotechnical project. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, chemical, hydraulic and mechanical controls of the swelling. This article presents a literature review of processes in swelling clay-sulfate rocks and associated controls. Numerical models that aim at simulating the processes and controls are also included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-related work in this review, the article intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling clay-sulfate rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical projects.

  1. Mineralogical Characteristics of Carbonate Rock-Hosted Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, E.; Roh, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural weathering and human activities. The parent rocks of asbestos have been associated with ultramafic and mafic rocks, and carbonate rock. The previous studies on naturally occurring asbestos were mainly limited to ultramafic and mafic rock-hosted asbestos and studies on carbonate rock-hosted asbestos are relatively rare in South Korea. Therefore, this study was aimed to characterize mineralogy of carbonate rock-hosted NOA at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk province and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province. The rock types at the four sites are consisting mainly of Precambrian metasedimentary rock. XRD and PLM analyses showed fibrous minerals in the sites were tremolite and actinolite of acicular and columnar forms. SEM-EDS analyses showed that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite had various ratios of length and diameters over 12:1, and needle and columnar forms. A columnar forms of tremolite and actinolite were showed small acicular at the edge of the particle. Its main chemical compositions are mainly Si, O, Mg, Ca, which were identical to tremolite. Actinolite contains Fe in addition to Si, O, Mg, Ca. EPMA analyses of asbestos occurred at Muju indicated that chemical composition are 55% SiO2, 23.2% MgO, 13.1 % CaO, and 0.61 % FeO and the chemical formula calculated as (K0.01Na0.01)Ca2.01(Mg4.94Fe0.05) (Al0.004Si7.98)O22(OH)2, which is close to ideal tremolite. In addition to tremolite, actinolite was also occurred at Seosan, Chungnam. XRD analyses showed that antigorite was existed at Muju, but PLM and SEM analyses showed the antigorite was platy structure, not asbestiform. These results indicate that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite with acicular forms contains in carbonate rocks at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province South Korea.

  2. Stress-strain relations for swelling anhydritic clay rocks – A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Simon; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunnel engineering, causing serious damage to tunnels and producing high additional costs during tunnel construction and operation. The swelling leads to geomechanical processes that may result in heave of the tunnel invert, destruction of the lining or uplift of the entire tunnel section. Heave-pressure-time relations are needed when predictions should be made about the mechanical behavior of swelling rock. For pure clay rocks, there is a linear relation between the swelling heave (strain) and the logarithm of pressure (Grob 1972). A generally accepted relation for clay-sulfate rocks, however, is still lacking to date. Therefore, finding appropriate and sustainable counter measures for an actual tunneling project affected by swelling remains extremely difficult. Grob (1972) proposed the linear relation between heave and the logarithm of pressure ("semi-logarithmic swelling law") not only for clay rocks, but also for clay-sulfate rocks. Pimentel (2007), however, presented laboratory experiments indicating that the semi-logarithmic swelling law may be inadequate for describing the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks. The laboratory tests revealed three different stages in the swelling process, including minimal deformation and prevented gypsum crystallization at high pressures (> 6 MPa); large deformation and gypsum crystallization at medium pressures; and only small deformation, possibly along with gypsum dissolution, at low pressures (< 4 MPa). He pointed at a "tri-linear" relation to describe the different stages. Kirschke (1995) generally doubts the existence of a fixed relation between swelling strain and (final) pressure. According to him, swelling pressures and their temporal development are controlled by water inflow into the rock, which cannot be reflected by general strain-stress relations. The present study critically reviews stress-strain relations for swelling anhydritic clay rocks proposed by various

  3. Microstructure and porosity of Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, M. E.; Laurich, B.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mont Terri rock laboratory (Canton Jura, Switzerland) is an international scientific platform of research on radioactive waste disposal in Opalinus Clay and results provide input for assessing the feasibility and safety of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in argillaceous formations [1]. A main safety issue is to accurately investigate mass transport rates. To date several methods analyzed bulk permeability and porosity of Opalinus Clay. However, detailed quantitative investigation of microstructure and pore morphology is necessary to understand sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation. To produce high quality cross-sections without microstructural damage that enable investigation of microstructure and porosity down the nm scale a combination of Broad Ion Beam (BIB) milling and SEM imaging has been used [2]. This method allowed direct imaging of the clay fabric and porosity on ca. 1 mm2 areas. The lateral variability of Opalinus Clay is low on the regional scale [1], whereas vertically the Opalinus Clay can be subdivided into six different lithological subfacies [3] based on variable silt layers, sandstone layers and siderite concretions present, where the end-members are the Shaly and Sandy facies. In this contribution microstructures and pore space in Opalinus Clay from the undisturbed Shaly and Sandy facies are studied and compared to disturbed samples from the "Main fault" within the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The Shaly facies in the lower half of the sequence constitutes of dark grey silty calcerous shales and argillaceous marls, whereas the Sandy facies comprises silty to sandy marls with sandstone lenses cemented with carbonate [3]. The qualitative mineralogical composition of all Opalinus Clay facies is similar, whereas the "Main Fault" shows calcite, celestite and pyrite veins. Although the overall microfabric differs per layer and per facies we observe low variability of microstructure and porosity in

  4. Crustal thickening and clay: Controls on O isotope variation in global magmatism and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Justin L.; Hand, Martin; Pearson, Norman J.; Barovich, Karin M.; McInerney, David J.

    2015-02-01

    New compilations of global O isotope data from zircon and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks highlight an increasing range in δ18O values in both systems since the late Archean. This is consistent with an increased clay component in sedimentary rocks and subsequent incorporation into igneous rocks. Each of these factors can arguably be achieved by increased crustal thickening in the late Archean resulting in greater burial and melting of supracrustal rocks and increased chemical weathering and recycling of upper crustal rocks. Despite the suggested change in tectonic regimes in the late Archean, stochastic modelling in this study demonstrates that δ18O data do not provide evidence for a secular decrease in the proportion of mantle-derived magmas in granitoid rocks. Instead, best-fit models indicate that juvenile input and reworking of supracrustal material vary with respect to the short term (100-200 Myr) tectonic cycles preserved in the continental crust. Hence, major step changes in global tectonic regimes in the post-Hadean, such as the initiation of subduction in the mid- to late Archean, are not supported by global zircon O isotope datasets and instead minor, progressive changes are indicated for Earth's tectonic regimes.

  5. Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, Christoph; Einstein, Herbert H.; Huggenberger, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel excavation. The present study investigates the hydraulic effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and analyzes how hydraulic changes caused by excavation lead to water inflow into anhydrite-containing layers in the tunnel area. Numerical groundwater models are used to conduct scenario simulations that allow one to relate hydrogeological conditions to rock swelling. The influence of the topographic setting, the excavation-damaged zone around the tunnel, the sealing effect of the tunnel liner, and the geological configuration are analyzed separately. The analysis is performed for synthetic situations and is complemented by a case study from a tunnel in Switzerland. The results illustrate the importance of geological and hydraulic information when assessing the risk of swelling at an actual site.

  6. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  7. Environmental rock-magnetism of Cenozoic red clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, Takaya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-01

    Nonfossiliferous red clay can be used for elucidating long-range environmental changes, although such studies were limited so far because of the difficulty in precise age estimation and extremely low sedimentation rates. We conducted an environmental rock-magnetic study of Cenozoic red clay at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1365 in the South Pacific Gyre. Magnetostratigraphy could be established only above ˜6 m below the seafloor (mbsf) (˜5 Ma). Below ˜6 mbsf, the ages of the cores were transferred from the published ages of nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 596, which is based mainly on a constant Cobalt flux model, by intercore correlation using magnetic susceptibility and rare earth element content variation patterns. Rock-magnetic analyses including first-order reversal curve diagrams, the ratio of anhysteretic remanent magnetization susceptibility to saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), and IRM component analyses revealed that magnetic minerals consist mainly of biogenic magnetite and terrigenous maghemite, and that the proportion of the terrigenous component increased since ˜23 Ma. We consider that the increase reflects a growth of eolian dust flux associated with a northward shift of Australia and the site to an arid region of the middle latitudes. The increase of the terrigenous component accelerated after ˜5 Ma, which may be associated with a further growth of the Antarctic glaciation at that time. This is coeval with the onset of the preservation of magnetostratigraphy, suggesting that the primary remanent magnetization is carried by the terrigenous component.

  8. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm-1 and 2852 cm-1. The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm-1, indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm-1 to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm-1, whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm-1 to 1605 cm-1, indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

  9. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm(-1) and 2852 cm(-1). The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm(-1), indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm(-1) to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm(-1), whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm(-1) to 1605 cm(-1), indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

  10. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm(-1) and 2852 cm(-1). The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm(-1), indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm(-1) to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm(-1), whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm(-1) to 1605 cm(-1), indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks. PMID:25879983

  11. Preparation of thermally stable well-dispersed water-soluble CdTe quantum dots in montmorillonite clay host media.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng

    2012-02-15

    In this work, a method to prepare a thermally stable QDs/clay powder is reported. First, several water soluble CdTe QDs characterised by different size-dependent emission wavelengths were synthesised through wet chemistry. Montmorillonite-Na(+) clay in water was dispersed into a muddy suspension by sonication. Then, the clay-water suspension was used as the host media for CdTe QDs to prepare the QDs/clay powder by freeze drying. The experiments showed that QDs/clay powder could be re-dispersed in water without changing the luminescent property of the QDs; this process was reversible. EDX showed that Cd and Te elements existed in the QDs/clay powder and the XRD tests showed that the clay [001] reflection peaks for raw clay, QDs (λ(em)=514 nm)/clay and QDs (λ(em)=560 nm)/clay were the same, namely 2θ=7.4°. Finally, QDs/clay powder was applied to the HDPE polymer extrusion process at 200 °C to produce thin films; the resultant QDs-polymer nanocomposite film exhibited strong fluorescence.

  12. Analyses of geochemical samples and descriptions of rock samples, Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas, Clay County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, M.S.; Hanley, J.T.; Kelley, D.L.; Sherlock, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative spectrographic analyses for 31 elements on 105 rocks, 47 stream-sediment, and 70 soil samples from the Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas and vicinity, Talladega National Forest, Clay County, Alabama are reported here in detail. Atomic-absorption analyses for zinc in all samples and for gold in 5 selected rock samples are also reported. Localities for all sables are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. A brief description of each rock sample is included. Rocks analyzed include quartzite, phyllite, vein quartz, and schist.

  13. Interpretation of K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks aided by modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Srodon, J.; Clauer, Norbert; Eberl, D.D.D.

    2002-01-01

    K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks may contain "mixed ages," i.e., may have ages that are intermediate between the ages of end-member events. Two phenomena that may cause mixed ages are: (1) long-lasting reaction during the burial illitization of smectite: and (2) physical mixing of detrital and diagenetic components. The first phenomenon was investigated by simulation of illitization reactions using a nucleation and growth mechanism. These calculations indicate that values for mixed ages are related to burial history: for an equivalent length of reaction time, fast burial followed by slow burial produces much older mixed ages than slow burial followed by fast. The type of reaction that occured in a rock can be determined from the distribution of ages with respect to the thickness of illite crystals. Dating of artificial mixtures confirms a non-linear relation between mixed ages and the proportions of the components. Vertical variation of K-Ar age dates from Gulf Coast shales can be modeled by assuming diagenetic illitization that overprints a subtle vertical trend (presumably of sedimentary origin) in detrital mineral content.

  14. Geochemical evaluation of different groundwater-host rock systems for radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Metz, V; Kienzler, B; Schüssler, W

    2003-03-01

    The geochemical suitability of a deep bedrock repository for radioactive waste disposal is determined by the composition of geomatrix and groundwater. Both influence radionuclide solubility, chemical buffer capacity and radionuclide retention. They also determine the chemical compatibility of waste forms, containers and backfill materials. Evaluation of different groundwater-host rock systems is performed by modeling the geochemical environments and the resulting radionuclide concentrations. In order to demonstrate the evaluation method, model calculations are applied to data sets available for various geological formations such as granite, clay and rocksalt. The saturation state of the groundwater-geomatrix system is found to be fundamental for the evaluation process. Hence, calculations are performed to determine if groundwater is in equilibrium with mineral phases of the geological formation. In addition, corrosion of waste forms in different groundwater is examined by means of reaction path modeling. The corrosion reactions change the solution compositions and pH, resulting in significant changes of radionuclide solubilities. The results demonstrate that geochemical modeling of saturation state and compatibility of the host formation environment with the radioactive waste proves to be a feasible tool for evaluation of various sites considered as deep underground repositories.

  15. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  16. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  17. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  18. Shock experiments in support of the Lithopanspermia theory: The influence of host rock composition, temperature, and shock pressure on the survival rate of endolithic and epilithic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Cornelia; Fritz, Jörg; Misgaiski, Martin; Stäffler, Dieter; Artemieva, Natalia A.; Hornemann, Ulrich; Moeller, Ralf; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Cockell, Charles; Horneck, Gerda; Ott, Sieglinde; Rabbow, Elke

    2011-05-01

    Shock recovery experiments were performed with an explosive set-up in which three types of microorganisms embedded in various types of host rocks were exposed to strong shock waves with pressure pulse lengths of lower than 0.5 μs: spores of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, Xanthoria elegans lichens, and cells of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp. 029. In these experiments, three fundamental parameters were systematically varied (1) shock pressures ranging from 5 to 50 GPa, (2) preshock ambient temperature of 293, 233 and 193 K, and (3) the type of host rock, including nonporous igneous rocks (gabbro and dunite as analogs for the Martian shergottites and chassignites, respectively), porous sandstone, rock salt (halite), and a clay-rich mineral mixture as porous analogs for dry and water-saturated Martian regolith. The results show that the three parameters have a strong influence on the survival rates of the microorganisms. The most favorable conditions for the impact ejection from Mars for microorganisms would be (1) low porosity host rocks, (2) pressures <10-20 GPa, and (3) low ambient temperature of target rocks during impact. All tested microorganisms were capable of surviving to a certain extent impact ejection in different geological materials under distinct conditions.

  19. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ˜1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon.

  1. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    characterized by increased fracture densities and higher percentages of fractures with large apertures. In the Upper Rhine Graben (2) damage zones in Muschelkalk limestones (Middle Triassic) are well developed even in fault zones with dm-scale displacements. Their fault cores, however, are narrow compared with that of fault zones with larger displacements and comprise brecciated material, clay smear, host rock lenses or zones of mineralization. Fracture apertures are larger parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike. A large fault zone footwall in Triassic Bunter sandstone shows a clearly developed fault core with fault gouge, slip zones, deformation bands and host rock lenses, a distal fault core with disturbed layering and high fracture density and a damage zone with increased fracture density compared with the host rock. In the study areas of palaeogeothermal fields in the Bristol Channel (3), all the mineral veins are clearly related to the faults and occur almost exclusively in the damage zones, indicating that geothermal water was transported along the then-active faults into the host rocks. Field measurements indicate that in all the localities, a large majority of the fractures in the fault damage zones are extension fractures, fewer are shear fractures. In the Jurassic Blue Lias there is evidence that the veins were injected as hydrofractures from fault planes into the limestone layers. In the Triassic Mercia Mudstone most veins were arrested during their propagation by layers with contrasting mechanical properties (stress barriers). Some veins, however, propagated through the barriers along faults to shallower levels. Our studies contribute to understanding and modelling of hydromechanical behaviour of fault zones and fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. For successful exploration and exploitation, fault zones must be studied in detail regarding their likely internal structure, fracture parameters and orientation in relation to the current stress field. We show

  2. Effect of Clay Nanoparticle Transport, Desorption Kinetics and Redox Equilibrium on Radionuclide Mobility in Fractured Rock investigated at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Huber, F. M.; Lagos, M.; Quinto, F.; Heck, S.; Martin, A. J.; Blechschmidt, I.; Lanyon, G. W.; Reiche, T.; Noseck, U.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of contaminants in crystalline environments might occur through dissolved species or attached to colloidal or nanoparticulate phases being mobile in water conducting features of the host rock. In this presentation we will discuss the mobility of clay nanoparticles as detected by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) as a function of fracture surface roughness and groundwater chemistry. The on site observed Tc-99, U-233, Np-237, Pu-242 and Am-243 sorption/desorption kinetics with and without natural or synthetic clay minerals (smectites) are compared to laboratory studies under similar groundwater conditions. The desorption or redox kinetics were monitored over a duration of up to 426 days using natural fracture filling material as a concurrence ligand and monitoring the colloid attachment via detection of Al, Si, Ni and Zn as smectite structural elements. For trivalent actinides smectite desorption rates in the range of 1.2-3.7E-3 per hour could be determined and significantly lower desorption rates for tetravalent actinides were found. This results will be compared with field data of migration experiments performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, Switzerland) using the same radionuclides and clay colloidal phases varying the fracture residence time by flow rate adjustment. Furthermore, the long-term actinide mobility will be addressed by presenting AMS/RIMS measurements of (a) samples collected several months into the tailing of the breakthrough curves not any longer detectable by HR-ICP-MS and (b) background samples of different GTS ground waters showing fallout U-236, whereas fallout Pu could not be detected indicating a much lower mobility under the given conditions.

  3. Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits of the Dian-Qian-Gui area, Guizhou, and Yunnan Provinces, and Guangxi District, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, S.G.; Jiazhan, H.; Zhiping, L.; Chenggui, J.

    2007-01-01

    Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Dian-Qian-Gui area in southwest China are hosted in Paleozoic and early Mesozoic sedimentary rocks along the southwest margin of the Yangtze (South China) Precambrian craton. Most deposits have characteristics similar to Carlin-type Au deposits and are spatially associated, on a regional scale, with deposits of coal, Sb, barite, As, Tl, and Hg. Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are disseminated stratabound and(or) structurally controlled. The deposits have many similar characteristics, particularly mineralogy, geochemistry, host rock, and structural control. Most deposits are associated with structural domes, stratabound breccia bodies, unconformity surfaces or intense brittle-ductile deformation zones, such as the Youjiang fault system. Typical characteristics include impure carbonate rock or calcareous and carbonaceous host rock that contains disseminated pyrite, marcasite, and arsenopyrite-usually with ??m-sized Au, commonly in As-rich rims of pyrite and in disseminations. Late realgar, orpiment, stibnite, and Hg minerals are spatially associated with earlier forming sulfide minerals. Minor base-metal sulfides, such as galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and Pb-Sb-As-sulphosalts also are present. The rocks locally are silicified and altered to sericite-clay (illite). Rocks and(or) stream-sediment geochemical signatures typically include elevated concentrations of As, Sb, Hg, Tl, and Ba. A general lack of igneous rocks in the Dian-Qian-Gui area implies non-pluton-related, ore forming processes. Some deposits contain evidence that sources of the metal may have originated in carbonaceous parts of the sedimentary pile or other sedimentary or volcanic horizons. This genetic process may be associated with formation and mobilization of petroleum and Hg in the region and may also be related to As-, Au-, and Tl-bearing coal horizons. Many deposits also contain textures and features indicative of strong structural control by

  4. Block Slides on Extremely Weak Tectonic Clay Seams in Openly Folded Tertiary Mud-Rocks at Auckland and the Rangitikei Valley, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prebble, Warwick M.; Williams, Ann L.

    2016-06-01

    Block slides have developed on extremely weak, thin clay seams of tectonic origin, parallel to bedding in gently dipping sandstones and mudstones of Tertiary age. Two areas of noted instability are investigated at Auckland and the Rangitikei valley. Dimensions range from 100 m across × 100 m long for short displacement block slides up to 4 km across × 3 km long for large landslide complexes in which block slides are a major component. Displacements of blocks range from incipient (cm) through short (30 m) to 2 or 3 km for large slides. Many of the Auckland slides are dormant but likely to move in a 2000 year return period earthquake or 100 year high intensity rain storm. At Rangitikei there are many active, younger slides. Sliding rates for active failures vary from a few cm/year to 50 m in 30 min. Host rocks are weak to very weak clayey sandstones and sandy mudstones. The seams are rich in smectite. They have polished and crushed walls, may have slickensides and some contain rounded rock fragments. Laboratory shear strength of the seams is 13 kPa cohesion and 13° friction, with a lower bound of 8° at zero cohesion. Strength is increased at the field scale by waviness, steps and splays. Continuity can be demonstrated over distances of hundreds of metres. Key investigation methods were mapping, shafts and trenches. Tectonic uplift, folding and faulting of the weak Tertiary strata and river down-cutting are perpetuating block slide development.

  5. Organic tissues, graphite, and hydrocarbons in host rocks of the Rum Jungle Uranium Field, northern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, C.B.; Robbins, E.I.; Bone, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Rum Jungle Uranium field consists of at least six early Proterozoic deposits that have been mined either for uranium and/or the associated base and precious metals. Organic matter in the host rocks of the Whites Formation and Coomalie Dolomite is now predominantly graphite, consistent with the metamorphic history of these rocks. For nine samples, the mean total organic carbon content is high (3.9 wt%) and ranged from 0.33 to 10.44 wt%. Palynological extracts from the host rocks include black, filamentous, stellate (Eoastrion-like), and spherical morphotypes, which are typical of early Proterozoic microbiota. The colour, abundance, and shapes of these morphotypes reflect the thermal history, organic richness, and probable lacustrine biofacies of the host rocks. Routine analysis of rock thin sections and of palynological residues shows that mineral grains in some of the host rocks are coated with graphitized organic matter. The grain coating is presumed to result from ultimate thermal degradation of a petroleum phase that existed prior to metamorphism. Hydrocarbons are, however, still present in fluid inclusions within carbonates of the Coomalie Dolomite and lower Whites Formation. The fluid inclusions fluoresce dull orange in blue-light excitation and their hydrocarbon content is confirmed by gas chromatography of whole-rock extracts. Preliminary analysis of the oil suggests that it is migrated, and because it has escaped graphitization through metamorphism it is probably not of early Proterozoic age. The presence of live oil is consistent with fluid inclusion data that suggest subsequent, low-temperature brine migration through the rocks. The present observations support earlier suggestions that organic matter in the host formations trapped uranium to form protore. Subsequent fluid migrations probably brought additional uranium and other metals to these formations, and the organic matter provided a reducing environment for entrapment. ?? 1990.

  6. Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics of Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Au Deposits in P.R. China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second report concerning results of a joint project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Tianjin Geological Academy to study sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Since the 1980s, Chinese geologists have devoted a large-scale exploration and research effort to the deposits. As a result, there are more than 20 million oz of proven Au reserves in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Additional estimated and inferred resources are present in over 160 deposits and occurrences, which are undergoing exploration. This makes China second to Nevada in contained ounces of Au in Carlin-type deposits. It is likely that many of the Carlin-type Au ore districts in China, when fully developed, could have resource potential comparable to the multi-1,000-tonne Au resource in northern Nevada. The six chapters of this report describe sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits that were visited during the project. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits and Carlin-type Au deposits and also provide a working classification for the sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 provide descriptions that were compiled from the literature in China in three main areas: the Dian-Qian-Gui, the Qinling fold belt, and Middle-Lower Yangtze River areas. Chapter 6 contains a weights-of-evidence (WofE), GIS-based mineral assessment of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Qinling fold belt and Dian-Qian-Gui areas. Appendices contain scanned aeromagnetic (Appendix I) and gravity (Appendix II) geophysical maps of south and central China. Data tables of the deposits (Appendix III) also are available in the first report as an interactive database at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-466/. Geochemical analysis of ore samples from the deposits visited are contained in Appendix IV.

  7. 3D surface roughness recreation and data processing of granitic rocks and claystones, potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buocz, Ildikó; Török, Ákos; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta

    2015-04-01

    The determination and modelling of the stability of rock slopes, tunnels, or underground spaces, i.e. radioactive waste disposal facilities, is an important task in engineering. The appropriate estimation of the mechanical parameters for a realistic description of the behaviour of rocks results in higher safety and more economic design. The failure of stability is primarily due to the shear failure of the rock masses along fractures and joints: therefore the correct determination of the shear strength is crucial. One of the most important parameters influencing the shear strength along rock joints is their surface roughness. Although the quantification of surface roughness has been an open question during the past century, several attempts have been made, starting with 2D and continuing with 3D measurements, to provide engineers with a method for determining shear strength numerically. As technology evolved, the 3D methods became more popular and several scientists started to investigate the surface properties through laser scanning and different photogrammetrical methods. This paper shows a photogrammetric method for the 3D digital recreation of joint surfaces of granitic rock and claystone, both potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The rocks derived from Bátaapáti (South Hungary) and Mont Terri (North Switzerland) respectively. The samples are laboratory scaled specimens with an areal size of 50x50 mm. The software used is called ShapeMetrix3D, developed by 3GSM GmbH in Austria. The major steps of the creation of the 3D picture are presented, as well as the following data processing which leads to the quantification of the 3D surface roughness.

  8. Porosity and Permeability Evolution in Cemented Rock Cores under Reactive Flowing Conditions: Comparative Analysis between Limestone and Sandstone Host Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, P.; Karpyn, Z.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2-brine has the potential to alter wellbore cement in depleted oil and gas reservoirs under geological CO2 sequestration conditions. A better understanding of CO2-brine-cement-rock interaction is needed to evaluate the seal integrity of candidate sequestration formation in the long run. This work investigates possible alteration of wellbore cement when bonded by different host formation rock upon exposure to CO2-saturated brine. Composite cement-sandstone and cement-limestone core samples were created to perform reactive coreflood experiments. After an eight-day dynamic flow-through period, both cores had a similar extent of porosity increase, while the cement-limestone core experienced a ten-fold higher increase in permeability. With the aid of X-ray Micro-CT imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy, it is observed that cement underwent greater degradation at the cement-sandstone interface. Degradation of cement-limestone core mainly took place on the host rock matrix. Worm holes were developed and a solution channel was formed in the limestone, creating a dominant flow path that altered both flow and reaction behavior. Limestone buffered the injected acidic brine preventing further deterioration of cement near the core outlet. Changes in fluid chemistry of limestone and sandstone coreflood effluents are compared. Results from this work are aimed at assisting the development and validation of robust reactive transport models through direct measurement of cemented rock core porosity and permeability evolution as well as the effluent aqueous chemistry change. This will subsequently improve predictive capabilities of reactive transport models associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic environments. Permeability Evolution of Cement-Rock Core Sample during Dynamic Flow of CO2-Brine

  9. Carbonate Reservoirs Within Abalak Clay Rocks and Bazhenov Shales in the Central West Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A.; Balushkina, N.; Prokofiev, V.; Bychkov, A.; Kalmykov, G.

    2015-12-01

    It has been established that main reservoirs within deposits of Abalak and Bazhenov formations are confined with carbonate rocks. Carbonate rocks are often fractured, irregularly distributed, genesis of carbonate material is not obvious, reservoir properties can strongly change at short distances. It complicates prediction of prospective carbonate rocks location in the sedimentary column and laterally. Main objective of the work was to reveal genesis of carbonate material and environmental factors influencing on reservoir properties of carbonate rocks. Carbonate rocks of different types have been studied in details using petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical methods. To reveal genesis of carbonate material and environmental conditions during its precipitation analysis of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes distribution and analysis of gas-liquid inclusions in calcite were carried out. As a result three groups of carbonates have been distinguished: methane-derived carbonates that precipitated as a result of microbial activity in the upper part of marine sediments; high-temperature calcite that precipitated from hydrothermal fluids, fills cracks within methane-derived carbonates of the first group; secondary limestones and dolomites that precipitated during katagenesis or also from hydrothermal fluids. Main reservoirs are associated with: 1. limestones at top of Abalak deposits with numerous cracks and caverns partially filled with high-temperature calcite - fractured cavernous reservoir; 2. dolomitized silicites within Bazhenov formation - fractured microporous reservoir. In both cases reservoir properties were formed as a result of secondary alterations of carbonate rocks, particularly induced by hydrothermal fluids migrating from underlying strata. For this reason presence of reservoirs in carbonate rocks is closely connected with the areas of excessive fissuring where fluids migration pathways exist. The work has been carried out with support of RFBR (Russian

  10. Modeling of water rock interactions in an aquitard of sandy clay in the coastal area near Beihai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhou; Jinmei, Yao; Hua, Zhang; Rui, Li; Fang, Xu

    2008-11-01

    Unconsolidated sand, gravel and clay deposits near Beihai and in the Leizhou Peninsula in southern China form an unconfined aquifer, aquitard and a confined aquifer. Water and soil samples were collected from the two aquifers in the coastal Beihai area for the determination of chemical compositions, minerals and soluble ions. Hydrogeochemical modeling of three flow paths through the aquitard are carried out using PHREEQC to determine water rock interactions along the flow paths. The results indicate that the dissolution of anorthite, fluorite, halite, rhodochrosite and CO2, and precipitation of potash feldspar and kaolinite may be occurring when groundwater leaks through the aquitard from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Cation exchanges between Na and Ca can also happen along the flow paths.

  11. Preliminary Numerical Simulations of Nozzle Formation in the Host Rock of Supersonic Volcanic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohletz, K. H.; Ogden, D. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Recognizing the difficulty in quantitatively predicting how a vent changes during an explosive eruption, Kieffer (Kieffer, S.W., Rev. Geophys. 27, 1989) developed the theory of fluid dynamic nozzles for volcanism, utilizing a highly developed predictive scheme used extensively in aerodynamics for design of jet and rocket nozzles. Kieffer's work shows that explosive eruptions involve flow from sub to supersonic conditions through the vent and that these conditions control the erosion of the vent to nozzle shapes and sizes that maximize mass flux. The question remains how to predict the failure and erosion of vent host rocks by a high-speed, multiphase, compressible fluid that represents an eruption column. Clearly, in order to have a quantitative model of vent dynamics one needs a robust computational method for a turbulent, compressible, multiphase fluid. Here we present preliminary simulations of fluid flowing from a high-pressure reservoir through an eroding conduit and into the atmosphere. The eruptive fluid is modeled as an ideal gas, the host rock as a simple incompressible fluid with sandstone properties. Although these simulations do not yet include the multiphase dynamics of the eruptive fluid or the solid mechanics of the host rock, the evolution of the host rock into a supersonic nozzle is clearly seen. Our simulations show shock fronts both above the conduit, where the gas has expanded into the atmosphere, and within the conduit itself, thereby influencing the dynamics of the jet decompression.

  12. Contrasting diagenetic histories of concretions vs. host rocks, Lion Mountain Member, Riley formation (upper Cambrian), Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.

    1988-02-01

    White, elliptical, calcite-cemented concretion nuclei up to 1 m long contrast markedly in color, composition, and diagenetic history from more glauconite-rich concretion rinds and from dark-green glaucarenite host rocks. Concretion nuclei are loosely packed deposits of trilobite carapaces and minor quartz and glauconite that have intergranular volumes of 58%. The nuclei are shell-lag deposits that were cemented by calcite at the sea floor or after burial of a few meters. Concretion rinds, composed of subequal amounts of quartz and compactionally deformed glauconite, have an intergranular volume of only 32% and minor quartz overgrowths that preceded pore-occluding calcite cement. The rinds underwent burial for several million years to tens of millions of years to depths of several hundred meters before they were cemented. The host rock is predominately glauconite with very minor quartz and calcite cement. Strontium isotopic ratios of host-rock calcite cement are variable (0.7084 to 0.7093), but the lowest value suggests precipitation during the Middle Ordovician. In the absence of significant amounts of carbonate cement, the host rock underwent complete dissolution of trilobite carapaces and maximum compaction with total loss of porosity through squashing of glauconite grains. Maximum burial during this stage was completed by the end of Ordovician time.

  13. Clay sized fraction and powdered whole-rock X-ray analyses from alluvial basin deposits in central and southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the study of the water quality and geochemistry of Southwest Alluvial Basins (SWAB) in parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas, which is a Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program, whole rock x-ray analysis and clay-size fraction mineralogy (x-ray) analysis of selected samples from alluvial basin deposits were done to investigate the types of minerals and clay types present in the aquifers. This was done to determine the plausible minerals and clay types in the aquifers that may be reacting with groundwater and affecting the water quality. The purpose of this report is only to present the whole rock x-ray and clay-fraction mineralogy data. Nineteen surface samples or samples from outcrop of Tertiary and Quaternary alluvial basin deposits in the central and southern Rio Grande rift were collected and analyzed. The analysis of the samples consisted of grain size analysis, and clay-size fraction mineralogy and semiquantitative analysis of the relative abundance of different clay mineral groups present. (USGS)

  14. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and

  15. An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository

    SciTech Connect

    Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Shale, mudstone, and claystone as potential host rocks for underground emplacement of waste

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E.A.; Sharps, J.A.; Gill, J.R.; Cooley, M.E.

    1973-01-01

    In this report, the suitability of the argillaceous formations in the conterminous United States as host rocks for underground waste emplacement is reviewed in terms of available geologic information. The strata are considered mainly according to their dimensions, Depth, composition, permeability, structural and seismic history, and to the extent of drilling in the area. Shale, mudstone, and claystone of marine origin in areas of little structural deformation and seismic risks are generally the most promising. These include the Ohio Shale of Devonian age in northern Ohio and the Devonian-Mississippian Ellsworth Shale and Mississippian Coldwater Shale in Michigan. In-the Rocky Mountain states, the Pierre Shale and other thick shales of Late Cretaceous age are also potential host rocks.

  17. Host rocks and their alterations as related to uranium-bearing veins in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.

    1956-01-01

    This paper, dealing with the different kinds of host rocks and their alterations associated with uranium-bearing veins in the United States, is a chapter of a comprehensive report entitled , "Geology of uranium-bearing vein deposits in the United States," in preparation by George W. Walker, Frank W. Osterwald, and others. The comprehensive report will include detailed information on tectonic and structural setting, kinds of host rocks, wall-rock alteration, mineralogy, physical characteristics, processes of deposition, and concepts of origin of uraniferous veins; but, because it will not be completed until sometime in the future, some chapters of the report are being transmitted as they are finished. Part of an introductory chapter to the comprehensive report entitled, "Classification and distribution of uranium-bearing veins in the United States" (Walker and Osterwald, 1956) has already been transmitted; several of the terms used herein are defined in the introductory chapter. Data included in this chapter demonstrate that uranium-bearing veins are: 1) in rocks of nearly all textural, chemical, and mineralogic types; 2) most abundant in holocrystalline, commonly equigranular, igeneous and metamorphic rocks characterized by a moderate to high silica content and and by similar physical properties. Although some of the physiochemical properties of the host rocks are discussed in terms of favorability or nonfavoribility for uranium deposition, the principal purpose of this chapter is to establish the petroloic environment in which uranium-bearing veins have been found. Because favorability or nonfavorability of host rocks is related complexly to the chemistry of ore solutions and to methods or uranium transport and deposition, several hypothetical processes of transport and deposition have been referred to briefly; these and other hypotheses will be outlines and discussed in greater detail in a subsequent chapter. The compilation of data leading to this report and its

  18. Mineralogy and petrology of the Cretaceous- Tertiary boundary clay bed and adjacent clay-rich rocks, Raton Basin, New Mexico and Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.; Pillmore, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The K-T boundary occurs at the top of a kaolinitic claystone layer, commonly referred to as the 'boundary clay layer', in an interval of coal and carbonaceous shale. The boundary is defined by the disappearance of certain fossil-pollen taxa. The boundary clay layer also contains shocked quartz grains and abundance anomalies of iridium, chromium, and other elements. Each of these characteristics support the hypothesis of an asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous. -from Authors

  19. A laboratory experiment for determining both the hydraulic and diffusive properties and the initial pore-water composition of an argillaceous rock sample: a test with the Opalinus clay (Mont Terri, Switzerland).

    PubMed

    Savoye, S; Michelot, J-L; Matray, J-M; Wittebroodt, Ch; Mifsud, A

    2012-02-01

    Argillaceous formations are thought to be suitable natural barriers to the release of radionuclides from a radioactive waste repository. However, the safety assessment of a waste repository hosted by an argillaceous rock requires knowledge of several properties of the host rock such as the hydraulic conductivity, diffusion properties and the pore water composition. This paper presents an experimental design that allows the determination of these three types of parameters on the same cylindrical rock sample. The reliability of this method was evaluated using a core sample from a well-investigated indurated argillaceous formation, the Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) (Switzerland). In this test, deuterium- and oxygen-18-depleted water, bromide and caesium were injected as tracer pulses in a reservoir drilled in the centre of a cylindrical core sample. The evolution of these tracers was monitored by means of samplers included in a circulation circuit for a period of 204 days. Then, a hydraulic test (pulse-test type) was performed. Finally, the core sample was dismantled and analysed to determine tracer profiles. Diffusion parameters determined for the four tracers are consistent with those previously obtained from laboratory through-diffusion and in-situ diffusion experiments. The reconstructed initial pore-water composition (chloride and water stable-isotope concentrations) was also consistent with those previously reported. In addition, the hydraulic test led to an estimate of hydraulic conductivity in good agreement with that obtained from in-situ tests.

  20. Mineral carbonation of gaseous carbon dioxide using a clay-hosted cation exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Il-Mo; Roh, Ki-Min

    2013-01-01

    The mineral carbonation method is still a challenge in practical application owing to: (1) slow reaction kinetics, (2) high reaction temperature, and (3) continuous mineral consumption. These constraints stem from the mode of supplying alkaline earth metals through mineral acidification and dissolution. Here, we attempt to mineralize gaseous carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate, using a cation exchange reaction of vermiculite (a species of expandable clay minerals). The mineralization is operated by draining NaCI solution through vermiculite powders and continuously dropping into the pool of NaOH solution with CO2 gas injected. The mineralization temperature is regulated here at 293 and 333 K for 15 min. As a result of characterization, using an X-ray powder diffractometer and a scanning electron microscopy, two types of pure CaCO3 polymorphs (vaterite and calcite) are identified as main reaction products. Their abundance and morphology are heavily dependent on the mineralization temperature. Noticeably, spindle-shaped vaterite, which is quite different from a typical vaterite morphology (polycrystalline spherulite), forms predominantly at 333 K (approximately 98 wt%).

  1. Weibull-distributed dyke thickness reflects probabilistic character of host-rock strength.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, Michael; Hieronymus, Christoph F; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Tanner, David C; Friese, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sheet intrusions (dykes) constitute the main form of magma transport in the Earth's crust. The size distribution of dykes is a crucial parameter that controls volcanic surface deformation and eruption rates and is required to realistically model volcano deformation for eruption forecasting. Here we present statistical analyses of 3,676 dyke thickness measurements from different tectonic settings and show that dyke thickness consistently follows the Weibull distribution. Known from materials science, power law-distributed flaws in brittle materials lead to Weibull-distributed failure stress. We therefore propose a dynamic model in which dyke thickness is determined by variable magma pressure that exploits differently sized host-rock weaknesses. The observed dyke thickness distributions are thus site-specific because rock strength, rather than magma viscosity and composition, exerts the dominant control on dyke emplacement. Fundamentally, the strength of geomaterials is scale-dependent and should be approximated by a probability distribution. PMID:24513695

  2. Weibull-distributed dyke thickness reflects probabilistic character of host-rock strength

    PubMed Central

    Krumbholz, Michael; Hieronymus, Christoph F.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Tanner, David C.; Friese, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sheet intrusions (dykes) constitute the main form of magma transport in the Earth’s crust. The size distribution of dykes is a crucial parameter that controls volcanic surface deformation and eruption rates and is required to realistically model volcano deformation for eruption forecasting. Here we present statistical analyses of 3,676 dyke thickness measurements from different tectonic settings and show that dyke thickness consistently follows the Weibull distribution. Known from materials science, power law-distributed flaws in brittle materials lead to Weibull-distributed failure stress. We therefore propose a dynamic model in which dyke thickness is determined by variable magma pressure that exploits differently sized host-rock weaknesses. The observed dyke thickness distributions are thus site-specific because rock strength, rather than magma viscosity and composition, exerts the dominant control on dyke emplacement. Fundamentally, the strength of geomaterials is scale-dependent and should be approximated by a probability distribution. PMID:24513695

  3. Formation conditions of paleovalley uranium deposits hosted in upper Eocene-lower Oligocene rocks of Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, S. F.; Strelkova, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The uranium deposits of Bulgaria related to the Late Alpine tectonomagmatic reactivation are subdivided into two groups: exogenic-epigenetic paleovalley deposits related to the basins filled with upper Eocene-lower Oligocene volcanic-sedimentary rocks and the hydrothermal deposits hosted in the coeval depressions. The geological and lithofacies conditions of their localization, the epigenetic alteration of rocks, mineralogy and geochemistry of uranium ore are exemplified in thoroughly studied paleovalley deposits of the Maritsa ore district. Argumentation of the genetic concepts providing insights into both sedimentation-diagenetic and exogenic-epigenetic mineralization with development of stratal oxidation zones is discussed. A new exfiltration model has been proposed to explain the origin of the aforementioned deposits on the basis of additional analysis with consideration of archival factual data and possible causes of specific ningyoite uranium ore composition.

  4. Hypogene speleogenesis in dolomite host rock by CO2-rich fluids, Kozak Cave (southern Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spötl, Christoph; Desch, Angelika; Dublyansky, Yuri; Plan, Lukas; Mangini, Augusto

    2016-02-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that cave formation by deep-seated groundwater (hypogene) is a more common process of subsurface water-rock interaction than previously thought. Fossil hypogene caves are identified by a characteristic suite of morphological features on different spatial scales. In addition, mineral deposits (speleothems) may provide clues about the chemical composition of the paleowater, which range from CO2-rich to sulfuric acid-bearing waters. This is one of the first studies to examine hypogene cave formation in dolomite. Kozak Cave is a fossil cave near the Periadriatic Lineament, an area known for its abundance of CO2-rich springs. The cave displays a number of macro-, meso- and micromorphological elements found also in other hypogene caves hosted in limestone, marble or gypsum, including cupolas, cusps, Laughöhle-type chambers and notches. The existance of cupolas and cusps suggests a thermal gradient capable of sustaining free convection during a first phase of speleogenesis, while triangular cross sections (Laughöhle morphology) indicate subsequent density-driven convection close to the paleowater table. Notches mark the final emergence of the cave due to continued rock uplift and valley incision. Very narrow shafts near the end of the cave may be part of the initial feeder system, but an epigene (vadose) overprint cannot be ruled out. Vadose speleothems indicate that the phreatic phase ended at least about half a million years ago. Drill cores show no evidence of carbon or oxygen isotope alteration of the wall rock. This is in contrast to similar studies in limestone caves, and highlights the need for further wall-rock studies of caves hosted in limestone and dolomite.

  5. Newly discovered sediment rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits in the People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Ashley, Roger P.; Chou, I. -Ming; Huang, Zushu; Chaoyuan, Wan; Li, Wenkang

    1988-01-01

    Five deposits discovered in Guizhou Province, Yata, Getang, Sanchahe, Ceyang, and Banqi are described for the first time in Western literature. The deposits have geologic features and geochemical signatures that are remarkably similar to those of sedimentary rock-hosted precious metal deposits in the United States. The sizes of the deposits are as yet undetermined, but they each contain significant reserves at average grades of 4 to 5 g of gold per metric ton. Exploration and drilling are in progress at all of the deposits, and other areas where the geologic setting and geochemical anomalies are similar are being tested.

  6. In search of early life: Carbonate veins in Archean metamorphic rocks as potential hosts of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Carl A.; Piazolo, Sandra; Webb, Gregory E.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; George, Simon C.

    2016-11-01

    The detection of early life signatures using hydrocarbon biomarkers in Precambrian rocks struggles with contamination issues, unspecific biomarkers and the lack of suitable sedimentary rocks due to extensive thermal overprints. Importantly, host rocks must not have been exposed to temperatures above 250 °C as at these temperatures biomarkers are destroyed. Here we show that Archean sedimentary rocks from the Jeerinah Formation (2.63 billion yrs) and Carawine Dolomite (2.55 billion yrs) of the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) drilled by the Agouron Institute in 2012, which previously were suggested to be suitable for biomarker studies, were metamorphosed to the greenschist facies. This is higher than previously reported. Both the mineral assemblages (carbonate, quartz, Fe-chlorite, muscovite, microcline, rutile, and pyrite with absence of illite) and chlorite geothermometry suggest that the rocks were exposed to temperatures higher than 300 °C and probably ∼400 °C, consistent with greenschist-facies metamorphism. This facies leads to the destruction of any biomarkers and explains why the extraction of hydrocarbon biomarkers from pristine drill cores has not been successful. However, we show that the rocks are cut by younger formation-specific carbonate veins containing primary oil-bearing fluid inclusions and solid bitumens. Type 1 veins in the Carawine Dolomite consist of dolomite, quartz and solid bitumen, whereas type 2 veins in the Jeerinah Formation consist of calcite. Within the veins fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures and calcite twinning geothermometry indicate maximum temperatures of ∼200 °C for type 1 veins and ∼180 °C for type 2 veins. Type 1 veins have typical isotopic values for reprecipitated Archean sea-water carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 3 ‰ to 0‰ and δ18OVPDB ranging from - 13 ‰ to - 7 ‰, while type 2 veins have isotopic values that are similar to hydrothermal carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 18

  7. Mechanical Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad M.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-01-09

    This report is being prepared under the FY14 activity FT-14LA0818069, Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-Field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations, and fulfills the Los Alamos National Laboratory deliverable M4FT-14LA08180610, which in PICS:NE is titled “Draft report, Test Plan for Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations.” Since the report is an intermediate deliverable intended as input to the eventual test plan for this test, rather than being an actual test plan, the activity title is used as the title of this document to avoid confusion as to the contents in the report. This report summarizes efforts to simulate mechanical processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report summarizes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt “, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013).

  8. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  9. Effect of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock on the dissolution rate of the SON68 simulated nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeway, James J.; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Ribet, Solange; El Mendili, Yassine; Schumacher, Stéphan; Grambow, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste glass in France is expected to occur in an engineered barrier system (EBS) located in a subsurface Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock formation in the Paris Basin in northeastern France. Understanding the behavior of glass dissolution in the complex system is critical to be able to reliably model the performance of the glass in this complex environment. To simulate this multi-barrier repository scenario in the laboratory, several tests have been performed to measure glass dissolution rates of the simulated high-level nuclear waste glass, SON68, in the presence of COx claystone at 90 °C. Experiments utilized a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pump to pass simulated Bure site COx pore water through a reaction cell containing SON68 placed between two COx claystone cores for durations up to 200 days. Silicon concentrations at the outlet were similar in all experiments, even the blank experiment with only the COx claystone (∼4 mg/L at 25 °C and ∼15 mg/L at 90 °C). The steady-state pH of the effluent, measured at room temperature, was roughly 7.1 for the blank and 7.3-7.6 for the glass-containing experiments demonstrating the pH buffering capacity of the COx claystone. Dissolution rates for SON68 in the presence of the claystone were elevated compared to those obtained from flow-through experiments conducted with SON68 without claystone in silica-saturated solutions at the same temperature and similar pH values. Additionally, through surface examination of the monoliths, the side of the monolith in direct contact with the claystone was seen to have a corrosion thickness 2.5× greater than the side in contact with the bulk glass powder. Results from one experiment containing 32Si-doped SON68 also suggest that the movement of Si through the claystone is controlled by a chemically coupled transport with a Si retention factor, Kd, of 900 mL/g.

  10. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (<˜45 °C) and high seawater:hydrothermal fluid (SW:HF) mixing ratios (>10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios <10, anaerobic processes dominate the energy landscape; sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are more exergonic than any of the aerobic respiration reactions. By comparison, in the basalt-hosted and felsic rock-hosted systems, sulfide oxidation was the predominant catabolic energy source at all temperatures (and SW:HF ratios) considered. The energetics of catabolism at the troctolite-basalt hybrid system were intermediate to these extremes. Reaction energetics for anabolism in chemolithoautotrophs—represented here by the synthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, saccharides, and amines—were generally most favorable at moderate temperatures (22-32 °C) and corresponding SW:HF mixing ratios (˜15). In peridotite-hosted and the troctolite-basalt hybrid systems

  11. Critical elements in sediment-hosted deposits (clastic-dominated Zn-Pb-Ag, Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb, sedimentary rock-hosted Stratiform Cu, and carbonate-hosted Polymetallic Deposits): A review: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, Erin; Hitzman, Murray W.; Leach, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Some sediment-hosted base metal deposits, specifically the clastic-dominated (CD) Zn-Pb deposits, carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits, sedimentary-rock hosted stratiform copper deposits, and carbonate-hosted polymetallic (“Kipushi type”) deposits, are or have been important sources of critical elements including Co, Ga, Ge, and Re. The generally poor data concerning trace element concentrations in these types of sediment-hosted ores suggest that there may be economically important concentrations of critical elements yet to be recognized.

  12. Subcritical dyke propagation in a host rock with temperature-dependent viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuan; Jin, Z.-H.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effects of temperature-dependent viscoelastic properties of the host rock on the subcritical growth of a dyke from a magma chamber. A theoretical relationship between the velocity of subcritical dyke growth and dyke length is established using a perturbation solution of stress intensity factor at the dyke tip and a viscoelastic crack growth theory in which the temperature-dependent creep properties are taken into account. The temperature field around the dyke is calculated using an analytic solution. The numerical results for a dyke subcritically propagating from a magma chamber indicate that while the general dyke growth characteristics are similar to those with constant creep properties, the subcritical dyke growth velocity is increased by an order of magnitude by considering the temperature dependence of the creep properties. Hence, the subcritical growth duration before the dyke reaches the unstable growth state is significantly shortened.

  13. The influence of igneous intrusions on the peak temperatures of host rocks: Finite-time emplacement, evaporation, dehydration, and decarbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayong; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Minglong; Qi, Tian; Liu, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    Using a 13-m-thick basic sill and its limestone host rocks of the Permian Irati Formation from the Parana Basin, South America, as an example, this paper presents a numerical investigation based on heat conduction models on the effect of the emplacement mechanism of igneous intrusions, pore-water evaporation, and dehydration and decarbonation of host rocks on the peak temperature ( Tpeak) of host rocks. Our results demonstrate that: (1) the finite-time intrusion mechanism of magma can lower the predicted Tpeak of host rocks by up to 100 °C relative to the instantaneous intrusion mechanism, and although pore-water evaporation together with dehydration and decarbonation reactions can also depress the thermal effect of the sill on its host rocks, the maximum effect of these mechanisms on Tpeak only reaches approximately 50 °C. (2) The effect of pore-water evaporation on Tpeak is obviously greater than that of the dehydration and decarbonation reactions: the former can cause a maximum deviation of 40 °C in the predicted Tpeak, whereas the deviation due to the latter is less than 20 °C. Further, the effect of the dehydration and decarbonation reactions on Tpeak is less than 10 °C if pore-water evaporation is allowed simultaneously in the models and can hence be ignored in thermal modeling. (3) The finite-time intrusion mechanism of magma probably represents the natural condition of the sill. Pore-water evaporation and dehydration and decarbonation of host rocks are also likely to play important roles in lowering the thermal effect of the sill.

  14. Geology and geochemistry of three sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits in Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, R.P.; Cunningham, C.G.; Bostick, N.H.; Dean, W.E.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1991-01-01

    Five sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits have been discovered since 1980 in southwestern Guizhou Province (PRC). Submicron-sized gold is disseminated in silty carbonate and carbonaceous shale host rocks of Permian and Triassic age. Arsenic, antimony, mercury, and thallium accompany the gold. Associated hydrothermal alteration resulted in decarbonatization of limestone, silicification, and argillization, and depletion of base metals, barium, and many other elements. Organic material occurs in most host rocks and ores. It was apparently devolatilized during a regional heating event that preceded hydrothermal activity, and thus was not mobilized during mineralization, and did not affect gold deposition. The geologic setting of the Guizhou deposits includes many features that are similar to those of sedimentary-rock-hosted deposits of the Great Basin, western United States. The heavy-element suite that accompanies gold is the same, but base metals are even scarcer in the Guizhou deposits than they are in U.S. deposits. The Guizhou deposits discovered to date are smaller than most U.S. deposits and have no known spatially associated igneous rocks. ?? 1991.

  15. Interaction Between Hyperalkaline Fluids and Rocks Hosting Repositories for Radioactive Waste: Reactive Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Josep M.; Maeder, Urs K.

    2005-09-15

    Reactive transport calculations simulating the interaction between hyperalkaline solutions derived from the degradation of cement and potential host rocks for repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste have been performed. Two different cases are shown: (a) The example of the planned repository at Wellenberg and (b) the modeling of the GTS-HPF experiment at the Grimsel Test Site. The GIMRT code has been used for the simulations. Mineral reactions are described by kinetic rate laws. The reaction rates for the primary minerals are based on experimentally determined rates published in the literature and geometric considerations combined with measurements regarding mineral surface areas. Relatively fast rates for the secondary minerals have been used, so the results resemble the local equilibrium solution for these minerals. In both cases, the alteration of the rock and the precipitation of secondary phases cause a reduction in the permeability of the system, which would actually be beneficial for the performance of a repository. Mineral surface area controls, to a large extent, the amount of mineral alteration and the change in permeability.

  16. Low temperature geomicrobiology follows host rock composition along a geochemical gradient in lau basin.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Sia, Tiffany Y; Haddad, Amanda G; Briscoe, Lindsey J; Toner, Brandy M; Girguis, Peter R; Edwards, Katrina J

    2013-01-01

    The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila, and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity) to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria, and ε-proteobacteria, while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis.

  17. Low temperature geomicrobiology follows host rock composition along a geochemical gradient in lau basin.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Sia, Tiffany Y; Haddad, Amanda G; Briscoe, Lindsey J; Toner, Brandy M; Girguis, Peter R; Edwards, Katrina J

    2013-01-01

    The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila, and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity) to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria, and ε-proteobacteria, while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis. PMID:23543862

  18. Low Temperature Geomicrobiology Follows Host Rock Composition Along a Geochemical Gradient in Lau Basin

    PubMed Central

    Sylvan, Jason B.; Sia, Tiffany Y.; Haddad, Amanda G.; Briscoe, Lindsey J.; Toner, Brandy M.; Girguis, Peter R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2013-01-01

    The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila, and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity) to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria, and ε-proteobacteria, while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis. PMID:23543862

  19. Phosphates in some missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Foord, E.E.; Keller, D.J.; Keller, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays. The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspora, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore ("burley" clay). The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality. The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore host

  20. On site measurements of the redox and carbonate system parameters in the low-permeability Opalinus Clay formation at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A. M. a.; Turrero, M. J.; Sánchez, D. M.; Yllera, A.; Melón, A. M.; Sánchez, M.; Peña, J.; Garralón, A.; Rivas, P.; Bossart, P.; Hernán, P.

    An in situ water sampling experiment was performed in the Opalinus Clay formation (Switzerland), with the aim of obtaining undisturbed pore water samples for its characterization. The study was made from a dedicated borehole, named BDI-B1, drilled in March 2002 in the DI niche of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, located at the north-western part of the formation, a few meters away of the underlying Jurensis Marl formation. Five water sampling campaigns have been completed, and on site measurements of the key parameters of the water, such as pH, Eh, Fe(II), S 2- and alkalinity, were performed under controlled conditions inside an anoxic glove box. The chemical composition of the seepage waters obtained from the borehole is Na-Cl type, with an ionic strength of about 0.4 M. The Cl concentrations fit the concentration profile of the Opalinus Clay pore water obtained in previous experiments from boreholes and squeezed water samples. The highest salinity is found in this zone of the Opalinus Clay, with around 12 g/L of chloride. A perturbation of the rock system was produced during the first stages of the experiment due to a packer failure. As a consequence, the borehole was exposed to air during the first phase of the experiment. The main perturbations induced were: (1) pyrite oxidation that caused an increase of sulphate, calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate content in the waters; and (2) the inflow of 3H-bearing water vapour that could penetrate the EDZ. This fresh water infiltration could have mixed with the original formation water, and tritium contents of up to 3.8 TU were measured in the first water sampling campaigns. Nevertheless, after some time the hydrogeochemical conditions of the formation were recovered, and the long-term instrumentation and monitoring of the borehole made possible to obtain different parameters of the formation. Successive water sampling campaigns show a tendency to the stabilization of the main parameters of the water, such as sulphate and

  1. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  2. Flexure and faulting of sedimentary host rocks during growth of igneous domes, Henry Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.D.; Pollard, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of sedimentary rocks about 4 km thick was bent, stretched and uplifted during the growth of three igneous domes in the southern Henry Mountains. Mount Holmes, Mount Ellsworth and Mount Hillers are all about 12 km in diameter, but the amplitudes of their domes are about 1.2, 1.85 and 3.0 km, respectively. These mountains record successive stages in the inflation of near-surface diorite intrusions that are probably laccolithic in origin. The host rocks deformed along networks of outcrop-scale faults, or deformation bands, marked by crushed grains, consolidation of the porous sandstone and small displacements of sedimentary beds. Zones of deformation bands oriented parallel to the beds and formation contacts subdivided the overburden into thin mechanical layers that slipped over one another during doming. Measurements of outcrop-scale fault populations at the three mountains reveal a network of faults that strikes at high angles to sedimentary beds which themselves strike tangentially about the domes. These faults have normal and reverse components of slip that accommodated bending and stretching strains within the strata. An early stage of this deformation is displayed at Mount Holmes, where states of stress computed from three fault samples correlate with the theoretical distribution of stresses resulting from bending of thin, circular, elastic plates. Field observations and analysis of frictional driving stresses acting on horizontal planes above an opening-mode dislocation, as well as the paleostress analysis of faulting, indicate that bedding-plane slip and layer flexure were important components of the early deformation. As the amplitude of doming increased, radial and circumferential stretching of the strata and rotation of the older faults in the steepening limbs of the domes increased the complexity of the fault patterns. Steeply-dipping, map-scale faults with dip-slip displacements indicate a late-stage jostling of major blocks over the central

  3. Clay alteration and gold deposition in the genesis and blue star deposits, Eureka County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drews-Armitage, S. P.; Romberger, S.B.; Whitney, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Genesis and Blue Star sedimentary rock-hosted gold deposits occur within the 40-mile-long Carlin trend and are located in Eureka County, Nevada. The deposits are hosted within the Devonian calcareous Popovich Formation, the siliciclastic Rodeo Creek unit and the siliciclastic Vinini Formation. The host rocks have undergone contact metamorphism, decalcification, silicification, argillization, and supergene oxidation. Detailed characterization of the alteration patterns, mineralogy, modes of occurrence, and associated geochemistry of clay minerals resulted in the following classifications: least altered rocks, found distal to the orebody, consisting of both metamorphosed and unmetamorphosed host rock that has not been completely decalcified; and altered rocks, found proximal to the orebody that have been decalcified. Altered rocks are classified further into the following groups based on clay mineral content: silicic, 1 to 10 percent clay; silicicargillic, 10 to 35 percent clay; and argillic, 35 to 80 percent clay. Clay species identified are 1M illite, 2M1 illite, kaolinite, halloysite, and dioctahedral smectite. An early hydrothermal event resulted in the precipitation of euhedral kaolinite and at least one generation of silica. This event occurred contemporaneously with decalcification which increased rock permeability and porosity. A second clay alteration event resulted in the precipitation of hydrothermal 1M illite which replaced hydrothermal kaolinite and is associated with gold deposition. Silver and silica deposition is also associated with this phase of hydrothermal alteration. Hydrothermal alteration was followed by supergene alteration which resulted in the formation of supergene kaolinite, halloysite, and smectite as well as the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals. Supergene clays are concentrated along faults, dike margins, and within rocks containing carbonate. Gold mineralization is not associated with supergene clay minerals within the Genesis and

  4. Influence of host lithofacies on fault rock variation in carbonate fault zones: A case study from the Island of Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, E. A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Relatively few studies have examined fault rock microstructures in carbonates. Understanding fault core production helps predict the hydraulic behaviour of faults and the potential for reservoir compartmentalisation. Normal faults on Malta, ranging from <1 m to 90 m displacement, cut two carbonate lithofacies, micrite-dominated and grain-dominated carbonates, allowing the investigation of fault rock evolution with increasing displacement in differing lithofacies. Lithological heterogeneity leads to a variety of deformation mechanisms. Nine different fault rock types have been identified, with a range of deformation microstructures along an individual slip surface. The deformation style, and hence type of fault rock produced, is a function of host rock texture, specifically grain size and sorting, porosity and uniaxial compressive strength. Homogeneously fine-grained micrtie-dominated carbonates are characterised by dispersed deformation with large fracture networks that develop into breccias. Alternatively, this lithofacies is commonly recrystallised. In contrast, in the coarse-grained, heterogeneous grain-dominated carbonates the development of faulting is characterised by localised deformation, creating protocataclasite and cataclasite fault rocks. Cementation also occurs within some grain-dominated carbonates close to and on slip surfaces. Fault rock variation is a function of displacement as well as juxtaposed lithofacies. An increase in fault rock variability is observed at higher displacements, potentially creating a more transmissible fault, which opposes what may be expected in siliciclastic and crystalline faults. Significant heterogeneity in the fault rock types formed is likely to create variable permeability along fault-strike, potentially allowing across-fault fluid flow. However, areas with homogeneous fault rocks may generate barriers to fluid flow.

  5. Chemistry of inner piedmont metamorphic rocks hosting a stratiform tin occurrence near Forest City, NC

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.J.; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Eckert, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Concordant, leucocratic lenses in regionally persistent upper amphibolite-grade biotite-amphibole gneiss have been identified by Carr and others (1984) as the bedrock source of alluvial cassiterite in the Inner Piedmont Belt of North and South Carolina. The lenses are composed of quartz, microcline, and dravitic tourmaline plus minor biotite, muscovite, and spessartine garnet; most are barren. Partial major-element analyses of drillcore samples from the gneiss suggest a protolith intermediate in composition between graywacke and arkose. Sill-like, two-mica granitoid bodies interlayered with the metasediments are corundum-normative and are granodioritic in composition. Variation plots of selected trace-element abundances discriminate effectively among (1) biotite-amphibole gneiss enriched in Mn, Zn, and V; (2) granitoids enriched in Ba, Sr, and Zr; and (3) laminated gneisses below the tin zone containing elevated levels of Ni and Cr that suggest an addition of mafic (volcanic.) material to the protolith. Lithium contents are as high as 860 ppm in 5 of 9 gneiss samples and in all 4 granitoids are 3-10 times the average abundance in common igneous and sedimentary rocks; biotite and amphibole are the probably host minerals. Lithium-charged fluids generated during metamorphism may have aided local partial melting and remobilization of tin dispersed (as detrital cassiterite.) in the sedimentary protolith. Li may prove useful in locating other stratiform tin occurrences in metamorphic terranes and in understanding processes of localization. Carr, R.S., III, and others, 1984.

  6. Alteration of national glass in radioactive waste repository host rocks: A conceptional review

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The storage of high-level radioactive wastes in host rocks containing natural glass has potential chemical advantages, especially if the initial waste temperatures are as high as 250/sup 0/C. However, it is not certain how natural glasses will decompose when exposed to an aqueous phase in a repository environment. The hydration and devitrification of both rhyolitic and natural basaltic natural glasses are reviewed in the context of hypothetical thermodynamic phase relations, infrared spectroscopic data and laboratory studies of synthetic glasses exposed to steam. The findings are compared with field observations and laboratory studies of hydrating and devitrifying natural glasses. The peculiarities of the dependence of hydration and devitrification behavior on compositional variation is noted. There is substantial circumstantial evidence to support the belief that rhyolitic glasses differ from basaltic glasses in their thermodynamic stability and their lattice structure, and that this is manifested by a tendency of the former to hydrate rather than devitrify when exposed to water. Further research remains to be done to confirm the differences in glass structure, and to determine both physically and chemically dependent properties of natural glasses as a function of composition.

  7. Mineralogical, chemical and K-Ar isotopic changes in Kreyenhagen Shale whole rocks and <2 µm clay fractions during natural burial and hydrous-pyrolysis experimental maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; Lewan, Michael D.; Dolan, Michael P.; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas; Curtis, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of smectite layers in the illite–smectite mixed layers of the pyrolyzed outcrop <2 μm fraction remain during thermal experiments, especially above 310 °C. With no illitization detected above 310 °C, smectite appears to have inhibited rather than promoted generation of expelled oil from decomposition of bitumen. This hindrance is interpreted to result from bitumen impregnating the smectite interlayer sites and rock matrix. Bitumen remains in the <2 μm fraction despite leaching with H2O2. Its presence in the smectite interlayers is apparent by the inability of the clay fraction to fully expand or collapse once bitumen generation from the thermal decomposition of the kerogen is completed, and by almost invariable K–Ar ages confirming for the lack of any K supply and/or radiogenic 40Ar removal. This suggests that once bitumen impregnates the porosity of a progressively maturing source rock, the pore system is no longer wetted by water and smectite to illite conversion ceases. Experimental attempts to evaluate the smectite conversion to illite should preferentially use low-TOC rocks to avoid inhibition of the reaction by bitumen impregnation.

  8. Identification and characterization of hydrothermally altered zones in granite by combining synthetic clay content logs with magnetic mineralogical investigations of drilled rock cuttings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Carola; Kontny, Agnes; Kohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Clay minerals as products of hydrothermal alteration significantly influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties of crystalline rock. Therefore, the localization and characterization of alteration zones by downhole measurements is a great challenge for the development of geothermal reservoirs. The magnetite bearing granite of the geothermal site in Soultz-sous-Forêts (France) experienced hydrothermal alteration during several tectonic events and clay mineral formation is especially observed in alteration halos around fracture zones. During the formation of clay minerals, magnetite was oxidized into hematite, which significantly reduces the magnetic susceptibility of the granite from ferrimagnetic to mostly paramagnetic values. The aim of this study was to find out if there exists a correlation between synthetic clay content logs (SCCLs) and measurements of magnetic susceptibility on cuttings in the granite in order to characterize their alteration mineralogy. Such a correlation has been proven for core samples of the EPS1 reference well. SCCLs were created from gamma ray and fracture density logs using a neural network. These logs can localize altered fracture zones in the GPK1-4 wells, where no core material is available. Mass susceptibility from 261 cutting samples of the wells GPK1-GPK4 was compared with the neural network derived synthetic logs. We applied a combination of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements with optical and electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to discriminate different stages of alteration. We found, that also in the granite cuttings an increasing alteration grade is characterized by an advancing oxidation of magnetite into hematite and a reduction of magnetic susceptibility. A challenge to face for the interpretation of magnetic susceptibility data from cuttings material is that extreme alteration grades can also display increased susceptibilities due to the formation of secondary magnetite

  9. Metal transports and enrichments in iron depositions hosted in basaltic rocks. II: Metal rich fluids and Fe origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Xuetong; Hu, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on revealing the mechanism of metal transport, enrichment and Fe origin of iron deposition during water basalt interactions occurred in basaltic rocks. Observations of the iron deposits (anhydrite-magnetite-pyroxene type deposits) hosted in K-rich basaltic rocks in the Mesozoic volcanic area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River valley, China, indicate that the mechanism of metal transport and enrichment for those deposits are significant objective to scientists, and the Fe origin problem is not well resolved. Here the metal transport, enrichment and iron origin have been investigated in high temperature experiments of water basaltic interactions. These deposits were accompanying a wide zone with metal alteration. The effects of hydrothermal alteration on major rock-forming element concentrations in basaltic rock were investigated by systematically comparing the chemical compositions of altered rocks with those of fresh rocks. In the deposits, these metals are distributed throughout altered rocks that exhibit vertical zoning from the deeper to the shallow. Then, combined with the investigations of the metal-alterations, we performed kinetic experiments of water-basaltic rock interactions using flow-through reactors in open systems at temperatures from 20 °C to 550 °C, 23-34 MPa. Release rates for the rock-forming elements from the rocks have been measured. Experiments provide the release rates for various elements at a large temperature range, and indicate that the dissolution rates (release rates) for various elements vary with temperature. Si, Al, and K have high release rates at temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C; the maximum release rates (RMX) for Si are reached at temperatures from 300 °C to 400 °C. The RMXs for Ca, Mg, and Fe are at low temperatures from 20 °C to 300 °C. Results demonstrate that Fe is not released from 400 °C to 550 °C, and indicate that when deep circling fluids passed through basaltic rocks, Fe was not mobile, and

  10. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  11. Electrical geophysical investigations of massive sulfide deposits and their host rocks, West Shasta copper-zinc district.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, R.J.; Smith, B.D.; Washburne, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Galvanic and induction electrical geophysical methods are described, and applied to characterize the electrical properties of selected West Shasta massive sulphide deposits and their host rocks at scales less than and greater than 25 ft. The measurements are analysed for their use in differentiating the various rocks and for their correlation with petrographic and geomorphological/climate attributes, and they are compared with other massive sulphide districts of contrasting geological ages. The integrated use of different methods is recommended for effective exploration of the complex West Shasta geology.-G.J.N.

  12. Fossil micrometeorites from Finland — Basic features, scientific potential, and characteristics of the mesoproterozoic host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettrup, Dirk; Deutsch, Alexander; Pihlaja, Pekka; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    The oldest known micrometeorites occur in the up to 1800 m thick Mesoproterozoic Satakunta sandstone in SW-Finland. This typical red bed formation covers a graben with the dimensions of about 15 × 100 km2. The Satakunta formation correlates with the Jotnian sandstone, overlaying at several locations in Fennoscandia basement rocks, which are part of the about 1.8 to 1.9 Ga old Svecofennian orogenic belt. The age of the Satakunta formation s.s. is not well constrained: Sedimentation may have already begun 1.65 Ga ago, and ended prior to the intrusion of the post-Jotnian diabases (1.26 Ga). The depositional environment of the Satakunta sediments was primarily mostly fluvial. In arkose sandstones of this formation, over 60 cosmic spherules (melted micrometeorites) have been identified. They belong to different mineralogical types, and display unaltered mineralogical and chemical features, including the presence of a still glassy matrix. Moreover, this cosmic dust lacks clear signs of mechanical transport. So far, the reasons for the excellent preservation of the micrometeorites are enigmatic. Conceivable factors that generally may have influenced the relatively high abundance of the micrometeorites in the Satakunta formation are (i) distinct concentrations mechanisms acting prior to the embedding into the host sediment, (ii) settling of the spherules at low energy, and lack of further transport in the sedimentological environment, (iii) only minor diagenetic compaction of the host sediments at rather reducing conditions, and (iv) a quite specific time-integrated temperature history for over a billion years. In this contribution, we outline sedimentological characteristics of both, barren, and spherule-carrying Satakunta lithologies. In addition, we discuss possible scenarios for deposition, and survival of this ancient cosmic dust. Understanding of these processes is of prime importance as red beds are quite common lithologies in the Earth's history, and hence, may

  13. Deformation of host rocks and flow of magma during growth of minette dikes and breccia-bearing intrusions near Ship Rock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, Paul T.; Pollard, David D.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied a small group of minette dikes and plugs that crop out within a flat-lying sequence of siltstone and shale near Ship Rock, a prominent volcanic throat of tuff breccia in northwestern New Mexico. Seven dikes form a radial pattern about Ship Rock we describe in detail the northeastern dike, which has an outcrop length of about 2,900 m, an average thickness of 2.3 m, and a maximum thickness of 7.2 m. The dike is composed of 35 discrete segments arranged in echelon; orientation. of dike segments ranges systematically from N. 52? E. to N. 66? E. A prominent joint set strikes parallel to the segments and is localized within several tens of meters of the dike. Regional joint patterns display no obvious relation to dike orientation. Small offsets of segment contacts, as well as wedge-shaped bodies of crumpled host rock within segments mark the sites of coalescence of smaller segments during dike growth. Bulges in the dike contact, which represent a nondilational component of growth, indicate that wall rocks were brecciated and eroded during the flow of magma. Breccias make up about 9 percent of the 7,176-m 2 area of the dike, are concentrated in its southwest half, and are commonly associated with its thickest parts. We also describe three subcircular plugs; each plug is smaller than 30 m in diameter, is laterally associated with a dike, and contains abundant breccias. Field evidence indicates that these plugs grew from the dikes by brecciation and erosion of wallrocks and that the bulges in the contact of the northeastern dike represent an initial stage of this process. From continuum-mechanical models of host-rock deformation, we conclude that dike propagation was the dominant mechanism for creating conduits for magma ascent where the host rock was brittle and elastic. At a given driving pressure, dikes dilate to accept greater volumes of magma than plugs, and for a given dilation, less work is done on the host rocks. In addition, the pressure required

  14. Dyke thicknesses follow a Weibull distribution controlled by host-rock strength and magmatic overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbholz, M.; Hieronymus, C.; Burchardt, S.; Troll, V. R.; Tanner, D. C.; Friese, N.

    2012-04-01

    thickness, irrespective of the tectonic setting, type of magmatic sheet intrusion (e.g. regional dykes and inclined sheets), or magma type. Moreover, the Weibull distribution of dyke thickness can be easily explained by the interplay of host-rock strength (i.e. the distribution of weaknesses) and magmatic overpressure.

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  16. Hydrothermal zeolitisation controlled by host-rock lithofacies in the Periadriatic (Oligocene) Smrekovec submarine composite stratovolcano, Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Polona

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermal zeolites (laumontite, yugawaralite, analcime, heulandite, clinoptilolite), prehnite and pumpellyite have been recognised in a succession of volcanic, autoclastic, pyroclastic, resedimented volcaniclastic and mixed siliciclastic-volcaniclastic deposits. In cone-building lithofacies association attaining 310 m, the alteration minerals commonly change within a single normally graded depositional unit or alternate in the section on a dm- to m-scale, according to the host-rock lithofacies. Fine-grained deposits rich in juvenile glassy pyroclasts are altered to heulandite and clinoptilolite or analcime, and laumontite widely occurs in coarse-grained host-rocks (lapilli tuff, hyaloclastite breccia, volcaniclastic breccia, hyaloclastites) and fracture systems. In near-vent lithofacies association attaining 420 m, prehnite-laumontite, laumontite-analcime, and laumontite-heulandite-clinoptilolite zones developed as a result of superimposed thermal regime generated by the emplacement of an over 200 m thick sill. The recognised dependence of alteration on porosity, permeability and fracturing of the host-rock is closely related to hydrological conditions in the stratovolcano-hosted hydrothermal system with convective-advective flow regime. After separation of steam and gases from convecting hydrothermal fluids, denser liquids outflowed intermittently, preferentially through steeply inclined (20-30°) high-permeability layers in the stratovolcano edifice. In low-permeability layers the flow was slow and thermal conditions were mainly attained by conduction. Zeolites developed only in coarse- and fine-grained vitroclastic tuffs, presumably by the dissolution of volcanic glass. The interstratified siliciclastic siltstones, tuffites and resedimented deposits with low content of glassy particles are devoid of zeolites and indicate compositional constraint on zeolitisation. Lava flows, cooling in a submarine environment and undergoing disintegration and mingling with

  17. Micro-XRF Analysis of Archean Spherule Layers and Host Rocks from the CT3 Drill Core, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehnel, D.; Tagle, R.; Hofmann, A.; Reimold, W. U.; Mohr-Westheide, T.; Fritz, J.; Altenberger, U.

    2016-08-01

    Spherule layers and host rock samples from the Barberton Greenstone Belt were studied with a µ-XRF spectrometer. Elemental distribution maps indicate distinct folding that had been recognized neither by visual inspection nor by petrographic analysis.

  18. Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

  19. Correlation between compositions of ore and host rocks in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Southern Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravkin, I. B.

    2013-05-01

    The geology and typification of volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits of the Southern Urals are considered. The mineralogical-geochemical types of these deposits correlate with the composition of the underlying igneous rocks: Ni-Co-Cu deposits correlatedwith serpentinites (Ivanovka type); (Co)-Cu deposits, with basalts (Dombarovka type); Cu-Zn deposits, with basalt-rhyolite and basalt-andesite-rhyolite complexes (Ural type); and Au-Ba-Pb-Zn-Cu deposits, with basalt-andesite-rhyolite complexes with predominance of andesitic and felsic volcanics (Baimak type). The Ural-type deposits are subdivided into three subtypes: I, underlain by basalts (Zn-Cu deposits); II, hosted in felsic volcanic rocks of bimodal complexes (Cu-Zn deposits); and III, hosted in felsic volcanic rocks of continuously differentiated complexes (Zn-Cu deposits with Ba, Pb, and As). The above types and subtypes bearing local names are compared with global types of VMS deposits (MAR, Cyprus, Noranda, and Kuroko), to which they are close but not identical.

  20. Heterogeneity in friction strength of an active fault by incorporation of fragments of the surrounding host rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naoki; Hirono, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    To understand the correlation between the mesoscale structure and the frictional strength of an active fault, we performed a field investigation of the Atera fault at Tase, central Japan, and made laboratory-based determinations of its mineral assemblages and friction coefficients. The fault zone contains a light gray fault gouge, a brown fault gouge, and a black fault breccia. Samples of the two gouges contained large amounts of clay minerals such as smectite and had low friction coefficients of approximately 0.2-0.4 under the condition of 0.01 m s-1 slip velocity and 0.5-2.5 MP confining pressure, whereas the breccia contained large amounts of angular quartz and feldspar and had a friction coefficient of 0.7 under the same condition. Because the fault breccia closely resembles the granitic rock of the hangingwall in composition, texture, and friction coefficient, we interpret the breccia as having originated from this protolith. If the mechanical incorporation of wall rocks of high friction coefficient into fault zones is widespread at the mesoscale, it causes the heterogeneity in friction strength of fault zones and might contribute to the evolution of fault-zone architectures.

  1. Speciation of neptunium during sorption and diffusion in natural clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Bӧrner, P. J. B.; Drebert, J.; Frӧhlich, D. R.; Grolimund, D.; Kaplan, U.

    2016-05-01

    In argillaceous rocks, which are considered as a potential host rock for nuclear waste repositories, sorption and diffusion processes govern the migration behaviour of actinides like neptunium. For the safety analysis of such a repository, a molecular-level understanding of the transport and retardation phenomena of radioactive contaminants in the host rock is mandatory. The speciation of Np during sorption and diffusion in Opalinus Clay was studied at near neutral pH using a combination of spatially resolved synchrotron radiation techniques. During the sorption and diffusion experiments, the interaction of 8 μM Np(V) solutions with the clay lead to the formation of spots at the clay-water interface with increased Np concentrations as determined by μ-XRF. Several of these spots are correlated with areas of increased Fe concentration. Np L3-edge μ-XANES spectra revealed that up to 85% of the initial Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV). Pyrite could be identified by μ-XRD as a redox-active mineral phase responsible for the formation of Np(IV). The analysis of the diffusion profile within the clay matrix after an in-diffusion experiment for two months showed that Np(V) is progressively reduced with diffusion distance, i.e. Np(IV) amounted to ≈12% and ≈26% at 30 μm and 525 μm, respectively.

  2. Geochemistry of banded iron formation (BIF) host rocks, Yishui county, North China : major element, REE and other trace element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, I.; Lee, I.; Yang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Banded iron formation (BIF) in Yishui area, Western Shangdong Province in North China was formed from late Archean to early Paleoproterizoic (2.6Ga-2.5Ga). Amphibolite, metasediment (schist, gneiss) and migmatitic granite consist of host rocks of the BIF in North China. To find characteristics of BIF host rocks, major element, rare earth element and trace element analyses of whole rocks were conducted. Major elements are analyzed using X-ray Fluorescene Spectrometer (XRF) and REE and trace elements are analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plazma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Amphibolites show large negative Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=0.91~0.99) and ranges of REE are ∑REE=305~380 ppm. LREE/HREE ratios are (La/Lu)cn=21.07~26.12. SiO2 contents are 35.1~44.2 wt% and some samples have high Loss On Ignition values ([LOI]=8.35-10.06 wt%) compared to other amphibolites. LOI value is related to water and volatile contents in the rocks and it reflects amphibolite got high degree of alteration. The Fe and Mg mobility effects are shown by Fe2O3/MgO ratios which are 4.7~5.7. The Mg# varies from 25.6 to 29.3. Migmatitic granites have various range of ∑REE=21~241 ppm. They show both Eu negative anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=0.53~0.71) and positive Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=1.95). Migmatitic granites have high SiO2 contents (68.8~72.2 wt%) and Al2O3 (13.4~14.2 wt%) contents. They have relatively low TiO2 (<0.5 wt%), MgO ( <0.6 wt%) and P2O5 (<0.2 wt%) contents. Gneiss samples were collected either from core or from mine pit. Core samples have negative Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=0.27~0.62) and show enriched LREE than HREE ((La/Lu)cn=45.60~62.32). Mine pit samples have positive Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=1.64~2.87) and almost flatten pattern except Eu anomalies ((La/Lu)cn=2.19~2.37). Core samples have higher Al2O3, TiO2, Na2O and K2O contents than mine pit samples. But remarkably mine pit samples have high contents of Fe2O3 (>40.4 wt%). Schists are divided into two types following REE patterns. Some

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SWEDISH DEEP REPOSITORY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN CRYSTALLINE HOST ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, Stig; Widing, Eva

    2003-02-27

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, has developed a system that ensures the safe handling of all kinds of radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power plants for a long time period ahead. The keystones of this system are: A transport system with the ship M/S Sigyn which has been in operation since 1983. A central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB, in operation since 1985. A final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level waste, SFR, in operation since 1988. In Sweden, the preferred method for final disposal of spent fuel is to encapsulate it in copper canisters and dispose them in a deep geological repository in crystalline host rock. SKB is planning to build an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central storage for spent fuel, CLAB. The siting for the deep repository has not yet been selected. A siting program with feasibility studies was completed in 2001. Early 2002 SKB received the necessary permits to start the site investigation at two potential sites for siting of the deep repository in Sweden. The site investigation at these sites started early 2002 and will be completed during 2007. Over the years, a number of generic studies of the layout of the operational area(s) above ground and underground facilities have been performed. During the site investigation phase the deep repository will be developed to conceptual design status and a number of design studies will be performed. These design studies are called Design Justification Statements (DJS). One important DJS is the selection of access routes from the ground level to the disposal level at tentatively 500 m depth and that study will be completed shortly. The repository design and layout of the disposal areas will be based on site specific conditions and results from demonstration of handling and equipment for canisters, buffer and backfilling. Some of these demonstrations have already been performed at Dspv HRL but additional development and

  4. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Wenner, D.B.; Gillon, K.A.

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the Piedmont province of Georgia to designate areas that may be favorable for field exploration for consideration of a repository for storage of radioactive waste. The criteria utilized in such a designation was based upon consideration of the rock unit having favorable geological, geotechnical, and geohydrological features. The most important are that the rock unit have: (1) satisfactory unit dimensions (> 100 km/sup 2/ outcrop area and at least 1500 meters (approx. 5000 feet) depth of a continuous rock type); and (2) acceptable geohydrological conditions. Among all rock types, it is concluded that the granites of the large post-metamorphic plutons and large, homogeneous orthogneissic units offer the most favorable geologic settings for exploration for siting a radioactive waste repository. Virtually all other rock types, including most metavolcanic and metasedimentary lithologies have unacceptable unit dimensions, generally unfavorable geohydrologic settings, and deleterious mechanical and physical geotechnical properties. After consideration of all major lithologies that comprise the Georgia Piedmont, the following units were deemed favorable: (1) the Elberton Pluton; (2) the Siloam Pluton; (3) the Sparta Pluton; (4) two unnamed plutons adjacent to the Snelson body of S.W. Georgia; (5) the Lithonia Gneiss; (6) basement orthogneisses and charnockites of the Pine Mountain Belt.

  5. Maine Pseudotachylyte Localities and the Role of Host Rock Anisotropy in Fault Zone Development and Frictional Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Three brittle strike-slip fault localities in coastal Maine have developed pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins and other reservoir structures in a variety of host rocks where the pre-existing layering can serve as a controlling fabric for brittle strike-slip reactivation. Host rocks with a poorly-oriented planar anisotropy at high angles to the shear direction will favor the development of R-shears in initial en echelon arrays as seen in the Two Lights and Richmond Island Fault Zones of Cape Elizabeth that cut gently-dipping phyllitic quartzites. These en echelon R-shears grow to through-going faults with the development of P-shear linkages across the dominantly contractional stepovers in the initial arrays. Pseudotachylyte on these faults is very localized, typically up to 1-2 mm in thickness and is restricted to through-going fault segments, P-shear linkages and some sidewall ripouts. Overall melt production is limited by the complex geometry of the multi-fault array. Host rocks with a favorably-oriented planar anisotropy for reactivation in brittle shear, however, preferentially develop a multitude of longer, non-coplanar layer-parallel fault segments. Pseudotachylyte in the newly-discovered Harbor Island Fault Zone in Muscongus Bay is developed within vertical bedding on regional upright folds with over 50 individual layer-parallel single-slip fault veins, some of which can be traced for over 40 meters along strike. Many faults show clear crosscuts of pre-existing quartz veins that indicate a range of coseismic displacements of 0.23-0.53 meters yielding fault vein widths of a few mm and dilatant reservoirs up to 2 cm thick. Both vertical and rare horizontal lateral injection veins can be found in the adjoining wall rock up to 0.7 cm thick and 80 cm in length. The structure of these faults is simple with minor development of splay faults, sidewall ripouts and strike-slip duplexes. The prominent vertical flow layering within the mylonite gneisses of

  6. Phyllosilicate production and sedimentation under the acidic conditions of the Rio Tinto: some constraints for clay-hosting environments of early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Remolar, D. C.; Rio Tinto Working Group

    OMEGA instrument boarded in the Mars Express planetary probe has provided clear evidence of diverse and extensive phyllosilicate deposits covering the Early Mars basins. As most clay-like terrestrial deposits require an active hydrosphere, the Mars materials have been interpreted as having been produced and sedimented under wet conditions. Moreover, the detection of phyllosilicate species such as kaolinite, nontronite, montmorillonite and chamosite were used to infer the chemistry of the ancient Martian solutions as quasi-neutral. Given that the composition of the early Mars atmosphere has been inferred to be composed mainly of CO2 the co-occurrence of carbonates with the phyllosilicate sediments should be expected. However, OMEGA has not detected carbonates, neither associated to the clays, nor in other Mars planetary regions. Two possibilities arise to explain this apparent paradox, they are as follows: (1) the spatial resolution of the OMEGA is not enough to separate the carbonate from the phyllosilicate spectra, and (2) the early Mars environment conditions were driven by a low pH hydrosphere. In the Rio Tinto Mars analog, some phyllosilicates are produced through acidic weathering and transported during rain events within the low-pH solutions of the river. Under acidic attack, the Rio Tinto volcanosedimentary rocks of ryolithic and andesitic nature, which are formed by albite and K-feldspars, produce secondary kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite; whereas chamosite is produced by the simple hydration and erosion of the chamositic deposits that were originated during the Lower Carboniferous hydrothermalism affecting the Paleozoic volcanic deposits. In the acidic stream, chamosite, illite and kaolinite are pervasive phases that resist degradation under low pH to dissolve to silica. Although montmorillonite shows a very low stability when transported inside these acidic solutions, it has been recognized in deposits left by the river during flooding events

  7. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10-50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100-1000, pH of ~7.5-12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  8. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Leveille, R; Westall, F; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Bristow, T; Edwards, P; Berger, G

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ∽7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component. PMID:26213668

  9. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  10. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  11. Geochemistry of igneous rocks associated with ultramafic-mafic-hosted Cu (Co, Ni, Au) VMS deposits from the Main Uralian Fault (Southern Urals, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimis, Paolo; Omenetto, Paolo; Buschmann, Bernd; Jonas, Peter; Simonov, Vladimir A.

    2010-11-01

    Ultramafic-mafic- and ultramafic-hosted Cu (Co, Ni, Au) volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits from ophiolite complexes of the Main Uralian Fault, Southern Urals, are associated with island arc-type igneous rocks. Trace element analyses show that these rocks are geochemically analogous to Early Devonian boninitic and island arc tholeiitic rocks found at the base of the adjacent Magnitogorsk volcanic arc system, while they are distinguished both from earlier, pre-subduction volcanic rocks and from later volcanic products that were erupted in progressively more internal arc settings. The correlation between the sulfide host-rocks and the earliest volcanic units of the Magnitogorsk arc suggests a connection between VMS formation and infant subduction-driven intraoceanic magmatism.

  12. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  13. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  14. On thermal properties of hard rocks as a host environment of an underground thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakova, L.; Hladky, R.; Broz, M.; Novak, P.; Lachman, V.; Sosna, K.; Zaruba, J.; Metelkova, Z.; Najser, J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing focus on environmentally friendly technologies waste heat recycling became an important issue. Under certain circumstances subsurface environment could be utilized to accommodate relatively large quantity of heat. Industrial waste heat produced during warm months can be stored in an underground thermal energy storage (UTES) and used when needed. It is however a complex task to set up a sustainable UTES for industrial scale. Number of parameters has to be studied and evaluated by means of thermohydromechanical and chemical coupling (THMC) before any UTES construction. Thermal characteristics of various rocks and its stability under thermal loading are amongst the most essential. In the Czech Republic study two complementary projects THMC processes during an UTES operation. The RESEN project (www.resen.cz) employs laboratory tests and experiments to characterise thermal properties of hard rocks in the Bohemian Massif. Aim of the project is to point out the most suitable rock environment in the Bohemian Massif for moderate to ultra-high temperature UTES construction (Sanyal, 2005). The VITA project (www.geology.cz/mokrsko) studies THM coupling in non-electrical temperature UTES using long term in-situ experiment. In both projects thermal properties of rocks were studied. Thermal conductivity and capacity were measured on rock samples. In addition an influence of increasing temperature and moisture content was considered. Ten hard rocks were investigated. The set included two sandstones, two ignibrites, a melaphyr, a syenite, two granites, a gneiss and a serpentinite. For each rock there were measured thermal conductivity and capacity of at least 54 dried samples. Subsequently, the samples were heated up to 380°C in 8 hours and left to cool down. Thermal characteristics were measured during the heating period and after the sample reached room temperature. Heating and cooling cycle was repeated 7 to 10 times to evaluate possible UTES-like degradation of

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  16. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  17. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  18. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  19. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  20. Ancient and recent clay formation on Mars as revealed from a global survey of hydrous minerals in crater central peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Vivian Z.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals on Mars have commonly been interpreted as the remnants of pervasive water-rock interaction during the Noachian period (>3.7 Ga). This history has been partly inferred by observations of clays in central peaks of impact craters, which often are presumed uplifted from depth. However, combined mineralogical and morphological analyses of individual craters have shown that some central peak clays may represent post-impact, possibly authigenic processes. Here we present a global survey of 633 central peaks to assess their hydrous minerals and the prevalence of uplifted, detrital, and authigenic clays. Central peak regions are examined using high-resolution Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment data to identify hydrous minerals and place their detections in a stratigraphic and geologic context. We find that many occurrences of Fe/Mg clays and hydrated silica are associated with potential impact melt deposits. Over 35% of central peak clays are not associated with uplifted rocks; thus, caution must be used when inferring deeper crustal compositions from surface mineralogy of central peaks. Uplifted clay-bearing rocks suggest the Martian crust hosts clays to depths of at least 7 km. We also observe evidence for increasing chloritization with depth, implying the presence of fluids in the upper portions of the crust. Our observations are consistent with widespread Noachian/Early Hesperian clay formation, but a number of central peak clays are also suggestive of clay formation during the Amazonian. These results broadly support current paradigms of Mars' aqueous history while adding insight to global crustal and diagenetic processes associated with clay mineral formation and stability.

  1. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in 3D - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Tronberens, Sebastian; Urai, Janos; Asmus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Clay smears in sedimentary basins are important factors defining the sealing properties of faults. However, as clay smears are highly complex 3D structures, processes involved in the formation and deformation of clay smears are not well identified and understood. To enhance the prediction of sealing properties of clay smears extensive studies of these structures are necessary including the 3D information. We present extraordinary outcrop data from an open cast lignite mine (Hambach) in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have Shale Gouge Ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. Material in the fault zones is layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. We studied the 3D thickness distribution of clay smear from a series of thin-spaced incremental cross-sections and several cross-sections in larger distances along the fault. Additionally, we excavated two large clay smear surfaces. Our observations show that clay smears are strongly affected by R- and R'-shears, mostly at the footwall side of our outcrops. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes. Thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cutoffs. Investigating the 3D thickness of the clay smears shows a heterogeneous distribution, rather than a continuous thinning of the smear with increasing distance to the source layers. We found two types of layered clay smears: one with continuous sheared sand between two clay smears providing vertical pathways for fluid flow, and one which consists of overlapping clay patches separated by sheared sand that provide a tortuous pathway across the clay smear. On smaller scale we identified grain-scale mixing as an important process for the formation of clay smears. Sand can be entrained into the clay smear by mixing from the surrounding host rock as well as due to intense shearing of sand lenses that were incorporated into the smear. This causes clay smears

  2. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  3. Infectious microbial diseases and host defense responses in Sydney rock oysters

    PubMed Central

    Raftos, David A.; Kuchel, Rhiannon; Aladaileh, Saleem; Butt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture has long been seen as a sustainable solution to some of the world's growing food shortages. However, experience over the past 50 years indicates that infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes limit the productivity of aquaculture. In extreme cases, these types of infectious agents threaten the viability of entire aquaculture industries. This article describes the threats from infectious diseases in aquaculture and then focuses on one example (QX disease in Sydney rock oysters) as a case study. QX appears to be typical of many emerging diseases in aquaculture, particularly because environmental factors seem to play a crucial role in disease outbreaks. Evidence is presented that modulation of a generic subcellular stress response pathway in oysters is responsible for both resistance and susceptibility to infectious microbes. Understanding and being able to manipulate this pathway may be the key to sustainable aquaculture. PMID:24795701

  4. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  5. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  6. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  7. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  8. Coupling fluid dynamics and host-rock deformation associated with magma intrusion in the crust: Insights from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. L.; Dennis, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Models of magma ascent in the crust tend to either consider the dynamics of fluid flow within intrusions or the associated host-rock deformation. However, these processes are coupled in nature, and so to develop a more complete understanding of magma ascent dynamics in the crust both need to be taken into account. We present a series of gelatine analogue experiments that use both Particle Image Velocimentry (PIV) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques to characterise the dynamics of fluid flow within intrusions and to quantify the associated deformation of the intruded media. Experiments are prepared by filling a 40x40x30 cm3 clear-Perspex tank with a low-concentration gelatine mixture (2-5 wt%) scaled to be of comparable stiffness to crustal strata. Fluorescent seeding particles are added to the gelatine mixture during its preparation and to the magma analogue prior to injection. Two Dantec CCD cameras are positioned outside the tank and a vertical high-power laser sheet positioned along the centre line is triggered to illuminate the seeding particles with short intense pulses. Dyed water (the magma analogue) injected into the solid gelatine from below causes a vertically propagating penny-shaped crack (dike) to form. Incremental and cumulative displacement vectors are calculated by cross-correlation between successive images at a defined time interval. Spatial derivatives map the fluid flow within the intrusion and associated strain and stress evolution of the host, both during dike propagation and on to eruption. As the gelatine deforms elastically at the experimental conditions, strain calculations correlate with stress. Models which couple fluid dynamics and host deformation make an important step towards improving our understanding of the dynamics of magma transport through the crust and to help constrain the tendency for eruption.

  9. Compositional variations in spinel-hosted pargasite inclusions in the olivine-rich rock from the oceanic crust-mantle boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akihiro; Morishita, Tomoaki; Ishimaru, Satoko; Hara, Kaori; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Arai, Shoji

    2016-05-01

    The crust-mantle boundary zone of the oceanic lithosphere is composed mainly of olivine-rich rocks represented by dunite and troctolite. However, we still do not fully understand the global variations in the boundary zone, and an effective classification of the boundary rocks, in terms of their petrographical features and origin, is an essential step in achieving such an understanding. In this paper, to highlight variations in olivine-rich rocks from the crust-mantle boundary, we describe the compositional variations in spinel-hosted hydrous silicate mineral inclusions in rock samples from the ocean floor near a mid-ocean ridge and trench. Pargasite is the dominant mineral among the inclusions, and all of them are exceptionally rich in incompatible elements. The host spinel grains are considered to be products of melt-peridotite reactions, because their origin cannot be ascribed to simple fractional crystallization of a melt. Trace-element compositions of pargasite inclusions are characteristically different between olivine-rich rock samples, in terms of the degree of Eu and Zr anomalies in the trace-element pattern. When considering the nature of the reaction that produced the inclusion-hosting spinel, the compositional differences between samples were found to reflect a diversity in the origin of the olivine-rich rocks, as for example in whether or not a reaction was accompanied by the fractional crystallization of plagioclase. The differences also reflect the fact that the melt flow system (porous or focused flow) controlled the melt/rock ratios during reaction. The pargasite inclusions provide useful data for constraining the history and origin of the olivine-rich rocks and therefore assist in our understanding of the crust-mantle boundary of the oceanic lithosphere.

  10. Biostratigraphy and structure of paleozoic host rocks and their relationship to Carlin-type gold deposits in the Jerritt Canyon mining district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, S.G.; Armstrong, A.K.; Harris, A.G.; Oscarson, R.L.; Noble, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Jerritt Canyon mining district in the northern Independence Range, northern Nevada, contains multiple, nearly horizontal, thrust masses of platform carbonate rocks that are exposed in a series of north- to northeast-elongated, tectonic windows through rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. The Roberts Mountains allochthon was emplaced during the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian Antler orogeny. These thrust masses contain structurally and stratigraphically controlled Carlin-type gold deposits. The gold deposits are hosted in tectonically truncated units of the Silurian to Devonian Hanson Creek and Roberts Mountains Formations that lie within structural slices of an Eastern assemblage of Cambrian to Devonian carbonate rocks. In addition, these multiply thrust-faulted and folded host rocks are structurally interleaved with Mississippian siliciclastic rocks and are overlain structurally by Cambrian to Devonian siliciclastic units of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. All sedimentary rocks were involved in thrusting, high-angle faulting, and folding, and some of these events indicate substantial late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic regional shortening. Early Pennsylvanian and late Eocene dikes also intrude the sedimentary rocks. These rocks all were uplifted into a northeast-trending range by subsequent late Cenozoic Basin and Range faulting. Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks flank part of the range. Pathways of hydrothermal fluid flow and locations of Carlin-type gold orebodies in the Jerritt Canyon mining district were controlled by structural and host-rock geometries within specific lithologies of the stacked thrust masses of Eastern assemblage rocks. The gold deposits are most common proximal to intersections of northeast-striking faults, northwest-striking dikes, and thrust planes that lie adjacent to permeable stratigraphic horizons. The host stratigraphic units include carbonate sequences that contained primary intercrystalline permeability, which

  11. The Kipushi Cu-Zn deposit (DR Congo) and its host rocks: A petrographical, stable isotope (O, C) and radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wilderode, J.; Heijlen, W.; De Muynck, D.; Schneider, J.; Vanhaecke, F.; Muchez, Ph.

    2013-03-01

    Near the city of Kipushi, located in the southern part of the Central African Copperbelt, a major vein-type Cu-Zn ore deposit occurs. A combination of petrographic techniques and both stable (O, C) and radiogenic (Sr, Nd) isotope analysis is used to investigate the influence of the mineralisation on the Neoproterozoic dolomite host rocks. A quantification of the abundance and size of the different host rock constituents (dolomite types, quartz, phyllosilicates) revealed a lithostratigraphical controlled variation, without trends towards the ore body. The bulk oxygen isotopic composition of the host rock varies between -2.54‰ and -9.64‰ V-PDB, with most values within the range of Neoproterozoic marine dolomite. Samples with more positive δ18O all originate from the same stratigraphic interval and are interpreted as the result of reflux dolomitisation by an evaporated brine. Few samples with depleted δ18O signatures could indicate the influence of a depleted or high temperature fluid, but are not related to the ore deposit. Moreover, the presence of the ore body cannot be traced through the host rock oxygen isotopic composition. δ18O of gangue dolomite is significantly depleted in comparison with the host rocks and ranges between -7.67‰ and -12.46‰ V-PDB. For an estimated mineralisation temperature of 310 °C, this implies a δ18Ofluid between 10.7‰ and 15.6‰ V-SMOW. This is a significant enrichment compared to Neoproterozoic seawater, indicating that the mineralising fluid underwent significant fluid-rock interactions. δ13C of both host rock and gangue dolomite are in range of Neoproterozoic marine dolomites. However, a limited stratigraphic interval has clearly more negative δ13C signatures, due to in situ maturation of carbonaceous material. At the time of mineralisation (450 Ma), the host rock dolomite has a strontium isotopic composition partly more radiogenic than Neoproterozoic marine carbonates (0.70793 < 87Sr/86Sr < 0.71167). Nevertheless

  12. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  13. Geochemistry of surface water in alpine catchments in central Colorado, USA: Resolving host-rock effects at different spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Verplanck, P.L.; San, Juan C.A.; Church, S.E.; Schmidt, T.S.; Fey, D.L.; deWitt, E.H.; Klein, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is conducting a study of surface-water quality in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado, an area of approximately 55,000 km2. Using new and existing geologic maps, the more than 200 rock formations represented in the area were arranged into 17 groups based on lithologic similarity. The dominant regional geologic feature affecting water quality in central Colorado is the Colorado mineral belt (CMB), a NE-trending zone hosting many polymetallic vein or replacement deposits, and porphyry Mo deposits, many of which have been mined historically. The influence of the CMB is seen in lower surface-water pH (<5), and higher concentrations of SO42 - (>100 mg/L) and chalcophile metals such as Cu (>10 ??g/L), Zn (>100 ??g/L), and Cd (>1 ??g/L) relative to surface water outside the CMB. Not all streams within the CMB have been affected by mineralization, as there are numerous catchments within the CMB that have no mineralization or alteration exposed at the surface. At the regional-scale, and away from sites affected by mineralization, hydrothermal alteration, or mining, the effects of lithology on water quality can be distinguished using geochemical reaction modeling and principal components analysis. At local scales (100 s of km2), effects of individual rock units on water chemistry are subtle but discernible, as shown by variations in concentrations of major lithophile elements or ratios between them. These results demonstrate the usefulness of regional geochemical sampling of surface waters and process-based interpretations incorporating geologic and geochemical understanding to establish geochemical baselines.

  14. Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions in microdiamond from the gneisses of Kokchetav and Erzgebirge massifs: Diversified characteristics of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamond in UHP rocks due to host-rock buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shyh-Lung; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Shen, Pouyan; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Liou, Juhn G.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2006-03-01

    Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions were identified within metamorphic microdiamonds from garnets of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) gneisses of the Kokchetav and the Erzgebirge massifs by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The chemical characteristics of these inclusions within microdiamonds are surprisingly similar among various gneissic rocks from both Kokchetav and Erzgebirge, but are significantly different from the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid inclusions within microdiamonds from garnets of the Kokchetav UHP marble. These contrasting findings not only provide constraints on the characteristics/compositions of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamonds, but also imply that the formation media must have been buffered by the hosting rocks, resulting in the observed diversities as reported here. In addition, depending on the rock types and thus on the nature of the formation media from which metamorphic microdiamonds were formed, the respective characteristic morphologies of the microdiamonds differ. The P/K-rich silica melt tends to form octahedral or cubo-octahedral microdiamonds within garnet in gneissic rocks, whereas the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid tends to form spheroids/cuboid microdiamonds with rugged surfaces within garnet in marble. Consequently, the buffered media in hosting rocks played a decisive role in determining the different morphologies and growth rates/mechanisms of metamorphic microdiamonds in general.

  15. I. Fundamental Practicum: Temperature Measurements of Falling Droplets, July, 1989. II. Industrial Practicum: Interaction and Effect of Adsorbed Organics on Reference Clays and Reservoir Rock, April, 1988. III. Apprenticeship Practicum: Studies of Group XIII Metal Inclusion Complexes, March, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Mark Richard

    The temperature of 225 μm decane droplets falling through a hot, quiescent, oxygen -free environment were measured using laser-induced exciplex fluorescence thermometry. The temperature of the droplets was found to increase approximately 0.42^ circC/^circC increase in the environment temperature as the environment temperature was increased to 250^circ C. Less than 10% evaporation of the droplets was observed at the highest environment temperatures. This represents one of the first successful applications of a remote-sensing technique for the temperature determination of droplets in a dynamic system. Industrial practicum. The industrial practicum report, entitled "Interaction and Effect of Adsorbed Organics on Reference Clays and Reservoir Rock," is a discussion of the measurement of the effect adsorbed organic material, especially from crude petroleum, has on the surface area, cation exchange capacity, and zeta potential of reference clay material and reservoir rock. In addition, the energetics of adsorption of a petroleum extract onto several reference clays and reservoir rock were measured using both flow and batch microcalorimetry. These results are very important in evaluating and understanding the wettability of reservoir rock and its impact on the recovery of crude oil from a petroleum reservoir. Apprenticeship practicum. "Studies of Group XIII Metal Inclusion Complexes" investigates the structure and dynamics of liquid inclusion complexes having the general formula (R_4N) (Al_2 Me_6I) cdot (C_6H_6) _{rm x}. ^1H and ^{13}C spin-lattice relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and molecular correlation times were measured as well as diffusion coefficients of the various species in solution. The dynamics of transfer between "guest" and free solvent molecules were measured using a variety of techniques. The inherent structure of liquid inclusion complexes as an ordered medium for homogeneous catalysis was studied using hydrogenation catalyzed by

  16. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  17. Wholesale, massive partial melting and melt separation in granite host rock, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currier, R. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    During Gondwana breakup, over 104 km3 of basaltic magma was erupted and emplaced through a deep-seated magmatic mush column forming the Ferrar Igneous Complex (FIC) of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The FIC consists of a 3.5 km interconnected stack of four thick (~350 m) and extensive (~100 km) sills capped by a series of flood basalts. The lowermost sill (Basement Sill) is floored and hosted by a complex of granitic plutons, which generally has undergone no melting at sill contacts. In the vicinity of the newly discovered central feeder vent in central Bull Pass, however, the granitc wall rock is extensively and thoroughly melted for over 40 m above the dolerite contact. The transition from essentially fully melted to un-melted rock is 100% exposed over many kms along the contact, delineating a huge block of crust, perhaps the foot of a massive caldera block, that evidently floated in the sill. Moreover, mafic dikes in the country rock vanish in the melt zone, indicating that the sliding block produced enough shear to stretch, thin, and erase the dikes. The degree and extent of melting clearly reflects the feeding locus for the establishment of the FIC. Besides the loss of dikes, it is the full loss of the coarse granitic texture and the bulk chemical profile that are most distinctive. The partial melt zone thus basically consists of two essential features: post melting residuum granite and granophyric segregations, reflecting locally separated melt. The residuum granite consists of varying amounts of unmelted feldspars and large (5-10 mm) distinctive globular clusters of quartz grains, thermally rounded by partial melting and tightly rimmed with biotite and iron oxides that fade away into unmelted granite. With distance from the contact the style and abundance of the granophyre segregations change in response to the degree of melting. Near the contact, they form irregular, bulbous masses up to several meters across, sometimes containing xenoliths of residuum granite

  18. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  19. In situ interaction between different concretes and Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenni, A.; Mäder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    Interactions between cementitious materials and claystone are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical modifications in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, this alteration might influence safety-relevant clay properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention. In this study, interfaces of Opalinus Clay, a potential host-rock in Switzerland, and three concrete formulations emplaced in the Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) were analysed after 2.2 years of interaction. Sampling techniques with interface stabilisation followed by inclined intersection drilling were developed. Element distribution maps of the concrete-clay interfaces show complex zonations like sulphur enrichment, zones depleted in Ca but enriched in Mg, strong Mg enrichment adjacent to the interface, or carbonation. Consistently, the carbonated zone shows a reduced porosity. Properties of the complex zonation strongly depend on cement properties like water content and pH (ordinary Portland cement vs. low-pH cement). An increased Ca or Mg content in the first 100 μm next to the interface is observed in Opalinus Clay. The cation occupancy of clay exchanger phases next to the ordinary Portland cement interface is depleted in Mg, but enriched in Na, whereas porosity shows no changes at all. The current data suggests migration of CO2/HCO3-, SO42-, and Mg species from clay into cement. pH decrease in the cement next to the interface leads to instability of ettringite, and the sulphate liberated diffuses towards higher pH regions (away from the interface), where additional ettringite can form.

  20. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  1. Analysis of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock in the Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Marina; Prokofiev, Vsevolod; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit is located on the western slope of the Polar Urals. It is one of the largest deposits of vein quartz and rock crystal in Russia. Most of the mineralization is hosted within a single horizon of very firm quartz-sandstone, where plastic deformation did not occur almost entirely. All tectonic stress was released by the development of numerous thrust faults of different scales. Cavities formed during this process were later filled with quartz and rock crystal. In order to obtain more details on conditions under which mineralization took place, analysis of trace element contents in vein quartz and host rocks, and the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz have been carried out. The trace element composition of vein quartz and of the host rock has been determined by ICP-MS. The results have shown that concentrations of most of the 46 studied elements in quartz are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and more than three orders of magnitude lower than in the upper crust. Even though Pb and Li have the highest concentrations in quartz samples, levels are only nearly comparable in chondrite, and substantially lower in the upper crust. At the same time, negative anomalies of Pb and Li concentrations in the host rock may indicate the removal of these elements during vein quartz formation. Contents of most REEs are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and three orders of magnitude lower than in the host rock. Generally, the patterns of REE distribution in vein quartz and the host rock express a clear correlation; confirming the genetic link between vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock. However, the process of quartz recrystallization led to an intense decrease of REEs content, and of all other impurities, which consequently influenced industrial value of the Zhelannoe deposit. As a result of the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz, the following physical

  2. A new approach to the selection of materials for engineered barriers and appropriate host rocks for high level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Omelianenko, B.I.; Nikonov, B.S.; Ryzhov, B.I.; Shikina, N.D.; Yudintsev, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    Sorptive properties of weathered dunites, gabbro-diabases and basic volcanic rocks for Sr and Cs were studied. The results show that the sorptive capacities of these rocks are equivalent to or, in some cases, superior to the industrial sorptive materials. Results of a uranium distribution study by fission-track radiography suggest that material from weathered basic rocks is characterized by high sorptive properties for uranium also. One can assume that other radionuclides of the transuranic group will be intensely sorbed by the residuum of weathered basic rocks. Low-temperature hydrothermal transformation leads to sealing fissures of the basic rocks with highly sorptive minerals, for example, smectite, chlorite, serpentine, in talc, zeolite, hydroxides of Fe, Ti, Mn. The process results in contemporaneous decreasing hydraulic conductivity and increasing sorptive capacity of the rocks. HLW disposal at the radiochemical plant Mayak is expected to be produced in deep wells situated in basaltic rocks. The safety of disposal is based on high sorptive properties of the crust of weathering and protective capacities of volcanic rocks. This method is not expensive and may allow the disposal of HLW in the near future.

  3. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  4. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  5. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  6. Desert varnish: the importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Potter, R M; Rossman, G R

    1977-06-24

    Desert varnish has been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. It is a distinct morphological entity having an abrupt boundary with the underlying rock. Clay minerals comprise more than 70 percent of the varnish. Iron and manganese oxides constitute the bulk of the remainder and are dispersed throughout the clay layer. PMID:17776923

  7. Desert varnish: the importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Potter, R M; Rossman, G R

    1977-06-24

    Desert varnish has been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. It is a distinct morphological entity having an abrupt boundary with the underlying rock. Clay minerals comprise more than 70 percent of the varnish. Iron and manganese oxides constitute the bulk of the remainder and are dispersed throughout the clay layer.

  8. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  9. TEM/AEM characterization of fine-grained clay minerals in very-low-grade rocks: Evaluation of contamination by EMPA involving celadonite family minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gejing; Peacor, D.R.; Coombs, D.S.; Kawachi, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) have led to many new insights into the structural and chemical characteristics of very fine-grained, optically homogeneous mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks. Chemical compositions obtained by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) on such materials have been shown by TEM/AEM to result from beam overlap on contaminant phases on a scale below resolution of EMPA, which in turn can lead to errors in interpretation and determination of formation conditions. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the relation between AEM and EMPA data, which leads also to the definition of new mineral phases, and demonstrate the resolution power of AEM relative to EMPA in investigations of very fine-grained mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks.

  10. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay

  11. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, located in the Petaquilla district of central Panama, is hosted by a sequence of medium- to high-K calc-alkaline volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks. New crystallisation ages obtained from a granodiorite Petaquilla batholith and associated mineralised diorite to granodiorite porphyry stocks and dikes at Cobre Panama indicate that the batholith was emplaced as a multi-phase intrusion, over a period of ~ 4 million years from 32.20 ± 0.76 Ma to 28.26 ± 0.61 Ma, while the porphyritic rocks were emplaced over a ~ 2 million year period from 28.96 ± 0.62 Ma to 27.48 ± 0.68 Ma. Both the volcanic to sub-volcanic host rocks and intrusive rocks of the Cobre Panama deposit evolved via fractional crystallisation processes, as demonstrated by the major elements (e.g. Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and MgO) displaying negative trends with increasing SiO2. The Petaquilla intrusive rocks, including the diorite-granodiorite porphyries and granodiorite batholith, are geochemically evolved and appear to have formed from more hydrous magmas than the preceding host volcanic rocks, as evidenced by the presence of hornblende phenocrysts, higher degrees of large-ion lithophile element (LILE) and light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment and heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletion, and higher Sr/Y and La/Yb values. However, the degree of LREE enrichment, HREE depletion and La/Yb values are insufficient for the intrusive rocks to be considered as adakites. Collectively, the volcanic and intrusive rocks have LILE, REE and mobile trace element concentrations similar to enriched Miocene-age Cordilleran arc magmatism found throughout central and western Panama. Both the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc magmatic suites are geochemically more evolved than the late Cretaceous to Eocene Chagres-Bayano arc magmas from northeastern Panama, as they display higher degrees of LILE and LREE enrichment. The geochemical similarities between the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc

  12. Clay cortex in epikarst forms as an indicator of age and morphogenesis-case studies from Lublin-Volhynia chalkland (East Poland, West Ukraine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, Radosław; Mroczek, Przemysław

    2015-10-01

    Clay cortex from the contact zone between the host rock (chalk) and infilling deposits were examined in paleokarst forms (pockets, pipes, and dolines of different age) from the Lublin-Volhynia chalk karst region. In light of the sedimentological and micromorphological analyses, it seems possible to work out a model as the basis for genetic and stratigraphic discussions. (1) Dolines with the Paleogene or Neogene mineral infills are characterized by (a) homogeneous, residual type of massive clay gradually passing into the chalk monolith, and at the same time (b) relatively thick weathered zone. (2) Pipes with glacigenic mineral infill from the Saalian Glacial are characterized by (a) sharp contact between host rock and clay, (b) narrow weathering zone of chalk, (c) diffuse nature of the contact zone between residual clay and mineral infill, and (d) contamination of clay by clastic material. (3) Pockets with glacigenic mineral infill and traces of the Weichselian periglacial transformation are characterized by (a) strong contamination of chalk by quartz grains, (b) diffuse transition between clay and infill: from clayey matrix with single quartz grains (at the contact with chalk) to clayey coatings and intergranular bridges (in the infill), (c) intensive weathering (cracking) of mineral grains in the infill.

  13. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    PubMed

    Zaoui, A; Sekkal, W

    2015-03-06

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  14. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaoui, A.; Sekkal, W.

    2015-03-01

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  15. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, A.; Sekkal, W.

    2015-01-01

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation. PMID:25742950

  16. Primary uranium sources for sedimentary-hosted uranium deposits in NE China: insight from basement igneous rocks of the Erlian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnetti, Christophe; Cuney, Michel; Bourlange, Sylvain; Deloule, Etienne; Poujol, Marc; Liu, Xiaodong; Peng, Yunbiao; Yang, Jianxing

    2016-05-01

    Carboniferous-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic igneous basement rocks around the Erlian Basin in northeast China have been investigated through detailed mineralogical, whole-rock geochemistry, geochronological data and Sm-Nd isotope studies. Carboniferous-Permian biotite granites and volcanic rocks belong to a calc-alkaline association and were emplaced during the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian (313 ± 1-286 ± 2 Ma). These rocks are characterised by positive ɛNd(t) (3.3-5.3) and fairly young T DM model ages (485-726 Ma), suggesting a dominant derivation from partial melting of earlier emplaced juvenile source rocks. Triassic biotite granites belong to a high-K calc-alkaline association and were emplaced during the Middle Triassic (243 ± 3-233 ± 2 Ma). Their negative ɛNd(t) (-2 to -0.1) and higher T DM model ages (703-893 Ma) suggest a contribution from Precambrian crust during the magma generation processes, leading to a strong enrichment in K and incompatible elements such as Th and U. Highly fractionated magmas crystallised in U-rich biotite (up to 21 ppm U) and two-mica granites. In biotite granite, the major U-bearing minerals are uranothorite and allanite. They are strongly metamict and the major part of their uranium (90 %) has been released from the mineral structure and was available for leaching. Mass balance calculations show that the Triassic biotite granites may have, at least, liberated ˜14,000 t U/km3 and thus correspond to a major primary uranium source for the U deposits hosted in the Erlian Basin.

  17. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  18. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  19. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  20. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States-Southern Piedmont subregion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the geology of the Southern Piedmont province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose was to identify geologic areas potentially suitable for containment of a repository for the long-term isolation of solidified radioactive waste. The crystalline rocks of the Southern Piedmont province range in age from Precambrian to Paleozoic, and are predominantly slates, phyllites, argillites, schists, metavolcanics, gneisses, gabbros, and granites. These rock units were classified as either favorable, potentially favorable, or unfavorable as potential study areas based on an evaluation of the geologic, hydrologic, and geotechnical characteristics. No socio-economic factors were considered. Rocks subjected to multiple periods of deformation and metamorphism, or described as highly fractured, or of limited areal extent were generally ranked as unfavorable. Potentially favorable rocks are primarily the high-grade metamorphic gneisses and granites. Sixteen areas were classified as being favorable for additional study. These areas are primarily large igneous granite plutons as follows: the Petersburg granite in Virginia; the Rolesville-Castallia, Churchland, and Landis plutons in North Carolina; the Liberty Hill, Winnsboro, and Ogden plutons in South Carolina; and the Siloam, Elberton, and six unnamed granite plutons in Georgia.

  1. Diagenesis of the Machar Field (British North Sea) chalk: Evidence for decoupling of diagenesis in fractures and the host rock

    SciTech Connect

    Maliva, R.G.; Dickson, J.A.D.; Smalley, P.C.; Oxtoby, N.H.

    1995-01-02

    The Chalk Group (Cretaceous/Tertiary) in the Machar Field (British North Sea) contains both fracture-filling and microcrystalline calcite cements. Modeling of fluid-rock interaction using data on light stable isotopes obtained by whole rock analyses and laser ablation analyses of calcite cements reveal that the fracture and matrix diagenetic systems were largely decoupled. The calcium and carbonate of the fracture-filling calcite cements were derived largely from the adjacent chalk matrix. The fracture diagenetic system had a high water-rock ratio, which maintained a relatively stable water {delta}{sup 18}O ratio during calcite dissolution and precipitation. The chalk matrix, on the contrary, had a low molar water-rock ratio during recrystallization, which resulted in increases in the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value during recrystallization at elevated temperatures. This evolution of the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value is manifested by highly variable cement {delta}{sup 18}O values. The present-day formation waters of the Machar Field have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios significantly higher than the whole rock and fracture-filling cement calcite values, evidence that the chemical composition of the formation waters is not representative of that of the pore waters during chalk recrystallization. Little diagenesis is therefore now occurring in the Machar Field. The diagenetic systems of the chalk matrix and fractures both had a high degree of openness with respect to carbon, because of the introduction of organically derived bicarbonate rather than advection of water through the chalk. The bulk of calcite cementation in fractures and the recrystallization and cementation of the chalk matrix occurred at temperatures in the 80--100 C range, at or just below the present-day reservoir temperature of 97 C.

  2. Using Pyroxene and Amphibole Compositions to Determine Protolith of Banded Quartz- Amphibole-Pyroxene Rocks on Akilia, Southwest Greenland: a Lithology Suitable for Hosting Earth's Oldest Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, M. M.; Usui, T.; Fedo, C. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    At ˜ 3.8 Ga in age, Earth's oldest known supracrustal rocks are exposed in SW Greenland and are comprised dominantly of mafic igneous rocks with less common sedimentary units, included banded iron formation (BIF). The great antiquity of the supracrustal rocks and repeated claims for a fossil record makes Greenland one of the prime astrobiological destinations on Earth, however, many primary characteristics of these rocks have been overprinted during multiple high-grade metamorphic events, which results in complex field relationships (e.g., Myers and Crowley, 2000; Whitehouse and Fedo, 2003). One example of this concerns an ˜ 5 m thick lithology dominated by bands of quartz, amphibole, pyroxene interpreted by some as BIF (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Nutman et al., 1997; Dauphas et al., 2004) on Akilia, SW Greenland. Correct identification of these rocks is of the utmost importance because they are reported to contain grains of apatite with 13C- depleted graphite inclusions that have been claimed as evidence for the oldest (> 3800 Mya) life on Earth (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Nutman et al., 1997; McKeegan et al., 2007). We analyzed mafic mineral compositions by electron microprobe from samples collected from a detailed measured section and from sample 92-197, the rock originally claimed to host Earth's oldest chemofossil. Ultramafic rocks from outside the quartz-amphibole-pyroxene (QAP) lithology are dominated by enstatite, anthophyllite, and hornblende and possess bulk trace-element signatures indicative of an igneous origin. Sample AK 38, a band of mixed pyroxene and amphibole that occurs within the QAP unit also has a bulk trace- element composition consistent with an ultramafic protolith, but contains Fe-rich clinopyroxene (Mg# = ˜ 50). AK 38 amphiboles are dominated by actinolite, although a few analyses of anthophyllite point towards an original Mg-rich protolith. Other QAP samples contain Fe-rich clino- and orthopyroxenes, actinolite and hornblende. Magnetite is

  3. Characterization of Geologic Structures and Host Rock Properties Relevant to the Hydrogeology of the Standard Mine in Elk Basin, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Manning, Andrew H.; Berger, Byron R.; Kremer, Yannick; Guzman, Mario A.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Schuller, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The Standard Mine Superfund Site is a source of mine drainage and associated heavy metal contamination of surface and groundwaters. The site contains Tertiary polymetallic quartz veins and fault zones that host precious and base metal sulfide mineralization common in Colorado. To assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in its effort to remediate mine-related contamination, we characterized geologic structures, host rocks, and their potential hydraulic properties to better understand the sources of contaminants and the local hydrogeology. Real time kinematic and handheld global positioning systems were used to locate and map precisely the geometry of the surface traces of structures and mine-related features, such as portals. New reconnaissance geologic mapping, field and x-ray diffraction mineralogy, rock sample collection, thin-section analysis, and elemental geochemical analysis were completed to characterize hydrothermal alteration, mineralization, and subsequent leaching of metallic phases. Surface and subsurface observations, fault vein and fracture network characterization, borehole geophysical logging, and mercury injection capillary entry pressure data were used to document potential controls on the hydrologic system.

  4. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Magma-driven hydraulic fracturing and infiltration of fluids into the damaged host rock, an example from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engvik, Ane K.; Bertram, Andreas; Kalthoff, Jörg F.; Stöckhert, Bernhard; Austrheim, Håkon; Elvevold, Synnøve

    2005-05-01

    Excellent outcrops in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, provide unique insight into the mode and extent of fluid infiltration into metamorphic and plutonic rocks in the middle crust. The fluids are liberated from pegmatitic veins and give rise to alteration halos. In the alteration halos, the conspicuous change in colour is correlated with (1) hydration mineral reactions, and (2) high density of microcracks in quartz and feldspar exceeding that observed in the unaltered host rock by an order of magnitude. The field relations indicate that the veins originated as melt-driven hydraulic fractures, sealed by pegmatite and aplite crystallising from volatile-rich melts, with the alteration halo being the wake of the process zone formed at the tip of the propagating fractures. It is proposed that (1) the size of the alteration zone and the width of the vein are correlated, resulting in higher values of both these quantities for cracks propagating at higher velocities and consequently higher crack propagation toughnesses; (2) the damage zone is characterised by a transient state of high permeability which was short-lived due to rapid healing and sealing of microcracks; (3) the infiltration and retrogression of the high-grade rocks can be considered as a quasi-instantaneous process on geologic time scales with a duration of hours to weeks.

  6. The Origin and Fate of Clay Minerals on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, R.; Bish, D. L.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Fischer, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    The detection of clay minerals (phyllosilicates) in ancient Noachian-aged terrains on Mars and their relative paucity in younger Hesperian terrains has led to the hypothesis that the planet transitioned to a drier and more acidic environment. Converting a largely basaltic planet, which will naturally tend to buffer acidic solutions, to an acid-dominated system is dependent on competition between acid production and the available volume of water. Clay-bearing strata associated with deltas (e.g., Eberswalde, Jezero) and other fluvial features are strong evidence for sediment transport of previously altered basaltic material, whereas some clay-bearing units may represent neoformation of smectites and other clay minerals. In either of these cases, the presence of 2:1 clays suggests that water was present for fluvial transport and pH levels were moderate to alkaline. Interestingly, most of the clay deposits detected thus far host primarily Fe/Mg-rich 2:1 clay minerals, suggesting alteration of a basaltic crust at relatively low water-to-rock ratios (or short-lived water-rock interaction) and minimal leaching. With a few exceptions, large exposures of late-stage Al-rich weathering products such as kaolinite or gibbsite are rare. It has also recently been noted that the production of smectite via dissolution of basalt leads to an excess of cations that implies the formation of coeval sedimentary salts (carbonates, sulfates, chlorides, etc.). However, sulfates are found primarily in Hesperian terrains and such salts are rarely observed in older clay-bearing units. Coupled with in situ observations by rovers, the orbital detection of these younger sulfate deposits has been used to suggest that Mars transitioned to an acidic planet during the Hesperian. Acid can be produced on Mars by the oxidation of Fe(II) in fluids in contact with the atmosphere, where UV photons or atmospheric O2 are likely sources of oxidant. Such processes would occur throughout Mars’ history, but

  7. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  8. Fluid-rock interactions in CO2-saturated, granite-hosted geothermal systems: Implications for natural and engineered systems from geochemical experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Ré, Caroline; Kaszuba, John P.; Moore, Joseph N.; McPherson, Brian J.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were conducted and geochemical models constructed to evaluate the geochemical and mineralogical response of fractured granite and granite + epidote in contact with thermal water, with and without supercritical CO2, at 250 °C and 25-45 MPa. Illite ± smectite ± zeolite(?) precipitate as secondary minerals at the expense of K-feldspar, oligoclase, and epidote. Illite precipitates in experiments reacting granite and granite + epidote with water; metastable smectite forms in the experiments injected with supercritical CO2. Waters are supersaturated with respect to quartz and saturated with respect to chalcedony in CO2-charged experiments, but neither mineral formed. Carbonate formation is predicted for experiments injected with supercritical CO2, but carbonate only formed during cooling and degassing of the granite + epidote + CO2 experiment. Experimental results provide insight into the buffering capacity of granites as well as the drivers of clay formation. Metastable smectite in the experiments is attributed to high water-rock ratios, high silica activities, and high CO2 and magnesium-iron concentrations. Smectite precipitation in supercritical CO2-bearing geothermal systems may affect reservoir permeability. Silicate formation may create or thicken caps within or on the edges of geothermal reservoirs. Carbonate formation, as desired for carbon sequestration projects coinciding with geothermal systems, may require extended periods of time; cooling and degassing of CO2-saturated waters leads to carbonate precipitation, potentially plugging near-surface production pathways.

  9. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    in the silicate (clay mineral in our case) structure, the specific bonding of these ions, and other factors. In fact, the reasons for coloration are not known completely, but it is certain that a combination of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions is necessary to give a nice green color to clays. In the green clay minerals discussed here, the colors vary greatly as seen under the optical microscope (not always the same as the one seen in hand specimen). Yellow to blue-green hues can be found. However, for the moment, no clear relation between iron content, iron valence ratio, or other factors such as minor transition element concentrations can be found to explain the greenness of green clay minerals. The fact that a clay is green just indicates a combination of the two oxidation states of iron. The color, however, indicates the key to the formation in nature of green clay minerals.Green clay minerals are in general the product of "mixed valence" conditions of formation, most often in a situation where some iron is reduced from Fe3+ and enters into a silicate mineral structure. In general, iron would rather be an oxide when it is in the trivalent state. The moment iron is reduced to a divalent state under surface or near-surface conditions, it looks for a silicate, sulfide, or carbonate to hide in. The reverse is also true, of course. When a silicate is oxidized, Fe2+ becoming Fe3+, the iron begins to group together in oxide clumps and eventually exits the silicate structure. This is seen in thin section in altered rocks (weathering or hydrothermal action). The production of trivalent, oxidized iron usually results in a brownish or orange mineral.If the geology of the formation of green silicate minerals is relatively well defined, especially at near surface or surface conditions, the question remains how much of the iron is in a reduced oxidation state and how? In the case of reduction of iron in surface environments: if most of the iron goes to Fe2+, one mineral is formed; if only

  10. CO2/clay interactions and the significance for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Andreas; Wentinck, Rick; Bertier, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    For the characterization of CO2 storage reservoirs a number of critical parameters need to be assessed, like storage capacity or injection rate, where a straight-forward work flow based on existing experience in the oil and gas industry is available. Added complexity is in the identification of (potential) leakage pathways along wellbores, faults/fractures or even capillary seal networks. The critical aspects are mechanisms and rates of potential leakage. Over the past few years an improved understanding of the interaction of CO2 with clay minerals was generated, with a major focus on swelling clays, such as montmorillonite. Especially in relatively young and / or low maturity sedimentary basins, smectite contents of the seal lithologies can be high (e.g. North Sea). It was found that for CO2 storage and storage containment non-negligible physical effects result from clays in contact with CO2 and water under pressure, temperature and stress conditions representative for geological reservoirs. It was shown that all clay minerals are able to adsorb significant amounts of CO2, while only smectite swells in the presence of CO2, thereby creating a swelling force that is potentially large and may affect local stress fields. Several cases where this interaction might become important are discussed in this contribution: (1) clay swelling between wellbore cement and host rock, (2) CO2 adsorption of clays in the storage reservoir, (3) clay swelling and the impact on fractures and faults, potentially acting as pathways, for fluid leakage and (4) shrinkage of swelling clays due to dehydration by CO2 and the possible creation of dehydration cracks. This contribution aims at summarizing these effects, increasing awareness and discussing its significance for the geological storage of CO2.

  11. Excavation Induced Hydraulic Response of Opalinus Clay - Investigations of the FE-Experiment at the Mont Terri URL in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, T.; Müller, H. R.; Garitte, B.; Sakaki, T.; Vietor, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) Experiment at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland is a full-scale heater test in a clay-rich formation (Opalinus Clay). Based on the Swiss disposal concept it simulates the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) evolution of a spent fuel / vitrified high-level waste (SF / HLW) repository tunnel in a realistic manner. The main aim of this experiment is to investigate SF / HLW repository-induced THM coupled effects mainly in the host rock but also in the engineered barrier system (EBS), which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks. A further aim is to gather experience with full-scale tunnel construction and associated hydro-mechanical (HM) processes in the host rock. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors (state-of-the-art sensors and measurement systems as well as fiber-optic sensors). The sensors are distributed in the host rock's near- and far-field, the tunnel lining, the EBS, and on the heaters. The heater emplacement and backfilling has not started yet, therefore only the host rock instrumentation is installed at the moment and is currently generating data. We will present the instrumentation concept and rationale as well as the first monitoring results of the excavation and ventilation phase. In particular, we investigated the excavation induced hydraulic response of the host rock. Therefore, the spatiotemporal evolution of porewater-pressure time series was analyzed to get a better understanding of HM coupled processes during and after the excavation phase as well as the impact of anisotropic geomechanic and hydraulic properties of the clay-rich formation on its hydraulic behavior. Excavation related investigations were completed by means of inclinometer data to characterize the non-elastic and time

  12. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In Greene Co., southwest Pennsylvania, the Upper Devonian sandstone formation waters have δ7Li values of + 14.6 ± 1.2 (2SD, n = 25), and are distinct from Marcellus Shale formation waters which have δ7Li of + 10.0 ± 0.8 (2SD, n = 12). These two formation waters also maintain distinctive 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggesting hydrologic separation between these units. Applying temperature-dependent illitilization model to Marcellus Shale, we found that Li concentration in clay minerals increased with Li concentration in pore fluid during diagenetic illite-smectite transition. Samples from north central PA show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr than in southwest Pennsylvania. Spatial variations in Li and δ7Li values show that Marcellus formation waters are not homogeneous across the Appalachian Basin. Marcellus formation waters in the northeastern Pennsylvania portion of the basin show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr, suggesting long term, cross-formational fluid migration in this region. Assessing the impact of potential mixing of fresh water with deep formation water requires establishment of a geochemical and isotopic baseline in the shallow, fresh water aquifers, and site specific characterization of formation water, followed by long-term monitoring, particularly in regions of future shale gas development.

  13. Microbial rock inhabitants survive hypervelocity impacts on Mars-like host planets: first phase of lithopanspermia experimentally tested.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Stöffler, Dieter; Ott, Sieglinde; Hornemann, Ulrich; Cockell, Charles S; Moeller, Ralf; Meyer, Cornelia; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Fritz, Jörg; Schade, Sara; Artemieva, Natalia A

    2008-02-01

    The scenario of lithopanspermia describes the viable transport of microorganisms via meteorites. To test the first step of lithopanspermia, i.e., the impact ejection from a planet, systematic shock recovery experiments within a pressure range observed in martian meteorites (5-50 GPa) were performed with dry layers of microorganisms (spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of the endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, and thalli and ascocarps of the lichen Xanthoria elegans) sandwiched between gabbro discs (martian analogue rock). Actual shock pressures were determined by refractive index measurements and Raman spectroscopy, and shock temperature profiles were calculated. Pressure-effect curves were constructed for survival of B. subtilis spores and Chroococcidiopsis cells from the number of colony-forming units, and for vitality of the photobiont and mycobiont of Xanthoria elegans from confocal laser scanning microscopy after live/dead staining (FUN-I). A vital launch window for the transport of rock-colonizing microorganisms from a Mars-like planet was inferred, which encompasses shock pressures in the range of 5 to about 40 GPa for the bacterial endospores and the lichens, and a more limited shock pressure range for the cyanobacterium (from 5-10 GPa). The results support concepts of viable impact ejections from Mars-like planets and the possibility of reseeding early Earth after asteroid cataclysms.

  14. Microbial rock inhabitants survive hypervelocity impacts on Mars-like host planets: first phase of lithopanspermia experimentally tested.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Stöffler, Dieter; Ott, Sieglinde; Hornemann, Ulrich; Cockell, Charles S; Moeller, Ralf; Meyer, Cornelia; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Fritz, Jörg; Schade, Sara; Artemieva, Natalia A

    2008-02-01

    The scenario of lithopanspermia describes the viable transport of microorganisms via meteorites. To test the first step of lithopanspermia, i.e., the impact ejection from a planet, systematic shock recovery experiments within a pressure range observed in martian meteorites (5-50 GPa) were performed with dry layers of microorganisms (spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of the endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, and thalli and ascocarps of the lichen Xanthoria elegans) sandwiched between gabbro discs (martian analogue rock). Actual shock pressures were determined by refractive index measurements and Raman spectroscopy, and shock temperature profiles were calculated. Pressure-effect curves were constructed for survival of B. subtilis spores and Chroococcidiopsis cells from the number of colony-forming units, and for vitality of the photobiont and mycobiont of Xanthoria elegans from confocal laser scanning microscopy after live/dead staining (FUN-I). A vital launch window for the transport of rock-colonizing microorganisms from a Mars-like planet was inferred, which encompasses shock pressures in the range of 5 to about 40 GPa for the bacterial endospores and the lichens, and a more limited shock pressure range for the cyanobacterium (from 5-10 GPa). The results support concepts of viable impact ejections from Mars-like planets and the possibility of reseeding early Earth after asteroid cataclysms. PMID:18237257

  15. Microbial Rock Inhabitants Survive Hypervelocity Impacts on Mars-Like Host Planets: First Phase of Lithopanspermia Experimentally Tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda; Stöffler, Dieter; Ott, Sieglinde; Hornemann, Ulrich; Cockell, Charles S.; Moeller, Ralf; Meyer, Cornelia; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Fritz, Jörg; Schade, Sara; Artemieva, Natalia A.

    2008-02-01

    The scenario of lithopanspermia describes the viable transport of microorganisms via meteorites. To test the first step of lithopanspermia, i.e., the impact ejection from a planet, systematic shock recovery experiments within a pressure range observed in martian meteorites (550 GPa) were performed with dry layers of microorganisms (spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of the endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, and thalli and ascocarps of the lichen Xanthoria elegans) sandwiched between gabbro discs (martian analogue rock). Actual shock pressures were determined by refractive index measurements and Raman spectroscopy, and shock temperature profiles were calculated. Pressure-effect curves were constructed for survival of B. subtilis spores and Chroococcidiopsis cells from the number of colony-forming units, and for vitality of the photobiont and mycobiont of Xanthoria elegans from confocal laser scanning microscopy after live/dead staining (FUN-I). A vital launch window for the transport of rock-colonizing microorganisms from a Mars-like planet was inferred, which encompasses shock pressures in the range of 5 to about 40 GPa for the bacterial endospores and the lichens, and a more limited shock pressure range for the cyanobacterium (from 510 GPa). The results support concepts of viable impact ejections from Mars-like planets and the possibility of reseeding early Earth after asteroid cataclysms.

  16. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, Florie A; Cheshire, Michael C; Newell, Dennis L; McCarney, Mary Kate

    2012-08-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  17. The dynamics of magma ascent in the crust: Characterising fluid flow and host-rock deformation using scaled analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Janine; Dennis, David

    2015-04-01

    We present the results from a series of analogue experiments that use gelatine injected by water to study magma ascent dynamics in the crust. Gelatine is a viscoelastic material that displays predominantly elastic deformation when used at low temperatures (5-10 °C) and mid-to-low concentrations (2-5 wt%). To study dyke propagation we have used a combination of Particle Image Velocimentry (PIV) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to characterise the dynamics of fluid flow within the intrusion and contemporaneous deformation of the host gelatine. Experiments are prepared by filling a 40 cm x 40 cm x 30 cm clear-Perspex tank with a gelatine mixture that has been seeded with neutrally buoyant fluorescent particles. Water, also seeded with tracer particles, is then injected into the solid gelatine from below under a constant flux or constant head pressure. This causes a vertical penny-shaped crack (dyke) to propagate through the gelatine and erupt at the surface. During the experiment, a vertical high-power laser sheet positioned along the centre of the tank is triggered to illuminate the seeding particles with short intense pulses, and two Dantec CCD cameras record successive images. Using PIV and DIC, vector fields of fluid flow within the intrusion and strain within the gelatine host is calculated by cross-correlation between successive images at a defined time interval. The experiments indicate that, prior to eruption, dyke propagation is characterised by rapid centralised and upwards fluid flow with accompanying downwards motion at the intrusion margin. Deformation of the gelatine solid is focused at a small head region, with the tail remaining relatively static as the dyke grows. Upon eruption, rapid centralised fluid evacuation occurs with contemporaneous contraction of the dyke and relaxation of the host gelatine. Models that can couple fluid dynamics and host deformation during magma ascent and eruption will make an important step towards improving our

  18. Coupled THMC models for bentonite in clay repository for nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Li, Y.; Anguiano, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Illitization, the transformation of smectite to illite, could compromise some beneficiary features of an engineered barrier system (EBS) that is composed primarily of bentonite and clay host rock. It is a major determining factor to establish the maximum design temperature of the repositories because it is believed that illitization could be greatly enhanced at temperatures higher than 100 oC and thus significantly lower the sorption and swelling capacity of bentonite and clay rock. However, existing experimental and modeling studies on the occurrence of illitization and related performance impacts are not conclusive, in part because the relevant couplings between the thermal, hydrological, chemical, and mechanical (THMC) processes have not been fully represented in the models. Here we present fully coupled THMC simulations of a generic nuclear waste repository in a clay formation with bentonite-backfilled EBS. Two scenarios were simulated for comparison: a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister can reach about 200 oC and a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister peaks at about 100 oC. The model simulations demonstrate that illitization is in general more significant at higher temperatures. We also compared the chemical changes and the resulting swelling stress change for two types of bentonite: Kunigel-VI and FEBEX bentonite. Higher temperatures also lead to much higher stress in the near field, caused by thermal pressurization and vapor pressure buildup in the EBS bentonite and clay host rock. Chemical changes lead to a reduction in swelling stress, which is more pronounced for Kunigel-VI bentonite than for FEBEX bentonite.

  19. Radiation Sensitivity of Natural Organic Matter: Clay Mineral Association Effects in the Callovo-Oxfordian Argillite

    SciTech Connect

    Schäfer, T.; Michel, P; Claret, F; Beetz, T; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Clay-rich low-organic carbon formations (e.g., Callovo-Oxfordian argillite in France and Opalinus Clay in Switzerland) are considered as host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The clay-organic carbon has a strong impact on the chemical stability of the clays. For this reason, the nature of the clay-organic carbon, the release of hydrophilic organic compounds, namely, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) and the radiation sensitivity of the undisturbed host rock organics was investigated. The clay sample originates from Oxfordian argillite (447 m depth, borehole EST 104). HA and FA were extracted following the standard International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) isolation procedure. Synchrotron based (C-, K-, Ca-, O- and Fe-edge XANES) scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and FT-IR microspectroscopy was used to identify under high spatial resolution the distribution of clay-organic matter with different functionality using principal component and cluster analysis. The results show that in this old (Jurassic) geological formation, small parts of the organic inventory (1-5%) keeps the structure/functionality and can be mobilized as hydrophilic humic substance type material (HA and FA). Target spectra analysis shows best correlation for isolated humic acids with organics found in smectite-rich regions, whereas the extractable FA has better spectral similarities with the illite mixed layer minerals (MLM) regions. After radiation of 1.7 GGy under helium atmosphere the same rock sample area was investigated for radiation damage. Radiation damage in the smectite and illite-MLM associated organic matter is comparably low with 20-30% total oxygen mass loss and 13-18% total carbon mass loss. A critical dose dc of 2.5 GGy and a optical density after infinite radiation (OD?) of 54% was calculated under room temperature conditions. C(1s) XANES show a clear increase in Cdouble bond; length as m-dashC bonds especially in the illite-MLM associated organics. This results

  20. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  1. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  2. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  3. Modelling iron clay interactions in deep geological disposal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Perronnet, M.; Jullien, M.

    In the context of deep geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes, the interactions between iron and clay-rich materials may lead to adverse transformations of clay minerals with a potential loss of confining properties such as swelling and capacity to exchange cations. Such transformations have been experimentally observed at temperatures starting at ca. 80 °C, where smectites contained in a mixture of bentonite and iron powder are transformed into iron-rich serpentine-type minerals. The reaction-transport code CRUNCH is used to investigate the iron-clay interactions at 50 °C over a period of 10,000 years, which are the conditions considered here to represent the mean temperature value and the expected timescale for the corrosion stage. The aim is to predict the nature and quantity of corrosion product, calculate the chemistry of water (essentially the pH) and the mineralogical transformation in the system containing the canister, an optional engineered barrier (bentonite) and the host-rock (argillite). The results of the calculations show that at the interface with the canister, where steel corrosion occurs, the iron is partly immobilized by the precipitation of iron oxides (essentially magnetite) and small amounts of siderite. The pH stabilizes at high values, between 10 and 11, at this location. In the bentonite or the argillite in contact with the container, the primary clay minerals are destabilized and iron-rich serpentine-like minerals precipitate as observed in the experiments (cronstedtite and berthierine). These minerals show low cation exchange and swelling capacities. The results also show that the interactions between iron and clay may lead to significant porosity changes in the system. A reduction of the porosity is predicted at the surface of the steel canister, due to the precipitation of iron oxides. Porosity increase is predicted in the clay material due to the dissolution of the primary clay minerals. The effect of these porosity

  4. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  5. The genesis of emeralds and their host rocks from Swat, northwestern Pakistan: a stable-isotope investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, M.; Fallick, A. E.; Moon, C. J.

    1996-05-01

    previously serpentinized ultramafic rocks by a CO2-bearing fluid of metamorphic origin.

  6. Phengite-hosted LILE enrichment in eclogite and related rocks: Implications for fluid-mediated mass transfer in subduction zones and arc magma genesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, J.N.; Perfit, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Geochemical differences between island arc basalts (LAB) and ocean-floor basalts (mid-ocean ridge basalts; MORB) suggest that the large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) K, Ba, Rb and Cs are probably mobilized in subduction zone fluids and melts. This study documents LILE enrichment of eclogite, amphibolite, and epidote ?? garnet blueschist tectonic blocks and related rocks from melanges of two subduction complexes. The samples are from six localities of the Franciscan Complex, California, and related terranes of Oregon and Baja California, and from the Samana Metamorphic Complex, Samana Peninsula, Dominican Republic. Most Franciscan blocks are MORB-like in their contents of rare earth elements (REE) and high field strength elements (HFSE); in contrast, most Samana blocks show an LAB signature of these elements. The whole-rock K2O contents of both groups range from 1 to 3 wt %; K, Ba, Rb, and Cs are all strongly intercorrelated. Many blocks display K/Ba similar to melasomatized transition zones and rinds at their outer margins. Some transition zones and rinds are enriched in LILE compared with host blocks; others are relatively depleted in these elements. Some LILE-rich blocks contain 'early' coarse-grained muscovite that is aligned in the foliation defined by coarse-grained omphacite or amphibole grains. Others display 'late' muscovite in veins and as a partial replacement of garnet; many contain both textural types. The muscovite is phengite that contains ???3??25-3??55 Si per 11 oxygens, and ???0??25-0??50 Mgper 11 oxygens. Lower-Si phengite has a significant paragonite component: Na per 11 oxygens ranges to ???0??12. Ba contents of phengite range to over 1 wt % (0??027 per 11 oxygens). Ba in phengite does not covary strongly with either Na or K. Ba contents of phengite increase from some blocks to their transition zones or rinds, or from blocks to their veins. Averaged KlBa ratios for phengite and host samples define an array which describes other subsamples of

  7. Clay smear: Review of mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrolijk, Peter J.; Urai, Janos L.; Kettermann, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Clay smear is a collection of fault processes and resulting fault structures that form when normal faults deform layered sedimentary sections. These elusive structures have attracted deep interest from researchers interested in subsurface fluid flow, particularly in the oil and gas industry. In the four decades since the association between clay-smear structures and oil and gas accumulations was introduced, there has been extensive research into the fault processes that create clay smear and the resulting effects of that clay smear on fluid flow. We undertake a critical review of the literature associated with outcrop studies, laboratory and numerical modeling, and subsurface field studies of clay smear and propose a comprehensive summary that encompasses all of these elements. Important fault processes that contribute to clay smear are defined in the context of the ratio of rock strength and in situ effective stresses, the geometric evolution of fault systems, and the composition of the faulted section. We find that although there has been progress in all avenues pursued, progress has been uneven, and the processes that disrupt clay smears are mostly overlooked. We highlight those research areas that we think will yield the greatest benefit and suggest that taking these emerging results within a more process-based framework presented here will lead to a new generation of clay smear models.

  8. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  9. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kaam-Peters, Heidy M. E.; Köster, Jürgen; van der Gaast, Sjierk J.; Dekker, Marlèn; de Leeuw, Jan W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1998-09-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the amount of clay relative to the amount of organic matter (clay/TOC ratios). This correlation may explain the high diasterane/sterane ratios in crude oils and extracts derived from certain carbonate source rocks. Based on the concentrations of regular and rearranged steroids in the sample sets, it is proposed that diasterenes are partly reduced to diasteranes and partly degraded during diagenesis in a ratio largely determined by the availability of clay minerals. It is suggested that the hydrogen atoms required for reduction of the diasterenes originate from the water in the interlayers of clay minerals.

  10. Pervasive remagnetization of detrital zircon host rocks in the Jack Hills, Western Australia and implications for records of the early geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Maloof, Adam C.; Tailby, Nicholas; Ramezani, Jahandar; Fu, Roger R.; Hanus, Veronica; Trail, Dustin; Bruce Watson, E.; Harrison, T. Mark; Bowring, Samuel A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Coe, Robert S.

    2015-11-01

    It currently is unknown when Earth's dynamo magnetic field originated. Paleomagnetic studies indicate that a field with an intensity similar to that of the present day existed 3.5 billion years ago (Ga). Detrital zircon crystals found in the Jack Hills of Western Australia are some of the very few samples known to substantially predate this time. With crystallization ages ranging from 3.0-4.38 Ga, these zircons might preserve a record of the missing first billion years of Earth's magnetic field history. However, a key unknown is the age and origin of magnetization in the Jack Hills zircons. The identification of >3.9 Ga (i.e., Hadean) field records requires first establishing that the zircons have avoided remagnetization since being deposited in quartz-rich conglomerates at 2.65-3.05 Ga. To address this issue, we have conducted paleomagnetic conglomerate, baked contact, and fold tests in combination with U-Pb geochronology to establish the timing of the metamorphic and alteration events and the peak temperatures experienced by the zircon host rocks. These tests include the first conglomerate test directly on the Hadean-zircon bearing conglomerate at Erawandoo Hill. Although we observed little evidence for remagnetization by recent lightning strikes, we found that the Hadean zircon-bearing rocks and surrounding region have been pervasively remagnetized, with the final major overprinting likely due to thermal and/or aqueous effects from the emplacement of the Warakurna large igneous province at ∼1070 million years ago (Ma). Although localized regions of the Jack Hills might have escaped complete remagnetization, there currently is no robust evidence for pre-depositional (>3.0 Ga) magnetization in the Jack Hills detrital zircons.

  11. Host-rock controlled epigenetic, hydrothermal metasomatic origin of the Bayan Obo REEFe-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, P.R.C.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Yinchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Bayan Obo, a complex rare earth element (REE)FeNb ore deposit, located in Inner Mongolia, P.R.C. is the world's largest known REE deposit. The deposit is chiefly in a marble unit (H8), but extends into an overlying unit of black shale, slate and schist unit (H9), both of which are in the upper part of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. Based on sedimentary structures, the presence of detrital quartz and algal fossil remains, and the 16-km long geographic extent, the H8 marble is a sedimentary deposit, and not a carbonatite of magmatic origin, as proposed by some previous investigators. The unit was weakly regionally metamorphosed (most probably the lower part of the green schist facies) into marble and quartzite prior to mineralization. Tectonically, the deposit is located on the northern flank of the Sino-Korean craton. Many hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Bayan Obo deposit; the studies reported here support an epigenetic, hydrothermal, metasomatic origin. Such an origin is supported by field and laboratory textural evidence; 232Th/208Pb internal isochron mineral ages of selected monazite and bastnaesite samples; 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating minimum mineral ages of selected alkali amphiboles; chemical compositions of different generations of both REE ore minerals and alkali amphiboles; and evidence of host-rock influence on the various types of Bayan Obo ores. The internal isochron ages of the REE minerals indicate Caledonian ages for various episodes of REE and Fe mineralization. No evidence was found to indicate a genetic relation between the extensive biotite granitic rocks of Hercynian age in the mine region and the Bayan Obo are deposit, as suggested by previous workers. ?? 1992.

  12. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  13. Comparative geology and geochemistry of sedimentary-rock-hosted (Carlin Type) gold deposits in the People's Republic of China and in Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Zhiping; Peters, Stephen G.

    1998-01-01

    Sedimentary-rock-hosted (Carlin-type) gold deposits have been considered economically significant and geologically distinct since the early 1960's. This report consists of a nine-part text and an interactive database. This small database is to help Western companies get more information about these gold deposits in China, and to help geologists who are interested in world Carlin-type deposits conduct research on them. Because of their economic significance and geological distinctiveness, these deposits have caught the interest of economic geologists all over the world since the early 1960's. Similar deposits have been discovered in China, Australia, Dominican Republic, Spain, and Russia besides Nevada. Perhaps most significant are the 165 Carlin-type gold deposits that were found in southwest China during the past 15 years. Of these, at least 19 deposits have proven to be of substantial tonnage, making China the second leading country to exploit such deposits. With the increasing interest in Chinese Carlin-type gold deposits, some western companies and geologists desire to get more information about these Chinese deposits. This seems to have been very difficult because the literature was in Chinese. It is estimated that several hundred scientific publications (including papers, books, and technical reports) have been published. This database of Chinese Carlin-type Gold deposits is built on the documentation published during the most recent 10 years and includes six subjects, which consist of 165 records and 30 fields. A new Proterozoic-age sedimentary-rock-hosted gold deposit in northeastern P.R. China also is described. Note that for the old version 1.1 on the CD-ROM, the latitude and longitude locations of the mineral occurrences have been estimated from sketch maps and journal articles and are not intended for digital analysis. One of the improvements in this version 1.2 is the accuracy of geographic data. Version 1.3 updates to the database and includes maps

  14. Geochemistry of host rocks in the Howards Pass district, Yukon-Northwest Territories, Canada: implications for sedimentary environments of Zn-Pb and phosphate mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, John F.; Falck, Hendrik; Kelley, Karen D.; Xue, Gabriel G.

    2016-10-01

    Detailed lithogeochemical data are reported here on early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks that host the large Howards Pass stratiform Zn-Pb deposits in Yukon-Northwest Territories. Redox-sensitive trace elements (Mo, Re, V, U) and Ce anomalies in members of the Duo Lake Formation record significant environmental changes. During the deposition of lower footwall units (Pyritic siliceous and Calcareous mudstone members), bottom waters were anoxic and sulphidic, respectively; these members formed in a marginal basin that may have become increasingly restricted with time. Relative to lower members, a major environmental change is proposed for deposition of the overlying Lower cherty mudstone member, which contains phosphorite beds up to ˜0.8 m thick in the upper part, near the base of the Zn-Pb deposits. The presence of these beds, together with models for modern phosphorite formation, suggests P input from an upwelling system and phosphorite deposition in an upper slope or outer shelf setting. The overlying Active mudstone member contains stratabound to stratiform Zn-Pb deposits within black mudstone and gray calcareous mudstone. Data for unmineralized black mudstone in this member indicate deposition under diverse redox conditions from suboxic to sulphidic. Especially distinctive in this member are uniformly low ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are unique within the Duo Lake Formation, attributed here to the dissolution of sedimentary apatite by downward-percolating acidic metalliferous brines. Strata that overlie the Active member (Upper siliceous mudstone member) consist mainly of black mudstone with thin (0.5-1.5 cm) laminae of fine-grained apatite, recording continued deposition on an upper slope or outer shelf under predominantly suboxic bottom waters. Results of this study suggest that exploration for similar stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb deposits should include the outer parts of ancient continental margins, especially at and near stratigraphic

  15. Mineralogical comparisons of experimental results investigating the biological impacts on rock transport processes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Doris; Milodowski, Antoni E; West, Julia M; Wragg, Joanna; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the influence of microbes on fluid transport in sedimentary and igneous host rock environments. It particularly focuses on granodiorite rock (Äspö; Sweden) and mudstone (Horonobe; Japan) that were utilised during laboratory-based column experiments. The results showed that biofilms form on both rock types in low nutrient conditions. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy showed that the morphology of biofilaments varied from filamentous meshwork (in crushed granodiorite column experiments) to clusters of rod-like cells (fracture surfaces in mudstone). X-ray diffraction analysis of the fine fractions (<5 µm) revealed the formation of secondary clay mineral phases within the crushed Äspö granodiorite rock substrate only. The formation of secondary clay minerals appears to be enhanced when bacteria are present. All experiments showed biofilm formation, bacterial enhanced trapping of fines blocking off pore throats and/or secondary clay mineral formation. These observations illustrate the importance of bacteria on rock transport properties which will impact on the containment and migration of contaminants. PMID:23770916

  16. Mineralogical comparisons of experimental results investigating the biological impacts on rock transport processes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Doris; Milodowski, Antoni E; West, Julia M; Wragg, Joanna; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the influence of microbes on fluid transport in sedimentary and igneous host rock environments. It particularly focuses on granodiorite rock (Äspö; Sweden) and mudstone (Horonobe; Japan) that were utilised during laboratory-based column experiments. The results showed that biofilms form on both rock types in low nutrient conditions. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy showed that the morphology of biofilaments varied from filamentous meshwork (in crushed granodiorite column experiments) to clusters of rod-like cells (fracture surfaces in mudstone). X-ray diffraction analysis of the fine fractions (<5 µm) revealed the formation of secondary clay mineral phases within the crushed Äspö granodiorite rock substrate only. The formation of secondary clay minerals appears to be enhanced when bacteria are present. All experiments showed biofilm formation, bacterial enhanced trapping of fines blocking off pore throats and/or secondary clay mineral formation. These observations illustrate the importance of bacteria on rock transport properties which will impact on the containment and migration of contaminants.

  17. Reaction zone between pre-UHP titanite and host rock: insights into fluid-rock interaction and deformation mechanisms during exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust (Dabie Shan UHP unit, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzenitz, N.; Romer, R. L.; Grasemann, B.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2012-04-01

    Exhumed crustal UHP rocks may occur as relict blocks in strongly metasomatized matrix rocks. Due to variations in competence between the mm to km sized blocks and their ductile matrix, the largely undeformed blocks may preserve the pre-subduction and the prograde history, whereas the matrix rocks have been ductilely deformed to high magnitudes and record successive stages of deformation. The reaction zones between blocks and matrix, however, provide insights into the fluid-rock interaction, deformation and the deformation mechanisms active during the exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust in the subduction channel. We investigate a titanite megacryst (3 cm in diameter) in a calc-silicate marble from the UHP unit in the Dabie Shan, China. The core of the titanite megacryst grew prograde during subduction. Its U-Pb system remained closed and yields a maximum age for UHP metamorphism. Sr and Nd isotope compositions in the core demonstrate that the titanite megacryst precipitated from a homogeneous fluid source. During metamorphism in the subduction zone, infiltration of external fluids resulted first in Sr-loss from the marbles and then introduction of Sr with unusually low 87Sr/86S values (Romer et al., 2003), leading to the contrasting 87Sr/86Sr values in the titanite megacryst and the hosting UHP marbles (Wawrzenitz et al., 2006). Related to deformation in the calc-silicate marble matrix, the rim of the titanite megacryst has been replaced during the following dissolution-precipitation reactions: (i) Pseudomorphic replacement of the old titanite megacryst by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation. Fluid migrated into the old grain producing a sharp boundary of the replacement front. (ii) New small titanite grains grew with their long axes parallel to the foliation of the marble matrix, reflecting the activation of dissolution precipitation creep. In the matrix, the foliation is defined by the orientation of the basal planes of phengitic white mica. The new

  18. Zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os geochronology, and whole-rock geochemistry of the Hashitu molybdenum deposit and host granitoids, Inner Mongolia, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Degao; Liu, Jiajun; Wang, Jianping; Yang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Xilong; Zhang, Qibin; Wang, Gongwen; Liu, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    The Hashitu deposit is a newly-discovered Mo deposit in the southern part of the Great Hinggan Range, NE China. Molybdenum mineralization occurs as quartz-sulfide veins within the Hashitu granite-porphyry composite pluton. The sulfide assemblage in the veins is dominated by molybdenite, with minor amounts of galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, pyrite and marcasite. The associated gangue minerals are quartz, fluorite, calcite, sericite, chlorite and epidote. Whole-rock chemical compositions show that the Hashitu granites belong to the A2-type. The U-Pb ages of zircons from the Hashitu granite and porphyry units are 147 ± 1 Ma and 143 ± 2 Ma, respectively. The Re-Os isochron age of molybdenites from the deposit is 150 ± 4 Ma. The molybdenite Re-Os model ages vary from 144 to 150 Ma, with a weighted mean of 147 ± 1 Ma. The results show that the ages of zircon crystallization and Mo mineralization are similar, mostly within analytical uncertainties, and that the host granite pluton is one of many late-Jurassic plutons in the Great Hinggan Range. The formation of the late-Jurassic granitic plutons in this region coincides with the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the North China block which took place ˜2000 km to the east at the time. The occurrence of abundant late-Jurassic granitoids with compositions similar to the Hashitu pluton in the Great Hinggan Range is a positive sign for more discoveries of Mo deposits in this region.

  19. CLAY MINERALOGY OF INSOLUBLE RESIDUES IN MARINE EVAPORITES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodine, Marc W.

    1985-01-01

    Insoluble residues from three sequences of Paleozoic marine evaporites (Retsof salt bed in western New York, Salado Formation in south-eastern New Mexico, and Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation in southeastern Utah) are rich in trioctahedral clays. Chlorite (clinochlore), corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite-trioctahedral smectite), talc, and illite (the only dioctahedral clay) are the dominant clay minerals; serpentine, discrete trioctahedral smectite (saponite), and interstratified talc-trioctahedral smectite are sporadically abundant. These clay-mineral assemblages differ chemically and mineralogically from those observed in most continental and normal marine rocks, which commonly contain kaolinite, dioctahedral smectite (beidellite-montmorillonite), illite, mixed-layer illite-dioctahedral smectite, and, in most cases, no more than minor quantities of trioctahedral clay minerals. The distinctive clay mineralogy in these evaporite sequences suggests a largely authigenic origin. These clay minerals are thought to have formed during deposition and early diagenesis through interaction between argillaceous detritus and Mg-rich marine evaporite brines.

  20. Palaeoceanographic approach to the Kimmeridge Clay Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G. )

    1988-08-01

    The Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) is northern Europe's premier source rock and can be understood using a new but relatively simple oceanographic model. This explains or accommodates most current observations about the KCF and its depositional environment and draws upon paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, geochemical, sedimentological, and paleontological evidence.

  1. Macro-permeability distribution and anisotropy in a 3D fissured and fractured clay rock: ‘Excavation Damaged Zone’ around a cylindrical drift in Callovo-Oxfordian Argilite (Bure)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababou, Rachid; Cañamón Valera, Israel; Poutrel, Adrien

    The Underground Research Laboratory at Bure (CMHM), operated by ANDRA, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, was developed for studying the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep clayey geologic repository. It comprises a network of underground galleries in a 130 m thick layer of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (depths 400-600 m). This work focuses on hydraulic homogenization (permeability upscaling) of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) around a cylindrical drift, taking into account: (1) the permeability of the intact porous rock matrix; (2) the geometric structure of micro-fissures and small fractures synthesized as a statistical set of planar discs; (3) the curved shapes of large ‘chevron’ fractures induced by excavation (periodically distributed). The method used for hydraulic homogenization (upscaling) of the 3D porous and fractured rock is based on a ‘frozen gradient’ superposition of individual fluxes pertaining to each fracture/matrix block, or ‘unit block’. Each unit block comprises a prismatic block of permeable matrix (intact rock) obeying Darcy’s law, crossed by a single piece of planar fracture obeying either Darcy or Poiseuille law. Polygonal as well as disc shaped fractures are accommodated. The result of upscaling is a tensorial Darcy law, with macro-permeability K ij( x) distributed over a grid of upscaling sub-domains, or ‘voxels’. Alternatively, K ij( x) can be calculated point-wise using a moving window, e.g., for obtaining permeability profiles along ‘numerical’ boreholes. Because the permeable matrix is taken into account, the upscaling procedure can be implemented sequentially, as we do here: first, we embed the statistical fissures in the matrix, and secondly, we embed the large curved chevron fractures. The results of hydraulic upscaling are expressed first in terms of ‘equivalent’ macro-permeability tensors, K ij( x, y, z) distributed around the drift. The statistically isotropic fissures are

  2. [Interaction of clay minerals with microorganisms: a review of experimental data].

    PubMed

    Naĭmark, E B; Eroshchev-Shak, V A; Chizhikova, N P; Kompantseva, E I

    2009-01-01

    A review of publications containing results of experiments on the interaction of microorganisms with clay minerals is presented. Bacteria are shown to be involved in all processes related to the transformation of clay minerals: formation of clays from metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, formation of clays from solutions, reversible transitions of different types of clay minerals, and consolidation of clay minerals into sedimentary rocks. Integration of these results allows to conclude that bacteria reproduced all possible abiotic reactions associated with the clay minerals, these reactions proceed much faster with the bacteria being involved. Thus, bacteria act as a living catalyst in the geochemical cycle of clay minerals. The ecological role of bacteria can be considered as a repetition of a chemical process of the abiotic world, but with the use of organic catalytic innovation.

  3. Occurrence of Rock Varnish at Yungay, Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; McKay, C. P.

    2007-03-01

    Rock varnish is a thin nanostratigraphic coating consisting of clay particles cemented together by Fe and Mn oxides and is ubiquitous in arid climates. We report the occurrence of rock varnish in the Mars-like conditions present at Yungay.

  4. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  5. The mangazeya Ag-Pb-Zn vein deposit hosted in sedimentary rocks, Sakha-Yakutia, Russia: Mineral assemblages, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes (C, O, S), and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikina, E. Yu.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Klubnikin, G. K.; Gamyanin, G. N.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The succession of mineral assemblages, chemistry of gangue and ore minerals, fluid inclusions, and stable isotopes (C, O, S) in minerals have been studied in the Mangazeya silver-base-metal deposit hosted in terrigenous rocks of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The deposit is localized in the junction zone of the Kuranakh Anticlinorium and the Sartanga Synclinorium at the steep eastern limb of the Endybal Anticline. The deposit is situated at the intersection of the regional Nyuektame and North Tirekhtyakh faults. Igneous rocks are represented by the Endybal massif of granodiorite porphyry 97.8 ± 0.9 Ma in age and dikes varying in composition. One preore and three types of ore mineralization separated in space are distinguished: quartz-pyrite-arsenopyrite (I), quartz-carbonate-sulfide (II), and silver-base-metal (III). Quartz and carbonate (siderite) are predominant in ore veins. Ore minerals are represented by arsenopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, fahlore, and less frequent sulfosalts. Three types of fluid inclusions in quartz differ in phase compositions: two- or three-phase aqueous-carbon dioxide (FI I), carbon dioxide gas (FI II), and two-phase (FI III) containing liquid and a gas bubble. The homogenization temperature and salinity fall within the ranges of 367-217°C and 13.8-2.6 wt % NaCl equiv in FI I; 336-126°C and 15.4-0.8 wt % NaCl equiv in FI III. Carbon dioxide in FI II was homogenized in gas at +30.2 to +15.3°C and at +27.2 to 29.0°C in liquid. The δ34S values for minerals of type I range from-1.8 to +4.7‰ (V-CDT); of type II, from-7.4 to +6.6‰; and of type III, from-5.6 to +7.1‰. δ13C and δ18O vary from-7.0 to-6.7‰ (V-PDB) and from +16.6 to +17.1 (V-SMOW) in siderite-I; from-9.1 to-6.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +18.9 (V-SMOW) in siderite-II; from-5.4 to-3.1‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +19.5 (V-SMOW) in ankerite; and from-4.2 to-2.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +13.5 to +16.8 (V-SMOW) in calcite. The data on mineral assemblages, fluid

  6. Association of gold with uraninite and pyrobitumen in the metavolcanic rock hosted hydrothermal Au-U mineralisation at Rompas, Peräpohja Schist Belt, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Ferenc; Oduro, Harry; Cook, Nick D. J.; Pohjolainen, Esa; Takács, Ágnes; O'Brien, Hugh; Pakkanen, Lassi; Johanson, Bo; Wirth, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Peräpohja Schist Belt comprises a supracrustal sequence of quartzites, mafic volcanics and volcaniclastics, carbonate rocks, black shales, mica schists and greywackes which were deposited from ca. 2.44 to ~1.91 Ga, during the rifting of the Archaean basement in the eastern part of the Fennoscandian shield. Metamorphism and multiple folding of the basin fill took place during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) followed by intrusions of late-orogenic (1.84-1.80 Ga) and post-orogenic granitoids (1.79-1.76 Ga). The Rompas Au-U mineralisation is hosted by deformed calcsilicate veins in mafic volcanic rocks and locally contains very high grade (>10,000 g/t Au) gold pockets with strict spatial association of gold minerals to uraninite and pyrobitumen. Chemical ages from the unaltered domains in the structure of uraninite indicate a 1.95-1.90 Ga age for the deposition of the primary, high temperature (e.g. U/Th < 100 in uraninite) hydrothermal uranium mineralisation. These data are in agreement with the results of previous U-Pb dating of uraninite by SIMS. Textural evidence suggests that metamorphic recrystallisation of the uraninite-bearing quartz-dolomite veins into calcsilicate mineral assemblages during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) was followed by a hydrocarbon-bearing fluid flow event and radiolytic polymerisation of hydrocarbons around grains of uraninite. Gold precipitated during a subsequent hydrothermal process in the fractures of uraninite, as well as in the cracks and on the botryoidal surfaces of uraninite-pyrobitumen nodules. Remobilisation and redeposition of uranium by these hydrothermal events produced secondary uraninite grains with chemical ages between 1.85 and 1.65 Ga. Native gold is associated with galena, altaite, hunchunite, nickeline and rare cobaltite, Pb-bearing maldonite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and titanite. Raman spectra show disordered structure of undeformed pyrobitumen nodules in contrast with the well

  7. Synthesis and catalytic properties of chromia pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Host clay layer charge and chromium pillaring solution synthesis conditions have a profound effect on the resulting physical properties of chromia pillared clays. Large gallery chromia pillared clays, with gallery heights greater than 10[angstrom], can be obtained from smectite clay hosts of relatively low layer charge. As the host clay layer charge increases, chromia pillared clay gallery heights decrease. Surface areas in excess of 500 m[sup 2]/g have been observed for chromia pillared montmorillonite after calcination at 500[degrees]C. The chromia pillared clays also show interesting thermal stabilities. Chromia pillared clays are unique bifunctional catalysts which exhibit both acidic and redox properties. The chromia pillars, which prop the smectite clay layers apart, are the source of the catalytic activity. The vertical height and lateral spacing of the pillars define a two-dimensional nanoporous environment for possible catalytic shape selectivity. The acidic properties of chromia pillared clays have been examined using decane cracking and a standard gas oil microactivity test as probe reactions. In addition, since chromia is a known dehydrocyclization catalyst, the aromatization of n-octane to p-xylene has been used to study the redox and shape selective properties. While chromia pillared clays do not exhibit exceptional shape selectivity for the n-octane dehydrocyclization reaction, a pore effect on the product distribution has been observed when compared to that of a non-microporous chromia on alumina catalyst. The hydroconversion of n-heptane over a chromia pillared montmorillonite catalyst and an alumina pillared montmorillonite catalyst are also compared. The yield of cracked products closely followed the conversion for the chromia pillared clay catalyst, while the formation of isomerized products was dependent upon the pretreatment temperature in air.

  8. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  9. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  10. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  11. Clay mineralogy of the Boda Claystone Formation (Mecsek Mts., SW Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Tibor; Máthé, Zoltán; Pekker, Péter; Dódony, István; Kovács-Kis, Viktória; Sipos, Péter; Cora, Ildikó; Kovács, Ivett

    2016-04-01

    Boda Claystone Formation (BCF) is the host rock of the planned site for high level nuclear waste repository inHungary. Samples representing the dominant rock types of BCF were studied: albitic claystone, claystone with high illite content, and analcime bearing claystone. Clay minerals in these three rock types were characterized by Xray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG), and the results were discussed from the point of view of the radionuclide sorption properties being studied in the future. Mineral compositions of bulk BCF samples vary in wide ranges. In the albitic sample, besides the dominant illite, few percent of chlorite represents the layer silicates in the clay fraction. Illite is the dominating phase in the illitic sample, with a few percent of chlorite. HRTEM study revealed that the thickness of illite particles rarely reaches 10 layers, usually are of 5-6 TOT layer thick. Illite crystals are generally thicker in the albitic sample than in the illitic one. The significant difference between the clay mineral characterisitics of the analcimous and the other two samples is that the former contains regularly interstratified chlorite/smectite beside the dominant illite. Based on the structural and chemical data two illite type minerals are present in the BCF samples: 1M polytype containing octahedral Fe and Mg besides Al, 2M polytype illite generally is free of Fe andMg. Close association of very thin illite plates and nanosized hematite crystals is typical textural feature for BCF. The goal of this study is to provide solid mineralogical basis for further studies focusing on radionuclide sorption properties.

  12. Central Antarctic provenance of Permian sandstones in Dronning Maud Land and the Karoo Basin: Integration of U Pb and TDM ages and host-rock affinity from detrital zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veevers, J. J.; Saeed, A.

    2007-12-01

    In conjugate SE Africa and Antarctica, Early Permian sandstones of the Swartrant Formation of the Ellisras Basin, Vryheid Formation of the Karoo Basin, and Amelang Plateau Formation of Dronning Maud Land (DML) were deposited after Gondwanan glaciation on a westward paleoslope. We analysed detrital zircons for U-Pb ages by a laser ablation microprobe-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LAM-ICPMS) and attached age significance only to clusters of three or more overlapping analyses. We analysed Hf-isotope compositions by a multi-collector spectrometer (LAM-MC-ICPMS) and trace elements by electron microprobe (EMP) and ICPMS. These analyses indicate the rock type and source (whether crustal or juvenile mantle) of the host magma, and a "crustal" model age ( TDMC). The integrated analysis gives a more distinctive, and more easily interpreted, picture of crustal evolution in the provenance area than age data alone. Zircons from the Ellisras Basin are aged 2700-2540 Ma with minor populations about 2815 Ma and 2040 Ma, which correspond with the ages of the upslope parts of the proximal Kaapvaal Craton and Limpopo Belt. Mafic rock is the dominant host rock, and it reflects the Archean granite-greenstone terrane of the Kaapvaal Craton. The three Karoo Basin samples and the two DML samples have zircons with these common properties: (1) 1160-880 Ma, host magma mafic granitoid (< 65% SiO 2) derived from juvenile depleted mantle sources ( ɛHf positive) at 1.65 Ga and 1.35 Ga, with TDMC of 2.0-0.9 Ga; (2) 760 to 480 Ma, host magma granitoid and low-heavy rare earth element rock (?alkaline rock-carbonatite), derived from mixed crustal and juvenile depleted mantle sources ( ɛHf positive and negative) at 1.50 Ga and 1.35 Ga, with TDMC of 2.0-0.9 Ga. Together with similar detrital zircons in Triassic sandstone of SE Australia, these properties reflect those in upslope central Antarctica, indicating a provenance of ˜ 1000 Ma (Grenville) cratons embedded in 700-500 Ma (Pan

  13. Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, Switzerland-Research Program And Key Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, C. O.; Bossart, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Argillaceous formations generally act as aquitards because of their low hydraulic conductivities. This property, together with the large retention capacity of clays for cationic contaminants and the potential for self-sealing, has brought clay formations into focus as potential host rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation, the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NW Switzerland is an important international test site for researching clay formations. Research is carried out in the underground facility, which is located adjacent to the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel. Fifteen partners from European countries, USA, Canada and Japan participate in the project. The objectives of the research program are to analyze the hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechanical properties of the Opalinus Clay, to determine the changes induced by the excavation of galleries and by heating of the rock formation, to test sealing and container emplacement techniques and to evaluate and improve suitable investigation techniques. For the safety of deep geological disposal, it is of key importance to understand the processes occurring in the undisturbed argillaceous environment, as well as the processes in a disturbed system, during the operation of the repository. The objectives are related to: 1. Understanding processes and mechanisms in undisturbed clays and 2. Experiments related to repository-induced perturbations. Experiments of the first group are dedicated to: i) Improvement of drilling and excavation technologies and sampling methods; ii) Estimation of hydrogeological, rock mechanical and geochemical parameters of the undisturbed Opalinus Clay. Upscaling of parameters from laboratory to in situ scale; iii) Geochemistry of porewater and natural gases; evolution of porewater over time scales; iv) Assessment of long-term hydraulic transients associated with erosion and thermal

  14. Rubidium-strontium dating of ore deposits hosted by Rb-rich rocks, using calcite and other common Sr-bearing minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, J.; Jones, L.M.; Kelly, W.C.

    1984-05-01

    The authors have tested a Rb-Sr technique that permits ore deposits to be dated using common gangue minerals such as calcite and fluorite. The only conditions the deposit must meet are that (1) it have minerals with a low Rb/Sr ratio and (2) it be enclosed by wall rock with a high Rb/Sr ratio. Because hydrothermal minerals acquire a strontium-isotope composition that is usually similar to that of the wall rock, minerals with low Rb/Sr ratio should record and retain the isotopic composition that the wall rock had at the time of mineralization. The difference between that ratio and that of the wall rock at present is a function of time and the Rb/Sr composition of the wall rock. The technique was tested fusing fluorite and calcite from three deposits ranging in age from Tertiary to Precambrian. In all cases the age determined here closely resembles that obtained by conventional K-Ar and Rb-Sr dating methods. The precision, however, can be poor and depends chiefly on the strontium-isotope heterogeneity of the wall rock and its Rb/Sr enrichment. 36 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  15. Elastic properties of dry clay mineral aggregates, suspensions and sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Prasad, Manika; Nur, Amos

    2003-10-01

    The presence of clay minerals can alter the elastic behaviour of rocks significantly. Although clay minerals are common in sedimentary formations and seismic measurements are our main tools for studying subsurface lithologies, measurements of elastic properties of clay minerals have proven difficult. Theoretical values for the bulk modulus of clay are reported between 20 and 50 GPa. The only published experimental measurement of Young's modulus in a clay mineral using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) gave a much lower value of 6.2 GPa. This study has concentrated on using independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. First, ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured as functions of hydrostatic pressure in cold-pressed clay aggregates with porosity and grain density ranging from 4 to 43 per cent and 2.13 to 2.83 g cm-3, respectively. In the second experiment, P- and S-wave velocities in clay powders were measured under uniaxial stresses compaction. In the third experiment, P-wave velocity and attenuation in a kaolinite-water suspension with clay concentrations between 0 and 60 per cent were measured at ambient conditions. Our elastic moduli measurements of kaolinite, montmorillonite and smectite are consistent for all experiments and with reported AFAM measurements on a nanometre scale. The bulk modulus values of the solid clay phase (Ks) lie between 6 and 12 GPa and shear (μs) modulus values vary between 4 and 6 GPa. A comparison is made between the accuracy of velocity prediction in shaley sandstones and clay-water and clay-sand mixtures using the values measured in this study and those from theoretical models. Using Ks= 12 GPa and μs= 6 GPa from this study, the models give a much better prediction both of experimental velocity reduction due to increase in clay content in sandstones and velocity measurements in a kaolinite-water suspension.

  16. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  17. Finicky clay divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  18. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  19. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  20. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  1. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  2. Clay mineralogy of weathering profiles from the Carolina Piedmont.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Saprolite profiles (12) that formed over various crystalline rocks from the Charlotte 1o X 2o quadrangle showed overall similarity in their clay mineralogy to depths of 6 to 45 m indicating control by weathering processes rather than by rock type. Most saprolite contained 10-25% clay, and ranged 3 to 70%. Kaolinite and halloysite composed = or >75% of the clay fraction of most samples. The ratio kaolinite:halloysite ranged widely, from 95% kaolinite to 90% halloysite, independent of depth. Clay-size mica was present in all profiles, and ranged 5-75% over a sericite schist. Mixed-layer mica-smectite and mica-vermiculite were subordinate; discrete smectite and vermiculite were rare. The abundance of halloysite indicates a continuously humid environment since the time of profile formation, because of the rapidity with which halloysite dehydrates irreversibly. -R.S.M.

  3. Incorporation of tramadol drug into Li-fluorohectorite clay: A preliminary study of a medical nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, L.; Hernández, D.; de Ménorval, L. Ch.; Pérez, I.; Altshuler, E.; Fossum, J. O.; Rivera, A.

    2016-07-01

    During the last years, clays have been increasingly explored as hosts for drugs. In the present paper, we have been able to host the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Tramadol, into the clay Li-fluorohectorite (Li-Fh). We preliminary evaluate its incorporation by means of UV spectroscopy and X ray diffraction. Our results indicate that the clay hosts the drug molecule in its interlayer space. We suggest a set of parameters to guarantee an efficient incorporation process. Future studies will concentrate on the release of the drug from the clay nanofluid.

  4. Clay swelling — A challenge in the oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. L.; Ratcliffe, I.; Greenwell, H. C.; Williams, P. A.; Cliffe, S.; Coveney, P. V.

    2010-02-01

    Water-based drilling fluids are increasingly being used for oil and gas exploration, and are generally considered to be more environmentally acceptable than oil-based or synthetic-based fluids. Unfortunately, their use facilitates clay hydration and swelling. Clay swelling, which occurs in exposed sedimentary rock formations, can have an adverse impact on drilling operations and may lead to significantly increased oil well construction costs. Minimizing clay swelling is therefore an important area attracting a large amount of interest from both academia and industry. To effectively reduce the extent of clay swelling the mechanism by which clay minerals swell needs to be understood so that efficient swelling inhibitors may be developed. Acceptable clay swelling inhibitors must not only significantly reduce clay hydration, but must also meet increasingly stringent environmental guidelines while remaining cost effective. The development of these inhibitors, which are generally based upon water soluble polymers, therefore represents a challenge to oilfield geochemistry. This review aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism by which clay minerals swell and what steps have been taken in the development of effective and environmentally friendly clay swelling inhibitors.

  5. Clay nanocomposites for use in Li batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory John

    1999-11-01

    Nanocomposites, materials made of more than one component and combined in an ordered manner on the nanometer scale, were synthesized using clay mineral hosts with various types of guests. The guests include polymers such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyaniline (PANI), large molecules such as ethylmethyl sulfone, tetramethylene sulfone, and various length alkylamines. Vanadyl groups (VO 2+) were also incorporated with the clays. The otherwise non-swellable mica clay, synthetic Na-fluorophlogopite, was expanded by intercalation of acidic ions such as Cu2+ and Fe3+. As aqueous solutions, these ions caused the stable fluoromica to go from its dehydrated interlayer spacing of 9.8 A to over 14 A. This clay became a host for many other reactions including swelling with alkylamines to over 25 A. However, despite hydrated Cu2+ ions swelling fluorophlogopite, polymeric species such as PEO or PANI could not be inserted. Another clay that was used for formation of nanocomposites came from a procedure for the synthesis of Li-taeniolite, Li(Mg2Li)Si 4O10F2. The clay was synthesized following a high temperature method that led to a non-reactive product. Instead, a novel precursor route was employed that gave a clay product with a single hydration layer. Various chemical analyses gave a formula of Li0.8(Mg 2.2Li0.8)Si4O10(F1.6O 0.4)·H2O. For the purpose of forming nanocomposite electrolytes, ethylmethyl sulfone was synthesized and incorporated into the clay. For comparison of different shaped sulfones, tetramethylene sulfone also was inserted into the layers for electrolytic studies. To make a polymer-clay electrolyte, polyethylene oxide was intercalated into the Li-taeniolite. All of these new electrolyte materials were characterized using impedance spectroscopy for measurement of their conductivity. Syntheses and analyses are thoroughly discussed for all of these materials. Special attention is placed on powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric techniques to

  6. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  7. Intercalated clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.

    1983-04-22

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  8. Intercalated Clay Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1983-04-01

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  9. Characterization of clay minerals and organic matter in shales: Application to high-level nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Gueven, N.; Landis, C.R.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to conduct investigations to assess the potential for shale to serve as a host medium for the isolation of high-level nuclear wastes. The emphasis on shale is a result of screening major sedimentary rock types (shale, sandstone, carbonate , anhydrite, and chalk) for a variety of attributes that affect the performance of repositories. The retardation of radionuclides was recognized as one of the potentially favorable features of shale. Because shale contains both clay minerals and organic matter, phases that may provide significant sorption of radioelement, the characterization of these phases is essential. In addition, the organic matter in shale has been identified as a critical area for study because of its potential to play either a favorable (reductant) or deleterious (organic ligands) role in the performance of a repository sited in shale. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Uranium and other element geochemical covariation in a granitic host rock and in the derived sediment, Deep Creek Range, Juab County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Correlation and factor analysis of geochemical data from a Tertiary biotite quartz monzonite, the Ibapah stock, and from derived sediment shows on comparison a major shift in element covariation among uranium and 24 other elements. Samples used were collected for a 1978 study in the central part of the Deep Creek Range, Juab County, Utah. Computed correlations among elements in granitic igneous rock samples suggest a high degree of covariation among elements that compose the rock. Uranium, however, shows significant correlation with only 12 elements and almost zero correlation with thorium. Computed correlations among elements in the derived sediment suggest that major decreases have occurred in covariation of the elements in the derived sands. Uranium in the sands, however, shows 15 significant correlations compared to 12 in the igneous rock samples, and shows an extremely high correlation with thorium. Factor analysis shows three geochemical petrogenic factors and the regional Be-U mineralization factor in the igneous rocks, and two mechanical segregation and one chemical precipitation factors in the sediments.

  11. Cesium in rock-water interaction, Yellowstone National Park. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.M.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1983-03-01

    Chemical analyses of thermal waters from research drill holes and nearby hot springs and geysers in Upper and Lower Geyser Basins indicate that Cs may be a reactive ion. A nearly constant Cs:Cl is found for four wells drilled in Lower Geyser Basin and for some hot spring and geysers. It is inferred from this plot that points falling below the trend indicate Cs depleted waters. A plot of Cs:CHO/sub 3//Cl, another measure of rock-water interaction, also indicates Cs removal from the waters. These data correlate well with a parallel study of chemistry and mineralogy of hydrothermally altered rocks from the drill holes which show that the rocks involved in hydrothermal rock-water reactions are vitrophyric rhyolite lava flows and pumiceous tuff overlain by obsidian-rich sands and gravels. Nearly 55 m of such a section from well Y-8 has been hydrothermally altered into alternating intervals consisting of analcime - quartz - clay (smectite, celadonite) or clinoptilolite - ..cap alpha..-cristobalite - smectite. Whole rock analyses of randomly selected samples of these intervals from several wells have Cs contents somewhat higher than those of the unaltered host rhyolite. However, the Cs content of the analcime - quartz - clay intervals is as much as 700 times higher than that of the host rock. Analyses of mineral separates show that analcime, containing as much as 4700 ppM Cs, is more enriched in Cs than any other mineral. Examination of experimental data suggests that Cs is incorporated into the analcime structure during crystallization. Clinoptilolite, which has been shown to readily exchange Cs, is only slightly enriched in this system.

  12. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  13. Designing in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1977-01-01

    What can be done to transform a lump of wet clay into something more than a lump of glaze-fired clay? It is at this point when forming techniques have been mastered that good design becomes most important. Discusses six criteria involved in the search for good design so that students can discover what good design is and how important it is.…

  14. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  15. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  16. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.

    2013-12-01

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features.

  17. Rock magnetic expression of fluid infiltration in the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (Longmen Shan thrust belt, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Yang, Xiaosong; Duan, Qingbao; Chen, Jianye; Dekkers, Mark J.

    2016-03-01

    Fluid infiltration within fault zones is an important process in earthquake rupture. Magnetic properties of fault rocks convey essential clues pertaining to physicochemical processes in fault zones. In 2011, two shallow holes (134 and 54 m depth, respectively) were drilled into the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (Longmen Shan thrust belt, China), which accommodated most of the displacement of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. Fifty-eight drill core samples, including granitic host rock and various fault rocks, were analyzed rock-magnetically, mineralogically, and geochemically. The magnetic behavior of fault rocks appears to be dominated by paramagnetic clay minerals. Magnetite in trace amounts is identified as the predominant ferrimagnetic fraction in all samples, decreasing from the host rock, via fault breccia to (proto-)cataclasite. Significant mass-losses (10.7-45.6%) are determined for the latter two with the "isocon" method. Volatile contents and alteration products (i.e., chlorite) are enriched toward the fault core relative to the host rocks. These observations suggest that magnetite depletion occurred in these fault rocks—exhumed from the shallow crust—plumbed by fluid-assisted processes. Chlorite, interpreted to result from hydrothermal activity, occurs throughout almost the entire fault core and shows high coefficients of determination (R2 > 0.6) with both low and high-field magnetic susceptibility. Close relationships, with R2 > 0.70, are also observed between both low and high-field magnetic susceptibility and the immobile elements (e.g., TiO2, P2O5, MnO), H2O+, and the calculated mass-losses of fault rocks. Hence, magnetic properties of fault rocks can serve as proxy indicators of fluid infiltration within shallow fault zones.

  18. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, T.; Blake, D.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Chipera, S.; Rampe, E. B.; Farmer, J. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R.; Morrison, S.; Achilles, C.; Des Marais, D. J.; Crisp, J. A.; Sarrazin, P.; Morookian, J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent ~150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (~3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of ~20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at ~10A with a slight inflexion at ~12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating >60°C in the presence of water

  19. Field trip guidebook on environmental impact of clays along the upper Texas coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Theron D.; Ming, Douglas W.; Tuck, Lisa Kay

    1991-01-01

    The field trip was prepared to provide an opportunity to see first hand some the environmental hazards associated with clays in the Houston, Texas area. Because of the very high clay content in area soils and underlying Beaumont Formation clay, Houston is a fitting location to host the Clay Mineral Society. Examinations were made of (1) expansive soils, (2) subsidence and surface faulting, and (3) a landfill located southeast of Houston at the Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority where clay is part of the liner material.

  20. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  1. Adsorption of nucleic Acid bases, ribose, and phosphate by some clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate how clays might catalyze the formation of nucleosides, nucleotides and polynucleotides in the "RNA world". The adsorption of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides from aqueous solution to clay minerals is affected by suspension pH. With montmorillonite, adsorption is also influenced by the nature of the exchangeable cations. Here, we review the interactions of some clay minerals with RNA components.

  2. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-08-04

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the

  3. Comparative anatomy of epithermal precious- and base-metal districts hosted by volcanic rocks: A talk presented at the GAC/MSC/GGU Joint Annual Meeting, May 11-13, 1983, Victoria, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heald-Wetlaufer, Pamela; Hayba, Daniel O.; Foley, Nora K.; Goss, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to distinguish dissimilar from similar features of epithermal districts, lithotectonic, mineralogical and geochemical traits are compiled for 15 such districts. The districts occur in structurally complex settings associated with silicic to intermediate volcanics. Affiliation with subduction environments on a continental scale and caldera settings on a regional scale is common but is not demonstrable for all districts. Most deposits formed near the end of major volcanism, but some formed considerably later. Paleodepth to the top of the ore is 300-600m for most districts, although Au-rich districts appear to be shallower. The lateral extent of the ore zone is highly variable and far exceeds the limited vertical range (300-800m). Most ore was deposited from dominantly meteoric fluids ranging in temperature from 220°-290°C. Salinities ranged from 0-13 wt% NaCl equiv., and typical values were 1-3 wt%. Although noted for eight deposits, boiling is clearly associated with precious-metal deposition in only two deposits. Four districts, typified by Goldfield, Nev., are characterized by a highly sulfidized mineral assemblage, advanced argillic alteration, and ore deposition closely following emplacement of the host rock. The remaining eleven districts highlight a second, discrete type of deposit. They contain adularia, exhibit sericitic ± argillic alteration, and were mineralized significantly after emplacement of the host rock. The latter category includes two subgroups: Ag- and base-metal-rich deposits (e.g., Creede, Colo.), and Au-rich, base-metal-poor deposits (e.g., Round Mtn., Nev.).

  4. Sources and sinks of clay minerals on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, Ralph E.; Bish, David L.

    2010-06-01

    The recent identification of clay minerals on the Martian surface using visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has had a profound effect on our view of aqueous alteration on Mars. Smectite, chlorite, kaolin group, and serpentine group minerals have been detected using the CRISM and OMEGA spectrometers, with Fe/Mg-smectite and chlorite varieties being the dominant types discovered throughout the ancient crust. Aqueous, eolian, and impact processes have transported and recycled some of these clays such that their current locations may not accurately reflect their formation environments. However, detrital clays could prove useful for constraining transport pathways and sediment provenance. Here we discuss the impact craters and channels that comprise the Uzboi-Ladon-Morava system, including Holden, Eberswalde, and Ladon craters, which represents a large-scale sediment sink for clay minerals derived from the surrounding Noachian crust. This system contains thick deposts of clay mineral-bearing strata that likely record a wide range of alluvial, fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian processes that provide direct insight into the Martian clay cycle. Broad concepts of sediment sources, sinks, and sediment transport paths can be outlined using orbital data, but future in situ exploration of the Martian sedimentary rock record will be necessary to distinguish fully between detrital and authigenic clay minerals, and thus to determine environmental conditions and transitions on ancient Mars.

  5. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  6. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  7. Modeling in Ceramic Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1976-01-01

    Modeling is an additive process of building up a sculpture with some plastic material like clay. It affords the student an opportunity to work in three dimensions, a creative relief from the general two-dimensional drawing and design activities that occupy a large segment of time in the art curriculum. (Author/RK)

  8. Magnificent Clay Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  9. Hybrid Finite-Discrete Element Simulation of the EDZ Formation and Mechanical Sealing Process Around a Microtunnel in Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisjak, Andrea; Tatone, Bryan S. A.; Mahabadi, Omid K.; Grasselli, Giovanni; Marschall, Paul; Lanyon, George W.; Vaissière, Rémi de la; Shao, Hua; Leung, Helen; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    The analysis and prediction of the rock mass disturbance around underground excavations are critical components of the performance and safety assessment of deep geological repositories for nuclear waste. In the short term, an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) tends to develop due to the redistribution of stresses around the underground openings. The EDZ is associated with an increase in hydraulic conductivity of several orders of magnitude. In argillaceous rocks, sealing mechanisms ultimately lead to a partial reduction in the effective hydraulic conductivity of the EDZ with time. The goal of this study is to strengthen the understanding of the phenomena involved in the EDZ formation and sealing in Opalinus Clay, an indurated claystone currently being assessed as a host rock for a geological repository in Switzerland. To achieve this goal, hybrid finite-discrete element method (FDEM) simulations are performed. With its explicit consideration of fracturing processes, FDEM modeling is applied to the HG-A experiment, an in situ test carried out at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory to investigate the hydro-mechanical response of a backfilled and sealed microtunnel. A quantitative simulation of the EDZ formation process around the microtunnel is first carried out, and the numerical results are compared with field observations. Then, the re-compression of the EDZ under the effect of a purely mechanical loading, capturing the increase of swelling pressure from the backfill onto the rock, is considered. The simulation results highlight distinctive rock failure kinematics due to the bedded structure of the rock mass. Also, fracture termination is simulated at the intersection with a pre-existing discontinuity, representing a fault plane oblique to the bedding orientation. Simulation of the EDZ re-compression indicates an overall reduction of the total fracture area as a function of the applied pressure, with locations of ineffective sealing associated with self

  10. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  11. Sarcocystis calchasi has an expanded host range and induces neurological disease in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and North American rock pigeons (Columbia livia f. dom.).

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Maier, Kristina; Wuenschmann, Arno; Reed, Leslie; Armién, Aníbal G; Shaw, Daniel P; Gruber, Achim D; Lierz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    Pigeon protozoal encephalitis (PPE) is an emerging central nervous system disease of pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica) caused by the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis calchasi. The intermediate host specificity of S. calchasi had been considered high, as domestic chickens were resistant to experimental infection. Here, we have re-evaluated this concept and expanded the known host range of S. calchasi by experimental infection of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), a species distantly related to pigeons. In this work, a group of eight cockatiels were experimentally infected with S. calchasi, which resulted in a biphasic central nervous system disease that paralleled PPE in many aspects, albeit with a more diverse pathology. All cockatiels became lethargic and polyuric between days 7 and 13 pi and during that time schizonts of S. calchasi were found primarily in the liver and spleen accompanied by necrosis and inflammation. As with pigeons, neurological signs occurred during a chronic phase of the disease in three cockatiels between 57 and 63 dpi. However, all five cockatiels necropsied in that period, or at the end of the trial at 76 dpi, had a severe lymphohistiocytic and necrotizing encephalitis. No tissue cysts were found in the heart, and cockatiels infected with 10(5) sporocysts only had a negligible parasite load in skeletal muscles despite the presence of severe central nervous system lesions. Notably, intralesional schizonts were identified in the brain of one cockatiel. In contrast to previous results, intralesional schizonts were also identified in the brains of three of six naturally infected pigeons from Minnesota and Missouri examined as part of an epidemiological investigation. In both the cockatiel and the pigeons, tissue cysts were found concurrently with schizonts suggesting an uncommon phenomenon in the Sarcocystis life cycle. Based on the results of this study, transmission of S. calchasi to avian species other than the domestic pigeon is

  12. Pressure, temperature, and timing of mineralization of the sedimentary rock-hosted orogenic gold deposit at Klipwal, southeastern Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnasamy, Sakthi Saravanan; Uken, Ron; Reinhardt, Jürgen; Selby, David; Johnson, Spencer

    2015-08-01

    fluid-forming event with fluid flow focused into a "compressional jog" of the KSZ. Shear-induced pressure fluctuations generated a phase separation of the initial aqueous-gaseous fluid, producing a gaseous and low-salinity aqueous fluid. This, together with fluid-rock interaction, and a decrease in fO2 lead to sulfide and gold precipitation at Klipwal. Re-Os data from six sulfide samples constrain the age of sulfide precipitation and, by inference, gold mineralization, to 2563 ± 84 Ma, with an initial 187Os/188Os = 0.29 ± 0.08 (MSWD = 0.38). This age is distinctly younger than the post-Pongola granites (2863-2721 Ma), ruling out the association of granite emplacement with mineralization. This would suggest that mineralization is linked to the regional D3 folding event which reactivated the KSZ after emplacement of the post-Pongola granites and that final brittle, post-mineralization reactivation is related to Karoo age faulting. Low initial Os values suggest that ore fluid interacted with mafic rocks, leaching non-radiogenic Os, the likely source being the deeper seated Nsuze Group volcanics and/or the greenstone belts that underlie the Pongola Supergroup.

  13. The Alberhill and other clay deposits of Temescal Canyon, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daviess, Steven Norman; Bramlette, M.N.

    1953-01-01

    Clay is mined in open pits by several companies in the Alberhill district, and the refractory clays of relatively high alumina sediment are used largely for fire brick. The Alberhill Coal and Clay Company is the largest operator and has produced a little over 2,000,000 tons of clay, of which nearly half was the refractory type. The clay occurs at the contact of the lower Tertiary and the Mesozoic basement complex. The weathered surface of basement rocks includes much clay of high iron and low alumina content, and the better clay occurs in the basal Tertiary sediments. The clay deposits vary rather abruptly in thickness and quality, and only local lenses contain workable deposits. Structural deformation makes dips of 10 to 20 degrees common and the clay strata therefore pitch under excessive overburden in short distances. Extensive deposits of thick alluvial fan deposits cover the clay-bearing strata over most of the area, and add to the overburden problems. The apparent lack of clay deposits of good quality that would total several million tons of ore, and the geological conditions that would make exploration and mining difficult and expensive make this district unpromising.

  14. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of high-grade host rocks to the Venetia kimberlite diatremes, Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Creus, P. K.; Anthonissen, C. J.; Stoch, B.; Ekkerd, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Beit Bridge Complex of the Central Zone (CZ) of the Limpopo Belt hosts the 519 ± 6 Ma Venetia kimberlite diatremes. Deformed shelf- or platform-type supracrustal sequences include the Mount Dowe, Malala Drift and Gumbu Groups, comprising quartzofeldspathic units, biotite-bearing gneiss, quartzite, metapelite, metacalcsilicate and ortho- and para-amphibolite. Previous studies define tectonometamorphic events at 3.3-3.1 Ga, 2.7-2.5 Ga and 2.04 Ga. Detailed structural mapping over 10 years highlights four deformation events at Venetia. Rules-based implicit 3D modelling in Leapfrog Geo™ provides an unprecedented insight into CZ ductile deformation and sheath folding. D1 juxtaposed gneisses against metasediments. D2 produced a pervasive axial planar foliation (S2) to isoclinal F2 folds. Sheared lithological contacts and S2 were refolded into regional, open, predominantly southward-verging, E-W trending F3 folds. Intrusion of a hornblendite protolith occurred at high angles to incipient S2. Constrictional-prolate D4 shows moderately NE-plunging azimuths defined by elongated hornblendite lenses, andalusite crystals in metapelite, crenulations in fuchsitic quartzite and sheath folding. D4 overlaps with a: 1) 2.03-2.01 Ga regional M3 metamorphic overprint; b) transpressional deformation at 2.2-1.9 Ga and c) 2.03 Ga transpressional, dextral shearing and thrusting around the CZ and d) formation of the Avoca, Bellavue and Baklykraal sheath folds and parallel lineations.

  15. Weak Polyelectrolyte-Clay Assemblies: Physical Mechanisms of Biological Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhishvili, Svetlana; Pavlukhina, Svetlana; Zhuk, Iryna

    2014-03-01

    We report on a highly efficient, non-leachable antibacterial coating, consisting of an ultrathin nanocomposite hydrogel capable of hosting, protecting and delivering antibiofilm agents in response to bacterial infection. Constructed using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of clay nanoplatelets and a weak polyelectrolyte and loaded with an antimicrobial agent (AmA), the coatings was highly resistant to colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. The high antibiofilm activity of the coating results from a combination of highly localized, bacteria-triggered AmA release and hydrogel swelling, as well as retention of AmA by clay nanoplatelets. We discuss the dependence of rheological and swelling properties of weak polyelectrolyte-clay assemblies on film thickness, clay platelet orientation and environmental pH.

  16. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of high-grade host rocks to the Venetia kimberlite diatremes, Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Creus, P. K.; Anthonissen, C. J.; Stoch, B.; Ekkerd, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Beit Bridge Complex of the Central Zone (CZ) of the Limpopo Belt hosts the 519 ± 6 Ma Venetia kimberlite diatremes. Deformed shelf- or platform-type supracrustal sequences include the Mount Dowe, Malala Drift and Gumbu Groups, comprising quartzofeldspathic units, biotite-bearing gneiss, quartzite, metapelite, metacalcsilicate and ortho- and para-amphibolite. Previous studies define tectonometamorphic events at 3.3-3.1 Ga, 2.7-2.5 Ga and 2.04 Ga. Detailed structural mapping over 10 years highlights four deformation events at Venetia. Rules-based implicit 3D modelling in Leapfrog Geo™ provides an unprecedented insight into CZ ductile deformation and sheath folding. D1 juxtaposed gneisses against metasediments. D2 produced a pervasive axial planar foliation (S2) to isoclinal F2 folds. Sheared lithological contacts and S2 were refolded into regional, open, predominantly southward-verging, E-W trending F3 folds. Intrusion of a hornblendite protolith occurred at high angles to incipient S2. Constrictional-prolate D4 shows moderately NE-plunging azimuths defined by elongated hornblendite lenses, andalusite crystals in metapelite, crenulations in fuchsitic quartzite and sheath folding. D4 overlaps with a: 1) 2.03-2.01 Ga regional M3 metamorphic overprint; b) transpressional deformation at 2.2-1.9 Ga and c) 2.03 Ga transpressional, dextral shearing and thrusting around the CZ and d) formation of the Avoca, Bellavue and Baklykraal sheath folds and parallel lineations.

  17. Illitization within bentonite engineered barrier system in clay repositories for nuclear waste and its effect on the swelling stress: a coupled THMC modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Liu, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear waste generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive waste from the biosphere. An engineered barrier system (EBS), which comprises in many design concepts a bentonite backfill, is widely used. Clay formations have been considered as a host rock throughout the world. Illitization, the transformation of smectite to illite, could compromise some beneficiary features of EBS bentonite and clay host rock such as sorption and swelling capacity. It is the major determining factor to establish the maximum design temperature of the repositories because it is believed that illitization could be greatly enhanced at temperatures higher than 100 oC. However, existing experimental and modeling studies on the occurrence of illitization and related performance impacts are not conclusive, in part because the relevant couplings between the thermal, hydrological, chemical, and mechanical (THMC) processes have not been fully represented in the models. Here we present a fully coupled THMC simulation study of a generic nuclear waste repository in a clay formation with a bentonite-backfilled EBS. Two scenarios were simulated for comparison: a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister can reach about 200 oC and a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister peaks at about 100 oC. The model simulations demonstrate that illitization is in general more significant under higher temperature. However, the quantity of illitization is affected by many chemical factors and therefore varies a great deal. The most important chemical factors are the concentration of K in the pore water as well as the abundance and dissolution rate of K-feldspar. For the particular case and bentonite properties studied, the reduction in swelling stress as a result of chemical changes vary from 2% up to 70% depending on chemical and temperature conditions, and key mechanical parameters. The

  18. Numerical investigation of the seismic detectability of carbonate thin beds in the Boom Clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2016-07-01

    The present study evaluates the capacity of the Boom Clay as a host rock for disposal purposes, more precisely its seismic characterization, which may assess its long-term performance to store radioactive wastes. Although the formation is relatively uniform and homogeneous, there are embedded thin layers of septaria (carbonates) that may affect the integrity of the Boom Clay. Therefore, it is essential to locate these geobodies. The seismic data to characterize the Boom Clay has been acquired at the Kruibeke test site. The inversion, which allowed us to obtain the anisotropy parameters and seismic velocities of the clay, is complemented with further information such as log and laboratory data. The attenuation properties have been estimated from equivalent formations (having similar composition and seismic velocities). The inversion yields quite consistent results although the symmetry of the medium is unusual but physically possible, since the anisotropy parameter ɛ is negative. According to a time-domain calculation of the energy velocity at four frequency bands up to 900 Hz, velocity increases with frequency, a behaviour described by the Zener model. Then, we use this model to describe anisotropy and anelasticity that are implemented into the equation of motion to compute synthetic seismograms in the space-time domain. The technique is based on memory variables and the Fourier pseudospectral method. We have computed reflection coefficients of the septaria thin layer. At normal incidence, the P-wave coefficient vanishes at specific thicknesses of the layer and there is no conversion to the S wave. For example, calculations at 600 Hz show that for thicknesses of 1 m the septarium can be detected more easily since the amplitudes are higher (nearly 0.8). Converted PS waves have a high amplitude at large offsets (between 30° and 80°) and can be useful to identify the target on this basis. Moreover, we have investigated the effect of septaria embedded in the Boom

  19. Clay alteration of volcaniclastic material in a submarine geothermal system, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Michael W. A.; Hannington, Mark D.; Percival, Jeanne B.; Stoffers, Peter; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; de Ronde, C. E. J.

    2010-04-01

    The Calypso Hydrothermal Vent Field (CHVF) is located along an offshore extension of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), an area of abundant volcanism and geothermal activity on the North Island of New Zealand. The field occurs within a northeast-trending submarine depression on the continental shelf approximately 10-15 km southwest of the White Island volcano in the Bay of Plenty. The graben has been partially filled by tephra from regional subaerial volcanic eruptions, and active hydrothermal venting occurs at several locations along its length. The vents occur at water depths of 160 to 190 m and have temperatures up to 201 °C. Recovered samples from the vent field include variably cemented and veined volcaniclastic sediments containing an assemblage of clay minerals, amorphous silica, barite, As-Sb-Hg sulfides, and abundant native sulfur. The volcanic glass has been altered primarily to montmorillonite and mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite; illite, and possibly minor talc and mixed-layer chlorite-smectite or chlorite-vermiculite are also present. A hydrothermal versus diagenetic origin for the smectite is indicated by the presence of both illite and mixed-layer clays and by the correlation between the abundance of clay minerals and the abundance of native sulfur in the samples. The mineralization and alteration of the volcanic host rocks are similar to that observed in near-neutral pH geothermal systems on land in the TVZ (e.g., Broadlands-Ohaaki). However, the clay minerals in the CHVF have a higher concentration of Mg in the dioctahedral layer and a higher interlayer Na content than clay minerals from Broadlands-Ohaaki, reflecting the higher concentrations of Mg and Na in seawater compared to meteoric water. Minerals formed at very low pH (e.g., kaolinite and alunite), typical of steam-heated acid-sulfate type alteration in the TVZ geothermal environment, were not found. Mixing with seawater likely prevented the formation of such low-pH mineral assemblages. The

  20. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (<55%). From the economic point of view, the Pure Gypsum Rocks, displaying a resistivity value of >800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship

  1. Bulk rock composition and geochemistry of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the Grey Porri Tuff and selected lavas of the Monte dei Porri volcano, Salina, Aeolian Islands, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, Angela L.; Bodnar, Robert J.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Bohrson, Wendy A.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Messina, Antonia; Tracy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aeolian Islands are an arcuate chain of submarine seamounts and volcanic islands, lying just north of Sicily in southern Italy. The second largest of the islands, Salina, exhibits a wide range of compositional variation in its erupted products, from basaltic lavas to rhyolitic pumice. The Monte dei Porri eruptions occurred between 60 ka and 30 ka, following a period of approximately 60,000 years of repose. The bulk rock composition of the Monte dei Porri products range from basaltic-andesite scoria to andesitic pumice in the Grey Porri Tuff (GPT), with the Monte dei Porri lavas having basaltic-andesite compositions. The typical mineral assemblage of the GPT is calcic plagioclase, clinopyroxene (augite), olivine (Fo72−84) and orthopyroxene (enstatite) ± amphibole and Ti-Fe oxides. The lava units show a similar mineral assemblage, but contain lower Fo olivines (Fo57−78). The lava units also contain numerous glomerocrysts, including an unusual variety that contains quartz, K-feldspar and mica. Melt inclusions (MI) are ubiquitous in all mineral phases from all units of the Monte dei Porri eruptions; however, only data from olivine-hosted MI in the GPT are reported here. Compositions of MI in the GPT are typically basaltic (average SiO2 of 49.8 wt %) in the pumices and basaltic-andesite (average SiO2 of 55.6 wt %) in the scoriae and show a bimodal distribution in most compositional discrimination plots. The compositions of most of the MI in the scoriae overlap with bulk rock compositions of the lavas. Petrological and geochemical evidence suggest that mixing of one or more magmas and/or crustal assimilation played a role in the evolution of the Monte dei Porri magmatic system, especially the GPT. Analyses of the more evolved mineral phases are required to better constrain the evolution of the magma.

  2. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  3. Evaluating sand and clay models: do rheological differences matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstadt, Gloria; Sims, Darrell

    2005-08-01

    Dry sand and wet clay are the most frequently used materials for physical modeling of brittle deformation. We present a series of experiments that shows when the two materials can be used interchangeably, document the differences in deformation patterns and discuss how best to evaluate and apply results of physical models. Extension and shortening produce similar large-scale deformation patterns in dry sand and wet clay models, indicating that the two materials can be used interchangeably for analysis of gross deformation geometries. There are subtle deformation features that are significantly different: (1) fault propagation and fault linkage; (2) fault width, spacing and displacement; (3) extent of deformation zone; and (4) amount of folding vs. faulting. These differences are primarily due to the lower cohesion of sand and its larger grain size. If these features are of interest, the best practice would be to repeat the experiments with more than one material to ensure that rheological differences are not biasing results. Dry sand and wet clay produce very different results in inversion models; almost all faults are reactivated in wet clay, and few, if any, are significantly reactivated in sand models. Fault reactivation is attributed to high fluid pressure along the fault zone in the wet clay, a situation that may be analogous to many rocks. Sand inversion models may be best applied to areas where most faults experience little to no reactivation, while clay models best fit areas where most pre-existing normal faults are reactivated.

  4. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  5. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  6. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  7. Investigating the Influence of Clay Mineralogy on Stream Bank Erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, R. K.; Stine, M. B.

    2005-12-01

    Soil scientists concerned with erosion of agricultural fields and geotechnical engineers concerned with the mechanical behavior of soils under different conditions have both examined the role of clay mineralogy in controlling soil/sediment properties. Fluvial geomorphologists studying stream channel erosion and stability have focused more on the effects of particle-size distribution, vegetation and rooting. The clay mineralogy of bed and bank sediment has the potential to influence cohesiveness and erodibility, however. The goal of this study is to determine the influence of clay mineralogy on the erodibility of natural stream bank sediment, utilizing techniques drawn from pedology and soil mechanics. Bank samples were collected from eleven sites in small watersheds in central and western Virginia. To obtain sediment containing a range of different clay minerals, watersheds with different types of bedrock were chosen for sampling. Rock types included mafic to felsic metamorphic and igneous rocks, shale, sandstone, and limestone. Where stream bank materials were clearly stratified, different layers were sampled separately. X-ray diffraction of the clay-fraction of the sediment indicates the presence of kaolinite, illite, vermiculite, and mixed-layer clay minerals in various abundances in the different samples. Clay content is 9-46%, as determined by the hydrometer method, and textures range from silty clay and silt loam to clay loam and sandy loam. Organic mater contents range from 1-5% by the loss-on-ignition method. Bulk density of intact sediment samples averages 1.5 g/cc. Liquid limits range from 23-41 with one sample having a value of 65; plasticity indices range from 15-22. While these tests predict that the samples would show a range of mechanical behaviors, the channel morphology at the sampling sites was not strikingly different, all having steep cut banks eroded primarily by scour with no evidence of mass movement and most having a width/depth ratio around

  8. Towards an understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin Mei; Zhou, Chun Hui; Keeling, John; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews progress in the understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation. Clay minerals are involved in the formation of kerogen, catalytic cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon, the migration of crude oil, and the continued change to hydrocarbon composition in underground petroleum reservoirs. In kerogen formation, clay minerals act as catalysts and sorbents to immobilize organic matter through ligand exchange, hydrophobic interactions and cation bridges by the mechanisms of Maillard reactions, polyphenol theory, selective preservation and sorptive protection. Clay minerals also serve as catalysts in acid-catalyzed cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon through Lewis and Brønsted acid sites on the clay surface. The amount and type of clay mineral affect the composition of the petroleum. Brønsted acidity of clay minerals is affected by the presence and state of interlayer water, and displacement of this water is a probable driver in crude oil migration from source rocks. During crude oil migration and accumulation in reservoirs, the composition of petroleum is continually modified by interaction with clay minerals. The clays continue to function as sorbents and catalysts even while they are being transformed by diagenetic processes. The detail of chemical interactions and reaction mechanisms between clay minerals and crude oil formation remains to be fully explained but promises to provide insights with broader application, including catalytic conversion of biomass as a source of sustainable energy into the future.

  9. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

    2008-10-15

    During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

  10. Functionalized synthetic clays designed for polymer-clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastek, Thuy Truong

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have many advantageous properties such as their light weight, transparency, flame retardency, barrier properties, and low cost. Exfoliation of natural clays into commercially important non-polar polymers such as polystyrene (PS) and polypropylene (PP) melts has been limited due to the immiscibility of these polymers with highly polar clays. Current means of addressing this problem, such as treating clays with surfactants, has met with limited success. Motivated by the need for synthetic clays that can be dispersed and exfoliated in non-polar polymer melts without added compatibilizers, we synthesized lamellar silicates and aluminosilicates to act as clay analogs. The flexibility of the sol-gel syntheses allowed hexadecyl and isobutyl functional groups to be covalently attached to the surface of the clays. Incorporating a high content of octahedral aluminum also strengthened the clay layers. The strength and surface functionalities of the layered silicates improved exfoliation during melt blending with PS and PP. We studied the effects of clay layer composition (silicate and alumino-silicate), layer thickness, organic functional groups, aluminum coordination, and covalent linking of surfactants on the performance of the nanocomposites. The lamellar morphology was determined from XRD and TEM. Organic functionalization was determined with solid state NMR and IR spectroscopy. The synthetic clays were mixed with various solvents to help predict their miscibility with PS and PP. Composites were prepared with different molecular weight polymers, which subjected the clays to a wide range of shear stresses. The clays were also pretreated by mixing in a master batch or dispersing in an organic solvent. The effects of PS and PP molecular weight, master batch, and solvent dispersion on the exfoliation of synthetic clays in PS are examined. Rheology and TEM were used to observe the quality of exfoliation and the final aspect ratio of the clay layers

  11. Particle size distributions, microstructures and chemistry of fault rocks in a shallow borehole adjacent to the San Andreas Fault near Little Rock, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Chester, J. S.; Rockwell, T. K.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In mapping the distribution of fractured crystalline rocks along the Mojave section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), Dor et al. (2006) found that almost all rocks within 50 to 200 m from the fault are pulverized to some degree. In an effort to characterize the role of surface weathering, and quantify the mesoscale and microscale deformation of these rocks as a function of depth in the shallow subsurface environment, we have collected a nearly continuous, 42 meter-deep core from the pulverized adjacent to the main strand of the SAF near Little Rock, California. The Little Rock site is characterized by extensive outcrops of granitic rock displaying varying degrees of damage up to a few hundreds of meters from the fault’s primary active strand. The cored section primarily is composed of pulverized granites and granodiorites, and is cut by numerous mesoscopic secondary shears. Medium to coarse silt- and fine sand-size particles dominate throughout the cored section; very few micron-scale particles are observed and only minor amounts of clay weathering products are present. Mapping on optical and SEM images of core samples at various depths and magnifications defines the distribution of two main fault rock types, pulverized zones displaying primarily opening-mode fractures, and cataclastic fault zones. The pulverized regions display large host-rock crystals that are fractured to produce angular particles often ranging from 10-100 microns in diameter. The fractured parts display optical continuity and a high density of fluid inclusion trails suggesting episodes of fracture healing. The cataclastic zones are characterized by smaller (0.5-10 microns) and more rounded grains, a greater clay content, and sometimes show repeated stages of calcite cementation and shear. The distribution of pulverized particles and cataclastic zones indicate multiple fracture-healing cycles to produce an outcrop that reduces to powder when dug out with a hammer. Most samples analyzed to date

  12. Leaching of S, Cu, and Fe from disseminated Ni-(Fe)-(Cu) sulphide ore during serpentinization of dunite host rocks at Mount Keith, Agnew-Wiluna belt, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gole, Martin J.

    2014-10-01

    Komatiite-hosted disseminated Ni sulphide deposits in the Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt occur both above and below the olivine isograd that was imposed on the greenstone sequence during the M2 metamorphic/deformation event. Deposits in the northern and central part of the belt and that are located below the isograd (Mount Keith, Honeymoon Well and West Jordan) have complex sulphide mineralogy and strongly zoned sulphide assemblages. These range from least-altered assemblages of pentlandite-pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite±pyrite to altered assemblages of pentlandite±chalcopyrite, pentlandite-heazlewoodite (or millerite), heazlewoodite (or millerite), and rarely to heazlewoodite-native Ni. Deposits to the south and that are above of the olivine isograd (Six Mile, Goliath North) are dominated by less complex magmatic assemblages with a lower proportion of weakly altered pentlandite±chalcopyrite assemblages. More altered assemblages are uncommon in these deposits and occur as isolated patches around the periphery of the deposits. The sulphide zonation is reflected by whole-rock reductions in S, Cu, Fe and Zn, whereas Ni, Pt and Pd and, with some exceptions, Co are conservative. The leaching of S, Cu, Fe and Zn from sulphide assemblages and the whole rock was initiated by highly reduced conditions that were produced during low fluid/rock ratio serpentinization. Consumption of H2O resulted in Cl, a component of the fluid, being concentrated sufficiently to stabilise iowaite as part of lizardite-rich assemblages. Once the rate of olivine hydration reactions declined and during and after expansion and associated fracturing of the ultramafic sequence allowed higher fluid access, a more fluid-dominated environment formed and new carbonate-bearing fluid gained access to varying extents to the ultramafic rock sequence. This drove Cl from iowaite (to form pyroaurite) and caused the sulphide assemblages to be altered from the original magmatic assemblages and compositions to those

  13. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  14. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency. PMID:14719252

  15. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency.

  16. The geology and mineralogy of Ritchey crater, Mars: Evidence for post-Noachian clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Vivian Z.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2014-04-01

    Widespread detection of phyllosilicates (clay minerals) in Noachian (>3.5 Ga) terrains on Mars and their paucity in younger terrains have led to the hypothesis that Noachian conditions were more clement than the colder, drier conditions that have since followed. However, recent clay detections in several Hesperian impact craters suggest that fluvial transport and alteration were possible after the posited early era of phyllosilicate formation. Here we present evidence that rocks within Hesperian age Ritchey crater (28.5°S, 51°W) record a period of post-Noachian fluvial transport and in situ alteration. This resulted in the transport of clays from the crater wall to the crater floor and the formation of hydrated silica and Fe/Mg smectite in Ritchey's central uplift. Clay minerals associated with central uplifts are commonly interpreted to represent preexisting clays excavated from depth, potentially providing insight into older crustal clay-forming processes. Here we present detailed geomorphic and mineralogic maps and show that the clays in Ritchey's central peak formed after or as a direct result of the impact and are thus Hesperian or younger. Clays on the crater wall were either preexisting clays exposed by the impact or formed in situ through postimpact water-rock interaction. In either scenario, some of these clays were likely subsequently transported to the crater floor by fluvial-alluvial processes in a source-to-sink system. In this context, the hydrated phases in Ritchey indicate several different formation and transport mechanisms and provide further evidence that near-surface clay mineral formation, and thus habitable conditions, existed on Mars after the Noachian.

  17. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  18. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  19. Organic Pillared Clays.

    PubMed

    Meier, L. P.; Nueesch, R.; Madsen, F. T.

    2001-06-01

    Commonly used organophilic clays are modified by alkylammonium cations which hold apart the aluminosilicate layers permanently. The cations fill the interlayer space and are contemplated as flexible pillars, resulting from the mobility of the alkyl chains. Therefore, the interlayer distance varies depending on the layer charge and on the alkyl chain length. Contrary to these cations, rigid pillaring cations guarantee a constant interlayer distance without occupying the interlayer by themselves and show special adsorption properties such as hydrophilic behavior contrary to the generally hydrophobic ones. Smectites were modified by flexible organic cations, e.g., dimethyldioctadecylammonium, and by rigid ones, e.g., tetraphenylphosphonium. Their adsorption properties are compared. Our investigations showed improved adsorption properties for rigid organic cations on smectites using 2-chlorophenol as pollutant. Best adsorption results are achieved using pillaring cations in combination with low charged smectites, especially at low pollutant concentrations. The properties of organic modified smectites are discussed by a pollution intercalation model. The intercalation process of an organic pollutant into an organic modified smectite is expressed by a two-step Born-Haber cycle process: (i) the formation of an adsorbing position by layer expansion and (ii) the occupation of the adsorbing position by the pollutant. The first step of the formation of the adsorbing position is an endothermal transition state which lowers the total intercalation energy and therefore worsens the adsorption behavior. Thus, an already expanded organophilic smectite will show improved adsorption behavior. The formed adsorbing position state on organic modified smectites is comparable to the pillared state of inorganic pillared clays. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11350131

  20. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  1. Effect of heat treatment on strength of clays

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, R.C.; Achari, G. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Horsfield, D. ); Nagaraj, T.S. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Thermal treatment alters the physical and mechanical properties of clayey soils. Thermally treated soils have been used since primitive times for making trails for access and bricks for dwellings. In comparison with other soil-improvement methods, thermal stabilization produces immediate results. Thermal treatment of clays alters several material characteristics, such as strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, and resistance to abrasion. Furthermore, thermal treatment causes decrease in cation exchange and compressibility and increase in particle size. Aggregates produced by thermal treatment provide durable and economic substitutes for gravel and crushed rock. These are then used for pavement construction particularly in areas where construction materials have to be imported at excessive costs. Thus, in the Western Beaufort Sea area where large quantities of granular fill for artificial island and undersea-berm construction are required, but not readily available, thermally treated clays may be a solution. Granular material produced from a clayey soil must retain strength when wetted and be durable under wetting and drying conditions. Beyond fusion temperatures of clays, i.e. above 900 C, these conditions are known to be met. However, it is not clear from existing information, if heating below fusion temperatures may also satisfy these requirements. This study examines the relationship between the strength of selected clays and clay mixtures heated from 300 C to 700 C and the factors that influence such a relationship.

  2. Determination of the permeability of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay at the metre to decametre scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enssle, Carl Philipp; Cruchaudet, Martin; Croisé, Jean; Brommundt, Jürgen

    Andra is continuously investigating the Callovo-Oxfordian clay unit as a potential host rock for the deep disposal of long-lived medium and high-level radioactive waste at the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory. A large number of hydraulic measurements have been performed in instrumented boreholes. In particular, hydraulic tests have been conducted for the determination of the average hydraulic conductivity and the formation pressure at the decimetre scale. Furthermore, the evolution of porewater pressure was measured for more than four years in test intervals at distances from a few decimetres to 20 m from the drift floor located at 492 m below ground level. These measurements, reflecting in particular the drainage and suction effect induced by the ventilated drift, present a unique set of data for the determination of the permeability of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay at the metre to decametre scale. The pressure data measured since the end of 2005 in four intervals of borehole PEP1001 were analysed by numerical modelling. Two different 2D models (vertical and axial-symmetric) were used considering also the rock desaturation and depressurisation processes due to the climatic conditions in the drift. The suction - related to the relative humidity of the ventilation air - was taken into account according to Kelvin’s equation. Other transient effects, e.g. due to the seasonal temperature variation in the drift were also investigated. Eventually, sensitivity analyses to the key hydraulic parameters were performed. The best fit yielded a horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 7 × 10 -13 m/s and a vertical hydraulic conductivity of 4 × 10 -13 m/s in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. The seasonal variation of the climatic conditions in the drift showed only little influence on the general pressure evolution and hence on the determination of the hydraulic conductivity. Further, the model results suggest that the measured pressure evolution in each interval of

  3. Life inhabits rocks: clues to rock erosion from electron microscopy of pisolite at a UNESCO heritage site in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Kazue; Asada, Ryuji; Lindenmayer, Zara Gerhardt; Shirotori, Tatsuya; Vargas, Juliana Missiaggia; Nowatzki, Carlos Henrique; Coelho, Osmar Wöhl

    2009-02-01

    Rock erosion is attracting increasing attention from scientists worldwide. The area encompassing the Saint John Baptist Church, Saint John Village, XVII century ruins in Rio Grande do Sul at the UNESCO World Heritage Site is considered a Brazilian treasure. However, the risk of damage to this site from rock erosion has recently increased tremendously. Generally, the rocky construction such as fence, wall and tomb stone, seems strong but is actually extremely sensitive to erosion caused by lichens, fungi, molds and bacteria. Because of biological erosion and massive exposure, the fresh rock is dominated by clays and microorganisms. Water-adsorbing clays and microorganisms influence the mechanisms of the rock erosion. In this study, the formation of bio-clay-minerals in porous structure of pisolite was demonstrated using electron microscopy. Bacterial clay mineralization can deform the rock structure and even produce organic materials. Biological activity could easily corrode rocky constructions around the Saint John Baptist Church site. The rocks are pisolitic laterites possibly formed in Tertiary over the Kretaceous Parana flood Basalts. Samples inhabited by lichens and fungi were collected from a collapsed wall in the ancient church. The zonal reddish-brown pisolites are 4 mm in diameter in a matrix of clays associated with porous and empty spaces. Elemental distribution maps from X-ray fluorescence microscopy show iron-rich spherules of pisolite, whereas the matrix is composed of Al, Si, Mn, and Sr; thus producing goethite and kaolinite. Transmission electron microscopic observation showed that various types of bacteria inhabit the spherule and are associated with clay minerals and graphite. STEM elemental analysis confirmed the bio-clay-mineralization with Al, Si, S, and Fe, around bacterial cells. The results presented here will improve our understanding of nm-scale bio-mineralization and bio-erosion in lateritic rocks.

  4. Fault imprint in clay units: magnetic fabric, structural and mineralogical signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Eva; Homberg, Catherine; Schnyder, Johann; Person, Alain; du Peloux1, Arthur; Dick, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Fault-induced deformations in clay units can be difficult to decipher because strain markers are not always visible at outcrop scale or using geophysical methods. Previous studies have indicated that the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (ASM) provides a powerful and rapid technique to investigate tectonic deformation in clay units even when they appear quite homogenous and undeformed at the outcrop scale (Lee et al. 1990, Mattei et al. 1997). We report here a study based on ASM, structural analysis and magnetic and clay mineralogy from two boreholes (TF1 and ASM1)drilled horizontally in the Experimental Station of Tournemire of the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in Aveyron (France). The boreholes intersect a N-S trending strike-slip fault from west to east. The ASM study indicates the evolution of the magnetic fabric from the undeformed host rock to the fault core. Also, all the fractures cutting the studied interval of the core have been measured as well as the slip vectors which are generally well preserved. In the two boreholes, the undeformed sediments outside the fault zone are characterized by an oblate fabric, a sub-vertical minimum susceptibility axis (k3) perpendicular to the bedding plane and without magnetic lineation. Within the fault zone, a tilt in the bedding plane has been observed in two boreholes TF1 and ASM1. In addition, in the TF1 core, the fault area presents a tectonic fabric characterized by a triaxial AMS ellipsoid. Moreover, the magnetic lineation increases and k3 switches from a vertical to a sub-horizontal plane. This kind of fabric has not been observed in borehole ASM1. The structural analysis of the individual fractures making the fault zone indicates a complex tectonic history with different imprint in the two fault segments cut by the two boreholes. The large majority of fractures correspond to dextral strike-slip faults but normal and reverse movements were observed and are more or less

  5. Hydromechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks investigated by the combination of ESEM and DIC techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Bornert, Michel; Chanchole, Serge; Héripré, Eva

    2013-04-01

    The hydromechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks, which are possible host rocks for underground radioactive nuclear waste storage, is investigated by means of micromechanical experimental investigations. Strain fields at the micrometric scale of the composite structure of this rock, composed of a clay matrix and other mineral particles (essentially quartz and calcite), are measured by the combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), in situ testing and digital image correlation technique (DIC). The evolution of argillaceous rocks under pure hydric loading is first investigated. The strain field is strongly heterogeneous, due to the complex hydromechanical interactions between the different components of this material. Moreover, it manifests an anisotropy which is likely to be linked to a preferred orientation of clay particles. The observed nonlinear deformation at high relative humidity (RH) is related not only to damage, but also to the nonlinear swelling of the clay mineral itself, controlled by different local mechanisms depending on RH. Irreversible deformations are observed during hydric cycles, as well as a network of microcracks located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the inclusion-matrix interface. Their occurrence, morphology and localization depend on the rate and direction (humidification/desiccation) of the hydric loading. It is noted that these irreversible phenomena are localized and sometimes counteract each other so that the apparent overall deformation is fairly reversible. Then, the local deformation field of the material under uniaxial compression at three different RH is quantified. To do so, in situ uniaxial compression tests are first conducted maintaining relative humidity constant in the ESEM's chamber, by means of a specifically designed miniaturized test rig. Three types of deformation bands are evidenced under mechanical loading, either normal to stress direction (compaction), parallel (microcracking) or

  6. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  7. Rock varnish in New York: An accelerated snapshot of accretionary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsley, David H.; Dorn, Ronald I.; DiGregorio, Barry E.; Langworthy, Kurt A.; Ditto, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Samples of manganiferous rock varnish collected from fluvial, bedrock outcrop and Erie Barge Canal settings in New York state host a variety of diatom, fungal and bacterial microbial forms that are enhanced in manganese and iron. Use of a Dual-Beam Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope to manipulate the varnish in situ reveals microbial forms that would not have otherwise been identified. The relative abundance of Mn-Fe-enriched biotic forms in New York samples is far greater than varnishes collected from warm deserts. Moisture availability has long been noted as a possible control on varnish growth rates, a hypothesis consistent with the greater abundance of Mn-enhancing bioforms. Sub-micron images of incipient varnish formation reveal that varnishing in New York probably starts with the mortality of microorganisms that enhanced Mn on bare mineral surfaces; microbial death results in the adsorption of the Mn-rich sheath onto the rock in the form of filamentous networks. Clay minerals are then cemented by remobilization of the Mn-rich material. Thus, the previously unanswered question of what comes first - clay mineral deposition or enhancement of Mn - can be answered in New York because of the faster rate of varnish growth. In contrast, very slow rates of varnishing seen in warm deserts, of microns per thousand years, make it less likely that collected samples will reveal varnish accretionary processes than samples collected from fast-accreting moist settings.

  8. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  9. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  10. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of clays and clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Hughes, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the configuration, texture, and fabric of clay samples. Growth mechanics of crystalline units-interpenetration and interlocking of crystallites, crystal habits, twinning, helical growth, and topotaxis-also are uniquely revealed by the SEM. Authigenic kaolins make up the bulk of the examples because their larger crystallite size, better crystallinity, and open texture make them more suited to examination by the SEM than most other clay mineral types. ?? 1971.

  12. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  13. Lithology and internal structure of the San Andreas fault at depth based on characterization of Phase 3 whole-rock core in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kelly K.; Evans, James P.; Chester, Judith S.; Chester, Frederick M.; Kirschner, David L.

    2011-10-01

    We characterize the lithology and structure of the spot core obtained in 2007 during Phase 3 drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) in order to determine the composition, structure, and deformation processes of the fault zone at 3 km depth where creep and microseismicity occur. A total of approximately 41 m of spot core was taken from three separate sections of the borehole; the core samples consist of fractured arkosic sandstones and shale west of the SAF zone (Pacific Plate) and sheared fine-grained sedimentary rocks, ultrafine black fault-related rocks, and phyllosilicate-rich fault gouge within the fault zone (North American Plate). The fault zone at SAFOD consists of a broad zone of variably damaged rock containing localized zones of highly concentrated shear that often juxtapose distinct protoliths. Two zones of serpentinite-bearing clay gouge, each meters-thick, occur at the two locations of aseismic creep identified in the borehole on the basis of casing deformation. The gouge primarily is comprised of Mg-rich clays, serpentinite (lizardite ± chrysotile) with notable increases in magnetite, and Ni-Cr-oxides/hydroxides relative to the surrounding host rock. The rocks surrounding the two creeping gouge zones display a range of deformation including fractured protolith, block-in-matrix, and foliated cataclasite structure. The blocks and clasts predominately consist of sandstone and siltstone embedded in a clay-rich matrix that displays a penetrative scaly fabric. Mineral alteration, veins and fracture-surface coatings are present throughout the core, and reflect a long history of syn-deformation, fluid-rock reaction that contributes to the low-strength and creep in the meters-thick gouge zones.

  14. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  15. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  16. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  17. Water Retention Characteristics and State-Dependent Mechanical and Petro-Physical Properties of a Clay Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Katrin M.; Wymann, Linda P.; Zimmer, Sebastian; Thoeny, Reto; Amann, Florian

    2015-03-01

    A series of clay shale specimens in equilibrium with various humidity conditions were used to establish the water retention characteristics, the influence of suction on ultrasonic p-wave velocity and rock mechanical properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, onset of dilatancy, unconfined compressive strength and Brazilian tensile strength. Opalinus Clay, a clay shale considered as host rock for the disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland was utilized. The results showed that the p-wave velocity normal to bedding ( v p,n) dropped sharply upon desaturation until suction approached the air-entry value. The sharp decrease was associated with desiccation cracks solely oriented parallel to bedding. For suction in excess of the air-entry value, v p,n was constant, indicating no further desiccation damage. The suction at the shrinkage limit and at the air-entry point is similar in magnitude. The p-wave velocity parallel to bedding ( v p,p) remained constant in the entire range of suction investigated in this study. The constant v p,p with increasing suction might be associated with the disproportional decrease in the Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus and its opposing effect on p-wave velocity. An almost linear increase in unconfined compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, stress at the onset of dilatancy and Young's modulus with increasing suction was observed up to a suction of 56.6 MPa. For suction larger than 56.6 MPa, relatively constant strength and stiffness was observed. The increase is associated with the net contribution of suction to strength/stiffness, which decreases nonlinearly with decreasing volumetric water content. The rate of increase in tensile strength and unconfined compressive strength with increasing suction is different depending on the rock anisotropy. Compared to the strength values (Brazilian tensile and uniaxial compressive strength) obtained from specimens loaded parallel to bedding, the tensile strength parallel to

  18. 'Lutefisk' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera to take this image of a rock called 'Lutefisk' on the rover's 286th martian day (Oct. 22, 2004). The surface of the rock is studded with rounded granules of apparently more-resistant material up to several millimeters (0.1 inch) or more across. The visible portion of Lutefisk is about 25 centimeters (10 inches) across.

  19. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Achilles, Cherie; DesMarais, David J.; Crisp, Joy A.; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael; Grotzinger. John P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 021 band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx 10A with a slight inflexion at approx 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating

  20. Paleoenvironmental Implications of Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx. 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx. 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx. 10A with a slight inflexion at approx. 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and

  1. Microbial Impacts on Clay Mineral Transformation and Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Jaisi, D.; Fredrickson, J.; Plymale, A.

    2006-05-01

    Clays and clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sedimentary rocks, and pelagic oozes. They play important roles in environmental processes such as nutrient cycling, plant growth, contaminant migration, organic matter maturation, and petroleum production. Iron is a major constituent in clay minerals, and its mobility and stability in different environmental processes is, in part, controlled by the oxidation state. Recent studies have shown that biological reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals can change the physical and chemical properties of clay minerals, such as swelling, cation exchange and fixation capacity, specific surface area, color, and magnetic exchange interactions. As a result of biological reduction of Fe(III), clay minerals also undergo mineral transformations, such as dissolution of smectite and precipitation of illite, siderite and vivianite. These chemical, structural and mineralogical changes of clay minerals have a profound effect on clay mineral reactivity, such as their reactivity with organic and inorganic (i.e., heavy metals and radionuclides) contaminants. Our latest data show that biologically reduced nontronite (a smectite variety) is much more effective in reducing soluble and mobile Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) than unreduced nontronite. The reduced Tc(IV) is insoluble in groundwater and soil and thus is immobile. Biologically reduced nontronite can be prepared by microbially reducing Fe(III) in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens in the absence of oxygen. Approximately 30% of structurally Fe(III) can be reduced in this manner. Biogenic Fe(II) can then serve as an electron donor to reduce Tc(VII). Nearly all Fe(II) is available to reduce Tc(VII), with the rate of reduction (typically within weeks) possibly depending on the speciation of Fe(II) (surface sorbed Fe(II) vs. structural Fe(II)). Further investigations are underway to further assess the reversibility of Tc reduction upon exposure to oxygen and to elucidate Tc reduction

  2. Pillared clays and pillared acid-activated clays: A comparative study of physical, acidic, and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mokaya, R.; Jones, W.

    1995-04-15

    The preparation, characterisation, and catalytic properties of alumina-pillared materials derived from an acid-treated host clay matrix is described. Various levels of acid treatment are studied in order to ascertain the level of acid treatment which yields pillared materials with the most suitable physicochemical properties and thermal stability. The pillared acid-activated clays prepared possess basal spacing (19.3 {angstrom} after thermal treatment at 500{degrees}C) and surface areas (315-374 m{sup 2}/g) comparable to conventional pillared clays but significantly higher pore volume (0.33-0.48 cm{sup 3}/g), average pore diameter and surface acidity. The improvement in acidity is mainly of the Broensted acid type. As a result of improved acidity, the pillared acid-activated clays are better catalysts compared to conventional pillared clays and they exhibit activity indicative of the presence of strong Broensted acid sites in the temperature range 250-400{degrees}C. 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Environmental Hf-Nd isotopic decoupling in World river clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon, Germain; Skonieczny, Charlotte; Delvigne, Camille; Toucanne, Samuel; Bermell, Sylvain; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; André, Luc

    2016-03-01

    The hafnium and neodymium radiogenic isotope systems behave differently during Earth surface processes, causing a wide dispersion of Hf and Nd isotopic compositions in sediments and other sedimentary rocks. The decoupling between Hf and Nd isotopes in sediments is generally attributed to a combination of preferential sorting of zircon during sediment transport and incongruent weathering processes on continents. In this study, we analysed size-fractions of sediment samples collected near the mouth of 53 rivers worldwide to better understand the factors controlling the distribution of Hf and Nd isotopes in sediments. Our results for rivers draining old cratonic areas and volcanic provinces demonstrate that both granite and basalt weathering can lead to significant grain-size dependent Hf isotopic variability. While silt-size fractions mainly plot along the Terrestrial Array, World river clays are systematically shifted towards more radiogenic Hf isotopic compositions, defining together with published data a new Clay Array (εHf = 0.78 ×εNd + 5.23). The Hf-Nd isotope decoupling observed in volcanogenic sediments is best explained by selective alteration of Lu-rich mineral phases (e.g. olivine) and preferential enrichment of resistant unradiogenic minerals, such as spinel and ilmenite, in silt fractions. We also show that the extent to which World river clays deviate from the Clay Array (ΔεHf clay) is not linked to the presence of zircons. Instead, it correlates positively with weathering indices and climatic parameters (temperature, rainfall) of the corresponding drainage basins. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the distribution of Hf-Nd isotopes in clay-size sediments is related to a large extent to weathering conditions on continents, although the precise mechanisms controlling this relationship remain unclear. We finally propose that the Hf-Nd isotope pair proxy could be used in palaeoenvironmental studies to provide semi-quantitative information on

  4. Neocrystallization, fabrics and age of clay minerals from an exposure of the Moab Fault, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Peacor, Donald R.

    2005-09-01

    Pronounced changes in clay mineral assemblages are preserved along the Moab Fault (Utah). Gouge is enriched up to ˜40% in 1M d illite relative to protolith, whereas altered protolith in the damage zone is enriched ˜40% in illite-smectite relative to gouge and up to ˜50% relative to protolith. These mineralogical changes indicate that clay gouge is formed not solely through mechanical incorporation of protolith, but also through fault-related authigenesis. The timing of mineralization is determined using 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of size fractions of fault rocks with varying detrital and authigenic clay content. We applied Ar dating of illite-smectite samples, as well as a newer approach that uses illite polytypes. Our analysis yields overlapping, early Paleocene ages for neoformed (1M d) gouge illite (63±2 Ma) and illite-smectite in the damage zone (60±2 Ma), which are compatible with results elsewhere. These ages represent the latest period of major fault motion, and demonstrate that the fault fabrics are not the result of recent alteration. The clay fabrics in fault rocks are poorly developed, indicating that fluids were not confined to the fault zone by preferentially oriented clays; rather we propose that fluids in the illite-rich gouge were isolated by adjacent lower permeability, illite-smectite-bearing rocks in the damage zone.

  5. Neocrystallization, fabrics and age of clay minerals from an exposure of the Moab Fault, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; van der Pluijm, B.A.; Peacor, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Pronounced changes in clay mineral assemblages are preserved along the Moab Fault (Utah). Gouge is enriched up to ???40% in 1Md illite relative to protolith, whereas altered protolith in the damage zone is enriched ???40% in illite-smectite relative to gouge and up to ???50% relative to protolith. These mineralogical changes indicate that clay gouge is formed not solely through mechanical incorporation of protolith, but also through fault-related authigenesis. The timing of mineralization is determined using 40Ar/39Ar dating of size fractions of fault rocks with varying detrital and authigenic clay content. We applied Ar dating of illite-smectite samples, as well as a newer approach that uses illite polytypes. Our analysis yields overlapping, early Paleocene ages for neoformed (1Md) gouge illite (63??2 Ma) and illite-smectite in the damage zone (60??2 Ma), which are compatible with results elsewhere. These ages represent the latest period of major fault motion, and demonstrate that the fault fabrics are not the result of recent alteration. The clay fabrics in fault rocks are poorly developed, indicating that fluids were not confined to the fault zone by preferentially oriented clays; rather we propose that fluids in the illite-rich gouge were isolated by adjacent lower permeability, illite-smectite-bearing rocks in the damage zone. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A reconnaissance Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, and K-Ar study of some host rocks and ore minerals in the West Shasta Cu- Zn district, California ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; McKee, E.H.; Futa, K.; Peterman, Z.E.; Zartman, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Copley Greenstone, Balaklala Rhyolite, and Mule Mountain stock in the West Shasta Cu-Zn district, California, have Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, and K-Ar systematics that indicate they are a cogenetic suite of ensimatic island-arc rocks about 400 Ma. Pervasive alteration and mineralization of these rocks, for the most part, was syngenetic and the major component of the mineralizing fluid was Devonian seawater. K-Ar ages of quarz-sericite concentrates from ore horizons and Rb-Sr systematics of a few rock and ore specimens record a later thermal and mineralizing event in the district of about 260 Ma. Contamination of some rocks with pelagic sediments is indicated by the Sm-Nd data. -Authors

  7. Relationships between clay mineralogy, hydrothermal metamorphism, and topography in a Western Cascades watershed, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, Rebecca K. R.

    2001-05-01

    This study investigates variation in clay mineralogy and its relation to hydrothermal metamorphism, hillslope processes, and topography in the western Cascade Mountains. The study area is the drainage basin of Dorena Lake, a medium-sized (686 km 2) watershed located near Cottage Grove, OR. The Bohemia Mining District is on the southeastern rim of the watershed in a hydrothermally metamorphosed region associated with a set of granodiorite plutons. To characterize large-scale patterns of clay mineral distribution within the watershed, suspended sediments were collected from 43 stream locations. Samples of several metamorphosed and unaffected volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks were collected to help clarify metamorphic reaction processes. One active earthflow was also sampled. X-ray diffraction methods were used to determine the mineralogy of the clay-sized (<2 μm) fraction of the samples. Clay mineralogy varies systematically across the watershed, and the three major stream tributaries carry sediment with distinct mineralogical signatures. Discrete minerals include kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, and illite. Interstratified kaolinite-smectite and chlorite-vermiculite (CV) are also present. The active earthflow and unmetamorphosed rock samples primarily contain smectite. In contrast, metamorphosed rock samples are composed of some combination of illite, interstratified illite-smectite, CV, and chlorite. Examination of clay mineral distribution reveals the effects of hydrothermal metamorphism in the mining district on clay mineralogy, hillslope processes, and landscape development. Compared with most of the watershed, the mining district has steeper slopes and higher elevations and lacks smectite almost entirely. Analyses of metamorphosed bedrock units indicate that smectite originally present in the rocks was converted to nonexpandable clay minerals during metamorphism. Induration of bedrock and loss of expandable clays resulted in thin soils and steep topography

  8. Biodegradable pectin/clay aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2013-03-13

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The addition of multivalent cations (Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) resulted in apparent cross-linking of the polymer and enhancement of aerogel properties. The compressive properties increased as the solid contents (both pectin and clay) increased; moduli in the range of 0.04-114 MPa were obtained for materials with bulk densities ranging from 0.03 g/cm(3) to 0.19 g/cm(3), accompanied by microstructural changes from a lamellar structure to a cellular structure. Biodegradability of the aerogels was investigated by detecting CO2 release for 4 weeks in compost media. The results revealed that pectin aerogels possess higher biodegradation rates than wheat starch, which is often used as a standard for effective biodegradation. The addition of clay and multivalent cations surprisingly increased the biodegradation rates. PMID:23406325

  9. Interaction of polymer with clays.

    SciTech Connect

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-07-02

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labelling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains.

  10. Tuffaceous sediments as source rocks for uranium: A case study of the White River Formation, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Fine-grained tuffaceous sediments of the White River Formation (Oligocene) are evaluated as a possible source of uranium for the sedimentary uranium deposits of Wyoming. The evaluation is based upon a model in which volcanic glass is considered to be a major host of uranium and thorium and in which uranium and silica are released during alteration of glass to montmorillonite. The evaluation scheme is applicable to other tuffaceous sediments in similar geologic settings. The average uranium and thorium contents of glass separates and glassy air-fall ashes of the White River Formation are 8 ppm and 22.4 ppm respectively, and these values approximate the average composition of glass deposited in Wyoming basins in Oligocene time. Comparison of these values with the uranium and thorium concentrations in montmorillonite separates indicates little change in thorium concentrations but reductions in uranium concentrations which average 3.3 ppm. In spite of the apparent major removal of uranium during alteration of glass to montmorillonite, whole-rock samples of tuffaceous siltstones show an average uranium loss of only 0.4 ?? 0.4 ppm, because of generally small amounts of clay alteration. This conclusion is generated by comparisons between glassy ash and partially altered vitric siltstones, the latter corrected for dilution of glass and clay-altered glass with uranium- and thorium-poor primary and detrital materials. The original volume of the White River Formation is adequate to generate economically significant quantities of mobile uranium, even with such modest losses. Uranium and silica which are mobilized during glass alteration can coprecipitate as uraniferous secondary silica in areas where solutions become silica saturated. These precipitates indicate pathways of ancient, uranium-rich solutions in tuffaceous rocks. Exploration efforts in the White River Formation and underlying units should concentrate on areas where such pathways intercept reducing environments

  11. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    PubMed

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-01

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  12. Preliminary inventory of pre-Cenozoic clay shales and argillites of the conterminous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, J.R.; Woodward, L.A.

    1980-03-01

    Cretaceous shales of the Western Interior of the United States occur in vast quantities and in thickness greater than 150 m (500 ft). Some older Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian shale and argillites also appear to approach these thicknesses in deposits of considerable lateral extent. These older rocks commonly have a lower proportion of expandable clays and lower water contents.

  13. Rock Paintings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Julienne Edwards

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the integration of art and academics in a fifth-grade instructional unit on Native American culture. Describes how students studied Native American pictographs, designed their own pictographs, made their own tools, and created rock paintings of their pictographs using these tools. Provides a list of references on Native American…

  14. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  15. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  16. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  17. New techniques for clay mineral identification by remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, M.J.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Lang, H.

    1983-03-01

    In the past three years there have been major advancements in our ability to identify clay minerals by remote sensing. Multispectral scanners, including NASA's Thematic Mapper Simulator (analog for Landsat-D Thematic Mapper) have had several broad-band channels in the wavelength region of 1.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m. In particular, the wavelength region 2.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m contains diagnostic spectral-absorption features for most layered silicates. Computer processing of image data obtained with these scanners has allowed the identification of the presence of clay minerals, without, however, being able to identify specific mineralogies. Studies of areas with known hydrocarbon deposits and porphyry copper deposits have demonstrated the value of this information for rock-type discrimination and recognition of hydrothermal alteration zones. Non-imaging, narrow-band radiometers and spectrometers have been used in the field, from aircraft, and from space to identify individual mineralogical constituents. This can be done because of diagnostic spectral absorption features in the 2.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m region characteristic of different clay types. Preliminary analysis of SMIRR data over Egypt showed that kaolinite, carbonate rocks, and possibly montmorillonite, could be identified directly. Plans are currently under way for development of narrow-band imaging systems which will be capable of producing maps showing the surface distribution of individual clay types. This will represent a major step in remote sensing, by allowing unique identification of minerals rather than the current ability only to discriminate among materials. Applications of this technology will provide geologists with a powerful new tool for resource exploration and general geologic mapping problems.

  18. Mineralogical evaluation and industrial applications of the Triassic clay deposits, Southern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Baccour, H. Medhioub, M.; Jamoussi, F.; Mhiri, T.; Daoud, A.

    2008-11-15

    This study deals with the mineralogical and thermal analysis of Triassic clays in the south-Eastern Tunisia (Medenine area) in order to use them in the faience ceramic. That is why the study had recourse to several quantitative and qualitative research instruments: chemical analysis, mineralogical study, thermal analyses and analyses of geotechnical traits. The data collected from these techniques show that illite and kaolinite are the major clay phases. The accessory minerals detected in powdered rock are; quartz, dolomite and hematite. Geotechnical characterization was carried out on the three representative mixtures of Triassic clay samples. Each mixture is fired at three different temperatures 850,900 and 950 deg. C. Firing characteristics (shrinkage, water absorption, and mechanical resistance to the inflection) were measured and the neomineralization processes were investigated principally by X-ray diffraction. At the end of this study, one can affirm that these clays have qualities necessary for the manufacture of faience ceramic and earthenware production.

  19. Clastic-hosted stratiform, vein/breccia and disseminated Zn-Pb-Ag deposits of the northwestern Brooks Range, AK: Are they different expressions of dewatering of the same source basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.M. ); Werdon, M.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Sphalerite and galena, with significant silver occur in 3 distinct types of mineralization hosted in Upper Devonian and Carboniferous clastic rocks of the northwestern Brooks Range. The best known are Zn-Pb-Ag massive sulfide deposits with variable pyrite, barite, and hydrothermal silifica hosted in Mississippian (to Pennsylvanian ) black siliceous shale and chert, and similar to shale-hosted Pb-Zn massive sulfide deposits worldwide. Zn-Pb-Ag breccias and veins are hosted in Upper Devonian to Lower Mississippian fine-grained quartzites and siltstone which stratigraphically underlie the massive sulfide-hosting units. The breccia-vein and disseminated occurrences are co-extensive with the rocks that host massive sulfide deposits, and with the western part of the Endicott Group clastic basin. Pb isotopic ratios of galena from all the deposits are remarkably uniform, and suggest a single Pb source. The authors genetic model suggests that all types are the result of dewatering of a single clastic source basin. Different mineralization styles are probably due to variable depths of emplacement (at or below the seafloor), thermal variations related to extensional thinning of the crust, and hydrologic flow out of the basin controlled by extensional thinning of the crust, and hydrologic flow out of the basin controlled by extensional faulting and permeability variations in local stratigraphy. The most likely sources for Zn and Pb are clay minerals within the lowermost (Hunt Fork Shale) portions of the western Endicott Group.

  20. Fluorescence and structure of methyl red-clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Kulhánková, Lenka; Malý, Petr; Capková, Pavla

    2008-04-01

    Two types of clay minerals-montmorillonite and vermiculite have been chosen as a host matrix for the intercalation of methyl red (MR) in order to investigate a possible fluorescence tuning via dye-clay interactions. The effect of silicate layer charge on the structure and fluorescence of dye-clay intercalated hybrid nanostructures was investigated using combination of molecular modeling with experiment. Structure of both intercalates MR-vermiculite (MR-VER) and MR-montmorillonite (MR-MMT) exhibits high degree of structural disorder resulting in broaden emission band. The fluorescence wavelength range of MR intercalated in clays is shifted to lower wavelengths compared with the pristine MR polycrystalline sample (800 nm). Results showed the strong dependence of fluorescence band maximum on the silicate layer charge, lambda(max) = 565 nm for MR-MMT, 645 nm for MR-VER and 800 nm for the methyl red fine crystalline powder, whereas the structural disorder in the arrangement of dye molecules affects the emission band broadening.

  1. Phosphine from rocks: mechanically driven phosphate reduction?

    PubMed

    Glindemann, Dietmar; Edwards, Marc; Morgenstern, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Natural rock and mineral samples released trace amounts of phosphine during dissolution in mineral acid. An order of magnitude more phosphine (average 1982 ng PH3 kg rock and maximum 6673 ng PH3/kg rock) is released from pulverized rock samples (basalt, gneiss, granite, clay, quartzitic pebbles, or marble). Phosphine was correlated to hardness and mechanical pulverization energy of the rocks. The yield of PH3 ranged from 0 to 0.01% of the total P content of the dissolved rock. Strong circumstantial evidence was gathered for reduction of phosphate in the rock via mechanochemical or "tribochemical" weathering at quartz and calcite/marble inclusions. Artificial reproduction of this mechanism by rubbing quartz rods coated with apatite-phosphate to the point of visible triboluminescence, led to detection of more than 70 000 ng/kg PH3 in the apatite. This reaction pathway may be considered a mechano-chemical analogue of phosphate reduction from lightning or electrical discharges and may contribute to phosphine production via tectonic forces and processing of rocks.

  2. Clay Formation and Fabric Development in the DFDP-1 Borehole, Central Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, A.; Sutherland, R.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2015-12-01

    Samples retrieved by shallow drilling into two principal slip zones of the central Alpine Fault, New Zealand, offer an excellent opportunity to investigate clay formation, fabric development and fluid-rock interaction in an active fault zone. Here, we provide lithological and structural observations of five samples from borehole DFDP-1B, drilled during Phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011. Each sample's mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the preferred orientation of the clays was analyzed by x-ray texture goniometry (XTG). The dominant clay mineral phases are illite and chlorite/kaolinite. Newly formed smectitic clays are observed solely in the cm-thick zones of fault gouge, indicating that these mineral reactions are restricted to the fault zone. We observe that smectite forms by transformation of very fine-grained material produced by cataclasis during slip. Clay fabric intensity of both illite and chlorite reveal that relatively strong fabrics are present in the cataclasites above the principal slip zone, but that the clay minerals in the gouge have a very weak preferred orientation. The weak fabric supports the notion that clay orientation is a result of authigenic mineral growth and not of strain-induced particle reorientation. It also indicates that fluids are able to pass through the gouge, presumably along variably spaced and interconnected fracture networks or between particle boundaries. Our analysis of samples retrieved by DFDP-1 drilling and sampling demonstrates intimate association of localized shear, comminution, and rapid fluid-rock interaction. It thus contributes to a growing body of evidence that alteration processes, particularly formation of frictionally weak smectitic clay minerals, may be a significant weakening mechanism within active shallow faults.

  3. Environmental degradation of Opalinus Clay with cyclic variations in relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Katrin; Walter, Patric; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Clay shales are considered as favorable host rocks for nuclear waste repositories due to their low permeability, high sorption capacity and the potential for self-sealing. However, the favorable characteristics of the rock mass may change during tunnel excavation. Excavation is accompanied by stress redistribution and the development of an excavation damage zone. Furthermore, unloading and exposure to atmospheric conditions with a lower relative humidity (RH) causes desaturation of the rock mass close to the tunnel. This leads to shrinkage and the formation of desiccation cracks. During the open drift stage, seasonal atmospheric changes, especially RH variations, may alter the rock mass and influence the long-term crack evolution. This contribution discusses the influence of RH variation on the mechanical behavior of OPA. A series of specimens were exposed to short-term and long-term, stepwise cyclic RH variations between about 60 and 95% at constant temperature. Strains were measured using strain gauges to monitor the volumetric response during RH cycles. After each applied RH cycle, Brazilian tensile strength (BTS) tests were performed to identify whether there is a change in tensile strength due to environmental damage caused by the change in RH. Swelling and shrinkage of the specimens accompanied by irreversible volumetric expansion was observed as a consequence of the exposure to RH cycles. However, the irreversible strain was limited to the direction normal to bedding suggesting that internal damage is restricted along the bedding planes. No significant effect of cyclic RH variations on the BTS of the specimens was observed. The strength parallel to bedding remained constant over several cycles while the strength normal to bedding shows a slightly decreasing trend after 2 cycles. Furthermore, the water retention characteristics of the specimens were not altered significantly during stepwise RH cycling as the evolution of the water content was reversible

  4. Amitriptyline removal using palygorskite clay.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yo-Lin; Chang, Po-Hsiang; Gao, Zong-You; Xu, Xiao-Yuan; Chen, Yan-Hsin; Wang, Zheng-Hong; Chen, Xin-Yu; Yang, Zheng-Ying; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Li, Zhaohui; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2016-07-01

    With the increased detections of commonly used pharmaceuticals in surface water and wastewater, extensive attentions were paid recently to the fate and transport of these pharmaceuticals in the environment. Amitriptyline (AMI) is a tricyclic antidepressant widely applied to treat patients with anxiety and depression. In this study, the removal of AMI with palygorskite clay (PFl-1) was investigated under different physico-chemical conditions and supplemented by instrumental analyses. The uptake of AMI on PFl-1 was well fitted by the Langmuir isotherm with an adsorption capacity of 0.168 mmol g(-1) at pH 6-7. The AMI uptake was fast and reached equilibrium in 15 min. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed no shift of the (110) peak position of palygorskite after AMI uptake. However, the (001) peak position of the minor component smectite (about 10%) shifted to lower angle as the amounts of AMI input increased. These results suggested surface uptake of AMI on palygorskite and interlayer uptake of AMI in smectite. As smectite is a common component of palygorskite clays, its role in assessing the properties and performances of palygorskite clays for the uptake and removal of contaminants should not be neglected. Overall, the high affinity of AMI for PFl-1 and strong retention of AMI on PFl-1 suggested that it could be a good adsorbent to remove AMI from wastewater. Palygorskite clays can also be a sink for many cationic pharmaceuticals in the environmental of the arid regions. PMID:27131449

  5. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  6. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  7. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  8. Clays on Mars: Review of chemical and mineralogical evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, Amos; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Mafic igneous bedrock is inferred for Mars, based on spectrophotometric evidence for pyroxene (principally in optically dark areas of the globe) and the pyroxenite-peridotite petrology of shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Visible and infrared spectra of reddish-brown surface fines (which dominate Martian bright areas) indicate ferric iron and compare favorably (though not uniquely) with spectra of palagonitic soils. Laboratory studies of SNC's and Viking Lander results support a model for Martian soil based on chemical weathering of mafic rocks to produce layer structured silicates (clay minerals), salts, and iron oxides.

  9. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  10. Phosphonium modified clay/polyimide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Hatice; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, octyltriphenylphosphonium bromide [OTPP-Br] was prepared from the reaction of triphenylphosphine and 1 -bromooctane. The modification of clay was done by ion exchange reaction using OTPP-Br in water medium. Poly(amic acid) was prepared from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-Oxydianiline (ODA). Polyimide(PI)/clay hybrids were prepared by blending of poly(amic acid) and organically modified clay as a type of layered clays. The morphology of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structures of polyimide and Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  11. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  12. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  13. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  14. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  15. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  16. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and....1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain varying quantities of alkalies...

  17. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  18. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  19. Mathematical modelling of undrained clay behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevost, J. H.; Noeg, K.

    1976-01-01

    The proposed general analytical model describes the anisotropic, elastoplastic, path-dependent, stress-strain properties of inviscid saturated clays under undrained conditions. Model parameters are determined by using results from strain-controlled simple shear tests on a saturated clay. The model's accuracy is evaluated by applying it to predict the results of other tests on the same clay, including monotonic and cyclic loading. The model explains the very anisotropic shear strength behavior observed for weak marine clays.

  20. Permissive tracts for incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatities, alkaline rocks, and carbonatities in Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 86), Chapter Q1 in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Horton, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This report contains the USGS results of the PRISM-II Mauritania Minerals Project and is presented in cooperation with the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The Report is composed of separate chapters consisting of multidisciplinary interpretive reports with accompanying plates on the geology, structure, geochronology, geophysics, hydrogeology, geochemistry, remote sensing (Landsat TM and ASTER), and SRTM and ASTER digital elevation models of Mauritania. The syntheses of these multidisciplinary data formed the basis for additional chapters containing interpretive reports on 12 different commodities and deposit types known to occur in Mauritania, accompanied by countrywide mineral resource potential maps of each commodity/deposit type. The commodities and deposit types represented include: (1) Ni, Cu, PGE, and Cr deposits hosted in ultramafic rocks; (2) orogenic, Carlin-like, and epithermal gold deposits; (3) polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposits; (4) sediment-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag deposits of the SEDEX and Mississippi Valley-type; (5) sediment-hosted copper deposits; ( 6) volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits; (7) iron oxide copper-gold deposits; (8) uranium deposits; (9) Algoma-, Superior-, and oolitic-type iron deposits; (10) shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits; (11) incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatites, alkaline rocks, and carbonatites, and; (12) industrial mineral deposits. Additional chapters include the Mauritanian National Mineral Deposits Database are accompanied by an explanatory text and the Mauritania Minerals Project GIS that contains all of the interpretive layers created by USGS scientists. Raw data not in the public domain may be obtained from the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines in Nouakchott, Mauritania.

  1. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  2. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  3. Log evaluation of oil-bearing igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Khatchikian, A.

    1983-12-01

    The evaluation of porosity, water saturation and clay content of oilbearing igneous rocks with well logs is difficult due to the mineralogical complexity of this type of rocks. The log responses to rhyolite and rhyolite tuff; andesite, dacite and zeolite tuff; diabase and basalt have been studied from examples in western Argentina and compared with values observed in other countries. Several field examples show how these log responses can be used in a complex lithology program to make a complete evaluation.

  4. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  5. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity in the Mont Terri gallery G-04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Adler, A.; Nicollin, F.; Gibert, D.; Nussbaum, C.

    2012-04-01

    The characteristics of opalinus clay have been studied in the last years for its capacity to retain radionuclide transport as a low permeable rock. This formation presents thereby suitable properties for hosting repository sites of radioactive waste. The Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland) has been excavated in opalinus clay layer in order to develop experiences improving the knowledge on the physico-chemical properties of the rock. The study of electrical properties furnishes information on the rock structure, its anisotropy and the changes of these properties with time (Nicollin et al., 2010 ; Thovert et al., 2011). Here the three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity aims at monitoring the temporal evolution of the excavation damaged zone. Three rings of electrodes have been set-up around the gallery and voltage is measured between two electrodes while a current is injected between two others (Gibert et al., 2006). Measurements have been achieved from July 2004 until April 2008 before, during and after the excavation of the gallery 04. In this study we develop a computational approach to reconstruct three dimensional images of the resistivity in the vicinity of the electrodes. A finite element model is used to represent the complex geometry of the gallery. The measurements inferred from a given resistivity distribution are estimated using the software EIDORS (Adler and Lionheart, 2006), this constitutes the forward problem. The reconstruction of the media resistivity is then implemented by fitting the estimated to the measured data, via the resolution of an inverse problem. The parameters of this inverse problem are defined by mapping the forward problem elements into a coarser mesh. This allows to reduce drastically the number of unknowns and so increases the robustness of the inversion. The inversion is executed with the conjugate gradient method regularised by an analysis of the Jacobian singular values. The results show an

  6. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  7. Tunable Exfoliation of Synthetic Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöter, Matthias; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Breu, Josef

    2015-07-01

    The large hydration enthalpy of inorganic interlayer cations sandwiched between moderately negatively charged silicate layers endows to smectites (e.g., hectorite) remarkably rich intracrystalline reactivity compared with most other layered materials. Moreover, they are transparent and inert in most potential suspension media. Upon suspension in water, smectites readily swell. For homogeneous, melt-synthesized smectites, the degree of swelling can be tuned by choice of interlayer cation and charge density of the layer. Because swelling renders the clay stacks more shear labile, the efficiency of exfoliation by applying shearing forces can in turn be adjusted. Certain smectites even spontaneously delaminate into clay platelets of uniform thickness of 1 nm by progressive osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling can also be applied to produce well-defined double stacks when one starts with ordered, interstratified heterostructures. Nanocomposites made with high-aspect-ratio fillers obtained this way show superior mechanical, flame retardancy, and permeability properties.

  8. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Radiometric dating of brittle fault rocks; illite polytype age analysis and application to the Spanish Pyrenees.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B. A.; Haines, S. H.

    2008-12-01

    A variety of approaches have been available to indirectly date the timing of deformation and motion on faults, but few approaches for direct, radiometric dating of shallow crustal fault rocks were available until recently. The growing recognition of clay neomineralization at low temperatures in many fault rocks, particularly the 1Md illite polytype, allows the successful application of Ar dating to these K-bearing phases. In this presentation we will discuss our recent illite age analysis approach (sampling, treatments, analytical methods), and present new results from fault dating along the Spanish Pyrenean orogenic front as an example. X-ray quantification of polytype ratios in three or more size fractions is used to define a mixing line between (1Md illite) authigenic and (2M illite) detrital end-member phases that constrain the fault age and host rock provenance/cooling age for each fault. The common problem of recoil in clays is addressed by encapsulating samples before irradiation. Nine fault gouge ages in the south-central and south-eastern Pyrenees support several contractional pulses in the Pyrenean orogen: 1) Late Cretaceous thrusting (Boixols), 2) Latest Paleocene-Early Eocene deformation (Nogueres Zone and Freser antiformal stack), 3) Middle-Late Eocene deformation (Ripoll syncline, Vallfogona, Gavernie, Abocador and L'Escala thrusts), and 4) Middle Oligocene thrusting in the central portion of the Axial Zone (Llavorsi-Senet). The late Paleocene-Early Eocene and Middle-Late Eocene events may or may not be one single phase, due to slightly overlapping error estimates. The outboard thrusts give Hercynian ages for the detrital component of the fault rock, while the inboard thrusts, which juxtapose metamorphic units, give Cretaceous ages for the non-authigenic component, reflecting the cooling age of the adjacent wallrocks. Based on our latest work, the illite polytype dating method complements previously developed illite-smectite dating (van der Pluijm et

  10. Genesis of clay mineral assemblages and micropaleoclimatic implications in the Tertiary Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Weaver, J.N. ); Bossiroy, D.; Thorez, J. )

    1990-05-01

    An x-ray diffraction (XRD) study was undertaken on the clay mineralogy of the early Tertiary coal-bearing sequences of the Powder River basin. The vertical and lateral distribution of alternating fluvial conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones, shales, coals, and paleosols reveals a transition from alluvial fans along the basin margin to an alluvial plain and peat bogs basinward. Samples included unweathered shales and mudstones from a borehole and a variety of corresponding surface outcrop samples of Cambrian to Eocene age. Samples older than Tertiary were collected along the basin margin specifically to determine the potential source of parent material during Tertiary sedimentation. XRD analyses were performed on the <2-{mu}m fraction prepared as oriented aggregates. To investigate the materials in their natural state, no chemical pre-treatments the authors applied before the analysis. A series of specific post-treatments, consisting of catonic saturation (Li+, K+), a solution with polyalcohols, heating, acid attack and hydrazine saturation was selectively applied. These post-treatments permit a good discrimination between the mimetic clay minerals such as smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers that constitute the bulk of the clay fraction in the Tertiary rocks. When analyzed only using routine XRD, these swelling minerals are apparently uniformly distributed in the fluvial sedimentary rocks and are better interpreted as a single smectitic population. However, the post-treatments clearly differentiate both qualitatively and quantitatively this smectitic stock. Other clays include illite and kaolinite, which have different degrees of crystallinity, and minor interstratified clays (i.e., illite-chlorite, chlorite-smectite). The clay minerals in pre-Tertiary (and pedogenic) materials are different from those in the Tertiary rocks.

  11. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  13. Hydrogeology of a fractured shale (Opalinus Clay): Implications for deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautschi, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Swiss programme for high-level radioactive-waste disposal, a Jurassic shale (Opalinus Clay) is being investigated as a potential host rock. Observations in clay pits and the results of a German research programme focusing on hazardous waste disposal have demonstrated that, at depths of 10-30 m, the permeability of the Opalinus Clay decreases by several orders of magnitude. Hydraulic tests in deeper boreholes (test intervals below 300 m) yielded hydraulic conductivities <10-12 m/s, even though joints and faults were included in some of the test intervals. These measurements are consistent with hydrogeological data from Opalinus Clay sections in ten tunnels in the Folded Jura of northern Switzerland. Despite extensive faulting, only a few indications of minor water inflow were encountered in more than 6,600 m of tunnel. All inflows were in tunnel sections where the overburden is less than 200 m. The hydraulic data are consistent with clay pore-water hydrochemical and isotopic data. The extensive hydrogeological data base - part of which derives from particularly unfavourable geological environments - provides arguments that advective transport through faults and joints is not a critical issue for the suitability of Opalinus Clay as a host rock for deep geological waste disposal. Résumé. Dans le cadre du programme suisse de stockage de déchets hautement radioactifs, une formation argileuse du Jurassique, l'argile à Opalinus, a été étudiée en tant que roche hôte potentielle. Des observations dans des cavités dans l'argile et les résultats du programme de recherche allemand consacré au stockage de déchets à risques ont démontré que, à des profondeur de 10 à 30 m, la perméabilité des argiles à Opalinus décroît de plusieurs ordres de grandeur. Des essais hydrauliques dans des forages plus profonds (intervalles de test á une profondeur de plus de 300 m) ont donné des conductivités hydrauliques inférieures à 10-12 m/s, m

  14. Hydrogeology of a fractured shale (Opalinus Clay): Implications for deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautschi, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Swiss programme for high-level radioactive-waste disposal, a Jurassic shale (Opalinus Clay) is being investigated as a potential host rock. Observations in clay pits and the results of a German research programme focusing on hazardous waste disposal have demonstrated that, at depths of 10-30 m, the permeability of the Opalinus Clay decreases by several orders of magnitude. Hydraulic tests in deeper boreholes (test intervals below 300 m) yielded hydraulic conductivities <10-12 m/s, even though joints and faults were included in some of the test intervals. These measurements are consistent with hydrogeological data from Opalinus Clay sections in ten tunnels in the Folded Jura of northern Switzerland. Despite extensive faulting, only a few indications of minor water inflow were encountered in more than 6,600 m of tunnel. All inflows were in tunnel sections where the overburden is less than 200 m. The hydraulic data are consistent with clay pore-water hydrochemical and isotopic data. The extensive hydrogeological data base - part of which derives from particularly unfavourable geological environments - provides arguments that advective transport through faults and joints is not a critical issue for the suitability of Opalinus Clay as a host rock for deep geological waste disposal. Résumé. Dans le cadre du programme suisse de stockage de déchets hautement radioactifs, une formation argileuse du Jurassique, l'argile à Opalinus, a été étudiée en tant que roche hôte potentielle. Des observations dans des cavités dans l'argile et les résultats du programme de recherche allemand consacré au stockage de déchets à risques ont démontré que, à des profondeur de 10 à 30 m, la perméabilité des argiles à Opalinus décroît de plusieurs ordres de grandeur. Des essais hydrauliques dans des forages plus profonds (intervalles de test á une profondeur de plus de 300 m) ont donné des conductivités hydrauliques inférieures à 10-12 m/s, m

  15. Modeling near-infrared reflectance spectra of clay and sulfate mixtures and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, K. M.; Milliken, R. E.

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution mapping by visible and near-infrared orbital spectrometers has revealed a diversity of hydrated mineral deposits on the surface of Mars. Quantitative analysis of mineral abundances within these deposits has the potential to distinguish depositional and diagenetic processes. Such analysis can also provide important constraints on the nature of putative global and local-scale mineralogical transitions on Mars. However, the ability of models to extract quantitative mineral abundances from spectra of mixtures relevant to sedimentary rocks remains largely untested. This is particularly true for clay and sulfate minerals, which often occur as fine-grained components of terrestrial sedimentary rocks and are known to occur in a number of sedimentary deposits on Mars. This study examines the spectral properties of a suite of mixtures containing the Mg-sulfate epsomite mixed with varying proportions of smectitic clay (saponite, nontronite, and montmorrilonite). The goal of this work is to test the ability of checkerboard (linear) and intimate (non-linear) mixing models to obtain accurate estimates of mineral abundances under ideal and controlled laboratory conditions. The results of this work suggest that: (1) spectra of clay-sulfate mixtures can be reproduced by checkerboard and intimate mixing models to within 2% absolute reflectance or single scattering albedo, (2) clay and epsomite abundance can be modeled to within 5 wt.% when particle diameter is optimized, and (3) the lower threshold for modeling clay in spectra of clay-epsomite mixtures is approximately 10 wt.%, below which the models often fail to recognize the presence of clay.

  16. Geology and Refractory Clay Deposits of the Haldeman and Wrigley Quadrangles, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Hosterman, John W.; Huddle, John Warfield

    1962-01-01

    The Haldeman and Wrigley 7th-minute quadrangles are near the western edge of the eastern Kentucky coal field and cover an area of approximately 117 square miles in parts of Carter, Rowan, Elliott, and Morgan Counties, Ky. The rocks exposed in the two quadrangles are of Early and Late Mississippian and Early and Middle Pennsylvanian age. The Mississippian rocks are composed of the thick Brodhead formation, which consists of siltstone and shale, and eleven thin marine limestone and shale formations, having an aggregate thickness of about 150 feet. The Lee and Breathitt formations, of Pennsylvanian age, consist of sandstone, siltstone, and shale; they also contain thin beds of coal and several beds of underclay, including the economically important Olive Hill clay bed of Crider, 1913. Pennsylvanian rocks include beds of both continental and marine origin. The eleven thin Mississippian formations and the upper-most part of the thick Brodhead formation are truncated by a prominent unconformity on which rocks of Pennsylvanian age rest. The rocks occupy a region of gentle dips between the Cincinnati arch and the Appalachian Mountains. Refractory clay deposits are in the Olive Hill clay bed, which occurs in the lower part of the Lee formation. The Olive Hill clay bed is discontinuous and consists of a series of irregularly shaped lenses. The bed is approximately two-thirds semifiint clay and one-third flint clay, and it contains minor amounts of plastic clay. Some of the flint clay is nearly pure kaolinite, but the semi flint and plastic clay consists of mixtures of kaolinite, illite, and mixed-layer clay minerals. The structure of the kaolinite ranges from highly crystalline to very poorly crystalline 'fireclay' type. The degree of crystallinity of the kaolinite and the hardness of the clay vary inversely with the amount of illite and mixed-layer clay minerals present. The nearly pure kaolinite is believed to have formed by the removal of alkalies and some silica fram

  17. Modernity and putty-clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  18. Dehydroxylated clay silicates on Mars: Riddles about the Martian regolith solved with ferrian saponites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Clay silicates, resulting from the chemical weathering of volcanic glasses and basaltic rocks of Mars, are generally believed to be major constituents of the martian regolith and atmospheric dust. Because little attention has been given to the role, if any, of Mg-bearing clay silicates on the martian surface, the crystal chemistry, stability, and reactivity of Mg-Fe smectites are examined. Partially dehydroxylated ferrian saponites are suggested to be major constituents of the surface of Mars, regulating several properties of the regolith.

  19. Thermal conductivity of carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.; Frost, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of several well-defined carbonate rocks were determined near 40??C. Values range from 1.2 W m-1 C-1 for a highly porous chalk to 5.1 W m-1 C-1 for a dolomite. The thermal conductivity of magnesite (5.0) is at the high end of the range, and that for Iceland Spar Calcite (3.2) is near the middle. The values for limestones decrease linearly with increasing porosity. Dolomites of comparable porosity have greater thermal conductivities than limestones. Water-sorbed samples have expected greater thermal conductivities than air-saturated (dry) samples of the same rock. An anomalously large increase in the thermal conductivity of a water-sorbed clayey dolomite over that of the same sample when dry is attributed to the clay fraction, which swells during water inhibition, causing more solid-to-solid contacts within the dolomite framework. Measurements were made with a Colora Thermoconductometer. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were made and tabulated. Porosity of the rocks was determined by mercury porosimetry and also from density measurements. The Iceland Spar Calcite and magnesite were included for reference. ?? 1973.

  20. Spherules from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay at Gubbio, Italy: the problem of outcrop contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, A.

    1986-12-01

    Surficial outcrop contamination has occurred in some well-known stratigraphic sections of carbonate rocks in the northern Apennines. A critical case involves several contaminated clay partings, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay in the classic Bottaccione section near Gubbio, Italy. These clay layers contain shiny spherules which, in several recent studies, have been said to consist of volcanic glass and have been used to support the hypothesis that the terminal Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by widespread volcanism. Laboratory tests, however, indicate that these shiny spherules are made of HF-insoluble and combustible material and are therefore of recent biological origin. These objects were introduced into the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and other clay layers from the surrounding soil along with abundant detrital contaminants derived from erosion of the middle Miocene flysch exposed at the head of the Bottaccione Gorge. They are completely different from the altered and flattened microtektitelike spheroids that are found only in the iridium-rich Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and that provide strong evidence for a large impact.

  1. Cyclic deformations in the Opalinus clay: a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Emanuel; Huggenberger, Peter; Möri, Andreas; Meier, Edi

    2015-04-01

    The influence of tunnel climate on deformation cycles of joint openings and closings is often observed immediately after excavation. At the EZ-B niche in the Mt. Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland), a cyclic deformation of the shaly Opalinus clay has been monitored for several years. The deformation cycles of the joints parallel to the clay bedding planes correlate with seasonal variations in relative humidity of the air in the niche. In winter, when the relative humidity is the lowest (down to 65%), the joints open as the clay volume decreases, whereas they tend to close in the summer when the relative humidity reaches up to 100%. Furthermore, in situ measurements have shown the trend of an increasingly smaller aperture of joints with time. A laboratory experiment was carried out to reproduce the observed cyclic deformation in a climate chamber using a core sample of Opalinus clay. The main goal of the experiment was to investigate the influence of the relative humidity on the deformation of the Opalinus clay while excluding the in situ effects (e.g. confining stress). The core sample of Opalinus clay was put into a closed ended PVC tube and the space between the sample and the tube was filled with resin. Then, the sample (size: 28 cm × 14 cm × 6.5 cm) was cut in half lengthways and the open end was cut, so that the half-core sample could move in one direction. The mounted sample was exposed to wetting and drying cycles in a climate chamber. Air temperature, air humidity and sample weight were continuously recorded. Photographs taken at regular time intervals by a webcam allowed the formation/deformation of cracks on the surface of the sample to be monitored. A crackmeter consisting of a double-plate capacitor attached to the core sample was developed to measure the dynamics of the crack opening and closing. Preliminary results show that: - Deformation movements during different climate cycles can be visualized with the webcam - The crackmeter signal gives a

  2. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs.

  3. ESEM study of the humidity-induced swelling of clay film.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Benoit; Wang, Linlin; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Bornert, Michel; Tanguy, Alexandre; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-10-15

    We measured the humidity-induced swelling of thin self-standing films of montmorillonite clay by a combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image correlation (DIC). The films were about 40 μm thick. They were prepared by depositing and evaporating a suspension of clay and peeling off the highly oriented deposits. The rationale for creating such original samples was to obtain mesoscopic samples that could be used to bridge experimentally the gap between the scale of the clay layer and the engineering scale of a macroscopic clay sample. Several montmorillonite samples were used: the reference clay Swy-2, the same clay homoionized with sodium or calcium ions, and a sodium-exchanged Cloisite. The edges of the clay films were observed by ESEM at various relative humidity values between 14% and 95%. The ESEM images were then analyzed by DIC to measure the swelling or the shrinkage of the films. We also measured the adsorption/desorption isotherms by weighing the film samples in a humidity-controlled environment. In order to analyze our results, we compared our swelling/shrinkage and adsorption/desorption data with previously published data on the interlayer spacing obtained by X-ray diffraction and with numerical estimates of the interlayer water obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. The swelling and the hysteresis of this swelling were found to be comparable for the overall macroscopic films and for the interlayer space. The same correspondence between film and interlayer space was observed for the amount of adsorbed water. This suggests that, in the range of relative humidities values explored, the films behave like freely swelling oriented stacks of clay layers, without any significant contribution from the mesoporosity. The relevance of this result for the behavior of clayey sedimentary rocks and the differences with the behavior of nonoriented samples (powders or compacted powders) are briefly discussed. PMID:24044513

  4. ESEM study of the humidity-induced swelling of clay film.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Benoit; Wang, Linlin; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Bornert, Michel; Tanguy, Alexandre; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-10-15

    We measured the humidity-induced swelling of thin self-standing films of montmorillonite clay by a combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image correlation (DIC). The films were about 40 μm thick. They were prepared by depositing and evaporating a suspension of clay and peeling off the highly oriented deposits. The rationale for creating such original samples was to obtain mesoscopic samples that could be used to bridge experimentally the gap between the scale of the clay layer and the engineering scale of a macroscopic clay sample. Several montmorillonite samples were used: the reference clay Swy-2, the same clay homoionized with sodium or calcium ions, and a sodium-exchanged Cloisite. The edges of the clay films were observed by ESEM at various relative humidity values between 14% and 95%. The ESEM images were then analyzed by DIC to measure the swelling or the shrinkage of the films. We also measured the adsorption/desorption isotherms by weighing the film samples in a humidity-controlled environment. In order to analyze our results, we compared our swelling/shrinkage and adsorption/desorption data with previously published data on the interlayer spacing obtained by X-ray diffraction and with numerical estimates of the interlayer water obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. The swelling and the hysteresis of this swelling were found to be comparable for the overall macroscopic films and for the interlayer space. The same correspondence between film and interlayer space was observed for the amount of adsorbed water. This suggests that, in the range of relative humidities values explored, the films behave like freely swelling oriented stacks of clay layers, without any significant contribution from the mesoporosity. The relevance of this result for the behavior of clayey sedimentary rocks and the differences with the behavior of nonoriented samples (powders or compacted powders) are briefly discussed.

  5. The Effect of Clay Chemistry and Particle Size Distribution on Carbon Storage from Two Forest Types in Piedmont Soils in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvoort, A.; Werts, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    In most soils, there is a general positive correlation between clay and carbon content laterally through the landscape. Clay serves to both physically and chemically protect carbon from decompositional processes. However, in some of the highly weathered, naturally acidic soils, such as those located in the southern piedmont area of the US, these trends do not necessarily hold true. We conducted two transects through a clay rich soil dominated by montmorillonite and another through a soil dominated by non-active clays and iron oxides in order to compare trends in both particle size distributions and carbon and nitrogen content using both a laser particle size distribution system and an elemental analyzer. The montmorillonite rich soils contain a higher pH due to the alkaline nature of the parent rock (gabbro) and reveal a negative correlation between clay content and carbon storage. The trends also hold true for the non-active clay soils suggesting that the negative correlations are not necessarily linked to clay chemistry. The absence of a difference in nitrogen and carbon percentages within the different clays proves to be significant because it shows that the clay chemistry is not solely responsible for a positive correlation between clay and carbon content. These results reiterate the complexity of carbon storage processes within the piedmont soil system.

  6. Burnt clay magnetic properties and palaeointensity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova, Mariya; Lesigyarski, Deyan

    2014-05-01

    Burnt clay structures found in situ are the most valuable materials for archaeomagnetic studies. From these materials the full geomagnetic field vector described by inclination, declination and intensity can be retrieved. The reliability of the obtained directional results is related to the precision of samples orientation and the accuracy of characteristic remanence determination. Palaeointensity evaluations depend on much more complex factors - stability of carried remanent magnetization, grain-size distribution of magnetic particles and mineralogical transformations during heating. In the last decades many efforts have been made to shed light over the reasons for the bad success rate of palaeointensity experiments. Nevertheless, sometimes the explanation of the bad archaeointensity results with the magnetic properties of the studied materials is quite unsatisfactory. In order to show how difficult is to apply a priory strict criteria for the suitability of a given collection of archaeomagnetic materials, artificial samples formed from four different baked clays are examined. Two of the examined clay types were taken from clay deposits from different parts of Bulgaria and two clays were taken from ancient archaeological baked clay structures from the Central part of Bulgaria and the Black sea coast, respectively. The samples formed from these clays were repeatedly heated in known magnetic field to 700oC. Different analyses were performed to obtain information about the mineralogical content and magnetic properties of the samples. The obtained results point that all clays reached stable magnetic mineralogy after the repeated heating to 700oC, the main magnetic mineral is of titano/magnetite type and the magnetic particles are predominantly with pseudo single domain grain sizes. In spite that, the magnetic properies of the studied clays seem to be very similar, reliable palaeointensity results were obtained only from the clays coming from clay deposits. The

  7. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  8. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  9. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species.

  10. Impoundment liner repair by electrophoresis of clay

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, A.T.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Stallard, W.M.; Chung, M.

    1997-10-01

    Electrophoresis of clay particles from dilute suspensions is an innovative technology to seal leaks in operating surface impoundments that does not require removal of impoundment contents, exposure of workers to contaminants, or prior knowledge of the leak locations. A suspension of clay particles is added to the impoundment liquid. A cathode (negative electrode) is placed inside and an anode (positive electrode) is placed outside the leaking impoundment. A direct current (DC) electric field is imposed externally across the geomembrane liner through the leaks. The clay particles migrate to the leaks under the influence of the imposed electric field to form a clay cake seal. The results of laboratory experiments to evaluate the use of a DC electric field to direct migration of clay particles into a leak and the hydraulic integrity of the resulting seal are presented in this paper. The effects of clay type, clay particle concentration in suspension, size of leak, and electric field strength on the migration of clay particles and process of cake formation are evaluated. The sealing effectiveness and internal structure of the resulting clay cakes are examined by hydraulic conductivity measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Electrophoretic mobilities of bentonite particles in different chemical environments were also measured to evaluate the feasibility of the technology in practical situations.

  11. A Rock Encyclopedia That Includes Rock Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laznicka, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Described is a rock encyclopedia combining rock sample sets and encyclopedic word and picture entries which can be used as a realistic information resource for independent study or as a part of a course. (JT)

  12. Trace and rare earth elements fractionation in volcanic- and sediment-hosted Mn ores: a study case of Sardinia (western Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinisi, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    It is widely accepted that, regardless of the geological environment (continental, marine or hydrothermal), the occurrences of clay minerals and/or mineral phases with clay-type crystal structure (as zeolites and Mn-oxides), play a key role in the trace elements and REEs uptake processes. The REE resources are produced mostly from ion-adsorption type REE deposits of southern China that are formed by weathering of granitic rocks and subsequent chemical adsorption of REE on clay minerals. A significant group of minerals with a high metal uptake capacity is represented by Mn oxides. Their "tunnel" structure, in fact, allows both the absorption (inside the minerals) and adsorption (outside the minerals) of cations and anions producing metal accumulations with economic and environmental significance. However, the ores, mainly that forming within sedimentary environment, often have impurities due to presence of minerals unrelated to mineralization. These minerals can significantly alter the compositional features of the ores and suggest misleading conclusions. In Sardinia (Italy, western Mediterranean), Mn-oxide mineralizations occur and recently their origin has been discussed and identified (Sinisi et al. 2012). In this study the mineralogical and chemical compositions of the Sardinian sediment-hosted and volcanic-hosted Mn-ore are exhibit exploring the possibility that they can represent exploitable trace and REE mineralizations. High contents of metals characterize these Mn deposits. Besides some trace elements (Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu, As, Pb, and U) that commonly typify the Mn oxi-hydroxide ores, all rare earth elements showed high concentrations in the Sardinian deposits, comparable to those of the main actually exploited REE sinks. For this reason, a simple statistical data treatment (R-mode Factor Analysis) was performed on fifteen and nineteen samples of sediment-hosted and volcanic-hosted Mn ore respectively, in order to identify both the mineral phases trapping trace

  13. Influence of clay swelling on the mechanical behaviour of Egyptian Helwan limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Nevin

    2016-04-01

    Clay minerals exist naturally in the majority of different Egyptian limestones types. Changes in the dimensions of clays during swelling / shrinking process induced by changes in the environmental conditions can result in acceleration the deterioration of the hosting stone. Petrographic investigation by scanning - electron microscope (SEM) of Helwan limestone (biomicritic limestone) revealed distribution of a typical smectite morphology (curled - leaf shape) beside abundance of glauconite pellets within the stone material. The clay frication extracted from Helwan reached 10% and oriented aggregates samples were analyzed by X- ray diffraction (XRD) and confirmed the identification of smectite as the main mineral in the clay frication. To study the effect of the clay content on the mechanical behavior of Helwan limestone, hygric swelling test was performed at first by using displacement sensor and then the effect of multiple wetting/ drying cycles on the stone strength was determined using unconfined compressive strength (UCS). Results revealed that there was a significant correlation between degree of swelling of the clay and strength of the limestone.

  14. Incorporation of phthalocyanines by cationic and anionic clays via ion exchange and direct synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.; Botto, R.E.; Winans, R.E. ); Forman, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) and metallophthalocyanines were incorporated into the galleries of anionic and cationic clays via ion exchange and in situ crystallization of the synthetic clay layers. Intercalation compounds between the layered magnesium silicate clay hectorite and cationic phthalocyanines were directly prepared by refluxing for 2 days aqueous solutions of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide, lithium flouride, and either alcian blue dyes (Cu(II)Pc) or 15-crown-5 tetra-substituted phthalocyanine (15C5Pc). The CuPc dyes are tetrapositively charged through peripheral quaternary ammonium groups, whereas the 15C5Pc is electrically neutral. Anionic clays prepared by hydrolysis of mixed solutions of aluminum nitrate, magnesium nitrate, and copper(II) phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid, tetrasodium salt (CuPcTs) in sodium hydroxide resulted in crystallization of an intercalation compound between a layered double hydroxide (LDH) and this anionic Pc. The material prepared by ion exchange of CuPcTs into a wet, freshly prepared LDH was superior in crystallinity. The phthalocyanines are oriented parallel to cationic hectorite clay layers (gallery heights 4.5-6.5[angstrom]) and perpendicular to anionic layered double hydroxide clay layers (gallery height 18,2[angstrom]) in correlation with their hosts' respective layer charge densities. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Dramatical Impact Of Low Amounts of Swelling Clays On The Rheology Of Alpine Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardou, E.; Bowen, P.; Banfill, P. G.; Boivin, P.

    2004-12-01

    Field observations show that the role and amount of swelling clays in the complex hard suspensions of alpine debris flow type were underestimated (see Boivin et al., this session). This work aims at exploring to which extent the swelling clay content influences the global rheology of a flow of rock grains from which the size spectrum extends from clays to gravel. We made a sample from calibrated materials with a grain size distribution similar to that of a viscoplastic debris flow (Bardou et al., 2003). Four replicates were made with the same grading curve. The clay content of the samples was 2% dry weight only, and different 2:1 swelling clay to 1:1 clay ratio were used. The swelling clay ratio (SCR) was calculated as the percentage of 2:1 clay in the clay fraction of the bulk samples. The 1:1 clay was (industrial) kaolinite and the 2:1 clay was a natural soil smectite. The smectite content in the bulk sample ranged from 0% to 2% dry weight, corresponding to SCR ranging from 0 to 80%. The four prepared samples were sheared in the large-size apparatus fully described in Tattersall and Banfill (1983). This apparatus is based on the measure of the torque necessary to rotate an impeller immersed in the sample. The impeller has the form of an "H" and moves in a plane according to two parallel axes. The observed behaviour were very contrasted. The sample with SCR=0 was poorly sensitive to changes in the solid concentration, in contrast to the three samples with SCR>0. Moreover, a small change in the SCR of the clay fraction induced a dramatic change of the behaviour of the mixture. For SCR=0, only little changes in the rheological parameters of the bulk samples were observed with respect to changes in the solid concentration. On the contrary the rheological parameters of the bulk samples with SCR>0, apparently followed a power law according to solid concentration. These tests carried out in the laboratory accord with observations realised on natural debris flow material

  16. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks.

    PubMed

    French, Katherine L; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M; Schoon, Petra L; Zumberge, J Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A; George, Simon C; Love, Gordon D; Brocks, Jochen J; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E

    2015-05-12

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼ 2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  17. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    PubMed Central

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories. PMID:25918387

  18. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks.

    PubMed

    French, Katherine L; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M; Schoon, Petra L; Zumberge, J Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A; George, Simon C; Love, Gordon D; Brocks, Jochen J; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E

    2015-05-12

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼ 2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories. PMID:25918387

  19. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-05-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  20. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding.

  1. The thermal responses of rock art pigments: Implications for rock art weathering in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kevin; Meiklejohn, Ian; Arocena, Joselito

    2007-10-01

    The San rock art of southern Africa is an international heritage subject to degradation and loss resulting from weathering. The paintings occur within rock shelters, where many are exposed to direct solar radiation for varying periods, rather than occurring in dark caves. As part of a study on the factors thought to be impacting weathering, data were collected pertaining to rock and pigment temperatures as well as humidity within the rock shelters. In addition, XRD analyses were undertaken on pigment samples, and the pigment to rock and pigment to pigment contacts were investigated by means of SEM. Pigments were found to be composed of ferric oxide (the ochre) and a gypsum-clay mix (the white) and to occur as a layer on top of, rather than penetrating into, the sandstone. Noncontact infrared sensors were used to monitor the temperatures of the actual pigments while micro-thermocouples to monitor the surrounding (nonpainted) rock surfaces. Thermal data show that there are significant differences between the white and the ochre pigments, both in terms of actual temperatures and short-term thermal responses. Noticeably, the white paint exhibits (relatively) large thermal fluctuations, as compared to the ochre or the rock, over the 20-s to 1-min timescale; these thermal variations may induce pigment-to-pigment stresses within the painting. The pigmented areas also exhibit different temperatures to the surrounding paint-free rock, suggesting that there may be both within-painting and between painting and rock (including the rock beneath the painting) stresses that can lead to degradation. Humidity data were found to be inadequate for any meaningful evaluation of the moisture conditions.

  2. Clay mineral content of continental shelf and river sediments, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Dowling, Jennifer S.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains data on the clay mineral content of 250 shelf surface-sediment samples from the California Continental Borderland (Tables 1, 2; Figures 1-7), 79 samples with depth in cores from Santa Monica Bay (Table 3; see Table 1 for surface sediment data for those same cores and for core locations), 24 suspended and 13 bottom sediment samples from rivers draining Southern California (Table 4), and six rock samples or composite rock samples from the Palos Verdes Headland (Table 4). This report is designed as the data repository and these data are discussed in a paper by Hein et al. (2001).

  3. Microtectonic analysis of an incipient thrust fault in Opalinus Clay.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurich, B.; Urai, J. L.; Desbois, G.; Vollmer, C.; Nussbaum, C.

    2014-12-01

    The microfabric of a fault rock controls the fault's mechanical and hydrological properties. Knowing the fabric is thus essential for estimating seismic behavior and potential fluid flow. We studied well-preserved core and outcrop samples from the Main Fault, an up to 3 m wide zone of approximately 10 m offset in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (CH), a site to evaluate long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal. We found four main structural elements: (1) slickensided shear surfaces, (2) veins, (3) fine-grained gouge, and (4) scaly clay fabric. We investigated each element by ultra-thin section microscopy, by broad-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (BIB-SEM) and focused-ion-beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM), by X-ray diffraction crystallography (XRD) and by naked-eye analysis. We found extremely thin shear zones (<4μm) along which several samples broke, revealing slickensides. BIB-SEM and FIB-TEM showed that these thin shear zones comprise strongly aligned nano-sized clay particles. The porosity of the shear zones is dramatically reduced compared to the protolith. The strong alignment of clay particles, which wrap larger grains as quartz, calcite fossils and feldspar, yields a shiny, smooth surface morphology of the slickensides. Occasionally, calcite and celestite veins are associated to releasing sections such as risers of the slickenside. Gouge comprises much finer particles, a higher fabric intensity and a strong reduction in porosity and calcite content compared to the protolith. These findings suggest that gouge evolved by a cataclastic deformation mechanism aided by pressure solution of calcite. Scaly clay occurs in varying intensity and comprises thin shear zones, which sometimes act as flexural-slip faults of microfolds and C'-type shear bands. We propose that next to cataclastic processes, pressure solution and precipitation are important micro-scale mechanisms in faulting in Opalinus Clay and thus need to be

  4. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  5. The U(VI) speciation influenced by a novel Paenibacillus isolate from Mont Terri Opalinus clay.

    PubMed

    Lütke, Laura; Moll, Henry; Bachvarova, Velina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-05-21

    Bacterial cell walls have a high density of ionizable functional groups available for U(VI) binding, hence have a great potential to affect the speciation of this contaminant in the environment. The studied strain of the genus Paenibacillus is a novel isolate originating from the Mont Terri Opalinus clay formations (Switzerland) which are currently investigated as a potential host rock for future nuclear waste storage. U(VI) binding to the cell surface functional groups was studied by potentiometry combined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Four bacterial U(VI) surface complexes were identified: R-COO-UO2(+), R-O-PO3-UO2, R-O-PO3H-UO2(+), and (R-O-PO3)2-UO2(2-). The corresponding complex stability constants were calculated to be 5.33 ± 0.08, 8.89 ± 0.04, 12.92 ± 0.05, and 13.62 ± 0.08, respectively. Hence UO2(2+) displays a moderate to strong interaction with the bacterial surface functional groups. In the acidic pH range (pH 3) UO2(2+) binding onto the cell envelope is governed by coordination to hydrogen phosphoryl sites. Upon increasing the pH an increasing coordination of UO2(2+) to carboxylic and deprotonated phosphoryl sites was found. At a pH greater than 7 uranyl hydroxides dominate the speciation. Additionally the bacteria-mediated release of inorganic phosphate in dependence on [U(VI)] at different pH values was studied to assess the influence of phosphate release on U(VI) mobilization. PMID:23508301

  6. Induced polarization of shaly sands - The effect of clay counterion type

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of clay counterion type on complex conductivities of shaly sands were studied for the Na/sup +/, Li/sup +/, K/sup +/, Ca/sup ++/ and (C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 4/N/sup +/ ions. The results are treated in terms of the Waxman-Smits in-phase conductivity equation and a new relation describing the quadrature conductivity. Topics considered include polarization, geochemistry, calculation methods, ionic conductivity, and reservoir rock.

  7. Painting with Clay Van Gogh Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Vincent Van Gogh's painting "Starry Night" and describes a lesson where fifth- and sixth-grade students created their own version of the artwork. Explains that the students utilized four colors of Permoplast clay, using their hands and fingers as brushes and blending tools and the clay as paint. (CMK)

  8. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  9. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  10. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  11. Clay Corner: Light up a Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Presents two activities that enable students to work with clay: a tile project and turkey candle-holders. Explains that before students actually create their own projects, they get an opportunity to experience the clay itself. Asserts that the new vocabulary, unusual equipment, and intriguing techniques make ceramics a motivating activity. (CMK)

  12. Alteration of the molecular-size-distribution of Boom Clay dissolved organic matter induced by Na+ and Ca2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durce, D.; Maes, N.; Bruggeman, C.; Van Ravestyn, L.

    2016-02-01

    In porous media, the extent of dissolved organic matter (DOM)-facilitated contaminant transport depends on the concentration, conformation and the size of the dissolved organic species. Yet, these parameters are highly sensitive to the ionic strength (IS) and the ionic composition of the solution. Boom Clay (BC) which is considered in Belgium as a potential host rock for nuclear waste disposal contains polydisperse DOM that might associate with radionuclide and increase their mobility. To get more insight into the effect of IS on DOM structure and into its impact on the solid/solution partitioning of OM in BC is essential for safety assessment. In a first set, we investigated the influence of NaCl and CaCl2 content on the concentration, the MW distribution and UV spectral parameters of DOM collected from BC. With an increase in IS two main mechanisms were identified: a compaction and/or dissociation of the DOM molecules and an aggregation. We showed that the sensitivity of the DOM species to these two mechanisms was size/MW dependent and that the presence of Ca2 + promotes the aggregation. The largest species are more prone to aggregation which at the extreme leads to their transfer to particulate OM. On the contrary, small DOM species hardly aggregate but compact or dissociate with an increase of IS. These observations were confirmed in the second experimental set in which we followed the release of DOM from BC rock in various electrolytes. The increase of IS and multivalent cations content reduces the amount, the degree of aromaticity and the MW of DOM released from BC which limit the extent of DOM-facilitated contaminant transport in BC.

  13. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2002-05-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  14. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  15. Preconsolidation versus aging behavior of kaolinite clay

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasopoulos, G.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Results of resonant column tests were used to determine the effects of overconsolidation ratio (OCR) and of aging on the normalized rate of secondary increase N[sub G] of low-amplitude shear modulus G[sub 0] of a remolded kaolinite clay. The value of N[sub G] decreased approximately linearly with the logarithm of OCR and with the logarithm of duration of aging of the clay. The similarity of behavior provided a basis for establishing an equivalency between age-and-stress-induced equivalent overconsolidation for the clay in question. It was concluded that up to a certain limiting duration of aging the age-induced OCR increases linearly with elapsed time, whereas the effect starts diminishing for longer durations of aging. It is suggested that the results of similar studies on natural clay soils be used for predicting the long-term behavior of clays from the results of short-duration tests.

  16. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  17. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  18. Ground Truthing Orbital Clay Mineral Observations with the APXS Onboard Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring approximately 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since 2011. Its rim segments predate the Hesperian-age Burns formation and expose Noachian-age material, which is associated with orbital Fe3+-Mg-rich clay mineral observations [1,2]. Moving to an orders of magnitude smaller instrumental field of view on the ground, the clay minerals were challenging to pinpoint on the basis of geochemical data because they appear to be the result of near-isochemical weathering of the local bedrock [3,4]. However, the APXS revealed a more complex mineral story as fracture fills and so-called red zones appear to contain more Al-rich clay minerals [5,6], which had not been observed from orbit. These observations are important to constrain clay mineral formation processes. More detail will be added as Opportunity is heading into her 10th extended mission, during which she will investigate Noachian bedrock that predates Endeavour crater, study sedimentary rocks inside Endeavour crater, and explore a fluid-carved gully. ESA's ExoMars rover will land on Noachian-age Oxia Planum where abundant Fe3+-Mg-rich clay minerals have been observed from orbit, but the story will undoubtedly become more complex once seen from the ground.

  19. Improved interpretation of in-diffusion measurements with confined swelling clays.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy E; Van Loon, Luc R

    2008-04-01

    Diffusion is considered the principal transport mechanism of radio-nuclides and other low-molecular-weight pollutants in compacted clays used as barriers at various disposal and storage sites, for example, at projected deep repositories for radioactive waste. Porous filters are routinely used to confine swelling clays in diffusion studies of radio-tracers. The presence of the filter gives rise to considerable mass-transfer limitations at the clay boundary that result in erroneous diffusion parameters. We have solved the problem of in-diffusion with due account for this phenomenon by means of Fourier transforms. By using literature data on the in-diffusion of traces of radioactive cesium in an argillaceous rock (Opalinus clay) and a compacted bentonite (FEBEX bentonite), we have demonstrated that taking into account the mass-transfer limitations considerably improves the quality of the theoretical fit of the time evolution of radio-tracer concentration in the reservoir. Besides that, we have shown that ignoring the mass-transfer limitations leads to a noticeable underestimation of both the effective diffusion coefficient and the specific sorption capacity of the clay. PMID:18291558

  20. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  1. Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Sklarew, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

  2. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Castañeda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids—like behenic acid—and dicarboxylic acids—like fumaric acid—as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  3. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  4. Clay-mineraloid weathering products in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.

    1986-01-01

    The production of clay mineraloids (CMs) in the weathering of stony meteorites recovered in the Allan Hills and Elephant Moraine areas of Antarctica is investigated, applying electron microbeam analysis, pyrolysis/mass spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and differential scanning calorimetry to whole-rock chips from two eucrites, two diogenites, and an H5 chondrite. The data are presented in tables, graphs, and photomicrographs and characterized in detail. Massive to incipient-vermicular CM formations with smectitelike or micalike compositions and indications of poor crystallization are observed and attributed to hydrocryogenic diagenesis (with little or no liquid water) on time scales of 10-1000 kyr. The need to take the compositional effects of weathering into account before attempting to reconstruct the preterrestrial histories of meteorites is stressed.

  5. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  6. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  7. Effects of leachate on geotechnical characteristics of sandy clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, N. S.; Ali, Z. Rahman; Rahim, A. S.; Lihan, T.; Idris, R. M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Leachate is a hazardous liquid that poses negative impacts if leaks out into environments such as soil and ground water systems. The impact of leachate on the downgraded quality in terms of chemical characteristic is more concern rather than the physical or mechanical aspect. The effect of leachate on mechanical behaviour of contaminated soil is not well established and should be investigated. This paper presents the preliminary results of the effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit, compaction and shear strength of leachate-contaminated soil. The contaminated soil samples were prepared by mixing the leachate at ratiosbetween 0% and 20% leachate contents with soil samples. Base soil used was residual soil originated from granitic rock and classified as sandy clay soil (CS). Its specific gravity ranged between 2.5 and 2.64 with clay minerals of kaolinite, muscovite and quartz. The field strength of the studied soil ranged between 156 and 207 kN/m2. The effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit clearly indicated by the decrease in liquid and plastic limit values with the increase in the leachate content. Compaction tests on leachate-contaminated soil caused the dropped in maximum dry density, ρdry and increased in optimum moisture content, wopt when the amount of leachate was increased between 0% and 20%. The results suggested that leachate contamination capable to modify some geotechnical properties of the studied residual soils.

  8. Weathering of basaltic rocks under cold, arid conditions - Antarctica and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Conca, J.-L.

    1991-01-01

    The processes taking part in the chemical weathering of nonvesicular dolerite cobbles producing etch pits and secondary minerals including clays, under cold arid conditions of high-altitude ice-free areas of Victoria Land (Antarctica) are investigated as a possible analog to processes that produced the pitted rocks and clay minerals on Mars. Results suggest that the pits in the dolerite cobbles are formed by the dissolution of the rock by rare snow-melt water during the austral summer, followed by wind erosion of weathered material. The upper interior walls of the pits are lined with a yellow precipitate consisting of illite and quartz mixture, while the pit bottoms contain alteration products including Fe-rich clay minerals and soluble salts. A model is proposed for rock pitting on Mars analogous to that of the Antarctic dolerites.

  9. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  10. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  11. The Effects of Fault Composition and Microstructures on Fault Weakness: A Study of Synthetic and Natural Clay-Rich Fault Gouges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical weakness of faults has long been a fundamental issue in faulting and earthquake mechanics studies. Studies of core and outcrop samples obtained from major faults, including the San Andreas Fault and subduction megathrusts, and laboratory friction experiments on natural and synthetic fault gouges all document that clay minerals are one likely explanation for fault weakness. While laboratory experiments have shown that clays are frictionally weak, with friction coefficients (μ) as low as 0.08-0.2 for smectite family minerals, and that μ varies systematically with clay content, the effects of microstructure, composition, and the evolution of friction throughout shearing of clay-rich gouges is not well understood. To investigate these processes, we conducted shearing experiments on two-phase synthetic gouges of varying proportions of quartz and Ca-montmorillonite. We then studied the resulting microstructures to test the hypothesis that as clay-rich gouges are sheared, clay minerals align and form discrete through-going surfaces that lead to reduced strength. Experiments were run in a double direct shear geometry at room temperature and normal stresses of 25 MPa. Samples were sheared at a constant velocity of 10μm/s. Sheared "wafers" were recovered for scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses. Our preliminary results yield values of μ = 0.35-0.62 for mixtures ranging from 10%-90% clay, and document a decrease in μ with clay content, consistent with previous studies. Additionally, we observe a characteristic peak and then drop in shear strength at the beginning of shearing. The magnitude of this peak increases with clay content. Ongoing analysis of fabrics will systematically assess the relationship between microstructures, clay alignment, and the evolution of friction for our synthetic gouges as well as for a suite of natural clay-rich fault rocks from exhumed subduction thrusts. We expect that with clay content and shear strain increases

  12. Weak Elastic Anisotropy in a Cracked Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Wong, T.

    2006-12-01

    Crack and textural fabrics have significant control over the development of mechanical anisotropy in a rock. Bedding in sedimentary rocks, cleavage in slates, preferred orientation of anisotropic minerals and anisotropic distribution of microcracks can all contribute to elastic anisotropy. Using Kachanov's (1992, 1993) formulation we analyzed the effects of an axisymmetric system of microcracks on seismic anisotropy. The elastic behavior of such a cracked rock is transversely isotropic, and its seismic properties can be characterized by the three Thomsen parameters. In this study we calculated the parameters ɛ, δ and γ under dry and saturated conditions. We derived analytic expressions for the model proposed by Sayers & Kachanov (1995), which assumes that the contribution from the fourth rank crack density tensor is negligible. This model predicts that the elliptic anisotropy condition ɛ=δ is obeyed in a dry rock. Guided by microstructural observations we adopted a two-parameter axisymmetric distribution to characterize the crack density, which predicts that δ and γ in a fluid saturated rock are related to ɛ in a nonlinear manner. All three Thomsen parameters are sensitively dependent on the crack density difference. While our model shows basic agreement with some of the laboratory data on seismic anisotropy in saturated shale, there are discrepancies which suggest that the petrofabric associated with preferred orientation of clay minerals and elastic anisotropy of the rock matrix may have considerable influence which should not be neglected in model. Preliminary comparison with borehole log data suggests rock physics tests which may be useful for interpreting the shear wave anisotropy observations.

  13. Ni clay neoformation on montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Dähn, R; Scheidegger, A; Manceau, A; Schlegel, M; Baeyens, B; Bradbury, M H

    2001-03-01

    Polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (P-EXAFS) was used to study the sorption mechanism of Ni on the aluminous hydrous silicate montmorillonite at high ionic strength (0.3 M NaClO4), pH 8 and a Ni concentration of 0.66 mM. Highly textured self-supporting clay films were obtained by slowly filtrating a clay suspension after a reaction time of 14 days. P-EXAFS results indicate that sorbed Ni has a Ni clay-like structural environment with the same crystallographic orientation as montmorillonite layers.

  14. The origin of vein-type copper-lead-zinc deposits Host in Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks at the Southeast Anatolian Orogenic Belt (Küplüce-Adıyaman, Southeastern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyıldız, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Nail; Gören, Burcu; Yıldırım, Esra; Ilhan, Semiha

    2015-02-01

    The study area is located around the town of Küplüce between the Çelikhan and Sincik districts (Adıyaman, Turkey). Mineralisations are located at the Southeast Anatolian Orogenic Belt. Despite many differential units, especially in age and lithology, that coexist in the region, mineralisation and alteration are only developed in partly concordant/partly disconcordant veins/veinlets of quartz within chlorite schists, sericite schists, mica schists/mica gneisses, quartz schists and metadiabases of the Palaeozoic Pütürge metamorphics. Pyrite, chalcopyrite and sphalerite are dominant minerals in mineral paragenesis. Chalcocite, covellite and carollite are also found in trace amounts. Quartz, calcite, sericite and chlorite are the gang minerals. Silicification, sericitisation, chloritisation, epidotisation and limonitisation are widespread in limited areas around ore veins. The estimated Co/Ni (1.8-4.3) ratio in pyrites belonging to mineralisation deposits indicates that mineralisation in the region is related to magmatic hydrothermal deposits. In addition, REE (rare earth element) contents of mineralisation deposits in chondrite-normalised diagrams are enriched and show a similar trend to that of chondritic values. This indicates that metals that form mineralisation deposits are related to magmatic rocks. Values of δ34S estimated in the Küplüce region vary between 1.6‰ and 2.34‰. Values of δ34S close to 0 indicate that the sulphur forming the mineralisation is of magmatic origin. In addition, δ18O values vary between 8‰ and 10.8‰ and are consistent with magmatic water. Analyses of the fluid inclusions in quartz samples from mineralisation deposits were performed, and the homogenisation temperature was estimated to be between 90 and 150 °C. These temperature values can be explained by the mixing of a solution with surface water. It was determined that mineralisation deposits were vein-type hydrothermal deposits that had developed due to Middle Eocene

  15. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  16. Clay Mineralogy, Authigenic Smectite Concentration, and Fault Weakening of the San Gregorio Fault; Moss Beach, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, S.; Moore, J.; Bish, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The apparently weak nature of the San Andreas fault system poses a fundamental geophysical question. The San Gregorio fault at Moss Beach, CA is an active splay of the right-lateral San Andreas fault zone and has a total offset of about 150 km. At Moss Beach, the San Gregorio fault offsets Pliocene sedimentary rocks and consists of a clay-rich gouge zone, eastern sandstone block, and western mudstone block. In the presence of fluids, smectite clays can swell and become very weak to shearing. We studied a profile of samples across the fault zone and wall rocks to determine if there is a concentration of smectite in the gouge zone and propose a possible formation mechanism. Samples were analyzed using standard quantitative X-ray diffraction methods and software recently developed at Los Alamos National Lab. XRD results show a high smectite/illite (weak clay/strong clay) ratio in the gouge (S/I ratio=2-4), lower in the mudstone (S/I ratio=2), and very low in the sandstone (S/I ratio=1). The variability of smectite/illite ratio in the gouge zone may be evidence of preferential alteration where developed shear planes undergo progressive smectite enrichment. The amount of illite layers in illite/smectites is 5-30%, indicating little illitization; therefore, these fault rocks have not undergone significant diagenesis above 100 degrees C and illite present must be largely detrital. Bulk mineralogy shows significant anti-correlation of smectite with feldspar, especially in the gouge, suggesting authigenic smectite generation from feldspar. Under scanning-electron microscope inspection, smectites have fibrous, grain coating growth fabrics, also suggesting smectite authigenesis. If in situ production of smectite via chemical alteration is possible in active faults, it could have significant implications for self-generated weakening of faults above the smectite-to-illite transition (<150 degrees C, or 5-7km).

  17. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Canakcii, H.; Mavi, B.

    2011-12-26

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of different fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioactivity. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), external hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  18. The Basics in Pottery: Clay and Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joan

    1985-01-01

    Art teachers at the middle school or junior high school level usually find themselves in a program teaching ceramics. The most essential tools needed for a ceramics class are discussed. Different kinds of clay are also discussed. (RM)

  19. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, I.; ćanakciı, H.; Mavi, B.; Günoǧlu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of diferent fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioacitivty. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure 226Ra, 232Th and 40K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  20. Used Fuel Disposal in Crystalline Rocks. FY15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifeng

    2015-08-20

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. Chapter headings are as follows: Fuel matrix degradation model and its integration with performance assessments, Investigation of thermal effects on the chemical behavior of clays, Investigation of uranium diffusion and retardation in bentonite, Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: dependence on density, Sorption and desorption of plutonium by bentonite, Dissolution of plutonium intrinsic colloids in the presence of clay and as a function of temperature, Laboratory investigation of colloid-facilitated transport of cesium by bentonite colloids in a crystalline rock system, Development and demonstration of discrete fracture network model, Fracture continuum model and its comparison with discrete fracture network model.

  1. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

  2. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  3. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-01

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  4. Clay-mediated reactions of HCN oligomers - The effect of the oxidation state of the clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Alwis, K. W.; Edelson, E. H.; Mount, N.; Hagan, W. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays which contain Fe(III) inhibit the oligomerization of aqueous solutions of HCN. The inhibitory effect is due to the rapid oxidation of diaminomaleonitrile, a key intermediate in HCN oligomerization, by the Fe(III) incorporated into the aluminosilicate lattice of the clay. The Fe(III) oxidizes diaminomaleonitrile to diiminosuccinonitrile, a compound which is rapidly hydrolyzed to HCN and oxalic acid derivatives. Diaminomaleonitrile is not oxidized when Fe(III) in the montmorillonite is reduced with hydrazine. The oxidation state of the clay is an important variable in experiments designed to simulate clay catalysis on the primitive earth.

  5. Investigation of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays by {sup 129}Xe NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsaio, C.-J.; Carrado, K. A.; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

    1998-04-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays has been used to glean information on the interlayer gallery height of clays before and after pillaring. Two clay minerals were studied, a Ca{sup 2+}-montmorillonite and Bentonite L. The NMR results indicate that the effective interlamellar spacing of the montmorillonite increased from 5.4 to 8.0 Angstroms after pillaring with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. These data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in gallery height from 5.6 to 8.4 Angstroms.

  6. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  7. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynda B; Metge, David W; Eberl, Dennis D; Harvey, Ronald W; Turner, Amanda G; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T

    2011-04-15

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe(2+) solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe(2+). Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe(2+) overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe(3+) and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals.

  8. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  9. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    PubMed Central

    David Walter, W.; Walsh, Daniel P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Miller, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors—especially soil properties—have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. PMID:21326232

  10. Clay: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Cheryl

    This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module indicates the values of craft activities with clay for preschool children. Classroom activities as well as instructional objectives for the CDA intern are provided. The module emphasizes (1) reasons for using clay in the preschool program, (2) types of clay and clay-like materials, and (3)…

  11. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  12. Exploring biotic vs. abiotic controls on syngenetic carbonate and clay mineral precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Gabriela S.; McKenzie, Judith A.; Martinez Ruiz, Francisca; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2016-04-01

    A possible syngenetic relationship between carbonate and clay mineral precipitation has been reported for sedimentary rocks deposited in both lacustrine and marine sedimentary environments throughout the geological record. In particular, the mineral dolomite is often found associated with Mg-rich clays, such as stevensite. It is notable that this carbonate/clay association has been recorded in numerous samples taken from modern dolomite precipitating environments; for example, the Coorong lakes, South Australia, coastal sabkhas, Abu Dhabi, UAE and coastal hypersaline lagoons (Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho) east of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An HRTEM study of samples from these three locations indicates a possible physical/chemical association between the Ca-dolomite and Mg-rich clays, demonstrating a probable co-precipitation. To test this hypothesis, we have conducted a series of biotic and abiotic laboratory experiments. If this syngenesis actually occurs in nature, what, if any, are the biogeochemical processes controlling these precipitation reactions? Our experiments were designed to determine the extent of the biotic versus abiotic component influencing the mineral precipitation and, in the case of a biotic influence, to understand the mechanism through which microorganisms might mediate the formation of clay minerals. The experiments were carried out in the Geomicrobiology Laboratory of ETH Zürich using cultures of living microbes and artificial organic compounds that simulate functional groups present in natural biofilms formed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, pure inorganic experiments were designed to understand possible physico-chemical conditions for diagenetic processes that could induce dissolution of Mg-carbonates and precipitation of Mg-rich clays. Our results show a remarkable biotic influence during the formation of clay minerals. Specifically, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), released by microbes in their

  13. Determination of fixed water in rocks by infrared absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, I.A.; Chandler, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    An infrared absorption technique has been developed for the quantitative determination of "fixed water" (H2O+) in rocks. Potassium bromide disks containing 2-mg samples are scanned in the 3-??m spectral region and absorption at 2.96 ??m is determined. Although the exact nature of this peak is not known, other than that it is caused by an interaction between the potassium bromide and hydroxyl groups and water, it can be used for quantitative analysis. Rock samples, other than those containing significant percentages of clay minerals, can be analyzed with a standard deviation of 0.26%.

  14. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  15. Creep versus Earthquake Slip: New insights from rock magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y.-M.; Aubourg, C.; Song, S.-R.; Lee, T.-Q.; Song, Y.-F.

    2012-04-01

    Pseudotachylyte is generally believed as the best evidence of high-friction heating during earthquake. However, in clay-rich derived gouge, the temperature elevation is limited to large-scale endothermic dehydration reaction (Brantut et al., 2011). In such a context where melting is likely, it has been suggested that the characterization of neoformed mineral may be a diagnostic clue to distinguish between creep process and earthquake slip zone. Here we show evidence of neoformed magnetic mineral in the active Chelungpu fault gouge that hosts the Chi-Chi slip zone (Taiwan, Mw 7.6, 1999). Thanks to boreholes of Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Program and the recovery of fresh gouge, we get new evidence of neoformed magnetic minerals. Both rock magnetic investigation and transmission X-ray microscope image show the occurrence of neoformed 5 µm goethite (α-FeOOH) within the Chi-Chi 16 cm thick gouge. Goethite forms post-seismically from the cooling of >350°C fluids. In addition to goethite, we detect occurrence of neoformed pyrrhotite (Fe7S8). The pyrrhotite forms at the expense of pyrite, in response to elevation of temperature >500°C. Within the mm-thick Chi-Chi principal slip zone, we do not detect evidence of goethite, nor pyrrhotite. Instead, we detect magnetite (Fe3O4). We suggest that a part of magnetite formed during friction-induced temperature elevation. We propose a simple model of evolution between goethite and magnetite within the entire gouge. If confirmed elsewhere, the recognition of the assemblage of iron oxide (magnetite), iron hydroxide (goethite) and iron sulfide (pyrrhotite) is possibly a diagnostic evidence of earthquake slip rather than creep process.

  16. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  17. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  18. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  19. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  20. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  1. Composition, Alteration, and Texture of Fault-Related Rocks from Safod Core and Surface Outcrop Analogs: Evidence for Deformation Processes and Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kelly K.; Davis, Colter R.; Shervais, John W.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Evans, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the fine-scale variations in mineralogical composition, geochemical alteration, and texture of the fault-related rocks from the Phase 3 whole-rock core sampled between 3,187.4 and 3,301.4 m measured depth within the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole near Parkfield, California. This work provides insight into the physical and chemical properties, structural architecture, and fluid-rock interactions associated with the actively deforming traces of the San Andreas Fault zone at depth. Exhumed outcrops within the SAF system comprised of serpentinite-bearing protolith are examined for comparison at San Simeon, Goat Rock State Park, and Nelson Creek, California. In the Phase 3 SAFOD drillcore samples, the fault-related rocks consist of multiple juxtaposed lenses of sheared, foliated siltstone and shale with block-in-matrix fabric, black cataclasite to ultracataclasite, and sheared serpentinite-bearing, finely foliated fault gouge. Meters-wide zones of sheared rock and fault gouge correlate to the sites of active borehole casing deformation and are characterized by scaly clay fabric with multiple discrete slip surfaces or anastomosing shear zones that surround conglobulated or rounded clasts of compacted clay and/or serpentinite. The fine gouge matrix is composed of Mg-rich clays and serpentine minerals (saponite ± palygorskite, and lizardite ± chrysotile). Whole-rock geochemistry data show increases in Fe-, Mg-, Ni-, and Cr-oxides and hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, and C-rich material, with a total organic content of >1 % locally in the fault-related rocks. The faults sampled in the field are composed of meters-thick zones of cohesive to non-cohesive, serpentinite-bearing foliated clay gouge and black fine-grained fault rock derived from sheared Franciscan Formation or serpentinized Coast Range Ophiolite. X-ray diffraction of outcrop samples shows that the foliated clay gouge is composed primarily of saponite and serpentinite, with localized

  2. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  3. Dynamic Tensile Failure of the Rock Interface Between Tuff and Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Feng, Xia-Ting; Chen, Rong; Xia, Kaiwen; Jin, Changyu

    2012-05-01

    The dynamic tensile strength properties of the rock interface and its host rocks sampled from the Baihetan Hydropower Station from Western China were measured using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results were compared with those for its two host rocks. The dynamic tensile strengths of the two host rocks, tuff and basalt have typical loading rate dependence. However, the dynamic response of the rock interface is much more complicated and at a given loading rate, varies between those of tuff and basalt. To explain the observation, numerical simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) was conducted to determine the detailed tensile failure process of the rock interface. The numerical simulation verifies that the variation of the dynamic tensile strength of the rock interface is a result of the variation of the interface geometry.

  4. Pier-scour depths affected by clay in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K. Van

    1998-01-01

    This paper briefly presents pier-scour depths measured during 1943-94, that are thought to have been affected by consolidated cohesive materials (clay) in Mississippi. MDOT soil reports were available for 29 measured pier-scour depths thought to be affected by clay. The cohesion and friction angles were approximated for the clay, and using the soil borings where clay was overlain by sand and(or) gravel, the top of the clay stratum was approximated in order to determine the net scour through the clay. Eight additional measured pier-scour depths were thought to be affected by clay, but no MDOT soil reports or borings were available. The net pier-scour depth through the clay is a rough approximation where sand and (or) gravel overlie a clay stratum and, therefore, only represents part of the total pier-scour depth. Limited data indicate the pier-scour depth decreases as shear strength of the clay increases.

  5. Rock and Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Simon; McRobbie, Angela

    1978-01-01

    Discusses rock as a form of both sexual expression and control. Describes rock's representations of masculinity and femininity and considers the contradictions involved in the representations. Relates the effects of rock to its form--as music, as commodity, as culture, and as entertainment. (JMF)

  6. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  7. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Hydrothermally altered impact melt rock and breccia - Contributions to the soil of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Keil, K.; Gooding, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    An examination is made of samples of melt rock and breccia from 12 terrestrial impact craters to identify alteration minerals and their conditions of formation. It is found that in most cases the dominant assemblage is clay-silica-K feldspar-zeolite, suggesting hydrothermal alteration at low pressures and temperatures of 100-300 C. The clays are in the main Fe-chlorites and smectites, in most cases depleted in Al and enriched in Fe and Mg relative to their source rocks. The alteration of impact glass is found often to be complete, whereas the alteration of crystalline melt rock is limited to a few percent of the rock volume. Impact breccia is altered to only a slight extent compared with the alteration of glass. It is believed that impact-induced hydrothermal alteration is to be expected at Martian impact sites if significant quantities of ground ice and/or water are present.

  9. Weathering of expansive sedimentary rock due to cycles of wetting and drying

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.W. )

    1994-09-01

    There are several different mechanisms by which sedimentary rock can weather, such as: (1) Rebound: for cut areas, where the overburden has been removed by erosion or during mass-grading operations, the sedimentary rock will rebound due to the release in overburden pressure, the rebound can cause the opening or widening of cracks and joints; (2) Physical Weathering: sedimentary rock can be broken apart by the physical growth of plant roots or by the freezing of water in rock cracks or joints. Studies have also shown that precipitation of gypsum in rock pores, cracks, and joints can cause rock expansion and disintegration. Such conditions occur in arid climates where subsurface moisture evaporates at ground surface, precipitating the minerals in the rock pores. Acicular gypsum crystals have been observed to grow perpendicular to structures and are believed to exert the most force at their growing end (Hawkins and Pinces, 1987). Acicular gypsum growth has even been observed in massive sandstone, which resulted in significant heave (Hollingsworth and Grover, 1992); (3) Chemical Weathering: weathering of sedimentary rock can be due to oxidation, hydration of clay minerals, and the chemical alteration of the silt-size particles to clay. Factors affecting oxidation include the presence of moisture and oxygen (aerobic conditions), biological activity, acidic environment, and temperature (Hollingsworth and Grover, 1992). The purpose of this study was to investigate the weathering of expansive sedimentary rock due to cycles of wetting and drying at temperatures representative of field conditions.

  10. Weathering and deterioration of volcanic tuff rocks used as natural building stone caused by moisture expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, W.; Lopez-Doncel, R.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tuff rocks are one of the most frequently used natural building rocks. Tuff rocks show great assortment in composition, grain size, sorting and textures, however scaling, flaking and cracking mostly affect all of them. Diverse authors suggest, that the swelling ability of clay minerals provoke moisture expansion contributing for the weathering and deterioration of the rocks and finally for the construction. Fourteen building volcanic tuff rocks from Germany, Hungary and Mexico of different ages, with diverse compositions and weathering conditions were studied in order to determine the influence of the moisture content regarding their deterioration. Hydric (water saturated) and hygric (related to the relative humidity) wetting experiments realized on the tuffs show that the phenomenon of the expansion certainly can be related to the content on clay minerals, which were clearly identified by XRD analysis. The moisture contents also dependents on the porosity, principally effective porosity and the radii distribution of the pores, because more water can be adsorbed and transported into the rock. However, there are tuff samples, which show a moderate or none expansion, although they have an important amount of clay minerals. Petrographic and geochemical analysis show, that the presence of other phyillosilicate minerals, like muscovite (sericite) and biotite, plays likewise an important role during the moisture expansion. On the other hand we identified a tuff type rich in clay minerals, which shows important hygric expansion but it is not so clear by the hydric water immersion experiment, because this tuff contains a high amount of calcium carbonate, principally in the fine grained matrix causing dissolution of the matrix and crumbling of the non-soluble particles including the clay-silt fraction. In this case it seems to be that the dissolution of the carbonate matrix causes a secondary porosity, which accelerates and favors the expansion and in consequent

  11. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  12. Hyperfiltration of potassium nitrate through clay membranes under relatively low-head conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Megan; Whitworth, Thomas Michael

    2005-10-01

    Much like reverse osmosis membranes, clays have been shown to exhibit reverse osmosis properties at high hydraulic heads. To determine if reverse osmosis was possible at lower hydraulic heads, potassium nitrate solutions were passed through thin clay layers at heads of 1.30 to 1.42 m. In each experiment, concentrations significantly increased due to partial solute rejection by the clay membranes. Concentration increases within the experimental cells were between 131% and 184%. Calculated values of the reflection coefficient ranged between 0.55 to 0.70, suggesting that these thin clay layers exhibited membrane effects. The results of these experiments suggest hyperfiltration may concentrate some dissolved contaminants from below to above regulatory limits in shallow aquifers bounded by a membrane-functioning aquitard or relatively low hydraulically conductive geologic strata. Hyperfiltration may also control nutrient distributions, creating subsurface microbial "hotspots". Consideration of hyperfiltration effects may ultimately lead to a clearer understanding of many subsurface processes, both shallow and deep, including contaminant fate and transport, subsurface microbiology, natural bioremediation and attenuation, redox, rock-water interaction, and groundwater chemistry.

  13. Abundance and distribution of mineral components associated with Moses Rock (kimberlite) diatreme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, J. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The surface mineralogy in and around Moses Rock diatreme, a kimberlite-bearing dike in SW Utah, was examined using internally calibrated Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data. Distinct near-infrared absorption characteristics of clays, gypsum, and serpentine (a key marker for kinberlite concentration) allowed the surface units containing these components to be identified spatially and the relative abundance of each component measured. Within the dike itself, channels and dispersed components of kimberlite and blocks of country rocks were accurately determined.

  14. Feasibility and Implications of a Rock Coating Catena: Analysis of a Desert Hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Ronald E.

    2002-08-01

    This research analyzes rock coatings on a basaltic hill in the western Mojave Desert using a combination of aerial imagery, a new method of digital in-field ground-based image processing, and statistical analyses. In addition, this research resulted in the development of a new rock coating index (RCI) to generalize changes in rock coatings along a slope, applied here to 2,760 individual clasts. RCI values reveal variations of different types of rock coatings on different particle sizes, in this case rock varnish, iron films, and rocks eroding too fast to host any coating. Larger particles host more rock varnish, iron films do not prefer a particular particle size, and highly weathered no-coating rocks are relatively smaller.

  15. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  16. Structural testing of hollow clay tile units

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.D. ); Bennett, R.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1992-08-05

    This report presents the results of laboratory testing of hollow clay tile masonry units. The testing is part of an ongoing natural phenomena evaluation program of Hollow Clay Tile Wall (HCTW) facilities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary purpose of these tests is to determine structural properties of unit tiles of the same lot to be used in large-scale laboratory testing of HCTW structures. Light red (terra cotta) clay masonry units, taken from the construction supply yard of were sampled and tested in accordance with applicable ASTM standards. Measurement of size, measurement of void area, initial rate of absorption, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength procedures were performed. Evaluation of the test results along with comparison to other published clay tile data is provided. Volume 1 of this document contains a description of the testing, a summary of the results, comparison to other published clay tile data, and conclusion drawn from the results. Volume 2 contains the unreduced test data, data reduction software, and quality assurance aspects of the testing.

  17. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  18. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  19. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  20. Clay Mineralogy of AN Alluvial Aquifer in a Mountainous, Semiarid Terrain, AN Example from Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, W. C.; Lim, D.; Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Pickering, R. A.; Williams, K. H.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Long, P. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial sediments deposited along the Colorado River corridor in the semi-arid regions of central to western Colorado can be important hosts for legacy contamination including U, V, As and Se. These alluvial sediments host aquifers which are thought to provide important "hot spots" and "hot moments" for microbiological activity controlling organic carbon processing and fluxes in the subsurface. Relatively little is known about the clay mineralogy of these alluvial aquifers and the parent alluvial sediments in spite of the fact that they commonly include lenses of silt-clay materials. These lenses are typically more reduced than coarser grained materials, but zones of reduced and more oxidized materials are present in these alluvial aquifer sediments. The clay mineralogy of the non-reduced parent alluvial sediments of the alluvial aquifer located in Rifle, CO (USA) is composed of chlorite, smectite, illite, kaolinite and quartz. The clay mineralogy of non-reduced fine-grained materials at Rifle are composed of the same suite of minerals found in the sediments plus a vermiculite-smectite intergrade that occurs near the bottom of the aquifer near the top of the Wasatch Formation. The clay mineral assemblages of the system reflect the mineralogically immature character of the source sediments. These assemblages are consistent with sediments and soils that formed in a moderately low rainfall climate and suggestive of minimal transport of the alluvial sediments from their source areas. Chlorite, smectite, smectite-vermiculite intergrade, and illite are the likely phases involved in the sorption of organic carbon and related microbial redox transformations of metals in these sediments. Both the occurrence and abundance of chlorite, smectite-vermiculite, illite and smectite can therefore exert an important control on the contaminant fluxes and are important determinants of biogeofacies in mountainous, semiarid terrains.

  1. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  2. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms. PMID:26218593

  3. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  4. Polymer based nanocomposites with nanofibers and exfoliated clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2005-01-01

    Polymer solutions, containing clay sheets, were electrospun into nanofibers and microfibers that contained clay sheets inside. Controllable removal of polymer by plasma etching from the surface of fibers revealed the arrangement of clay. The shape, flexibility, size distribution and arrangement of clay sheets were observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The clay sheets were partially aligned in big fibers with normal direction of clay sheets perpendicular to fiber axis. Crumpling of clay sheets inside fibers was observed when the fiber diameter was comparable to the lateral size of clay sheets. Single sheets of clay were observed both by catching clay sheets dispersed in water with electrospun nanofiber mats and by the deliberate removal of most of the polymer in the fibers. Thin, flexible gas barrier films, that are reasonably strong, were assembled from clay sheets and polymer nanofibers. Structure of composite films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Continuous film of clay sheets were physically attached to the surface of fiber mats. Spincoating film of polymer and clay sheets was reinforced by electrospun fiber scaffold. Certain alignment of clay sheets was observed in the vicinity of fibers.

  5. Biodiversity of Rock Varnish at Yungay, Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Venkat, P.; La Duc, M.; Kuhlman, G.; McKay, C.

    2007-12-01

    Rock varnish is a very slow-growing nanostratigraphic coating consisting of approximately 70% clay and 30% iron and manganese oxides of fine-grained clay minerals rich in manganese and iron oxides, which forms on the surfaces of rocks in most semi-arid to hyper-arid climates. Rock varnish has even been postulated to exist on Mars based on surface imagery from several landed missions, and is considered a potential biomarker. However, the mechanism of varnish nucleation and growth remains unknown. Whether or not microbes are involved in the nucleation and growth of rock varnish, the detection of microbes using cultivation or cultivation- independent techniques has demonstrated that varnish provides a microhabitat for microbes. We hypothesized that rock varnish in the Mars-like Yungay region of the Atacama Desert may provide such a microhabitat for microbial life where none has been found to date in the surface soil (< 1 cm). The presence of microbes was investigated using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay techniques and culture-independent biomolecular methods. High levels of both total and intracellular ATP were associated with the rock varnish while negligible ATP was found in the surrounding surface soil, suggesting that viable organisms were present. Total DNA was extracted from ground varnish and surrounding surface soil and subjected to trifurcate polymerase chain reactions (PCR). No DNA was recovered from the soil. Amplicons were used to generate ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone libraries, which suggest the presence of numerous phylogenetically distinct microorganisms in eight Eubacterial clades, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacterium- Bacteroides (CFB), Chloroflexi (green non-sulfur bacteria (GNS)), Gemmatimonadetes, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria. The diversity of bacteria found and presence of cyanobacteria suggests that rock varnish provides a niche environment for a cryptoendolithic microbial community where

  6. Rocks and geology in the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2002-01-01

    The landscape of the San Francisco Bay region is host to a greater variety of rocks than most other regions in the United States. This introductory guide provides illustrated descriptions of 46 common and important varieties of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock found in the region. Rock types are described in context of their identification qualities, how they form, and where they occur in the region. The guide also provides discussion about of regional geology, plate tectonics, the rock cycle, the significance of the selected rock types in relation to both earth history and the impact of mineral resources on the development in the region. Maps and text also provide information where rocks, fossils, and geologic features can be visited on public lands or in association with public displays in regional museums, park visitor centers, and other public facilities.

  7. Comparison of rapid methods for chemical analysis of milligram samples of ultrafine clays.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rettig, S.L.; Marinenko, J.W.; Khoury, H.N.; Jones, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Two rapid methods for the decomposition and chemical analysis of clays were adapted for use with 20-40mg size samples, typical amounts of ultrafine products (< 0.5 micrometer diameter) obtained from modern separation methods for clay minrals. The results of these methods were compared with those of 'classical' rock analyses. The two methods consisted of mixed lithium metaborate fusion and heated decomposition with HF in a closed vessel. The latter technique was modified to include subsequent evaporation with concentrated H2SO4 and re-solution in HCl, which reduced the interference of the fluoride ion in the determination of Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, and K.-from Authors

  8. Shape memory starch-clay bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Coativy, Gildas; Gautier, Nicolas; Pontoire, Bruno; Buléon, Alain; Lourdin, Denis; Leroy, Eric

    2015-02-13

    1-10% starch/clay bionanocomposites with shape memory properties were obtained by melt processing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TEM evidenced the presence of a major fraction of clay tactoids, consisting of 4-5 stacked crystalline layers, with a thickness of 6.8 nm. A significant orientation of the nanoparticles induced by extrusion was also observed. Tensile tests performed above the glass transition of the materials showed that the presence of clay nanoparticles leads to higher elastic modulus and maximum stress, without significant loss in elongation at break which typically reached 100%. Samples submitted to a 50% elongation and cooled below the glass transition showed shape memory behavior. Like unreinforced starch, the bionanocomposites showed complete shape recovery in unconstrained conditions. In mechanically constrained conditions, the maximum recovered stress was significantly improved for the bionanocomposites compared to unreinforced starch, opening promising perspectives for the design of sensors and actuators. PMID:25458305

  9. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    PubMed Central

    Mutman, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation. PMID:23766671

  10. Interaction of polymer with discotic clay particles.

    SciTech Connect

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-08-04

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labeling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains in the dilute regime. Attempts have also been made to characterize the structure in the concentrated regime of laponite with polymer.

  11. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  12. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  13. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  14. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  15. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  16. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    PubMed

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  17. Dual-wavelength moisture meter for clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgia, Michele; Pesatori, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    An optical sensor for measuring the moisture level of clay has been realized by a couple of telecommunications lasers at 1300 and 1550 nm. The sensor can operate directly during building material production. The measurement principle is based on the measurement of the optical reflection at different wavelengths in the infrared region. Custom low-noise electronics allows rejecting disturbances of ambient light, and a digital processing makes the system independent on the clay distance. By means of a proper calibration, the sensor can monitor the moisture level during brick production, without moving parts or optical filters.

  18. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  19. Numerical Modelling of Embankment on Soft Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nujid, M. M.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to predict deformation of embankment on soft clay of Muar. The prediction performance focusing on displacement at critical fill height of 5.5 m. The study was based on reported result in 1992. With the aid of computer intelligence, the advanced constitutive soil models could be adopted to analyze the soft clay behavior. The COMSOL Multiphysics (v4.4) has been used to simulate the problem with coupled physics available in the software. The vertical displacements are in good agreement close to published result.

  20. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  1. The rock melting approach to drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  2. Numerical simulation of the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock based on digital core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xin; Zou, Changchun; Li, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiaohong; Qi, Xinghua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock by applying the finite element method to digital cores which are built based on an advanced Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and a combination workflow. Study shows that the shale gas reservoir rock has strong anisotropic electrical conductivity because the conductivity is significantly different in both horizontal and vertical directions. The Archie formula is not suitable for application in shale reservoirs. The formation resistivity decreases in two cases; namely (a) with the increase of clay mineral content and the cation exchange capacity of clay, and (b) with the increase of pyrite content. The formation resistivity is not sensitive to the solid organic matter but to the clay and gas in the pores.

  3. Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have exhibited superior strength and thermo- oxidative properties as compared to pure polymers for use in air and space craft; however, there has often been difficulty completely dispersing the clay within the matrices of the polymer. In order to improve this process, the cation exchange capacity of lithium clay is first lowered using twenty-four hour heat treatments of no heat, 130 C, 150 C, or 170 C to fixate the lithium ions within the clay layers so that they are unexchangeable. Generally, higher temperatures have generated lower cation exchange capacities. An ion exchange involving dodecylamine, octadecylamine, or dimethyl benzidine (DMBZ) is then employed to actually expand the clay galleries. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy can be used to determine whether the clay has been successfully exfoliated. Finally, resins of DMBZ with clay are then pressed into disks for characterization using dynamic mechanical analyzer and oven- aging techniques in order to evaluate their glass transition, modulus strength, and thermal-oxidative stability in comparison to neat DMBZ. In the future, they may also be tested as composites for flexural and laminar shear strength.

  4. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  5. Ground water regimes containing country rock minerals in Southern Kuzbass (case study: Narysk-Ostashkin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domrocheva, E.; Lepokurova, O.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the calculation results revealing groundwater in equilibrium to carbonates and aluminosilicate minerals of country rocks in Narysk-Ostashkinsk area. It was proved that groundwater is in nonequilibrium to primary (endogenous) minerals in which they dissolve, however are in equilibrium to clays and carbonates which precipitate in the groundwater. The groundwater composition varies.

  6. The Rock Physics Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gary; Mukerji, Tapan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2003-10-01

    The Rock Physics Handbook conveniently brings together the theoretical and empirical relations that form the foundations of rock physics, with particular emphasis on seismic properties. It also includes commonly used models and relations for electrical and dielectric rock properties. Seventy-six articles concisely summarize a wide range of topics, including wave propagation, AVO-AVOZ, effective media, poroelasticity, pore fluid flow and diffusion. The book contains overviews of dispersion mechanisms, fluid substitution, and Vp-Vs relations. Useful empirical results on reservoir rocks and sediments, granular media, tables of mineral data, and an atlas of reservoir rock properties complete the text. This distillation of an otherwise scattered and eclectic mass of knowledge is presented in a form that can be immediately applied to solve real problems. Geophysics professionals, researchers and students as well as petroleum engineers, well log analysts, and environmental geoscientists will value The Rock Physics Handbook as a unique resource.

  7. Physical response of backfill materials to mineralogical changes in a basalt environment. [Sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Backfill materials surrounding waste canisters in a high-level nuclear waste repository are capable of ensuring very slow flow of groundwater past the canisters, and thereby increase the safety of the repository. However, in the design of a repository it will be necessary to allow for possible changes in the backfill. In this experimental program, changes in permeability, swelling behavior, and plastic behavior of the backfill at the temperatures, pressures, and radiation levels expected in a repository are investigated. The emphasis is on investigation of relevant phenomena and evaluation of experimental procedures for use in licensing procedures. The permeability of a slightly compacted sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite, with a dry bulk density of 1.59 g/cm/sup 3/, was determined to be 0.9 x 10/sup -18/ m/sup 2/ in liquid water at 25 and 200/sup 0/C, respectively. This is sufficiently low to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of proposed materials. In practice, fractures in the host rock may form short circuits around the backfill, so an even lower flow rate is probable. However, alteration by any of several mechanisms is expected to change the properties of the backfill. Crushed basalt plus bentonite is a leading candidate backfill for a basalt repository. Experiments show that basalt reacts with groundwater vapor or with liquid groundwater producing smectites, zeolites, silica, and other products that may be either beneficial or detrimental to the long-term performance of the backfill. Concentration of groundwater salts in the backfill by evaporation would cause immediate, but possibly reversible, reduction of the swelling abaility of bentonite. Moreover, under some circumstances, gamma radiolysis of moist air in the backfill could produce up to 0.5 mole of nitric acid or ammonia per liter of pore space. 27 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 {Angstrom} to 8.0 {Angstrom} after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 {Angstrom} to 8.4 {Angstrom}.

  9. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 poli