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Sample records for clay host rocks

  1. Reactive transport simulations of the evolution of a cementitious repository in clay-rich host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A.

    2010-05-01

    that the clay mineral is represented by a X- '(solute) ligand' initially occupied with e.g. Na+. Our representation of cation exchange is based on a multi end-member ideal solid solution model for the clay which at the same time considers the chemical reactivity of the clay phase in the high pH cement environment. As a first application, we will present the results of calculations of the interaction between a cement compartment in contact with a clay-rich host rock. References: Bradbury, M. & Baeyens, B. (2002). Porewater chemistry in compacted re-saturated MX-80 bentonite: Physico-chemical characterisation and geochemical modelling. PSI-Report 02-10, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland. Lothenbach, B. & Wieland, E. (2006). A thermodynamic approach to the hydration of sulphate-resisting Portland cement. Waste Management, 26, 706-719. Shao, H., Dmytrieva, S.V., Kolditz, O., Kulik, D.A., Pfingsten, W. & Kosakowski, G. (2009). Modeling reactive transport in non-ideal aqueous-solid solution system. Applied Geochemistry, 24(7), 1287-1300.

  2. Uranium in clays of crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.; Caruso, L.

    1985-03-10

    Uraniferous clay aggregates in several granites have been examined in detail with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a high resolution backscattered electron detector (BSE) and an energy dispersive x-ray system (EDS). The same polished sections used for the microscope observations were irradiated with thermal neutrons and the etched lexan detectors were then used to determine the location of uranium with a spatial resolution of a few microns. A set of 100 samples of the following granites were used for this study: Carnmenellis granite of southwestern England, Conway and Mount Osceola granites of central New Hampshire, Sherman granite of Wyoming and Colorado, Granite Mountains granite of Wyoming, several granites from central Maine, and the Graniteville granite of Missouri. These samples contain clay rich regions as large as a few millimeters that appear to consist entirely of clay when examined with the petrographic microscope. The clays are smectite, nontronite, or vermiculite. The fission track detectors show uranium to be present within the regions. Close examination with the BSE and EDS, however, shows in every instance that the host for the uranium is not clay but clay-sized grains of the following minerals: bastnesite group, hematite, siderite, secondary monazite, secondary thorite, and several different Y-bearing niobates. This finding may have severe implications for the long-term retention of uranium and transuranic elements adsorbed on clay. Perhaps the presence of clay is not significant for the long-term retention of radioisotopes. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Kunhwi; Houseworth, James; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Cheshire, Michael; Palaich, Sarah; Norskog, Katherine E.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Wolery, Thomas J.; Jerden, James L.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Cruse, Terry; Ebert, William L.

    2015-09-04

    Deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations has received much consideration given its desirable attributes such as isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, slow diffusion, sorbtive mineralogy, and geologically widespread (Jové Colón et al., 2014). There is a wealth of gained scientific expertise on the behavior of clay/shale/ argillaceous rock given its focus in international nuclear waste repository programs that includes underground research laboratories (URLs) in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. Jové Colón et al. (2014) have described some of these investigative efforts in clay rock ranging from site characterization to research on the engineered barrier system (EBS). Evaluations of disposal options that include nuclear waste disposition in clay/shale/argillaceous rock have determined that this host media can accommodate a wide range of waste types. R&D work within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) assessing thermal effects and fluid-mineral interactions for the disposition of heat-generating waste have so far demonstrated the feasibility for the EBS and clay host rock to withstand high thermal loads. This report represents the continuation of disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), hydrothermal experiments on clay interactions, used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development. The development and implementation of a clay/shale/argillite reference case described in Jové Colón et al. (2014) for FY15 will be documented in another report (Mariner et al. 2015) – only a brief description will be given here. This clay reference case implementation is the result of integration efforts between the GDSA PA and disposal in argillite work packages. The assessment of sacrificial zones in the EBS is being addressed through experimental work along with 1D reactive

  4. Using Modeling Clay to Model the Rock Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    During this interactive exploration, students will be guided through the rock cycle using modeling clay as a medium. Each student will be given a ball of red clay and a ball of yellow clay. The instructor will introduce students to igneous rocks as they use their red clay to create a volcano. Students will then learn about weathering and erosion as they break their yellow ball of clay into smaller and smaller pieces that they will round into spheres. The "sand" created from the yellow clay gets accumulated and lithified (via gentle compression by the students) to form a sandstone. This sandstone then becomes covered by a lava flow, created by smashing the red clay volcanoes. The process of metamorphism is introduced as students gently cover their sandstone using the lava flow. This also serves a segue for a discussion about the various types of metamorphism beginning with contact metamorphism. Metamorphic grade is discussed as increased pressure further alters the sedimentary rock and lava flow. Ultimately a migmatite is formed by mixing the red and yellow clay together. Finally, they clays become so intermingled that a new larger orange ball is created, beginning the rock cycle anew with an igneous melt. This activity is engaging and effective with students of all ages. Intended as a fun, light-hearted approach to introducing rocks in an undergraduate earth science class, this can be effectively customized for use in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

  5. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  6. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  7. Effect of the local clay distribution on the effective electrical conductivity of clay rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosenza, P.; Prêt, D.; Zamora, M.

    2015-01-01

    The "local porosity theory" proposed by Hilfer was revisited to develop a "local clay theory" (LCT) that establishes a quantitative relationship between the effective electrical conductivity and clay distribution in clay rocks. This theory is primarily based on a "local simplicity" assumption; under this assumption, the complexity of spatial clay distribution can be captured by two local functions, namely, the local clay distribution and the local percolation probability, which are calculated from a partitioning of a mineral map. The local clay distribution provides information about spatial clay fluctuations, and the local percolation probability describes the spatial fluctuations in the clay connectivity. This LCT was applied to (a) a mineral map made from a Callovo-Oxfordian mudstone sample and (b) (macroscopic) electrical conductivity measurements performed on the same sample. The direct and inverse modeling shows two results. First, the textural and classical model assuming that the electrical anisotropy of clay rock is mainly controlled by the anisotropy of the sole clay matrix provides inconsistent inverted values. Another textural effect, the anisotropy induced by elongated and oriented nonclayey grains, should be considered. Second, the effective conductivity values depend primarily on the choice of the inclusion-based models used in the LCT. The impact of local fluctuations of clay content and connectivity on the calculated effective conductivity is lower.

  8. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale

  9. Processes and controls in swelling anhydritic clay rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Referring to the swelling of anhydritic clay rocks in tunneling, Leopold Müller-Salzburg noted in the third volume on tunneling of his fundamental text book on rock engineering that "a truly coherent explanation of these phenomena is still owing" (Müller-Salzburg 1978, p. 306). This valuation is still true after more than three decades of research in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of such rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical controls of the swelling. In this contribution, a review of processes in swelling anhydritic clay rocks and of associated controls is presented. Also numerical models that aim at simulating the swelling processes and controls are included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-oriented work in this review, the presentation intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical engineering projects. Keywords: swelling; anhydritic clay rocks; review

  10. Identification of clay minerals in reservoir rocks by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong Khang, Vu; Korovkin, Mikhail V.; Ananyeva, Ludmila G.

    2016-09-01

    Clay minerals including kaolinite, montmorillonite and bentonite in oil and gas reservoir rocks are identified by absorption spectra obtained via Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Bands around 3695, 3666, 3650 and 3630 cm-1 and bands around 3620 and 3400 cm-1 are the most diagnostically reliable for kaolinite and montmorillonite, respectively; also absorption bands in the region of 1200...955 cm-1 are equally diagnostic for all the clay minerals studied.

  11. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  12. Clay-shoveler's fracture during indoor rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Kaloostian, Paul E; Kim, Jennifer E; Calabresi, Peter A; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Indoor rock climbing is becoming more popular for people of all ages. Despite the tremendous interest in this competitive sport, participants are made aware of the dangers associated with participating. The authors present the first reported case of a clay-shoveler's fracture at the T1 spinous process during indoor rock climbing. They describe the management and natural history of this fracture and discuss management strategies for this increasingly popular recreational sport.A 14-year-old competitive indoor rock climber presented with acute-onset midline thoracic pain at T1 while indoor rock climbing. He reported no recent falls or trauma but stated that the pain came on abruptly while rock climbing. On examination, he was neurologically intact except for significant tenderness to palpation at the T1 spinous process. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a minimally displaced T1 spinous process fracture with evidence of significant surrounding muscular edema, suggesting an acute fracture. He was treated conservatively with anti-inflammatory drugs, complete climbing restriction, and rest. He continued to have focal upper back pain at the level of the fracture over the next 4 months. He was unable to climb for 4 months until his pain resolved after conservative treatment of climbing restriction, pain control, and rest.This is the first documented case of a clay-shoveler's fracture sustained in a pediatric patient directly attributable to indoor rock climbing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The evolution of clay rock/cement interfaces in a cementitious repository for low- and intermediate level radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs

    In Switzerland, deep geological storage in clay rich host rocks is the preferred option for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. For these waste types cementitious materials are used for tunnel support and backfill, waste containers and waste matrixes. The different geochemical characteristics of clay and cementitious materials may induce mineralogical and pore water changes which might affect the barrier functionality of host rocks and concretes. We present numerical reactive transport calculations that systematically compare the geochemical evolution at cement/clay interfaces for the proposed host rocks in Switzerland for different transport scenarios. We developed a consistent set of thermodynamic data, simultaneously valid for cementitious (concrete) and clay materials. With our setup we successfully reproduced mineralogies, water contents and pore water compositions of the proposed host rocks and of a reference concrete. Our calculations show that the effects of geochemical gradients between concrete and clay materials are very similar for all investigated host rocks. The mineralogical changes at material interfaces are restricted to narrow zones for all host rocks. The extent of strong pH increase in the host rocks is limited, although a slight increase of pH over greater distances seems possible in advective transport scenarios. Our diffusive and partially also the advective calculations show massive porosity changes due to precipitation/dissolution of mineral phases near the interface, in line with many other reported transport calculations on cement/clay interactions. For all investigated transport scenarios the degradation of concrete materials in emplacement caverns due to diffusive and advective transport of clay pore water into the caverns is limited to narrow zones. A specific effort has been made to improve the geochemical setup and the extensive use of solid solution phases demonstrated the successful application of a thermodynamically

  14. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  15. Evaluation of used fuel disposition in clay-bearing rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Zheng, Liange; Kim, Kunhwi; Xu, Hao.; Rutqvist, Jonny; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Norskog, Katherine E.; Maner, James; Palaich, Sarah; Cheshire, Michael; Zavarin, Mavrik; Wolery, Thomas J.; Atkins-Duffin, Cindy; Jerden, James L.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Cruse, Terry; Ebert, William L.

    2016-09-01

    The R&D program from the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) has documented key advances in coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) modeling of clay to simulate its complex dynamic behavior in response to thermal and hydrochemical feedbacks. These efforts have been harnessed to assess the isolation performance of heat-generating nuclear waste in a deep geological repository in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations. This report describes the ongoing disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled THMC process models, hydrothermal experiments on barrier clay interactions, used fuel and canister material degradation, thermodynamic database development, and reactive transport modeling of the near-field under non-isothermal conditions. These play an important role to the evaluation of sacrificial zones as part of the EBS exposure to thermally-driven chemical and transport processes. Thermal inducement of chemical interactions at EBS domains enhances mineral dissolution/precipitation but also generates mineralogical changes that result in mineral H2O uptake/removal (hydration/dehydration reactions). These processes can result in volume changes that can affect the interface / bulk phase porosities and the mechanical (stress) state of the bentonite barrier. Characterization studies on bentonite barrier samples from the FEBEX-DP international activity have provided important insight on clay barrier microstructures (e.g., microcracks) and interactions at EBS interfaces. Enhancements to the used fuel degradation model outlines the need to include the effects of canister corrosion due the strong influence of H2 generation on the source term.

  16. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-10-14

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present.

  17. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-10-01

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present.

  18. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present. PMID:27739431

  19. Alteration minerals in impact-generated hydrothermal systems - Exploring host rock variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Kring, David A.

    2013-09-01

    Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been previously linked to the alteration of Mars’ crust and the production of secondary mineral assemblages seen from orbit. The sensitivity of the resultant assemblages has not yet been evaluated as a function of precursor primary rock compositions. In this work, we use thermochemical modeling to explore the variety of minerals that could be produced by altering several known lithologies based on martian meteorite compositions. For a basaltic host rock lithology (Dhofar 378, Humphrey) the main alteration phases are feldspar, zeolite, pyroxene, chlorite, clay (nontronite, kaolinite), and hematite; for a lherzolithic host rock lithology (LEW 88516) the main alteration phases are amphibole, serpentine, chlorite, clay (nontronite, kaolinite), and hematite; and for an ultramafic host rock lithology (Chassigny) the main minerals are secondary olivine, serpentine, magnetite, quartz, and hematite. These assemblages and proportions of phases in each of those cases depend on W/R and temperature. Integrating geologic, hydrologic and alteration mineral evidence, we have developed a model to illustrate the distribution of alteration assemblages that occur in different levels of an impact structure. At the surface, hot, hydrous alteration affects the ejecta and melt sheet producing clay and chlorite. Deeper in the subsurface and depending on the permeability of the rock, a variety of minerals - smectite, chlorite, serpentine, amphiboles and hematite - are produced in a circulating hydrothermal system. These modeled mineral distributions should assist with interpretation of orbital observations and help guide surface exploration by rovers and sample return assets.

  20. Discrete fracture hydromechanical model for the disturbed rock zone in a clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, D.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) fracture damage model, TOUGH-RBSN, to investigate the behavior of fracture generation and evolution in rock in the presence of perturbations to THM conditions. This model combines the capabilities of the TOUGH2 simulator to represent thermal-hydrological processes with a rigid-body-spring-network (RBSN) model, a type of discrete modeling, to treat geomechanical and fracture-damage processes. In particular, the development and evolution of fractures in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) of a clay rock, with application to high-level nuclear waste disposal, is a focus for this model development. Previously, the TOUGH-RBSN approach has been used to model fracture damage under tensile conditions as a result of desiccation shrinkage. The next phase of model testing will be application to the HG-A test being conducted at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. This test is being conducted in a 13-m long, 1-m diameter microtunnel in the Opalinus clay rock in which a test section at the far end of the microtunnel is isolated using a packer. The test is specifically targeted to observe how fluids injected into the test section penetrate into the rock, with particular emphasis on the EDZ. The HG-A microtunnel was excavated in 2005 and subsequent mapping of the tunnel surface shows preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts along zones where bedding planes are tangential to the tunnel wall and where faults intercept the tunnel. It appears that the EDZ fracture damage can be attributed to both tensile and shear fracturing mechanisms. A series of injection tests with water and gas have been performed which also show preferential invasion of the fluid pressure along the observed damage zones, as well as fracture self-sealing over time. The TOUGH-RBSN approach has been successfully applied to modeling fracture driven by predominately tensile loading, whereas only

  1. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Characterization of Formulations with Ornamental Rock Waste and Clays to Produce Ceramic Paver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Carlos Mauricio Fontes; Motta, Thiago Samarão; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    This work has as its objective to characterize ceramic bodies formulated with ornamental rock waste and two different clays to produce ceramic paver. Specimens were made by uniaxial press-molding at 20 MPa and then fired at 950 and 1050°C respectively. The determined technological properties were: plasticity, dry bulk density, linear shrinkage, water absorption and flexural rupture strength. The results showed that the type of the clay has strong influence on the properties of interest for heavy clay ceramics. The investigated waste must be incorporated in small amounts to avoid increasing in the porosity of the ceramics.

  3. Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

    2004-06-20

    The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

  4. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  5. Thermal impact on host rock of geologic repository; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Ching-Hua

    1986-03-01

    The initial stress of rock was estimated and analyzed based on the geological survey information collected during the site visits. Change in stress and its distribution in the rock due to excavation was investigated and predicted according to the repository geometry. Thermal effects on the magnitude and distribution of stress in rock was also investigated and predicted according to the repository geometry. Thermal effects on the magnitude and distribution of rock stresses were investigated under two different temperature conditions. Emphasis was placed on the development of fractures due to stress concentration at or near the repository openings. Permeability characteristics of host rock were evaluated at three temperature levels. Series of permeability tests were conducted for determining the thermal effect on the hydrological characteristics of rock. The following goals were achieved from this investigation: (1) Better understanding of stress changes in host rock due to repository excavation and thermal impact. (2) Better understanding of the development of rock fractures and its effect on the hydrological characteristics of host rock. (3) To provide the technical information obtained from this study to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Wastes Management (OCRWM) with a hope that it may assist OCRWM in the decision making of selecting a repository site. Due to limited time for this research, only one type of host media, granite, was included in the study.

  6. Swelling of Clay-Sulfate Rocks: A Review of Processes and Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, Christoph; Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunnel engineering, causing serious damage to tunnels and producing high additional costs during tunnel construction and operation. The swelling problem is also known from other geotechnical fields, such as road and bridge construction, and in conjunction with geothermal drillings. The planning of counter measures that would stop or minimize the swelling is extremely difficult, and it is currently impossible to predict the swelling behavior of an actual geotechnical project. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, chemical, hydraulic and mechanical controls of the swelling. This article presents a literature review of processes in swelling clay-sulfate rocks and associated controls. Numerical models that aim at simulating the processes and controls are also included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-related work in this review, the article intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling clay-sulfate rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical projects.

  7. Experimental study on the difference between gas and water permeability of clay-rich fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qingbao; Yang, Xiaosong; Chen, Jianye

    2017-04-01

    Gas permeability of clay rich rocks is generally higher than that measured with water as the pore fluid in laboratory. Besides the Klinkenberg gas slippage effect, the swelling and adsorption of clay minerals subjected to water may have strong influences (Faulkner and Rutter, 2000; Duan and Yang, 2014). To better understand the discrepancy between gas and water permeability of clay-rich fault rocks, we performed detail fluid transport property experiments on synthetic smectite-quartz, illite-quartz mixtures and natural fault gouge, as well as clay-deplete sandstones for the comparison purpose. Experiments were conducted on a fluid flow apparatus with effective pressures cycling between 5 and 105 MPa. Each sample was subject to nine pressure cycles (the first eight with nitrogen and the last one with de-ionized water as the pore fluid), along which permeability and porosity of either the dry or water-saturated samples were measured. In a few additional experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to examine the hydration state of the smectite before and after the introduction of water. Results show that permeability of all the samples investigated decreases with increasing effective pressure, following a power law relation. Gas permeabilities exhibit strong pore pressure dependence, which can be attributed to the slippage effect. Water permeabilities of the samples are generally lower than the gas results after correction, with a few exceptions for the synthetic samples (clay content ≤10%). The permeability trends observed for samples after the introduction of water can be generally explained by the evolution of sample porosity, as can be obtained from the bulk and solid phase volume measurement results. Take the smectite-quartz synthetic samples for instance. Bulk volume of the samples generally expands after water saturation and XRD results show that almost three layers of water enter the smectite interlayers (001 basal spacing expands from about 14

  8. Stress-strain relations for swelling anhydritic clay rocks – A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Simon; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunnel engineering, causing serious damage to tunnels and producing high additional costs during tunnel construction and operation. The swelling leads to geomechanical processes that may result in heave of the tunnel invert, destruction of the lining or uplift of the entire tunnel section. Heave-pressure-time relations are needed when predictions should be made about the mechanical behavior of swelling rock. For pure clay rocks, there is a linear relation between the swelling heave (strain) and the logarithm of pressure (Grob 1972). A generally accepted relation for clay-sulfate rocks, however, is still lacking to date. Therefore, finding appropriate and sustainable counter measures for an actual tunneling project affected by swelling remains extremely difficult. Grob (1972) proposed the linear relation between heave and the logarithm of pressure ("semi-logarithmic swelling law") not only for clay rocks, but also for clay-sulfate rocks. Pimentel (2007), however, presented laboratory experiments indicating that the semi-logarithmic swelling law may be inadequate for describing the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks. The laboratory tests revealed three different stages in the swelling process, including minimal deformation and prevented gypsum crystallization at high pressures (> 6 MPa); large deformation and gypsum crystallization at medium pressures; and only small deformation, possibly along with gypsum dissolution, at low pressures (< 4 MPa). He pointed at a "tri-linear" relation to describe the different stages. Kirschke (1995) generally doubts the existence of a fixed relation between swelling strain and (final) pressure. According to him, swelling pressures and their temporal development are controlled by water inflow into the rock, which cannot be reflected by general strain-stress relations. The present study critically reviews stress-strain relations for swelling anhydritic clay rocks proposed by various

  9. Mineralogical Characteristics of Carbonate Rock-Hosted Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, E.; Roh, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural weathering and human activities. The parent rocks of asbestos have been associated with ultramafic and mafic rocks, and carbonate rock. The previous studies on naturally occurring asbestos were mainly limited to ultramafic and mafic rock-hosted asbestos and studies on carbonate rock-hosted asbestos are relatively rare in South Korea. Therefore, this study was aimed to characterize mineralogy of carbonate rock-hosted NOA at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk province and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province. The rock types at the four sites are consisting mainly of Precambrian metasedimentary rock. XRD and PLM analyses showed fibrous minerals in the sites were tremolite and actinolite of acicular and columnar forms. SEM-EDS analyses showed that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite had various ratios of length and diameters over 12:1, and needle and columnar forms. A columnar forms of tremolite and actinolite were showed small acicular at the edge of the particle. Its main chemical compositions are mainly Si, O, Mg, Ca, which were identical to tremolite. Actinolite contains Fe in addition to Si, O, Mg, Ca. EPMA analyses of asbestos occurred at Muju indicated that chemical composition are 55% SiO2, 23.2% MgO, 13.1 % CaO, and 0.61 % FeO and the chemical formula calculated as (K0.01Na0.01)Ca2.01(Mg4.94Fe0.05) (Al0.004Si7.98)O22(OH)2, which is close to ideal tremolite. In addition to tremolite, actinolite was also occurred at Seosan, Chungnam. XRD analyses showed that antigorite was existed at Muju, but PLM and SEM analyses showed the antigorite was platy structure, not asbestiform. These results indicate that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite with acicular forms contains in carbonate rocks at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province South Korea.

  10. Microstructure and porosity of Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, M. E.; Laurich, B.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mont Terri rock laboratory (Canton Jura, Switzerland) is an international scientific platform of research on radioactive waste disposal in Opalinus Clay and results provide input for assessing the feasibility and safety of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in argillaceous formations [1]. A main safety issue is to accurately investigate mass transport rates. To date several methods analyzed bulk permeability and porosity of Opalinus Clay. However, detailed quantitative investigation of microstructure and pore morphology is necessary to understand sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation. To produce high quality cross-sections without microstructural damage that enable investigation of microstructure and porosity down the nm scale a combination of Broad Ion Beam (BIB) milling and SEM imaging has been used [2]. This method allowed direct imaging of the clay fabric and porosity on ca. 1 mm2 areas. The lateral variability of Opalinus Clay is low on the regional scale [1], whereas vertically the Opalinus Clay can be subdivided into six different lithological subfacies [3] based on variable silt layers, sandstone layers and siderite concretions present, where the end-members are the Shaly and Sandy facies. In this contribution microstructures and pore space in Opalinus Clay from the undisturbed Shaly and Sandy facies are studied and compared to disturbed samples from the "Main fault" within the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The Shaly facies in the lower half of the sequence constitutes of dark grey silty calcerous shales and argillaceous marls, whereas the Sandy facies comprises silty to sandy marls with sandstone lenses cemented with carbonate [3]. The qualitative mineralogical composition of all Opalinus Clay facies is similar, whereas the "Main Fault" shows calcite, celestite and pyrite veins. Although the overall microfabric differs per layer and per facies we observe low variability of microstructure and porosity in

  11. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    The ability to predict the permeability of fine-grained soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks is a fundamental challenge in the geosciences with potentially transformative implications in subsurface hydrology. In particular, fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) constitute about two-thirds of the sedimentary rock mass and play important roles in three energy technologies: petroleum geology, geologic carbon sequestration, and radioactive waste management. The problem is a challenging one that requires understanding the properties of complex natural porous media on several length scales. One inherent length scale, referred to hereafter as the mesoscale, is associated with the assemblages of large grains of quartz, feldspar, and carbonates over distances of tens of micrometers. Its importance is highlighted by the existence of a threshold in the core scale mechanical properties and regional scale energy uses of shale formations at a clay content Xclay ≈ 1/3, as predicted by an ideal packing model where a fine-grained clay matrix fills the gaps between the larger grains. A second important length scale, referred to hereafter as the nanoscale, is associated with the aggregation and swelling of clay particles (in particular, smectite clay minerals) over distances of tens of nanometers. Mesoscale phenomena that influence permeability are primarily mechanical and include, for example, the ability of contacts between large grains to prevent the compaction of the clay matrix. Nanoscale phenomena that influence permeability tend to be chemomechanical in nature, because they involve strong impacts of aqueous chemistry on clay swelling. The second length scale remains much less well characterized than the first, because of the inherent challenges associated with the study of strongly coupled nanoscale phenomena. Advanced models of the nanoscale properties of fine-grained media rely predominantly on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, a mean field

  12. Clay mineralogy of the malmian source rock of the Vienna Basin: Effects on shale gas exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, Andrea; Gier, Susanne; Herzog, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    In an unique opportunity the diagenetic changes of clay minerals of a marlstone formation with only minor differences in provenance and depositional environment was studied from shallow (1400 m) to very deep (8550 m) burial. The clay mineralogy of 46 core samples from ten wells was quantified with X-ray diffraction in applying the mineral intensity factor (MIF)-method of Moore and Reynolds (1997). The clay fraction of the marlstone contains a prominent illite/smectite (I/S) mixed-layer mineral (20 to 70 wt%), illite (20 to 70 wt%), chlorite (0.5 to 12 wt%) and kaolinite (2 to 17 wt%). The amounts of I/S and kaolinite decrease with depth, whereas illite and chlorite increase. A gradual transformation of smectite to illite through mixed-layer I/S intermediates is recognized. With increasing depth the illite content in I/S intermediates increases from 25% to 90% in parallel the ordering of the mixed layer I/S changes from R0 (25% illite in I/S) to R1 (60-80% illite in I/S) to R3 (90% illite in I/S). R3 ordering prevails at depths greater than 4000 m and implies that the effect of the expandable mineral smectite is negligible. This paper covers a part of a shale gas feasibility study on the main Vienna Basin hydrocarbon source rock (Mikulov Formation, a Malmian marlstone) recently performed by OMV. Shale gas production usually is enabled by pumping fluids (mainly water) into a gas-mature source rock in order to generate fracture permeability. Expandable clays within the source rock can dramatically reduce stimulation effectiveness and gas production. Moore and Reynolds (1997) X-ray diffraction and the identification and analysis of clay minerals. Oxford University Press, New York, 378 p.

  13. Dielectric relaxation behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock: A hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Bore, Thierry; Robinet, Jean-Charles; Coelho, Daniel; Taillade, Frederic; Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    Water content is a key parameter to monitor in nuclear waste repositories such as the planed underground repository in Bure, France, in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay formation. High-frequency electromagnetic (HF-EM) measurement techniques, i.e., time or frequency domain reflectometry, offer useful tools for quantitative estimation of water content in porous media. However, despite the efficiency of HF-EM methods, the relationship between water content and dielectric material properties needs to be characterized. Moreover, the high amount of swelling clay in the COx clay leads to dielectric relaxation effects which induce strong dispersion coupled with high absorption of EM waves. Against this background, the dielectric relaxation behavior of the clay rock was studied at frequencies from 1 MHz to 10 GHz with network analyzer technique in combination with coaxial transmission line cells. For this purpose, undisturbed and disturbed clay rock samples were conditioned to achieve a water saturation range from 0.16 to nearly saturation. The relaxation behavior was quantified based on a generalized fractional relaxation model under consideration of an apparent direct current conductivity assuming three relaxation processes: a high-frequency water process and two interface processes which are related to interactions between the aqueous pore solution and mineral particles (adsorbed/hydrated water relaxation, counter ion relaxation and Maxwell-Wagner effects). The frequency-dependent HF-EM properties were further modeled based on a novel hydraulic-mechanical-electromagnetic coupling approach developed for soils. The results show the potential of HF-EM techniques for quantitative monitoring of the hydraulic state in underground repositories in clay formations.

  14. Adsorption and retarded diffusion of EuIII-EDTA- through hard clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descostes, Michael; Pointeau, Ingmar; Radwan, Jean; Poonoosamy, Jenna; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Menut, Denis; Vercouter, Thomas; Dagnelie, Romain V. H.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption and diffusion experiments of EuIII were performed in Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock in the presence of EDTA. The predictive model based on binary system parameters (Eu/COx and EDTA/COx) was in good agreement with the results for the Eu/EDTA/COx ternary system. At low EDTA concentrations, the behaviour of EuIII was mainly driven by Eu3+adsorption and complexation by carbonates and EDTA. At higher EDTA concentrations, the behaviour of EuIII was driven by the adsorption of [EuIII-EDTA]- anions. Europium was then used as a probe to estimate the transport of EDTA. Three through-diffusion experiments of EDTA were compared with 14C, Eu and 152Eu tracers. EuIII-EDTA was not quantitatively dissociated by diffusion through the rock. The effective diffusion coefficients quantified De(EuIII-EDTA) = 1.5-1.7 · 1012 m2 s-1 were an order of magnitude lower than that of water, evidencing the anionic exclusion of [EuIII-EDTA]- within the clay rock. Break-through curves and diffusion profiles confirmed retardation due to significant adsorption on the clay rock (Rd(EuIII-EDTA) ∼ 6-14 L kg-1) in comparison with inorganic anions. However, the model based on batch adsorption measurements failed to predict the diffusion results. All experiments displayed an early break-through of EDTA complexes. This behaviour contrasted with results on iron oxides rich sediments, which usually led to higher retardation than expected from the batch studies.

  15. Crustal thickening and clay: Controls on O isotope variation in global magmatism and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Justin L.; Hand, Martin; Pearson, Norman J.; Barovich, Karin M.; McInerney, David J.

    2015-02-01

    New compilations of global O isotope data from zircon and siliciclastic sedimentary rocks highlight an increasing range in δ18O values in both systems since the late Archean. This is consistent with an increased clay component in sedimentary rocks and subsequent incorporation into igneous rocks. Each of these factors can arguably be achieved by increased crustal thickening in the late Archean resulting in greater burial and melting of supracrustal rocks and increased chemical weathering and recycling of upper crustal rocks. Despite the suggested change in tectonic regimes in the late Archean, stochastic modelling in this study demonstrates that δ18O data do not provide evidence for a secular decrease in the proportion of mantle-derived magmas in granitoid rocks. Instead, best-fit models indicate that juvenile input and reworking of supracrustal material vary with respect to the short term (100-200 Myr) tectonic cycles preserved in the continental crust. Hence, major step changes in global tectonic regimes in the post-Hadean, such as the initiation of subduction in the mid- to late Archean, are not supported by global zircon O isotope datasets and instead minor, progressive changes are indicated for Earth's tectonic regimes.

  16. Benchmarking PET for geoscientific applications: 3D quantitative diffusion coefficient determination in clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann-Pipke, J.; Gerasch, R.; Schikora, J.; Kulenkampff, J.

    2017-04-01

    The 3D diagonal anisotropic effective diffusion coefficient of Na+, Deff=(Dxx, Dyy, Dzz), was quantified in a clay material in one single experiment/simulation. That is possible due to the combination of the non-invasive observation of Na+ diffusion in Opalinus clay by means of GeoPET method (PET: positron emission tomography) followed by quantitative 3D+t data evaluation by means of the finite element numerical modelling (FEM). The extracted anisotropic effective diffusion coefficient parallel (||) and normal (⊥) to the bedding of the clay rock, Deff=(D||, D⊥, D||) are comparable to those obtained on earlier experimental studies in the same clay material but with different methods. We consider this study as benchmark for the long-standing development of our GeoPET method, that explicitly includes a resolute and physics based attenuation and Compton scatter correction algorithm (Kulenkampff, J., M. Gründig, A. Zakhnini and J. Lippmann-Pipke (2016). "Geoscientific process monitoring with positron emission tomography (GeoPET)." Solid Earth 7: 1217-1231). We suggest GeoPET based fluid flow transport visualization combined with computer based process simulation henceforth as a qualified way for the quantification of three-dimensional, effective transport parameters in geosciences.

  17. A constitutive law for thermo-plastic behaviour of rocks: An analogy with clays

    SciTech Connect

    Hueckel, T.; Peano, A.; Pellegrini, R.

    1994-09-01

    Thermo-mechanical behaviour of rocks shows phenomenological similarities to that of clays. A visible decrease of strength and an increase in ductility at elevated temperatures are observed in drained conditions. In undrained conditions the strength decrease is even more dramatic and the ductile behaviour may turn into the brittle one, if a sufficient amount of water is present in the pores at the start of the process, or it is being released during heating by the decomposition of hydrous minerals. Applying a thermo-plasticity theory, major macroscopical characteristics of behaviour may be modelled. According to this theory, the elastic domain is postulated as temperature dependent, shrinking with temperature; heating may result in expansive or compactive volumetric irreversible strain depending on the confining stress. This theory is applied to the modelling of heat effects on local changes of permeability around a cylindrical nuclear waste container disposed off in deep clays, and in the numerical simulation of a mechanism initiating deep earthquakes.

  18. Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks and groundwater flow in tunnel engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, C.; Huggenberger, P.

    2009-12-01

    The governing goal of the presented study is to contribute to a better understanding of the complex coupled hydromechanical and geochemical processes that occur during rock swelling in clay-sulfate rocks. The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks, which produces major difficulties and high additional costs during tunnel construction and maintenance, is a well known threat in tunneling (Einstein, 1996). This threat is mostly counteracted on an engineering, technical level by constructive measures (Anagnostou, 2007). However, the processes which trigger these phenomena are at present far from being comprehensively understood. In this study, we aim to introduce a novel approach to this problem. We assume that groundwater circulation plays a major role in understanding the involved processes, and that changes in groundwater flow patterns induced by the tunnel excavation are responsible for the swelling phenomena. Generally, the swelling is caused by the transformation of anhydrite into gypsum under water uptake (hydration of anhydrite), entailing a 60% volume increase. However, the transformation takes place not in a direct, but in an indirect way, making a detour via anhydrite solution, transport of the solutes with groundwater flow, and precipitation at a different place. For this reason, the dynamics of groundwater flow in particular was taken into consideration in this study. The study is part of a project carried out at the Chienberg road tunnel in Switzerland (Huggenberger and Butscher, 2008). In this tunnel, swelling phenomena associated with heave of the tunnel invert and at the surface were observed during construction at two sections comprising clay-sulfate rocks. The study was designed to investigate the regional and local groundwater circulation systems and to link them to the observed swelling. In particular, the role of the topographic and geological framework (Tóth, 1995), the effects of heterogeneity and anisotropy, as well as scale effects were investigated

  19. Integrated hydrogeological and geochemical processes in swelling clay-sulfate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Daniel; Butscher, Christoph; Blum, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a well-known problem in tunnel engineering where it poses a severe threat to important infrastructure. However, recently it was also encountered in an entirely different setting: The inaccurate implementation of geothermal installations in the town Staufen, Germany, led to water inflow into clay-sulfate rocks, resulting in heavy swelling. The swelling caused uplift rates of the ground surface exceeding 1 cm month-1, and severely damaged over 250 houses. The underlying processes of clay-sulfate rock swelling are complex and not yet sufficiently understood. In particular, hydraulic and geochemical processes in the zone of swelling are difficult to assess and the additional impact of constructional measures, such as borehole drilling, remains mostly unknown. The transformation of anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water influx is considered to be the main mechanism contributing to the swelling process, leading to an increase in volume of up to 60 %. This transformation process is decoupled: Anhydrite is dissolved and the pore-water concentration of sulfate increases; the dissolved sulfate may be transported with groundwater flow and finally precipitates as gypsum. Hence, groundwater flow and geochemistry of the pore-water play an essential role in the swelling processes. In fact, the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is likely initiated by a change in geochemistry brought about by a change in hydraulic conditions. Thus, the main objective of this project is to quantify groundwater flux and geochemical reactions within swelling zones influenced by engineering activities, such as geothermal drillings. Additionally, reaction rates of anhydrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation at the field scale are to be compared with reaction rates determined in laboratory experiments. This study investigates the significance of (1) the local geological setting, (2) hydrology and geochemistry of the swelling zone and (3) their modification upon

  20. The effect of very low water content on the complex dielectric permittivity of clays, sand-clay and sand rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, T. A.; Bobrov, P. P.; Kroshka, E. S.; Lapina, A. S.; Rodionova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of measurements of complex relative permittivity of bentonite and clayey sandstone with different degrees of salinity with low moisture are given in the range of temperatures -20° to  +105 °C at frequencies from 25 Hz to 1 GHz. It is shown, that even a small amount of water in sandy and sandy-argillaceous rocks causes an increase of the real part of complex relative permittivity at frequencies below 100 Hz. The explanation by linearly-broken dependence of refractive index on moisture is given at its small values. By a dielectric method it is shown that in the process of water film formation on the surface of a mineral, the water molecules binding energy changes. Big distinctions in low-frequency dielectric relaxation times testify to the change of binding energy of molecules of water on the surface of a mineral. Also dependences of relaxation times on temperature are various. The results of dielectric measurements showed a strong influence of the salt on the dielectric permittivity of the clay and clayey sandstone even at a low moisture level.

  1. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Al, T; Mazurek, M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I(-)) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax=12MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I(-) tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (±12%) suggesting that, for

  2. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Y.; Al, T.; Mazurek, M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I-) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4 MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23 MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax = 12 MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15 MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4 MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4 MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15 MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I- tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (± 12%) suggesting that, for

  3. Geological modeling of a fault zone in clay rocks at the Mont-Terri laboratory (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakurina, M.; Guglielmi, Y.; Nussbaum, C.; Valley, B.

    2016-12-01

    Clay-rich formations are considered to be a natural barrier for radionuclides or fluids (water, hydrocarbons, CO2) migration. However, little is known about the architecture of faults affecting clay formations because of their quick alteration at the Earth's surface. The Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory provides exceptional conditions to investigate an un-weathered, perfectly exposed clay fault zone architecture and to conduct fault activation experiments that allow explore the conditions for stability of such clay faults. Here we show first results from a detailed geological model of the Mont Terri Main Fault architecture, using GoCad software, a detailed structural analysis of 6 fully cored and logged 30-to-50m long and 3-to-15m spaced boreholes crossing the fault zone. These high-definition geological data were acquired within the Fault Slip (FS) experiment project that consisted in fluid injections in different intervals within the fault using the SIMFIP probe to explore the conditions for the fault mechanical and seismic stability. The Mont Terri Main Fault "core" consists of a thrust zone about 0.8 to 3m wide that is bounded by two major fault planes. Between these planes, there is an assembly of distinct slickensided surfaces and various facies including scaly clays, fault gouge and fractured zones. Scaly clay including S-C bands and microfolds occurs in larger zones at top and bottom of the Mail Fault. A cm-thin layer of gouge, that is known to accommodate high strain parts, runs along the upper fault zone boundary. The non-scaly part mainly consists of undeformed rock block, bounded by slickensides. Such a complexity as well as the continuity of the two major surfaces are hard to correlate between the different boreholes even with the high density of geological data within the relatively small volume of the experiment. This may show that a poor strain localization occurred during faulting giving some perspectives about the potential for

  4. Properties of Clay for Ceramics with Rock Waste for Production Structural Block by Pressing and Firing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, N. A.; Choe, D.; Alexandre, J.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Xavier, C. G.; Souza, V. B.

    Building work requires optimization of materials and labor, so that the execution of its subsystems contribute to the quality, reduce costs, decrease waste in buildings, productivity, practicality and especially agility. Thus, the fitting blocks can contribute in this direction. This work therefore consists of physical characterization (determination of fitness levels, grain size and bulk density), chemical (EDX) and thermal (DTA and TGA) sample clay Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ and waste rock ornamental Cachoeiro de Itapemirim-ES, to verify potential for producing red ceramic blocks, pressed and burned, male and female type. The output of block will be with different pe rcentages of incorporation of residues of ornamental rocks (0%, 5% and 10%). With the results obtained, it was found that the raw materials under consideration has the potential for application in the production of ceramic articles.

  5. Environmental rock-magnetism of Cenozoic red clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, Takaya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-01

    Nonfossiliferous red clay can be used for elucidating long-range environmental changes, although such studies were limited so far because of the difficulty in precise age estimation and extremely low sedimentation rates. We conducted an environmental rock-magnetic study of Cenozoic red clay at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1365 in the South Pacific Gyre. Magnetostratigraphy could be established only above ˜6 m below the seafloor (mbsf) (˜5 Ma). Below ˜6 mbsf, the ages of the cores were transferred from the published ages of nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 596, which is based mainly on a constant Cobalt flux model, by intercore correlation using magnetic susceptibility and rare earth element content variation patterns. Rock-magnetic analyses including first-order reversal curve diagrams, the ratio of anhysteretic remanent magnetization susceptibility to saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), and IRM component analyses revealed that magnetic minerals consist mainly of biogenic magnetite and terrigenous maghemite, and that the proportion of the terrigenous component increased since ˜23 Ma. We consider that the increase reflects a growth of eolian dust flux associated with a northward shift of Australia and the site to an arid region of the middle latitudes. The increase of the terrigenous component accelerated after ˜5 Ma, which may be associated with a further growth of the Antarctic glaciation at that time. This is coeval with the onset of the preservation of magnetostratigraphy, suggesting that the primary remanent magnetization is carried by the terrigenous component.

  6. DRIFT spectroscopic study of diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingli; Cai, Jingong; Song, Guoqi; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-09-05

    Thermo diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to study the diagenetic organic-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, China. The results indicated that aliphatic organic matter (OM) represented the most prominent organic functional groups in the spectra, with two CH2 stretching vibrations at approximately 2926 cm(-1) and 2852 cm(-1). The peak areas of these vibrations correlated well with the amount of total organic carbon (TOC), indicating that the OM evolution may be represented by the variation in CH2 with depth. Infrared spectra obtained from samples that were heated to 105 °C, 250 °C and 550 °C suggest that the aliphatic OM consists of two fractions: combined OM and free OM. The former was more stable between 250 °C and 550 °C. This phenomenon was correlated with the H2O stretching vibration near 3300 cm(-1), indicating that this OM was bonded to the clay via H2O bridges. The location of the broad H2O stretching band gradually shifted with depth from 3298 cm(-1) to a higher wavenumber of 3305 cm(-1), whereas the corresponding bending band shifted rapidly from 1640 cm(-1) to 1605 cm(-1), indicating a weakening of the hydrogen bond and a decrease in the combined OM fraction. The correlation between the diagenetic smectite illitization and the decrease in the amount of combined OM leads to the conclusion that the smectite illitization may be a driving force for the OM desorption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the thermo-DRIFT approach for exploring diagenetic OM-clay interactions in argillaceous source rocks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A preliminary reactive transport approach to quantify swelling of clay-sulfate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, D.; Prommer, H.; Blum, P.; Butscher, C.; Siade, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The processes underlying the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks are complex and have been the subject of numerous previous investigations. In general, the transformation of anhydrite into gypsum is considered the main mechanism of swelling, a process that is likely initiated by a change in hydraulic conditions, followed by influx of water and a change in geochemistry. Furthermore, it is accompanied by a volume increase of 61 % and a heat production of 28 kJ/mol. However, hydraulic and geochemical processes in the swelling zone, typically induced by construction measures such as borehole drillings, remain difficult to assess. In this study a numerical model was developed and applied to a site in Staufen, Germany, where significant swelling occurred in clay-sulfate rocks as a result of geothermal drillings. We used a field-scale dual-domain reactive transport modeling approach to investigate and quantify the importance of groundwater influx and geochemical reactions within the swelling zone. The observed swelling process was conceptualized through (i) a mobile domain that accounts for water flux and solute transport along preferential flow paths (PFP); and (ii) an immobile `reactive' domain considering the rate-limited transformation of anhydrite into gypsum. The model development was constrained by geodesic heave measurements at the ground surface as well as vertical temperature profiles. Both data types could be related to the predicted increase in rock volume and release of heat caused by the exothermal reaction, respectively. Compared to reported reaction rates of anhydrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation determined in laboratory experiments, our calibrated model yields considerably lower effective reaction rates. It was found that transport by PFP as well as the mass transfer between domains and therefore water availability impose a strong control on the magnitude and spatial extent of the simulated swelling process.

  8. Analyses of geochemical samples and descriptions of rock samples, Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas, Clay County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, M.S.; Hanley, J.T.; Kelley, D.L.; Sherlock, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative spectrographic analyses for 31 elements on 105 rocks, 47 stream-sediment, and 70 soil samples from the Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas and vicinity, Talladega National Forest, Clay County, Alabama are reported here in detail. Atomic-absorption analyses for zinc in all samples and for gold in 5 selected rock samples are also reported. Localities for all sables are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. A brief description of each rock sample is included. Rocks analyzed include quartzite, phyllite, vein quartz, and schist.

  9. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  10. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    characterized by increased fracture densities and higher percentages of fractures with large apertures. In the Upper Rhine Graben (2) damage zones in Muschelkalk limestones (Middle Triassic) are well developed even in fault zones with dm-scale displacements. Their fault cores, however, are narrow compared with that of fault zones with larger displacements and comprise brecciated material, clay smear, host rock lenses or zones of mineralization. Fracture apertures are larger parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike. A large fault zone footwall in Triassic Bunter sandstone shows a clearly developed fault core with fault gouge, slip zones, deformation bands and host rock lenses, a distal fault core with disturbed layering and high fracture density and a damage zone with increased fracture density compared with the host rock. In the study areas of palaeogeothermal fields in the Bristol Channel (3), all the mineral veins are clearly related to the faults and occur almost exclusively in the damage zones, indicating that geothermal water was transported along the then-active faults into the host rocks. Field measurements indicate that in all the localities, a large majority of the fractures in the fault damage zones are extension fractures, fewer are shear fractures. In the Jurassic Blue Lias there is evidence that the veins were injected as hydrofractures from fault planes into the limestone layers. In the Triassic Mercia Mudstone most veins were arrested during their propagation by layers with contrasting mechanical properties (stress barriers). Some veins, however, propagated through the barriers along faults to shallower levels. Our studies contribute to understanding and modelling of hydromechanical behaviour of fault zones and fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. For successful exploration and exploitation, fault zones must be studied in detail regarding their likely internal structure, fracture parameters and orientation in relation to the current stress field. We show

  11. Evolution of organo-clay composites with respect to thermal maturity in type II organic-rich source rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthonneau, Jeremie; Grauby, Olivier; Abuhaikal, Muhannad; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Ulm, Franz J.; Van Damme, Henri

    2016-12-01

    Among the proposed pathways of sequestration and progressive transformation of organic matter (OM) during burial, the sorptive protection mechanism explains the strong relationship between total organic carbon (TOC) and mineral surface area (MSA) noted in numerous black shales around the globe. The complete mechanistic framework of preservation and evolution of OM in organo-mineral complexes remains, however, an enigma. On one hand, smectite layers composing the clay fraction are known to have a major influence on available surface area. OM maturation occurs, on the other hand, concurrently with the smectite illitization that provokes the closure of the interlayer spaces. The potential of smectite layers in the sequestration and preservation of organic molecules and the fate of these molecules with respect to the smectite illitization were therefore addressed. Here, the mineralogy of three organic-rich source rocks of various maturities was characterized in regards with the geochemistry of their OM. A thorough examination of the clay minerals present in the clay matrices provided evidences of mixed layer minerals containing smectite and illite layers with an increasing illite component with respect to maturity. The comprehensive interpretation of the X-ray diffractograms and analytical electron microscopy results suggested the presence of organic molecules in the inter-particulate and possibly the interlayer spaces of the smectite-rich components in immature source rocks. This eventuality was further supported by the presence of intercalated clay-organic nanocomposites observed by transmitted electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Textural observations also showed that the increased illite content found in the overmature sample led to the reorganization of the OM and the clay particles into nano-scale aggregates. These results clarify the geochemical mechanism beyond the reported relationship between TOC and MSA and allow generalizing it

  12. Interpretation of K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks aided by modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Srodon, J.; Clauer, Norbert; Eberl, D.D.D.

    2002-01-01

    K-Ar dates of illitic clays from sedimentary rocks may contain "mixed ages," i.e., may have ages that are intermediate between the ages of end-member events. Two phenomena that may cause mixed ages are: (1) long-lasting reaction during the burial illitization of smectite: and (2) physical mixing of detrital and diagenetic components. The first phenomenon was investigated by simulation of illitization reactions using a nucleation and growth mechanism. These calculations indicate that values for mixed ages are related to burial history: for an equivalent length of reaction time, fast burial followed by slow burial produces much older mixed ages than slow burial followed by fast. The type of reaction that occured in a rock can be determined from the distribution of ages with respect to the thickness of illite crystals. Dating of artificial mixtures confirms a non-linear relation between mixed ages and the proportions of the components. Vertical variation of K-Ar age dates from Gulf Coast shales can be modeled by assuming diagenetic illitization that overprints a subtle vertical trend (presumably of sedimentary origin) in detrital mineral content.

  13. Lithium, a preliminary survey of its mineral occurrence in flint clay and related rock types in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourtelot, H.A.; Brenner-Tourtelot, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    Maximum concentrations of lithium found in samples of flint clay and associated rocks of Pennsylvanian age in different States, in parts per million (ppm), are: Missouri, 5100; Pennsylvania-Maryland, 2100; Kentucky, 890; Ohio, 660; Alabama, 750; and Illinois, 160. Lithium-bearing kaolin deposits are distributed in the Coastal Plain province from New Jersey to Texas, and one occurs in Idaho; maximum lithium concentrations in samples from these deposits range from 64 to 180 ppm. The maximum concentration found in the Arkansas bauxite region is 460 ppm and that in flint clay in Colorado is 370 ppm. Samples from areas other than Pennsylvania, Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri are relatively few in number, represent mostly commercially valuable clays, and represent only a part of the refractory clay deposits in the United States. Data are not available on the clays associated with these deposits that may be unusable because they contain too much lithium as well as other deleterious elements. In both Pennsylvania and Missouri, lithium contents vary regionally between districts and locally between deposits. In samples containing more than 2000 ppm lithium, the lithium occurs in a dioctahedral chlorite mineral very similar to cookeite, which previously has not been recognized in sedimentary clays. The associated clays consist chiefly of well-crystallized kaolinite. The dioctahedral chlorite, however, seems to be most abundant where diaspore and boehmite occur along with the kaolinite. Barium, chromium, copper, phosphorus and strontium are present in some samples in amounts of several hundred pans per million or more, and may contribute to the failure of some clays to perform satisfactorily in firing tests. Lithium-rich clays could serve as a significant lithium resource in the very distant future. Clays that contain as much as 1% lithium may be common enough in Missouri or in Pennsylvania to be produced as a by-product to help support benefication costs for refractory clays

  14. Host-Parasite Interactions and Population Dynamics of Rock Ptarmigan.

    PubMed

    Stenkewitz, Ute; Nielsen, Ólafur K; Skírnisson, Karl; Stefánsson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Populations of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) in Iceland fluctuate in multiannual cycles with peak numbers c. every 10 years. We studied the ptarmigan-parasite community and how parasites relate to ptarmigan age, body condition, and population density. We collected 632 ptarmigan in northeast Iceland in early October from 2006 to 2012; 630 (99.7%) were infected with at least one parasite species, 616 (98%) with ectoparasites, and 536 (85%) with endoparasites. We analysed indices for the combined parasite community (16 species) and known pathogenic parasites, two coccidian protozoans Eimeria muta and Eimeria rjupa, two nematodes Capillaria caudinflata and Trichostrongylus tenuis, one chewing louse Amyrsidea lagopi, and one skin mite Metamicrolichus islandicus. Juveniles overall had more ectoparasites than adults, but endoparasite levels were similar in both groups. Ptarmigan population density was associated with endoparasites, and in particular prevalence of the coccidian parasite Eimeria muta. Annual aggregation level of this eimerid fluctuated inversely with prevalence, with lows at prevalence peak and vice versa. Both prevalence and aggregation of E. muta tracked ptarmigan population density with a 1.5 year time lag. The time lag could be explained by the host specificity of this eimerid, host density dependent shedding of oocysts, and their persistence in the environment from one year to the next. Ptarmigan body condition was negatively associated with E. muta prevalence, an indication of their pathogenicity, and this eimerid was also positively associated with ptarmigan mortality and marginally inversely with fecundity. There were also significant associations between fecundity and chewing louse Amyrsidea lagopi prevalence (negative), excess juvenile mortality and nematode Capillaria caudinflata prevalence (positive), and adult mortality and skin mite Metamicrolichus islandicus prevalence (negative). Though this study is correlational, it provides strong

  15. Host-Parasite Interactions and Population Dynamics of Rock Ptarmigan

    PubMed Central

    Stenkewitz, Ute; Nielsen, Ólafur K.; Skírnisson, Karl; Stefánsson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Populations of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) in Iceland fluctuate in multiannual cycles with peak numbers c. every 10 years. We studied the ptarmigan-parasite community and how parasites relate to ptarmigan age, body condition, and population density. We collected 632 ptarmigan in northeast Iceland in early October from 2006 to 2012; 630 (99.7%) were infected with at least one parasite species, 616 (98%) with ectoparasites, and 536 (85%) with endoparasites. We analysed indices for the combined parasite community (16 species) and known pathogenic parasites, two coccidian protozoans Eimeria muta and Eimeria rjupa, two nematodes Capillaria caudinflata and Trichostrongylus tenuis, one chewing louse Amyrsidea lagopi, and one skin mite Metamicrolichus islandicus. Juveniles overall had more ectoparasites than adults, but endoparasite levels were similar in both groups. Ptarmigan population density was associated with endoparasites, and in particular prevalence of the coccidian parasite Eimeria muta. Annual aggregation level of this eimerid fluctuated inversely with prevalence, with lows at prevalence peak and vice versa. Both prevalence and aggregation of E. muta tracked ptarmigan population density with a 1.5 year time lag. The time lag could be explained by the host specificity of this eimerid, host density dependent shedding of oocysts, and their persistence in the environment from one year to the next. Ptarmigan body condition was negatively associated with E. muta prevalence, an indication of their pathogenicity, and this eimerid was also positively associated with ptarmigan mortality and marginally inversely with fecundity. There were also significant associations between fecundity and chewing louse Amyrsidea lagopi prevalence (negative), excess juvenile mortality and nematode Capillaria caudinflata prevalence (positive), and adult mortality and skin mite Metamicrolichus islandicus prevalence (negative). Though this study is correlational, it provides strong

  16. Reactive transport modeling to quantify swelling of clay-sulfate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Daniel; Prommer, Henning; Blum, Philipp; Siade, Adam J.; Butscher, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The processes underlying the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks are complex and have been the subject of numerous previous investigations. In general, the transformation of anhydrite into gypsum, which is accompanied by a volume increase of 61 %, is considered the main mechanism of swelling. The process is typically initiated by a change in hydraulic conditions, followed by influx of water and a change in geochemistry. However, hydraulic and geochemical changes in the swelling zone, which may be induced by construction measures and borehole drillings, remain difficult to assess. In this study, a numerical reactive transport model was developed for a study site in SW-Germany, where geothermal drillings led to significant swelling in clay-sulfate rocks, heaves at the ground surface and large damage of houses. A dual-domain reactive transport modeling approach was employed to investigate and quantify the importance of groundwater influx and geochemical reactions within the swelling zone. The observed swelling process was conceptualized through (i) a mobile domain that accounts for water flux and solute transport along preferential flow paths (PFP); and (ii) an immobile 'reactive' domain considering the rate-limited transformation of anhydrite into gypsum. The model was calibrated by optimizing adjustable model parameters until the calculated volume changes that result from the simulated transformation of anhydrite into gypsum agreed with geodesic heave measurements at the ground surface. The calibrated model is capable of closely replicating the heave measurements that were taken prior to the mitigation measures that were implemented at the site. The reaction rate constants for anhydrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation that were determined during the model calibration were, not unexpectedly, lower than the corresponding constants reported from laboratory experiments. It was found that transport by PFP as well as the mass transfer between the mobile and immobile

  17. Geochemical evaluation of different groundwater-host rock systems for radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Metz, V; Kienzler, B; Schüssler, W

    2003-03-01

    The geochemical suitability of a deep bedrock repository for radioactive waste disposal is determined by the composition of geomatrix and groundwater. Both influence radionuclide solubility, chemical buffer capacity and radionuclide retention. They also determine the chemical compatibility of waste forms, containers and backfill materials. Evaluation of different groundwater-host rock systems is performed by modeling the geochemical environments and the resulting radionuclide concentrations. In order to demonstrate the evaluation method, model calculations are applied to data sets available for various geological formations such as granite, clay and rocksalt. The saturation state of the groundwater-geomatrix system is found to be fundamental for the evaluation process. Hence, calculations are performed to determine if groundwater is in equilibrium with mineral phases of the geological formation. In addition, corrosion of waste forms in different groundwater is examined by means of reaction path modeling. The corrosion reactions change the solution compositions and pH, resulting in significant changes of radionuclide solubilities. The results demonstrate that geochemical modeling of saturation state and compatibility of the host formation environment with the radioactive waste proves to be a feasible tool for evaluation of various sites considered as deep underground repositories. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Diffusive transport and reaction in clay rocks: A storage (nuclear waste, CO2, H2), energy (shale gas) and water quality issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, Laurent; Alt-Epping, Peter; Wersin, Paul; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Clay rocks are low permeability sedimentary formations that provide records of Earth history, influence the quality of water resources, and that are increasingly used for the extraction or storage of energy resources and the sequestration of waste materials. Informed use of clay rock formations to achieve low-carbon or carbon-free energy goals requires the ability to predict the rates of diffusive transport processes for chemically diverse dissolved and gaseous species over periods up to thousands of years. We survey the composition, properties and uses of clay rock and summarize fundamental science challenges in developing confident conceptual and quantitative gas and solute transport models.

  19. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  20. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  1. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Modeling of Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes for Bentonite in a Clay-rock Repository for Heat-generating Nuclear Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Rutqvist, J.; Zheng, L.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) that include a bentonite-based buffer are designed to isolate the high-level radioactive waste emplaced in tunnels in deep geological formations. The heat emanated from the waste can drive the moisture flow transport and induce strongly coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes within the bentonite buffer and may also impact the evolution of the excavation disturbed zone and the sealing between the buffer and walls of an emplacement tunnel The flow and contaminant transport potential along the disturbed zone can be minimized by backfilling the tunnels with bentonite, if it provides enough swelling stress when hydrated by the host rock. The swelling capability of clay minerals within the bentonite is important for sealing gaps between bentonite block, and between the EBS and the surrounding host rock. However, a high temperature could result in chemical alteration of bentonite-based buffer and backfill materials through illitization, which may compromise the function of these EBS components by reducing their plasticity and capability to swell under wetting. Therefore, an adequate THMC coupling scheme is required to understand and to predict the changes of bentonite for identifying whether EBS bentonite can sustain higher temperatures. More comprehensive links between chemistry and mechanics, taking advantage of the framework provided by a dual-structure model, named Barcelona Expansive Model (BExM), was implemented in TOUGHREACT-FLAC3D and is used to simulate the response of EBS bentonite in in clay formation for a generic case. The current work is to evaluate the chemical changes in EBS bentonite and the effects on the bentonite swelling stress under high temperature. This work sheds light on the interaction between THMC processes, evaluates the potential deterioration of EBS bentonite and supports the decision making in the design of a nuclear waste repository in light of the maximum allowance

  3. Fluid-rock interaction controlling clay-mineral crystallization in quartz-rich rocks and its influence on the seismicity of the Carboneras fault area (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Espinosa, R.; Abad, I.; Jimenez-Millan, J.; Lorite-Herrera, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Carboneras Fault zone is one of the longest fault in the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) and it would be a good candidate to generate large magnitude earthquakes (Gracia et al., 2006). Seismicity in the region is characterised by low to moderate magnitude events, although large destructive earthquakes have occurred, which reveals significant earthquake and tsunami hazards (Masana et al., 2004). Due to the internal architecture of the fault zone, shear lenses of post-orogenic sediments of Miocene and Pliocene age including marls and sandstones sequences are juxtaposed to the predominant slaty gouges of the Alpine basement. Microcataclasites and gouges of the quartz-rich post-orogenic sediments are also developed as cm- to m-scale bands, allowing the comparison between the deformed materials and their protoliths. Red, yellow and white sandstones and their respective cataclasites can be identified. This communication is concerned with the clay mineral crystallization events in these materials and its possible influence on the seismicity model of the region. The presence of phyllosilicates in fault zones as either neoformed or inherited clays is commonly related with fluid circulation and a mechanically weak fault behaviour (e.g., Wang, 1984). A critical factor for the understanding of the mechanical role of clays in fault rocks is to determine the timing of formation of mineral assemblages and microstructure of fault rocks and protolith. The effects of post-faulting alteration limit inferences about fault behaviour that can be made from exhumed rocks. The Carboneras fault zone provides good opportunities to study mineral processes enhanced by deformation, given that it is located in a region of arid climate and shows outcroppings of quartzitic rocks included in slaty rocks. Combined XRD, optical microscopy and SEM analyses reveal that deformed quartzitic rocks are enriched in phyllosilicates, increasing especially the amount of chlorite. The samples strongly damaged

  4. Effect of Clay Nanoparticle Transport, Desorption Kinetics and Redox Equilibrium on Radionuclide Mobility in Fractured Rock investigated at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Huber, F. M.; Lagos, M.; Quinto, F.; Heck, S.; Martin, A. J.; Blechschmidt, I.; Lanyon, G. W.; Reiche, T.; Noseck, U.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of contaminants in crystalline environments might occur through dissolved species or attached to colloidal or nanoparticulate phases being mobile in water conducting features of the host rock. In this presentation we will discuss the mobility of clay nanoparticles as detected by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) as a function of fracture surface roughness and groundwater chemistry. The on site observed Tc-99, U-233, Np-237, Pu-242 and Am-243 sorption/desorption kinetics with and without natural or synthetic clay minerals (smectites) are compared to laboratory studies under similar groundwater conditions. The desorption or redox kinetics were monitored over a duration of up to 426 days using natural fracture filling material as a concurrence ligand and monitoring the colloid attachment via detection of Al, Si, Ni and Zn as smectite structural elements. For trivalent actinides smectite desorption rates in the range of 1.2-3.7E-3 per hour could be determined and significantly lower desorption rates for tetravalent actinides were found. This results will be compared with field data of migration experiments performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, Switzerland) using the same radionuclides and clay colloidal phases varying the fracture residence time by flow rate adjustment. Furthermore, the long-term actinide mobility will be addressed by presenting AMS/RIMS measurements of (a) samples collected several months into the tailing of the breakthrough curves not any longer detectable by HR-ICP-MS and (b) background samples of different GTS ground waters showing fallout U-236, whereas fallout Pu could not be detected indicating a much lower mobility under the given conditions.

  5. Block Slides on Extremely Weak Tectonic Clay Seams in Openly Folded Tertiary Mud-Rocks at Auckland and the Rangitikei Valley, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prebble, Warwick M.; Williams, Ann L.

    2016-06-01

    Block slides have developed on extremely weak, thin clay seams of tectonic origin, parallel to bedding in gently dipping sandstones and mudstones of Tertiary age. Two areas of noted instability are investigated at Auckland and the Rangitikei valley. Dimensions range from 100 m across × 100 m long for short displacement block slides up to 4 km across × 3 km long for large landslide complexes in which block slides are a major component. Displacements of blocks range from incipient (cm) through short (30 m) to 2 or 3 km for large slides. Many of the Auckland slides are dormant but likely to move in a 2000 year return period earthquake or 100 year high intensity rain storm. At Rangitikei there are many active, younger slides. Sliding rates for active failures vary from a few cm/year to 50 m in 30 min. Host rocks are weak to very weak clayey sandstones and sandy mudstones. The seams are rich in smectite. They have polished and crushed walls, may have slickensides and some contain rounded rock fragments. Laboratory shear strength of the seams is 13 kPa cohesion and 13° friction, with a lower bound of 8° at zero cohesion. Strength is increased at the field scale by waviness, steps and splays. Continuity can be demonstrated over distances of hundreds of metres. Key investigation methods were mapping, shafts and trenches. Tectonic uplift, folding and faulting of the weak Tertiary strata and river down-cutting are perpetuating block slide development.

  6. Clay and Magnetite Formation at Yellowknife Bay, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2014-09-01

    Sheepbed mudstone contains a clay-magnetite assemblage formed by dissolution of approximately 70% amorphous phase, 20% olivine, 10% host rock mixture, by a pore fluid at moderate W/R ratio. The clay is similar to Lafayette's ferric saponite and gel.

  7. Importance of Interlayer Equivalent Pores for Anion Diffusion in Clay-Rich Sedimentary Rocks.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Cornelia; Van Loon, Luc R

    2017-02-21

    The anion exclusion behavior in two different clay stones, Opalinus Clay (OPA) and Helvetic Marl (HM), was studied using a well-established experimental through-diffusion technique. The ionic strength of the pore water was varied between 0.01 and 5 M to evaluate its effect on the diffusion of HTO and (36)Cl(-). The total porosity determined by HTO-diffusion was independent of the ionic strength, while the anion accessible porosity varies with the ionic strength of the pore water. In the case of Opalinus Clay, the anion accessible porosity increases from 3% at low ionic strength (0.01 M) up to 8.4% at high ionic strength (5 M), whereas the anion accessible porosity of Helvetic Marl increases from 0.6% up to only 1.1%. The anion exclusion effect in HM is thus more pronounced than that in OPA, even at high ionic strength. This observation can be correlated to differences in mineralogy and to the fact that HM has a larger fraction of interlayer equivalent pores. Interlayer equivalent pores are small pores in compressed clay stones that are small enough to have, because of overlapping electric double layers, properties similar to those of interlayers and are therefore rather inaccessible for anions.

  8. Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits of the Dian-Qian-Gui area, Guizhou, and Yunnan Provinces, and Guangxi District, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, S.G.; Jiazhan, H.; Zhiping, L.; Chenggui, J.

    2007-01-01

    Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Dian-Qian-Gui area in southwest China are hosted in Paleozoic and early Mesozoic sedimentary rocks along the southwest margin of the Yangtze (South China) Precambrian craton. Most deposits have characteristics similar to Carlin-type Au deposits and are spatially associated, on a regional scale, with deposits of coal, Sb, barite, As, Tl, and Hg. Sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are disseminated stratabound and(or) structurally controlled. The deposits have many similar characteristics, particularly mineralogy, geochemistry, host rock, and structural control. Most deposits are associated with structural domes, stratabound breccia bodies, unconformity surfaces or intense brittle-ductile deformation zones, such as the Youjiang fault system. Typical characteristics include impure carbonate rock or calcareous and carbonaceous host rock that contains disseminated pyrite, marcasite, and arsenopyrite-usually with ??m-sized Au, commonly in As-rich rims of pyrite and in disseminations. Late realgar, orpiment, stibnite, and Hg minerals are spatially associated with earlier forming sulfide minerals. Minor base-metal sulfides, such as galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and Pb-Sb-As-sulphosalts also are present. The rocks locally are silicified and altered to sericite-clay (illite). Rocks and(or) stream-sediment geochemical signatures typically include elevated concentrations of As, Sb, Hg, Tl, and Ba. A general lack of igneous rocks in the Dian-Qian-Gui area implies non-pluton-related, ore forming processes. Some deposits contain evidence that sources of the metal may have originated in carbonaceous parts of the sedimentary pile or other sedimentary or volcanic horizons. This genetic process may be associated with formation and mobilization of petroleum and Hg in the region and may also be related to As-, Au-, and Tl-bearing coal horizons. Many deposits also contain textures and features indicative of strong structural control by

  9. Effects of a thermal perturbation on mineralogy and pore water composition in a clay-rock: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailhanou, H.; Lerouge, C.; Debure, M.; Gaboreau, S.; Gaucher, E. C.; Grangeon, S.; Grenèche, J.-M.; Kars, M.; Madé, B.; Marty, N. C. M.; Warmont, F.; Tournassat, C.

    2017-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of clay-rocks are, at least partly, controlled by the chemical composition of their pore water. In evaluating the concept of disposing of radioactive waste in clay-rock formations, determining pore water composition is an important step in predicting how a clay-rock will behave over time and as a function of external forces, such as chemical and thermal perturbations. This study aimed to assess experimental and modeling methodology to calculate pore water composition in a clay-rock as a function of temperature (up to 80 °C). Hydrothermal alteration experiments were carried out on clay-rock samples. We conducted comprehensive chemical and mineralogical characterization of the material before and after reaction, and monitored how the chemical parameters in the liquid and gas phases changed. We compared the experimental results with the a priori predictions made by various models that differed in their hypotheses on the reactivity of the minerals present in the system. Thermodynamic equilibrium could not be assessed unequivocally in these experiments and most of the predicted mineralogy changes were too subtle to be tracked quantitatively. However, from observing the neo-formation of minerals such as goethite we were able to assess the prominent role of Fe-bearing phases in the outcome of the experiments, especially for the measured pH and pCO2 values. After calibrating the amount of reacting Fe-bearing phases with our data, we proposed a thermodynamic model that was capable of predicting the chemical evolution of the systems under investigation as well as the evolution of other systems already published in the literature, with the same clay-rock material but with significant differences in experimental conditions.

  10. Regulation of the collisional self-quenching of fluorescence in clay/porphyrin complex by strong host-guest interaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Inoue, Haruo; Takagi, Shinsuke

    2012-12-13

    This paper proposes a novel methodology to improve noncollisional photochemical reactions such as Förster resonance energy transfer on solid surfaces. Since an excited guest molecule densely adsorbed on the solid surfaces is quenched by an unfavorable interaction between guests in general, the photochemical reactions such as electron and energy transfers tend to be inefficient compared to those in homogeneous systems. In this work, the mechanism of unfavorable quenching process of dyes on the clay surface as a typical solid surface for the photochemical energy transfer was systematically investigated by using a series of porphyrin derivatives. As a result, it was found that the quenching rate constants of excited guest dye determined by the time-resolved fluorescence measurements correlated well with the strengths of coulombic interaction between host and guest. The strong coulombic interaction should suppress the mobility and collision frequency of guests on the clay surface; thus, the collision of guest molecules was revealed as the origin of unfavorable quenching for photochemical reactions on the clay surface. According to this principle, we will be able to construct efficient photochemical reaction systems without any quenching process, such as efficient energy transfers toward an artificial light-harvesting system. In fact, we have already realized almost 100% energy transfer by the suppression of quenching process on the clay surface (e.g., J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 133, 14280-14286).

  11. Organic tissues, graphite, and hydrocarbons in host rocks of the Rum Jungle Uranium Field, northern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, C.B.; Robbins, E.I.; Bone, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Rum Jungle Uranium field consists of at least six early Proterozoic deposits that have been mined either for uranium and/or the associated base and precious metals. Organic matter in the host rocks of the Whites Formation and Coomalie Dolomite is now predominantly graphite, consistent with the metamorphic history of these rocks. For nine samples, the mean total organic carbon content is high (3.9 wt%) and ranged from 0.33 to 10.44 wt%. Palynological extracts from the host rocks include black, filamentous, stellate (Eoastrion-like), and spherical morphotypes, which are typical of early Proterozoic microbiota. The colour, abundance, and shapes of these morphotypes reflect the thermal history, organic richness, and probable lacustrine biofacies of the host rocks. Routine analysis of rock thin sections and of palynological residues shows that mineral grains in some of the host rocks are coated with graphitized organic matter. The grain coating is presumed to result from ultimate thermal degradation of a petroleum phase that existed prior to metamorphism. Hydrocarbons are, however, still present in fluid inclusions within carbonates of the Coomalie Dolomite and lower Whites Formation. The fluid inclusions fluoresce dull orange in blue-light excitation and their hydrocarbon content is confirmed by gas chromatography of whole-rock extracts. Preliminary analysis of the oil suggests that it is migrated, and because it has escaped graphitization through metamorphism it is probably not of early Proterozoic age. The presence of live oil is consistent with fluid inclusion data that suggest subsequent, low-temperature brine migration through the rocks. The present observations support earlier suggestions that organic matter in the host formations trapped uranium to form protore. Subsequent fluid migrations probably brought additional uranium and other metals to these formations, and the organic matter provided a reducing environment for entrapment. ?? 1990.

  12. Evaluation of garnet discrimination diagrams using geochemical data of garnets derived from various host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krippner, Anne; Meinhold, Guido; Morton, Andrew C.; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2014-06-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate six different garnet discrimination diagrams (one binary diagram and five ternary diagrams) commonly used by many researchers. The mineral chemistry of detrital garnet is a useful tool in sedimentary provenance studies, yet there is no clear-cut understanding of what garnet type originates from which host lithology. Several discrimination diagrams exist for garnet showing distinct compositional fields, separated by strict boundaries that are thought to reflect specific types of source rocks. For this study, a large dataset was compiled (N = 3532) encompassing major element compositions of garnets derived from various host lithologies, including metamorphic, igneous, and mantle-derived rocks, in order to test the applicability of the various discrimination schemes. The dataset contains mineral chemical data collected from the literature complemented with some new data (N = 530) from garnet-bearing metamorphic and ultramafic rocks in Austria and Norway. Discrimination of the tested diagrams only works for a small group of garnets derived from mantle rocks, granulite-facies metasedimentary rocks, and felsic igneous rocks. For other garnet types, the assignment to a certain type of host rock remains ambiguous. This is considered insufficient and therefore the evaluated diagrams should be used with great care. We further apply compositional biplot analysis to derive some hints towards future perspectives in detrital garnet discrimination.

  13. Acid rock drainage passive remediation: Potential use of alkaline clay, optimal mixing ratio and long-term impacts.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Fernando; Wen, Yipei; Perone, Hanna; Xu, Yi; Liang, Xu

    2017-01-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is one of the most adverse environmental problems of the mining industry. Surface and ground water affected by this pollution are characterized by their acidity and the high content of sulfates and metals/metalloids. In this study, alkaline clay (AC), an industrial waste with a high alkalinity, which is utilized in the alumina refining process, was used as the remediation material to inhibit pyrite oxidation in waste coal piles. Through a series of laboratory experiments (static and kinetic), complemented with field measurements and geochemical modeling, three important issues associated with this passive and sustainable ARD remediation method were investigated: 1) the potential use of alkaline clay as an ARD remediation material, 2) the adequate alkaline clay/coal refuse mixing ratio (AC/CR) to ensure pH values close to neutral conditions, and, 3) the implications for long-term performance, in terms of the trends of the main parameters involved in this process such as pH, concentrations of sulfate, iron and other dissolved contaminants. Both field measurements and the samples used for the experiments came from a local waste coal site. Through the analysis of the field measurements and the outcome of the laboratory experiments, AC proved to be an effective remediation material for ARD. Compared to those found in mine tailings, the concentrations of contaminants such as iron, manganese or sulfate were significantly reduced with this remediation approach. Moreover, results suggest a reliable long-term stability of the remediation (i.e. neutral pH conditions are maintained), thus enhancing the generation of iron precipitates that could produce pyrite grain coating. These processes also made the amended layer less porous, thus increased water retention and hindered oxygen diffusion.

  14. Modeling of water rock interactions in an aquitard of sandy clay in the coastal area near Beihai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhou; Jinmei, Yao; Hua, Zhang; Rui, Li; Fang, Xu

    2008-11-01

    Unconsolidated sand, gravel and clay deposits near Beihai and in the Leizhou Peninsula in southern China form an unconfined aquifer, aquitard and a confined aquifer. Water and soil samples were collected from the two aquifers in the coastal Beihai area for the determination of chemical compositions, minerals and soluble ions. Hydrogeochemical modeling of three flow paths through the aquitard are carried out using PHREEQC to determine water rock interactions along the flow paths. The results indicate that the dissolution of anorthite, fluorite, halite, rhodochrosite and CO2, and precipitation of potash feldspar and kaolinite may be occurring when groundwater leaks through the aquitard from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Cation exchanges between Na and Ca can also happen along the flow paths.

  15. Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics of Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Au Deposits in P.R. China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second report concerning results of a joint project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Tianjin Geological Academy to study sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Since the 1980s, Chinese geologists have devoted a large-scale exploration and research effort to the deposits. As a result, there are more than 20 million oz of proven Au reserves in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Additional estimated and inferred resources are present in over 160 deposits and occurrences, which are undergoing exploration. This makes China second to Nevada in contained ounces of Au in Carlin-type deposits. It is likely that many of the Carlin-type Au ore districts in China, when fully developed, could have resource potential comparable to the multi-1,000-tonne Au resource in northern Nevada. The six chapters of this report describe sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits that were visited during the project. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits and Carlin-type Au deposits and also provide a working classification for the sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 provide descriptions that were compiled from the literature in China in three main areas: the Dian-Qian-Gui, the Qinling fold belt, and Middle-Lower Yangtze River areas. Chapter 6 contains a weights-of-evidence (WofE), GIS-based mineral assessment of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Qinling fold belt and Dian-Qian-Gui areas. Appendices contain scanned aeromagnetic (Appendix I) and gravity (Appendix II) geophysical maps of south and central China. Data tables of the deposits (Appendix III) also are available in the first report as an interactive database at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-466/. Geochemical analysis of ore samples from the deposits visited are contained in Appendix IV.

  16. Clay sized fraction and powdered whole-rock X-ray analyses from alluvial basin deposits in central and southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the study of the water quality and geochemistry of Southwest Alluvial Basins (SWAB) in parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas, which is a Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program, whole rock x-ray analysis and clay-size fraction mineralogy (x-ray) analysis of selected samples from alluvial basin deposits were done to investigate the types of minerals and clay types present in the aquifers. This was done to determine the plausible minerals and clay types in the aquifers that may be reacting with groundwater and affecting the water quality. The purpose of this report is only to present the whole rock x-ray and clay-fraction mineralogy data. Nineteen surface samples or samples from outcrop of Tertiary and Quaternary alluvial basin deposits in the central and southern Rio Grande rift were collected and analyzed. The analysis of the samples consisted of grain size analysis, and clay-size fraction mineralogy and semiquantitative analysis of the relative abundance of different clay mineral groups present. (USGS)

  17. 3D surface roughness recreation and data processing of granitic rocks and claystones, potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buocz, Ildikó; Török, Ákos; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta

    2015-04-01

    The determination and modelling of the stability of rock slopes, tunnels, or underground spaces, i.e. radioactive waste disposal facilities, is an important task in engineering. The appropriate estimation of the mechanical parameters for a realistic description of the behaviour of rocks results in higher safety and more economic design. The failure of stability is primarily due to the shear failure of the rock masses along fractures and joints: therefore the correct determination of the shear strength is crucial. One of the most important parameters influencing the shear strength along rock joints is their surface roughness. Although the quantification of surface roughness has been an open question during the past century, several attempts have been made, starting with 2D and continuing with 3D measurements, to provide engineers with a method for determining shear strength numerically. As technology evolved, the 3D methods became more popular and several scientists started to investigate the surface properties through laser scanning and different photogrammetrical methods. This paper shows a photogrammetric method for the 3D digital recreation of joint surfaces of granitic rock and claystone, both potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The rocks derived from Bátaapáti (South Hungary) and Mont Terri (North Switzerland) respectively. The samples are laboratory scaled specimens with an areal size of 50x50 mm. The software used is called ShapeMetrix3D, developed by 3GSM GmbH in Austria. The major steps of the creation of the 3D picture are presented, as well as the following data processing which leads to the quantification of the 3D surface roughness.

  18. Porosity and Permeability Evolution in Cemented Rock Cores under Reactive Flowing Conditions: Comparative Analysis between Limestone and Sandstone Host Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, P.; Karpyn, Z.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2-brine has the potential to alter wellbore cement in depleted oil and gas reservoirs under geological CO2 sequestration conditions. A better understanding of CO2-brine-cement-rock interaction is needed to evaluate the seal integrity of candidate sequestration formation in the long run. This work investigates possible alteration of wellbore cement when bonded by different host formation rock upon exposure to CO2-saturated brine. Composite cement-sandstone and cement-limestone core samples were created to perform reactive coreflood experiments. After an eight-day dynamic flow-through period, both cores had a similar extent of porosity increase, while the cement-limestone core experienced a ten-fold higher increase in permeability. With the aid of X-ray Micro-CT imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy, it is observed that cement underwent greater degradation at the cement-sandstone interface. Degradation of cement-limestone core mainly took place on the host rock matrix. Worm holes were developed and a solution channel was formed in the limestone, creating a dominant flow path that altered both flow and reaction behavior. Limestone buffered the injected acidic brine preventing further deterioration of cement near the core outlet. Changes in fluid chemistry of limestone and sandstone coreflood effluents are compared. Results from this work are aimed at assisting the development and validation of robust reactive transport models through direct measurement of cemented rock core porosity and permeability evolution as well as the effluent aqueous chemistry change. This will subsequently improve predictive capabilities of reactive transport models associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic environments. Permeability Evolution of Cement-Rock Core Sample during Dynamic Flow of CO2-Brine

  19. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    DOE PAGES

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; ...

    2016-10-14

    A significant fraction (~ 20%) of microbial life is found in the terrestrial deep subsurface, yet the metabolic processes extant in those environments are poorly understood. Here we show that H2, injected into the Opalinus Clay formation in a borehole located 300 meters below the surface, fuels a community of microorganisms with interconnected metabolisms. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis reveal a complete carbon cycle, driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers. Dead biomass from these organisms is a substrate for a fermenting bacterium that produces acetate as a product. In turn, complete oxidizer heterotrophic sulfate- reducing bacteria utilize acetate and oxidize itmore » to CO2, closing the cycle. This metabolic reconstruction sheds light onto a hydrogen-driven carbon cycle, and a sunlight-independent ecosystem in the deep subsurface.« less

  20. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-10-14

    A significant fraction (~ 20%) of microbial life is found in the terrestrial deep subsurface, yet the metabolic processes extant in those environments are poorly understood. Here we show that H2, injected into the Opalinus Clay formation in a borehole located 300 meters below the surface, fuels a community of microorganisms with interconnected metabolisms. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis reveal a complete carbon cycle, driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers. Dead biomass from these organisms is a substrate for a fermenting bacterium that produces acetate as a product. In turn, complete oxidizer heterotrophic sulfate- reducing bacteria utilize acetate and oxidize it to CO2, closing the cycle. This metabolic reconstruction sheds light onto a hydrogen-driven carbon cycle, and a sunlight-independent ecosystem in the deep subsurface.

  1. Contrasting diagenetic histories of concretions vs. host rocks, Lion Mountain Member, Riley formation (upper Cambrian), Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.

    1988-02-01

    White, elliptical, calcite-cemented concretion nuclei up to 1 m long contrast markedly in color, composition, and diagenetic history from more glauconite-rich concretion rinds and from dark-green glaucarenite host rocks. Concretion nuclei are loosely packed deposits of trilobite carapaces and minor quartz and glauconite that have intergranular volumes of 58%. The nuclei are shell-lag deposits that were cemented by calcite at the sea floor or after burial of a few meters. Concretion rinds, composed of subequal amounts of quartz and compactionally deformed glauconite, have an intergranular volume of only 32% and minor quartz overgrowths that preceded pore-occluding calcite cement. The rinds underwent burial for several million years to tens of millions of years to depths of several hundred meters before they were cemented. The host rock is predominately glauconite with very minor quartz and calcite cement. Strontium isotopic ratios of host-rock calcite cement are variable (0.7084 to 0.7093), but the lowest value suggests precipitation during the Middle Ordovician. In the absence of significant amounts of carbonate cement, the host rock underwent complete dissolution of trilobite carapaces and maximum compaction with total loss of porosity through squashing of glauconite grains. Maximum burial during this stage was completed by the end of Ordovician time.

  2. Air and groundwater flow at the interface between fractured host rock and a bentonite buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessirier, B.; Jarsjo, J.; Frampton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Designs of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel include several levels of confinement. The Swedish and Finnish concept KBS-3 targets for example sparsely fractured crystalline bedrock as host formation and would have the waste canisters embedded in an engineered buffer of compacted MX-80 bentonite. The host rock is a highly heterogeneous dual porosity material containing fractures and a rock matrix. Bentonite is a complex expansive porous material. Its water content and mechanical properties are interdependent. Beyond the specific physics of unsaturated flow and transport in each medium, the interface between them is critical. Detailed knowledge of the transitory two-phase flow regime, induced by the insertion of the unsaturated buffer in a saturated rock environment, is necessary to assess the performance of planned KBS-3 deposition holes. A set of numerical simulations based on the equations of two-phase flow for water and air in porous media were conducted to investigate the dynamics of air and groundwater flow near the rock/bentonite interface in the period following installation of the unsaturated bentonite buffer. We assume state of the two-phase flow parameter values for bentonite from laboratory water uptake tests and typical fracture and rock properties from the Äspö Hard rock laboratory (Sweden) gathered under several field characterization campaigns. The results point to desaturation of the rock domain as far as 10 cm away from the interface into matrix-dominated regions for up to 160 days. Similar observations were made during the Bentonite Rock Interaction Experiment (BRIE) at the Äspö HRL, with a desaturation sustained for even longer times. More than the mere time to mechanical and hydraulic equilibrium, the occurrence of sustained unsaturated conditions opens the possibility for biogeochemical processes that could be critical in the safety assessment of the planned repository.

  3. Mineralogy and petrology of the Cretaceous- Tertiary boundary clay bed and adjacent clay-rich rocks, Raton Basin, New Mexico and Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.; Pillmore, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The K-T boundary occurs at the top of a kaolinitic claystone layer, commonly referred to as the 'boundary clay layer', in an interval of coal and carbonaceous shale. The boundary is defined by the disappearance of certain fossil-pollen taxa. The boundary clay layer also contains shocked quartz grains and abundance anomalies of iridium, chromium, and other elements. Each of these characteristics support the hypothesis of an asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous. -from Authors

  4. A laboratory experiment for determining both the hydraulic and diffusive properties and the initial pore-water composition of an argillaceous rock sample: a test with the Opalinus clay (Mont Terri, Switzerland).

    PubMed

    Savoye, S; Michelot, J-L; Matray, J-M; Wittebroodt, Ch; Mifsud, A

    2012-02-01

    Argillaceous formations are thought to be suitable natural barriers to the release of radionuclides from a radioactive waste repository. However, the safety assessment of a waste repository hosted by an argillaceous rock requires knowledge of several properties of the host rock such as the hydraulic conductivity, diffusion properties and the pore water composition. This paper presents an experimental design that allows the determination of these three types of parameters on the same cylindrical rock sample. The reliability of this method was evaluated using a core sample from a well-investigated indurated argillaceous formation, the Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) (Switzerland). In this test, deuterium- and oxygen-18-depleted water, bromide and caesium were injected as tracer pulses in a reservoir drilled in the centre of a cylindrical core sample. The evolution of these tracers was monitored by means of samplers included in a circulation circuit for a period of 204 days. Then, a hydraulic test (pulse-test type) was performed. Finally, the core sample was dismantled and analysed to determine tracer profiles. Diffusion parameters determined for the four tracers are consistent with those previously obtained from laboratory through-diffusion and in-situ diffusion experiments. The reconstructed initial pore-water composition (chloride and water stable-isotope concentrations) was also consistent with those previously reported. In addition, the hydraulic test led to an estimate of hydraulic conductivity in good agreement with that obtained from in-situ tests.

  5. A laboratory experiment for determining both the hydraulic and diffusive properties and the initial pore-water composition of an argillaceous rock sample: A test with the Opalinus clay (Mont Terri, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoye, S.; Michelot, J.-L.; Matray, J.-M.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Mifsud, A.

    2012-02-01

    Argillaceous formations are thought to be suitable natural barriers to the release of radionuclides from a radioactive waste repository. However, the safety assessment of a waste repository hosted by an argillaceous rock requires knowledge of several properties of the host rock such as the hydraulic conductivity, diffusion properties and the pore water composition. This paper presents an experimental design that allows the determination of these three types of parameters on the same cylindrical rock sample. The reliability of this method was evaluated using a core sample from a well-investigated indurated argillaceous formation, the Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) (Switzerland). In this test, deuterium- and oxygen-18-depleted water, bromide and caesium were injected as tracer pulses in a reservoir drilled in the centre of a cylindrical core sample. The evolution of these tracers was monitored by means of samplers included in a circulation circuit for a period of 204 days. Then, a hydraulic test (pulse-test type) was performed. Finally, the core sample was dismantled and analysed to determine tracer profiles. Diffusion parameters determined for the four tracers are consistent with those previously obtained from laboratory through-diffusion and in-situ diffusion experiments. The reconstructed initial pore-water composition (chloride and water stable-isotope concentrations) was also consistent with those previously reported. In addition, the hydraulic test led to an estimate of hydraulic conductivity in good agreement with that obtained from in-situ tests.

  6. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and

  7. Microstructures and deformation mechanisms in Opalinus Clay: insights from scaly clay from the Main Fault in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (CH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurich, Ben; Urai, Janos L.; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    The Main Fault in the shaly facies of Opalinus Clay is a small reverse fault formed in slightly overconsolidated claystone at around 1 km depth. The fault zone is up to 6 m wide, with micron-thick shear zones, calcite and celestite veins, scaly clay and clay gouge. Scaly clay occurs in up to 1.5 m wide lenses, providing hand specimens for this study. We mapped the scaly clay fabric at 1 m-10 nm scale, examining scaly clay for the first time using broad-ion beam polishing combined with scanning electron microscopy (BIB-SEM). Results show a network of thin shear zones and microveins, separating angular to lensoid microlithons between 10 cm and 10 µm in diameter, with slickensided surfaces. Our results show that microlithons are only weakly deformed and that strain is accumulated by fragmentation of microlithons by newly formed shear zones, by shearing in the micron-thick zones and by rearrangement of the microlithons.The scaly clay aggregates can be easily disintegrated into individual microlithons because of the very low tensile strength of the thin shear zones. Analyses of the microlithon size by sieving indicate a power-law distribution model with exponents just above 2. From this, we estimate that only 1 vol % of the scaly clay aggregate is in the shear zones.After a literature review of the hypotheses for scaly clay generation, we present a new model to explain the progressive formation of a self-similar network of anastomosing thin shear zones in a fault relay. The relay provides the necessary boundary conditions for macroscopically continuous deformation. Localization of strain in thin shear zones which are locally dilatant, and precipitation of calcite veins in dilatant shear fractures, evolve into complex microscale re-partitioning of shear, forming new shear zones while the microlithons remain much less deformed internally and the volume proportion of the µm-thick shear zones slowly increases. Grain-scale deformation mechanisms are microfracturing

  8. Experiments in a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) Hosted in Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Kimballton, M. O.; Science Team

    2004-12-01

    Sedimentary-rock environments, particularly those dominated by carbonate rock, provide unique opportunities for geoscientists, geobiologists, and geophysicists, to perform revolutionary experiments aimed at answering fundamental science questions and satisfying our societal demands for resources and environmental stewardship. As part of the National Science Foundation's DUSEL initiative, the selected site should offer structurally and biologically diverse environments. At the same time, the site should offer host rock capable of providing safely engineered hallways and laboratories at depths as great as 2,200 m for numerous deep underground physics, engineering, and earth science experiments. An ideal sedimentary-rock environment offers the prospect of highly folded, thrusted, and fractured rocks that allow opportunities to study the 3-D behavior of thrusts that propagate parallel to bedding as well as those that ramp across bedding. Flow dynamics along and across deeply buried faults is poorly understood. Experiments will be developed at various scales to assess flow and transport processes to better quantify hydrogeological mechanisms influencing flow and possible aquifer compartmentalization. Seismic reflection images, vertical seismic profiles, and tomograms will provide details of the fault properties and geometry, which can be verified in-situ. Repeated overthrusted sequences provide opportunities for geobiologists to investigate how microbes in rocks of similar age are affected by differences in pressure, temperature, and depth. Carbonate rocks provide opportunities to study energy sources and adaptations for nutrient acquisition, reproduction, stability, survival, and repair under extreme conditions. Results from these investigations will permit comparisons with other foreland fold-thrust belts worldwide. Fossil fuels remain the world's main energy resource and the large majority of these are hosted in sedimentary rocks. Improved methods for reservoir

  9. The role of clay content during earthquake propagation in carbonate-hosted faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paola, N.; Bullock, R. J.; Holdsworth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate faults often contain small amounts of phyllosilicate in their slip zone. To assess the effect of phyllosilicate content on earthquake propagation in carbonate faults, we performed friction experiments at seismic slip rate (v = 1.3 m/s) on gouges of calcite, phyllosilicate (montmorillonite and illite-smectite) and mixed calcite/phyllosilicate compositions. Experiments were carried out at 9 MPa normal load and under both room-humidity (dry) and water-saturated (wet) conditions. All dry gouges, regardless of clay content, plus the wet calcite, produce a friction evolution curve, comprising an initial slip-hardening phase, during which friction evolves to peak values f = 0.60-0.76, followed by a dramatic slip-weakening phase, during which f decreases to a constant steady-state value of 0.19-0.33 over a distance which ranges from 0.2 m for clay-bearing gouges up to 0.6 m for pure calcite. Conversely, wet gouges with phyllosilicate content ≥ 10 wt.% show negligible slip-hardening, and the attainment of steady-state sliding almost immediately at the onset of slip, with f = 0.05-0.26. Dry gouges show slip localization and grain size reduction within a narrow (<65 microns) principal slip zone, accompanied by microstructural evidence for thermal decomposition of calcite (although only when clay content is ≤ 50 wt.%). Wet gouges are characterized by distributed deformation and grain size reduction, with no microstructural evidence for thermal decomposition of calcite. We interpret that slip initiates within the wet gouges along interconnected networks of weak phyllosilicates, formed during axial loading compaction prior to shear. This can explain the: 1) measured lack of slip-hardening and peak friction; 2) observed distributed nature of deformation and grain size reduction; 3) lack of evidence for thermally activated processes, due to low frictional heating in accord with small values of friction and lack of slip localization. Our findings imply that small

  10. The CO2seals project: Investigation of the CO2 capillary sealing efficiency of low-permeable clay-bearing rocks and potential alteration mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Alexandra; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Waschbüsch, Margret; Krooss, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    The safe long-term storage of gas/CO2 in spatially limited underground volumes requires the combination of a structural trap with intact structural integrity and a suitable low permeability cap rock (seal). The occurrence of natural gas reservoirs proves that certain lithotypes do provide efficient seals which can prevent leakage of gas to the atmosphere over long geological time periods (millions of years). In order to assess the risk of CO2 leakage through caprocks above potential storage sites to the surface one has to consider both, the present sealing capacity of the rock and its likelihood to alter in contact with CO2. In the CO2seals project the prominent (coupled) processes associated with the transport and retention of CO2 in caprocks are being investigated, comprising capillary sealing, viscous flow, diffusion and adsorption. As shown in a study by Wollenweber et al. (in press), exposure to CO2 can significantly reduce the capillary sealing efficiency of clay-rich rocks. On the other hand, sorption of CO2 on clay minerals may "slow down" the process of leakage, by acting as an additional storing barrier (Busch et al., 2006). To investigate the processes of CO2-water-clay interactions, batch and flow reactor experiments on single clay minerals and synthetic mineral assemblages are being performed. First results suggest that CO2 leads to a shrinkage of the clay minerals (loss if interlayer water) and that iron (Fe) may be released from smectites. Additionally, first results of permeability studies and adsorption measurements will be presented. Literature BUSCH, A., ALLES, S., GENSTERBLUM, Y., PRINZ, D., DEWHURST, D.N., RAVEN, M.D., STANJEK, H., KROOSS, B.M., (2006): Carbon dioxide storage potential of shales. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control 2, 297-308. WOLLENWEBER J., ALLES, A., BUSCH, A., KROOSS, B.M., STANJEK, H., LITTKE, R. (in press). Experimental investigation of the CO2 sealing efficiency of caprocks. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control

  11. Host rocks and their alterations as related to uranium-bearing veins in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.

    1956-01-01

    This paper, dealing with the different kinds of host rocks and their alterations associated with uranium-bearing veins in the United States, is a chapter of a comprehensive report entitled , "Geology of uranium-bearing vein deposits in the United States," in preparation by George W. Walker, Frank W. Osterwald, and others. The comprehensive report will include detailed information on tectonic and structural setting, kinds of host rocks, wall-rock alteration, mineralogy, physical characteristics, processes of deposition, and concepts of origin of uraniferous veins; but, because it will not be completed until sometime in the future, some chapters of the report are being transmitted as they are finished. Part of an introductory chapter to the comprehensive report entitled, "Classification and distribution of uranium-bearing veins in the United States" (Walker and Osterwald, 1956) has already been transmitted; several of the terms used herein are defined in the introductory chapter. Data included in this chapter demonstrate that uranium-bearing veins are: 1) in rocks of nearly all textural, chemical, and mineralogic types; 2) most abundant in holocrystalline, commonly equigranular, igeneous and metamorphic rocks characterized by a moderate to high silica content and and by similar physical properties. Although some of the physiochemical properties of the host rocks are discussed in terms of favorability or nonfavoribility for uranium deposition, the principal purpose of this chapter is to establish the petroloic environment in which uranium-bearing veins have been found. Because favorability or nonfavorability of host rocks is related complexly to the chemistry of ore solutions and to methods or uranium transport and deposition, several hypothetical processes of transport and deposition have been referred to briefly; these and other hypotheses will be outlines and discussed in greater detail in a subsequent chapter. The compilation of data leading to this report and its

  12. Diffusion of ionic tracers in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock using the Donnan equilibrium model and the formation factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jougnot, D.; Revil, A.; Leroy, P.

    2009-05-01

    The transient diffusion of cationic and anionic tracers through clay-rocks is usually modeled with parameters like porosity, tortuosity (and/or constrictivity), sorption coefficients, and anionic exclusion. Recently, a new pore scale model has been developed by Revil and Linde [Revil A. and Linde N. (2006) Chemico-electromechanical coupling in microporous media. J. Colloid Interface Sci.302, 682-694]. This model is based on a volume-averaging approach of the Nernst-Planck equation. The influence of the electrical diffuse layer is accounted for by a generalized Donnan equilibrium model through the whole connected pore space that is valid for a multicomponent electrolyte. This new model can be used to determine the composition of the pore water of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock, the osmotic efficiency of bentonite as a function of salinity, the osmotic pressure, and the streaming potential coupling coefficient of clay-rocks. This pore scale model is used here to model the transient diffusion of ionic tracers ( 22Na +, 36Cl -, and 35SO42-) through the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock. Speciation of SO42- shows that ˜1/3 of the SO 4 is tied-up in different complexes. Some of these complexes are neutral and are therefore only influence by the tortuosity of the pore space. Using experimental data from the literature, we show that all the parameters required to model the flux of ionic tracers (especially the mean electrical potential of the pore space and the formation factor) are in agreement with independent evaluations of these parameters using the osmotic pressure determined from in situ pressure measurements and HTO diffusion experiments.

  13. Obtaining the porewater composition of a clay rock by modeling the in- and out-diffusion of anions and cations from an in-situ experiment.

    PubMed

    Appelo, C A J; Vinsot, A; Mettler, S; Wechner, S

    2008-10-23

    A borehole in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock in ANDRA's underground research facility was sampled during 1 year and chemically analyzed. Diffusion between porewater and the borehole solution resulted in concentration changes which were modeled with PHREEQC's multicomponent diffusion module. In the model, the clay rock's pore space is divided in free porewater (electrically neutral) and diffuse double layer water (devoid of anions). Diffusion is calculated separately for the two domains, and individually for all the solute species while a zero-charge flux is maintained. We explain how the finite difference formulas for radial diffusion can be translated into mixing factors for solutions. Operator splitting is used to calculate advective flow and chemical reactions such as ion exchange and calcite dissolution and precipitation. The ion exchange reaction is formulated in the form of surface complexation, which allows distributing charge over the fixed sites and the diffuse double layer. The charge distribution affects pH when calcite dissolves, and modeling of the experimental data shows that about 7% of the cation exchange capacity resides in the diffuse double layer. The model calculates the observed concentration changes very well and provides an estimate of the pristine porewater composition in the clay rock.

  14. Lower Paleozoic host rocks in the Getchell gold belt: several distinct allochthons or a sequence of continuous sedimentation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madden-McGuire, D.J.; Marsh, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The lower Paleozoic rocks that host gold deposits along the Getchell gold belt in Humboldt County, Nevada, represent several allochthonous terranes rather than a sequence of continuous deposition. The term "terrane' is used only in a descriptive sense. Evidence for allochthonous terranes in this area includes fault boundaries and differences in age, lithology, and structural style among several rock sequences. -from Authors

  15. Weibull-distributed dyke thickness reflects probabilistic character of host-rock strength

    PubMed Central

    Krumbholz, Michael; Hieronymus, Christoph F.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Tanner, David C.; Friese, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sheet intrusions (dykes) constitute the main form of magma transport in the Earth’s crust. The size distribution of dykes is a crucial parameter that controls volcanic surface deformation and eruption rates and is required to realistically model volcano deformation for eruption forecasting. Here we present statistical analyses of 3,676 dyke thickness measurements from different tectonic settings and show that dyke thickness consistently follows the Weibull distribution. Known from materials science, power law-distributed flaws in brittle materials lead to Weibull-distributed failure stress. We therefore propose a dynamic model in which dyke thickness is determined by variable magma pressure that exploits differently sized host-rock weaknesses. The observed dyke thickness distributions are thus site-specific because rock strength, rather than magma viscosity and composition, exerts the dominant control on dyke emplacement. Fundamentally, the strength of geomaterials is scale-dependent and should be approximated by a probability distribution. PMID:24513695

  16. Weibull-distributed dyke thickness reflects probabilistic character of host-rock strength.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, Michael; Hieronymus, Christoph F; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Tanner, David C; Friese, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Magmatic sheet intrusions (dykes) constitute the main form of magma transport in the Earth's crust. The size distribution of dykes is a crucial parameter that controls volcanic surface deformation and eruption rates and is required to realistically model volcano deformation for eruption forecasting. Here we present statistical analyses of 3,676 dyke thickness measurements from different tectonic settings and show that dyke thickness consistently follows the Weibull distribution. Known from materials science, power law-distributed flaws in brittle materials lead to Weibull-distributed failure stress. We therefore propose a dynamic model in which dyke thickness is determined by variable magma pressure that exploits differently sized host-rock weaknesses. The observed dyke thickness distributions are thus site-specific because rock strength, rather than magma viscosity and composition, exerts the dominant control on dyke emplacement. Fundamentally, the strength of geomaterials is scale-dependent and should be approximated by a probability distribution.

  17. Formation conditions of paleovalley uranium deposits hosted in upper Eocene-lower Oligocene rocks of Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, S. F.; Strelkova, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The uranium deposits of Bulgaria related to the Late Alpine tectonomagmatic reactivation are subdivided into two groups: exogenic-epigenetic paleovalley deposits related to the basins filled with upper Eocene-lower Oligocene volcanic-sedimentary rocks and the hydrothermal deposits hosted in the coeval depressions. The geological and lithofacies conditions of their localization, the epigenetic alteration of rocks, mineralogy and geochemistry of uranium ore are exemplified in thoroughly studied paleovalley deposits of the Maritsa ore district. Argumentation of the genetic concepts providing insights into both sedimentation-diagenetic and exogenic-epigenetic mineralization with development of stratal oxidation zones is discussed. A new exfiltration model has been proposed to explain the origin of the aforementioned deposits on the basis of additional analysis with consideration of archival factual data and possible causes of specific ningyoite uranium ore composition.

  18. Finite-element modeling of magma chamber-host rock interactions prior to caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabele, Petr; Žák, Jiří; Somr, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Gravity-driven failure of shallow magma chamber roofs and formation of collapse calderas are commonly accompanied by ejection of large volumes of pyroclastic material to the Earth's atmosphere and thus represent severe volcanic hazards. In this respect, numerical analysis has proven as a key tool in understanding the mechanical conditions of caldera collapse. The main objective of this paper is to find a suitable approach to finite-element simulation of roof fracturing and caldera collapse during inflation and subsequent deflation of shallow magma chambers. Such a model should capture the dominant mechanical phenomena, for example, interaction of the host rock with magma and progressive deformation of the chamber roof. To this end, a comparative study, which involves various representations of magma (inviscid fluid, nearly incompressible elastic, or plastic solid) and constitutive models of the host rock (fracture and plasticity), was carried out. In particular, the quasi-brittle fracture model of host rock reproduced well the formation of tension-induced radial and circumferential fractures during magma injection into the chamber (inflation stage), especially at shallow crustal levels. Conversely, the Mohr-Coulomb shear criterion has shown to be more appropriate for greater depths. Subsequent magma withdrawal from the chamber (deflation stage) results in further damage or even collapse of the chamber roof. While most of the previous studies of caldera collapse rely on the elastic stress analysis, the proposed approach advances modeling of the process by incorporating non-linear failure phenomena and nearly incompressible behaviour of magma. This leads to a perhaps more realistic representation of the fracture processes preceding roof collapse and caldera formation.

  19. Newly discovered sediment rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits in the People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Ashley, Roger P.; Chou, I. -Ming; Huang, Zushu; Chaoyuan, Wan; Li, Wenkang

    1988-01-01

    Five deposits discovered in Guizhou Province, Yata, Getang, Sanchahe, Ceyang, and Banqi are described for the first time in Western literature. The deposits have geologic features and geochemical signatures that are remarkably similar to those of sedimentary rock-hosted precious metal deposits in the United States. The sizes of the deposits are as yet undetermined, but they each contain significant reserves at average grades of 4 to 5 g of gold per metric ton. Exploration and drilling are in progress at all of the deposits, and other areas where the geologic setting and geochemical anomalies are similar are being tested.

  20. Effect of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock on the dissolution rate of the SON68 simulated nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeway, James J.; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Ribet, Solange; El Mendili, Yassine; Schumacher, Stéphan; Grambow, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste glass in France is expected to occur in an engineered barrier system (EBS) located in a subsurface Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock formation in the Paris Basin in northeastern France. Understanding the behavior of glass dissolution in the complex system is critical to be able to reliably model the performance of the glass in this complex environment. To simulate this multi-barrier repository scenario in the laboratory, several tests have been performed to measure glass dissolution rates of the simulated high-level nuclear waste glass, SON68, in the presence of COx claystone at 90 °C. Experiments utilized a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pump to pass simulated Bure site COx pore water through a reaction cell containing SON68 placed between two COx claystone cores for durations up to 200 days. Silicon concentrations at the outlet were similar in all experiments, even the blank experiment with only the COx claystone (∼4 mg/L at 25 °C and ∼15 mg/L at 90 °C). The steady-state pH of the effluent, measured at room temperature, was roughly 7.1 for the blank and 7.3-7.6 for the glass-containing experiments demonstrating the pH buffering capacity of the COx claystone. Dissolution rates for SON68 in the presence of the claystone were elevated compared to those obtained from flow-through experiments conducted with SON68 without claystone in silica-saturated solutions at the same temperature and similar pH values. Additionally, through surface examination of the monoliths, the side of the monolith in direct contact with the claystone was seen to have a corrosion thickness 2.5× greater than the side in contact with the bulk glass powder. Results from one experiment containing 32Si-doped SON68 also suggest that the movement of Si through the claystone is controlled by a chemically coupled transport with a Si retention factor, Kd, of 900 mL/g.

  1. In search of early life: Carbonate veins in Archean metamorphic rocks as potential hosts of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Carl A.; Piazolo, Sandra; Webb, Gregory E.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; George, Simon C.

    2016-11-01

    The detection of early life signatures using hydrocarbon biomarkers in Precambrian rocks struggles with contamination issues, unspecific biomarkers and the lack of suitable sedimentary rocks due to extensive thermal overprints. Importantly, host rocks must not have been exposed to temperatures above 250 °C as at these temperatures biomarkers are destroyed. Here we show that Archean sedimentary rocks from the Jeerinah Formation (2.63 billion yrs) and Carawine Dolomite (2.55 billion yrs) of the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) drilled by the Agouron Institute in 2012, which previously were suggested to be suitable for biomarker studies, were metamorphosed to the greenschist facies. This is higher than previously reported. Both the mineral assemblages (carbonate, quartz, Fe-chlorite, muscovite, microcline, rutile, and pyrite with absence of illite) and chlorite geothermometry suggest that the rocks were exposed to temperatures higher than 300 °C and probably ∼400 °C, consistent with greenschist-facies metamorphism. This facies leads to the destruction of any biomarkers and explains why the extraction of hydrocarbon biomarkers from pristine drill cores has not been successful. However, we show that the rocks are cut by younger formation-specific carbonate veins containing primary oil-bearing fluid inclusions and solid bitumens. Type 1 veins in the Carawine Dolomite consist of dolomite, quartz and solid bitumen, whereas type 2 veins in the Jeerinah Formation consist of calcite. Within the veins fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures and calcite twinning geothermometry indicate maximum temperatures of ∼200 °C for type 1 veins and ∼180 °C for type 2 veins. Type 1 veins have typical isotopic values for reprecipitated Archean sea-water carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 3 ‰ to 0‰ and δ18OVPDB ranging from - 13 ‰ to - 7 ‰, while type 2 veins have isotopic values that are similar to hydrothermal carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 18

  2. Comparative study of Se oxyanions retention on three argillaceous rocks: Upper Toarcian (Tournemire, France), Black Shales (Tournemire, France) and Opalinus Clay (Mont Terri, Switzerland).

    PubMed

    Frasca, B; Savoye, S; Wittebroodt, C; Leupin, O X; Michelot, J-L

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of selenium oxyanion sorption was carried out by means of batch sorption experiments on three argillaceous rocks that differ in their mineralogical compositions and textural properties. The results show no selenate (Se(VI)) sorption onto the argillaceous rocks after 60 days, but clear sorption of selenite (Se(IV)), the extent being closely related to the initial Se(IV) concentration. At the lowest concentration ([Se(IV)]eq < 10(-8) mol L(-1)), the ranking of rock affinity for Se(IV) is Black Shales > Opalinus Clay (OPA) > Upper Toarcian, with Rd values of 910 ± 70, 600 ± 65 and 470 ± 70 mL g(-1) respectively. The Se(IV) sorption isotherms acquired for the three argillaceous rocks can be reproduced well by means of Langmuir formalism, particularly with a two-site Langmuir model. The comparison of the Se(IV) sorption isotherms obtained for these three rocks led to identification of pyrite associated with natural organic matter (NOM) as one of the main phases involved in selenium retention. While the desorption results suggested a significant Se(IV) reduction in the Upper Toarcian samples, the reversible sorption shown on the Black Shales and OPA samples was correlated with a sulfate increase, symptomatic of surface oxidation of pyrite which could limit the Se(IV) reduction in favor of sorption.

  3. Mechanical Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad M.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-01-09

    This report is being prepared under the FY14 activity FT-14LA0818069, Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-Field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations, and fulfills the Los Alamos National Laboratory deliverable M4FT-14LA08180610, which in PICS:NE is titled “Draft report, Test Plan for Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations.” Since the report is an intermediate deliverable intended as input to the eventual test plan for this test, rather than being an actual test plan, the activity title is used as the title of this document to avoid confusion as to the contents in the report. This report summarizes efforts to simulate mechanical processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report summarizes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt “, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013).

  4. Effects of Host-rock Fracturing on Elastic-deformation Source Models of Volcano Deflation.

    PubMed

    Holohan, Eoghan P; Sudhaus, Henriette; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Walsh, John J

    2017-09-08

    Volcanoes commonly inflate or deflate during episodes of unrest or eruption. Continuum mechanics models that assume linear elastic deformation of the Earth's crust are routinely used to invert the observed ground motions. The source(s) of deformation in such models are generally interpreted in terms of magma bodies or pathways, and thus form a basis for hazard assessment and mitigation. Using discontinuum mechanics models, we show how host-rock fracturing (i.e. non-elastic deformation) during drainage of a magma body can progressively change the shape and depth of an elastic-deformation source. We argue that this effect explains the marked spatio-temporal changes in source model attributes inferred for the March-April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion. We find that pronounced deflation-related host-rock fracturing can: (1) yield inclined source model geometries for a horizontal magma body; (2) cause significant upward migration of an elastic-deformation source, leading to underestimation of the true magma body depth and potentially to a misinterpretation of ascending magma; and (3) at least partly explain underestimation by elastic-deformation sources of changes in sub-surface magma volume.

  5. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  6. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-08

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  7. A tree diagram for compiling a methodology to evaluate suitability of host rock for geological disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, A.; Sawada, A.; Goto, J.; Ishii, E.; Moriya, T.; Inagaki, M.; Kubota, S.; Ebashi, T.

    2012-12-01

    In Japan, the Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act states that the siting process of geological repository for vitrified high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and low-level radioactive waste containing long-lived nuclides (TRU waste) shall consist of three stages. In the first stage, the Preliminary Investigation Areas (PIAs) will be selected by excluding these areas where future significant impacts of natural phenomena such as volcanism and rock deformation are expected based on literature information. The Detailed Investigation Areas (DIAs) will be then selected in the second stage among PIAs focusing on suitability of the host rock where the underground facility is constructed, as well as confirming the results of the first stage through a series of surface-based field activities such as regional geophysics and borehole investigations. The suitability of the host rock is evaluated taking account of thermal, hydrologic, mechanical and geochemical conditions and the volume of host rock, based on the site descriptive models which are constructed by integrating geoscientific information obtained from step-wise investigations. However, due to the limitation of such information in particular in the early stages of investigation, the relatively large uncertainties are associated with the developed site descriptive models. In addition, the integration of above-mentioned multi-disciplinary site investigation information into a site descriptive model is very complex task. It is therefore essential to clarify relationships between the important factors for both safety assessment (SA) and repository design (Design) and the information obtained by the site investigations via site descriptive models. Taking this into account, we have developed a method for evaluating the suitability of the host rock by linking site investigations, SA and Design. In this method, special attention has been paid to uncertainties associated with the site descriptive models and the degree

  8. Phosphates in some missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Foord, E.E.; Keller, D.J.; Keller, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays. The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspora, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore ("burley" clay). The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality. The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore host

  9. Evaluation of the predictive capability of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical models for a heated bentonite/clay system (HE-E) in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Garitte, B.; Shao, H.; Wang, X. R.; ...

    2017-01-09

    Process understanding and parameter identification using numerical methods based on experimental findings are a key aspect of the international cooperative project DECOVALEX. Comparing the predictions from numerical models against experimental results increases confidence in the site selection and site evaluation process for a radioactive waste repository in deep geological formations. In the present phase of the project, DECOVALEX-2015, eight research teams have developed and applied models for simulating an in-situ heater experiment HE-E in the Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory in Switzerland. The modelling task was divided into two study stages, related to prediction and interpretation ofmore » the experiment. A blind prediction of the HE-E experiment was performed based on calibrated parameter values for both the Opalinus Clay, that were based on the modelling of another in-situ experiment (HE-D), and modelling of laboratory column experiments on MX80 granular bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture .. After publication of the experimental data, additional coupling functions were analysed and considered in the different models. Moreover, parameter values were varied to interpret the measured temperature, relative humidity and pore pressure evolution. The analysis of the predictive and interpretative results reveals the current state of understanding and predictability of coupled THM behaviours associated with geologic nuclear waste disposal in clay formations.« less

  10. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (<˜45 °C) and high seawater:hydrothermal fluid (SW:HF) mixing ratios (>10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios <10, anaerobic processes dominate the energy landscape; sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are more exergonic than any of the aerobic respiration reactions. By comparison, in the basalt-hosted and felsic rock-hosted systems, sulfide oxidation was the predominant catabolic energy source at all temperatures (and SW:HF ratios) considered. The energetics of catabolism at the troctolite-basalt hybrid system were intermediate to these extremes. Reaction energetics for anabolism in chemolithoautotrophs—represented here by the synthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, saccharides, and amines—were generally most favorable at moderate temperatures (22-32 °C) and corresponding SW:HF mixing ratios (˜15). In peridotite-hosted and the troctolite-basalt hybrid systems

  11. Effect of host-rock rheology on dyke shape, thickness and magma overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, Rémi; Hieronymus, Christoph F.

    2017-03-01

    The size and thickness of dykes is of fundamental importance for volcano dynamics because dykes are the primary path for magma transport, and because large numbers of dykes often comprise a major proportion of the volcanic edifice and of the underlying crust. Standard elastic models predict dyke geometry to be elliptic in cross-section for constant overpressure and uniform host-rock properties, whereas observations show that dyke thickness is typically more nearly constant with a sharp taper at the ends. Moreover, the predicted overpressures required to inflate dykes in a purely elastic medium are often significantly higher (>150 MPa and up to 2 GPa) than those estimated by other means (about 1-50 MPa). In this study, we use 2-D finite element models to test whether other host-rock rheologies lead to more realistic dyke shapes and overpressures. We examine three different rheologies, each of which is affected by the presence of the dyke itself: (1) elasticity with reduced moduli in regions of low pressure or tension; (2) elastoplasticity with plastic failure in the high-stress regions surrounding the dyke tips; (3) viscoelasticity with a viscosity decrease due to heating by the dyke. We use rheological parameters obtained from laboratory experiments whenever possible, and assume static conditions for the final dyke shape. We find that all three rheologies tend to make the dyke more rectangular relative to the elliptical dykes of the linearly elastic models. The change in shape is due to enhanced deformation in the high-stress zone surrounding the dyke tip. We also find that the overpressure required to inflate an initially thin dyke to a given thickness is reduced for all three rheologies. The greatest decrease in overpressure by a factor of about 0.1 is observed for the elastoplastic model, and for the viscoelastic model if the dyke intrudes into moderately pre-heated host-rock. We discuss our results with respect to dyke observations from Rum Island (Scotland

  12. Effect of host-rock rheology on dyke shape, thickness, and magma overpressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, Rémi; Hieronymus, Christoph F.

    2016-12-01

    The size and thickness of dykes is of fundamental importance for volcano dynamics because dykes are the primary path for magma transport, and because large numbers of dykes often comprise a major proportion of the volcanic edifice and of the underlying crust. Standard elastic models predict dyke geometry to be elliptic in cross-section for constant overpressure and uniform host-rock properties, whereas observations show that dyke thickness is typically more nearly constant with a sharp taper at the ends. Moreover, the predicted overpressures required to inflate dykes in a purely elastic medium are often significantly higher (>150 MPa and up to 2 GPa) than those estimated by other means (about 1-50 MPa). In this study, we use two-dimensional finite element models to test whether other host-rock rheologies lead to more realistic dyke shapes and overpressures. We examine 3 different rheologies, each of which is affected by the presence of the dyke itself: (1) elasticity with reduced moduli in regions of low pressure or tension; (2) elasto-plasticity with plastic failure in the high-stress regions surrounding the dyke tips; (3) visco-elasticity with a viscosity decrease due to heating by the dyke. We use rheological parameters obtained from laboratory experiments whenever possible, and assume static conditions for the final dyke shape. We find that all 3 rheologies tend to make the dyke more rectangular relative to the elliptical dykes of the linearly elastic models. The change in shape is due to enhanced deformation in the high-stress zone surrounding the dyke tip. We also find that the overpressure required to inflate an initially thin dyke to a given thickness is reduced for all 3 rheologies. The greatest decrease in overpressure by a factor of about 0.1 is observed for the elasto-plastic model, and for the visco-elastic model if the dyke intrudes into moderately pre-heated host-rock. We discuss our results with respect to dyke observations from Rum Island (Scotland

  13. Geology and geochemistry of three sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits in Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, R.P.; Cunningham, C.G.; Bostick, N.H.; Dean, W.E.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1991-01-01

    Five sedimentary-rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits have been discovered since 1980 in southwestern Guizhou Province (PRC). Submicron-sized gold is disseminated in silty carbonate and carbonaceous shale host rocks of Permian and Triassic age. Arsenic, antimony, mercury, and thallium accompany the gold. Associated hydrothermal alteration resulted in decarbonatization of limestone, silicification, and argillization, and depletion of base metals, barium, and many other elements. Organic material occurs in most host rocks and ores. It was apparently devolatilized during a regional heating event that preceded hydrothermal activity, and thus was not mobilized during mineralization, and did not affect gold deposition. The geologic setting of the Guizhou deposits includes many features that are similar to those of sedimentary-rock-hosted deposits of the Great Basin, western United States. The heavy-element suite that accompanies gold is the same, but base metals are even scarcer in the Guizhou deposits than they are in U.S. deposits. The Guizhou deposits discovered to date are smaller than most U.S. deposits and have no known spatially associated igneous rocks. ?? 1991.

  14. Low temperature geomicrobiology follows host rock composition along a geochemical gradient in lau basin.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Sia, Tiffany Y; Haddad, Amanda G; Briscoe, Lindsey J; Toner, Brandy M; Girguis, Peter R; Edwards, Katrina J

    2013-01-01

    The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila, and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity) to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria, and ε-proteobacteria, while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis.

  15. Low Temperature Geomicrobiology Follows Host Rock Composition Along a Geochemical Gradient in Lau Basin

    PubMed Central

    Sylvan, Jason B.; Sia, Tiffany Y.; Haddad, Amanda G.; Briscoe, Lindsey J.; Toner, Brandy M.; Girguis, Peter R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2013-01-01

    The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila, and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity) to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria, and ε-proteobacteria, while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis. PMID:23543862

  16. Interaction Between Hyperalkaline Fluids and Rocks Hosting Repositories for Radioactive Waste: Reactive Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Josep M.; Maeder, Urs K.

    2005-09-15

    Reactive transport calculations simulating the interaction between hyperalkaline solutions derived from the degradation of cement and potential host rocks for repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste have been performed. Two different cases are shown: (a) The example of the planned repository at Wellenberg and (b) the modeling of the GTS-HPF experiment at the Grimsel Test Site. The GIMRT code has been used for the simulations. Mineral reactions are described by kinetic rate laws. The reaction rates for the primary minerals are based on experimentally determined rates published in the literature and geometric considerations combined with measurements regarding mineral surface areas. Relatively fast rates for the secondary minerals have been used, so the results resemble the local equilibrium solution for these minerals. In both cases, the alteration of the rock and the precipitation of secondary phases cause a reduction in the permeability of the system, which would actually be beneficial for the performance of a repository. Mineral surface area controls, to a large extent, the amount of mineral alteration and the change in permeability.

  17. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  18. Critical elements in sediment-hosted deposits (clastic-dominated Zn-Pb-Ag, Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb, sedimentary rock-hosted Stratiform Cu, and carbonate-hosted Polymetallic Deposits): A review: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, Erin; Hitzman, Murray W.; Leach, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Some sediment-hosted base metal deposits, specifically the clastic-dominated (CD) Zn-Pb deposits, carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits, sedimentary-rock hosted stratiform copper deposits, and carbonate-hosted polymetallic (“Kipushi type”) deposits, are or have been important sources of critical elements including Co, Ga, Ge, and Re. The generally poor data concerning trace element concentrations in these types of sediment-hosted ores suggest that there may be economically important concentrations of critical elements yet to be recognized.

  19. Clay alteration and gold deposition in the genesis and blue star deposits, Eureka County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drews-Armitage, S. P.; Romberger, S.B.; Whitney, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Genesis and Blue Star sedimentary rock-hosted gold deposits occur within the 40-mile-long Carlin trend and are located in Eureka County, Nevada. The deposits are hosted within the Devonian calcareous Popovich Formation, the siliciclastic Rodeo Creek unit and the siliciclastic Vinini Formation. The host rocks have undergone contact metamorphism, decalcification, silicification, argillization, and supergene oxidation. Detailed characterization of the alteration patterns, mineralogy, modes of occurrence, and associated geochemistry of clay minerals resulted in the following classifications: least altered rocks, found distal to the orebody, consisting of both metamorphosed and unmetamorphosed host rock that has not been completely decalcified; and altered rocks, found proximal to the orebody that have been decalcified. Altered rocks are classified further into the following groups based on clay mineral content: silicic, 1 to 10 percent clay; silicicargillic, 10 to 35 percent clay; and argillic, 35 to 80 percent clay. Clay species identified are 1M illite, 2M1 illite, kaolinite, halloysite, and dioctahedral smectite. An early hydrothermal event resulted in the precipitation of euhedral kaolinite and at least one generation of silica. This event occurred contemporaneously with decalcification which increased rock permeability and porosity. A second clay alteration event resulted in the precipitation of hydrothermal 1M illite which replaced hydrothermal kaolinite and is associated with gold deposition. Silver and silica deposition is also associated with this phase of hydrothermal alteration. Hydrothermal alteration was followed by supergene alteration which resulted in the formation of supergene kaolinite, halloysite, and smectite as well as the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals. Supergene clays are concentrated along faults, dike margins, and within rocks containing carbonate. Gold mineralization is not associated with supergene clay minerals within the Genesis and

  20. Mineralogical, chemical and K-Ar isotopic changes in Kreyenhagen Shale whole rocks and <2 µm clay fractions during natural burial and hydrous-pyrolysis experimental maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; Lewan, Michael D.; Dolan, Michael P.; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas; Curtis, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of smectite layers in the illite–smectite mixed layers of the pyrolyzed outcrop <2 μm fraction remain during thermal experiments, especially above 310 °C. With no illitization detected above 310 °C, smectite appears to have inhibited rather than promoted generation of expelled oil from decomposition of bitumen. This hindrance is interpreted to result from bitumen impregnating the smectite interlayer sites and rock matrix. Bitumen remains in the <2 μm fraction despite leaching with H2O2. Its presence in the smectite interlayers is apparent by the inability of the clay fraction to fully expand or collapse once bitumen generation from the thermal decomposition of the kerogen is completed, and by almost invariable K–Ar ages confirming for the lack of any K supply and/or radiogenic 40Ar removal. This suggests that once bitumen impregnates the porosity of a progressively maturing source rock, the pore system is no longer wetted by water and smectite to illite conversion ceases. Experimental attempts to evaluate the smectite conversion to illite should preferentially use low-TOC rocks to avoid inhibition of the reaction by bitumen impregnation.

  1. Identification and characterization of hydrothermally altered zones in granite by combining synthetic clay content logs with magnetic mineralogical investigations of drilled rock cuttings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Carola; Kontny, Agnes; Kohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Clay minerals as products of hydrothermal alteration significantly influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties of crystalline rock. Therefore, the localization and characterization of alteration zones by downhole measurements is a great challenge for the development of geothermal reservoirs. The magnetite bearing granite of the geothermal site in Soultz-sous-Forêts (France) experienced hydrothermal alteration during several tectonic events and clay mineral formation is especially observed in alteration halos around fracture zones. During the formation of clay minerals, magnetite was oxidized into hematite, which significantly reduces the magnetic susceptibility of the granite from ferrimagnetic to mostly paramagnetic values. The aim of this study was to find out if there exists a correlation between synthetic clay content logs (SCCLs) and measurements of magnetic susceptibility on cuttings in the granite in order to characterize their alteration mineralogy. Such a correlation has been proven for core samples of the EPS1 reference well. SCCLs were created from gamma ray and fracture density logs using a neural network. These logs can localize altered fracture zones in the GPK1-4 wells, where no core material is available. Mass susceptibility from 261 cutting samples of the wells GPK1-GPK4 was compared with the neural network derived synthetic logs. We applied a combination of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements with optical and electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to discriminate different stages of alteration. We found, that also in the granite cuttings an increasing alteration grade is characterized by an advancing oxidation of magnetite into hematite and a reduction of magnetic susceptibility. A challenge to face for the interpretation of magnetic susceptibility data from cuttings material is that extreme alteration grades can also display increased susceptibilities due to the formation of secondary magnetite

  2. A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

    2004-05-14

    A new disposal well was drilled in the vicinity of an injection well that had been in operation for 12 years. The drilling activities provided an opportunity to assess the fate and transport of waste products injected in the nearby well, and the impact, if any, on the host geologic formation. The origin of the fluid collected while drilling the new well and the interaction between injected waste and the formation were investigated using analyses of formation waters, waste, and formation minerals, by applying traditional graphical methods and sophisticated numerical models. This approach can be used to solve a wide range of geochemical problems related to deep well injection of waste. Trilinear Piper diagrams, Stiff diagrams, and correlation plots show that the chemical characteristics of recovered fluid at the new well are similar to those of formation water. The concentrations of most major constituents in the fluid appear diluted when compared to formation water sampled at other locations. This could be explained by mixing with waste, which is less saline than formation water. However, the waste injected near the new well consists primarily of ammonia and sulfate, and these waste constituents are not found at concentrations elevated enough to suggest that significant mixing of formation water with waste has occurred. To determine whether chemical interactions between injected waste and formation could explain the chemistry of fluid recovered from the new well, we simulated the chemical reaction between waste, formation water, and the formation rock by numerical modeling. Initial modeling calculations were done using a multicomponent geochemical reaction-path model to simulate fresh waste reacting with the formation. A more complex simulation coupling flow, transport, and reaction was then run using a multicomponent geochemical reactive transport model. These numerical simulations were carried out to calculate porosity changes and evaluate chemical processes

  3. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  4. Flexure and faulting of sedimentary host rocks during growth of igneous domes, Henry Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.D.; Pollard, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of sedimentary rocks about 4 km thick was bent, stretched and uplifted during the growth of three igneous domes in the southern Henry Mountains. Mount Holmes, Mount Ellsworth and Mount Hillers are all about 12 km in diameter, but the amplitudes of their domes are about 1.2, 1.85 and 3.0 km, respectively. These mountains record successive stages in the inflation of near-surface diorite intrusions that are probably laccolithic in origin. The host rocks deformed along networks of outcrop-scale faults, or deformation bands, marked by crushed grains, consolidation of the porous sandstone and small displacements of sedimentary beds. Zones of deformation bands oriented parallel to the beds and formation contacts subdivided the overburden into thin mechanical layers that slipped over one another during doming. Measurements of outcrop-scale fault populations at the three mountains reveal a network of faults that strikes at high angles to sedimentary beds which themselves strike tangentially about the domes. These faults have normal and reverse components of slip that accommodated bending and stretching strains within the strata. An early stage of this deformation is displayed at Mount Holmes, where states of stress computed from three fault samples correlate with the theoretical distribution of stresses resulting from bending of thin, circular, elastic plates. Field observations and analysis of frictional driving stresses acting on horizontal planes above an opening-mode dislocation, as well as the paleostress analysis of faulting, indicate that bedding-plane slip and layer flexure were important components of the early deformation. As the amplitude of doming increased, radial and circumferential stretching of the strata and rotation of the older faults in the steepening limbs of the domes increased the complexity of the fault patterns. Steeply-dipping, map-scale faults with dip-slip displacements indicate a late-stage jostling of major blocks over the central

  5. Metal transports and enrichments in iron depositions hosted in basaltic rocks. II: Metal rich fluids and Fe origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Xuetong; Hu, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on revealing the mechanism of metal transport, enrichment and Fe origin of iron deposition during water basalt interactions occurred in basaltic rocks. Observations of the iron deposits (anhydrite-magnetite-pyroxene type deposits) hosted in K-rich basaltic rocks in the Mesozoic volcanic area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River valley, China, indicate that the mechanism of metal transport and enrichment for those deposits are significant objective to scientists, and the Fe origin problem is not well resolved. Here the metal transport, enrichment and iron origin have been investigated in high temperature experiments of water basaltic interactions. These deposits were accompanying a wide zone with metal alteration. The effects of hydrothermal alteration on major rock-forming element concentrations in basaltic rock were investigated by systematically comparing the chemical compositions of altered rocks with those of fresh rocks. In the deposits, these metals are distributed throughout altered rocks that exhibit vertical zoning from the deeper to the shallow. Then, combined with the investigations of the metal-alterations, we performed kinetic experiments of water-basaltic rock interactions using flow-through reactors in open systems at temperatures from 20 °C to 550 °C, 23-34 MPa. Release rates for the rock-forming elements from the rocks have been measured. Experiments provide the release rates for various elements at a large temperature range, and indicate that the dissolution rates (release rates) for various elements vary with temperature. Si, Al, and K have high release rates at temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C; the maximum release rates (RMX) for Si are reached at temperatures from 300 °C to 400 °C. The RMXs for Ca, Mg, and Fe are at low temperatures from 20 °C to 300 °C. Results demonstrate that Fe is not released from 400 °C to 550 °C, and indicate that when deep circling fluids passed through basaltic rocks, Fe was not mobile, and

  6. Alteration of national glass in radioactive waste repository host rocks: A conceptional review

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The storage of high-level radioactive wastes in host rocks containing natural glass has potential chemical advantages, especially if the initial waste temperatures are as high as 250/sup 0/C. However, it is not certain how natural glasses will decompose when exposed to an aqueous phase in a repository environment. The hydration and devitrification of both rhyolitic and natural basaltic natural glasses are reviewed in the context of hypothetical thermodynamic phase relations, infrared spectroscopic data and laboratory studies of synthetic glasses exposed to steam. The findings are compared with field observations and laboratory studies of hydrating and devitrifying natural glasses. The peculiarities of the dependence of hydration and devitrification behavior on compositional variation is noted. There is substantial circumstantial evidence to support the belief that rhyolitic glasses differ from basaltic glasses in their thermodynamic stability and their lattice structure, and that this is manifested by a tendency of the former to hydrate rather than devitrify when exposed to water. Further research remains to be done to confirm the differences in glass structure, and to determine both physically and chemically dependent properties of natural glasses as a function of composition.

  7. Chemistry of inner piedmont metamorphic rocks hosting a stratiform tin occurrence near Forest City, NC

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.J.; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Eckert, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Concordant, leucocratic lenses in regionally persistent upper amphibolite-grade biotite-amphibole gneiss have been identified by Carr and others (1984) as the bedrock source of alluvial cassiterite in the Inner Piedmont Belt of North and South Carolina. The lenses are composed of quartz, microcline, and dravitic tourmaline plus minor biotite, muscovite, and spessartine garnet; most are barren. Partial major-element analyses of drillcore samples from the gneiss suggest a protolith intermediate in composition between graywacke and arkose. Sill-like, two-mica granitoid bodies interlayered with the metasediments are corundum-normative and are granodioritic in composition. Variation plots of selected trace-element abundances discriminate effectively among (1) biotite-amphibole gneiss enriched in Mn, Zn, and V; (2) granitoids enriched in Ba, Sr, and Zr; and (3) laminated gneisses below the tin zone containing elevated levels of Ni and Cr that suggest an addition of mafic (volcanic.) material to the protolith. Lithium contents are as high as 860 ppm in 5 of 9 gneiss samples and in all 4 granitoids are 3-10 times the average abundance in common igneous and sedimentary rocks; biotite and amphibole are the probably host minerals. Lithium-charged fluids generated during metamorphism may have aided local partial melting and remobilization of tin dispersed (as detrital cassiterite.) in the sedimentary protolith. Li may prove useful in locating other stratiform tin occurrences in metamorphic terranes and in understanding processes of localization. Carr, R.S., III, and others, 1984.

  8. Major phylum-level differences between porefluid and host rock bacterial communities in the terrestrial deep subsurface.

    PubMed

    Momper, Lily; Kiel Reese, Brandi; Zinke, Laura; Wanger, Greg; Osburn, Magdalena R; Moser, Duane; Amend, Jan P

    2017-07-05

    Earth's deep subsurface biosphere (DSB) is home to a vast number and wide variety of microorganisms. Although difficult to access and sample, deep subsurface environments have been probed through drilling programs, exploration of mines and sampling of deeply sourced vents and springs. In an effort to understand the ecology of deep terrestrial habitats, we examined bacterial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), the former Homestake gold mine, in South Dakota, USA. Whole genomic DNA was extracted from deeply circulating groundwater and corresponding host rock (at a depth of 1.45 km below ground surface). Pyrotag DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed diverse communities of putative chemolithoautotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, numerous candidate phyla and unique rock-associated microbial assemblage. There was a clear and near-total separation of communities between SURF deeply circulating fracture fluids and SURF host-rocks. Sequencing data from SURF compared against five similarly sequenced terrestrial subsurface sites in Europe and North America revealed classes Clostridia and Betaproteobacteria were dominant in terrestrial fluids. This study presents a unique analysis showing differences in terrestrial subsurface microbial communities between fracture fluids and host rock through which those fluids permeate. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using thetemperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain,Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

    2003-11-25

    A large volume of temperature data has been collected from a very large, underground heater test, the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The DST was designed to obtain thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) data in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain. Sophisticated numerical models have been developed to analyze the collected THMC data. In these analyses, thermal conductivities measured from core samples have been used as input parameters to the model. However, it was not known whether these core measurements represented the true field-scale thermal conductivity of the host rock. Realizing these difficulties, elaborate, computationally intensive geostatistical simulations have also been performed to obtain field-scale thermal conductivity of the host rock from the core measurements. In this paper, we use the temperature data from the DST as the input (instead of the measured core-scale thermal conductivity values) to develop an estimate of the field-scale thermal conductivity values. Assuming a conductive thermal regime, we develop an analytical solution for the temperature rise in the host rock of the DST; and using a nonlinear fitting routine, we obtain a best-fit estimate of field-scale thermal conductivity for the DST host rock. The temperature data collected from the DST shows clear evidence of two distinct thermal regimes: a zone below boiling (wet) and a zone above boiling (dry). We obtain estimates of thermal conductivity for both the wet and dry zones. We also analyze the sensitivity of these estimates to the input heating power of the DST.

  10. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Secor, D.T. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    This report reviews the geology of the Piedmont Province of South Carolina with the aim of designating rock units favorable for field exploration for a potential underground repository for the storage of radioactive waste. Most of the rocks in the South Carolina Piedmont are metamorphosed sedimentary volcanic or igneous rocks that have experienced at least one episode of strong deformation. As a consequence of this deformation, they have irregular shapes, making it difficult to predict their subsurface extent. In evaluating the suitability of the rock units for radioactive waste storage, certain criteria were found to be particularly useful. The requirements that the storage site be located in a large volume of homogeneous, impermeable, relatively unfractured rock was the most important criteria in eliminating most of the Piedmont rock units for consideration as field study areas. Six large late- to post-tectonic igneous plutons (Winnsboro, Liberty Hill, Ogden, Newberry, Lowrys, and Bald Rock) are recommended as field study areas.

  11. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  12. Fossil micrometeorites from Finland — Basic features, scientific potential, and characteristics of the mesoproterozoic host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettrup, Dirk; Deutsch, Alexander; Pihlaja, Pekka; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    The oldest known micrometeorites occur in the up to 1800 m thick Mesoproterozoic Satakunta sandstone in SW-Finland. This typical red bed formation covers a graben with the dimensions of about 15 × 100 km2. The Satakunta formation correlates with the Jotnian sandstone, overlaying at several locations in Fennoscandia basement rocks, which are part of the about 1.8 to 1.9 Ga old Svecofennian orogenic belt. The age of the Satakunta formation s.s. is not well constrained: Sedimentation may have already begun 1.65 Ga ago, and ended prior to the intrusion of the post-Jotnian diabases (1.26 Ga). The depositional environment of the Satakunta sediments was primarily mostly fluvial. In arkose sandstones of this formation, over 60 cosmic spherules (melted micrometeorites) have been identified. They belong to different mineralogical types, and display unaltered mineralogical and chemical features, including the presence of a still glassy matrix. Moreover, this cosmic dust lacks clear signs of mechanical transport. So far, the reasons for the excellent preservation of the micrometeorites are enigmatic. Conceivable factors that generally may have influenced the relatively high abundance of the micrometeorites in the Satakunta formation are (i) distinct concentrations mechanisms acting prior to the embedding into the host sediment, (ii) settling of the spherules at low energy, and lack of further transport in the sedimentological environment, (iii) only minor diagenetic compaction of the host sediments at rather reducing conditions, and (iv) a quite specific time-integrated temperature history for over a billion years. In this contribution, we outline sedimentological characteristics of both, barren, and spherule-carrying Satakunta lithologies. In addition, we discuss possible scenarios for deposition, and survival of this ancient cosmic dust. Understanding of these processes is of prime importance as red beds are quite common lithologies in the Earth's history, and hence, may

  13. Deformation of host rocks and flow of magma during growth of minette dikes and breccia-bearing intrusions near Ship Rock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, Paul T.; Pollard, David D.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied a small group of minette dikes and plugs that crop out within a flat-lying sequence of siltstone and shale near Ship Rock, a prominent volcanic throat of tuff breccia in northwestern New Mexico. Seven dikes form a radial pattern about Ship Rock we describe in detail the northeastern dike, which has an outcrop length of about 2,900 m, an average thickness of 2.3 m, and a maximum thickness of 7.2 m. The dike is composed of 35 discrete segments arranged in echelon; orientation. of dike segments ranges systematically from N. 52? E. to N. 66? E. A prominent joint set strikes parallel to the segments and is localized within several tens of meters of the dike. Regional joint patterns display no obvious relation to dike orientation. Small offsets of segment contacts, as well as wedge-shaped bodies of crumpled host rock within segments mark the sites of coalescence of smaller segments during dike growth. Bulges in the dike contact, which represent a nondilational component of growth, indicate that wall rocks were brecciated and eroded during the flow of magma. Breccias make up about 9 percent of the 7,176-m 2 area of the dike, are concentrated in its southwest half, and are commonly associated with its thickest parts. We also describe three subcircular plugs; each plug is smaller than 30 m in diameter, is laterally associated with a dike, and contains abundant breccias. Field evidence indicates that these plugs grew from the dikes by brecciation and erosion of wallrocks and that the bulges in the contact of the northeastern dike represent an initial stage of this process. From continuum-mechanical models of host-rock deformation, we conclude that dike propagation was the dominant mechanism for creating conduits for magma ascent where the host rock was brittle and elastic. At a given driving pressure, dikes dilate to accept greater volumes of magma than plugs, and for a given dilation, less work is done on the host rocks. In addition, the pressure required

  14. Gas Migration In The Opalinus Clay As A Function Of The Gas Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2008-07-01

    Clay formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be backfilled in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. After healing and re-saturation of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and saturation of the backfill, the waste containers and the metallic components will corrode resulting in a generation of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon dioxide will be released as a result of oxidation and thermal decomposition of the organic components in the waste and in the clay. If the disposal boreholes and chambers are sealed gas-tight, high gas pressure may be produced leading to the potential generation of fractures in the host rock which could influence the integrity of the repository. Therefore it is essential that the gases migrate through the technical barriers (backfill) or into the surrounding host rock at lower pressure and without any irreversible damage of the repository. In order to estimate the consequences of the gas generation the knowledge of the gas paths in the host rock and the knowledge of the parameters which influence the gas migration in the host rock are important. During an ongoing project at the underground research laboratory Mt. Terri in Switzerland the gas migration in the undisturbed over-consolidated Opalinus Clay is investigated. (authors)

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, four companies including H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay, Old Hickory Clay and Unimin mined ball clay in four states. Based on a preliminary survey of the ball clay industry, production reached 1.32 Mt valued at $53.3 million. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producer state with 61% of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky.

  16. Clays, specialty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the specialty clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. The specialty clays mined in the U.S. are ball clay, fuller's earth, bentonite, fire clay, and kaolin. Sales of specialty clays in the U.S. were around 17 Mt in 1997. Approximately 53 kt of specialty clays were imported.

  17. Experimental Determination of Clay Mineral Reactions in Clastic Reservoir Rock Resulting from the Injection of Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangini, S. A.; Shaw, C. A.; Skidmore, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Cretaceous Frontier Formation of the Powder River Basin, WY has been considered as a potential reservoir for storing anthropogenic CO2. The reservoir zones are composed of fine-grained quartz and potassium feldspar rich sandstones, cemented with clay minerals (kaolinite and interlayered illite and montmorillonite). The purpose of these experiments is to determine whether susceptible minerals such as illite, montmorillonite, and potassium feldspar undergo in-situ 'weathering' reactions when exposed to the high concentrations of carbonic acid generated by the dissolution of supercritical CO2 in formation water. The transformation of these minerals has the potential to: 1.) open up pore space through dissolution; 2.) reduce pore space and/or close pore throats by precipitating new minerals, or 3.) cause little change if the reactions take place slowly. Core samples of the Frontier Formation were obtained from the USGS Core Repository in Denver, CO and their physical and mineralogical properties analyzed. Porosity and permeability of the cores have been determined by helium porosimetry and gas permeability testing. Pore space distribution was analyzed by CT scan. Mineralogy was determined by thin section analysis, X-Ray diffraction, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Ongoing experiments will expose the cores to CO2 saturated brine in a flow-through reactor at conditions similar to those found in the subsurface (100oC and 15MPa). Changes to the chemical composition of the brine will be determined by withdrawing samples at regular intervals during the experiment and analyzing their contents with ion chromatography and colorimetry. The physical and mineralogical properties of the cores will be analyzed after each experiment and compared to the initial conditions. We will report on the results of these experiments.

  18. Speciation of neptunium during sorption and diffusion in natural clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Bӧrner, P. J. B.; Drebert, J.; Frӧhlich, D. R.; Grolimund, D.; Kaplan, U.

    2016-05-01

    In argillaceous rocks, which are considered as a potential host rock for nuclear waste repositories, sorption and diffusion processes govern the migration behaviour of actinides like neptunium. For the safety analysis of such a repository, a molecular-level understanding of the transport and retardation phenomena of radioactive contaminants in the host rock is mandatory. The speciation of Np during sorption and diffusion in Opalinus Clay was studied at near neutral pH using a combination of spatially resolved synchrotron radiation techniques. During the sorption and diffusion experiments, the interaction of 8 μM Np(V) solutions with the clay lead to the formation of spots at the clay-water interface with increased Np concentrations as determined by μ-XRF. Several of these spots are correlated with areas of increased Fe concentration. Np L3-edge μ-XANES spectra revealed that up to 85% of the initial Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV). Pyrite could be identified by μ-XRD as a redox-active mineral phase responsible for the formation of Np(IV). The analysis of the diffusion profile within the clay matrix after an in-diffusion experiment for two months showed that Np(V) is progressively reduced with diffusion distance, i.e. Np(IV) amounted to ≈12% and ≈26% at 30 μm and 525 μm, respectively.

  19. New host/parasite record for very rare chewing louse Cuculotogaster arabicus (Clay, 1938) (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) on endemic mountain partridges of Arabian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Mohamed Gamal El-Den; Alahmed, Azzam; Shobrak, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The endemic avifauna of Arabia is unique and characteristic through the whole region. Little is known about these birds and their ectoparasites. The Arabian partridge Alectoris melanocephala (Rüppell, 1835) and Philby's partridge Alectoris philbyi Lowe, 1934 are two endemic species which are distributed through the Sarawat Mountains in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Captive breeding population of these birds were examined for chewing lice at the National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) near Ta'if. Only one rare species of louse, Cuculotogaster arabicus (Clay 1938), was found to infest these birds. The occurrence of such species is considered a first record of the genus Cuculotogaster from Saudi Arabia, and the association of C. arabicus with Philby's partridge is considered a new host/parasite association. The clear diagnostic characters, high definition photos, and drawing of male genitalia are available through this paper.

  20. A modified version of the combined in-diffusion/abrasive peeling technique for measuring diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in argillaceous rocks: a test study on the diffusion of caesium in Opalinus Clay.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Luc R; Müller, Werner

    2014-08-01

    A filter free diffusion set-up was developed for measuring the diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in indurated argillaceous rocks such as Opalinus Clay (OPA) that normally disintegrate when contacted with a solution. Small bore cores drilled parallel to the bedding plane and embedded in epoxy resin were found to be stable and could be used for performing in-diffusion measurements. The method was tested with the diffusion of caesium, spiked with caesium-134, in Opalinus Clay. The profile of Cs in the clay sample was determined with a modified version of the abrasive peeling technique. The diffusion parameters obtained for caesium were in fair agreement with those determined earlier using the classical through-diffusion technique where stainless steel filters were used to confine the samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrothermal zeolitisation controlled by host-rock lithofacies in the Periadriatic (Oligocene) Smrekovec submarine composite stratovolcano, Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Polona

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermal zeolites (laumontite, yugawaralite, analcime, heulandite, clinoptilolite), prehnite and pumpellyite have been recognised in a succession of volcanic, autoclastic, pyroclastic, resedimented volcaniclastic and mixed siliciclastic-volcaniclastic deposits. In cone-building lithofacies association attaining 310 m, the alteration minerals commonly change within a single normally graded depositional unit or alternate in the section on a dm- to m-scale, according to the host-rock lithofacies. Fine-grained deposits rich in juvenile glassy pyroclasts are altered to heulandite and clinoptilolite or analcime, and laumontite widely occurs in coarse-grained host-rocks (lapilli tuff, hyaloclastite breccia, volcaniclastic breccia, hyaloclastites) and fracture systems. In near-vent lithofacies association attaining 420 m, prehnite-laumontite, laumontite-analcime, and laumontite-heulandite-clinoptilolite zones developed as a result of superimposed thermal regime generated by the emplacement of an over 200 m thick sill. The recognised dependence of alteration on porosity, permeability and fracturing of the host-rock is closely related to hydrological conditions in the stratovolcano-hosted hydrothermal system with convective-advective flow regime. After separation of steam and gases from convecting hydrothermal fluids, denser liquids outflowed intermittently, preferentially through steeply inclined (20-30°) high-permeability layers in the stratovolcano edifice. In low-permeability layers the flow was slow and thermal conditions were mainly attained by conduction. Zeolites developed only in coarse- and fine-grained vitroclastic tuffs, presumably by the dissolution of volcanic glass. The interstratified siliciclastic siltstones, tuffites and resedimented deposits with low content of glassy particles are devoid of zeolites and indicate compositional constraint on zeolitisation. Lava flows, cooling in a submarine environment and undergoing disintegration and mingling with

  2. Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

  3. Heterogeneity in friction strength of an active fault by incorporation of fragments of the surrounding host rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naoki; Hirono, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    To understand the correlation between the mesoscale structure and the frictional strength of an active fault, we performed a field investigation of the Atera fault at Tase, central Japan, and made laboratory-based determinations of its mineral assemblages and friction coefficients. The fault zone contains a light gray fault gouge, a brown fault gouge, and a black fault breccia. Samples of the two gouges contained large amounts of clay minerals such as smectite and had low friction coefficients of approximately 0.2-0.4 under the condition of 0.01 m s-1 slip velocity and 0.5-2.5 MP confining pressure, whereas the breccia contained large amounts of angular quartz and feldspar and had a friction coefficient of 0.7 under the same condition. Because the fault breccia closely resembles the granitic rock of the hangingwall in composition, texture, and friction coefficient, we interpret the breccia as having originated from this protolith. If the mechanical incorporation of wall rocks of high friction coefficient into fault zones is widespread at the mesoscale, it causes the heterogeneity in friction strength of fault zones and might contribute to the evolution of fault-zone architectures.

  4. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  5. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  7. Seismic Properties of Opalinus Clay During Triaxial Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; Braun, G.

    Argillaceous formations are being considered as potential host rocks for repositories of radioactive waste. For analysing hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechani- cal properties an underground rock laboratory has been established in the reconnais- sance gallery of the Mont Terri situated in the Opalinus Clay formation. This host rock consists mainly of 40-70% clay minerals, 10-30% quartz and 5-20% calcite with a porosity of 12-18 vol.%. We used cubic Opalinus Clay samples, oriented normal, parallel and 45 to bedding to perform deformation experiments in a multi anvil appa- ratus with simultaneous seismic velocity measurements of Vp, Vs and shear splitting in the three orthogonal directions under various loading conditions. The results show marked inherent velocity anisotropy and shear wave splitting (up to more than 30%) related to the quasi-hexagonal fabric as revealed by X-ray texture measurements. The observed effects of foliation related anisotropy and, in addition, stress induced crack opening and crack closure, are important for interpreting the seismic response of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around tunnels with varying shape and orientation.

  8. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  9. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars.

    PubMed

    Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Leveille, R; Westall, F; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Bristow, T; Edwards, P; Berger, G

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10-50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100-1000, pH of ∽7.5-12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  10. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE PAGES

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; ...

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  11. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10-50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100-1000, pH of ~7.5-12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  12. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Leveille, R; Westall, F; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Bristow, T; Edwards, P; Berger, G

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ∽7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component. PMID:26213668

  13. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  14. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  15. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Li, Lianchong; Rutqvist, Jonny; Liu, Hui -Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  16. Geochemistry of banded iron formation (BIF) host rocks, Yishui county, North China : major element, REE and other trace element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, I.; Lee, I.; Yang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Banded iron formation (BIF) in Yishui area, Western Shangdong Province in North China was formed from late Archean to early Paleoproterizoic (2.6Ga-2.5Ga). Amphibolite, metasediment (schist, gneiss) and migmatitic granite consist of host rocks of the BIF in North China. To find characteristics of BIF host rocks, major element, rare earth element and trace element analyses of whole rocks were conducted. Major elements are analyzed using X-ray Fluorescene Spectrometer (XRF) and REE and trace elements are analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plazma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Amphibolites show large negative Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=0.91~0.99) and ranges of REE are ∑REE=305~380 ppm. LREE/HREE ratios are (La/Lu)cn=21.07~26.12. SiO2 contents are 35.1~44.2 wt% and some samples have high Loss On Ignition values ([LOI]=8.35-10.06 wt%) compared to other amphibolites. LOI value is related to water and volatile contents in the rocks and it reflects amphibolite got high degree of alteration. The Fe and Mg mobility effects are shown by Fe2O3/MgO ratios which are 4.7~5.7. The Mg# varies from 25.6 to 29.3. Migmatitic granites have various range of ∑REE=21~241 ppm. They show both Eu negative anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=0.53~0.71) and positive Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=1.95). Migmatitic granites have high SiO2 contents (68.8~72.2 wt%) and Al2O3 (13.4~14.2 wt%) contents. They have relatively low TiO2 (<0.5 wt%), MgO ( <0.6 wt%) and P2O5 (<0.2 wt%) contents. Gneiss samples were collected either from core or from mine pit. Core samples have negative Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=0.27~0.62) and show enriched LREE than HREE ((La/Lu)cn=45.60~62.32). Mine pit samples have positive Eu anomalies ([Eu]/[Eu*]=1.64~2.87) and almost flatten pattern except Eu anomalies ((La/Lu)cn=2.19~2.37). Core samples have higher Al2O3, TiO2, Na2O and K2O contents than mine pit samples. But remarkably mine pit samples have high contents of Fe2O3 (>40.4 wt%). Schists are divided into two types following REE patterns. Some

  17. Clay Mineral Structure Similar to Clays Observed in Mudstone on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-09

    This schematic shows the atomic structure of the smallest units that make up the layers and interlayer region of clay minerals. This structure is similar to the clay mineral in drilled rock powder collected by NASA Curiosity Mars rover.

  18. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Wenner, D.B.; Gillon, K.A.

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the Piedmont province of Georgia to designate areas that may be favorable for field exploration for consideration of a repository for storage of radioactive waste. The criteria utilized in such a designation was based upon consideration of the rock unit having favorable geological, geotechnical, and geohydrological features. The most important are that the rock unit have: (1) satisfactory unit dimensions (> 100 km/sup 2/ outcrop area and at least 1500 meters (approx. 5000 feet) depth of a continuous rock type); and (2) acceptable geohydrological conditions. Among all rock types, it is concluded that the granites of the large post-metamorphic plutons and large, homogeneous orthogneissic units offer the most favorable geologic settings for exploration for siting a radioactive waste repository. Virtually all other rock types, including most metavolcanic and metasedimentary lithologies have unacceptable unit dimensions, generally unfavorable geohydrologic settings, and deleterious mechanical and physical geotechnical properties. After consideration of all major lithologies that comprise the Georgia Piedmont, the following units were deemed favorable: (1) the Elberton Pluton; (2) the Siloam Pluton; (3) the Sparta Pluton; (4) two unnamed plutons adjacent to the Snelson body of S.W. Georgia; (5) the Lithonia Gneiss; (6) basement orthogneisses and charnockites of the Pine Mountain Belt.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SWEDISH DEEP REPOSITORY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN CRYSTALLINE HOST ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, Stig; Widing, Eva

    2003-02-27

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, has developed a system that ensures the safe handling of all kinds of radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power plants for a long time period ahead. The keystones of this system are: A transport system with the ship M/S Sigyn which has been in operation since 1983. A central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB, in operation since 1985. A final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level waste, SFR, in operation since 1988. In Sweden, the preferred method for final disposal of spent fuel is to encapsulate it in copper canisters and dispose them in a deep geological repository in crystalline host rock. SKB is planning to build an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central storage for spent fuel, CLAB. The siting for the deep repository has not yet been selected. A siting program with feasibility studies was completed in 2001. Early 2002 SKB received the necessary permits to start the site investigation at two potential sites for siting of the deep repository in Sweden. The site investigation at these sites started early 2002 and will be completed during 2007. Over the years, a number of generic studies of the layout of the operational area(s) above ground and underground facilities have been performed. During the site investigation phase the deep repository will be developed to conceptual design status and a number of design studies will be performed. These design studies are called Design Justification Statements (DJS). One important DJS is the selection of access routes from the ground level to the disposal level at tentatively 500 m depth and that study will be completed shortly. The repository design and layout of the disposal areas will be based on site specific conditions and results from demonstration of handling and equipment for canisters, buffer and backfilling. Some of these demonstrations have already been performed at Dspv HRL but additional development and

  20. Maine Pseudotachylyte Localities and the Role of Host Rock Anisotropy in Fault Zone Development and Frictional Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Three brittle strike-slip fault localities in coastal Maine have developed pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins and other reservoir structures in a variety of host rocks where the pre-existing layering can serve as a controlling fabric for brittle strike-slip reactivation. Host rocks with a poorly-oriented planar anisotropy at high angles to the shear direction will favor the development of R-shears in initial en echelon arrays as seen in the Two Lights and Richmond Island Fault Zones of Cape Elizabeth that cut gently-dipping phyllitic quartzites. These en echelon R-shears grow to through-going faults with the development of P-shear linkages across the dominantly contractional stepovers in the initial arrays. Pseudotachylyte on these faults is very localized, typically up to 1-2 mm in thickness and is restricted to through-going fault segments, P-shear linkages and some sidewall ripouts. Overall melt production is limited by the complex geometry of the multi-fault array. Host rocks with a favorably-oriented planar anisotropy for reactivation in brittle shear, however, preferentially develop a multitude of longer, non-coplanar layer-parallel fault segments. Pseudotachylyte in the newly-discovered Harbor Island Fault Zone in Muscongus Bay is developed within vertical bedding on regional upright folds with over 50 individual layer-parallel single-slip fault veins, some of which can be traced for over 40 meters along strike. Many faults show clear crosscuts of pre-existing quartz veins that indicate a range of coseismic displacements of 0.23-0.53 meters yielding fault vein widths of a few mm and dilatant reservoirs up to 2 cm thick. Both vertical and rare horizontal lateral injection veins can be found in the adjoining wall rock up to 0.7 cm thick and 80 cm in length. The structure of these faults is simple with minor development of splay faults, sidewall ripouts and strike-slip duplexes. The prominent vertical flow layering within the mylonite gneisses of

  1. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  2. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  3. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in 3D - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Tronberens, Sebastian; Urai, Janos; Asmus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Clay smears in sedimentary basins are important factors defining the sealing properties of faults. However, as clay smears are highly complex 3D structures, processes involved in the formation and deformation of clay smears are not well identified and understood. To enhance the prediction of sealing properties of clay smears extensive studies of these structures are necessary including the 3D information. We present extraordinary outcrop data from an open cast lignite mine (Hambach) in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have Shale Gouge Ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. Material in the fault zones is layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. We studied the 3D thickness distribution of clay smear from a series of thin-spaced incremental cross-sections and several cross-sections in larger distances along the fault. Additionally, we excavated two large clay smear surfaces. Our observations show that clay smears are strongly affected by R- and R'-shears, mostly at the footwall side of our outcrops. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes. Thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cutoffs. Investigating the 3D thickness of the clay smears shows a heterogeneous distribution, rather than a continuous thinning of the smear with increasing distance to the source layers. We found two types of layered clay smears: one with continuous sheared sand between two clay smears providing vertical pathways for fluid flow, and one which consists of overlapping clay patches separated by sheared sand that provide a tortuous pathway across the clay smear. On smaller scale we identified grain-scale mixing as an important process for the formation of clay smears. Sand can be entrained into the clay smear by mixing from the surrounding host rock as well as due to intense shearing of sand lenses that were incorporated into the smear. This causes clay smears

  4. On thermal properties of hard rocks as a host environment of an underground thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakova, L.; Hladky, R.; Broz, M.; Novak, P.; Lachman, V.; Sosna, K.; Zaruba, J.; Metelkova, Z.; Najser, J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing focus on environmentally friendly technologies waste heat recycling became an important issue. Under certain circumstances subsurface environment could be utilized to accommodate relatively large quantity of heat. Industrial waste heat produced during warm months can be stored in an underground thermal energy storage (UTES) and used when needed. It is however a complex task to set up a sustainable UTES for industrial scale. Number of parameters has to be studied and evaluated by means of thermohydromechanical and chemical coupling (THMC) before any UTES construction. Thermal characteristics of various rocks and its stability under thermal loading are amongst the most essential. In the Czech Republic study two complementary projects THMC processes during an UTES operation. The RESEN project (www.resen.cz) employs laboratory tests and experiments to characterise thermal properties of hard rocks in the Bohemian Massif. Aim of the project is to point out the most suitable rock environment in the Bohemian Massif for moderate to ultra-high temperature UTES construction (Sanyal, 2005). The VITA project (www.geology.cz/mokrsko) studies THM coupling in non-electrical temperature UTES using long term in-situ experiment. In both projects thermal properties of rocks were studied. Thermal conductivity and capacity were measured on rock samples. In addition an influence of increasing temperature and moisture content was considered. Ten hard rocks were investigated. The set included two sandstones, two ignibrites, a melaphyr, a syenite, two granites, a gneiss and a serpentinite. For each rock there were measured thermal conductivity and capacity of at least 54 dried samples. Subsequently, the samples were heated up to 380°C in 8 hours and left to cool down. Thermal characteristics were measured during the heating period and after the sample reached room temperature. Heating and cooling cycle was repeated 7 to 10 times to evaluate possible UTES-like degradation of

  5. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  6. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  7. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  8. The origin of K-feldspar megacrysts hosted in alkaline potassic rocks from central Italy: a track for low-pressure processes in mafic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, Giulia; Tepley, Frank J.; Davidson, Jon P.; Conticelli, Sandro

    2003-02-01

    In situ Sr-isotope and microchemical studies were used to determine the provenance of K-feldspar megacrysts hosted in mafic alkaline potassic, ultrapotassic rocks and in differentiated rocks from two nearby volcanic apparatus in central Italy. At Monte Cimino volcanic complex, mafic leucite-free ultrapotassic megacryst-bearing rocks of olivine latitic composition are associated with evolved latite and trachyte. Here, latites and trachytes straddle the sub-alkaline field. Age-corrected 87Sr/ 86Sr values (Sr i) of the analysed Cimino olivine latites vary from 0.71330 and 0.71578 and strongly increase at constant Mg value. Latite and trachyte have lower Sr i than olivine latites ranging between 0.71331 and 0.71361. Sr i of K-feldspar megacrysts from olivine latites are between 0.71352 and 0.71397, but core and rim 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios within individual megacryst are indistinguishable. In all the mafic rocks, the megacrysts are not in isotopic equilibrium with the hosts. K-feldspar megacrysts from both the latite and trachyte have similar Sr-isotope compositions (Sr i=0.71357-0.71401) to those in the olivine latites. However, Sr i of megacryst in the trachyte vary significantly from core to rim (Sr i from 0.71401 to 0.71383). As with the olivine latites, the K-feldspar megacrysts are not in isotopic equilibrium with bulk rock compositions of the latite or trachyte. At Vico volcano, megacryst-bearing rocks are mafic leucite-free potassic rocks, mafic leucite-bearing ultrapotassic rocks and old trachytic rocks. The mafic leucite-bearing and leucite-free rocks are a tephri-phonolite and an olivine latite, respectively. A megacryst in Vico trachyte is isotopically homogeneous (Sr i core=0.71129, rim=0.71128) and in equilibrium with the host rock (Sr i bulk rock=0.71125). Sr i of megacryst from tephri-phonolite is clearly not in isotopic equilibrium with its host (Sr i bulk rock=0.71158), and it increases from core (Sr i=0.71063) to rim (Sr i=0.71077). A megacryst in Vico

  9. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  10. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  11. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  12. Mineral resource of the month: clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Clays represent one of the largest mineral commodities in the world in terms of mineral and rock production and use. Many people, however, do not recognize that clays are used in an amazingly wide variety of applications. Use continues to increase worldwide as populations and their associated needs increase. Robert Virta, clay and shale commodity specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey, has prepared the following information about clays.

  13. White clays of Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, John W.

    1984-01-01

    The white clays of Pennsylvania are composed chiefly of kaolinite and various amounts of illite. Most of the white clays are silty and a few are sandy. Quartz or chert is the only nonclay mineral in the whitest material; goethite is also present in the colored samples high in iron. The average alumina content is slightly more than 20 percent in samples from three clay pits and less than 15 percent in samples from five clay pits. The white clay deposits are found in eastern, south-central, and central Pennsylvania. They occur in rocks of the Appalachian basin that range in age from Cambrian to Devonian; however, their age of formation is Cretaceous or later. Some of the deposits are the result of katamorphic alteration, and some are the result of weathered material being transported and deposited in sinkaoles or caverns. The presence of alunite in one deposit suggests the possibility that the clay may be the result of both katamorphic and hydrothermal alteration.

  14. Infectious microbial diseases and host defense responses in Sydney rock oysters

    PubMed Central

    Raftos, David A.; Kuchel, Rhiannon; Aladaileh, Saleem; Butt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture has long been seen as a sustainable solution to some of the world's growing food shortages. However, experience over the past 50 years indicates that infectious diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes limit the productivity of aquaculture. In extreme cases, these types of infectious agents threaten the viability of entire aquaculture industries. This article describes the threats from infectious diseases in aquaculture and then focuses on one example (QX disease in Sydney rock oysters) as a case study. QX appears to be typical of many emerging diseases in aquaculture, particularly because environmental factors seem to play a crucial role in disease outbreaks. Evidence is presented that modulation of a generic subcellular stress response pathway in oysters is responsible for both resistance and susceptibility to infectious microbes. Understanding and being able to manipulate this pathway may be the key to sustainable aquaculture. PMID:24795701

  15. Petrology of the Crystalline Rocks Hosting the Santa Fe Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Cohen, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    We collected samples from within the area of shatter cone occurrence and for approximately 8 kilometers (map distance) along the roadway. Our primary goal is to date the impact. Our secondary goal is to use the petrology and Ar systematics to provide further insight into size and scale of the impact. Our approach is to: Conduct a detailed petrology study to identify lithologies that share petrologic characteristics and tectonic histories but with differing degrees of shock. Obtain micro-cores of K-bearing minerals from multiple samples for Ar-40/Ar-39 analysis. Examine the Ar diffusion patterns for multiple minerals in multiple shocked and control samples. This will help us to better understand outcrop and regional scale relationships among rocks and their responses to the impact event.

  16. A Tree Diagram: Compilation of Methods for Evaluating Host Rock Suitability Taking Account of Uncertainties in Hydrogeological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, A.; Hayano, A.; Goto, J.; Inagaki, M.

    2014-12-01

    In Japan, the siting process of geological repositories for vitrified high-level radioactive waste and low-level radioactive waste containing long-lived nuclides shall comprise step-wise site investigations and evaluations. The Detailed Investigation Areas will be selected focusing on the suitability for the host rock where the underground facility is constructed, after a series of surface-based investigations at Preliminary Investigation Areas. The suitability shall be judged by considering multi-disciplinary performances of the rock mass, such as thermal, hydrologic, mechanical and geochemical conditions and the volume of rock mass, based on the site models. However, the limited geoscientific information yields relatively large uncertainties of the site models, especially the hydrogeological models due to a wider variability of hydraulic properties. The uncertainties make it difficult to clarify the relationship among the site investigation, repository design (Design) and safety assessment (SA). In this study, groundwater travel time is identified as one of the important evaluation factors relevant for SA in terms of hydrology. In addition, the various options for evaluating the groundwater travel time are put together into a tree diagram. The highest level of the tree diagram is defined by the evaluation factor (groundwater travel time), and evaluation methods are systematically classified into multi-levels that comprise analytical methods/models in one dimension and three dimensions, parameters, datasets, data and investigation methods. Multiple options, such as alternative cases and/or models caused by uncertainties in data, analytical methods and models, are incorporated at each level of the tree diagrams. The feasibility of the tree diagram was examined by tracing both analytical options. Through this examination, the importance of interaction among the site investigation, SA and Design was also demonstrated.

  17. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  18. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  19. Biostratigraphy and structure of paleozoic host rocks and their relationship to Carlin-type gold deposits in the Jerritt Canyon mining district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, S.G.; Armstrong, A.K.; Harris, A.G.; Oscarson, R.L.; Noble, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Jerritt Canyon mining district in the northern Independence Range, northern Nevada, contains multiple, nearly horizontal, thrust masses of platform carbonate rocks that are exposed in a series of north- to northeast-elongated, tectonic windows through rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. The Roberts Mountains allochthon was emplaced during the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian Antler orogeny. These thrust masses contain structurally and stratigraphically controlled Carlin-type gold deposits. The gold deposits are hosted in tectonically truncated units of the Silurian to Devonian Hanson Creek and Roberts Mountains Formations that lie within structural slices of an Eastern assemblage of Cambrian to Devonian carbonate rocks. In addition, these multiply thrust-faulted and folded host rocks are structurally interleaved with Mississippian siliciclastic rocks and are overlain structurally by Cambrian to Devonian siliciclastic units of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. All sedimentary rocks were involved in thrusting, high-angle faulting, and folding, and some of these events indicate substantial late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic regional shortening. Early Pennsylvanian and late Eocene dikes also intrude the sedimentary rocks. These rocks all were uplifted into a northeast-trending range by subsequent late Cenozoic Basin and Range faulting. Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks flank part of the range. Pathways of hydrothermal fluid flow and locations of Carlin-type gold orebodies in the Jerritt Canyon mining district were controlled by structural and host-rock geometries within specific lithologies of the stacked thrust masses of Eastern assemblage rocks. The gold deposits are most common proximal to intersections of northeast-striking faults, northwest-striking dikes, and thrust planes that lie adjacent to permeable stratigraphic horizons. The host stratigraphic units include carbonate sequences that contained primary intercrystalline permeability, which

  20. Compositional variations in spinel-hosted pargasite inclusions in the olivine-rich rock from the oceanic crust-mantle boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akihiro; Morishita, Tomoaki; Ishimaru, Satoko; Hara, Kaori; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Arai, Shoji

    2016-05-01

    The crust-mantle boundary zone of the oceanic lithosphere is composed mainly of olivine-rich rocks represented by dunite and troctolite. However, we still do not fully understand the global variations in the boundary zone, and an effective classification of the boundary rocks, in terms of their petrographical features and origin, is an essential step in achieving such an understanding. In this paper, to highlight variations in olivine-rich rocks from the crust-mantle boundary, we describe the compositional variations in spinel-hosted hydrous silicate mineral inclusions in rock samples from the ocean floor near a mid-ocean ridge and trench. Pargasite is the dominant mineral among the inclusions, and all of them are exceptionally rich in incompatible elements. The host spinel grains are considered to be products of melt-peridotite reactions, because their origin cannot be ascribed to simple fractional crystallization of a melt. Trace-element compositions of pargasite inclusions are characteristically different between olivine-rich rock samples, in terms of the degree of Eu and Zr anomalies in the trace-element pattern. When considering the nature of the reaction that produced the inclusion-hosting spinel, the compositional differences between samples were found to reflect a diversity in the origin of the olivine-rich rocks, as for example in whether or not a reaction was accompanied by the fractional crystallization of plagioclase. The differences also reflect the fact that the melt flow system (porous or focused flow) controlled the melt/rock ratios during reaction. The pargasite inclusions provide useful data for constraining the history and origin of the olivine-rich rocks and therefore assist in our understanding of the crust-mantle boundary of the oceanic lithosphere.

  1. The response of Opalinus Clay when exposed to cyclic relative humidity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Katrin M.; Walter, Patric; Amann, Florian

    2017-03-01

    Clay shale specimens were exposed to cyclic relative humidity (RH) variations to investigate the response of the material to natural environmental changes. Opalinus Clay, a clay shale chosen as host rock for nuclear waste disposal in Switzerland, was utilized. The specimens were exposed to stepwise relative humidity cycles in which they were alternately allowed to equilibrate at 66 and 93 % relative humidity. Principal strains were monitored throughout the experiments using strain gauges. After each relative humidity cycle, Brazilian tensile strength tests were performed to identify possible changes in tensile strength due to environmental degradation.Results showed that Opalinus Clay follows a cyclic swelling-shrinkage behaviour with irreversible expansion limited to the direction normal to bedding, suggesting that internal damage is restricted along the bedding planes. The Brazilian tensile strength in direction parallel and normal to bedding as well as the water retention characteristic remained unaffected by the RH variations.

  2. Mineralogical, chemical and K-Ar isotopic changes in Kreyenhagen Shale whole rocks and <2 μm clay fractions during natural burial and hydrous-pyrolysis experimental maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, N.; Lewan, M. D.; Dolan, M. P.; Chaudhuri, S.; Curtis, J. B.

    2014-04-01

    Progressive maturation of the Eocene Kreyenhagen Shale from the San Joaquin Basin of California was studied by combining mineralogical and chemical analyses with K-Ar dating of whole rocks and <2 μm clay fractions from naturally buried samples and laboratory induced maturation by hydrous pyrolysis of an immature outcrop sample. The K-Ar age decreases from 89.9 ± 3.9 and 72.4 ± 4.2 Ma for the outcrop whole rock and its <2 μm fraction, respectively, to 29.7 ± 1.5 and 21.0 ± 0.7 Ma for the equivalent materials buried to 5167 m. The natural maturation does not produce K-Ar ages in the historical sense, but rather K/Ar ratios of relative K and radiogenic 40Ar amounts resulting from a combined crystallization of authigenic and alteration of initial detrital K-bearing minerals of the rocks. The Al/K ratio of the naturally matured rocks is essentially constant for the entire depth sequence, indicating that there is no detectable variation in the crystallo-chemical organization of the K-bearing alumino-silicates with depth. No supply of K from outside of the rock volumes occurred, which indicates a closed-system behavior for it. Conversely, the content of the total organic carbon (TOC) content decreases significantly with burial, based on the progressive increasing Al/TOC ratio of the whole rocks. The initial varied mineralogy and chemistry of the rocks and their <2 μm fractions resulting from differences in detrital sources and depositional settings give scattered results that homogenize progressively during burial due to increased authigenesis, and concomitant increased alteration of the detrital material. Hydrous pyrolysis was intended to alleviate the problem of mineral and chemical variations in initially deposited rocks of naturally matured sequences. However, experiments on aliquots from thermally immature Kreyenhagen Shale outcrop sample did not mimic the results from naturally buried samples. Experiments conducted for 72 h at temperatures from 270 to 365

  3. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  4. Geochemistry of surface water in alpine catchments in central Colorado, USA: Resolving host-rock effects at different spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Verplanck, P.L.; San, Juan C.A.; Church, S.E.; Schmidt, T.S.; Fey, D.L.; deWitt, E.H.; Klein, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is conducting a study of surface-water quality in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado, an area of approximately 55,000 km2. Using new and existing geologic maps, the more than 200 rock formations represented in the area were arranged into 17 groups based on lithologic similarity. The dominant regional geologic feature affecting water quality in central Colorado is the Colorado mineral belt (CMB), a NE-trending zone hosting many polymetallic vein or replacement deposits, and porphyry Mo deposits, many of which have been mined historically. The influence of the CMB is seen in lower surface-water pH (<5), and higher concentrations of SO42 - (>100 mg/L) and chalcophile metals such as Cu (>10 ??g/L), Zn (>100 ??g/L), and Cd (>1 ??g/L) relative to surface water outside the CMB. Not all streams within the CMB have been affected by mineralization, as there are numerous catchments within the CMB that have no mineralization or alteration exposed at the surface. At the regional-scale, and away from sites affected by mineralization, hydrothermal alteration, or mining, the effects of lithology on water quality can be distinguished using geochemical reaction modeling and principal components analysis. At local scales (100 s of km2), effects of individual rock units on water chemistry are subtle but discernible, as shown by variations in concentrations of major lithophile elements or ratios between them. These results demonstrate the usefulness of regional geochemical sampling of surface waters and process-based interpretations incorporating geologic and geochemical understanding to establish geochemical baselines.

  5. Geochemical Considerations Regarding the Processes Involved in Mineral Deposition in Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J. W.; Gledhill, D. K.

    2005-12-01

    In order for mineral deposition to take place in a vein, first the opposite reaction-dissolution of the mineral must occur from some source rock to place the requisite dissolved components into solution. Then the dissolved components must be transported to the vein either by advective or diffusive means before deposition can ensue. Finally conditions must be such in the vein that a supersaturated solution is produced and conditions are favorable for the nucleation and precipitation of the vein filling mineral. Although these general principles are widely accepted, there are many fundamental questions remaining regarding the chemistry that controls these processes. The controlling parameters are far more complex than simple temperature and pressure variations that are readily dealt with by equilibrium thermodynamic models. Answers for many questions reside, at least in a substantial part, in a better understanding of mineral solubility behavior, and precipitation and dissolution kinetics in high ionic strength solutions (brines) typically found in the subsurface. (Fluid inclusions commonly indicate that vein-filling minerals have precipitated from high ionic strength solutions.) We give as an example of the chemical complexities involving mineral reactions in brines the dissolution of calcite. The good news is that the calcite dissolution reaction is close to first order at high ionic strengths. In addition, common inhibitors, such as magnesium, are not very effective in influencing the rate constant, probably as a result of surface site competition. However, the bad news is that the sensitivity of the rate constant to composition increases with increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure and becomes most strongly influenced by total ionic strength. It is hypothesized that this is the result of a depressed water activity in brines that decreases the rate of cation hydration. We also observed that the inhibitory influence of anionic brine components, such as sulfate

  6. Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions in microdiamond from the gneisses of Kokchetav and Erzgebirge massifs: Diversified characteristics of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamond in UHP rocks due to host-rock buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shyh-Lung; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Shen, Pouyan; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Liou, Juhn G.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2006-03-01

    Nanometer-size P/K-rich silica glass (former melt) inclusions were identified within metamorphic microdiamonds from garnets of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) gneisses of the Kokchetav and the Erzgebirge massifs by analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The chemical characteristics of these inclusions within microdiamonds are surprisingly similar among various gneissic rocks from both Kokchetav and Erzgebirge, but are significantly different from the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid inclusions within microdiamonds from garnets of the Kokchetav UHP marble. These contrasting findings not only provide constraints on the characteristics/compositions of the formation media of metamorphic microdiamonds, but also imply that the formation media must have been buffered by the hosting rocks, resulting in the observed diversities as reported here. In addition, depending on the rock types and thus on the nature of the formation media from which metamorphic microdiamonds were formed, the respective characteristic morphologies of the microdiamonds differ. The P/K-rich silica melt tends to form octahedral or cubo-octahedral microdiamonds within garnet in gneissic rocks, whereas the Si-poor ultrapotassic fluid tends to form spheroids/cuboid microdiamonds with rugged surfaces within garnet in marble. Consequently, the buffered media in hosting rocks played a decisive role in determining the different morphologies and growth rates/mechanisms of metamorphic microdiamonds in general.

  7. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  8. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  9. In situ interaction between different concretes and Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenni, A.; Mäder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    Interactions between cementitious materials and claystone are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical modifications in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, this alteration might influence safety-relevant clay properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention. In this study, interfaces of Opalinus Clay, a potential host-rock in Switzerland, and three concrete formulations emplaced in the Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) were analysed after 2.2 years of interaction. Sampling techniques with interface stabilisation followed by inclined intersection drilling were developed. Element distribution maps of the concrete-clay interfaces show complex zonations like sulphur enrichment, zones depleted in Ca but enriched in Mg, strong Mg enrichment adjacent to the interface, or carbonation. Consistently, the carbonated zone shows a reduced porosity. Properties of the complex zonation strongly depend on cement properties like water content and pH (ordinary Portland cement vs. low-pH cement). An increased Ca or Mg content in the first 100 μm next to the interface is observed in Opalinus Clay. The cation occupancy of clay exchanger phases next to the ordinary Portland cement interface is depleted in Mg, but enriched in Na, whereas porosity shows no changes at all. The current data suggests migration of CO2/HCO3-, SO42-, and Mg species from clay into cement. pH decrease in the cement next to the interface leads to instability of ettringite, and the sulphate liberated diffuses towards higher pH regions (away from the interface), where additional ettringite can form.

  10. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  11. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  12. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  13. The carbonate rock-hosted epithermal gold deposit of Agdarreh, Takab geothermal field, NW Iran—hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daliran, Farahnaz

    2008-06-01

    The disseminated gold deposit of Agdarreh (24.5 t at 3.7 g/t Au) is hosted in hydrothermally leached Miocene reefal limestone in the Takab geothermal field, which is part of the Cenozoic Urumieh-Dokhtar volcanic arc of NW Iran. Alteration and mineralisation are largely bedding controlled blanket-like and include: (1) pre-ore decalcification; (2) first-stage silicification associated with pyrite (early pyrite with 3-4 wt% As, late pyrite with <1-3 wt% As) and sphalerite; (3) second-stage silicification with precipitation of galena, Pb-Sb-As sulphides, sulphosalts, tellurides and native bismuth; (4) late-stage cinnabar and barite in vugs; (5) oxide ore stage and carbonate alteration (complex Mn-Fe-rich oxyhydroxides, arsenates, sulphates, APS minerals and rutile in residual leached rock and infill of karstic cavities). Gold occurs invisibly in the jasperoids and is enriched in the Mn-Fe oxyhydroxide surface cap of the jasperoids. Gold mineralisation is associated with the hydrothermal metal suite of As, Sb, Hg, Te, Se, Tl, Ba, Zn, Ag, Cd, Bi and Pb, and is characterised by very low Cu contents. Arsenian pyrite probably carried most of the primary (invisible) gold. Native gold occurs in association with the late-stage cinnabar and the oxide ore. The Agdarreh deposit shows many similarities with Carlin-type ore and is interpreted to have resulted from near-surface hydrothermal activity related to the Cenozoic arc volcanism that developed within the extensional Takab graben. The extensive oxidation at Agdarreh may be partly due to the waning stages of hydrothermal activity. Active H2S-bearing thermal springs are locally depositing extremely high contents of Au and Ag, and travertine is present over large areas, suggesting that ore-forming hydrothermal activity occurred periodically from the Miocene to Recent in the Takab geothermal field.

  14. Modeling of Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Processes with Links to Geochemistry Associated with Bentonite-Backfilled Repository Tunnels in Clay Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Chen, Fei; Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents simulation results related to coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes in engineered barrier systems (EBS) and clay host rock, in one case considering a possible link to geochemistry. This study is part of the US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's used fuel disposition campaign, to investigate current modeling capabilities and to identify issues and knowledge gaps associated with coupled THMC processes and EBS-rock interactions associated with repositories hosted in clay rock. In this study, we simulated a generic repository case assuming an EBS design with waste emplacement in horizontal tunnels that are back-filled with bentonite-based swelling clay as a protective buffer and heat load, derived for one type of US reactor spent fuel. We adopted the Barcelona basic model (BBM) for modeling of the geomechanical behavior of the bentonite, using properties corresponding to the FEBEX bentonite, and we used clay host rock properties derived from the Opalinus clay at Mont Terri, Switzerland. We present results related to EBS host-rock interactions and geomechanical performance in general, as well as studies related to peak temperature, buffer resaturation and thermally induced pressurization of host rock pore water, and swelling pressure change owing to variation of chemical composition in the EBS. Our initial THM modeling results show strong THM-driven interactions between the bentonite buffer and the low-permeability host rock. The resaturation of the buffer is delayed as a result of the low rock permeability, and the fluid pressure in the host rock is strongly coupled with the temperature changes, which under certain circumstances could result in a significant increase in pore pressure. Moreover, using the BBM, the bentonite buffer was found to have a rather complex geomechanical behavior that eventually leads to a slightly nonuniform density distribution. Nevertheless, the simulation shows that the swelling of the buffer is functioning to

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  16. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  17. Analysis of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock in the Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Marina; Prokofiev, Vsevolod; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit is located on the western slope of the Polar Urals. It is one of the largest deposits of vein quartz and rock crystal in Russia. Most of the mineralization is hosted within a single horizon of very firm quartz-sandstone, where plastic deformation did not occur almost entirely. All tectonic stress was released by the development of numerous thrust faults of different scales. Cavities formed during this process were later filled with quartz and rock crystal. In order to obtain more details on conditions under which mineralization took place, analysis of trace element contents in vein quartz and host rocks, and the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz have been carried out. The trace element composition of vein quartz and of the host rock has been determined by ICP-MS. The results have shown that concentrations of most of the 46 studied elements in quartz are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and more than three orders of magnitude lower than in the upper crust. Even though Pb and Li have the highest concentrations in quartz samples, levels are only nearly comparable in chondrite, and substantially lower in the upper crust. At the same time, negative anomalies of Pb and Li concentrations in the host rock may indicate the removal of these elements during vein quartz formation. Contents of most REEs are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and three orders of magnitude lower than in the host rock. Generally, the patterns of REE distribution in vein quartz and the host rock express a clear correlation; confirming the genetic link between vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock. However, the process of quartz recrystallization led to an intense decrease of REEs content, and of all other impurities, which consequently influenced industrial value of the Zhelannoe deposit. As a result of the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz, the following physical

  18. A new approach to the selection of materials for engineered barriers and appropriate host rocks for high level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Omelianenko, B.I.; Nikonov, B.S.; Ryzhov, B.I.; Shikina, N.D.; Yudintsev, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    Sorptive properties of weathered dunites, gabbro-diabases and basic volcanic rocks for Sr and Cs were studied. The results show that the sorptive capacities of these rocks are equivalent to or, in some cases, superior to the industrial sorptive materials. Results of a uranium distribution study by fission-track radiography suggest that material from weathered basic rocks is characterized by high sorptive properties for uranium also. One can assume that other radionuclides of the transuranic group will be intensely sorbed by the residuum of weathered basic rocks. Low-temperature hydrothermal transformation leads to sealing fissures of the basic rocks with highly sorptive minerals, for example, smectite, chlorite, serpentine, in talc, zeolite, hydroxides of Fe, Ti, Mn. The process results in contemporaneous decreasing hydraulic conductivity and increasing sorptive capacity of the rocks. HLW disposal at the radiochemical plant Mayak is expected to be produced in deep wells situated in basaltic rocks. The safety of disposal is based on high sorptive properties of the crust of weathering and protective capacities of volcanic rocks. This method is not expensive and may allow the disposal of HLW in the near future.

  19. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay

  20. P-T evolution of the Precambrian mafic rocks hosting the Varena iron ore deposit in SE Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiliauskas, Laurynas; Skridlaitė, Gražina; Prusinskiene, Sabina

    2017-04-01

    The Precambrian Varena iron ore deposit in the western East European Craton, near the Latvian-East Lithuanian and Middle Lithuanian domain boundary, is buried beneath 210-500 m thick sediments. It consists of variable metasomatic rocks, mostly Mg-Fe skarns, associated with dolomitic marbles, magnetite and other ores. Metasomatites are hosted by metamorphosed igneous (mostly mafic) and sedimentary rocks and crosscut by later granites and diabase dikes. Three samples of altered mafic rocks (D8-3, D8-4 and D8-6) were chosen for PT estimations. D8-3 sample (582.5 m) is a coarse-grained metagabbro near a metasomatic K-Mg hastingsite rock. It consists of diopsidic pyroxene, edenitic and actinolitic hornblende, plagioclase (An22-15) and scapolite with minor titanite, chlorite, apatite and talc. Diopside compositions range from iron richer (Mg# 0.64, jadeite component of 0.027) to magnesium richer (Mg# 0.89, jadeite less than 0.01). Amphiboles vary from primary Mg-hastingsitic (AlVI 0.38 apfu, Mg# 0.70) to secondary edenitic (AlVI 0.25, Mg# 0.72) hornblende. Plagioclase is slightly zoned, cores more calcium-rich (An22-20) than rims (An18-15). Sample D8-4 (588 m) has similar mineral and chemical compositions, but is somewhat more altered than the D8-3 sample. Plagioclase in diopside is more anorthitic (An32-30), while matrix plagioclase is more albitic (An27-20). Sample D8-6 (710 m) is composed of diopside, plagioclase, scapolite, Mg-hornblende and actinolite. Diopside has Mg# of 0.77-0.84 and jadeite component of 0.01-0.02. Amphibole compositions range from Mg-hornblende (Mg# 0.64-0.7, Al VI 0.2-0.17 apfu) to actinolite (Mg# 0.76-0.83, Al VI 0.12-0.10 apfu). Plagioclases are An18 in cores and An10 at rims. Diopsides with the lowest Mg# and highest jadeite components, together with plagioclase cores were used for PT calculations by the winTWQ software (Berman, 1991). Temperatures of 530° C and 550° C and pressures of 6.3 and 6.1 kbar were estimated for the D8-3 and D8

  1. TEM/AEM characterization of fine-grained clay minerals in very-low-grade rocks: Evaluation of contamination by EMPA involving celadonite family minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gejing; Peacor, D.R.; Coombs, D.S.; Kawachi, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) have led to many new insights into the structural and chemical characteristics of very fine-grained, optically homogeneous mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks. Chemical compositions obtained by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) on such materials have been shown by TEM/AEM to result from beam overlap on contaminant phases on a scale below resolution of EMPA, which in turn can lead to errors in interpretation and determination of formation conditions. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the relation between AEM and EMPA data, which leads also to the definition of new mineral phases, and demonstrate the resolution power of AEM relative to EMPA in investigations of very fine-grained mineral aggregates in sedimentary and very low-grade metamorphic rocks.

  2. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui -Hai; Houseworth, Jim; Rutqvist, Jonny; Li, Lianchong; Asahina, Daisuke; Chen, Fei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the EDZ, and (3) development of a THM model for the FE tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. The overall objective of these activities is to provide an improved understanding of EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop advanced relevant modeling capabilities.

  3. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, Stacey Leigh

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  4. Clay cortex in epikarst forms as an indicator of age and morphogenesis-case studies from Lublin-Volhynia chalkland (East Poland, West Ukraine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, Radosław; Mroczek, Przemysław

    2015-10-01

    Clay cortex from the contact zone between the host rock (chalk) and infilling deposits were examined in paleokarst forms (pockets, pipes, and dolines of different age) from the Lublin-Volhynia chalk karst region. In light of the sedimentological and micromorphological analyses, it seems possible to work out a model as the basis for genetic and stratigraphic discussions. (1) Dolines with the Paleogene or Neogene mineral infills are characterized by (a) homogeneous, residual type of massive clay gradually passing into the chalk monolith, and at the same time (b) relatively thick weathered zone. (2) Pipes with glacigenic mineral infill from the Saalian Glacial are characterized by (a) sharp contact between host rock and clay, (b) narrow weathering zone of chalk, (c) diffuse nature of the contact zone between residual clay and mineral infill, and (d) contamination of clay by clastic material. (3) Pockets with glacigenic mineral infill and traces of the Weichselian periglacial transformation are characterized by (a) strong contamination of chalk by quartz grains, (b) diffuse transition between clay and infill: from clayey matrix with single quartz grains (at the contact with chalk) to clayey coatings and intergranular bridges (in the infill), (c) intensive weathering (cracking) of mineral grains in the infill.

  5. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  6. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaoui, A.; Sekkal, W.

    2015-03-01

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  7. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, A.; Sekkal, W.

    2015-01-01

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation. PMID:25742950

  8. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    PubMed

    Zaoui, A; Sekkal, W

    2015-03-06

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  9. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  10. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, located in the Petaquilla district of central Panama, is hosted by a sequence of medium- to high-K calc-alkaline volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks. New crystallisation ages obtained from a granodiorite Petaquilla batholith and associated mineralised diorite to granodiorite porphyry stocks and dikes at Cobre Panama indicate that the batholith was emplaced as a multi-phase intrusion, over a period of ~ 4 million years from 32.20 ± 0.76 Ma to 28.26 ± 0.61 Ma, while the porphyritic rocks were emplaced over a ~ 2 million year period from 28.96 ± 0.62 Ma to 27.48 ± 0.68 Ma. Both the volcanic to sub-volcanic host rocks and intrusive rocks of the Cobre Panama deposit evolved via fractional crystallisation processes, as demonstrated by the major elements (e.g. Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and MgO) displaying negative trends with increasing SiO2. The Petaquilla intrusive rocks, including the diorite-granodiorite porphyries and granodiorite batholith, are geochemically evolved and appear to have formed from more hydrous magmas than the preceding host volcanic rocks, as evidenced by the presence of hornblende phenocrysts, higher degrees of large-ion lithophile element (LILE) and light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment and heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletion, and higher Sr/Y and La/Yb values. However, the degree of LREE enrichment, HREE depletion and La/Yb values are insufficient for the intrusive rocks to be considered as adakites. Collectively, the volcanic and intrusive rocks have LILE, REE and mobile trace element concentrations similar to enriched Miocene-age Cordilleran arc magmatism found throughout central and western Panama. Both the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc magmatic suites are geochemically more evolved than the late Cretaceous to Eocene Chagres-Bayano arc magmas from northeastern Panama, as they display higher degrees of LILE and LREE enrichment. The geochemical similarities between the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc

  11. Characterization of a clay-rich rock through development and installation of specific hydrogeological and diffusion test equipment in deep boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Jacques; Distinguin, Marc; Dewonck, Sarah

    Andra (Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs - National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) has developed specific tools and methodologies to evaluate and understand the main transport mechanisms of solute species in an argillaceous rock in the framework of the scientific program of the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory. This paper focuses on three specific equipments already installed in boreholes for the determination of convection and diffusion parameters in a very low permeability environment. The first one is a specific borehole completion for head and permeability measurements with an integrated wireless telemetry device. In 1995, Andra devised a probe equipped with a pressure sensor to monitor the long-term evolution of electro-magnetically transmitted pore pressures. The data gathered by this first device, and a second one installed in 2001, have shown the occurrence of overpressures in very low permeability formations. The second device is derived from the multipacker system used for monitoring the drainage of the Oxfordian limestone due to the sinking of the shaft above the Callovo-Oxfordian. It is used for obtaining from a single borehole, a pressure profile of the argillaceous formation and its encasing units. To date, the major information obtained with these two borehole equipments is the existence of a 25-35 m anomalous excess hydraulic head in the 130 m thick Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation. Head values in the argillaceous rock exceed those in the overlying Oxfordian limestone by 25-35 m, and those in the underlying Dogger by over 45 m. The third equipment described in the paper, is derived from the experiment carried out at the Mont Terri rock laboratory since 1996 for the characterization of diffusion and retention processes. The system is adapted for a borehole drilled from the surface. The objectives of this experiment are as follows: Verification of the predominant role played by molecular diffusion

  12. Complicated secondary textures in zircon record evolution of the host granitic rocks: Studies from Western Tauern Window and Ötztal-Stubai Crystalline Complex (Eastern Alps, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Harlov, Daniel; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-07-01

    Samples of metamorphosed and deformed granitic rocks were collected from two Alpine complexes with well-constrained metamorphic history: Western Tauern Window and Ötztal-Stubai Crystalline Complex. Zircon grains from these samples were investigated in situ by a combination of scanning electron microscope techniques, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and Raman spectroscopy. The aims were: to describe and interpret complicated secondary textures and microstructures in zircon; based on cross-cutting relationships between secondary microstructures, reconstruct the sequence of processes, affecting zircon crystals; link the evolution of zircon with the history of the host rocks. The results indicate that zircon in the sampled granitic rocks forms growth twins and multi-grain aggregates, which are unusual for this mineral. Moreover, various secondary textures have been found in the sampled zircon, often cross-cutting each other in a single crystal. These include: distorted oscillatory CL zoning with inner zones forming inward-penetrating, CL-bright embayments, which are the evidence of dry recrystallization via annealing/lattice recovery; CL mosaicism with no preservation of growth zoning, but abundant nano- and micro-scale pores and mineral inclusions, which are the evidence of recrystallization by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation and/or leaching; embayed zircon boundaries filled with apatite, monazite, epidote and mylonitic matrix, indicating mineral-fluid reactions resulting in zircon dissolution and fragmentation; overgrowth CL-dark rims, which contain nano-pores and point to transport and precipitation of dissolved zircon matter. We conclude that zircon in our meta-granites is sensitive to metamorphism/deformation events, and was reactive with metamorphic fluids. Additionally, we have found evidence of crystal-plastic deformation in the form of low angle boundaries and bent grain tips, which is a result of shearing and ductile deformation of the host rock. We

  13. Sulfates and Clays in Columbus Crater, Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-21

    Sulfates are found overlying clay minerals in sediments within Columbus Crater, a depression that likely hosted a lake in the past in this image based on information from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  14. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  15. The Fluid Memory of Clays in Faults and Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B.; Fitz-Diaz, E.; Haines, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining fluid sources is key to understanding crustal-scale fluid circulation, rock mechanics, mineral reactions and the origin of economic deposits. The role of meteoric fluids in exhumed fault rocks has been proposed in a few recent studies, notably in mylonites in low-angle normal fault (LANF) systems. However, the extent of meteoric influx and fluid pathways, and a mechanism for infiltration of surface waters up to 10+km depth remains mostly unknown. The occurrence of clay neomineralization in fault rocks and folds has the potential to resolve this question, as clay (trans)formation preserves host fluid information in its isotopic signatures, particularly H. New stable isotope studies of clays in normal faults and folds in the SW US and Mexico show major meteoric input, based on which we propose a mechanism for downward fluid infiltration and upper-crustal circulation. We obtained paired δ18O and δ2H (‰ wrt SMOW) isotopic measurements from neo-formed clays in fault gouge that formed above major LANF detachments in the SW US, which show that clays in brittle fault rocks formed from exchange with pristine to only weakly evolved meteoric fluids. Illite δ18O measurements range from -2.0‰ to +11.5‰, while illite δ2H measurements range from -142‰ to -107‰. Smectite δ18O values are +3.6‰ to 17.9‰, while smectite δ2H measurements are -147‰ to -95‰. The isotopic signature of clays at multiple depths in LANFs indicates that crustal-scale normal fault systems are highly permeable over geologic time scales, and that they are dominated by downward fluid flow of surface waters, instead of buoyancy-driven flow from deeper levels. Clay grain size fractions from folded rocks of the Mexican fold-thrust belt containing chlorite and smectite show very low values in δ2H (-75.9 to -53.9‰), while samples containing illite and kaolinite or pure illite show slightly higher δ2H values (-33.1 to -50.1‰). In these samples the discriminating potential of

  16. Primary uranium sources for sedimentary-hosted uranium deposits in NE China: insight from basement igneous rocks of the Erlian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnetti, Christophe; Cuney, Michel; Bourlange, Sylvain; Deloule, Etienne; Poujol, Marc; Liu, Xiaodong; Peng, Yunbiao; Yang, Jianxing

    2017-03-01

    Carboniferous-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic igneous basement rocks around the Erlian Basin in northeast China have been investigated through detailed mineralogical, whole-rock geochemistry, geochronological data and Sm-Nd isotope studies. Carboniferous-Permian biotite granites and volcanic rocks belong to a calc-alkaline association and were emplaced during the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian (313 ± 1-286 ± 2 Ma). These rocks are characterised by positive ɛNd( t) (3.3-5.3) and fairly young T DM model ages (485-726 Ma), suggesting a dominant derivation from partial melting of earlier emplaced juvenile source rocks. Triassic biotite granites belong to a high-K calc-alkaline association and were emplaced during the Middle Triassic (243 ± 3-233 ± 2 Ma). Their negative ɛNd( t) (-2 to -0.1) and higher T DM model ages (703-893 Ma) suggest a contribution from Precambrian crust during the magma generation processes, leading to a strong enrichment in K and incompatible elements such as Th and U. Highly fractionated magmas crystallised in U-rich biotite (up to 21 ppm U) and two-mica granites. In biotite granite, the major U-bearing minerals are uranothorite and allanite. They are strongly metamict and the major part of their uranium (90 %) has been released from the mineral structure and was available for leaching. Mass balance calculations show that the Triassic biotite granites may have, at least, liberated ˜14,000 t U/km3 and thus correspond to a major primary uranium source for the U deposits hosted in the Erlian Basin.

  17. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    in the silicate (clay mineral in our case) structure, the specific bonding of these ions, and other factors. In fact, the reasons for coloration are not known completely, but it is certain that a combination of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions is necessary to give a nice green color to clays. In the green clay minerals discussed here, the colors vary greatly as seen under the optical microscope (not always the same as the one seen in hand specimen). Yellow to blue-green hues can be found. However, for the moment, no clear relation between iron content, iron valence ratio, or other factors such as minor transition element concentrations can be found to explain the greenness of green clay minerals. The fact that a clay is green just indicates a combination of the two oxidation states of iron. The color, however, indicates the key to the formation in nature of green clay minerals.Green clay minerals are in general the product of "mixed valence" conditions of formation, most often in a situation where some iron is reduced from Fe3+ and enters into a silicate mineral structure. In general, iron would rather be an oxide when it is in the trivalent state. The moment iron is reduced to a divalent state under surface or near-surface conditions, it looks for a silicate, sulfide, or carbonate to hide in. The reverse is also true, of course. When a silicate is oxidized, Fe2+ becoming Fe3+, the iron begins to group together in oxide clumps and eventually exits the silicate structure. This is seen in thin section in altered rocks (weathering or hydrothermal action). The production of trivalent, oxidized iron usually results in a brownish or orange mineral.If the geology of the formation of green silicate minerals is relatively well defined, especially at near surface or surface conditions, the question remains how much of the iron is in a reduced oxidation state and how? In the case of reduction of iron in surface environments: if most of the iron goes to Fe2+, one mineral is formed; if only

  18. Clay minerals in Alpine Fault gouge: First results from the DFDP-1B pilot hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B. A.; Schleicher, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Clay mineralization is increasingly recognized as a key process along fault systems in the upper crust. The Alpine Fault in New Zealand is a major active fault zone with locally large earthquakes. Samples from this fault zone offer excellent opportunity to investigate recent and ancient rupture zones, and the mechanical role of clay mineral transformations and fluid-rock interactions in particular. The Alpine Fault drilling project (DFDP-project) on the South Island of New Zealand sampled two shallow pilot holes; DFDP-1A was drilled down to 100.6 m and DFDP-1B drilled down to 151.4 m. Five samples from borehole DFDP-1B have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray texture goniometry and electron microscopy. These samples were taken at ~143.3 m (sections 69_2 to 69_2) and ~128.1 m depth (sections 59_1 to 59_1); the latter is the area of principal slip. The bulk rock mineralogy shows similar compositions in all samples with quartz, phyllosilicates (muscovite, chlorite), calcite, zeolite and clay minerals; the dominant clay phases in all samples are illite and chlorite. Importantly, abundant discrete smectite is uniquely present in gouge zones at sections 69_2 (~143.4 m) and 59_1 (~128.1 m). Smectite was likely formed by dissolution-precipitation reactions during displacement and movement of aqueous fluids along permeable fractures, at the expense of host rock minerals. Electron microscopy of fault gouge at section 69_2 shows small illite and smectite particles with pseudo-hexagonal shapes and variable amounts of K, Ca, Mg and Fe, growing adjacent to each other. Some distinct illite and smectite mineral veins form epitaxially on quartz-feldspar mineral surfaces. Clay fabric intensity, measured by X-ray goniometry, is higher outside the gouge zones (true cataclasite, section 69_1) with average fabric intensities of m.r.d. 3.5. Both gouge zones at sections 59_2 and 69_1 exhibit uniformly weak fabrics for illite and chlorite (m.r.d. ~2.5 on average). The weak

  19. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States-Southern Piedmont subregion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the geology of the Southern Piedmont province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose was to identify geologic areas potentially suitable for containment of a repository for the long-term isolation of solidified radioactive waste. The crystalline rocks of the Southern Piedmont province range in age from Precambrian to Paleozoic, and are predominantly slates, phyllites, argillites, schists, metavolcanics, gneisses, gabbros, and granites. These rock units were classified as either favorable, potentially favorable, or unfavorable as potential study areas based on an evaluation of the geologic, hydrologic, and geotechnical characteristics. No socio-economic factors were considered. Rocks subjected to multiple periods of deformation and metamorphism, or described as highly fractured, or of limited areal extent were generally ranked as unfavorable. Potentially favorable rocks are primarily the high-grade metamorphic gneisses and granites. Sixteen areas were classified as being favorable for additional study. These areas are primarily large igneous granite plutons as follows: the Petersburg granite in Virginia; the Rolesville-Castallia, Churchland, and Landis plutons in North Carolina; the Liberty Hill, Winnsboro, and Ogden plutons in South Carolina; and the Siloam, Elberton, and six unnamed granite plutons in Georgia.

  20. Parasites of QX-resistant and wild-type Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) in Moreton Bay, SE Queensland, Australia: diversity and host response.

    PubMed

    Dang, Cécile; Cribb, Thomas H; Cutmore, Scott C; Chan, Janlin; Hénault, Olivier; Barnes, Andrew C

    2013-03-01

    Wild caught (WC) and QX resistant (QXR) Sydney rock oysters were introduced at North Stradbroke Island and Pimpama River, SE Queensland, Australia, and sampled monthly during 1 year. Three groups of parasites/diseases were identified by observation of histological sections: (1) Marteilia sydneyi (Queensland unknown (QX) disease) and Steinhausia sp. (Microsporidia) characterized by a high prevalence and deleterious impact on the host; (2) disseminated neoplasia and the trematode Proctoeces sp. characterized by low prevalence but deleterious effects on the host; (3) parasites or symbionts with no detectable effect on the host: trematodes, ciliates, turbellarians and metacestodes. Mortality rates were similar between both oyster lines but higher at Pimpama River (reaching around 90%) than Stradbroke Island, mostly because of QX disease and, to a lesser extent, to the unfavourable environmental conditions of the summer 2010-2011. Lower prevalences of QX disease at Stradbroke Island probably related to the relative lack of intermediate hosts of the parasite and to lower freshwater input. Surprisingly, no difference in prevalence of QX disease was observed between the two oyster lines.

  1. Using Pyroxene and Amphibole Compositions to Determine Protolith of Banded Quartz- Amphibole-Pyroxene Rocks on Akilia, Southwest Greenland: a Lithology Suitable for Hosting Earth's Oldest Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, M. M.; Usui, T.; Fedo, C. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    At ˜ 3.8 Ga in age, Earth's oldest known supracrustal rocks are exposed in SW Greenland and are comprised dominantly of mafic igneous rocks with less common sedimentary units, included banded iron formation (BIF). The great antiquity of the supracrustal rocks and repeated claims for a fossil record makes Greenland one of the prime astrobiological destinations on Earth, however, many primary characteristics of these rocks have been overprinted during multiple high-grade metamorphic events, which results in complex field relationships (e.g., Myers and Crowley, 2000; Whitehouse and Fedo, 2003). One example of this concerns an ˜ 5 m thick lithology dominated by bands of quartz, amphibole, pyroxene interpreted by some as BIF (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Nutman et al., 1997; Dauphas et al., 2004) on Akilia, SW Greenland. Correct identification of these rocks is of the utmost importance because they are reported to contain grains of apatite with 13C- depleted graphite inclusions that have been claimed as evidence for the oldest (> 3800 Mya) life on Earth (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Nutman et al., 1997; McKeegan et al., 2007). We analyzed mafic mineral compositions by electron microprobe from samples collected from a detailed measured section and from sample 92-197, the rock originally claimed to host Earth's oldest chemofossil. Ultramafic rocks from outside the quartz-amphibole-pyroxene (QAP) lithology are dominated by enstatite, anthophyllite, and hornblende and possess bulk trace-element signatures indicative of an igneous origin. Sample AK 38, a band of mixed pyroxene and amphibole that occurs within the QAP unit also has a bulk trace- element composition consistent with an ultramafic protolith, but contains Fe-rich clinopyroxene (Mg# = ˜ 50). AK 38 amphiboles are dominated by actinolite, although a few analyses of anthophyllite point towards an original Mg-rich protolith. Other QAP samples contain Fe-rich clino- and orthopyroxenes, actinolite and hornblende. Magnetite is

  2. Diagenesis of the Machar Field (British North Sea) chalk: Evidence for decoupling of diagenesis in fractures and the host rock

    SciTech Connect

    Maliva, R.G.; Dickson, J.A.D.; Smalley, P.C.; Oxtoby, N.H.

    1995-01-02

    The Chalk Group (Cretaceous/Tertiary) in the Machar Field (British North Sea) contains both fracture-filling and microcrystalline calcite cements. Modeling of fluid-rock interaction using data on light stable isotopes obtained by whole rock analyses and laser ablation analyses of calcite cements reveal that the fracture and matrix diagenetic systems were largely decoupled. The calcium and carbonate of the fracture-filling calcite cements were derived largely from the adjacent chalk matrix. The fracture diagenetic system had a high water-rock ratio, which maintained a relatively stable water {delta}{sup 18}O ratio during calcite dissolution and precipitation. The chalk matrix, on the contrary, had a low molar water-rock ratio during recrystallization, which resulted in increases in the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value during recrystallization at elevated temperatures. This evolution of the pore-water {delta}{sup 18}O value is manifested by highly variable cement {delta}{sup 18}O values. The present-day formation waters of the Machar Field have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios significantly higher than the whole rock and fracture-filling cement calcite values, evidence that the chemical composition of the formation waters is not representative of that of the pore waters during chalk recrystallization. Little diagenesis is therefore now occurring in the Machar Field. The diagenetic systems of the chalk matrix and fractures both had a high degree of openness with respect to carbon, because of the introduction of organically derived bicarbonate rather than advection of water through the chalk. The bulk of calcite cementation in fractures and the recrystallization and cementation of the chalk matrix occurred at temperatures in the 80--100 C range, at or just below the present-day reservoir temperature of 97 C.

  3. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, Florie A; Cheshire, Michael C; Newell, Dennis L; McCarney, Mary Kate

    2012-08-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  4. Characterization of Geologic Structures and Host Rock Properties Relevant to the Hydrogeology of the Standard Mine in Elk Basin, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Manning, Andrew H.; Berger, Byron R.; Kremer, Yannick; Guzman, Mario A.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Schuller, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The Standard Mine Superfund Site is a source of mine drainage and associated heavy metal contamination of surface and groundwaters. The site contains Tertiary polymetallic quartz veins and fault zones that host precious and base metal sulfide mineralization common in Colorado. To assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in its effort to remediate mine-related contamination, we characterized geologic structures, host rocks, and their potential hydraulic properties to better understand the sources of contaminants and the local hydrogeology. Real time kinematic and handheld global positioning systems were used to locate and map precisely the geometry of the surface traces of structures and mine-related features, such as portals. New reconnaissance geologic mapping, field and x-ray diffraction mineralogy, rock sample collection, thin-section analysis, and elemental geochemical analysis were completed to characterize hydrothermal alteration, mineralization, and subsequent leaching of metallic phases. Surface and subsurface observations, fault vein and fracture network characterization, borehole geophysical logging, and mercury injection capillary entry pressure data were used to document potential controls on the hydrologic system.

  5. Mössbauer and XRD Comparative Study of Host Rock and Iron Rich Mineral Samples from Paz del Rio Iron Ore Mineral Mine in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, M.; Pérez Alcázar, G. A.; Moreira, A. M.; Speziali, N. L.

    2004-12-01

    A comparative study between the host rock and the iron rich mineral samples from the Paz del Rio iron ore mineral mine in Colombia was performed using X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Diffraction results of the iron rich mineral sample show that goethite, hematite, quartz, kaolinite and siderite are the main phases, and that a small amount of illite is also present. By Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) the presence of all the above mentioned phases was detected except quartz as well as an additional presence of small amount of biotite. The goethite, which appears as four sextets with hyperfine fields of 33.5, 30.5, 27.5 and 18.5 T, respectively, is the majority phase. This result shows the different grades of formation of this oxyhydroxide. The Mössbauer spectrum of this sample at 80 K presents the same phases obtained at RT without any superparamagnetic effect. In this case the goethite appears as two sextets. Diffraction results of the host rock sample show a large amount of quartz and kaolinite and small amounts of illite and biotite, whereas by Mössbauer spectroscopy illite, kaolinite and biotite were detected.

  6. Excavation Induced Hydraulic Response of Opalinus Clay - Investigations of the FE-Experiment at the Mont Terri URL in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, T.; Müller, H. R.; Garitte, B.; Sakaki, T.; Vietor, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) Experiment at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland is a full-scale heater test in a clay-rich formation (Opalinus Clay). Based on the Swiss disposal concept it simulates the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) evolution of a spent fuel / vitrified high-level waste (SF / HLW) repository tunnel in a realistic manner. The main aim of this experiment is to investigate SF / HLW repository-induced THM coupled effects mainly in the host rock but also in the engineered barrier system (EBS), which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks. A further aim is to gather experience with full-scale tunnel construction and associated hydro-mechanical (HM) processes in the host rock. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors (state-of-the-art sensors and measurement systems as well as fiber-optic sensors). The sensors are distributed in the host rock's near- and far-field, the tunnel lining, the EBS, and on the heaters. The heater emplacement and backfilling has not started yet, therefore only the host rock instrumentation is installed at the moment and is currently generating data. We will present the instrumentation concept and rationale as well as the first monitoring results of the excavation and ventilation phase. In particular, we investigated the excavation induced hydraulic response of the host rock. Therefore, the spatiotemporal evolution of porewater-pressure time series was analyzed to get a better understanding of HM coupled processes during and after the excavation phase as well as the impact of anisotropic geomechanic and hydraulic properties of the clay-rich formation on its hydraulic behavior. Excavation related investigations were completed by means of inclinometer data to characterize the non-elastic and time

  7. Clay: The Forgotten Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Doris Marie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the tactile and kinesthetic areas of learning children experience when using clay. Includes practical tips for using and storing clay for preschool use and notes the differences between potters' clay and play dough. (HTH)

  8. Clay: The Forgotten Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Doris Marie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the tactile and kinesthetic areas of learning children experience when using clay. Includes practical tips for using and storing clay for preschool use and notes the differences between potters' clay and play dough. (HTH)

  9. Fluid-rock interactions in CO2-saturated, granite-hosted geothermal systems: Implications for natural and engineered systems from geochemical experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Ré, Caroline; Kaszuba, John P.; Moore, Joseph N.; McPherson, Brian J.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were conducted and geochemical models constructed to evaluate the geochemical and mineralogical response of fractured granite and granite + epidote in contact with thermal water, with and without supercritical CO2, at 250 °C and 25-45 MPa. Illite ± smectite ± zeolite(?) precipitate as secondary minerals at the expense of K-feldspar, oligoclase, and epidote. Illite precipitates in experiments reacting granite and granite + epidote with water; metastable smectite forms in the experiments injected with supercritical CO2. Waters are supersaturated with respect to quartz and saturated with respect to chalcedony in CO2-charged experiments, but neither mineral formed. Carbonate formation is predicted for experiments injected with supercritical CO2, but carbonate only formed during cooling and degassing of the granite + epidote + CO2 experiment. Experimental results provide insight into the buffering capacity of granites as well as the drivers of clay formation. Metastable smectite in the experiments is attributed to high water-rock ratios, high silica activities, and high CO2 and magnesium-iron concentrations. Smectite precipitation in supercritical CO2-bearing geothermal systems may affect reservoir permeability. Silicate formation may create or thicken caps within or on the edges of geothermal reservoirs. Carbonate formation, as desired for carbon sequestration projects coinciding with geothermal systems, may require extended periods of time; cooling and degassing of CO2-saturated waters leads to carbonate precipitation, potentially plugging near-surface production pathways.

  10. Petrogenesis of volcanic rocks that host the world-class Agsbnd Pb Navidad District, North Patagonian Massif: Comparison with the Jurassic Chon Aike Volcanic Province of Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhier, Verónica E.; Franchini, Marta B.; Caffe, Pablo J.; Maydagán, Laura; Rapela, Carlos W.; Paolini, Marcelo

    2017-05-01

    We present the first study of the volcanic rocks of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation that host the Navidad world-class Ag + Pb epithermal district located in the North Patagonian Massif, Patagonia, Argentina. These volcanic and sedimentary rocks were deposited in a lacustrine environment during an extensional tectonic regime associated with the breakup of Gondwana and represent the mafic to intermediate counterparts of the mainly silicic Jurassic Chon Aike Volcanic Province. Lava flows surrounded by autobrecciated carapace were extruded in subaerial conditions, whereas hyaloclastite and peperite facies suggest contemporaneous subaqueous volcanism and sedimentation. LA-ICPMS Usbnd Pb ages of zircon crystals from the volcanic units yielded Middle Jurassic ages of 173.9 ± 1.9 Ma and 170.8 ± 3 Ma. In the Navidad district, volcanic rocks of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation show arc-like signatures including high-K basaltic-andesite to high-K dacite compositions, Rb, Ba and Th enrichment relative to the less mobile HFS elements (Nb, Ta), enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), Ysbnd Ti depletion, and high Zr contents. These characteristics could be explained by assimilation of crustal rocks in the Jurassic magmas, which is also supported by the presence of zircon xenocrysts with Permian and Middle-Upper Triassic ages (281.3 Ma, 246.5, 218.1, and 201.3 Ma) and quartz xenocrysts recognized in these volcanic units. Furthermore, Sr and Nd isotope compositions suggest a contribution of crustal components in these Middle Jurassic magmas. High-K basaltic andesite has initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70416-0.70658 and ξNd(t) values of -5.3 and -4. High-K dacite and andesite have initial 87Sr/86Sr compositions of 0.70584-0.70601 and ξNd(t) values of -4,1 and -3,2. The range of Pb isotope values (206Pb/204Pb = 18.28-18.37, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.61-15.62, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.26-38.43) of Navidad volcanic rocks and ore minerals suggest mixing Pb sources with contributions of

  11. Coupled THMC models for bentonite in clay repository for nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Li, Y.; Anguiano, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Illitization, the transformation of smectite to illite, could compromise some beneficiary features of an engineered barrier system (EBS) that is composed primarily of bentonite and clay host rock. It is a major determining factor to establish the maximum design temperature of the repositories because it is believed that illitization could be greatly enhanced at temperatures higher than 100 oC and thus significantly lower the sorption and swelling capacity of bentonite and clay rock. However, existing experimental and modeling studies on the occurrence of illitization and related performance impacts are not conclusive, in part because the relevant couplings between the thermal, hydrological, chemical, and mechanical (THMC) processes have not been fully represented in the models. Here we present fully coupled THMC simulations of a generic nuclear waste repository in a clay formation with bentonite-backfilled EBS. Two scenarios were simulated for comparison: a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister can reach about 200 oC and a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister peaks at about 100 oC. The model simulations demonstrate that illitization is in general more significant at higher temperatures. We also compared the chemical changes and the resulting swelling stress change for two types of bentonite: Kunigel-VI and FEBEX bentonite. Higher temperatures also lead to much higher stress in the near field, caused by thermal pressurization and vapor pressure buildup in the EBS bentonite and clay host rock. Chemical changes lead to a reduction in swelling stress, which is more pronounced for Kunigel-VI bentonite than for FEBEX bentonite.

  12. Excavation induced fractures in a plastic clay formation: Observations at the HADES URF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marcke, Philippe; Bastiaens, Wim

    2010-11-01

    The Belgian research programme for geological disposal of radioactive waste focuses on the Boom Clay as the potential host rock formation. To examine the feasibility of constructing an underground repository in this clay layer, an underground research facility HADES has been constructed in several stages since 1980. The two galleries most recently excavated, the Connecting Gallery in 2002 and the Praclay Gallery in 2007, were constructed by means of an industrial method using a tunnelling machine. During these excavations the hydro-mechanical response of the clay was characterised. A fracture pattern was observed consistently during the excavation of both galleries. The extent of this fractured zone was determined for the Connecting Gallery, but requires some further study. A strong hydro-mechanical coupling and a clear time dependency were noticed, even at an unexpectedly large distance from the excavation. Furthermore the Boom Clay responds in an anisotropic manner to the excavation due to anisotropy in the in situ stress state and the Boom Clay characteristics. Self-sealing processes were observed and appear to occur relatively fast.

  13. Radiation Sensitivity of Natural Organic Matter: Clay Mineral Association Effects in the Callovo-Oxfordian Argillite

    SciTech Connect

    Schäfer, T.; Michel, P; Claret, F; Beetz, T; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Clay-rich low-organic carbon formations (e.g., Callovo-Oxfordian argillite in France and Opalinus Clay in Switzerland) are considered as host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The clay-organic carbon has a strong impact on the chemical stability of the clays. For this reason, the nature of the clay-organic carbon, the release of hydrophilic organic compounds, namely, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) and the radiation sensitivity of the undisturbed host rock organics was investigated. The clay sample originates from Oxfordian argillite (447 m depth, borehole EST 104). HA and FA were extracted following the standard International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) isolation procedure. Synchrotron based (C-, K-, Ca-, O- and Fe-edge XANES) scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and FT-IR microspectroscopy was used to identify under high spatial resolution the distribution of clay-organic matter with different functionality using principal component and cluster analysis. The results show that in this old (Jurassic) geological formation, small parts of the organic inventory (1-5%) keeps the structure/functionality and can be mobilized as hydrophilic humic substance type material (HA and FA). Target spectra analysis shows best correlation for isolated humic acids with organics found in smectite-rich regions, whereas the extractable FA has better spectral similarities with the illite mixed layer minerals (MLM) regions. After radiation of 1.7 GGy under helium atmosphere the same rock sample area was investigated for radiation damage. Radiation damage in the smectite and illite-MLM associated organic matter is comparably low with 20-30% total oxygen mass loss and 13-18% total carbon mass loss. A critical dose dc of 2.5 GGy and a optical density after infinite radiation (OD?) of 54% was calculated under room temperature conditions. C(1s) XANES show a clear increase in Cdouble bond; length as m-dashC bonds especially in the illite-MLM associated organics. This results

  14. Rock Physics Modeling to Constrain Petrophysical Properties in the Productive Zone of the Marcellus Shale, WV from Wireline Log Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, S. M.; Tatham, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    A rock physics characterization based on wireline log data is proposed for constraining the petrophysical properties of the productive interval in the Marcellus Shale. The method involves two parts, 1) petrophysical interpretation of organic shale from wireline log data, and 2) rock physics modeling utilizing the interpreted log data. A petrophysical interpretation of the more radioactive interval of log data suggests that higher TOC is associated with lower clay content. This interpretation also showed that upper the part of the Marcellus Shale is clay dominated whereas the lower part is quartz dominated. Following the petrophysically interpreted data, the rock physics modeling was performed using differential effective medium (DEM) scheme in an inclusion based model to estimate the effective elastic moduli of the composites. The elastic moduli of the matrix phase in the DEM were provided with the Voigt-Reuss-Hill average for a composition of quartz and clay. Imbedded inclusions were assumed. Three types of inclusion phases were considered; a dry pore (i.e. equant pores or ellipsoidal pores), a water-wet clay pore and kerogen. Dry pores were saturated with pore fluids simulating reservoir situations with the low frequency Gassmann equations. Rock physics modeling suggests that the elastic properties of the Marcellus Shale were controlled by the interplay of clay content, kerogen content and low aspect ratio pores. Low aspect ratio pores (~1/40) also comprise the dominant pore types in the Marcellus Shale and these pores are more common in the lower part of the formation. An illustration of the DEM scheme for understanding the effect of inclusion moduli and inclusion shape to host material. Here, the host is a solid rock of 40% Quartz with clay mixture, and kerogen is the inclusion. It shows that aspect ratio of kerogen inclusion plays a significant role in this scheme; lower aspect ratio produces much lower elastic moduli than higher aspect ratios.

  15. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  16. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  17. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  18. Provenance and tectonic setting of the Neoproterozoic clastic rocks hosting the Banana Zone Cu-Ag mineralisation, northwest Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelepile, Tebogo; Bineli Betsi, Thierry; Franchi, Fulvio; Shemang, Elisha; Suh, Cheo Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical data were combined in order to decipher the petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic sedimentary succession associated with the Banana Zone Cu-Ag mineralisation (northwest Botswana), in the Kalahari Copperbelt. The investigated Neoproterozoic sedimentary succession is composed of two formations including the Ngwako Pan and the D'kar Formations. The Ngwako Pan Formation is made up of continental siliciclastic sediments, mainly sandstones interbedded with siltstones and mudstones, whereas the D'kar Formation is comprised of shallow marine laminated siltstones, sandstones and mudstones, with subordinate limestone. Copper-Ag mineralisation is essentially confined at the base of the D'kar Formation, which bears reduced organic components, likely to have controlled Cu-Ag precipitation. Sandstones of both the Ngwako Pan and the D'kar Formations are arkoses and subarkoses, composed of quartz (Q), feldspars (F) and lithic fragments (L). Moreover, geochemically the sandstones are considered as potassic and classified as arkoses. On the other hand, mudrocks of the D'kar Formation are finely laminated and are dominated by muscovite, sericite, chlorite and quartz. The modified chemical index of weathering (CIW‧) values indicated an intense chemical weathering of the source rock. The dominance of detrital quartz and feldspar grains coupled with Al2O3/TiO2 ratios (average 29.67 and 24.52 for Ngwako Pan and D'kar Formations, respectively) and Ni and Cr depletion in the sandstones, suggest a dominant felsic source. However, high concentrations of Ni and Cr and a low Al2O3/TiO2 ratio (<20) in the mudrocks of the D'kar Formation indicate a mixed source. Provenance of the investigated sandstones and mudrocks samples is further supported by the REE patterns, the size of Eu anomaly as well as La/Co, Th/Co, Th/Cr and Cr/Th ratios, which show a felsic source for the sandstones of both the Ngwako Pan and D'kar Formations and an intermediate source for the mudrocks

  19. Chemistry of Martian Rock Esperance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-07

    This triangle plot shows the relative concentrations of some of the major chemical elements in the Martian rock Esperance. The compositions of average Martian crust and of montmorillonite, a common clay mineral, are shown.

  20. Modelling iron clay interactions in deep geological disposal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Perronnet, M.; Jullien, M.

    In the context of deep geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes, the interactions between iron and clay-rich materials may lead to adverse transformations of clay minerals with a potential loss of confining properties such as swelling and capacity to exchange cations. Such transformations have been experimentally observed at temperatures starting at ca. 80 °C, where smectites contained in a mixture of bentonite and iron powder are transformed into iron-rich serpentine-type minerals. The reaction-transport code CRUNCH is used to investigate the iron-clay interactions at 50 °C over a period of 10,000 years, which are the conditions considered here to represent the mean temperature value and the expected timescale for the corrosion stage. The aim is to predict the nature and quantity of corrosion product, calculate the chemistry of water (essentially the pH) and the mineralogical transformation in the system containing the canister, an optional engineered barrier (bentonite) and the host-rock (argillite). The results of the calculations show that at the interface with the canister, where steel corrosion occurs, the iron is partly immobilized by the precipitation of iron oxides (essentially magnetite) and small amounts of siderite. The pH stabilizes at high values, between 10 and 11, at this location. In the bentonite or the argillite in contact with the container, the primary clay minerals are destabilized and iron-rich serpentine-like minerals precipitate as observed in the experiments (cronstedtite and berthierine). These minerals show low cation exchange and swelling capacities. The results also show that the interactions between iron and clay may lead to significant porosity changes in the system. A reduction of the porosity is predicted at the surface of the steel canister, due to the precipitation of iron oxides. Porosity increase is predicted in the clay material due to the dissolution of the primary clay minerals. The effect of these porosity

  1. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In Greene Co., southwest Pennsylvania, the Upper Devonian sandstone formation waters have δ7Li values of + 14.6 ± 1.2 (2SD, n = 25), and are distinct from Marcellus Shale formation waters which have δ7Li of + 10.0 ± 0.8 (2SD, n = 12). These two formation waters also maintain distinctive 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggesting hydrologic separation between these units. Applying temperature-dependent illitilization model to Marcellus Shale, we found that Li concentration in clay minerals increased with Li concentration in pore fluid during diagenetic illite-smectite transition. Samples from north central PA show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr than in southwest Pennsylvania. Spatial variations in Li and δ7Li values show that Marcellus formation waters are not homogeneous across the Appalachian Basin. Marcellus formation waters in the northeastern Pennsylvania portion of the basin show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr, suggesting long term, cross-formational fluid migration in this region. Assessing the impact of potential mixing of fresh water with deep formation water requires establishment of a geochemical and isotopic baseline in the shallow, fresh water aquifers, and site specific characterization of formation water, followed by long-term monitoring, particularly in regions of future shale gas development.

  2. Microbial rock inhabitants survive hypervelocity impacts on Mars-like host planets: first phase of lithopanspermia experimentally tested.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Stöffler, Dieter; Ott, Sieglinde; Hornemann, Ulrich; Cockell, Charles S; Moeller, Ralf; Meyer, Cornelia; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Fritz, Jörg; Schade, Sara; Artemieva, Natalia A

    2008-02-01

    The scenario of lithopanspermia describes the viable transport of microorganisms via meteorites. To test the first step of lithopanspermia, i.e., the impact ejection from a planet, systematic shock recovery experiments within a pressure range observed in martian meteorites (5-50 GPa) were performed with dry layers of microorganisms (spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of the endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, and thalli and ascocarps of the lichen Xanthoria elegans) sandwiched between gabbro discs (martian analogue rock). Actual shock pressures were determined by refractive index measurements and Raman spectroscopy, and shock temperature profiles were calculated. Pressure-effect curves were constructed for survival of B. subtilis spores and Chroococcidiopsis cells from the number of colony-forming units, and for vitality of the photobiont and mycobiont of Xanthoria elegans from confocal laser scanning microscopy after live/dead staining (FUN-I). A vital launch window for the transport of rock-colonizing microorganisms from a Mars-like planet was inferred, which encompasses shock pressures in the range of 5 to about 40 GPa for the bacterial endospores and the lichens, and a more limited shock pressure range for the cyanobacterium (from 5-10 GPa). The results support concepts of viable impact ejections from Mars-like planets and the possibility of reseeding early Earth after asteroid cataclysms.

  3. Micro-fabric damages in Boom Clay inferred from cryo-BIB-SEM experiment: recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schmatz, Joyce; Klaver, Jop; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    The Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock in Belgium for nuclear waste disposal in a deep geological formation. One of the keys to understand the long-term performance of such a host rock is the fundamental understanding of coupling between microstructural evolution, poromechanical behaviour and the state of hydration of the system. At in situ conditions, Boom Clay is a nearly water-saturated (>94%) clay-rich geomaterial. Subsequently, for measurement of mechanical and transport properties in laboratory, cores of Boom Clay are vacuum-packed in Al-coated-poly-ethylene barrier foil to be best preserved at original hydric state. Because clay microstructures are very sensitive to dehydration, the validity of investigations done on such preserved or/and dried samples is often questionable. Desbois et al. (2009, 2013, 2014) showed the possibility to image fluid-filled porosity in Boom Clay, by using the FIB-cryo-SEM (FIB: Focussed Ion Beam) and FIB-cryo-SEM (BIB: Broad Ion Beam) techniques. However, surprisingly in Desbois et al. (2014), BIB-cryo-SEM experiments on Boom Clay, shown that the majority of the pores were fluid-free, contrasting with result in Desbois et al. (2009). In Desbois et al. (2014), several reasons were discussed to explain such discrepancies. The likely ones are the sealing efficiency of the Al-barrier foil at long term and the volume expansion due to the release of in-situ stress after core extraction, contributing both to dehydration and microfabric damage. This contribution presents the newest results based on cryo-BIB-SEM. Small pieces (30 mm3) of Boom Clay were preserved in liquid nitrogen after the core extraction at the MOL/Dessel Underground Research Laboratory in Belgium. A maximum of ten minutes time span was achieved between opening the core, the sub-sample extraction and the quenching of sub-samples in liquid nitrogen. First results show that all pores visible at cryo-SEM resolution are water saturated. However, water

  4. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  5. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  6. Mineral chemistry of magnetite from magnetite-apatite mineralization and their host rocks: examples from Kiruna, Sweden, and El Laco, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughm, Shannon G.; Hanchar, John M.; Tornos, Fernando; Westhues, Anne; Attersley, Samuel

    2017-03-01

    Interpretation of the mineralizing environment of magnetite-apatite deposits remains controversial with theories that include a hydrothermal or magmatic origin or a combination of those two processes. To address this controversy, we have analyzed the trace element content of magnetite from precisely known geographic locations and geologic environments from the Precambrian magnetite-apatite ore and host rocks in Kiruna, Sweden, and the Pliocene-Holocene El Laco volcano in the Atacama desert of Chile. Magnetite samples from Kiruna have low trace element concentrations with little chemical variation between the ore, host, and related intrusive rocks. Magnetite from andesite at El Laco, and dacite from the nearby Láscar volcano, has high trace element concentrations typical of magmatic magnetite. El Laco ore magnetite have low trace element concentrations and displays growth zoning in incompatible elements (Si, Ca, and Ce), compatible elements (Mg, Al, and Mn), large-ion lithophile element (Sr), and high field strength element (Y, Nb, and Th). The El Laco ore magnetite are similar in composition to magnetite that has been previously interpreted to have crystallized from hydrothermal fluids; however, there is a significant difference in the internal zoning patterns. At El Laco, each zoned element is either enriched or depleted in the same layers, suggesting the magnetite crystallized from a volatile-rich, iron-oxide melt. In general, the compositions of magnetite from these two deposits plot in very wide fields that are not restricted to the proposed fields in published discriminant diagrams. This suggests that the use of these diagrams and genetic models based on them should be used with caution.

  7. How temperature-dependent elasticity alters host rock/magmatic reservoir models: A case study on the effects of ice-cap unloading on shallow volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard R.; Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    In geodynamic numerical models of volcanic systems, the volcanic basement hosting the magmatic reservoir is often assumed to exhibit constant elastic parameters with a sharp transition from the host rocks to the magmatic reservoir. We assess this assumption by deriving an empirical relation between elastic parameters and temperature for Icelandic basalts by conducting a set of triaxial compression experiments between 200 °C and 1000 °C. Results show a significant decrease of Young's modulus from ∼38 GPa to less than 4.7 GPa at around 1000 °C. Based on these laboratory data, we develop a 2D axisymmetric finite-element model including temperature-dependent elastic properties of the volcanic basement. As a case study, we use the Snæfellsjökull volcanic system, Western Iceland to evaluate pressure differences in the volcanic edifice and basement due to glacial unloading of the volcano. First, we calculate the temperature field throughout the model and assign elastic properties accordingly. Then we assess unloading-driven pressure differences in the magma chamber at various depths in models with and without temperature-dependent elastic parameters. With constant elastic parameters and a sharp transition between basement and magma chamber we obtain results comparable to other studies. However, pressure changes due to surface unloading become smaller when using more realistic temperature-dependent elastic properties. We ascribe this subdued effect to a transition zone around the magma chamber, which is still solid rock but with relatively low Young's modulus due to high temperatures. We discuss our findings in the light of volcanic processes in proximity to the magma chamber, such as roof collapse, dyke injection, or deep hydrothermal circulation. Our results aim at quantifying the effects of glacial unloading on magma chamber dynamics and volcanic activity.

  8. Fluid-mediated slab-mantle interaction during (U)HP and HT metamorphism of garnet peridotites and their hosting crustal rocks (Monte Duria, Central Alps, N Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Luca; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Tumiati, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The Adula-Cima Lunga nappe represents the highest of the Lower Penninic units of the Central Alps. It consists of orthogneiss and paragneiss of pre-Mesozoic origin hosting lenses of metacarbonates, partly retrogressed eclogites and garnet/chlorite peridotites. The garnet peridotite bodies cropping out in the southern area of the nappe complex (Alpe Arami, Cima di Gagnone and Monte Duria) record the highest metamorphic conditions (P>3.0 GPa, T=800-850°C. In the study area garnet peridotite lenses are in contact with biotite-bearing migmatites or hosted in amphibole-bearing migmatites and K-feldspar gneisses. Petrographic and minerochemical data indicate a previously unknown HT stage during peridotite and eclogite exhumation. Peridotites show orthopyroxene with symplectites of tiny crystals of baddeleyte (ZrO2) and srilankite (ZrTi2O6), whereas only zircon was found in the symplectites after garnet. Bulk rock analyses of peridotites show REE content 3 to 5 times lower than PM but with a clear selective enrichment in LREE (spoon-like pattern), and with a Eu positive anomaly. The same "spoon like" pattern in the LREE field is displayed also by eclogites, shifted to values 2 to 5 times higher than PM. Due to the similarities of the REE patterns of peridotite and eclogite and the occurrence of the Eu positive anomaly in most of the peridotite analyses that points to a contamination by a "basaltic" source, we suggest that eclogites are the source of the metasomatic agent that enriched the original garnet peridotite. The Monte Duria area thus represents a natural laboratory where is possible to study "in situ" the mantle-crust interaction. Metasomatic agents and processes, relationships between UHP-UHT metamorphism and metasomatism, and mechanisms of emplacement of mantle rocks into crustal slab can be here addressed and framed in the context of the well known geological background of the Alps.

  9. Clay smear: Review of mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrolijk, Peter J.; Urai, Janos L.; Kettermann, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Clay smear is a collection of fault processes and resulting fault structures that form when normal faults deform layered sedimentary sections. These elusive structures have attracted deep interest from researchers interested in subsurface fluid flow, particularly in the oil and gas industry. In the four decades since the association between clay-smear structures and oil and gas accumulations was introduced, there has been extensive research into the fault processes that create clay smear and the resulting effects of that clay smear on fluid flow. We undertake a critical review of the literature associated with outcrop studies, laboratory and numerical modeling, and subsurface field studies of clay smear and propose a comprehensive summary that encompasses all of these elements. Important fault processes that contribute to clay smear are defined in the context of the ratio of rock strength and in situ effective stresses, the geometric evolution of fault systems, and the composition of the faulted section. We find that although there has been progress in all avenues pursued, progress has been uneven, and the processes that disrupt clay smears are mostly overlooked. We highlight those research areas that we think will yield the greatest benefit and suggest that taking these emerging results within a more process-based framework presented here will lead to a new generation of clay smear models.

  10. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kaam-Peters, Heidy M. E.; Köster, Jürgen; van der Gaast, Sjierk J.; Dekker, Marlèn; de Leeuw, Jan W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1998-09-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the amount of clay relative to the amount of organic matter (clay/TOC ratios). This correlation may explain the high diasterane/sterane ratios in crude oils and extracts derived from certain carbonate source rocks. Based on the concentrations of regular and rearranged steroids in the sample sets, it is proposed that diasterenes are partly reduced to diasteranes and partly degraded during diagenesis in a ratio largely determined by the availability of clay minerals. It is suggested that the hydrogen atoms required for reduction of the diasterenes originate from the water in the interlayers of clay minerals.

  11. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  12. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  13. CLAY MINERALOGY OF INSOLUBLE RESIDUES IN MARINE EVAPORITES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodine, Marc W.

    1985-01-01

    Insoluble residues from three sequences of Paleozoic marine evaporites (Retsof salt bed in western New York, Salado Formation in south-eastern New Mexico, and Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation in southeastern Utah) are rich in trioctahedral clays. Chlorite (clinochlore), corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite-trioctahedral smectite), talc, and illite (the only dioctahedral clay) are the dominant clay minerals; serpentine, discrete trioctahedral smectite (saponite), and interstratified talc-trioctahedral smectite are sporadically abundant. These clay-mineral assemblages differ chemically and mineralogically from those observed in most continental and normal marine rocks, which commonly contain kaolinite, dioctahedral smectite (beidellite-montmorillonite), illite, mixed-layer illite-dioctahedral smectite, and, in most cases, no more than minor quantities of trioctahedral clay minerals. The distinctive clay mineralogy in these evaporite sequences suggests a largely authigenic origin. These clay minerals are thought to have formed during deposition and early diagenesis through interaction between argillaceous detritus and Mg-rich marine evaporite brines.

  14. Palaeoceanographic approach to the Kimmeridge Clay Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G. )

    1988-08-01

    The Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) is northern Europe's premier source rock and can be understood using a new but relatively simple oceanographic model. This explains or accommodates most current observations about the KCF and its depositional environment and draws upon paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, geochemical, sedimentological, and paleontological evidence.

  15. The genesis of emeralds and their host rocks from Swat, northwestern Pakistan: a stable-isotope investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, M.; Fallick, A. E.; Moon, C. J.

    1996-05-01

    previously serpentinized ultramafic rocks by a CO2-bearing fluid of metamorphic origin.

  16. Phengite-hosted LILE enrichment in eclogite and related rocks: Implications for fluid-mediated mass transfer in subduction zones and arc magma genesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, J.N.; Perfit, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Geochemical differences between island arc basalts (LAB) and ocean-floor basalts (mid-ocean ridge basalts; MORB) suggest that the large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) K, Ba, Rb and Cs are probably mobilized in subduction zone fluids and melts. This study documents LILE enrichment of eclogite, amphibolite, and epidote ?? garnet blueschist tectonic blocks and related rocks from melanges of two subduction complexes. The samples are from six localities of the Franciscan Complex, California, and related terranes of Oregon and Baja California, and from the Samana Metamorphic Complex, Samana Peninsula, Dominican Republic. Most Franciscan blocks are MORB-like in their contents of rare earth elements (REE) and high field strength elements (HFSE); in contrast, most Samana blocks show an LAB signature of these elements. The whole-rock K2O contents of both groups range from 1 to 3 wt %; K, Ba, Rb, and Cs are all strongly intercorrelated. Many blocks display K/Ba similar to melasomatized transition zones and rinds at their outer margins. Some transition zones and rinds are enriched in LILE compared with host blocks; others are relatively depleted in these elements. Some LILE-rich blocks contain 'early' coarse-grained muscovite that is aligned in the foliation defined by coarse-grained omphacite or amphibole grains. Others display 'late' muscovite in veins and as a partial replacement of garnet; many contain both textural types. The muscovite is phengite that contains ???3??25-3??55 Si per 11 oxygens, and ???0??25-0??50 Mgper 11 oxygens. Lower-Si phengite has a significant paragonite component: Na per 11 oxygens ranges to ???0??12. Ba contents of phengite range to over 1 wt % (0??027 per 11 oxygens). Ba in phengite does not covary strongly with either Na or K. Ba contents of phengite increase from some blocks to their transition zones or rinds, or from blocks to their veins. Averaged KlBa ratios for phengite and host samples define an array which describes other subsamples of

  17. The Namaqua rock mouse (Micaelamys namaquensis) as a potential reservoir and host of arthropod vectors of diseases of medical and veterinary importance in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fagir, Dina M; Ueckermann, Eddie A; Horak, Ivan G; Bennett, Nigel C; Lutermann, Heike

    2014-08-15

    The role of endemic murid rodents as hosts of arthropod vectors of diseases of medical and veterinary significance is well established in the northern hemisphere. In contrast, endemic murids are comparatively understudied as vector hosts in Africa, particularly in South Africa. Considering the great rodent diversity in South Africa, many of which may occur as human commensals, this is unwarranted. In the current study we assessed the ectoparasite community of a widespread southern African endemic, the Namaqua rock mouse (Micaelamys namaquensis), that is known to carry Bartonella spp. and may attain pest status. We aimed to identify possible vectors of medical and/or veterinary importance which this species may harbour and explore the contributions of habitat type, season, host sex and body size on ectoparasite prevalence and abundance. Small mammal abundance was substantially lower in grasslands compared to rocky outcrops. Although the small mammal community comprised of different species in the two habitats, M. namaquensis was the most abundant species in both habitat types. From these 23 ectoparasite species from four taxa (fleas, ticks, mites and lice) were collected. However, only one flea (Xenopsylla brasiliensis) and one tick species (Haemaphysalis elliptica) have a high zoonotic potential and have been implicated as vectors for Yersinia pestis and Bartonella spp. and Rickettsia conorii, respectively. The disease status of the most commonly collected tick (Rhipicephalus distinctus) is currently unknown. Only flea burdens differed markedly between habitat types and increased with body size. With the exception of lice, all parasite taxa exhibited seasonal peaks in abundance during spring and summer. M. namaquensis is the dominant small mammal species irrespective of habitat type. Despite the great ectoparasite diversity harboured by M. namaquensis, only a small number of these are known as vectors of diseases of medical and/or veterinary importance but occur at

  18. Host-rock controlled epigenetic, hydrothermal metasomatic origin of the Bayan Obo REEFe-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, P.R.C.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Yinchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Bayan Obo, a complex rare earth element (REE)FeNb ore deposit, located in Inner Mongolia, P.R.C. is the world's largest known REE deposit. The deposit is chiefly in a marble unit (H8), but extends into an overlying unit of black shale, slate and schist unit (H9), both of which are in the upper part of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. Based on sedimentary structures, the presence of detrital quartz and algal fossil remains, and the 16-km long geographic extent, the H8 marble is a sedimentary deposit, and not a carbonatite of magmatic origin, as proposed by some previous investigators. The unit was weakly regionally metamorphosed (most probably the lower part of the green schist facies) into marble and quartzite prior to mineralization. Tectonically, the deposit is located on the northern flank of the Sino-Korean craton. Many hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Bayan Obo deposit; the studies reported here support an epigenetic, hydrothermal, metasomatic origin. Such an origin is supported by field and laboratory textural evidence; 232Th/208Pb internal isochron mineral ages of selected monazite and bastnaesite samples; 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating minimum mineral ages of selected alkali amphiboles; chemical compositions of different generations of both REE ore minerals and alkali amphiboles; and evidence of host-rock influence on the various types of Bayan Obo ores. The internal isochron ages of the REE minerals indicate Caledonian ages for various episodes of REE and Fe mineralization. No evidence was found to indicate a genetic relation between the extensive biotite granitic rocks of Hercynian age in the mine region and the Bayan Obo are deposit, as suggested by previous workers. ?? 1992.

  19. Pervasive remagnetization of detrital zircon host rocks in the Jack Hills, Western Australia and implications for records of the early geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Maloof, Adam C.; Tailby, Nicholas; Ramezani, Jahandar; Fu, Roger R.; Hanus, Veronica; Trail, Dustin; Bruce Watson, E.; Harrison, T. Mark; Bowring, Samuel A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Coe, Robert S.

    2015-11-01

    It currently is unknown when Earth's dynamo magnetic field originated. Paleomagnetic studies indicate that a field with an intensity similar to that of the present day existed 3.5 billion years ago (Ga). Detrital zircon crystals found in the Jack Hills of Western Australia are some of the very few samples known to substantially predate this time. With crystallization ages ranging from 3.0-4.38 Ga, these zircons might preserve a record of the missing first billion years of Earth's magnetic field history. However, a key unknown is the age and origin of magnetization in the Jack Hills zircons. The identification of >3.9 Ga (i.e., Hadean) field records requires first establishing that the zircons have avoided remagnetization since being deposited in quartz-rich conglomerates at 2.65-3.05 Ga. To address this issue, we have conducted paleomagnetic conglomerate, baked contact, and fold tests in combination with U-Pb geochronology to establish the timing of the metamorphic and alteration events and the peak temperatures experienced by the zircon host rocks. These tests include the first conglomerate test directly on the Hadean-zircon bearing conglomerate at Erawandoo Hill. Although we observed little evidence for remagnetization by recent lightning strikes, we found that the Hadean zircon-bearing rocks and surrounding region have been pervasively remagnetized, with the final major overprinting likely due to thermal and/or aqueous effects from the emplacement of the Warakurna large igneous province at ∼1070 million years ago (Ma). Although localized regions of the Jack Hills might have escaped complete remagnetization, there currently is no robust evidence for pre-depositional (>3.0 Ga) magnetization in the Jack Hills detrital zircons.

  20. Comparative geology and geochemistry of sedimentary-rock-hosted (Carlin Type) gold deposits in the People's Republic of China and in Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Zhiping; Peters, Stephen G.

    1998-01-01

    Sedimentary-rock-hosted (Carlin-type) gold deposits have been considered economically significant and geologically distinct since the early 1960's. This report consists of a nine-part text and an interactive database. This small database is to help Western companies get more information about these gold deposits in China, and to help geologists who are interested in world Carlin-type deposits conduct research on them. Because of their economic significance and geological distinctiveness, these deposits have caught the interest of economic geologists all over the world since the early 1960's. Similar deposits have been discovered in China, Australia, Dominican Republic, Spain, and Russia besides Nevada. Perhaps most significant are the 165 Carlin-type gold deposits that were found in southwest China during the past 15 years. Of these, at least 19 deposits have proven to be of substantial tonnage, making China the second leading country to exploit such deposits. With the increasing interest in Chinese Carlin-type gold deposits, some western companies and geologists desire to get more information about these Chinese deposits. This seems to have been very difficult because the literature was in Chinese. It is estimated that several hundred scientific publications (including papers, books, and technical reports) have been published. This database of Chinese Carlin-type Gold deposits is built on the documentation published during the most recent 10 years and includes six subjects, which consist of 165 records and 30 fields. A new Proterozoic-age sedimentary-rock-hosted gold deposit in northeastern P.R. China also is described. Note that for the old version 1.1 on the CD-ROM, the latitude and longitude locations of the mineral occurrences have been estimated from sketch maps and journal articles and are not intended for digital analysis. One of the improvements in this version 1.2 is the accuracy of geographic data. Version 1.3 updates to the database and includes maps

  1. Geochronological, geochemical and petrographic constraints on the Paleoproterozoic Tocantinzinho gold deposit (Tapajos Gold Province, Amazonian Craton - Brazil): Implications for timing, regional evolution and deformation style of its host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgo, Ariadne; Biondi, João Carlos; Chauvet, Alain; Bruguier, Olivier; Monié, Patrick; Baker, Timothy; Ocampo, Ruperto; Friedman, Richard; Mortensen, James

    2017-04-01

    The Tapajós Domain in the Amazonian Craton comprises hundreds of gold occurrences mainly hosted by Paleoproterozoic granitic rocks, whose geotectonic evolution and deformation style are poorly understood. The Tocantinzinho granite hosts a large amount of gold, forming the largest gold deposit known in the Tapajós Domain. The Tocantinzinho area is formed by plutonic rocks cut by subvolcanic rocks shallowly emplaced and constrained by NW-SE strike-slip faults, probably in a transtensive site. The magmatism started with the emplacement of huge granodiorite that presently formed the basement country rocks (2007-1997Ma), it was followed by the Tocantinzinho granite magmatism (1989-1979 Ma), and the coeval to late andesite emplacement. Petrological and textural evidence suggest the complex and synchronous occurrence of tectonics and few magmatic events expressed by the emplacement of successive granite, aplite, pegmatite, andesite, and dacite. The magmatic event finished with the cooling of this set of rocks below c. 320 °C, at c. 1950 Ma. The cooling rates vary from c. 3.6-14.7°C/Ma, with an average of 7.5°C/Ma, indicating no important vertical exhumations. The elongated geometry of the Tocantinzinho granite and related rocks, features of solid-state deformation within granites and syntectonic deformation of some andesite dikes imply the existence of wrench type tectonic control. The I-type signature of these rocks, their high-K calc-alkaline and metaluminous to peraluminous affinities combined with the tectonic style indicate a post-collisional tectonic setting. Based on geochemical and structural constrains, the rocks from the Tocantinzinho area are interpreted as a part of the Creporizão Suite and probably represent the first expressions of this syn-to late-tectonic magmatism in the region. A continuous and progressive process of magmatic emplacement controlled by tectonics will be proposed and discussed in conclusion.

  2. Reaction zone between pre-UHP titanite and host rock: insights into fluid-rock interaction and deformation mechanisms during exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust (Dabie Shan UHP unit, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzenitz, N.; Romer, R. L.; Grasemann, B.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2012-04-01

    Exhumed crustal UHP rocks may occur as relict blocks in strongly metasomatized matrix rocks. Due to variations in competence between the mm to km sized blocks and their ductile matrix, the largely undeformed blocks may preserve the pre-subduction and the prograde history, whereas the matrix rocks have been ductilely deformed to high magnitudes and record successive stages of deformation. The reaction zones between blocks and matrix, however, provide insights into the fluid-rock interaction, deformation and the deformation mechanisms active during the exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust in the subduction channel. We investigate a titanite megacryst (3 cm in diameter) in a calc-silicate marble from the UHP unit in the Dabie Shan, China. The core of the titanite megacryst grew prograde during subduction. Its U-Pb system remained closed and yields a maximum age for UHP metamorphism. Sr and Nd isotope compositions in the core demonstrate that the titanite megacryst precipitated from a homogeneous fluid source. During metamorphism in the subduction zone, infiltration of external fluids resulted first in Sr-loss from the marbles and then introduction of Sr with unusually low 87Sr/86S values (Romer et al., 2003), leading to the contrasting 87Sr/86Sr values in the titanite megacryst and the hosting UHP marbles (Wawrzenitz et al., 2006). Related to deformation in the calc-silicate marble matrix, the rim of the titanite megacryst has been replaced during the following dissolution-precipitation reactions: (i) Pseudomorphic replacement of the old titanite megacryst by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation. Fluid migrated into the old grain producing a sharp boundary of the replacement front. (ii) New small titanite grains grew with their long axes parallel to the foliation of the marble matrix, reflecting the activation of dissolution precipitation creep. In the matrix, the foliation is defined by the orientation of the basal planes of phengitic white mica. The new

  3. Geochemistry of host rocks in the Howards Pass district, Yukon-Northwest Territories, Canada: implications for sedimentary environments of Zn-Pb and phosphate mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.; Falck, Hendrik; Kelley, Karen D.; Xue, Gabriel G.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed lithogeochemical data are reported here on early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks that host the large Howards Pass stratiform Zn-Pb deposits in Yukon-Northwest Territories. Redox-sensitive trace elements (Mo, Re, V, U) and Ce anomalies in members of the Duo Lake Formation record significant environmental changes. During the deposition of lower footwall units (Pyritic siliceous and Calcareous mudstone members), bottom waters were anoxic and sulphidic, respectively; these members formed in a marginal basin that may have become increasingly restricted with time. Relative to lower members, a major environmental change is proposed for deposition of the overlying Lower cherty mudstone member, which contains phosphorite beds up to ∼0.8 m thick in the upper part, near the base of the Zn-Pb deposits. The presence of these beds, together with models for modern phosphorite formation, suggests P input from an upwelling system and phosphorite deposition in an upper slope or outer shelf setting. The overlying Active mudstone member contains stratabound to stratiform Zn-Pb deposits within black mudstone and gray calcareous mudstone. Data for unmineralized black mudstone in this member indicate deposition under diverse redox conditions from suboxic to sulphidic. Especially distinctive in this member are uniformly low ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are unique within the Duo Lake Formation, attributed here to the dissolution of sedimentary apatite by downward-percolating acidic metalliferous brines. Strata that overlie the Active member (Upper siliceous mudstone member) consist mainly of black mudstone with thin (0.5–1.5 cm) laminae of fine-grained apatite, recording continued deposition on an upper slope or outer shelf under predominantly suboxic bottom waters. Results of this study suggest that exploration for similar stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb deposits should include the outer parts of ancient continental margins, especially at and near

  4. Geochemistry of host rocks in the Howards Pass district, Yukon-Northwest Territories, Canada: implications for sedimentary environments of Zn-Pb and phosphate mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, John F.; Falck, Hendrik; Kelley, Karen D.; Xue, Gabriel G.

    2016-10-01

    Detailed lithogeochemical data are reported here on early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks that host the large Howards Pass stratiform Zn-Pb deposits in Yukon-Northwest Territories. Redox-sensitive trace elements (Mo, Re, V, U) and Ce anomalies in members of the Duo Lake Formation record significant environmental changes. During the deposition of lower footwall units (Pyritic siliceous and Calcareous mudstone members), bottom waters were anoxic and sulphidic, respectively; these members formed in a marginal basin that may have become increasingly restricted with time. Relative to lower members, a major environmental change is proposed for deposition of the overlying Lower cherty mudstone member, which contains phosphorite beds up to ˜0.8 m thick in the upper part, near the base of the Zn-Pb deposits. The presence of these beds, together with models for modern phosphorite formation, suggests P input from an upwelling system and phosphorite deposition in an upper slope or outer shelf setting. The overlying Active mudstone member contains stratabound to stratiform Zn-Pb deposits within black mudstone and gray calcareous mudstone. Data for unmineralized black mudstone in this member indicate deposition under diverse redox conditions from suboxic to sulphidic. Especially distinctive in this member are uniformly low ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are unique within the Duo Lake Formation, attributed here to the dissolution of sedimentary apatite by downward-percolating acidic metalliferous brines. Strata that overlie the Active member (Upper siliceous mudstone member) consist mainly of black mudstone with thin (0.5-1.5 cm) laminae of fine-grained apatite, recording continued deposition on an upper slope or outer shelf under predominantly suboxic bottom waters. Results of this study suggest that exploration for similar stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb deposits should include the outer parts of ancient continental margins, especially at and near stratigraphic

  5. Geochemistry of host rocks in the Howards Pass district, Yukon-Northwest Territories, Canada: implications for sedimentary environments of Zn-Pb and phosphate mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, John F.; Falck, Hendrik; Kelley, Karen D.; Xue, Gabriel G.

    2017-04-01

    Detailed lithogeochemical data are reported here on early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks that host the large Howards Pass stratiform Zn-Pb deposits in Yukon-Northwest Territories. Redox-sensitive trace elements (Mo, Re, V, U) and Ce anomalies in members of the Duo Lake Formation record significant environmental changes. During the deposition of lower footwall units (Pyritic siliceous and Calcareous mudstone members), bottom waters were anoxic and sulphidic, respectively; these members formed in a marginal basin that may have become increasingly restricted with time. Relative to lower members, a major environmental change is proposed for deposition of the overlying Lower cherty mudstone member, which contains phosphorite beds up to ˜0.8 m thick in the upper part, near the base of the Zn-Pb deposits. The presence of these beds, together with models for modern phosphorite formation, suggests P input from an upwelling system and phosphorite deposition in an upper slope or outer shelf setting. The overlying Active mudstone member contains stratabound to stratiform Zn-Pb deposits within black mudstone and gray calcareous mudstone. Data for unmineralized black mudstone in this member indicate deposition under diverse redox conditions from suboxic to sulphidic. Especially distinctive in this member are uniformly low ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are unique within the Duo Lake Formation, attributed here to the dissolution of sedimentary apatite by downward-percolating acidic metalliferous brines. Strata that overlie the Active member (Upper siliceous mudstone member) consist mainly of black mudstone with thin (0.5-1.5 cm) laminae of fine-grained apatite, recording continued deposition on an upper slope or outer shelf under predominantly suboxic bottom waters. Results of this study suggest that exploration for similar stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb deposits should include the outer parts of ancient continental margins, especially at and near stratigraphic

  6. Macro-permeability distribution and anisotropy in a 3D fissured and fractured clay rock: ‘Excavation Damaged Zone’ around a cylindrical drift in Callovo-Oxfordian Argilite (Bure)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababou, Rachid; Cañamón Valera, Israel; Poutrel, Adrien

    The Underground Research Laboratory at Bure (CMHM), operated by ANDRA, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, was developed for studying the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep clayey geologic repository. It comprises a network of underground galleries in a 130 m thick layer of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (depths 400-600 m). This work focuses on hydraulic homogenization (permeability upscaling) of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) around a cylindrical drift, taking into account: (1) the permeability of the intact porous rock matrix; (2) the geometric structure of micro-fissures and small fractures synthesized as a statistical set of planar discs; (3) the curved shapes of large ‘chevron’ fractures induced by excavation (periodically distributed). The method used for hydraulic homogenization (upscaling) of the 3D porous and fractured rock is based on a ‘frozen gradient’ superposition of individual fluxes pertaining to each fracture/matrix block, or ‘unit block’. Each unit block comprises a prismatic block of permeable matrix (intact rock) obeying Darcy’s law, crossed by a single piece of planar fracture obeying either Darcy or Poiseuille law. Polygonal as well as disc shaped fractures are accommodated. The result of upscaling is a tensorial Darcy law, with macro-permeability K ij( x) distributed over a grid of upscaling sub-domains, or ‘voxels’. Alternatively, K ij( x) can be calculated point-wise using a moving window, e.g., for obtaining permeability profiles along ‘numerical’ boreholes. Because the permeable matrix is taken into account, the upscaling procedure can be implemented sequentially, as we do here: first, we embed the statistical fissures in the matrix, and secondly, we embed the large curved chevron fractures. The results of hydraulic upscaling are expressed first in terms of ‘equivalent’ macro-permeability tensors, K ij( x, y, z) distributed around the drift. The statistically isotropic fissures are

  7. Communicating with Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on clay that is centered around sign language in which students explore the slab method of working with clay. States that each student picks a letter of the sign language alphabet and fashions a clay hand to depict the letter. (CMK)

  8. Frictional processes during flank motion at Mount Etna (Italy): experimental characterisation of slip on similar and dissimilar volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanski, Wojciech; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Castagna, Angela; Mitchell, Thomas; Heap, Michael; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Hirose, Takehiro; Dingwell, Donald

    2015-04-01

    The edifice of Mount Etna (Italy) is structurally unstable, exhibiting a near continuous ESE seaward sliding along a set of faults due to interplay between regional tectonics, gravity instability and magma intrusion. Continuous seismic and ground deformation monitoring reveals the resulting large-scale flank motion at variable rates. The mechanisms controlling this faulting kinetic remains, however, poorly constrained. Examination of the fault zones reveals a range of rock types along the different fault segments: fresh and altered basalt, clay and limestone. As lithological contrasts can jeopardise the structural stability of an edifice, we experimentally investigate the frictional properties of these rocks using low- to high-velocity-rotary shear tests on similar and dissimilar rocks to better understand episodes of slow flank motion as well as rapid and catastrophic sector collapse events. The first set of experiments was performed at velocities up to 1.2 m/s and at normal stresses of 1.5 MPa, commensurate with depths of the contacts seen in the Etna edifice. Friction experiments on clay gouge shows the strong rate-weakening dependence of slip in this material as well as the release of carbon dioxide. Friction experiments on solid rocks show a wider range of mechanical behaviour. At high velocity (>0.6 m/s) volcanic rocks tend to melt whereas the clay and limestone do not; rather they decarbonate, which prevents the rock from achieving the temperature required for melting. Experiments on dissimilar rocks clearly show that composition of host rocks affects the composition and viscosity of the resultant frictional melt, which can have a dramatic effect on shear stress leading to fault weakening or strengthening depending on the combination of host rock samples. A series of low- to moderate-slip velocity experiments is now being conducted to complement our dataset and provide a more complete rock friction model applicable to Mount Etna.

  9. Microstructural evidence for seismic and aseismic slips along clay-bearing, carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeraglia, Luca; Bettucci, Andrea; Billi, Andrea; Carminati, Eugenio; Cavallo, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Natali, Marco; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Spagnuolo, Elena

    2017-05-01

    In this multimethodological study, microstructural observations of fault rocks are combined with micromechanical property analyses (contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM)) and with rotary friction experiments (Slow- to High-Velocity rotary-shear friction Apparatus apparatus) to find evidence of seismic to aseismic slip and understand the nanoscale rheology of clay-bearing, carbonate-hosted faults. Fluidized structures, truncated clasts, pores and vesicles, and phyllosilicate nanosized spherules and tubes suggest fast deformation events occurred during seismic slip, whereas clay-assisted pressure-solution processes, clumped clasts, foliation surfaces, and mantled clasts indicate slow deformation events occurred during postseismic/interseismic periods. CR-AFM measurements show that the occurrence of 5 wt % of clay within the carbonate-hosted gouges can significantly reduce the fault core stiffness at nanoscale. In addition, during high-velocity friction experiments simulating seismic slip conditions, the presence of ultrathin phyllosilicate-bearing (≤3 wt %) layers within calcite gouges, as those observed in the natural fault, show faster dynamic weakening than that of pure calcite gouges. The weak behavior of such layers could facilitate the upward propagation of seismic slip during earthquakes, thus possibly enhancing surface faulting. Microstructural observations and experimental evidence fit some well-known geophysical and geodetic observations on the short- to long-term mechanical behavior of faults such as postseismic/interseismic aseismic creep, interseismic fault locking, and seismic slip propagation up to the Earth's surface.

  10. Water saturation of hydrothermal smectite-rich clay might have promoted slope instability prior to the 1998 debris avalanche at Casita volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, P.; Opfergelt, S.; Boivin, P.; Delvaux, B.

    2006-12-01

    In October 1998, a relatively small collapse (1 600 000 cubic meters) of a pre-existing scarp occurred on the southern flank of the dormant Casita volcano, Nicaragua. It resulted in a debris avalanche, which quickly transformed into a disastrous debris flow that destroyed two towns and killed more than 2500 people. The failure was shown to be triggered by an excess pore water pressure within highly fractured rocks, following prolonged seasonal rains and precipitations from Hurricane Mitch. This pressure was linked to the water saturation of a hydrothermally-altered clay bedrock impeding in-depth infiltration. Yet, the nature and amounts of the clay material involved in the slope failure were still unknown. Here we report on physical, chemical and mineralogical investigations aimed at quantifying the clay content, and identifying the layer silicates of the hydrothermally-altered clays uncovered by the 1998 debris avalanche. The fine clay material was exceptionally rich in smectite (up to 50 wt. percent), which swells upon wetting and shrinks during dry conditions (Opfergelt et al., 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 (15), L15305). The smectite belonged to the beidellite-montmorillonite series. The pervasive presence of water-saturated smectitic clay strongly reduced the permeability in depth, and also altered the rheological and mechanical properties of both the pre-failure rock mass and flow materials. The shrink-swell behavior progressively decreased the rock's shear strength, and gradually destabilized the overlying rock mass in the decades and centuries before the landslide, thereby contributing to slope instability. Prolonged intense rainfall led to the formation of incipient weak failure surfaces in the superficial rock mass. As provoked by water saturation, this process was likely favored by the rapid change of the mechanical properties of smectite-rich clays deposited in fracture, joint and gouge interfaces. We suggest that hazard assessments associated with

  11. [Interaction of clay minerals with microorganisms: a review of experimental data].

    PubMed

    Naĭmark, E B; Eroshchev-Shak, V A; Chizhikova, N P; Kompantseva, E I

    2009-01-01

    A review of publications containing results of experiments on the interaction of microorganisms with clay minerals is presented. Bacteria are shown to be involved in all processes related to the transformation of clay minerals: formation of clays from metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, formation of clays from solutions, reversible transitions of different types of clay minerals, and consolidation of clay minerals into sedimentary rocks. Integration of these results allows to conclude that bacteria reproduced all possible abiotic reactions associated with the clay minerals, these reactions proceed much faster with the bacteria being involved. Thus, bacteria act as a living catalyst in the geochemical cycle of clay minerals. The ecological role of bacteria can be considered as a repetition of a chemical process of the abiotic world, but with the use of organic catalytic innovation.

  12. Alumina clay compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, J.S.; Gembicki, S.A.; Schoonover, M.W.; Kocal, J.A.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a composition consisting essentially of a layered clay homogeneously dispersed in an inorganic oxide matrix, such that the clay layers are completely surrounded by the inorganic oxide matrix, the inorganic oxide selected from the group consisting of alumina, titania, silica, zirconia, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and mixtures thereof. This patent also describes a process of preparing a composition consisting essentially of a layered clay homogeneously dispersed in an inorganic oxide matrix, the process comprising mixing a clay with a hydrosol of a precursor of the inorganic oxide, forming spherical particles from the clay containing hydrosol and calcining the particles to form a composition comprising a clay homogeneously dispersed in an inorganic oxide matrix, such that the clay layers are completely surrounded by the inorganic oxide matrix.

  13. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  14. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  15. Reactive transport modeling of ferroan dolomitization by seawater interaction with mafic igneous dikes and carbonate host rock at the Latemar platform, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomme, Katreine; Fowler, Sarah Jane; Bachaud, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The Middle Triassic Latemar carbonate platform, northern Italy, has featured prominently in the longstanding debate regarding dolomite petrogenesis [1-4]. Recent studies agree that ferroan and non-ferroan dolomite replaced calcite in limestone during reactive fluid flow at <0.1 GPa and 40-80°C. Regional igneous activity drove heating that provided kinetically favorable conditions for the replacement reaction. However, the origin of the dolomitizing fluid is unclear. Seawater may have been an important component, but its Fe concentrations are insufficient to account for ferroan dolomite. New field, petrographic, XRD, and geochemical data document a spatial, temporal, and geochemical link between ferroan replacement dolomite and altered mafic igneous dikes that densely intrude the platform. A critical observation is that ferroan dolomite abundances increase towards the dikes. We hypothesize that seawater interacted with mafic minerals in the dikes, leading to Fe enrichment in the fluid that subsequently participated in dolomitization. This requires that dolomite formation was preceded by dike alteration reactions that liberated Fe and did not consume Mg. Another requirement is that ferroan and non-ferroan dolomite (instead of other Fe- and Mg-bearing minerals) formed during fluid circulation within limestone host rock. We present reactive transport numerical simulations (Coores-Arxim, [5]) that predict equilibrium mineral assemblages and the evolution of fluid dolomitizing potential from dike crystallization, through dike alteration by seawater, to replacement dolomitization in carbonate host rock. The simulations are constrained by observations. A major advantage of the simulations is that stable mineral assemblages are identified based on a forward modeling approach. In addition, the dominant igneous minerals (plagioclase, clinopyroxene olivine and their alteration products) are solid solutions. Most reactive transport simulations of carbonate petrogenesis do not

  16. Controls of host rock mineralogy and H2O content on the nature of pseudotachylyte melts: Evidence from Pan-African faulting in the foreland of the Gariep Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, S. H.; Sherlock, S.; Fryer, L.; Lodge, J.; Diale, T.; Kazondunge, R.; Macey, P.

    2013-11-01

    Late-orogenic Pan-African tectonics formed an 8 km long fault-fracture zone in the shallow foreland crust of the Gariep Orogen in Mesoproterozoic granitoid basement. Pseudotachylyte was locally formed during a single seismic event that caused brittle failure in cohesive quartz-diorite, granodiorite and granitic gneiss. 40Ar/39Ar laser spot analysis provides an age of 512.5 ± 7.5 Ma for this seismic event. The depth of the hypocentre between 1700 and 5300 m is inferred from the likely thickness of the overlying rock at that time. Abundant quartz melting in conjunction with low host rock temperature indicates a minimum seismic temperature rise exceeding 1030 °C but in some samples dry quartz melting at temperatures exceeding 1700 °C might have been possible. The abundance of hydrous phases in the host rock controlled the volume of melt produced in a given host rock type. Different types of primary melt were formed by the fusion of batches of host rock with different relative proportions of plagioclase, alkali feldspar, quartz, biotite, and, where present, amphibole or garnet. The chemical and physical interaction between these melts depended on contrasting melt mobility and viscosity. In quartz-diorite, glasses of variable composition are well preserved and show the distribution of primary melt species at the time of quenching. These different melt species had limited tendency of mixing, unless mixing was assisted by syn-seismic shearing. In granodiorite, which has a low proportion of hydrous phases, low-viscosity melt was formed at high temperatures, eliminating most host rock fragments and leading to extensive melting of quartz. The low melt viscosity, probably further decreased by the dissolution of free H2O, permitted effective melt homogenisation in such veins. Still in the liquid state these melts segregated, effectively separating secondary melts of sodic-calcic and of K-Mg-Fe-rich composition. After quenching the solid state diffusion of cations in glass

  17. Normal faults, layering and elastic properties of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, V.; Homberg, C.; David, C.; Rocher, M.

    2014-05-01

    We study mesoscale normal faults cutting alternating limestone and clay-rich layers in several localities in the South-Eastern Mesozoic sedimentary basin (France). The displacement gradients, defined as the displacement variation per unit length along fault profile, and the mean fault dips are correlated to the structural and petrophysical properties of the host rock, including the carbonate content, the stiffness, the layering pattern and the maximum burial depth. Analysis of the fault dips indicates that the faults propagate (downward or upward) from an initial fracture from one unit to another rather than through connections of fractures that nucleated in different units. The fault dips are consistent with shear, mixed mode and tensile failures in limestone units. They are consistent with shear failure or are abnormally low in the clay-rich units. Among the studied attributes, in limestone units the failure mode is related to the contrast of the Young's modulus between the limestone and the clay-rich layers. A high contrast promotes tensile failure, whereas a low contrast promotes mixed mode or shear failures. In clay-rich layers, the dip is related to the layering pattern and abnormally low dips are promoted in thin clay-rich layers surrounded by thick limestone units. Specific displacement gradients characterize each lithology of the layered section. It ranges from 0.06 to 0.2 in the clay-rich units and it increases with Young's modulus. The analyses of the fault dips and the displacement gradients have implications in term of local stress. Both analyses converge and they can be related to a variation in stress controlled by the variation in stiffness through the layering.

  18. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  19. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  20. In situ chemical osmosis experiment in the Boom Clay at the Mol underground research laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garavito, A. M.; De Cannière, P.; Kooi, H.

    -permeability plastic formation such as the Boom Clay. The osmotic efficiency of Boom Clay is high under undisturbed chemical conditions ( σ = 0.41 at 0.014 M NaHCO 3), but rapidly decreases when the dissolved salts concentration increases ( σ = 0.07 at 0.14 M NaHCO 3). A semi-permeable membrane behaviour of the Boom Clay (high efficiencies) may be expected for the disposal of nitrate-bearing radioactive waste. However, the presently observed osmotically induced pressure is too low to have a significant mechanical impact on the host rock. Finally, the short duration of the osmosis test performed suggests that the shut-in test method used is effective for osmosis testing.

  1. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  2. Clay mineralogy of the Boda Claystone Formation (Mecsek Mts., SW Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Tibor; Máthé, Zoltán; Pekker, Péter; Dódony, István; Kovács-Kis, Viktória; Sipos, Péter; Cora, Ildikó; Kovács, Ivett

    2016-04-01

    Boda Claystone Formation (BCF) is the host rock of the planned site for high level nuclear waste repository inHungary. Samples representing the dominant rock types of BCF were studied: albitic claystone, claystone with high illite content, and analcime bearing claystone. Clay minerals in these three rock types were characterized by Xray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG), and the results were discussed from the point of view of the radionuclide sorption properties being studied in the future. Mineral compositions of bulk BCF samples vary in wide ranges. In the albitic sample, besides the dominant illite, few percent of chlorite represents the layer silicates in the clay fraction. Illite is the dominating phase in the illitic sample, with a few percent of chlorite. HRTEM study revealed that the thickness of illite particles rarely reaches 10 layers, usually are of 5-6 TOT layer thick. Illite crystals are generally thicker in the albitic sample than in the illitic one. The significant difference between the clay mineral characterisitics of the analcimous and the other two samples is that the former contains regularly interstratified chlorite/smectite beside the dominant illite. Based on the structural and chemical data two illite type minerals are present in the BCF samples: 1M polytype containing octahedral Fe and Mg besides Al, 2M polytype illite generally is free of Fe andMg. Close association of very thin illite plates and nanosized hematite crystals is typical textural feature for BCF. The goal of this study is to provide solid mineralogical basis for further studies focusing on radionuclide sorption properties.

  3. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  4. Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, Switzerland-Research Program And Key Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, C. O.; Bossart, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Argillaceous formations generally act as aquitards because of their low hydraulic conductivities. This property, together with the large retention capacity of clays for cationic contaminants and the potential for self-sealing, has brought clay formations into focus as potential host rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation, the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NW Switzerland is an important international test site for researching clay formations. Research is carried out in the underground facility, which is located adjacent to the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel. Fifteen partners from European countries, USA, Canada and Japan participate in the project. The objectives of the research program are to analyze the hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechanical properties of the Opalinus Clay, to determine the changes induced by the excavation of galleries and by heating of the rock formation, to test sealing and container emplacement techniques and to evaluate and improve suitable investigation techniques. For the safety of deep geological disposal, it is of key importance to understand the processes occurring in the undisturbed argillaceous environment, as well as the processes in a disturbed system, during the operation of the repository. The objectives are related to: 1. Understanding processes and mechanisms in undisturbed clays and 2. Experiments related to repository-induced perturbations. Experiments of the first group are dedicated to: i) Improvement of drilling and excavation technologies and sampling methods; ii) Estimation of hydrogeological, rock mechanical and geochemical parameters of the undisturbed Opalinus Clay. Upscaling of parameters from laboratory to in situ scale; iii) Geochemistry of porewater and natural gases; evolution of porewater over time scales; iv) Assessment of long-term hydraulic transients associated with erosion and thermal

  5. Final Report (BMWi Project No.: 02 E 10971): Joint project: Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems - Subproject 2: Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the prese

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeide, Katja; Fritsch, Katharina; Lippold, Holger; Poetsch, Maria; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Jordan, Norbert; Joseph, Claudia; Moll, Henry; Cherkouk, Andrea; Bader, Miriam

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide – organics – clay – aquifer. For this, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg-1) and the background electrolyte (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2).

  6. Clay mineralogy of weathering profiles from the Carolina Piedmont.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Saprolite profiles (12) that formed over various crystalline rocks from the Charlotte 1o X 2o quadrangle showed overall similarity in their clay mineralogy to depths of 6 to 45 m indicating control by weathering processes rather than by rock type. Most saprolite contained 10-25% clay, and ranged 3 to 70%. Kaolinite and halloysite composed = or >75% of the clay fraction of most samples. The ratio kaolinite:halloysite ranged widely, from 95% kaolinite to 90% halloysite, independent of depth. Clay-size mica was present in all profiles, and ranged 5-75% over a sericite schist. Mixed-layer mica-smectite and mica-vermiculite were subordinate; discrete smectite and vermiculite were rare. The abundance of halloysite indicates a continuously humid environment since the time of profile formation, because of the rapidity with which halloysite dehydrates irreversibly. -R.S.M.

  7. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  8. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  9. Finicky clay divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  10. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  11. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  12. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  13. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  14. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  15. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  16. Association of gold with uraninite and pyrobitumen in the metavolcanic rock hosted hydrothermal Au-U mineralisation at Rompas, Peräpohja Schist Belt, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Ferenc; Oduro, Harry; Cook, Nick D. J.; Pohjolainen, Esa; Takács, Ágnes; O'Brien, Hugh; Pakkanen, Lassi; Johanson, Bo; Wirth, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Peräpohja Schist Belt comprises a supracrustal sequence of quartzites, mafic volcanics and volcaniclastics, carbonate rocks, black shales, mica schists and greywackes which were deposited from ca. 2.44 to ~1.91 Ga, during the rifting of the Archaean basement in the eastern part of the Fennoscandian shield. Metamorphism and multiple folding of the basin fill took place during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) followed by intrusions of late-orogenic (1.84-1.80 Ga) and post-orogenic granitoids (1.79-1.76 Ga). The Rompas Au-U mineralisation is hosted by deformed calcsilicate veins in mafic volcanic rocks and locally contains very high grade (>10,000 g/t Au) gold pockets with strict spatial association of gold minerals to uraninite and pyrobitumen. Chemical ages from the unaltered domains in the structure of uraninite indicate a 1.95-1.90 Ga age for the deposition of the primary, high temperature (e.g. U/Th < 100 in uraninite) hydrothermal uranium mineralisation. These data are in agreement with the results of previous U-Pb dating of uraninite by SIMS. Textural evidence suggests that metamorphic recrystallisation of the uraninite-bearing quartz-dolomite veins into calcsilicate mineral assemblages during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) was followed by a hydrocarbon-bearing fluid flow event and radiolytic polymerisation of hydrocarbons around grains of uraninite. Gold precipitated during a subsequent hydrothermal process in the fractures of uraninite, as well as in the cracks and on the botryoidal surfaces of uraninite-pyrobitumen nodules. Remobilisation and redeposition of uranium by these hydrothermal events produced secondary uraninite grains with chemical ages between 1.85 and 1.65 Ga. Native gold is associated with galena, altaite, hunchunite, nickeline and rare cobaltite, Pb-bearing maldonite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and titanite. Raman spectra show disordered structure of undeformed pyrobitumen nodules in contrast with the well

  17. The mangazeya Ag-Pb-Zn vein deposit hosted in sedimentary rocks, Sakha-Yakutia, Russia: Mineral assemblages, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes (C, O, S), and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikina, E. Yu.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Klubnikin, G. K.; Gamyanin, G. N.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The succession of mineral assemblages, chemistry of gangue and ore minerals, fluid inclusions, and stable isotopes (C, O, S) in minerals have been studied in the Mangazeya silver-base-metal deposit hosted in terrigenous rocks of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The deposit is localized in the junction zone of the Kuranakh Anticlinorium and the Sartanga Synclinorium at the steep eastern limb of the Endybal Anticline. The deposit is situated at the intersection of the regional Nyuektame and North Tirekhtyakh faults. Igneous rocks are represented by the Endybal massif of granodiorite porphyry 97.8 ± 0.9 Ma in age and dikes varying in composition. One preore and three types of ore mineralization separated in space are distinguished: quartz-pyrite-arsenopyrite (I), quartz-carbonate-sulfide (II), and silver-base-metal (III). Quartz and carbonate (siderite) are predominant in ore veins. Ore minerals are represented by arsenopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, fahlore, and less frequent sulfosalts. Three types of fluid inclusions in quartz differ in phase compositions: two- or three-phase aqueous-carbon dioxide (FI I), carbon dioxide gas (FI II), and two-phase (FI III) containing liquid and a gas bubble. The homogenization temperature and salinity fall within the ranges of 367-217°C and 13.8-2.6 wt % NaCl equiv in FI I; 336-126°C and 15.4-0.8 wt % NaCl equiv in FI III. Carbon dioxide in FI II was homogenized in gas at +30.2 to +15.3°C and at +27.2 to 29.0°C in liquid. The δ34S values for minerals of type I range from-1.8 to +4.7‰ (V-CDT); of type II, from-7.4 to +6.6‰; and of type III, from-5.6 to +7.1‰. δ13C and δ18O vary from-7.0 to-6.7‰ (V-PDB) and from +16.6 to +17.1 (V-SMOW) in siderite-I; from-9.1 to-6.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +18.9 (V-SMOW) in siderite-II; from-5.4 to-3.1‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +19.5 (V-SMOW) in ankerite; and from-4.2 to-2.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +13.5 to +16.8 (V-SMOW) in calcite. The data on mineral assemblages, fluid

  18. Clay Mineralogy of Soils and Sediments from an Alluvial Aquifer, Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, W. C.; Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Lim, D.; Pickering, R. A.; Williams, K. H.; Long, P. E.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2014-12-01

    Alluvial aquifers along the Colorado River corridor in central to western Colorado contain legacy contamination including U, V, As and Se. These alluvial aquifers host important "hot spots" and "hot moments" for microbiological activity controlling organic carbon processing and fluxes in the subsurface that are both significant on their own, but also influence contaminant behavior. Mineral phases likely active in the sequestration of metal contaminants are chlorite, smectite-vermiculite, illite, and smectite. These minerals are also important biogeofacies markers. The Colorado alluvial sediments include lenses of silt and clay that are commonly more reduced than coarser grained materials. The clay minerals that make up the alluvial aquifer sediments include these mineral phases important for metal sequestration (chlorite, smectite, illite), as well as kaolinite and quartz. More specifically, the clay mineralogy of soils derived from these sediments at Rifle are composed of the same suite of minerals found in the alluvial sediments plus a vermiculite-smectite intergrade. The vermiculite-smectite intergrade is a weathering product of illite. The presence of illite and chlorite in both the sediments and the soils at Rifle reflect a mineralogically immature character of the source rocks. These assemblages are consistent with sediments and soils that formed in a moderately low rainfall climate, indicative of mixed provence of immature (chlorite, smectite, illite) and mature (kaolinite) minerals relative to their source areas.

  19. Incorporation of tramadol drug into Li-fluorohectorite clay: A preliminary study of a medical nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, L.; Hernández, D.; de Ménorval, L. Ch.; Pérez, I.; Altshuler, E.; Fossum, J. O.; Rivera, A.

    2016-07-01

    During the last years, clays have been increasingly explored as hosts for drugs. In the present paper, we have been able to host the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, Tramadol, into the clay Li-fluorohectorite (Li-Fh). We preliminary evaluate its incorporation by means of UV spectroscopy and X ray diffraction. Our results indicate that the clay hosts the drug molecule in its interlayer space. We suggest a set of parameters to guarantee an efficient incorporation process. Future studies will concentrate on the release of the drug from the clay nanofluid.

  20. Evaluation of frictional melting on the basis of trace element analyses of fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Ujiie, K.

    2016-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes (solidified frictional melts produced during seismic slip) found in exhumed accretionary complexes are considered to have formed originally at seismogenic depths, and help our understanding of the dynamics of earthquake faulting in subduction zones. The frictional melting should affect rock chemistry. Actually, major element compositions of unaltered pseudotachylyte matrix in the Shimanto accretionary complex are reported to be similar to that of illite, implying disequilibrium melting in the slip zone (Ujiie et al., 2007). Bulk-rock trace element analyses of the pseudotachylyte-bearing fault rocks also revealed their shift to the clay-mineral-like compositions (Honda et al., 2011). Toward better understanding of the frictional melting using chemical means, we carried out detailed major and trace element analyses for pseudotachylyte-bearing dark veins and surrounding host rocks from the Mugi area of the Shimanto accretionary complex (Ujiie et al., 2007). About one milligram each of samples was collected from a rock chip along the microstructure by using the PC-controlled micro-drilling apparatus, and then analyzed by ICP-MS. Host rocks showed a series of compositional trends controlled by mixing of detrital sedimentary components. Unaltered part of the pseudotachylyte vein, on the other hand, showed striking enrichment of fluid-immobile trace elements, consistent with selective melting of fine-grained, clay-rich matrix of the fault rock. Importantly, completely altered parts of the dark veins exhibit essentially the same characteristics as the unaltered part, indicating that the trace element composition of the pseudotachylyte is well preserved even after considerable alteration in the later stages. These results demonstrate that trace element and structural analyses are useful to detect preexistence of pseudotachylytes resulting from selective frictional melting of clay minerals. It has been controversial that pseudotachylytes are rarely formed or

  1. Interplay between cataclasis, clay mineral diagenesis and porosity reduction in deformation bands in unconsolidated arkosic sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    . The dominant deformation mechanisms and the magnitude of porosity reduction in the carbonate-free lithologies are controlled by the initial mica content, mean grain size, level of alteration and albite content in the host rock. The studied deformation bands show a preferred fracturing of sericitized albite grains and the smearing of micas into the pore space. These processes increase the amount of phyllosilicates in the pore space and facilitate the growth of various authigenic clay minerals like smectite, vermiculite, kaolinite and illite. Because of the changed petrophysical properties the deformation bands show a different diagenetic evolution in comparison with the host rock. We identified 4 steps in the development from a high-porosity host rock to a low porosity deformation band. The measured reduction in porosity by up to 18% is associated with a permeability reduction, reflected in the retention of fluids along the deformation bands with the highest content of authigenic clay minerals.

  2. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  3. Characterization of clay minerals and organic matter in shales: Application to high-level nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Gueven, N.; Landis, C.R.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to conduct investigations to assess the potential for shale to serve as a host medium for the isolation of high-level nuclear wastes. The emphasis on shale is a result of screening major sedimentary rock types (shale, sandstone, carbonate , anhydrite, and chalk) for a variety of attributes that affect the performance of repositories. The retardation of radionuclides was recognized as one of the potentially favorable features of shale. Because shale contains both clay minerals and organic matter, phases that may provide significant sorption of radioelement, the characterization of these phases is essential. In addition, the organic matter in shale has been identified as a critical area for study because of its potential to play either a favorable (reductant) or deleterious (organic ligands) role in the performance of a repository sited in shale. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic evidence for a secondary yet early magnetization in large sandstone pipes and host Late Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and Bluff Sandstone near Mesita, west central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, John W.; Harlan, Stephen S.

    2004-07-01

    Processes responsible for the acquisition of ancient yet secondary magnetizations are important facets of the geologic history of rocks and, when the age of such magnetizations can be estimated with confidence, provide useful information on the ancient geomagnetic field. In west central New Mexico near Mesita, on the Colorado Plateau, hematitic sandstone and siltstone beds of the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Summerville Formation and overlying Bluff Sandstone are host to numerous large (up to 100 m2 in map area) pipe-like sandstone bodies. The pipes are as strongly cemented by hematite (colors range from 10R 6/6 to 10R 3/4) as the host strata; paleomagnetic data from them and their host strata are interpreted to indicate that these rocks have been remagnetized, probably in association with sandstone pipe formation. Reverse polarity magnetizations isolated in both alternating field and thermal demagnetization from pipes are well grouped and are similar to, and not statistically distinct from, those in adjacent host strata. The grand-mean direction for 16 sites (7 sites in sandstone pipes and 9 in host strata), corrected for slight (5°) west-northwest tilt of the strata, is D = 163.0°, I = -44.3° (α95 = 2.7°, k = 169). This direction yields a pole position of 72.8°N, 135.7°E (dp = 2.1°, dm = 3.4°). Assuming a modest (i.e., ˜5°) clockwise rotation of the Colorado Plateau, the pole lies at 68.7°N, 143.8°E. Median destructive fields for the remanence in pipes and host strata are typically 40-50 mT; over 90% of the remanence is "unblocked" or removed during changes in the magnetic mineralogy by temperatures of ˜400-450°C. Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition data, and thermal demagnetization of "saturation" IRM, however, demonstrate that the dominant magnetic phase is of high coercivity and relatively high (above 600°C) laboratory unblocking temperatures in both sandstone pipes and host strata, yet it does not appear to contribute

  5. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  6. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  7. Designing in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1977-01-01

    What can be done to transform a lump of wet clay into something more than a lump of glaze-fired clay? It is at this point when forming techniques have been mastered that good design becomes most important. Discusses six criteria involved in the search for good design so that students can discover what good design is and how important it is.…

  8. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  9. Cesium in rock-water interaction, Yellowstone National Park. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.M.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1983-03-01

    Chemical analyses of thermal waters from research drill holes and nearby hot springs and geysers in Upper and Lower Geyser Basins indicate that Cs may be a reactive ion. A nearly constant Cs:Cl is found for four wells drilled in Lower Geyser Basin and for some hot spring and geysers. It is inferred from this plot that points falling below the trend indicate Cs depleted waters. A plot of Cs:CHO/sub 3//Cl, another measure of rock-water interaction, also indicates Cs removal from the waters. These data correlate well with a parallel study of chemistry and mineralogy of hydrothermally altered rocks from the drill holes which show that the rocks involved in hydrothermal rock-water reactions are vitrophyric rhyolite lava flows and pumiceous tuff overlain by obsidian-rich sands and gravels. Nearly 55 m of such a section from well Y-8 has been hydrothermally altered into alternating intervals consisting of analcime - quartz - clay (smectite, celadonite) or clinoptilolite - ..cap alpha..-cristobalite - smectite. Whole rock analyses of randomly selected samples of these intervals from several wells have Cs contents somewhat higher than those of the unaltered host rhyolite. However, the Cs content of the analcime - quartz - clay intervals is as much as 700 times higher than that of the host rock. Analyses of mineral separates show that analcime, containing as much as 4700 ppM Cs, is more enriched in Cs than any other mineral. Examination of experimental data suggests that Cs is incorporated into the analcime structure during crystallization. Clinoptilolite, which has been shown to readily exchange Cs, is only slightly enriched in this system.

  10. Magnetic Susceptibility: Correlations with Clay Content and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients Controlling Electrical Double Layer Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T.; Keating, K.; Robinson, J.; Slater, L. D.; Parker, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Clay content and mineralogy play a critical role in determining the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response in soils and rocks. Clay minerals enhance the induced polarization response of soils due to an increase in the mineral surface area. Traditionally, x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques are used to determine clay content, requiring intact samples to be ground into powder. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements have previously been used to estimate clay content of samples when paramagnetic clays (e.g. illite and chlorite) dominate the response. Building on this work, this study assumes that sandstone samples from two lithologic formations could be approximated as a simple mixture of diamagnetic quartz and a paramagnetic component. Paramagnetic susceptibility is assumed proportional to iron content and thus to the iron bearing clays that control the susceptibility response. Fractions of iron rich clay components were determined with XRD and the volume magnetic susceptibility values of these clays were used to estimate clay content. We evaluated these clay content estimates with SIP measurements (imaginary conductivity magnitude and characteristic time constant (tau)) and properties related to fluid flow, including permeability and pore normalized surface area (Spor). A recently proposed SIP permeability model that uses a single value of the diffusion coefficient for clays and sands was evaluated to see whether apparent diffusion coefficients are correlated with magnetic susceptibility. Our findings show that MS can be helpful in rapidly determining clay content and also brings insight into the effect of paramagnetic clays on SIP measurements.

  11. A comparative study of discrete fracture network and equivalent continuum models for simulating flow and transport in the far field of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository in crystalline host rock

    DOE PAGES

    Hadgu, Teklu; Karra, Satish; Kalinina, Elena; ...

    2017-07-28

    One of the major challenges of simulating flow and transport in the far field of a geologic repository in crystalline host rock is related to reproducing the properties of the fracture network over the large volume of rock with sparse fracture characterization data. Various approaches have been developed to simulate flow and transport through the fractured rock. The approaches can be broadly divided into Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Equivalent Continuum Model (ECM). The DFN explicitly represents individual fractures, while the ECM uses fracture properties to determine equivalent continuum parameters. In this paper, we compare DFN and ECM in termsmore » of upscaled observed transport properties through generic fracture networks. The major effort was directed on making the DFN and ECM approaches similar in their conceptual representations. This allows for separating differences related to the interpretation of the test conditions and parameters from the differences between the DFN and ECM approaches. The two models are compared using a benchmark test problem that is constructed to represent the far field (1 × 1 × 1 km3) of a hypothetical repository in fractured crystalline rock. The test problem setting uses generic fracture properties that can be expected in crystalline rocks. The models are compared in terms of the: 1) effective permeability of the domain, and 2) nonreactive solute breakthrough curves through the domain. The principal differences between the models are mesh size, network connectivity, matrix diffusion and anisotropy. We demonstrate how these differences affect the flow and transport. Finally, we identify the factors that should be taken in consideration when selecting an approach most suitable for the site-specific conditions.« less

  12. A comparative study of discrete fracture network and equivalent continuum models for simulating flow and transport in the far field of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository in crystalline host rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadgu, Teklu; Karra, Satish; Kalinina, Elena; Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Klise, Katherine; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Wang, Yifeng

    2017-10-01

    One of the major challenges of simulating flow and transport in the far field of a geologic repository in crystalline host rock is related to reproducing the properties of the fracture network over the large volume of rock with sparse fracture characterization data. Various approaches have been developed to simulate flow and transport through the fractured rock. The approaches can be broadly divided into Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Equivalent Continuum Model (ECM). The DFN explicitly represents individual fractures, while the ECM uses fracture properties to determine equivalent continuum parameters. We compare DFN and ECM in terms of upscaled observed transport properties through generic fracture networks. The major effort was directed on making the DFN and ECM approaches similar in their conceptual representations. This allows for separating differences related to the interpretation of the test conditions and parameters from the differences between the DFN and ECM approaches. The two models are compared using a benchmark test problem that is constructed to represent the far field (1 × 1 × 1 km3) of a hypothetical repository in fractured crystalline rock. The test problem setting uses generic fracture properties that can be expected in crystalline rocks. The models are compared in terms of the: 1) effective permeability of the domain, and 2) nonreactive solute breakthrough curves through the domain. The principal differences between the models are mesh size, network connectivity, matrix diffusion and anisotropy. We demonstrate how these differences affect the flow and transport. We identify the factors that should be taken in consideration when selecting an approach most suitable for the site-specific conditions.

  13. Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie

    2013-07-01

    For over two decades, Boom Clay has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. Today, also the microbiological properties and the possibility of microbes interacting with radionuclides or repository components including the waste form, in a host formation like Boom Clay are considered [2,3]. In the past, a reference composition for synthetic Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) was derived, based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay [1]. Similarly, the primary aim of this microbiological study was to determine the core BCPW bacterial community and identify representative water samples for future microbial directed lab experiments. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by microscopy and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant micro-organisms. (authors)

  14. Uranium and other element geochemical covariation in a granitic host rock and in the derived sediment, Deep Creek Range, Juab County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Correlation and factor analysis of geochemical data from a Tertiary biotite quartz monzonite, the Ibapah stock, and from derived sediment shows on comparison a major shift in element covariation among uranium and 24 other elements. Samples used were collected for a 1978 study in the central part of the Deep Creek Range, Juab County, Utah. Computed correlations among elements in granitic igneous rock samples suggest a high degree of covariation among elements that compose the rock. Uranium, however, shows significant correlation with only 12 elements and almost zero correlation with thorium. Computed correlations among elements in the derived sediment suggest that major decreases have occurred in covariation of the elements in the derived sands. Uranium in the sands, however, shows 15 significant correlations compared to 12 in the igneous rock samples, and shows an extremely high correlation with thorium. Factor analysis shows three geochemical petrogenic factors and the regional Be-U mineralization factor in the igneous rocks, and two mechanical segregation and one chemical precipitation factors in the sediments.

  15. Rock magnetic expression of fluid infiltration in the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (Longmen Shan thrust belt, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Yang, Xiaosong; Duan, Qingbao; Chen, Jianye; Dekkers, Mark J.

    2016-03-01

    Fluid infiltration within fault zones is an important process in earthquake rupture. Magnetic properties of fault rocks convey essential clues pertaining to physicochemical processes in fault zones. In 2011, two shallow holes (134 and 54 m depth, respectively) were drilled into the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (Longmen Shan thrust belt, China), which accommodated most of the displacement of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. Fifty-eight drill core samples, including granitic host rock and various fault rocks, were analyzed rock-magnetically, mineralogically, and geochemically. The magnetic behavior of fault rocks appears to be dominated by paramagnetic clay minerals. Magnetite in trace amounts is identified as the predominant ferrimagnetic fraction in all samples, decreasing from the host rock, via fault breccia to (proto-)cataclasite. Significant mass-losses (10.7-45.6%) are determined for the latter two with the "isocon" method. Volatile contents and alteration products (i.e., chlorite) are enriched toward the fault core relative to the host rocks. These observations suggest that magnetite depletion occurred in these fault rocks—exhumed from the shallow crust—plumbed by fluid-assisted processes. Chlorite, interpreted to result from hydrothermal activity, occurs throughout almost the entire fault core and shows high coefficients of determination (R2 > 0.6) with both low and high-field magnetic susceptibility. Close relationships, with R2 > 0.70, are also observed between both low and high-field magnetic susceptibility and the immobile elements (e.g., TiO2, P2O5, MnO), H2O+, and the calculated mass-losses of fault rocks. Hence, magnetic properties of fault rocks can serve as proxy indicators of fluid infiltration within shallow fault zones.

  16. Dewatering of industrial clay wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smelley, A.G.; Scheiner, B.J.; Zatko, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    As a part of research conducted to effect pollution a dewatering technique that allows for disposal of clay wastes, for reuse of water now lost with clays, and for reclamation of mined land was developed. The technique utilizes a high-molecular-weight nonionic polyethylene oxide polymer (PEO) that has the ability to flocculate and dewater materials containing clay wastes. In laboratory experiments, coal-clay waste, potash-clay brine slurry, phosphatic clay waste, uranium tailings, and talc tailings were successfully consolidated. Coal-clay waste was consolidated from 3.6 to 57%; potash-clay brine slurry was consolidated from 3.8 to 35%; phosphatic clay waste from 15.6 to 49%; uranium tailings from 15.4 to 67%; tailings from talc production from 9.7 to 53%; and an acidic TiO/sub 2/ slurr slurry from 1.68 to 30%.

  17. Did the Kiruna iron ores form as a result of a metasomatic or igneous process? New U-Pb and Nd data for the iron oxide apatite ores and their host rocks in the Norrbotten region of northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhues, A.; Hanchar, J. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Fisher, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    A number of iron deposits near Kiruna in the Norrbotten region of northern Sweden are of the iron oxide apatite (IOA) type of deposits; also referred to as Kiruna-type deposits. They are commonly considered a subgroup or end-member of iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) deposits, containing no economic grades of copper or gold. Both IOCG and IOA deposits are characterized by abundant low-Ti Fe oxides, an enrichment in REE, and intense sodium and potassium wall-rock alteration adjacent to the ores. Deposits of these types are of a great economic importance, not only for iron, but also for other elements such as rare earth elements (REE) or uranium. Kiruna, the type locality of the IOA type of mineral deposits, is the focus of this study. Despite a century-long mining history and 2500 Mt of iron ore produced in the region to date (with grades of 30 to 70 wt.% Fe), the genesis of these deposits is poorly understood: theories of a magmatic vs. a hydrothermal or metasomatic origin have been debated, and the timing of mineralization of the ores in the Norbotten region has never been directly dated. The results anticipated from this study will provide a better understanding of the nature of the IOA type of mineral deposits and their relation to IOCG deposits such as Olympic Dam in Australia. An array of geochemical methods is used in order to gain insights on the emplacement history of the host rocks, their subsequent alteration, and the ore genesis of these deposits. This includes in situ U/Pb geochronology of zircon, monazite, and titanite to constrain the timing between host rock emplacement, alteration and mineralization. Isotopic data from whole rocks and in situ at mineral scale will provide constraints on the involvement of hydrothermal fluids and their possible sources, as well as on the sources of Fe, U, and the REE. Newly obtained Sm-Nd isotopic data points to distinct source differences between host rocks, ore and alteration related samples. Preliminary in situ U

  18. Field trip guidebook on environmental impact of clays along the upper Texas coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Theron D.; Ming, Douglas W.; Tuck, Lisa Kay

    1991-01-01

    The field trip was prepared to provide an opportunity to see first hand some the environmental hazards associated with clays in the Houston, Texas area. Because of the very high clay content in area soils and underlying Beaumont Formation clay, Houston is a fitting location to host the Clay Mineral Society. Examinations were made of (1) expansive soils, (2) subsidence and surface faulting, and (3) a landfill located southeast of Houston at the Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority where clay is part of the liner material.

  19. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate how clays might catalyze the formation of nucleosides, nucleotides and polynucleotides in the “RNA world”. The adsorption of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides from aqueous solution to clay minerals is affected by suspension pH. With montmorillonite, adsorption is also influenced by the nature of the exchangeable cations. Here, we review the interactions of some clay minerals with RNA components. PMID:25734235

  20. Molecular profile and functional characterization of the ferritin H subunit from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus), revealing its putative role in host antioxidant and immune defense.

    PubMed

    Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Lim, Bong-Soo; Whang, Ilson; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jehee

    2014-11-01

    Ferritins are iron binding proteins made out of 24 subunits, involved in iron homeostasis and metabolism in cellular environments. Here, we sought to identify and functionally characterize a one type of subunits of ferritin (ferritin H-like subunit) from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus; RbFerH). The complete coding sequence of RbFerH was 531 bp in length, encoding a 177-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 20.8 kDa. The deduced protein structure possessed the domain architecture characteristic of known ferritin H subunits, including metal ligands for iron binding, a ferroxidase center, and two iron-binding region signatures. As expected, the 5' untranslated region of the RbFerH cDNA sequence contained a putative iron response element region, a characteristic regulatory element involved in its translation. The RbFerH gene comprised 5 exons and 4 introns spanning a 4195 bp region. Overexpressed recombinant RbFerH protein demonstrated prominent Fe(II) ion depriving activity, bacteriostatic properties, and protective effects against oxidative double-stranded DNA damage. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we found that RbFerH was expressed ubiquitously in the majority of physiologically important tissues in rock bream. A greater abundance of the mRNA transcripts were detected in blood and liver tissues. Upon administering different microbial pathogens and pathogen-derived mitogens, RbFerH transcription was markedly elevated in the blood of rock bream. Taken together, our findings suggest that RbFerH acts as a potent iron sequestrator in rock bream and may actively participate in antimicrobial as well as antioxidative defense. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  2. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  3. Characterisation of Excavation-Induced Damage Around a Short Test Tunnel in the Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Salina; Loew, Simon; Schuster, Kristof; Nussbaum, Christophe; Fidelibus, Corrado

    2017-08-01

    In Switzerland, the Opalinus Clay is under consideration as a potential host rock for deep geological storage of nuclear waste. The Swiss concept involves high-level waste containers emplaced in small-diameter drifts of roughly 3 m. At the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, a short mine-by experiment (EZ-B) was executed in 2005 with the objective of characterising the excavation-induced damage through an interpretation of integrated field data. The damage zone was found to consist of two parts. Fracture mapping from drillcores and televiewer images revealed a thin inner zone of macroscopic fracturing (20 cm) and devoid of borehole instabilities as well as coinciding with the lowest P-wave characteristics (normalised amplitudes and velocities). The outer zone (50-80 cm) was defined by increasing P-wave characteristics and evidence of borehole instabilities. Supplementing the data interpretation, a simplified numerical elastic stress analysis indicated that the rock mass in the sidewalls and upper western haunch are the most susceptible to spalling. In these regions, stress levels only just reach a spalling limit around 0.05 in the inner fractured zone, suggesting that the zone of macro-fracturing around the niche is not significant. It is postulated that the physical manifestation of the relatively weak bedding plane strength is dominated by bedding-perpendicular displacement as opposed to bedding-parallel shear.

  4. Unsaturated properties for non-Darcian water flow in clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Li, Lianchong; Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-04-01

    SummaryClay rock formations, and compacted clay (e.g., bentonite) used as backfill within disposal drifts, have been considered as natural and engineered barriers, respectively, for isolating high-level nuclear wastes in mined geologic repositories. Accurately modeling unsaturated flow in those clay materials is important for assessing the performance of a geological repository. While the non-Darcian behavior of water flow in clay materials has been demonstrated in the literature, a systematic study of modeling unsaturated non-Darcian flow is still lacking. Based on a hypothesis that pore water in clay becomes non-Newtonian as a result of water-clay interaction, we propose new constitutive relationships for unsaturated flow, including a relationship between water flux and hydraulic gradient and those among capillary pressure, water saturation, and hydraulic conductivity. An evaluation based on a set of laboratory experimental observations supports the usefulness of the proposed relationships. More experimental studies are desirable for further confirming the non-Newtonian water flow behavior in clay materials and evaluating the proposed relationships.

  5. Catalyzed Synthesis of Zinc Clays by Prebiotic Central Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruixin; Basu, Kaustuv; Hartman, Hyman; Matocha, Christopher J; Sears, S Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2017-04-03

    How primordial metabolic networks such as the reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and clay mineral catalysts coevolved remains a mystery in the puzzle to understand the origin of life. While prebiotic reactions from the rTCA cycle were accomplished via photochemistry on semiconductor minerals, the synthesis of clays was demonstrated at low temperature and ambient pressure catalyzed by oxalate. Herein, the crystallization of clay minerals is catalyzed by succinate, an example of a photoproduced intermediate from central metabolism. The experiments connect the synthesis of sauconite, a model for clay minerals, to prebiotic photochemistry. We report the temperature, pH, and concentration dependence on succinate for the synthesis of sauconite identifying new mechanisms of clay formation in surface environments of rocky planets. The work demonstrates that seeding induces nucleation at low temperatures accelerating the crystallization process. Cryogenic and conventional transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and measurements of total surface area are used to build a three-dimensional representation of the clay. These results suggest the coevolution of clay minerals and early metabolites in our planet could have been facilitated by sunlight photochemistry, which played a significant role in the complex interplay between rocks and life over geological time.

  6. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-08-04

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the

  7. Deformation characteristics and associated clay-mineral variation in 2-3 km buried Hota accretionary complex, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kameda, J.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2009-12-01

    quite intense clay minerals preferred orientation in the matrix, cutting the phacoidal deformation. The host and faulted (S-C structure) rocks composed of hemipelagic siltstone containing 70-80% of clay minerals. Considerable-smectite reduction and positive anomaly of illite/smectite ratio were clearly identified inside the latter S-C structure, which would cause remarkable increase in friction coefficient. Such strain hardening associated with dynamic clay-mineral variation would be the primary mechanism in décollement -zone and/or mélange-zone thickening and fundamental mechanical transition just prior to entering the seismogenic zone. Positive anomaly of the vitrinite reflectance data (Ro) inside infers frictional heating during the deformation plausibly caused the clay mineral variation.

  8. Fault rock mineralogy and fluid flow in the Coso Geothermal Field, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Hickman, S. H.

    2005-12-01

    to differ because the processes that accommodate deformation depend strongly on mineralogy. Frictional strength of quartz-dominated fault rocks in the near surface and in the reservoir should be greater (~0.6) than that in the clay-dominated cap rock (~0.2-0.4). Similarly, permeability should be much lower in foliated clay-rich fault rocks than in quartz-rich fault rocks as evidenced by larger, more connected pores imaged in quartz-rich gouge. Mineral stability is a function of loading, strain rate, temperature, and fluid flow conditions. Which minerals form, and the rates at which they grow is also a key element in determining variations in the magnitude and anisotropy of fault zone properties at Coso. Consequently, we suggest that the development of fault-zone properties depends on the feedback between deformation, resulting changes in permeability, and large-scale fluid flow and the leading to dissolution/precipitation of minerals in the fault rock and adjacent host rock. The implication for Coso is that chemical alteration of otherwise low-porosity crystalline rocks appears to determine the distribution and temporal evolution of permeability in the actively deforming fracture network at small to moderate scales as well as along major, reservoir-penetrating fault zones.

  9. Moving Along: Sporting Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Presents a junior high school student art project where three-dimensional art sculptures of surfing, snow boarding, or dirt biking were created. Discusses how the students created their three-dimensional works of art using a clay-slab technique. (CMK)

  10. Modeling in Ceramic Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1976-01-01

    Modeling is an additive process of building up a sculpture with some plastic material like clay. It affords the student an opportunity to work in three dimensions, a creative relief from the general two-dimensional drawing and design activities that occupy a large segment of time in the art curriculum. (Author/RK)

  11. Moving Along: Sporting Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Presents a junior high school student art project where three-dimensional art sculptures of surfing, snow boarding, or dirt biking were created. Discusses how the students created their three-dimensional works of art using a clay-slab technique. (CMK)

  12. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  13. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  14. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  15. Hybrid Finite-Discrete Element Simulation of the EDZ Formation and Mechanical Sealing Process Around a Microtunnel in Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisjak, Andrea; Tatone, Bryan S. A.; Mahabadi, Omid K.; Grasselli, Giovanni; Marschall, Paul; Lanyon, George W.; Vaissière, Rémi de la; Shao, Hua; Leung, Helen; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    The analysis and prediction of the rock mass disturbance around underground excavations are critical components of the performance and safety assessment of deep geological repositories for nuclear waste. In the short term, an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) tends to develop due to the redistribution of stresses around the underground openings. The EDZ is associated with an increase in hydraulic conductivity of several orders of magnitude. In argillaceous rocks, sealing mechanisms ultimately lead to a partial reduction in the effective hydraulic conductivity of the EDZ with time. The goal of this study is to strengthen the understanding of the phenomena involved in the EDZ formation and sealing in Opalinus Clay, an indurated claystone currently being assessed as a host rock for a geological repository in Switzerland. To achieve this goal, hybrid finite-discrete element method (FDEM) simulations are performed. With its explicit consideration of fracturing processes, FDEM modeling is applied to the HG-A experiment, an in situ test carried out at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory to investigate the hydro-mechanical response of a backfilled and sealed microtunnel. A quantitative simulation of the EDZ formation process around the microtunnel is first carried out, and the numerical results are compared with field observations. Then, the re-compression of the EDZ under the effect of a purely mechanical loading, capturing the increase of swelling pressure from the backfill onto the rock, is considered. The simulation results highlight distinctive rock failure kinematics due to the bedded structure of the rock mass. Also, fracture termination is simulated at the intersection with a pre-existing discontinuity, representing a fault plane oblique to the bedding orientation. Simulation of the EDZ re-compression indicates an overall reduction of the total fracture area as a function of the applied pressure, with locations of ineffective sealing associated with self

  16. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  17. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  18. Chemical and isotopic analysis to define how many groundwater types could be hosted in a fractured flysch delimited by clayey and evaporites rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchetti, Francesco; Deiana, Manuela; Vezzalini, Maria Giovanna; Lugli, Stefano; Fioroni, Chiara; Brunelli, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the research is to define using chemical and isotope analysis how many groundwater types are present in 100 meters of thickness of a fractured volcanoclastic flysch, which is delimited by evaporites and clayey rock masses and outcropping in the northern Apennines. Chemical analysis have defined the content of: Ca, Mg, Na, K, B, Sr, HCO3, SO4, Cl. Isotope analysis have defined the content of the oxygen, deuterium and tritium. Groundwater samples have been collected from springs and deep wells. The research highlights the presence of four groundwater types and of some mixing products, that are the interaction between the four groundwater types. Chemistry and age of the four groundwater types are in agreement with the mineralogical composition of the different interacting rocks and with the mean groundwater transit time. In particular the research discovers the presence of: 1) a shallow and recent Ca-HCO3 groundwater, that is the product of interaction between rainfall and flysch; 2) a shallow and deep not recent Ca-HCO3 groundwater, rich in Na, which moves only under high hydraulic gradient and that is the product of a long interaction between rainfall and flysch; 3) a deep and old Ca-SO4 groundwater, rich in Na, which is the product of a long interaction between rainfall and evaporates, in an oxic environment; 4) a deep and old Na-Cl groundwater, which is the product of a long interaction between rainfall and evaporites in an anoxic environment.

  19. The Alberhill and other clay deposits of Temescal Canyon, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daviess, Steven Norman; Bramlette, M.N.

    1953-01-01

    Clay is mined in open pits by several companies in the Alberhill district, and the refractory clays of relatively high alumina sediment are used largely for fire brick. The Alberhill Coal and Clay Company is the largest operator and has produced a little over 2,000,000 tons of clay, of which nearly half was the refractory type. The clay occurs at the contact of the lower Tertiary and the Mesozoic basement complex. The weathered surface of basement rocks includes much clay of high iron and low alumina content, and the better clay occurs in the basal Tertiary sediments. The clay deposits vary rather abruptly in thickness and quality, and only local lenses contain workable deposits. Structural deformation makes dips of 10 to 20 degrees common and the clay strata therefore pitch under excessive overburden in short distances. Extensive deposits of thick alluvial fan deposits cover the clay-bearing strata over most of the area, and add to the overburden problems. The apparent lack of clay deposits of good quality that would total several million tons of ore, and the geological conditions that would make exploration and mining difficult and expensive make this district unpromising.

  20. Microbe-Clay Mineral Reactions and Characterization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Ji, S.; Jaisi, D.; Kim, J.

    2008-12-01

    Clays and clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks. They play an important role in environmental processes such as nutrient cycling, plant growth, contaminant migration, organic matter maturation, and petroleum production. The changes in the oxidation state of the structural iron in clay minerals, in part, control their physical and chemical properties in natural environments, such as clay particle flocculation, dispersion, swelling, hydraulic conductivity, surface area, cation and anion exchange capacity, and reactivity towards organic and inorganic contaminants. The structural ferric iron [Fe(III)] in clay minerals can be reduced either chemically or biologically. Many different chemical reductants have been tried, but the most commonly used agent is dithionite. Biological reductants are bacteria, including dissimilatory iron reducing prokaryotes (DIRP) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). A wide variety of DIRP have been used to reduce ferric iron in clay minerals, including mesophilic, thermophilic, and hyperthermophilic prokaryotes. Multiple clay minerals have been used for microbial reduction studies, including smectite, nontronite (iron-rich smectite variety), illite, illite/smectite, chlorite, and their various mixtures. All these clay minerals are reducible by microorganisms under various conditions with smectite (nontronite) being the most reducible. The reduction extent and rate of ferric iron in clay minerals are measured by wet chemistry, and the reduced clay mineral products are typically characterized with chemical methods, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques (such as EXAFS). Microbially reduced smectites (nontronites) have been found to be reactive in reducing a variety of organic and inorganic contaminants. Degradable organic contaminants include pesticides

  1. Porosity anisotropy of Opalinus Clay: implications for the poroelastic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lukas M.

    2017-03-01

    Regarding the storage of nuclear waste within clay rock formations, which are considered as natural seals, requires fundamental understanding of the poromechanical behaviour of this rock type with regard to the risk evaluation process. Here, the influence of pore fluid pressure on elastic properties of Opalinus Clay was studied on the basis of realistic pore microstructures, which were reconstructed from image data acquired by focused ion beam nanotomography. These microstructures were used as input pore geometries for linear elastic finite-element modeling in order to predict the anisotropic poroelastic properties of Opalinus Clay. The computational approach allowed determining complete sets of anisotropic poroelastic coefficients. It was found that the anisotropic pore structure of Opalinus Clay leads to a poroelastically anisotropic behaviour. In particular, the pore pressure affects vertical strain/stress differently when compared to the horizontal direction. Hence, long-term safety assessments related to a potential repository for nuclear waste within the Opalinus Clay unit should include anisotropic poroelasticity to predict the mechanical response of this geomaterial.

  2. Comparative anatomy of epithermal precious- and base-metal districts hosted by volcanic rocks: A talk presented at the GAC/MSC/GGU Joint Annual Meeting, May 11-13, 1983, Victoria, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heald-Wetlaufer, Pamela; Hayba, Daniel O.; Foley, Nora K.; Goss, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to distinguish dissimilar from similar features of epithermal districts, lithotectonic, mineralogical and geochemical traits are compiled for 15 such districts. The districts occur in structurally complex settings associated with silicic to intermediate volcanics. Affiliation with subduction environments on a continental scale and caldera settings on a regional scale is common but is not demonstrable for all districts. Most deposits formed near the end of major volcanism, but some formed considerably later. Paleodepth to the top of the ore is 300-600m for most districts, although Au-rich districts appear to be shallower. The lateral extent of the ore zone is highly variable and far exceeds the limited vertical range (300-800m). Most ore was deposited from dominantly meteoric fluids ranging in temperature from 220°-290°C. Salinities ranged from 0-13 wt% NaCl equiv., and typical values were 1-3 wt%. Although noted for eight deposits, boiling is clearly associated with precious-metal deposition in only two deposits. Four districts, typified by Goldfield, Nev., are characterized by a highly sulfidized mineral assemblage, advanced argillic alteration, and ore deposition closely following emplacement of the host rock. The remaining eleven districts highlight a second, discrete type of deposit. They contain adularia, exhibit sericitic ± argillic alteration, and were mineralized significantly after emplacement of the host rock. The latter category includes two subgroups: Ag- and base-metal-rich deposits (e.g., Creede, Colo.), and Au-rich, base-metal-poor deposits (e.g., Round Mtn., Nev.).

  3. Polymer-clay nanocomposites as precursors of nanostructured carbon materials for electrochemical devices: templating effect of clays.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Saavedra, Rocío; Darder, Margarita; Gómez-Avilés, Almudena; Aranda, Pilar; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    The present work introduces a comparative study on the use of polymer nanocomposites containing clay minerals of different structure, such as montmorillonite and sepiolite as host solids for the templating synthesis of carbon-like materials from different organic precursors. Carbon-clay nanocomposites were obtained by polymerization of either acrylonitrile or sucrose previously inserted in the pores of the clay minerals, followed by their further thermal transformation in carbon-like compounds. Acid treatment of the resulting carbon-clay nanocomposites removes the inorganic templates giving carbon-like materials with different textural features. Polymer-clay, carbon-clay and carbon-like materials have been characterized by applying spectroscopic techniques as FTIR and in situ EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and other structural, textural and analytical tools (chemical analysis, XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, N2 adsorption isotherms,...). Electrochemical properties of these carbon-clay nanocomposites, as well as their templated carbonaceous materials and their use as electrode materials of different electrochemical devices such as rechargeable Li-batteries, supercapacitors and electrochemical sensors, are also discussed.

  4. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  5. Numerical investigation of the seismic detectability of carbonate thin beds in the Boom Clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2016-07-01

    The present study evaluates the capacity of the Boom Clay as a host rock for disposal purposes, more precisely its seismic characterization, which may assess its long-term performance to store radioactive wastes. Although the formation is relatively uniform and homogeneous, there are embedded thin layers of septaria (carbonates) that may affect the integrity of the Boom Clay. Therefore, it is essential to locate these geobodies. The seismic data to characterize the Boom Clay has been acquired at the Kruibeke test site. The inversion, which allowed us to obtain the anisotropy parameters and seismic velocities of the clay, is complemented with further information such as log and laboratory data. The attenuation properties have been estimated from equivalent formations (having similar composition and seismic velocities). The inversion yields quite consistent results although the symmetry of the medium is unusual but physically possible, since the anisotropy parameter ɛ is negative. According to a time-domain calculation of the energy velocity at four frequency bands up to 900 Hz, velocity increases with frequency, a behaviour described by the Zener model. Then, we use this model to describe anisotropy and anelasticity that are implemented into the equation of motion to compute synthetic seismograms in the space-time domain. The technique is based on memory variables and the Fourier pseudospectral method. We have computed reflection coefficients of the septaria thin layer. At normal incidence, the P-wave coefficient vanishes at specific thicknesses of the layer and there is no conversion to the S wave. For example, calculations at 600 Hz show that for thicknesses of 1 m the septarium can be detected more easily since the amplitudes are higher (nearly 0.8). Converted PS waves have a high amplitude at large offsets (between 30° and 80°) and can be useful to identify the target on this basis. Moreover, we have investigated the effect of septaria embedded in the Boom

  6. Nucleation of Salt Crystals in Clay Minerals: Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Dashtian, Hassan; Wang, Haimeng; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-07-20

    Nucleation of salt crystals in confined media occurs in many processes of high importance, such as injection of CO2 in geological formations for its sequestration. In particular, salt precipitation in clays, a main component of sedimentary rock, is an important phenomenon. The crystals precipitate on the pores' surface, modify the pore space morphology, and reduce its flow and transport properties. Despite numerous efforts to understand the mechanisms of nucleation of salt crystals in confined media, the effect of the clay's chemistry on the growth, distribution, and properties of the crystals is not well understood. We report the results of extensive molecular dynamics simulation of nucleation and growth of NaCl crystals in a clay pore using molecular models of two types of clay minerals, Na-montmorillonite and kaolinite. Clear evidence is presented for the nucleation of the salt crystals that indicates that the molecular structure of clay minerals affects their spatial distribution, although the nucleation mechanism is the same in both types of clays.

  7. Evaluating sand and clay models: do rheological differences matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstadt, Gloria; Sims, Darrell

    2005-08-01

    Dry sand and wet clay are the most frequently used materials for physical modeling of brittle deformation. We present a series of experiments that shows when the two materials can be used interchangeably, document the differences in deformation patterns and discuss how best to evaluate and apply results of physical models. Extension and shortening produce similar large-scale deformation patterns in dry sand and wet clay models, indicating that the two materials can be used interchangeably for analysis of gross deformation geometries. There are subtle deformation features that are significantly different: (1) fault propagation and fault linkage; (2) fault width, spacing and displacement; (3) extent of deformation zone; and (4) amount of folding vs. faulting. These differences are primarily due to the lower cohesion of sand and its larger grain size. If these features are of interest, the best practice would be to repeat the experiments with more than one material to ensure that rheological differences are not biasing results. Dry sand and wet clay produce very different results in inversion models; almost all faults are reactivated in wet clay, and few, if any, are significantly reactivated in sand models. Fault reactivation is attributed to high fluid pressure along the fault zone in the wet clay, a situation that may be analogous to many rocks. Sand inversion models may be best applied to areas where most faults experience little to no reactivation, while clay models best fit areas where most pre-existing normal faults are reactivated.

  8. Muon tomography in the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Gibert, D.; Marteau, J.; Carlus, B.; Nussbaum, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland) was excavated in a Mesozoic shale formation constituted by Opalinus clay. This impermeable formation presents suitable properties for hosting repository sites of radioactive waste. A muon telescope has been placed in this laboratory in October 2009 to establish the feasibility of the muon tomography and to test the sensor performance in a calm environment, where we are protected from atmospheric noisy particles. However, the presence of radon in the gallery as well as charged particles issued from the decay of gamma rays may create a background noise. This noise shift and smooths the signal inducing an under estimation of the rock density. The uncorrelated background has been measured by placing the planes of detection in anti-coincidence. This estimation is preponderant and has to be combined to the theoretical feasibility evaluation to determine the best experimental set-up to observe muon flux fluctuations due to density variations. The muon densitometry experience is here exposed with the estimation of its feasibility. The data acquired from different locations inside the underground laboratory are presented. They are compared to two models representing the layer above the laboratory corresponding to a minimum and a maximum muon flux expectation depending on the values of the rock density.

  9. Illitization within bentonite engineered barrier system in clay repositories for nuclear waste and its effect on the swelling stress: a coupled THMC modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Liu, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear waste generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive waste from the biosphere. An engineered barrier system (EBS), which comprises in many design concepts a bentonite backfill, is widely used. Clay formations have been considered as a host rock throughout the world. Illitization, the transformation of smectite to illite, could compromise some beneficiary features of EBS bentonite and clay host rock such as sorption and swelling capacity. It is the major determining factor to establish the maximum design temperature of the repositories because it is believed that illitization could be greatly enhanced at temperatures higher than 100 oC. However, existing experimental and modeling studies on the occurrence of illitization and related performance impacts are not conclusive, in part because the relevant couplings between the thermal, hydrological, chemical, and mechanical (THMC) processes have not been fully represented in the models. Here we present a fully coupled THMC simulation study of a generic nuclear waste repository in a clay formation with a bentonite-backfilled EBS. Two scenarios were simulated for comparison: a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister can reach about 200 oC and a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister peaks at about 100 oC. The model simulations demonstrate that illitization is in general more significant under higher temperature. However, the quantity of illitization is affected by many chemical factors and therefore varies a great deal. The most important chemical factors are the concentration of K in the pore water as well as the abundance and dissolution rate of K-feldspar. For the particular case and bentonite properties studied, the reduction in swelling stress as a result of chemical changes vary from 2% up to 70% depending on chemical and temperature conditions, and key mechanical parameters. The

  10. Contrasting compositional trends of rocks and olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Cerro Negro volcano (Central America): implications for decompression-driven fractionation of hydrous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnyagin, Maxim V.; Hoernle, Kaj; Mironov, Nikita L.

    2014-10-01

    Melt inclusions in olivine Fo83-72 from tephras of 1867, 1971 and 1992 eruptions of Cerro Negro volcano represent a series of basaltic to andesitic melts of narrow range of MgO (5.6-8 wt %) formed by ~46 wt % fractional crystallization of olivine (~6 wt %), plagioclase (~27 wt %), pyroxene (~13 wt %) and magnetite (<1 wt %) from primitive basaltic melt (average SiO2 = 49 wt %, MgO = 7.6 wt %, H2O = 6 wt %) as it ascended to the surface from the depth of about 14 km. The crystallization occurred at increasing liquidus temperature from 1,050 to 1,090 °C in the pressure range from 400 to 50 MPa and was induced by release of mixed H2O-CO2 fluid from the melt at decreasing pressure. Matrix glass compositions fall at the high-Si end of the melt inclusion trend and represent the final stage of melt crystallization during and after eruption. The bulk compositions of erupted Cerro Negro magmas (tephras and lavas) range from high- to low-MgO (3-10 wt %) basalts, which form a compositional array crossing the trend of melt inclusions so that virtually no rock from Cerro Negro has composition akin to true melt represented by the inclusions. The variations of the bulk magma (rocks) and melt (melt inclusions) compositions can be generated in a dyke connecting a deep primitive magma reservoir with the Cerro Negro edifice. While the melt inclusions represent the compositional trend of instantaneous melts along the magma pathway at decreasing pressure and H2O content, occurrence of low-Mg to high-Mg basalts reflects the process of phenocryst re-distribution in progressively evolving melt. The crystallization scenario is anticipated to operate everywhere in dykes feeding basaltic volcanoes and can explain the predominance of plagioclase-rich high-Al basalts in island arc as well as typical compositional variations of magmas during single eruptions.

  11. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (<55%). From the economic point of view, the Pure Gypsum Rocks, displaying a resistivity value of >800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship

  12. Investigating the Influence of Clay Mineralogy on Stream Bank Erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, R. K.; Stine, M. B.

    2005-12-01

    Soil scientists concerned with erosion of agricultural fields and geotechnical engineers concerned with the mechanical behavior of soils under different conditions have both examined the role of clay mineralogy in controlling soil/sediment properties. Fluvial geomorphologists studying stream channel erosion and stability have focused more on the effects of particle-size distribution, vegetation and rooting. The clay mineralogy of bed and bank sediment has the potential to influence cohesiveness and erodibility, however. The goal of this study is to determine the influence of clay mineralogy on the erodibility of natural stream bank sediment, utilizing techniques drawn from pedology and soil mechanics. Bank samples were collected from eleven sites in small watersheds in central and western Virginia. To obtain sediment containing a range of different clay minerals, watersheds with different types of bedrock were chosen for sampling. Rock types included mafic to felsic metamorphic and igneous rocks, shale, sandstone, and limestone. Where stream bank materials were clearly stratified, different layers were sampled separately. X-ray diffraction of the clay-fraction of the sediment indicates the presence of kaolinite, illite, vermiculite, and mixed-layer clay minerals in various abundances in the different samples. Clay content is 9-46%, as determined by the hydrometer method, and textures range from silty clay and silt loam to clay loam and sandy loam. Organic mater contents range from 1-5% by the loss-on-ignition method. Bulk density of intact sediment samples averages 1.5 g/cc. Liquid limits range from 23-41 with one sample having a value of 65; plasticity indices range from 15-22. While these tests predict that the samples would show a range of mechanical behaviors, the channel morphology at the sampling sites was not strikingly different, all having steep cut banks eroded primarily by scour with no evidence of mass movement and most having a width/depth ratio around

  13. Effect of Hydrothermal Alteration on Rock Properties in Active Geothermal Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikisek, P.; Bignall, G.; Sepulveda, F.; Sass, I.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration records the physical-chemical changes of rock and mineral phases caused by the interaction of hot fluids and wall rock, which can impact effective permeability, porosity, thermal parameters, rock strength and other rock properties. In this project, an experimental approach has been used to investigate the effects of hydrothermal alteration on rock properties. A rock property database of contrastingly altered rock types and intensities has been established. The database details horizontal and vertical permeability, porosity, density, thermal conductivity and thermal heat capacity for ~300 drill core samples from wells THM12, THM13, THM14, THM17, THM18, THM22 and TH18 in the Wairakei-Tauhara geothermal system (New Zealand), which has been compared with observed hydrothermal alteration type, rank and intensity obtained from XRD analysis and optical microscopy. Samples were selected from clay-altered tuff and intercalated siltstones of the Huka Falls Formation, which acts as a cap rock at Wairakei-Tauhara, and tuffaceous sandstones of the Waiora Formation, which is a primary reservoir-hosting unit for lateral and vertical fluid flows in the geothermal system. The Huka Falls Formation exhibits argillic-type alteration of varying intensity, while underlying Waiora Formations exhibits argillic- and propylithic-type alteration. We plan to use a tempered triaxial test cell at hydrothermal temperatures (up to 200°C) and pressures typical of geothermal conditions, to simulate hot (thermal) fluid percolation through the rock matrix of an inferred "reservoir". Compressibility data will be obtained under a range of operating (simulation reservoir) conditions, in a series of multiple week to month-long experiments that will monitor change in permeability and rock strength accompanying advancing hydrothermal alteration intensity caused by the hot brine interacting with the rock matrix. We suggest, our work will provide new baseline information concerning

  14. Micas from mariupolite of the Oktiabrski massif (SE Ukraine): An insight into the host rock evolution - Geochemical data supported by Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumańska-Słowik, Magdalena; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Pieczka, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Muscovite and two dark mica varieties (the coarse-crystalline, pegmatitic, and fine-crystalline with signs of early weathering) representing members of the biotite series, originating from mariupolite of the Oktiabrski massif, (Ukraine), were investigated along with their solid inclusions using electron microprobe and Raman micro-spectroscopy to discuss their genesis and relationship to the parental magma. The coarse-crystalline, pegmatitic biotite, (K1.90Rb0.02Na0.01)(Fe2+3.56Mg1.34Ti0.36Fe3+0.34Mn0.03)[(Si5.73Al2.10Fe3+0.17)O20](OH3.24 F0.76) represents the primary, magmatic annite that crystallized from an alkaline, Fe-rich and Mg-depleted host magma, whereas the fine-crystalline biotite, partly altered to vermiculite, (K1.75Rb0.03Na0.03)(Fe3+3.23Fe2+1.16Mg0.26Mn0.04Ti0.10)[(Si5.16 Al2.84)O20](OH)4.00, devoid of F, represents a re-equilibrated or secondary, post-magmatic Fe3+-bearing mica crystallized from alkaline to the subalkaline host magma. Muscovite, (K1.96Na0.06)(Al3.97Fe2+0.06)[(Si5.99Al2.01)O20](OH)4, with low Na/(Na + K) ratio, low Fe and devoid of Ti and also F, forms only tiny, subhedral flakes formed in the post-magmatic, hydrothermal stage. The primary, unaltered biotite contains numerous solid inclusions of primary origin (albite, aegirine, zircon, K-feldspar, nepheline, pyrochlore, magnetite) and secondary origin (natrolite, hematite, Ti-Mn oxides/hydroxides); most of them are accompanied by a carbonaceous substance, all confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy.

  15. Towards an understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin Mei; Zhou, Chun Hui; Keeling, John; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews progress in the understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation. Clay minerals are involved in the formation of kerogen, catalytic cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon, the migration of crude oil, and the continued change to hydrocarbon composition in underground petroleum reservoirs. In kerogen formation, clay minerals act as catalysts and sorbents to immobilize organic matter through ligand exchange, hydrophobic interactions and cation bridges by the mechanisms of Maillard reactions, polyphenol theory, selective preservation and sorptive protection. Clay minerals also serve as catalysts in acid-catalyzed cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon through Lewis and Brønsted acid sites on the clay surface. The amount and type of clay mineral affect the composition of the petroleum. Brønsted acidity of clay minerals is affected by the presence and state of interlayer water, and displacement of this water is a probable driver in crude oil migration from source rocks. During crude oil migration and accumulation in reservoirs, the composition of petroleum is continually modified by interaction with clay minerals. The clays continue to function as sorbents and catalysts even while they are being transformed by diagenetic processes. The detail of chemical interactions and reaction mechanisms between clay minerals and crude oil formation remains to be fully explained but promises to provide insights with broader application, including catalytic conversion of biomass as a source of sustainable energy into the future.

  16. "Rock Garden"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-10-14

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks "Shark" and "Half Dome" at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00987

  17. Pressure, temperature, and timing of mineralization of the sedimentary rock-hosted orogenic gold deposit at Klipwal, southeastern Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnasamy, Sakthi Saravanan; Uken, Ron; Reinhardt, Jürgen; Selby, David; Johnson, Spencer

    2015-08-01

    fluid-forming event with fluid flow focused into a "compressional jog" of the KSZ. Shear-induced pressure fluctuations generated a phase separation of the initial aqueous-gaseous fluid, producing a gaseous and low-salinity aqueous fluid. This, together with fluid-rock interaction, and a decrease in fO2 lead to sulfide and gold precipitation at Klipwal. Re-Os data from six sulfide samples constrain the age of sulfide precipitation and, by inference, gold mineralization, to 2563 ± 84 Ma, with an initial 187Os/188Os = 0.29 ± 0.08 (MSWD = 0.38). This age is distinctly younger than the post-Pongola granites (2863-2721 Ma), ruling out the association of granite emplacement with mineralization. This would suggest that mineralization is linked to the regional D3 folding event which reactivated the KSZ after emplacement of the post-Pongola granites and that final brittle, post-mineralization reactivation is related to Karoo age faulting. Low initial Os values suggest that ore fluid interacted with mafic rocks, leaching non-radiogenic Os, the likely source being the deeper seated Nsuze Group volcanics and/or the greenstone belts that underlie the Pongola Supergroup.

  18. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

    2008-10-15

    During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

  19. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  20. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  1. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  2. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  3. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  4. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  5. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  6. Sarcocystis calchasi has an expanded host range and induces neurological disease in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and North American rock pigeons (Columbia livia f. dom.).

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Maier, Kristina; Wuenschmann, Arno; Reed, Leslie; Armién, Aníbal G; Shaw, Daniel P; Gruber, Achim D; Lierz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    Pigeon protozoal encephalitis (PPE) is an emerging central nervous system disease of pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica) caused by the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis calchasi. The intermediate host specificity of S. calchasi had been considered high, as domestic chickens were resistant to experimental infection. Here, we have re-evaluated this concept and expanded the known host range of S. calchasi by experimental infection of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), a species distantly related to pigeons. In this work, a group of eight cockatiels were experimentally infected with S. calchasi, which resulted in a biphasic central nervous system disease that paralleled PPE in many aspects, albeit with a more diverse pathology. All cockatiels became lethargic and polyuric between days 7 and 13 pi and during that time schizonts of S. calchasi were found primarily in the liver and spleen accompanied by necrosis and inflammation. As with pigeons, neurological signs occurred during a chronic phase of the disease in three cockatiels between 57 and 63 dpi. However, all five cockatiels necropsied in that period, or at the end of the trial at 76 dpi, had a severe lymphohistiocytic and necrotizing encephalitis. No tissue cysts were found in the heart, and cockatiels infected with 10(5) sporocysts only had a negligible parasite load in skeletal muscles despite the presence of severe central nervous system lesions. Notably, intralesional schizonts were identified in the brain of one cockatiel. In contrast to previous results, intralesional schizonts were also identified in the brains of three of six naturally infected pigeons from Minnesota and Missouri examined as part of an epidemiological investigation. In both the cockatiel and the pigeons, tissue cysts were found concurrently with schizonts suggesting an uncommon phenomenon in the Sarcocystis life cycle. Based on the results of this study, transmission of S. calchasi to avian species other than the domestic pigeon is

  7. Micas from mariupolite of the Oktiabrski massif (SE Ukraine): an insight into the host rock evolution--geochemical data supported by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dumańska-Słowik, Magdalena; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Pieczka, Adam

    2015-02-25

    Muscovite and two dark mica varieties (the coarse-crystalline, pegmatitic, and fine-crystalline with signs of early weathering) representing members of the biotite series, originating from mariupolite of the Oktiabrski massif, (Ukraine), were investigated along with their solid inclusions using electron microprobe and Raman micro-spectroscopy to discuss their genesis and relationship to the parental magma. The coarse-crystalline, pegmatitic biotite, (K1.90Rb0.02Na0.01)(Fe3.56(2+)Mg1.34Ti0.36Fe0.34(3+)Mn0.03)[(Si5.73Al2.10Fe0.17(3+))O20](OH3.24 F0.76) represents the primary, magmatic annite that crystallized from an alkaline, Fe-rich and Mg-depleted host magma, whereas the fine-crystalline biotite, partly altered to vermiculite, (K1.75Rb0.03Na0.03)(Fe3.23(3+)Fe1.16(2+)Mg0.26Mn0.04Ti0.10)[(Si5.16 Al2.84)O20](OH)4.00, devoid of F, represents a re-equilibrated or secondary, post-magmatic Fe(3+)-bearing mica crystallized from alkaline to the subalkaline host magma. Muscovite, (K1.96Na0.06)(Al3.97Fe0.06(2+))[(Si5.99Al2.01)O20](OH)4, with low Na/(Na+K) ratio, low Fe and devoid of Ti and also F, forms only tiny, subhedral flakes formed in the post-magmatic, hydrothermal stage. The primary, unaltered biotite contains numerous solid inclusions of primary origin (albite, aegirine, zircon, K-feldspar, nepheline, pyrochlore, magnetite) and secondary origin (natrolite, hematite, Ti-Mn oxides/hydroxides); most of them are accompanied by a carbonaceous substance, all confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of high-grade host rocks to the Venetia kimberlite diatremes, Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Creus, P. K.; Anthonissen, C. J.; Stoch, B.; Ekkerd, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Beit Bridge Complex of the Central Zone (CZ) of the Limpopo Belt hosts the 519 ± 6 Ma Venetia kimberlite diatremes. Deformed shelf- or platform-type supracrustal sequences include the Mount Dowe, Malala Drift and Gumbu Groups, comprising quartzofeldspathic units, biotite-bearing gneiss, quartzite, metapelite, metacalcsilicate and ortho- and para-amphibolite. Previous studies define tectonometamorphic events at 3.3-3.1 Ga, 2.7-2.5 Ga and 2.04 Ga. Detailed structural mapping over 10 years highlights four deformation events at Venetia. Rules-based implicit 3D modelling in Leapfrog Geo™ provides an unprecedented insight into CZ ductile deformation and sheath folding. D1 juxtaposed gneisses against metasediments. D2 produced a pervasive axial planar foliation (S2) to isoclinal F2 folds. Sheared lithological contacts and S2 were refolded into regional, open, predominantly southward-verging, E-W trending F3 folds. Intrusion of a hornblendite protolith occurred at high angles to incipient S2. Constrictional-prolate D4 shows moderately NE-plunging azimuths defined by elongated hornblendite lenses, andalusite crystals in metapelite, crenulations in fuchsitic quartzite and sheath folding. D4 overlaps with a: 1) 2.03-2.01 Ga regional M3 metamorphic overprint; b) transpressional deformation at 2.2-1.9 Ga and c) 2.03 Ga transpressional, dextral shearing and thrusting around the CZ and d) formation of the Avoca, Bellavue and Baklykraal sheath folds and parallel lineations.

  9. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency.

  10. Bulk rock composition and geochemistry of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the Grey Porri Tuff and selected lavas of the Monte dei Porri volcano, Salina, Aeolian Islands, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, Angela L.; Bodnar, Robert J.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Bohrson, Wendy A.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Messina, Antonia; Tracy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aeolian Islands are an arcuate chain of submarine seamounts and volcanic islands, lying just north of Sicily in southern Italy. The second largest of the islands, Salina, exhibits a wide range of compositional variation in its erupted products, from basaltic lavas to rhyolitic pumice. The Monte dei Porri eruptions occurred between 60 ka and 30 ka, following a period of approximately 60,000 years of repose. The bulk rock composition of the Monte dei Porri products range from basaltic-andesite scoria to andesitic pumice in the Grey Porri Tuff (GPT), with the Monte dei Porri lavas having basaltic-andesite compositions. The typical mineral assemblage of the GPT is calcic plagioclase, clinopyroxene (augite), olivine (Fo72−84) and orthopyroxene (enstatite) ± amphibole and Ti-Fe oxides. The lava units show a similar mineral assemblage, but contain lower Fo olivines (Fo57−78). The lava units also contain numerous glomerocrysts, including an unusual variety that contains quartz, K-feldspar and mica. Melt inclusions (MI) are ubiquitous in all mineral phases from all units of the Monte dei Porri eruptions; however, only data from olivine-hosted MI in the GPT are reported here. Compositions of MI in the GPT are typically basaltic (average SiO2 of 49.8 wt %) in the pumices and basaltic-andesite (average SiO2 of 55.6 wt %) in the scoriae and show a bimodal distribution in most compositional discrimination plots. The compositions of most of the MI in the scoriae overlap with bulk rock compositions of the lavas. Petrological and geochemical evidence suggest that mixing of one or more magmas and/or crustal assimilation played a role in the evolution of the Monte dei Porri magmatic system, especially the GPT. Analyses of the more evolved mineral phases are required to better constrain the evolution of the magma.

  11. The geology and mineralogy of Ritchey crater, Mars: Evidence for post-Noachian clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Vivian Z.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2014-04-01

    Widespread detection of phyllosilicates (clay minerals) in Noachian (>3.5 Ga) terrains on Mars and their paucity in younger terrains have led to the hypothesis that Noachian conditions were more clement than the colder, drier conditions that have since followed. However, recent clay detections in several Hesperian impact craters suggest that fluvial transport and alteration were possible after the posited early era of phyllosilicate formation. Here we present evidence that rocks within Hesperian age Ritchey crater (28.5°S, 51°W) record a period of post-Noachian fluvial transport and in situ alteration. This resulted in the transport of clays from the crater wall to the crater floor and the formation of hydrated silica and Fe/Mg smectite in Ritchey's central uplift. Clay minerals associated with central uplifts are commonly interpreted to represent preexisting clays excavated from depth, potentially providing insight into older crustal clay-forming processes. Here we present detailed geomorphic and mineralogic maps and show that the clays in Ritchey's central peak formed after or as a direct result of the impact and are thus Hesperian or younger. Clays on the crater wall were either preexisting clays exposed by the impact or formed in situ through postimpact water-rock interaction. In either scenario, some of these clays were likely subsequently transported to the crater floor by fluvial-alluvial processes in a source-to-sink system. In this context, the hydrated phases in Ritchey indicate several different formation and transport mechanisms and provide further evidence that near-surface clay mineral formation, and thus habitable conditions, existed on Mars after the Noachian.

  12. Mesoarchean (3.0 and 2.86 Ga) host rocks of the iron oxide-Cu-Au Bacaba deposit, Carajás Mineral Province: U-Pb geochronology and metallogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreto, Carolina Penteado Natividade; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Amaral, Wagner S.; Dos Santos, Ticiano José S.; Juliani, Caetano; de Souza Filho, Carlos Roberto

    2011-10-01

    The Bacaba iron oxide-copper-gold deposit, situated within a WNW-ESE-striking shear zone in the Carajás Domain, Carajás Mineral Province, is hosted by the Serra Dourada Granite, the Bacaba Tonalite, and crosscutting gabbro intrusions, which were intensely affected by sodic (albite-scapolite), potassic, chloritic, and hydrolytic hydrothermal alteration. This deposit is located 7 km northeast of the world-class Sossego iron oxide-copper-gold deposit and might represent a distal and deeper portion of the same or related hydrothermal system. The U-Pb laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry data for zircon from a sodically altered sample of the Serra Dourada Granite yielded a 2,860±22 Ma (MSWD=11.5) age. Three samples from the Bacaba Tonalite, including one with potassic alteration and two with Cu-Au mineralization, rendered the 3,001.2±3.6 Ma (MSWD=1.8), 2,990.9±5.8 Ma (MSWD=1.9), and 3,004.6±9 Ma (MSWD=2.2) ages, respectively. The ca. 2.86 and ca. 3.0 Ga ages are interpreted as the timing of the igneous crystallization of the Serra Dourada Granite and the Bacaba Tonalite, respectively, and represent the oldest magmatic events recognized in the Carajás Domain. The Serra Dourada Granite and the Bacaba Tonalite are interpreted to greatly predate the genesis of the Bacaba deposit. A genetic link is improbable in the light of the similarities with the Sossego deposit, which is also hosted by younger ca. 2.76 Ga metavolcano-sedimentary units of the Itacaiúnas Supergroup. In this context, the iron oxide-copper-gold deposits in the southern sector of the Carajás Domain could be mainly controlled by important crustal discontinuities, such as a regional shear zone, rather than be associated with a particular rock type. These results expand the potential for occurrences of iron oxide-copper-gold deposits within the Mesoarchean basement rocks underlying the Carajás Basin, particularly those crosscut by Neoarchean shear zones.

  13. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  14. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  15. 'Escher' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

    The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water.

    Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend.

    These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  16. 'Escher' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

    The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water.

    Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend.

    These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  17. Analytical Characterization of Natural Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sheikhy, Refat; Al-Shamrani, Mosleh

    2010-10-01

    The current paper introduces the study of morphology and electronic microscopy characterization of one type of the smectite Saudi nano clay montmorillonite type. During the last decade, nanotechnology achieved a recognized progress in many fields based mainly on synthesized materials. Much attention is devoted to produce natural nano particles. It was found that the clay is one of the rare materials which have platelets of nano scale size. The nano clay minerals are found in different types. It is investigated that the nano clay minerals have super properties which can not be found in the other materials. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has many zones having different types of good nano clays. These nano clays are found in certain mixtures with other different materials such as Mg, Ca, Fe and others. By developing an innovated technique we could extract Saudi Arabian nano clay with high grade purity. The results are very interesting. The produced nano clay particles are with good quality and super properties. It can be used in many fields of nanocomposites.

  18. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  19. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  20. Clay Mineralogy and Organic Carbon Burial in Proterozoic Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, N. J.; Johnston, D. T.; Mushegian, A.; Rothman, D. H.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    Pedogenic, or soil-derived, clay minerals have long been implicated in the efficiency of organic matter (OM) burial and coincident accumulation of atmospheric oxygen. As diagenesis and metamorphism obscure pedogenic clays in many Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. In this study we analyzed the mineralogy and total organic carbon (TOC) of a number of organic rich shales deposited in Late Archean to Early Cambrian sedimentary basins. Across all samples, diagenetic transformation of pre-existing smectite minerals has led to the predominance of glauconite and the diagenetic 1M and 1Md illite polytypes, which, collectively, can be thought of as "proto-smectite". The correlations between TOC and illite crystallinity suggest that OM burial and preservation in the Proterozoic proceeded by the physical aggregation of OM and pedogenic clays upon deposition. This association, in turn, led to the interference of OM with the illitization process, resulting in the ubiquitous relationship between high surface area (or, finely crystalline) material and high TOC. This interpretation is consistent with suggestions that the preservation of OM after burial proceeds by physical exclusion, with mineral surfaces effectively isolating OM from enzymatic breakdown. Together, it appears that the deposition of pedogenic clays has remained broadly constant over Proterozoic time and into the Early Cambrian, which is incompatible with the hypothesis that late Neoproterozoic oxygenation was influenced by increases in pedogenic clay production. As no clear temporal relationship exists between clays and OM, Precambrian oxygenation was likely controlled by other mechanisms.

  1. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  2. Determination of the permeability of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay at the metre to decametre scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enssle, Carl Philipp; Cruchaudet, Martin; Croisé, Jean; Brommundt, Jürgen

    Andra is continuously investigating the Callovo-Oxfordian clay unit as a potential host rock for the deep disposal of long-lived medium and high-level radioactive waste at the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory. A large number of hydraulic measurements have been performed in instrumented boreholes. In particular, hydraulic tests have been conducted for the determination of the average hydraulic conductivity and the formation pressure at the decimetre scale. Furthermore, the evolution of porewater pressure was measured for more than four years in test intervals at distances from a few decimetres to 20 m from the drift floor located at 492 m below ground level. These measurements, reflecting in particular the drainage and suction effect induced by the ventilated drift, present a unique set of data for the determination of the permeability of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay at the metre to decametre scale. The pressure data measured since the end of 2005 in four intervals of borehole PEP1001 were analysed by numerical modelling. Two different 2D models (vertical and axial-symmetric) were used considering also the rock desaturation and depressurisation processes due to the climatic conditions in the drift. The suction - related to the relative humidity of the ventilation air - was taken into account according to Kelvin’s equation. Other transient effects, e.g. due to the seasonal temperature variation in the drift were also investigated. Eventually, sensitivity analyses to the key hydraulic parameters were performed. The best fit yielded a horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 7 × 10 -13 m/s and a vertical hydraulic conductivity of 4 × 10 -13 m/s in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. The seasonal variation of the climatic conditions in the drift showed only little influence on the general pressure evolution and hence on the determination of the hydraulic conductivity. Further, the model results suggest that the measured pressure evolution in each interval of

  3. Life inhabits rocks: clues to rock erosion from electron microscopy of pisolite at a UNESCO heritage site in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Kazue; Asada, Ryuji; Lindenmayer, Zara Gerhardt; Shirotori, Tatsuya; Vargas, Juliana Missiaggia; Nowatzki, Carlos Henrique; Coelho, Osmar Wöhl

    2009-02-01

    Rock erosion is attracting increasing attention from scientists worldwide. The area encompassing the Saint John Baptist Church, Saint John Village, XVII century ruins in Rio Grande do Sul at the UNESCO World Heritage Site is considered a Brazilian treasure. However, the risk of damage to this site from rock erosion has recently increased tremendously. Generally, the rocky construction such as fence, wall and tomb stone, seems strong but is actually extremely sensitive to erosion caused by lichens, fungi, molds and bacteria. Because of biological erosion and massive exposure, the fresh rock is dominated by clays and microorganisms. Water-adsorbing clays and microorganisms influence the mechanisms of the rock erosion. In this study, the formation of bio-clay-minerals in porous structure of pisolite was demonstrated using electron microscopy. Bacterial clay mineralization can deform the rock structure and even produce organic materials. Biological activity could easily corrode rocky constructions around the Saint John Baptist Church site. The rocks are pisolitic laterites possibly formed in Tertiary over the Kretaceous Parana flood Basalts. Samples inhabited by lichens and fungi were collected from a collapsed wall in the ancient church. The zonal reddish-brown pisolites are 4 mm in diameter in a matrix of clays associated with porous and empty spaces. Elemental distribution maps from X-ray fluorescence microscopy show iron-rich spherules of pisolite, whereas the matrix is composed of Al, Si, Mn, and Sr; thus producing goethite and kaolinite. Transmission electron microscopic observation showed that various types of bacteria inhabit the spherule and are associated with clay minerals and graphite. STEM elemental analysis confirmed the bio-clay-mineralization with Al, Si, S, and Fe, around bacterial cells. The results presented here will improve our understanding of nm-scale bio-mineralization and bio-erosion in lateritic rocks.

  4. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  5. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  6. Wind Carved Rock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-19

    The distinctively fluted surface and elongated hills in this image in Medusae Fossae are caused by wind erosion of a soft fine-grained rock. Called yardangs, these features are aligned with the prevailing wind direction. This wind direction would have dominated for a very long time to carve these large-scale features into the exposed rock we see today. Yardangs not only reveal the strength and direction of historic winds, but also reveal something of the host rock itself. Close inspection by HiRISE shows an absence of boulders or rubble, especially along steep yardang cliffs and buttresses. The absence of rubble and the scale of the yardangs tells us that the host rock consists only of weakly cemented fine granules in tens of meters or more thick deposits. Such deposits could have come from extended settling of volcanic ash, atmospheric dust, or accumulations of wind deposited fine sands. After a time these deposits became cemented and cohesive, illustrated by the high standing relief and exposed cliffs. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21111

  7. Regional aquifer geochemistry below the Boom Clay (NE-Belgium): data analysis and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersteen, Katrijn; Leterme, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    For more than 35 years, SCK•CEN has been investigating the possibility of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste disposal in the Boom Clay in NE-Belgium, including the study of the regional hydrogeology and geochemistry of the aquifer systems surrounding the Boom Clay. This study presents the analysis and modelling of groundwater geochemistry in the confined aquifers below the Boom Clay in NE-Belgium. This so-called deep aquifer system includes, with increasing depth, parts of the Oligocene Aquifer System, The Bartoon Aquitard System and the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian Aquifer System. At the end of the Neogene period, during which several marine transgressions and regressions took place, the sea definitely drew back after having deposited shallow marine and estuarine sands and some clay. The original seawater in the pores of the sediments was in first instance gradually diluted as the aquifer was flushed by recharge (fresh) water. Afterwards, water-rock interactions, including cation exchange, began to play a role in the deep aquifer system. This led to changes in groundwater composition over time. Geochemical data (major ions, stable isotopes, radioactive isotopes, dissolved gases) have been collected at a regional scale from the piezometric network in the deep aquifer system. Several measurement campaigns have been performed between 1980 and 2010. Groundwater is currently mainly of Na-HCO3 to Na-Cl type water, and because of the low groundwater velocity, re-equilibration with the host formations generally occurs. The main geochemical indicators (salinity, stable isotopes) point to a mixture between saline water (to the NW) and fresh recharge water (from SE). SE-NW gradients of ion concentrations are observed and can be explained in agreement with the pattern of natural groundwater flow. Building on the concepts emerging from the geochemical data analysis and recent groundwater modelling, a geochemical model was developed in PhreeqC, using geochemical and

  8. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  9. Rock varnish in New York: An accelerated snapshot of accretionary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsley, David H.; Dorn, Ronald I.; DiGregorio, Barry E.; Langworthy, Kurt A.; Ditto, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Samples of manganiferous rock varnish collected from fluvial, bedrock outcrop and Erie Barge Canal settings in New York state host a variety of diatom, fungal and bacterial microbial forms that are enhanced in manganese and iron. Use of a Dual-Beam Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope to manipulate the varnish in situ reveals microbial forms that would not have otherwise been identified. The relative abundance of Mn-Fe-enriched biotic forms in New York samples is far greater than varnishes collected from warm deserts. Moisture availability has long been noted as a possible control on varnish growth rates, a hypothesis consistent with the greater abundance of Mn-enhancing bioforms. Sub-micron images of incipient varnish formation reveal that varnishing in New York probably starts with the mortality of microorganisms that enhanced Mn on bare mineral surfaces; microbial death results in the adsorption of the Mn-rich sheath onto the rock in the form of filamentous networks. Clay minerals are then cemented by remobilization of the Mn-rich material. Thus, the previously unanswered question of what comes first - clay mineral deposition or enhancement of Mn - can be answered in New York because of the faster rate of varnish growth. In contrast, very slow rates of varnishing seen in warm deserts, of microns per thousand years, make it less likely that collected samples will reveal varnish accretionary processes than samples collected from fast-accreting moist settings.

  10. Macro-scale deformation behavior and characterization of deformation mechanisms below µm-scale in experimentally deformed Boom Clay by using the combination of triaxial compression, X-ray µ-CT imaging, DIC, BIB cross sectioning, and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelker, Anne; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; Bésuelle, Pierre; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Levasseur, Séverine

    2017-04-01

    Boom Clay is one formation being studied in Belgium as a potential host rock for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. This poorly indurated clay presents in its natural state favorable properties against the migration of radionuclides: low permeability, low solute diffusion rates, good retention and sorption capacity for many radionuclides and good self-sealing capacity. During construction of disposal galleries, stress redistribution will lead to perturbation of the clay and the formation around galleries of the so-called "Excavation disturbed Zone" (EdZ). The study of deformation mechanisms and evolution of Boom Clay properties at macro but also micro scale allows to assess in a more mechanistic way the evolution of Boom Clay properties in this EdZ. In this work, we show microstructural investigations of Boom Clay deformed in undrained triaxial compression by linking conventional stress/strain curves with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of broad-ion-beam (BIB) milled cross-sections to deduce deformation mechanisms based on microstructures at sub-micron resolution. Two specimens, collected in Mol (Belgium) at the European Underground Laboratories (URL) on HADES level, were analyzed: The major principal stress σ1 was applied parallel as well as perpendicular to the bedding direction with an initial mean normal effective stress of 4.5 MPa and an initial pore water pressure of 2.3 MPa, which are equal to the in-situ values. Linking the resulting DIC-derived maps of incremental strains with the corresponding stress/strain curve give not only information about the moment of the shear band development, but also on the way strain evolves within the specimen throughout the rest. Incremental DIC analysis of X-ray tomographic scans performed during loading tests give a time evolution of the strain field, and subsequently allow to detect strain localization which appears close to the stress peak. Regions with a

  11. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of clays and clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Hughes, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the configuration, texture, and fabric of clay samples. Growth mechanics of crystalline units-interpenetration and interlocking of crystallites, crystal habits, twinning, helical growth, and topotaxis-also are uniquely revealed by the SEM. Authigenic kaolins make up the bulk of the examples because their larger crystallite size, better crystallinity, and open texture make them more suited to examination by the SEM than most other clay mineral types. ?? 1971.

  13. Rock-fluid interaction and phase properties of fluids in nano- and subnano-pores of shales: Sorption-based studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanyog

    vapors in organic-rich shale and siltstone samples suggest that hexane vapor measures pores in both clay and in organic matter (OM) while water vapor selectively probes only clay-hosted pores. Thus, OM pores, which are not accessed by water vapor adsorption, are concluded to be hydrophobic. Nitrogen adsorption underestimates porosity in the organic rich shales due to the kinetic-restriction faced by nitrogen in the cryogenic test conditions. The OM pores in the organic-rich shale samples retained their sorption capacity after water-imbibition. On the other hand, illite clay pores lost most of their supercritical CO2 sorption capacity in the presence of water. The diffusion of dissolved CO2 in water and its subsequent sorption in the OM pores suggests that dissolved gases can still be sorbed. As a consequence, rock-fluid interaction in nano- and sub-nanometer sized pores of shales may potentially alter the PVT properties of multi-component hydrocarbon liquids. The deformational and flow properties of confined undersaturated condensates (CUC) or the adsorbed phase of water and hexane in the nano- and sub-nanometer sized pores of various clay minerals were thus characterized and found to have liquid-like properties. However, the cation-hydrating CUC of water had unusual phase properties, as it was found to increase the overall p-wave stiffness of the clay aggregates. The sorption-based methods developed in the thesis for studying the rock-fluid interaction and fluid properties of shales are shown to be theoretically consistent and appear operationally more viable than the existing methods for rock-fluid interaction studies. Therefore, the proposed methods may have wider implications in the rock-physical and reservoir engineering studies of shales.

  14. Lithology and internal structure of the San Andreas fault at depth based on characterization of Phase 3 whole-rock core in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kelly K.; Evans, James P.; Chester, Judith S.; Chester, Frederick M.; Kirschner, David L.

    2011-10-01

    We characterize the lithology and structure of the spot core obtained in 2007 during Phase 3 drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) in order to determine the composition, structure, and deformation processes of the fault zone at 3 km depth where creep and microseismicity occur. A total of approximately 41 m of spot core was taken from three separate sections of the borehole; the core samples consist of fractured arkosic sandstones and shale west of the SAF zone (Pacific Plate) and sheared fine-grained sedimentary rocks, ultrafine black fault-related rocks, and phyllosilicate-rich fault gouge within the fault zone (North American Plate). The fault zone at SAFOD consists of a broad zone of variably damaged rock containing localized zones of highly concentrated shear that often juxtapose distinct protoliths. Two zones of serpentinite-bearing clay gouge, each meters-thick, occur at the two locations of aseismic creep identified in the borehole on the basis of casing deformation. The gouge primarily is comprised of Mg-rich clays, serpentinite (lizardite ± chrysotile) with notable increases in magnetite, and Ni-Cr-oxides/hydroxides relative to the surrounding host rock. The rocks surrounding the two creeping gouge zones display a range of deformation including fractured protolith, block-in-matrix, and foliated cataclasite structure. The blocks and clasts predominately consist of sandstone and siltstone embedded in a clay-rich matrix that displays a penetrative scaly fabric. Mineral alteration, veins and fracture-surface coatings are present throughout the core, and reflect a long history of syn-deformation, fluid-rock reaction that contributes to the low-strength and creep in the meters-thick gouge zones.

  15. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  16. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  17. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  18. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  19. Experimental constraints on the relationship between clay abundance, clay fabric, and frictional behavior for the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojatschke, Jasmaria; Scuderi, Marco M.; Warr, Laurence N.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Saffer, Demian; Marone, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The presence of smectite (saponite) in fault gouge from the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, CA has been linked to low mechanical strength and aseismic slip. However, the precise relationship between clay mineral structure, fabric development, fault strength, and the stability of frictional sliding is not well understood. We address these questions through the integration of laboratory friction tests and FIB-SEM analysis of fault rock recovered from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole. Intact fault rock was compared with experimentally sheared fault gouge and different proportions of either quartz clasts or SAFOD clasts extracted from the sample. Nano-textural measurements show the development of localized clay particle alignment along shear folia developed within synthetic gouges; such slip planes have multiples of random distribution (MRD) values of 3.0-4.9. The MRD values measured are higher than previous estimates (MRD 1.5) that show lower degrees of shear localization and clay alignment averaged over larger volumes. The intact fault rock exhibits less well-developed nano-clay fabrics than the experimentally sheared materials, and MRD values decrease with smectite content. We show that the abundance, strength, and shape of clasts all influence fabric evolution via strain localization: quartz clasts yield more strongly developed clay fabrics than serpentine-dominated SAFOD clasts. Our results suggest that (1) both clay abundance and the development of nano-scale fabrics play a role in fault zone weakening and (2) aseismic creep is promoted by slip along clay shears with >20 wt % smectite content and MRD values ≥2.7.

  20. Microbial Impacts on Clay Mineral Transformation and Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Jaisi, D.; Fredrickson, J.; Plymale, A.

    2006-05-01

    Clays and clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sedimentary rocks, and pelagic oozes. They play important roles in environmental processes such as nutrient cycling, plant growth, contaminant migration, organic matter maturation, and petroleum production. Iron is a major constituent in clay minerals, and its mobility and stability in different environmental processes is, in part, controlled by the oxidation state. Recent studies have shown that biological reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals can change the physical and chemical properties of clay minerals, such as swelling, cation exchange and fixation capacity, specific surface area, color, and magnetic exchange interactions. As a result of biological reduction of Fe(III), clay minerals also undergo mineral transformations, such as dissolution of smectite and precipitation of illite, siderite and vivianite. These chemical, structural and mineralogical changes of clay minerals have a profound effect on clay mineral reactivity, such as their reactivity with organic and inorganic (i.e., heavy metals and radionuclides) contaminants. Our latest data show that biologically reduced nontronite (a smectite variety) is much more effective in reducing soluble and mobile Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) than unreduced nontronite. The reduced Tc(IV) is insoluble in groundwater and soil and thus is immobile. Biologically reduced nontronite can be prepared by microbially reducing Fe(III) in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens in the absence of oxygen. Approximately 30% of structurally Fe(III) can be reduced in this manner. Biogenic Fe(II) can then serve as an electron donor to reduce Tc(VII). Nearly all Fe(II) is available to reduce Tc(VII), with the rate of reduction (typically within weeks) possibly depending on the speciation of Fe(II) (surface sorbed Fe(II) vs. structural Fe(II)). Further investigations are underway to further assess the reversibility of Tc reduction upon exposure to oxygen and to elucidate Tc reduction

  1. Nigerian geophagical clay: a traditional antidiarrheal pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, D E; Ferrell, R E

    1985-02-08

    The chief geophagical clay entering the West African market system comes from the village of Uzalla, Nigeria. Village inhabitants ascribe antidiarrheal properties to the clay, and they use it in traditional medicinal preparations to counteract intestinal problems. Mineralogical analyses demonstrate a striking similarity between the Uzalla village clay and the clay in the commercial pharmaceutical Kaopectate.

  2. Water Retention Characteristics and State-Dependent Mechanical and Petro-Physical Properties of a Clay Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Katrin M.; Wymann, Linda P.; Zimmer, Sebastian; Thoeny, Reto; Amann, Florian

    2015-03-01

    A series of clay shale specimens in equilibrium with various humidity conditions were used to establish the water retention characteristics, the influence of suction on ultrasonic p-wave velocity and rock mechanical properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, onset of dilatancy, unconfined compressive strength and Brazilian tensile strength. Opalinus Clay, a clay shale considered as host rock for the disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland was utilized. The results showed that the p-wave velocity normal to bedding ( v p,n) dropped sharply upon desaturation until suction approached the air-entry value. The sharp decrease was associated with desiccation cracks solely oriented parallel to bedding. For suction in excess of the air-entry value, v p,n was constant, indicating no further desiccation damage. The suction at the shrinkage limit and at the air-entry point is similar in magnitude. The p-wave velocity parallel to bedding ( v p,p) remained constant in the entire range of suction investigated in this study. The constant v p,p with increasing suction might be associated with the disproportional decrease in the Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus and its opposing effect on p-wave velocity. An almost linear increase in unconfined compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, stress at the onset of dilatancy and Young's modulus with increasing suction was observed up to a suction of 56.6 MPa. For suction larger than 56.6 MPa, relatively constant strength and stiffness was observed. The increase is associated with the net contribution of suction to strength/stiffness, which decreases nonlinearly with decreasing volumetric water content. The rate of increase in tensile strength and unconfined compressive strength with increasing suction is different depending on the rock anisotropy. Compared to the strength values (Brazilian tensile and uniaxial compressive strength) obtained from specimens loaded parallel to bedding, the tensile strength parallel to

  3. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. Opportunity Rocks!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows in superb detail a portion of the puzzling rock outcropping that scientists are eagerly planning to investigate. Presently, Opportunity is on its lander facing northeast; the outcropping lies to the northwest. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall and are thought to be either volcanic ash deposits or sediments carried by water or wind. The small rock in the center is about the size of a golf ball.

  5. Paleoenvironmental Implications of Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx. 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx. 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx. 10A with a slight inflexion at approx. 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and

  6. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 021 band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx 10A with a slight inflexion at approx 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating

  7. Mechanically infiltrated clays: recognition and influence in fluvial reservoirs of Reconcavo basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, M.A.S.; De Ros, L.F.

    1989-03-01

    Fluvial sandstones and conglomerates of the Sergi Formation (Jurassic) are the main reservoirs of the Reconcavo basin in northeastern Brazil. These reservoirs contain significant amounts of interstitial detrital clays resulting from early diagenetic mechanical infiltration. The infiltration developed under arid/semiarid conditions, where the lowered water table allowed muddy waters of episodic runoff to infiltrate through the coarse alluvium. The main clay concentrations occurred in the upper phreatic zone and in proximity to sources of influent seepage. It is difficult to identify infiltrated clays in ancient sedimentary rocks due to a lack of well-established petrographic criteria. In this work, a series of petrographic criteria is proposed to recognize these clays in clastic reservoirs. These criteria include the anisophachous coatings of tangentially accreted lamellae and the geometric patterns developed due to shrinkage. The infiltrated clays are among the main controls of reservoir properties, and the horizons of maximum clay concentration are the main internal barriers in most Sergi reservoirs. In general, infiltrated clays damage reservoir quality by creating macroheterogeneities and microheterogeneities, by decreasing recovery efficiency and permeability, and by increasing water saturation. Also, they can cause formation damage either by their swelling properties or through the migration of loose particles left by shrinkage. As demonstrated in the Sergi Formation, infiltrated clays must be adequately identified for the definition of proper procedures for drilling, completion, reservoir development, and EOR programs.

  8. White Rock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-21

    White Rock is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during NASA Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970 and is now shown here in an image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

  9. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  10. 'Lutefisk' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera to take this image of a rock called 'Lutefisk' on the rover's 286th martian day (Oct. 22, 2004). The surface of the rock is studded with rounded granules of apparently more-resistant material up to several millimeters (0.1 inch) or more across. The visible portion of Lutefisk is about 25 centimeters (10 inches) across.

  11. Clay mineral distribution along the southern and western Svalbard continental margin in association with contouritic deposition: insights for environmental and oceanographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musco, Maria Elena; Caricchi, Chiara; Giulia Lucchi, Renata; Princivalle, Francesco; GIorgetti, Giovanna; Caburlotto, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Kveithola and Storfjorden troughs are two glacial depositional systems, situated South of the Svalbard Archipelago (North Western Barents Sea), that during the last glaciation (MIS-2) have hosted ice streams, which contributed to the build-up of the relative Trough Mouth Fans (TMFs) on the continental slope. The sedimentary record contained in TMFs provides several proxies that can be useful for reconstructing the ice-streams dynamics during glacial periods, the onset of deglaciation and the climatic variability during interglacials. The TMF slopes facing the two troughs have been investigated during several international oceanographic cruises: SVAIS onboard R/V BIO Hespérides; EGLACOM, onboard R/V OGS Explora; PNRA Project CORIBAR, onboard R/V Maria S. Marien; Eurofleets-2 PREPARED, onboard RV-G.O. Sars. For this study we have focused on XRD analyses on clay minerals, collected from seven cores, taken during these cruises, and XRF analyses have also been conducted on the whole length of the cores. Clay mineral assemblages are controlled by source rock composition, physical-chemical weathering, transport and depositional mechanisms. In polar areas clay mineral analysis can be used also for reconstructing sedimentary processes, associated with glacial and interglacial conditions. Moreover in the North western Barents Sea smectite is considered a good proxy for reconstructing the North Atlantic Current strength, giving thus additional indication on the palaeoceanographic conditions associated with climatic changes. Here we present a first correlation among these cores, aiming to describe the clay mineral distribution in response to the climatic variations that followed the Last Glacial Maximum and describe the changes in ice-stream dynamics and related oceanographic/environmental changes along the margin.

  12. Mineralogical, geochemical, and sedimentological characteristics of clay deposits from central Uganda and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyakairu, George W. A.; Kurzweil, Hans; Koeberl, Christian

    2002-07-01

    In Uganda, Precambrian rocks have undergone extensive weathering and erosion, and are locally altered to form considerable clay deposits. We have studied the geochemical, mineralogical, and sedimentological characteristics of clay deposits from central Uganda to determine their composition, source rocks, deposition, and possible use in local industry. Samples were collected from the Kajjansi, Kitiko, Masooli, and Ntawo deposits (near Kampala), all of which are currently used for both industrial and traditional brick, tile, and pottery manufacture. The deposits are widely scattered individual basins, with clays deposited under lacustrine and alluvial environmental conditions, and were all found to belong to the sedimentary group. The clays are composed of silt-sand fractions and predominantly consist of kaolinite and have a relatively high Fe 2O 3 content. The studied deposits are chemically homogeneous, except for the samples richer in sand fraction, which have higher SiO 2 and K 2O values. The chemistry of the studied samples, compared to European clays, shows that they need elaborate treatment to render them suitable for ceramics production. An analysis of the chemical and mineralogical composition of the clays has demonstrated that, taken as a whole, they possess characteristics satisfactory for brick production.

  13. Relationships between clay mineralogy, hydrothermal metamorphism, and topography in a Western Cascades watershed, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, Rebecca K. R.

    2001-05-01

    This study investigates variation in clay mineralogy and its relation to hydrothermal metamorphism, hillslope processes, and topography in the western Cascade Mountains. The study area is the drainage basin of Dorena Lake, a medium-sized (686 km 2) watershed located near Cottage Grove, OR. The Bohemia Mining District is on the southeastern rim of the watershed in a hydrothermally metamorphosed region associated with a set of granodiorite plutons. To characterize large-scale patterns of clay mineral distribution within the watershed, suspended sediments were collected from 43 stream locations. Samples of several metamorphosed and unaffected volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks were collected to help clarify metamorphic reaction processes. One active earthflow was also sampled. X-ray diffraction methods were used to determine the mineralogy of the clay-sized (<2 μm) fraction of the samples. Clay mineralogy varies systematically across the watershed, and the three major stream tributaries carry sediment with distinct mineralogical signatures. Discrete minerals include kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, and illite. Interstratified kaolinite-smectite and chlorite-vermiculite (CV) are also present. The active earthflow and unmetamorphosed rock samples primarily contain smectite. In contrast, metamorphosed rock samples are composed of some combination of illite, interstratified illite-smectite, CV, and chlorite. Examination of clay mineral distribution reveals the effects of hydrothermal metamorphism in the mining district on clay mineralogy, hillslope processes, and landscape development. Compared with most of the watershed, the mining district has steeper slopes and higher elevations and lacks smectite almost entirely. Analyses of metamorphosed bedrock units indicate that smectite originally present in the rocks was converted to nonexpandable clay minerals during metamorphism. Induration of bedrock and loss of expandable clays resulted in thin soils and steep topography

  14. Lithium Isotopic Fractionation in Subduction Zones: Clues From Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Lithium isotope ratios show such large variations in nature (>30 per mil), that many areas of geosciences are exploring the usefulness of this system in explaining the evolution of particular rocks. Here we show how the lithium isotope ratios change during the transformation of smectite clay minerals to illite during burial metamorphism. Such a transition may be a common feature in the shallow regions of subduction zones and may ultimately affect the Li isotope compositions of fluids contributing to arc magmatism. Lithium is a ubiquitous trace element in natural formation waters that, like B, shows large isotopic fractionation especially during interactions with clay minerals. Lithium is adsorbed in the interlayer region of expandable clay minerals but is easily exchanged. Lithium is also incorporated into the octahedral sites. The substitutions of Li in two crystallographic sites of clay minerals may complicate interpretations of bulk Li-isotope ratios. We suggest that the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of Li between fluid and clay is different in the interlayer sites of clay minerals than in the octahedral sites of clay minerals. Examination of Li contents and isotope variations in experimental reactions of smectite to illite (300C, 100MPa) shows changes with structural re-arrangement of the clay layers. The Li-isotope trend declines (from ~+6 to -13 per mil, expressed as ratios of 7/6) throughout R1-ordering of the mixed-layered illite smectite (I/S). However, the equilibrium end products of the reaction have R3-ordering and show a heavier isotope ratio (~0 per mil). This observation is very similar to the trends we observed for B-isotopes, where the interlayer B initially overprinted the tetrahedral-layer B isotope composition, but as the interlayer sites were collapsed during illitization, the equilibrium isotope composition was approached. The significant Li and B isotopic changes that occur during ordering of I/S coincides with the temperatures

  15. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    PubMed

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  16. Preliminary inventory of pre-Cenozoic clay shales and argillites of the conterminous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, J.R.; Woodward, L.A.

    1980-03-01

    Cretaceous shales of the Western Interior of the United States occur in vast quantities and in thickness greater than 150 m (500 ft). Some older Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian shale and argillites also appear to approach these thicknesses in deposits of considerable lateral extent. These older rocks commonly have a lower proportion of expandable clays and lower water contents.

  17. Determination of the thermal conductivity of opalinus clay via simulations of experiments performed at the Mont Terri underground laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mügler, C.; Filippi, M.; Montarnal, Ph.; Martinez, J.-M.; Wileveau, Y.

    2006-02-01

    Storage in deep geological formations is a potential solution for the management of high-level radioactive wastes. In this context, different types of rocks such as argillite are extensively studied. In the Mont Terri underground laboratory (Switzerland), several experiments have been performed in order to characterize the properties of the opalinus clay. One of these experiments, called HE-C, has consisted in measuring in situ the time evolution of the rock temperature submitted to a heating source. Experimental measurements have shown that the thermal behaviour of the clay was not homogeneous around the borehole where the heater was installed. Furthermore, 3D direct numerical simulations of this experiment performed with the code Cast3M have proved that it was necessary to introduce a new parameter α to model the amount of electric power lost in cables and by air convection inside the metallic tube containing the heater. A numerical simulation-optimization technique has been used to estimate the thermal longitudinal and transverse conductivities ( λ// and λ⊥) of the host rock. It consists in minimizing an objective function that is the sum of the squared differences between measured and calculated temperatures. But this method induced a lot of Cast3M simulations. In order to drastically reduce the CPU time, we used a neural network approximation built from a sample training of 1100 Cast3M simulations. It allowed us to calculate the objective function for 500 000 different values of the triplet ( λ//, λ⊥, α). Finally, we obtained the following values for the thermal conductivities on one side of the borehole, λ// = 1.84 ± 0.04 W m - 1 K - 1 and λ⊥ = 0.55 ± 0.03 W m - 1 K - 1 ; on the other side, λ// = 1.90 ± 0.07 W m - 1 K - 1 and λ⊥ = 1.07 ± 0.09 W m - 1 K - 1 . The estimated thermal conductivities λ⊥ perpendicular to the bedding plane are quite different. It is perhaps caused by the presence of an intensive fractured zone on one side of

  18. 'Wopmay' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an unusual, lumpy rock informally named 'Wopmay' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the Canadian bush pilot Wilfrid Reid 'Wop' May. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe the lumps in Wopmay may be related to cracking and alteration processes, possibly caused by exposure to water. The area between intersecting sets of cracks eroded in a way that created the lumpy appearance. Rover team members plan to drive Opportunity over to Wopmay for a closer look in coming sols. This image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 248 (Oct. 4, 2004), using its 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters.

  19. Clay mineralogy, organic carbon burial, and redox evolution in Proterozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; Johnston, David T.; Mushegian, Alexandra; Rothman, Daniel H.; Summons, Roger E.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2010-03-01

    Clay minerals formed through chemical weathering have long been implicated in the burial of organic matter (OM), but because diagenesis and metamorphism commonly obscure the signature of weathering-derived clays in Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. Here we have analyzed the mineralogy, geochemistry and total organic carbon (TOC) of organic rich shales deposited in late Archean to early Cambrian sedimentary basins. Across all samples we have quantified the contribution of 1 M and 1 Md illite polytypes, clay minerals formed by diagenetic transformation of smectite and/or kaolinite-rich weathering products. This mineralogical signal, together with corrected paleo-weathering indices, indicates that late Archean and Mesoproterozoic samples were moderately to intensely weathered. However, in late Neoproterozoic basins, 2 M1 illite/mica dominates clay mineralogy and paleo-weathering indices sharply decrease, consistent with an influx of chemically immature and relatively unweathered sediment. A late Neoproterozoic switch to micaceous clays is inconsistent with hypotheses for oxygen history that require an increased flux of weathering-derived clays (i.e., smectite or kaolinite) across the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. Compared to previous studies, our XRD data display the same variation in Schultz Ratio across the late Neoproterozoic, but we show the cause to be micaceous clay and not pedogenic clay; paleo-weathering signals cannot be recovered from bulk mineralogy without this distinction. We find little evidence to support a link between these mineralogical variations and organic carbon in our samples and conclude that modal clay mineralogy cannot by itself explain an Ediacaran increase in atmospheric oxygen driven by enhanced OM burial.

  20. Interaction of ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay: Dual porosity modelling compared to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenni, A.; Gimmi, T.; Alt-Epping, P.; Mäder, U.; Cloet, V.

    2017-06-01

    Interactions between concrete and clays are driven by the strong chemical gradients in pore water and involve mineral reactions in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, these reactions may influence safety-relevant clay properties such as swelling pressure, permeability or radionuclide retention. Interfaces between ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay show weaker, but more extensive chemical disturbance compared to a contact between low-pH cement and Opalinus Clay. As a consequence of chemical reactions porosity changes occur at cement-clay interfaces. These changes are stronger and may lead to complete pore clogging in the case of low-pH cements. The prediction of pore clogging by reactive transport simulations is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusive solute fluxes, cement clinker chemistry, and phase reaction kinetics. For instance, the consideration of anion-depleted porosity in clays substantially influences overall diffusion and pore clogging at interfaces. A new concept of dual porosity modelling approximating Donnan equilibrium is developed and applied to an ordinary Portland cement - Opalinus Clay interface. The model predictions are compared with data from the cement-clay interaction (CI) field experiment in the Mt Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), which represent 5 y of interaction. The main observations such as the decalcification of the cement at the interface, the Mg enrichment in the clay detached from the interface, and the S enrichment in the cement detached from the interface, are qualitatively predicted by the new model approach. The model results reveal multiple coupled processes that create the observed features. The quantitative agreement of modelled and measured data can be improved if uncertainties of key input parameters (tortuosities, reaction kinetics, especially of clay minerals) can be reduced.

  1. Clay minerals for advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    The author describes new and improved beneficiation techniques available to allow the production of clay minerals of exceptionally high purity. This is particularly true for kaolins and smectites. Wet processing techniques include particle size separation, high intensity magnetic separation, chemical leaching, flotation, and selective flocculation. The blending of clay minerals with other minerals provides opportunities to make special ceramic materials such as cordierite and other minerals that have very special ceramic properties including low heat expansion, high fired strength, low absorption, and other desired qualities.

  2. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  3. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  4. The Mobility of Organic Contaminants in Water and Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, P. A.; Skipper, N. T.; Mirza, Z.; Fernandez-Alonso, F.; Adams, M.; Howells, S.; Swenson, J.

    2005-12-01

    The interlayer pores of swelling clays provide an ideal environment in which to study confined fluids, and are the site of many important hydrological and petrological processes. Swelling clays, such as vermiculites, are layered minerals, widespread in soils and sedimentary rocks and are an important sink/source of many toxic organic chemicals. Knowledge of diffusion of organics through clay-rich materials is therefore highly relevant to environmental issues. Experimental studies of solvation structure in aqueous systems show that charged groups can co-ordinate the surrounding water molecules quite strongly, but their is less certainty about the effect of polar and apolar groups. There is currently interest in bulk water-alcohol systems since these are known to aggregate at the nanometer scale. Our hypothesis is that the property of the interlayer fluids in clays arises from the very subtle balance of forces between the interactions of water, cations, clay and organic species. Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) has been used to probe the dynamics of fluids trapped inside clays and reveal the first detailed picture of confined methanol, phenol and glycol in aqueous solution. The picture that emerges is that these model contaminant molecules are surprisingly mobile. Successive QENS broadening for methanol in Na-Vermiculite over 150-330K was measured. The progressive broadening of the energy signal was accompanied by decrease in amplitude with rise in temperature. This is indicative of an overall increase in rotational and translational freedom. Methanol exhibits a Fickian diffusion mechanism as an unconfined fluid, characterised by a linear dependence of broadening of the energy signal with the scattering vector. Inside Na-Vermiculite clay however, the same fluid produces a signal broadening that becomes non-linear indicating a jump activated motion to be present. Glycol and phenol are also of fundamental interest, the former as a clay-swelling inhibitor of

  5. Mineralogical evaluation and industrial applications of the Triassic clay deposits, Southern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Baccour, H. Medhioub, M.; Jamoussi, F.; Mhiri, T.; Daoud, A.

    2008-11-15

    This study deals with the mineralogical and thermal analysis of Triassic clays in the south-Eastern Tunisia (Medenine area) in order to use them in the faience ceramic. That is why the study had recourse to several quantitative and qualitative research instruments: chemical analysis, mineralogical study, thermal analyses and analyses of geotechnical traits. The data collected from these techniques show that illite and kaolinite are the major clay phases. The accessory minerals detected in powdered rock are; quartz, dolomite and hematite. Geotechnical characterization was carried out on the three representative mixtures of Triassic clay samples. Each mixture is fired at three different temperatures 850,900 and 950 deg. C. Firing characteristics (shrinkage, water absorption, and mechanical resistance to the inflection) were measured and the neomineralization processes were investigated principally by X-ray diffraction. At the end of this study, one can affirm that these clays have qualities necessary for the manufacture of faience ceramic and earthenware production.

  6. Rock-Fluid Interactions Under Stress: How Rock Microstructure Controls The Evolution of Porosity and Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring chemo-mechanical processes geophysically — e.g., fluid disposal or storage, thermal and chemical stimulation of reservoirs, or natural fluids simply entering a new system in the subsurface— raises numerous concerns because of the likelihood of fluid-rock chemical interactions and our limited ability to decipher the geophysical signature of coupled processes. One of the missing links is coupling the evolution of porosity, permeability, and velocity of rocks together with reactive transport, since rocks deform and their microstructure evolves, as a result of chemical reactions under stress. This study describes recent advances in rock-physics experiments to understand the effects of dissolution-induced compaction on acoustic velocity, porosity, and permeability. Data observation includes time-lapse experiments and imaging tracking transport and elastic properties, the rock microstructure, and the pH and chemical composition of the fluid permeating the rock. Results show that the removal of high surface area, mineral phases such as microcrystalline calcite and clay appears to be mostly responsible for dissolution-induced compaction. Nevertheless, it is the original rock microstructure and its response to stress that ultimately defines how solution-transfer and rock compaction feed back upon each other. This work has a dual aim: understanding the mechanisms underlying permanent modifications to the rock microstructure and providing a richer set of experimental information to inform the formulation of new simulations and rock modeling.

  7. Surveying Clay Mineral Diversity in the Murray Formation, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, T. F.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; hide

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary science goals of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is to investigate layered clay mineral-bearing deposits outcropping in the lower NW slopes of Aeolis Mons (Mt. Sharp) detected from orbit. Martian clay mineral-bearing layered rocks are of particular interest because they are potential markers of sedimentary deposits formed in habitable aqueous environments. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument aboard MSL has documented clay minerals in various drill samples during its traverse of Gale Crater's floor and ascent of Mt. Sharp. Previously, the high concentrations of clay minerals (approximately 20 wt.%) detected in drill powders of mudstone (Sheepbed member) at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) allowed their detailed characterization. Drill powders recovered from lacustrine mudstones of the Sheepbed member at YKB contain smectite clay minerals. Based on the position of 02l reflections in XRD patterns, which serve as an indicator of octahedral occupancy, the smectites are Fe-bearing, trioctahedral species analogous to ferrian saponites from terrestrial deposits. The smectites are thought to have been formed through a process of isochemical aqueous alteration of detrital olivine close to the time of sediment deposition under anoxic to poorly oxidizing conditions. The clay minerals are key indicators that the lake waters were benign and habitable at the time. Clay minerals were detected at other locations during MSL's traverse, including samples from the Pahrump Hills, but lower abundances and overlapping peaks from crystalline phases in XRD patterns hamper in-depth analysis.

  8. MRI profiles over very wide concentration ranges: application to swelling of a bentonite clay.

    PubMed

    Dvinskikh, S V; Szutkowski, K; Furó, I

    2009-06-01

    In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly mobile water is detected, similarly to that in biological and medical samples. However, the spin relaxation properties of water in these materials and/or low water concentration may make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Despite these limitations, one can combine MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and use independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, to obtain true images of both water and material content. We present procedures for obtaining such true density maps and demonstrate their use for studying the swelling of bentonite clay by water. A constant time imaging protocol provides 1D mapping of the clay distribution in regions with clay concentration above 10 vol%. T(1) relaxation time imaging is employed to monitor the clay content down to 10(-3) vol%. Data provided by those two approaches are in good agreement in the overlapping range of concentrations. Covering five orders of magnitude of clay concentration, swelling of sodium-exchanged bentonite clays from pre-compacted pellets into a gel phase is followed in detail.

  9. MRI profiles over very wide concentration ranges: Application to swelling of a bentonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, S. V.; Szutkowski, K.; Furó, I.

    2009-06-01

    In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly mobile water is detected, similarly to that in biological and medical samples. However, the spin relaxation properties of water in these materials and/or low water concentration may make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Despite these limitations, one can combine MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and use independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, to obtain true images of both water and material content. We present procedures for obtaining such true density maps and demonstrate their use for studying the swelling of bentonite clay by water. A constant time imaging protocol provides 1D mapping of the clay distribution in regions with clay concentration above 10 vol%. T1 relaxation time imaging is employed to monitor the clay content down to 10 -3 vol%. Data provided by those two approaches are in good agreement in the overlapping range of concentrations. Covering five orders of magnitude of clay concentration, swelling of sodium-exchanged bentonite clays from pre-compacted pellets into a gel phase is followed in detail.

  10. Gas flow modelling through clay and claystones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, E.

    2012-12-01

    Large scale gas flow experiments conducted in connection with nuclear waste disposal research have shown the dominant effect of "minor" details such as interfaces, contacts and layer boundaries. Even if the scale of the analysis is highly reduced, in search of homogeneous point-like conditions, a systematic development of preferential paths is very often reported. Small size samples become boundary value problems. Preferential paths, when their thickness is modified by the stress-strain response of the media, under the combined action of stress and fluid pressure changes, become highly conductive features for gas flow. The development of preferential paths for fluid flow has been approached in a simple manner by embedding a discontinuity feature into an otherwise continuous element which models clay or claystone matrix behavior. The joint is activated when tensile strains develop in the continuous element. Then, hydraulic properties (permeability, retention behavior) are modified by means of laws derived from the physics of flow in discontinuities. The outlined idea was incorporated into a full Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical finite element code (CODE_BRIGHT) which has a wide range of capabilities for the modeling of two-phase flow in elasto-viscoplastic porous materials. A particular aspect which required attention is the modeling of expansive and shrinkage behavior induced by suction changes. In this way, healing effects during re-saturation may be simulated. Two experimental programs on clay shale samples, performed under triaxial stress conditions will be discussed. In the first case samples of Opalinus shale were subjected to a series of gas pulse decay tests during the application of stress paths involving a particular sequence of confining stress and shearing up to failure. In the second experimental program, performed on a tertiary mudstone from the Norwegian shelf, attention was paid to the effect of bedding-induced anisotropy. Experimental results will be

  11. Clay Formation and Fabric Development in the DFDP-1 Borehole, Central Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, A.; Sutherland, R.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2015-12-01

    Samples retrieved by shallow drilling into two principal slip zones of the central Alpine Fault, New Zealand, offer an excellent opportunity to investigate clay formation, fabric development and fluid-rock interaction in an active fault zone. Here, we provide lithological and structural observations of five samples from borehole DFDP-1B, drilled during Phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011. Each sample's mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the preferred orientation of the clays was analyzed by x-ray texture goniometry (XTG). The dominant clay mineral phases are illite and chlorite/kaolinite. Newly formed smectitic clays are observed solely in the cm-thick zones of fault gouge, indicating that these mineral reactions are restricted to the fault zone. We observe that smectite forms by transformation of very fine-grained material produced by cataclasis during slip. Clay fabric intensity of both illite and chlorite reveal that relatively strong fabrics are present in the cataclasites above the principal slip zone, but that the clay minerals in the gouge have a very weak preferred orientation. The weak fabric supports the notion that clay orientation is a result of authigenic mineral growth and not of strain-induced particle reorientation. It also indicates that fluids are able to pass through the gouge, presumably along variably spaced and interconnected fracture networks or between particle boundaries. Our analysis of samples retrieved by DFDP-1 drilling and sampling demonstrates intimate association of localized shear, comminution, and rapid fluid-rock interaction. It thus contributes to a growing body of evidence that alteration processes, particularly formation of frictionally weak smectitic clay minerals, may be a significant weakening mechanism within active shallow faults.

  12. Predictive Models for Hydrodynamic Coupling Coefficients in Clay Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueutin, P.; Gonçalvès, J.; Violette, S.

    2007-12-01

    In charged and low permeability media (e.g. clay media) the classical Darcy's law does not describe accurately the water movement. A generalized Darcy's law, one of the coupled fluxes equations, has to be used. The identification of the coupling parameters, in clay-rocks, is crucial in order to estimate the water flow. Here, we will only focus on the electrochemical-hydraulic coupling coefficients : the intrinsic permeability k and the osmotic permeability kc. These hydrodynamic coupling coefficients can be estimated using two approaches: (i) theoretical models : • porosity/intrinsic permeability relationships, defined for a clay medium, are used to estimate the intrinsic permeability. • an electrochemical model is used to estimate the osmotic coupling coefficient. The electrical model, a triple layer model, is implemented to simulate the interactions between the charged surfaces of the clay minerals and the pore solution. (ii) experiments : • at the sample scale. • at the field scale. The measurement of these parameters is generally challenging either at the sample or at the field scale. For this reason, predictive models can be useful. The purpose of this study is to give reference values for the two coupling parameters under consideration here, using to the petrophysical properties of the medium. Different models to estimate these coupling coefficients are tested : (i) the intrinsic permeability is estimated with a pretrophysical model. In this model, the intrinsic permeability depends on the effective pore radius and the electrical formation factor. (ii) the osmotic coupling coefficient is estimated with the model developed by Revil and Leroy (2004). The comparison between three different models with the available data shows that these data are more closely reproduced using this model. Some reference values are provided for several type of clays as a fonction of some readily measurable or estimable parameters or variables, such as the porosity, the

  13. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has…

  14. Fluorescence and structure of methyl red-clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Kulhánková, Lenka; Malý, Petr; Capková, Pavla

    2008-04-01

    Two types of clay minerals-montmorillonite and vermiculite have been chosen as a host matrix for the intercalation of methyl red (MR) in order to investigate a possible fluorescence tuning via dye-clay interactions. The effect of silicate layer charge on the structure and fluorescence of dye-clay intercalated hybrid nanostructures was investigated using combination of molecular modeling with experiment. Structure of both intercalates MR-vermiculite (MR-VER) and MR-montmorillonite (MR-MMT) exhibits high degree of structural disorder resulting in broaden emission band. The fluorescence wavelength range of MR intercalated in clays is shifted to lower wavelengths compared with the pristine MR polycrystalline sample (800 nm). Results showed the strong dependence of fluorescence band maximum on the silicate layer charge, lambda(max) = 565 nm for MR-MMT, 645 nm for MR-VER and 800 nm for the methyl red fine crystalline powder, whereas the structural disorder in the arrangement of dye molecules affects the emission band broadening.

  15. Clays on Mars: Review of chemical and mineralogical evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, Amos; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Mafic igneous bedrock is inferred for Mars, based on spectrophotometric evidence for pyroxene (principally in optically dark areas of the globe) and the pyroxenite-peridotite petrology of shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Visible and infrared spectra of reddish-brown surface fines (which dominate Martian bright areas) indicate ferric iron and compare favorably (though not uniquely) with spectra of palagonitic soils. Laboratory studies of SNC's and Viking Lander results support a model for Martian soil based on chemical weathering of mafic rocks to produce layer structured silicates (clay minerals), salts, and iron oxides.

  16. Clays on Mars: Review of chemical and mineralogical evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, Amos; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Mafic igneous bedrock is inferred for Mars, based on spectrophotometric evidence for pyroxene (principally in optically dark areas of the globe) and the pyroxenite-peridotite petrology of shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) meteorites. Visible and infrared spectra of reddish-brown surface fines (which dominate Martian bright areas) indicate ferric iron and compare favorably (though not uniquely) with spectra of palagonitic soils. Laboratory studies of SNC's and Viking Lander results support a model for Martian soil based on chemical weathering of mafic rocks to produce layer structured silicates (clay minerals), salts, and iron oxides.

  17. Structural clay tile component behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Columber, Christopher Eugene

    1994-12-18

    The basic properties of structural clay tile walls were determined through component and composite testing of structural clay tile and mortar. The fundamental material parameters and strengths of clay tile coupons were determined through compression, tension, modulus of rupture and absorption tests. Mortar cylinders were tested in both compression and split cylinder fashion. Stress-strain curves for mortar under compression were determined. Four miniature prisms were tested in compression. These prisms were made from two 8 inches x 12 inches x 12 inches structural clay tiles, using a stack bond with a 3/4 inches mortar joint. Stress strain curves as well as material property values were obtained. These results were compared with previous tests on larger (2 feet x 4 feet) prisms. Twenty five bond wrench samples were tested. Two series of bond wrench samples were run. The first series (six tests) were fitted with LVDTs so that load deflection curves as well as flexural strengths could be obtained. A shifting of the neutral axis towards the compression face was observed. The second series were made with different mortar types: type N masonry cement mortar, type S masonry cement mortar, type N portland cement lime (PCL) mortar, and type S PCL mortar. Type S mortar and portland cement lime mortar were found to improve the bond strength.

  18. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  19. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  20. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  1. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  2. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  3. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  4. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  5. Environmental degradation of Opalinus Clay with cyclic variations in relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Katrin; Walter, Patric; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Clay shales are considered as favorable host rocks for nuclear waste repositories due to their low permeability, high sorption capacity and the potential for self-sealing. However, the favorable characteristics of the rock mass may change during tunnel excavation. Excavation is accompanied by stress redistribution and the development of an excavation damage zone. Furthermore, unloading and exposure to atmospheric conditions with a lower relative humidity (RH) causes desaturation of the rock mass close to the tunnel. This leads to shrinkage and the formation of desiccation cracks. During the open drift stage, seasonal atmospheric changes, especially RH variations, may alter the rock mass and influence the long-term crack evolution. This contribution discusses the influence of RH variation on the mechanical behavior of OPA. A series of specimens were exposed to short-term and long-term, stepwise cyclic RH variations between about 60 and 95% at constant temperature. Strains were measured using strain gauges to monitor the volumetric response during RH cycles. After each applied RH cycle, Brazilian tensile strength (BTS) tests were performed to identify whether there is a change in tensile strength due to environmental damage caused by the change in RH. Swelling and shrinkage of the specimens accompanied by irreversible volumetric expansion was observed as a consequence of the exposure to RH cycles. However, the irreversible strain was limited to the direction normal to bedding suggesting that internal damage is restricted along the bedding planes. No significant effect of cyclic RH variations on the BTS of the specimens was observed. The strength parallel to bedding remained constant over several cycles while the strength normal to bedding shows a slightly decreasing trend after 2 cycles. Furthermore, the water retention characteristics of the specimens were not altered significantly during stepwise RH cycling as the evolution of the water content was reversible

  6. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  7. Clay complexes support HDS catalyst.

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C. L.; Carrado, K.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    Hydroprocessing represents a crucial component of petroleum refining operations both in terms of environmental and economic considerations. Regulations concerning maximum amount of sulfur content of gasoline and emissions of sulfur-oxide compounds upon combustion are becoming more and more stringent. One 1994-2000 focus of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been the development of catalysts for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Typical HDS catalysts are comprised of Co-Mo sulfides or Ni-Mo sulfides on an alumina support. Modification of the pore structure of the support has generated great attention among researchers. Most desulfurization test reactions have used dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the model compound to test various configurations of support material with Co-Mo-S and Ni-Mo-S catalysts. In this testing, the desired product would be biphenyl and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). A competing reaction creates cyclohexylbenzene by saturating one aromatic ring prior to desulfurization. Ring saturation requires more costly hydrogen and is not desirable. Fortunately, a more effective catalyst for adding hydrogen at the sulfur site with hydrogenating the aromatic rings has been found. However, this has only been tested on DBT. HDS uses various types of catalysts to add hydrogen to reduce unwanted sulfur compounds. Typically this requires expensive, high-pressure, high-temperature equipment to produce the environmentally friendly low-sulfur fuels. ANL scientists identified several new desulfurization catalysts with improved HDS activity and selectivity. From these new catalysts, it may be possible to achieve HDS processing at lower temperature and pressure. The catalysts used for HDS at ANL are various clay complexes. Natural clays have a history of use in the hydroprocessing industry since they are abundant and inexpensive. ANL's approach is to create synthetic organo-clay complexes (SOCC). An advantage of SOCCs is that the pore size and distribution can be controlled by

  8. Cryosalt Formation in Delaminated Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    -montmorillonite at hosting hydrohalite, the results of this study can be used to suggest that delaminated Na-montmorillonite sheets encapsulate the salt solutions and by preventing sublimation of water, promotes crystallization of hydrohalite. As delamination is not possible in Ca-montmorillonite, water more readily sublimated from the system, leaving behind a dry Ca-montmorillonite/NaCl assemblage. As such, this work identified processes through which clay minerals can affect the formation of cryosalts that are not only of importance to terrestrial environments of the cryosphere but also to atmospheric processes involving dust aerosols. [1] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), Scientific Reports. 6, 32136. [2] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 7, 2849-2855. [3] Wagner, R., Möhler O., Schnaiter, M. (2012), 33, 8557-8571.

  9. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  10. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  11. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  12. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  13. Juxtaposition of different fault rocks into fault cores in sandstone-dominated formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philit, Sven; Soliva, Roger; Ballas, Grégory; Chemenda, Alexandre; Castilla, Raymi

    2017-04-01

    We analyze normal faults in porous quartz sandstones at two sites to characterize the juxtaposition of three well-known processes along faults: cataclasis, brecciation and smearing. At the first study site (Jurassic sandstone in Utah, USA), deformation structures formed during a single tectonic episode, displacing sandstones including 10-60 cm thick layers of silt and clay from 2 to 6 m. We observe that cataclastic deformation takes place and thickens along the sandstone/sandstone juxtaposition producing clusters of deformation bands up to tens of centimeters in thickness. With further displacement, the cluster is shifted against the developing silt/clay smear that provides reduced strength. A displacement of 2 meters is sufficient to create a major slip-surface along the clusters of deformation bands. The presence of thin layers of silt/clay therefore induces a fault core made of two adjacent types of fault rocks, namely cataclastic deformation and smear. At the second study site (Permian sandstone in Scotland, UK), two overprinting episodes of faulting occurred within an evolving sandstone lithology. The studied fault is of seismic scale and accommodates a total displacement of 20 to 50 m. Structural analysis based on macroscopic and microscopic observations allows showing a first stage of cataclastic deformation occurring in unlithified sandstone. A second subsequent stage of faulting corresponds to brecciation formed in hardened material (cemented sandstone and cataclastic structure). The breccia currently comprises over 40% of oxides in its composition of meteoric income. In this case, the diagenetic evolution of the sandstone permitted the juxtaposition of these two types of fault rocks. The process of cataclasis causes a porosity reduction of 32 to >90% of the initial porosity and a permeability reduction of 2 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to the host rock. Silts and clays do not undergo significant porosity and permeability reduction through smearing

  14. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  15. Log evaluation of oil-bearing igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Khatchikian, A.

    1983-12-01

    The evaluation of porosity, water saturation and clay content of oilbearing igneous rocks with well logs is difficult due to the mineralogical complexity of this type of rocks. The log responses to rhyolite and rhyolite tuff; andesite, dacite and zeolite tuff; diabase and basalt have been studied from examples in western Argentina and compared with values observed in other countries. Several field examples show how these log responses can be used in a complex lithology program to make a complete evaluation.

  16. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  18. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  19. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  20. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  1. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  2. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  3. Clastic-hosted stratiform, vein/breccia and disseminated Zn-Pb-Ag deposits of the northwestern Brooks Range, AK: Are they different expressions of dewatering of the same source basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.M. ); Werdon, M.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Sphalerite and galena, with significant silver occur in 3 distinct types of mineralization hosted in Upper Devonian and Carboniferous clastic