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Sample records for clay particle orientation

  1. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  2. A Study on the Effect of Clay Particle Orientation on Diffusion in Compacted Bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.

    2002-02-26

    In this study, the effect of the orientation of clay particles on diffusion in compacted bentonite, which is regarded to be quite important as a candidate buffer material in safety assessment for a geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was experimentally discussed by investigating effective diffusion coefficients (De) for tritiated water (HTO), which is non-sorptive onto bentonite. The diffusion experiments were carried out for 2 kinds of smectite contents of Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1{reg_sign} (content of Na-smectite, 46-49wt%) and Kunipia-F{reg_sign} (content of Na-smectite, > 99wt%) at dry densities of 1.0 and 1.5 Mg/m3 by a through-diffusion method. The through-diffusion experiments were carried out for the same direction as compacted direction of bentonite and perpendicular direction to compacted direction. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations for the cross section of bentonite in the axial and perpendicular directions to compacted direction of bentonite were also carried out at dry densities of 1.0, 1.6, and 2.0 Mg/m3. Although De values for Kunigel-V1{reg_sign} were approximately the same for both diffusion directions to compacted direction over the densities, and no anisotropy in De was found, De values in the perpendicular direction to compacted direction for Kunipia-F{reg_sign} were clearly higher than those in the same direction as compacted direction. In the SEM observations, no significant orientation of clay particles was found for Kunigel-V1{reg_sign} over the densities, while the orientation of clay particles was clearly found for Kunipia-F{reg_sign}, and the degree of the orientation of clay particles became significant with an increase in dry density of bentonite. This tendency is in good agreement with that for De values obtained, indicating that smectite content in bentonite affects the orientation property of clay particles, and that the orientated clay particles affect diffusion pathway.

  3. X-ray Scattering Measurements of Particle Orientation in a Sheared Polymer/Clay Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Dougherty, Leah; Mobuchon, Christoph; Carreau, Pierre J.; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-01-20

    We report steady and transient measurements of particle orientation in a clay dispersion subjected to shear flow. An organically modified clay is dispersed in a Newtonian polymer matrix at a volume fraction of 0.02, using methods previously reported by Mobuchon et al. (Rheol Acta 46: 1045, 2007). In accord with prior studies, mechanical rheometry shows yield stress-like behavior in steady shear, while time dependent growth of modulus is observed following flow cessation. Measurements of flow-induced orientation in the flow-gradient plane of simple shear flow using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) are reported. Both SAXS and WAXS reveal increasing particle orientation as shear rate is increased. Partial relaxation of nanoparticle orientation upon flow cessation is well correlated with time-dependent changes in complex modulus. SAXS and WAXS data provide qualitatively similar results; however, some quantitative differences are attributed to differences in the length scales probed by these techniques.

  4. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  5. Shear-induced orientation in model polymer-clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, Laura; Burghardt, Wesley; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2003-03-01

    We report studies of the structural dynamics in model polymer/clay inorganic nanocomposites. Organically modified montmorillonite and fluorohectorite are dispersed in relatively low viscosity PDMS-PDPS copolymer, leading to rheologically complex materials that may be conveniently studied at room temperature. We utilize an annular cone and plate x-ray shear cell, in conjunction with synchrotron x-ray scattering to enable real-time measurements of the average degree and direction of platelet orientation within the flow-gradient (1-2) plane in shear flow. We characterize orientation in steady unidirectional shear flow, upon flow reversal and cessation, and during large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Average platelet orientation increases modestly with increasing shear rate, while the average platelet orientation moves somewhat closer to the flow direction. In all samples studied, orientation does not relax significantly upon cessation of shear. Upon flow reversal, moderately concentrated montmorillonite dispersions exhibit oscillations in anisotropy and orientation angle that scale with shear strain, presumably associated with the tumbling motion of the plate-like clay particles. These oscillations are suppressed at higher particle concentrations.

  6. Magnetic orientation of nontronite clay in aqueous dispersions and its effect on water diffusion.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Christoffer; Nordstierna, Lars; Nordin, Matias; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Nydén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion rate of water in dilute clay dispersions depends on particle concentration, size, shape, aggregation and water-particle interactions. As nontronite clay particles magnetically align parallel to the magnetic field, directional self-diffusion anisotropy can be created within such dispersion. Here we study water diffusion in exfoliated nontronite clay dispersions by diffusion NMR and time-dependant 1H-NMR-imaging profiles. The dispersion clay concentration was varied between 0.3 and 0.7 vol%. After magnetic alignment of the clay particles in these dispersions a maximum difference of 20% was measured between the parallel and perpendicular self-diffusion coefficients in the dispersion with 0.7 vol% clay. A method was developed to measure water diffusion within the dispersion in the absence of a magnetic field (random clay orientation) as this is not possible with standard diffusion NMR. However, no significant difference in self-diffusion coefficient between random and aligned dispersions could be observed.

  7. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  8. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  10. Sedimentation of athermal particles in clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clotet, Xavier; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-03-01

    We discuss sedimentation of athermal particles in dense clay suspensions which appear liquid-like to glass-like. These studies are motivated by the physics important to a diverse range of problems including remediation of oil sands after the extraction of hydrocarbons, and formation of filter cakes in bore wells. We approach this problem by first considering collective sedimentation of athermal spherical particles in a viscous liquid in quasi-two dimensional and three dimensional containers. We examine the system using optical and x-ray tomography techniques which gives particle level information besides global information on the evolution of the volume fraction. Unlike sediments in the dilute limit - which can be modeled as isolated particles that sediment with a constant velocity and slow down exponentially as they approach the bottom of the container - we find interaction between the particles through the viscous fluids leads to qualitatively differences. We find significant avalanching behavior and cooperative motion as the grains collectively settle, and non-exponential increase in settling time. We discuss the effect of stirring caused by the sedimenting particles on their viscosity and consequently the sedimentation rates as a function of particle concentration. Supported by Petroleum Research Fund Grant PRF # 54045-ND9.

  11. Shear-Induced Orientation in Well-Exfoliated Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, Laura M.C.; Torkelson, John M.; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-03-26

    We report measurements of shear-induced particle orientation in highly exfoliated polystyrene/clay nanocomposites. Samples were prepared using an in situ polymerization technique, in which native clay is organically modified with a cationic surfactant that incorporates a polymerizable vinylbenzyl moiety. Controlled radical polymerization was used during the synthesis to limit the molecular weight and polydispersity of the nanocomposite polymer matrix. Flow-induced orientation was measured in the flow-gradient plane of shear flow using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering. Despite the small rotational diffusivity expected for the clay particles, significant particle orientation was only observed at relatively high rates in steady shear or at high frequencies in large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Measurements of orientation upon flow cessation provided direct evidence of a structural relaxation process that was orders of magnitude faster than estimates of rotational Brownian motion. It is suggested that this fast relaxation arises from either relaxation of shear-induced distortion of partially flexible exfoliated clay sheets in a highly entangled nanoparticle network or coupling of particle and polymer dynamics.

  12. Release of clay particles from an unconsolidated clay-sand core: experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauré, Marie-Hélène; Sardin, Michel; Vitorge, Pierre

    1997-04-01

    This work identifies the main phenomena that control the peptisation and transport of clay particles in a sand core. Clay can be dispersed into small particles in an aqueous solution of low ionic strength. This property is used to generate clay particles with NaCl concentration varying from 0.5 M to 0.015 M. For this purpose, a chromatographic column is initially packed with a 5% clay-sand mixture. The monitored decrease of the NaCl concentration of the feed solution allows the control of transport of the particles without plugging the porous medium. In this condition it is shown that in a column of a given length, the amount of clay particles released into solution and available to transport, depend only on NaCl concentration. Some clay particles are available to migration when the NaCl concentration of the feed concentration is between 0.16 M and 0.05 M (first domain) or between 0.035 M and 0.019 M (second domain). An empirical function, Pd([NaCl]), accounts for this particle generation. Transport is mainly dependent on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the porous medium that vary during the elution, probably owing to the particle motion inside the column. A phenomenological modelling is derived from these results, coupling the particle generation term, Pd([NaCl]), with an adapted nonequilibrium transport solute model. Similarly to the solute, particles were attributed a characteristic time of mass transfer between mobile and immobile water zones. This is sufficient to take into account the kinetic limitations of particles transport. The values of the parameters are determined by independent experiments. Finally, breakthrough curves of clay particles are predicted when a column of a given length, is flushed by a salinity gradient of NaCl in various conditions.

  13. Interaction of polymer with discotic clay particles.

    SciTech Connect

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-08-04

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labeling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains in the dilute regime. Attempts have also been made to characterize the structure in the concentrated regime of laponite with polymer.

  14. Fractal dimensions of flocs between clay particles and HAB organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Yu, Zhiming; Cao, Xihua; Song, Xiuxian

    2011-05-01

    The impact of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on public health and related economics have been increasing in many coastal regions of the world. Sedimentation of algal cells through flocculation with clay particles is a promising strategy for controlling HABs. Previous studies found that removal efficiency (RE) was influenced by many factors, including clay type and concentration, algal growth stage, and physiological aspects of HAB cells. To estimate the effect of morphological characteristics of the aggregates on HAB cell removal, fractal dimensions were measured and the RE of three species of HAB organism, Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium tamarense, and Skeletonema costatum, by original clay and modified clay, was determined. For all HAB species, the modified clay had a higher RE than original clay. For the original clay, the two-dimensional fractal dimension ( D 2) was 1.92 and three-dimensional fractal dimension ( D 3) 2.81, while for the modified clay, D 2 was 1.84 and D 3 was 2.50. The addition of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) lead to a decrease of the repulsive barrier between clay particles, and resulted in lower D 2 and D 3. Due to the decrease of D 3, and the increase of the effective sticking coefficient, the flocculation rate between modified clay particles and HAB organisms increased, and thus resulted in a high RE. The fractal dimensions of flocs differed in HAB species with different cell morphologies. For example, Alexandrium tamarense cells are ellipsoidal, and the D 3 and D 2 of flocs were the highest, while for Skeletonema costatum, which has filamentous cells, the D 3 and D 2 of flocs were the lowest.

  15. Controlling particle orientation during forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Shawn Michael

    Particle orientation is a microstructural feature that can significantly impact the properties of a fired ceramic. For example, Patwardhan and Cannon showed that particle orientation occurring during tape casting affects dimensional control due to the influence that particle shape has on sintering kinetics. The particle orientation was caused by the complex shear state that occurs during tape casting. This dissertation examined the relationship between shear state and the resulting particle orientation and its influence on selected properties of the body. The first step towards this was the determination of the shear state during tape casting. Based on measured geometries and rheologies, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed which predicted shear rates throughout the geometry. The simulations predicted that for slurries exhibiting power-law shear thinning behavior, shear rate is higher near the doctor blade and the slurry is not only sheared between the doctor blade and substrate but also into the slurry reservoir and behind the doctor blade. Tape casting was performed on the compositions that were characterized for the determination of shear state. Casting parameters such as doctor blade gap and casting velocity were varied to alter the shear profile in the system. These samples were then analyzed to determine the particle orientation and texture in various regions throughout the tapes. An optical texture measurement technique based on the birefringence of green bodies was developed to address the need for highly sensitive measurements capable of detecting small variations in green texture. Results given by this technique were found to be consistent with measurements performed by XRD. Experimental samples were analyzed and localized texture measurements were found to follow shear profiles predicted by the CFD simulations. Elastic moduli of fired samples exhibiting a range of textures were measured to reveal effects of particle orientation

  16. Orientation of charged clay nanotubes in evaporating droplet meniscus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yafei; Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Lvov, Yuri

    2015-02-15

    During drying, an aqueous suspension of strongly charged halloysite clay nanotubes concentrates at the edge of the droplet ("coffee-ring" effect) which provides alignment of the tubes along the liquid-substrate contact line. First, the surface charge of the nanotubes was enhanced by polyanion adsorption inside of the lumen to compensate for the internal positive charges. This increased the magnitude of the ξ-potential of the tubes from -36 to -81 mV and stabilized the colloids. Then, colloidal halloysite was dropped onto the substrate, dried at 65 °C and after a concentration of ∼0.05 mg mL(-1) was reached, the alignment of nanotubes occurred starting from the droplet edges. The process was described with Onsager's theory, in which longer nanorods, which have higher surface charge, give better ordering after a critical concentration is reached. This study indicates a new application of halloysite clay nanotubes in polymeric composites with anisotropic properties, microchannel orientation, and production of coatings with aligned nanotubes.

  17. Magnetorheological behavior of magnetite covered clay particles in aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Gonzalez, C.; Lopez-Lopez, M. T.; Duran, J. D. G.

    2012-08-01

    Montmorillonite clay particles coated with magnetite nanoparticles suspended in aqueous media behave as magnetorheological fluids with enhanced stability as compared to conventional ones. In this work, the study of the magnetorheological behavior of these suspensions of magnetite-clay composite particles has been carried out. For this purpose, both steady and dynamic rheological measurements were carried out in the absence and in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the first kind of experiments, the rheograms of the suspensions (shear stress versus shear rate plot) are analyzed as a function of the strength of the magnetic field applied. In the second one, oscillatory stresses are applied to the system, and the storage modulus is studied as a function of the external magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic field, the suspensions develop a weak yield stress due to the aggregation of the magnetite covered clay particles. In the presence of magnetic field, the yield stress is strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength inside the samples, demonstrating that the suspensions experience a magnetorheological effect, moderate when the magnetic field strength is weak and stronger for values of magnetic field higher than 150-200 kA/m. Actually, the most intriguing result is the change of the trend in the dependence of the yield stress with the field. This dependence is approximately linear with the field for strength values smaller than 150-200 kA/m. On the other hand, for higher values, the yield stress increases with magnetic field following a power law with exponent 4.5.The results are interpreted by means of a model that relates the structure of the particles in the suspensions to the magnetic field applied and using the interaction energy between particles calculated by the extended DLVO theory to include magnetic interaction.

  18. Orientation specific deposition of mesoporous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellman, Tomas; Bodén, Niklas; Wennerström, Hâkan; Edler, Karen J.; Alfredsson, Viveka

    2014-11-01

    We present a protocol for a facile orientation specific deposition of plate-like mesoporous SBA-15 silica particles onto a surface (mesopores oriented normal to surface). A drop of an aqueous dispersion of particles is placed on the surface and water vaporizes under controlled relative humidity. Three requirements are essential for uniform coverage: particle dispersion should not contain aggregates, a weak attraction between particles and surface is needed, and evaporation rate should be low. Aggregates are removed by stirring/sonication. Weak attraction is realized by introducing cationic groups to the surface. Insight into the mechanisms of the so-called coffee stain effect is also provided.

  19. Modeling the arrangement of particles in natural swelling-clay porous media using three-dimensional packing of elliptic disks.

    PubMed

    Ferrage, Eric; Hubert, Fabien; Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Swelling clay minerals play a key role in the control of water and pollutant migration in natural media such as soils. Moreover, swelling clay particles' orientational properties in porous media have significant implications for the directional dependence of fluid transfer. Herein we investigate the ability to mimic the organization of particles in natural swelling-clay porous media using a three-dimensional sequential particle deposition procedure [D. Coelho, J.-F. Thovert, and P. M. Adler, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1959 (1997)]. The algorithm considered is first used to simulate disk packings. Porosities of disk packings fall onto a single master curve when plotted against the orientational scalar order parameter value. This relation is used to validate the algorithm used in comparison with existing ones. The ellipticity degree of the particles is shown to have a negligible effect on the packing porosity for ratios ℓ(a)/ℓ(b) less than 1.5, whereas a significant increase in porosity is obtained for higher values. The effect of the distribution of the geometrical parameters (size, aspect ratio, and ellipticity degree) of particles on the final packing properties is also investigated. Finally, the algorithm is used to simulate particle packings for three size fractions of natural swelling-clay mineral powders. Calculated data regarding the distribution of the geometrical parameters and orientation of particles in porous media are successfully compared with experimental data obtained for the same samples. The results indicate that the obtained virtual porous media can be considered representative of natural samples and can be used to extract properties difficult to obtain experimentally, such as the anisotropic features of pore and solid phases in a system.

  20. Modeling the arrangement of particles in natural swelling-clay porous media using three-dimensional packing of elliptic disks.

    PubMed

    Ferrage, Eric; Hubert, Fabien; Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Swelling clay minerals play a key role in the control of water and pollutant migration in natural media such as soils. Moreover, swelling clay particles' orientational properties in porous media have significant implications for the directional dependence of fluid transfer. Herein we investigate the ability to mimic the organization of particles in natural swelling-clay porous media using a three-dimensional sequential particle deposition procedure [D. Coelho, J.-F. Thovert, and P. M. Adler, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1959 (1997)]. The algorithm considered is first used to simulate disk packings. Porosities of disk packings fall onto a single master curve when plotted against the orientational scalar order parameter value. This relation is used to validate the algorithm used in comparison with existing ones. The ellipticity degree of the particles is shown to have a negligible effect on the packing porosity for ratios ℓ(a)/ℓ(b) less than 1.5, whereas a significant increase in porosity is obtained for higher values. The effect of the distribution of the geometrical parameters (size, aspect ratio, and ellipticity degree) of particles on the final packing properties is also investigated. Finally, the algorithm is used to simulate particle packings for three size fractions of natural swelling-clay mineral powders. Calculated data regarding the distribution of the geometrical parameters and orientation of particles in porous media are successfully compared with experimental data obtained for the same samples. The results indicate that the obtained virtual porous media can be considered representative of natural samples and can be used to extract properties difficult to obtain experimentally, such as the anisotropic features of pore and solid phases in a system. PMID:26172708

  1. Modeling the arrangement of particles in natural swelling-clay porous media using three-dimensional packing of elliptic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrage, Eric; Hubert, Fabien; Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Michot, Laurent J.; Levitz, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Swelling clay minerals play a key role in the control of water and pollutant migration in natural media such as soils. Moreover, swelling clay particles' orientational properties in porous media have significant implications for the directional dependence of fluid transfer. Herein we investigate the ability to mimic the organization of particles in natural swelling-clay porous media using a three-dimensional sequential particle deposition procedure [D. Coelho, J.-F. Thovert, and P. M. Adler, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1959 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevE.55.1959]. The algorithm considered is first used to simulate disk packings. Porosities of disk packings fall onto a single master curve when plotted against the orientational scalar order parameter value. This relation is used to validate the algorithm used in comparison with existing ones. The ellipticity degree of the particles is shown to have a negligible effect on the packing porosity for ratios ℓa/ℓb less than 1.5, whereas a significant increase in porosity is obtained for higher values. The effect of the distribution of the geometrical parameters (size, aspect ratio, and ellipticity degree) of particles on the final packing properties is also investigated. Finally, the algorithm is used to simulate particle packings for three size fractions of natural swelling-clay mineral powders. Calculated data regarding the distribution of the geometrical parameters and orientation of particles in porous media are successfully compared with experimental data obtained for the same samples. The results indicate that the obtained virtual porous media can be considered representative of natural samples and can be used to extract properties difficult to obtain experimentally, such as the anisotropic features of pore and solid phases in a system.

  2. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence. PMID:19428022

  3. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence.

  4. Modeling film formation of polymer-clay nanocomposite particles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan J; Gundabala, Venkata R; Routh, Alexander F

    2010-03-16

    Polymer films may be formed by drying aqueous suspensions of colloidal polymer particles (latexes) on a substrate. Higher-performance films may be obtained by using nanocomposite particles in the latexes. In particular, polymer-clay nanocomposites show good potential in producing stiff, optically transparent, scratch-resistant coatings. The final film must be continuous (i.e., crack-free). This work predicts the minimum temperature, relative to the glass-transition temperature, at which a given suspension forms a crack-free nanocomposite film. The model extends a previous model for film formation with inclusion-free latexes (Routh, A. F.; Russel, W. B. Langmuir 1999, 15, 7762-7773). The inclusions are modeled as rigid cylinders, and the polymer is modeled as linearly viscoelastic. The major term arising in the extended model is the interfacial shear stress between the polymer and the inclusions. Film formation slows as the shear stress increases, and this effect is proportional to the magnitude of the stress, the inclusion volume fraction, and the inclusion aspect ratio.

  5. Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with glass beads: Gravity effects.

    PubMed

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2016-03-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined.

  6. Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with glass beads: Gravity effects.

    PubMed

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2016-03-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined. PMID:26747984

  7. Experimental investigation of virus and clay particles cotransport in partially saturated columns packed with glass beads.

    PubMed

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-02-15

    Suspended clay particles in groundwater can play a significant role as carriers of viruses, because, depending on the physicochemical conditions, clay particles may facilitate or hinder the mobility of viruses. This experimental study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in both saturated and partially saturated columns packed with glass beads, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid filtration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto glass beads. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of suspended virus and clay-virus particles was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer. Under unsaturated conditions both clay particles facilitated the transport of ΦX174, while hindered the transport of MS2. Moreover, the surface properties of viruses, clays and glass beads were employed for the construction of classical DLVO and capillary potential energy profiles, and the results suggested that capillary forces play a significant role on colloid retention. It was estimated that the capillary potential energy of MS2 is lower than that of ΦX174, and the capillary potential energy of KGa-1b is lower than that of STx-1b, assuming that the protrusion distance through the water film is the same for each pair of particles. Moreover, the capillary potential energy is several orders of

  8. Experimental investigation of viruses and clay particles cotransport in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2014-05-01

    Suspended clay particles in groundwater can play a significant role as carriers of viruses, because, depending on the physicochemical conditions, clay particles may facilitate or hinder the mobility of viruses. This study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in partially saturated columns packed with glass beads, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid ?ltration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto glass beads. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of both suspended and attached onto suspended clay-particles viruses was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer.

  9. Clay preference and particle transport behavior of Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae): a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg

    2014-12-01

    Although preference and utilization of clay have been studied in many higher termites, little attention has been paid to lower termites, especially subterranean termites. The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, can modify its habitat by using clay to fill tree cavities. Here, the biological significance of clay on C. formosanus was investigated. Choice tests showed that significantly more termites aggregated in chambers where clay blocks were provided, regardless of colony group, observation period, or nutritional condition (fed or starved). No-choice tests showed that clay had no observable effect on survivorship, live or dry biomass, water content, and tunneling activity after 33-35 d. However, clay appeared to significantly decrease filter paper consumption (dry weight loss). Active particle (sand, paper, and clay) transport behavior was observed in both choice and no-choice tests. When present, clay was preferentially spread on the substrate, attached to the smooth surfaces of the containers, and used to line sand tunnels. Mechanisms and potential application of clay attraction are discussed.

  10. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical report, May 9, 1991--August 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  11. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  12. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions.

  13. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions. PMID:24911544

  14. Phase diagrams of Wyoming Na-montmorillonite clay. Influence of particle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Michot, Laurent J; Bihannic, Isabelle; Porsch, Katharina; Maddi, Solange; Baravian, Christophe; Mougel, Julien; Levitz, Pierre

    2004-12-01

    Natural Na-Wyoming montmorillonite was size fractionated by successive centrifugation. Polydisperse particles with average sizes of 400, 290, and 75 nm were then obtained. As the structural charge of the particles belonging to three fractions (determined by cationic exchange capacity measurements) is the same, such a procedure allows studying the effect of particle anisotropy on the colloidal phase behavior of swelling clay particles. Osmotic stress experiments were carried out at different ionic strengths. The osmotic pressure curves display a plateau whose beginning systematically coincides with the sol/gel transition determined by oscillatory stress measurements. The concentration corresponding to the sol/gel transition increases linearly with particle anisotropy, which shows that the sol/gel transition is not directly related to an isotropic/nematic transition of individual clay particles. Indeed, a reverse evolution should be observed for an I/N transition involving the individual clay particles. Still, when observed between crossed polarizer and analyzer, the gel samples exhibit permanent birefringent textures, whereas in the "sol" region, transient birefringence is observed when the samples are sheared. This suggests that interacting clay particles are amenable to generate, at rest and/or under shear, large anisotropic particle associations. PMID:15568830

  15. Cotransport of viruses and clay particles in water saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Syngouna, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in both saturated and partially saturated columns packed with glass beads, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦΧ174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid filtration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto glass beads. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of suspended virus and clay-virus particles was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer. Under unsaturated conditions both clay particles hindered the transport of the two viruses considered in this work. Moreover, the surface properties of viruses, clays and glass beads were employed for the construction of classical DLVO and capillary potential energy profiles, and the results suggested that capillary forces play a significant role on colloid retention. It was estimated that the capillary potential energy of MS2 is lower than that of ΦΧ174, and the capillary potential energy ofKGa-1b is lower than that of STx-1b, assuming that the protrusion distance through the water filmis the same for each pair of particles. Moreover, the capillary potential energy is several orders of magnitude greater than the DLVO energy potential. Figure 1Schematic illustration of the various concentrations involved in the cotransport experiments for: (a) saturated and (b) unsaturated porous media.

  16. Synthesis of polymer latex particles decorated with organically-modified laponite clay platelets via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Norma Negrete; Persoz, Stéphanie; Putaux, Jean-Luc; David, Laurent; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2006-02-01

    We report a new route to colloidal nanocomposites consisting of polymer latex particles covered with Laponite clay nanoplatelets. These composite particles are prepared by seeded emulsion (co)polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate from Laponite clay suspensions previously functionalized by ion exchange using either a free radical initiator: 2,2-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) hydrochloride (AIBA) or a cationic vinyl monomer: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MADQUAT). The successful intercalation of the cationic reactive molecules was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, 13C solid-state NMR and WAXD. The organically-modified clays were dispersed into water with the help of tetrasodium pyrophosphate and an anionic surfactant. stable latexes, produced under different experimental conditions, were successfully obtained from the clay suspensions. Cryo-TEM images of the resulting latexes showed spherical composite particles with diameters in the 50-250 nm range with clay sheets located on their surface. This paper reports on the effect of the processing conditions on the particle morphology and latex stability, and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite particles.

  17. Estimating vertical and lateral pressures in periodically structured montmorillonite clay particles.

    PubMed

    Narsilio, Guillermo A; Smith, David W; Pivonka, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Given a montmorillonitic clay soil at high porosity and saturated by monovalent counterions, we investigate the particle level responses of the clay to different external loadings. As analytical solutions are not possible for complex arrangements of particles, we employ computational micromechanical models (based on the solution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations) using the finite element method, to estimate counterion and electrical potential distributions for particles at various angles and distances from one another. We then calculate the disjoining pressures using the Van't Hoff relation and Maxwell stress tensor. As the distance between the clay particles decreases and double-layers overlap, the concentration of counterions in the micropores among clay particles increases. This increase lowers the chemical potential of the pore fluid and creates a chemical potential gradient in the solvent that generates the socalled 'disjoining' or 'osmotic' pressure. Because of this disjoining pressure, particles do not need to contact one another in order to carry an 'effective stress'. This work may lead towards theoretical predictions of the macroscopic load deformation response of montmorillonitic soils based on micromechanical modelling of particles. PMID:20209240

  18. Quasi-hydrodynamic lubrication effect of clay particles on sand grain erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, K. M.; Thieke, R. J.; Mehta, A. J.

    2006-03-01

    Minor changes in the mass physical properties of submerged sand beds can have significant consequences relative to bed stability against erosion. To examine the effect of small amounts of clay-sized particles in bed pore water on the critical shear stress τc for the erosion of sand grains, flume experiments were carried out on the erosion of quartz sand beds impregnated with clay particles. Starting with no clay, as the clay mass fraction ψ was increased, τc was found to decrease below the value for pure sand τco at ψ = ψm, then reverted to τco at ψ = ψr and continued to increase above τco as ψ was increased further. Post-experimental analysis suggests that ψr is the pore space-filling fine sediment fraction above which sand erosion is significantly influenced by clay. In the range of ψ ≥ ψm, slider-bearing type lubrication due to the viscosity of the clay-laden interstitial fluid appears to govern the dependence of τc on ψ, mimicking Petroff's law of thick-film lubrication. When ψ < ψm, as ψ decreases lubrication is increasingly curtailed by grain asperities, and τc reverts ultimately to τco at ψ = 0. An equation relating τc to ψ is proposed in analogy with the quasi-hydrodynamic Stribeck function for lubrication. The observed effect of clay particles appears to be significant enough to require its consideration in coastal and estuarine sediment transport modeling. It may also be a factor in the estimation of bed stability when biological activity in the benthic boundary layer introduces fine particles in clean sand beds.

  19. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  20. Surface characteristics and photoactivity of silver-modified palygorskite clays coated with nanosized titanium dioxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Difang . E-mail: zdf6910@163.com; Zhou Jie; Liu Ning

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a study in which nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) crystal particles were coated onto the surface of palygorskite fibrous clay which had been modified by silver ions using titanium tetrachloride as a precursor. Coated TiO{sub 2} particles with the anatase structure were formed after calcining at 400 deg. C for 2 h in air. Various analytical techniques were used to characterize the surface properties of titanium dioxide particles on the palygorskite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that TiO{sub 2} particles were supported on the surface of the palygorskite clays and their size was in the range of 3-6 nm. The titanium oxide coatings were found to be very active for the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue.

  1. Influence of clay particles on microfluidic-based preparation of hydrogel composite microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Joung Sook

    2016-05-01

    For the successful fabrication of a hydrogel composite microsphere, this study aimed to investigate the influence of clay particles on microsphere formation in a microfluidic device which has flow focusing and a 4.5:1 contraction channel. A poly alginic acid solution (2.0 wt.%) with clay particles was used as the dispersed phase to generate drops in an oil medium, which then merged with drops of a CaCl2 solution for gelation. Drop generations were observed with different flow rates and particles types. When the flow rate increased, drop generation was enhanced and drop size decreased by the build-up of more favorable hydrodynamic flow conditions to detach the droplets. The addition of a small amount of particles insignificantly changed the drop generation behavior even though it reduced interfacial tension and increased the viscosity of the solution. Instead, clays particles significantly affected hydro-gelation depending on the hydrophobicity of particles, which produced further heterogeneity in the shape and size of microsphere.

  2. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production: A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Teklay, Abraham; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Bøjer, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO{sub 2} intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model is developed, which fully addresses the conversion process of raw kaolinite particles suspended in hot gas. Particles are discretized into a number of spherical cells, on each of which mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations are numerically solved by using the finite volume method. Reactions considered in the model include dehydration, dehydroxylation and various phase transformations. Thermogravimetric analysis is used to determine reaction kinetic data required as inputs in the model and to validate the model. Finally, model-based sensitivity analysis is performed, from which quantitative guidelines for calcination condition optimization are derived. - Highlights: • A general 1D mathematical model for single clay particle calcination is developed. • The model fully addresses momentum, heat and mass transfer and all the reactions. • Experiments are performed to determine kinetic data of the key reactions. • The model is verified by different means, including experimental results. • Sensitivity study is done to address key assumptions and derive useful guidelines.

  3. Estimating Particle-Size Distribution from Sand, Silt, and Clay Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaee, Maryam; Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Liaghat, Abdolmajid

    2010-05-01

    Particle-size distribution (PSD) is one of the soil properties which not only is used in estimation of soil water retention curve as well as unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, but also is applied in the most hydrological studies. Since the measurement of particle-size distribution, soil water retention curve and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is time consuming and expensive especially in large scale hydrological investigations, in this study, a method was developed based upon the least squares optimization approach to estimate cumulative particle-size distribution from sand, silt and clay content. A revised form of van Genuchten retention model which has been previously applied to represent cumulative particle-size distribution was fitted to the measured three points of PSD, and its two unknown parameters such as N and Dg were determined. For this purpose, we used curve fitting toolbox of MATLAB software. Then estimated N and Dg values were applied to estimate cumulative particle mass for other particle radii in order to determine the whole shape of PSD. A total of 80 soil samples from the UNSODA database including 10 soil textures were selected to verify the presented method. We divided our database into three groups, (1) is coarse soil texture including sand, sandy loam and loamy sand (32 soil samples), (2) medium soil texture such as sandy clay loam, loam, silt loam (31 soil samples), and (3) fine soil texture including clay, sandy clay, silty clay and clay loam (17 soil samples). The RMSE value was calculated to evaluate the presented method. For groups 1, 2 and 3, the RMSE values were 0.071, 0.064, and 0.046, respectively. The linear regression between the estimated and measured cumulative particle mass showed that this method is capable for estimating PSD from three measured points. The line slope for groups 1, 2 and 3 were 0.93, 0.94 and 0.95, respectively, and correlation coefficient (R2) values were obtained greater than 0.96. For all 80 soil samples

  4. Crystallography of decahedral and icosahedral particles. II - High symmetry orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Yacaman, M. J.; Heinemann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the exact crystal structure of decahedral and icosahedral particles, high energy electron diffraction patterns and image profiles have been derived for various high symmetry orientations of the particles with respect to the incident beam. These results form a basis for the identification of small metal particle structures with advanced methods of transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Zeta potential of clay-size particles in urban rainfall runoff during hydrologic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Sansalone, John J.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryUrban rainfall-runoff transports a wide spectrum of anthropogenic aqueous complexes and particulate matter (PM). Zeta potential (ξ) as an electrostatic parameter provides an index of destabilization for clay-size particles (<2 μm) transported during hydrologic processes including passage of the runoff hydrograph. However, ξ of PM in urban rainfall-runoff has rarely been studied due to the dynamic and complex hydrologic, physical and chemical nature of rainfall-runoff systems. This study examined a series of rainfall-runoff events captured from a paved source area catchment in Baton Rouge, LA to characterize ξ of clay-size particles. The ξ of clay-size particles was also examined as a function of hydrologic transport with coupled water chemistry variables. Study results indicated that ξ varied from approximately -15 to -30 mV across the hydrograph of each event and generally mimicked the runoff intensity during hydrologic transport. Hydrologic transport results indicate while ξ was inversely correlated to the hydrograph flow rate, this inverse correlation was a function of variations in water chemistry parameters (pH and ionic strength); parameters that were driven by hydrologic flow rate. For each event ξ exhibited hysteretic trends as a function of rainfall-runoff ionic strength and pH during the passage of the hydrograph. Results demonstrate that hydrologic transport played an important role driving both water chemistry and ξ trends for clay-size particles; as well as treatment behavior of rainfall-runoff unit operations and processes.

  6. A recommended procedure for the preparation of oriented clay-mineral specimens for X-ray diffraction analysis; modifications to Drever's filter-membrane peel technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely well-oriented clay mineral mounts for X-ray diffraction analysis can be prepared quickly and without introducing segregation using the filter-membrane peel technique. Mounting problems encountered with smectite-rich samples can be resolved by using minimal sample and partial air-drying of the clay film before transfer to a glass slide. Samples containing small quantities of clay can produce useful oriented specimens if Teflon masks having more restrictive areas are inserted above the membrane filter during clay deposition. War]page and thermal shock of glass slides can be controlled by using a flat, porous, ceramic plate as a holding surface during heat treatments.

  7. Spatial confinement governs orientational order in patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Yasutaka; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Orientational order in condensed matter plays a key role in determining material properties such as ferromagnetism, viscoelasticity or birefringence. We studied purely orientational ordering in closely-packed one-patch colloidal particles confined between flat substrates, where the particles can only rotate and are ordered via the sticky interaction between the patches. For the first time, we experimentally realized a rich variety of mesoscopic patterns through orientational ordering of colloids by controlling patch size and confinement thickness. The combination of experiment and numerical simulation reveals the decisive role of confinement: An ordered state(s) is selected from the (meta)stable options in bulk when it is commensurate with the system geometry and boundary conditions; otherwise, frustration induces a unique order. Our study offers a new means of systematic control over mesoscopic structures via orientational ordering in patchy particles. The system would also possess unique functionalities through the rotational response of the particles to external stimuli.

  8. Spatial confinement governs orientational order in patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Iwashita, Yasutaka; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Orientational order in condensed matter plays a key role in determining material properties such as ferromagnetism, viscoelasticity or birefringence. We studied purely orientational ordering in closely-packed one-patch colloidal particles confined between flat substrates, where the particles can only rotate and are ordered via the sticky interaction between the patches. For the first time, we experimentally realized a rich variety of mesoscopic patterns through orientational ordering of colloids by controlling patch size and confinement thickness. The combination of experiment and numerical simulation reveals the decisive role of confinement: An ordered state(s) is selected from the (meta)stable options in bulk when it is commensurate with the system geometry and boundary conditions; otherwise, frustration induces a unique order. Our study offers a new means of systematic control over mesoscopic structures via orientational ordering in patchy particles. The system would also possess unique functionalities through the rotational response of the particles to external stimuli. PMID:27264521

  9. Benthic biofilm structure controls the deposition-resuspension dynamics of fine clay particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, W. R.; Roche, K. R.; Drummond, J. D.; Boano, F.; Packman, A. I.; Battin, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In fluvial ecosystems the alternation of deposition and resuspension of particles represents an important pathway for the downstream translocation of microbes and organic matter. Such particles can originate from algae and microbes, the spontaneous auto-aggregation of organic macromolecules (e.g., "river sown"), terrestrial detritus (traditionally classified as "particulate organic matter"), and erosive mineral and organo-mineral particles. The transport and retention of particles in headwater streams is associated with biofilms, which are surface-attached microbial communities. Whilst biofilm-particle interactions have been studied in bulk, a mechanistic understanding of these processes is lacking. Parallel macroscale/microscale observations are required to unravel the complex feedbacks between biofilm structure, coverage and the dynamics of deposition and resuspension. We used recirculating flume mesocosms to test how changes in biofilm structure affected the deposition and resuspension of clay-sized (< 10 μm) particles. Biofilms were grown in replicate 3-m-long recirculating flumes over variable lengths of time (0, 14, 21, 28, and 35) days. Fixed doses of fluorescent clay-sized particles were introduced to each flume and their deposition was traced over 30 minutes. A flood event was then simulated via a step increase in flowrate to quantify particle resuspension. 3D Optical Coherence Tomography was used to determine roughness, areal coverage and height of biofilms in each flume. From these measurements we characterised particle deposition and resuspension rates, using continuous time random walk modelling techniques, which we then tested as responses to changes in biofilm coverage and structure under both base-flow and flood-flow scenarios. Our results suggest that biofilm structural complexity is a primary control upon the retention and downstream transport of fine particles in stream mesocosms.

  10. The IAA cosmic dust laboratory: Experimental scattering matrices of clay particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Ramos, J. L.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results of measurements on solid particles performed at the Instituto de Astrofı´sica de Andalucı´a (IAA) cosmic dust laboratory located in Granada, Spain. The laboratory apparatus measures the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of aerosol particles. The measurements can be performed at a wavelength ( λ) of 483, 488, 520, 568, or 647 nm in the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. Results of special test experiments are presented which show that our experimental results for scattering matrices are not significantly contaminated by multiple scattering and that the sizes/shapes of the particles do not change during the measurements. Moreover, the measured scattering matrix for a sample of green clay particles is compared with measurements previously performed in the Amsterdam light scattering setup for the same sample. New measurements on a white clay sample at 488 and 647 nm are also presented. The apparatus is devoted to experimentally studying the angle dependence of scattering matrices of dust samples of astrophysical interest. Moreover, there is a great interest in similar studies of aerosols that can affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere of the Earth and other planets such as silicates, desert dust, volcanic ashes, and carbon soot particles.

  11. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  12. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  13. Orientational defects near colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Feng, James J; Zhou, Chixing

    2004-01-01

    We study the interaction between a surface-anchoring colloidal particle and a liquid-crystalline host, and in particular the formation of orientational defects near the particle. A mean-field theory based on the nonlocal Marrucci-Greco nematic potential is used to represent molecular interactions in an inhomogeneous orientational field. An evolution equation for the molecular configuration tensor is solved numerically whose steady state minimizes the total free energy of the system. With strong homeotropic anchoring on the particle surface, three types of solutions may appear depending on initial conditions and particle size: Saturn rings, satellite point defects, and polar rings. The Saturn ring remains stable on micrometer-sized particles, contrary to previous calculations but consistent with experiments. A phase diagram is constructed for the three regimes. Based on the free energy, the most stable state is the Saturn ring for smaller particles and the satellite defect for larger ones.

  14. DNA-labeled clay: A sensitive new method for tracing particle transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Winkler, M.; Bennett, P.; Hillis, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of mobile colloids and sediment in most natural environments remains poorly understood, in part because characteristics of existing sediment tracers limit their wide-spread use. Here we describe the development of a new approach that uses a DNA-labeled montmorillonite clay as a highly sensitive and selective sediment tracer that can potentially characterize sediment and colloid transport in a wide variety of environments, including marine, wetland, ground-water, and atmospheric systems. Characteristics of DNA in natural systems render it unsuitable as an aqueous tracer but admirably suited as a label for tracing particulates. The DNA-labeled-clay approach, using techniques developed from molecular biology, has extremely low detection limits, very specific detection, and a virtually infinite number of tracer signatures. Furthermore, DNA-labeled clay has the same physical characteristics as the particles it is designed to trace, it is environmentally benign, and it can be relatively inexpensively produced and detected. Our initial results show that short (500 base pair) strands of synthetically produced DNA reversibly adsorb to both Na-montmorillonite and powdered silica surfaces via a magnesium bridge. The DNA-montmorillonite surface complexes are stable in calcium-bicarbonate spring waters for periods of up to 18 days and only slowly desorb to the aqueous phase, whereas the silica surface complex is stable only in distilled water. Both materials readily release the adsorbed DNA in dilute EDTA solutions for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantification. The stability of the DNA-labeled clay complex suggests that this material would be appropriate for use as an extremely sensitive sediment tracer for flow periods of as long as 2 weeks, and possibly longer.

  15. Characterization and Safety of Uniform Particle Size NovaSil Clay as a Potential Aflatoxin Enterosorbent

    PubMed Central

    Marroquín-Cardona, A.; Deng, Y.; Garcia-Mazcorro, J.; Johnson, N.M.; Mitchell, N.; Tang, L.; Robinson, A.; Taylor, J.; Wang, J.-S.; Phillips, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    NovaSil (NS) clay, a common anti-caking agent in animal feeds, has been shown to adsorb aflatoxins and diminish their bioavailability in multiple animal models. The safety of long-term dietary exposure to NS has also been demonstrated in a 6-month sub-chronic study in rats and in a 3-month intervention in humans highly exposed to aflatoxins. Uniform particle size NovaSil (UPSN) is a refined material derived from parent NS; it contains lower levels of dioxins/furans, and has been selected for a more consistent uniform particle size. Nevertheless, the efficacy and potential safety/toxicity of UPSN for long term-use has not yet been determined. In this research, 4-week-old male and female Sprague Dawley rats were fed rations free of clay (control) and containing UPSN at low dose (0.25%) and high dose (2%) for 13 weeks. AFB1 sorption characteristics remained the same for both clays. When compared to the control, total body weight gain was unaffected in either sex at the doses tested. No UPSN-dependent differences in relative organ weights or gross appearance were observed. Isolated differences between UPSN groups and the control were observed for some biochemical parameters and selected vitamins and minerals. None of these differences were dose-dependent, and all parameters fell between ranges reported as normal for rats less than 6 month old. The Na/K ratio, Na and vitamin E concentrations were the only parameters that were increased in both males and females in the low dose and high dose UPSN groups. Serum Zn levels in males from the 2% UPSN treatment were lower compared to the control. Serum K levels were lower in the males of UPSN groups than in the control. However, neither Na/K ratio, K, nor Zn values were dose dependent and fell outside ranges reported as normal. These results suggest that dietary inclusion of UPSN at levels as high as 2% (w/w) does not result in overt toxicity. Nevertheless, further research on the effects of clays on Na, Zn, K and vitamin E is

  16. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biopysical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-08-02

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.

  17. Object-oriented high-performance particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Sergey Y.; Plotnikov, Max

    2003-10-01

    Particle systems nowadays are the most popular visualization method for various special effects in 3D computer graphics. Software implementation of a particle system must have an abstract object-oriented model in order to be generic and portable. Besides, for real time graphics it is necessary that the particle system would remain efficient in processor time and memory. Original methods are described in this paper, which allow us to build such systems abstract and generic; as much as possible not depending on software environment and efficient at the same time.

  18. Multisensor on-the-go mapping of readily dispersible clay, particle size and soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debaene, Guillaume; Niedźwiecki, Jacek; Papierowska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Particle size fractions affect strongly the physical and chemical properties of soil. Readily dispersible clay (RDC) is the part of the clay fraction in soils that is easily or potentially dispersible in water when small amounts of mechanical energy are applied to soil. The amount of RDC in the soil is of significant importance for agriculture and environment because clay dispersion is a cause of poor soil stability in water which in turn contributes to soil erodibility, mud flows, and cementation. To obtain a detailed map of soil texture, many samples are needed. Moreover, RDC determination is time consuming. The use of a mobile visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) platform is proposed here to map those soil properties and obtain the first detailed map of RDC at field level. Soil properties prediction was based on calibration model developed with 10 representative samples selected by a fuzzy logic algorithm. Calibration samples were analysed for soil texture (clay, silt and sand), RDC and soil organic carbon (SOC) using conventional wet chemistry analysis. Moreover, the Veris mobile sensor platform is also collecting electrical conductivity (EC) data (deep and shallow), and soil temperature. These auxiliary data were combined with VIS-NIR measurement (data fusion) to improve prediction results. EC maps were also produced to help understanding RDC data. The resulting maps were visually compared with an orthophotography of the field taken at the beginning of the plant growing season. Models were developed with partial least square regression (PLSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR). There were no significant differences between calibration using PLSR or SVMR. Nevertheless, the best models were obtained with PLSR and standard normal variate (SNV) pretreatment and the fusion with deep EC data (e.g. for RDC and clay content: RMSECV = 0,35% and R2 = 0,71; RMSECV = 0,32% and R2 = 0,73 respectively). The best models were used to predict soil properties from the

  19. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field

    PubMed Central

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  20. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field.

    PubMed

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  1. Radiological characteristics of charged particle interactions in the first clay-nanoparticle dichromate gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. L.; Maeyama, T.; Fukunishi, N.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukasaku, K.; Furuta, T.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Fukuda, S.

    2013-06-01

    The incorporation of clay nanoparticles into gel dosimeters shows promise for significant diffusion reduction - but to what extent does the presence of the nano-clay influence charged particle interactions and, in particular, what is the impact on water equivalence? In this work, we quantify the radiological characteristics of electron, proton and carbon ion interactions in the RIKEN dichromate nanoclay gel and specifically evaluate the water equivalence over a broad energy range. Results indicate that the radiological properties are sufficiently representative of tissues that this low-diffusion gel could readily be used for validation of complex dose distributions. Electron and proton ranges are within 1 % of those in water. Mean effective atomic numbers for electron interactions in the range 10 keV - 10 GeV are within 1 % of those of water which, coupled with the similar mass density, ultimately means the overall impact on dose distributions is not great. The range of C6+ ions in the nanoclay gel is closer to that of water (< 4 %) than a common polymer gel dosimeter (< 7 %), though experimentally measured R1 values indicate an over-response at low doses.

  2. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Three supplementary movies and an experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02254d

  3. Oriented clay nanopaper from biobased components--mechanisms for superior fire protection properties.

    PubMed

    Carosio, F; Kochumalayil, J; Cuttica, F; Camino, G; Berglund, L

    2015-03-18

    The toxicity of the most efficient fire retardant additives is a major problem for polymeric materials. Cellulose nanofiber (CNF)/clay nanocomposites, with unique brick-and-mortar structure and prepared by simple filtration, are characterized from the morphological point of view by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. These nanocomposites have superior fire protection properties to other clay nanocomposites and fiber composites. The corresponding mechanisms are evaluated in terms of flammability (reaction to a flame) and cone calorimetry (exposure to heat flux). These two tests provide a wide spectrum characterization of fire protection properties in CNF/montmorrilonite (MTM) materials. The morphology of the collected residues after flammability testing is investigated. In addition, thermal and thermo-oxidative stability are evaluated by thermogravimetric analyses performed in inert (nitrogen) and oxidative (air) atmospheres. Physical and chemical mechanisms are identified and related to the unique nanostructure and its low thermal conductivity, high gas barrier properties and CNF/MTM interactions for char formation. PMID:25723913

  4. Oriented clay nanopaper from biobased components--mechanisms for superior fire protection properties.

    PubMed

    Carosio, F; Kochumalayil, J; Cuttica, F; Camino, G; Berglund, L

    2015-03-18

    The toxicity of the most efficient fire retardant additives is a major problem for polymeric materials. Cellulose nanofiber (CNF)/clay nanocomposites, with unique brick-and-mortar structure and prepared by simple filtration, are characterized from the morphological point of view by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. These nanocomposites have superior fire protection properties to other clay nanocomposites and fiber composites. The corresponding mechanisms are evaluated in terms of flammability (reaction to a flame) and cone calorimetry (exposure to heat flux). These two tests provide a wide spectrum characterization of fire protection properties in CNF/montmorrilonite (MTM) materials. The morphology of the collected residues after flammability testing is investigated. In addition, thermal and thermo-oxidative stability are evaluated by thermogravimetric analyses performed in inert (nitrogen) and oxidative (air) atmospheres. Physical and chemical mechanisms are identified and related to the unique nanostructure and its low thermal conductivity, high gas barrier properties and CNF/MTM interactions for char formation.

  5. Directing Translational and Orientational Order of Rectangular Particle Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Mark; Truskett, Thomas; Bonnecaze, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances have shown that the tunability of nanoparticle interactions can lead to a large number of thermodynamically accessible structures. The role of an external field in the assembly of particulate systems, however, is still incompletely understood. The use of larger scale patterned substrates to drive smaller scale assembly of particle monolayers can potentially expand the set of achievable lattices, and could be used in nanopatterning processes or in the manufacture of functional materials. In this presentation, grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations are used to assess the suitability of graphoepitaxial assembly for particle monolayers. Our prior work has shown that topographically or chemically patterned substrates can sufficiently organize hard-spheres, but many motivating applications can utilize anisotropic particle shapes (e.g. rectangular particles for bit-patterned media). Here, we describe our recent GCMC results for structures formed by rectangular particles in the presence of sparse enthalpic barriers. We examine systems of varying chemical potential, template geometry, and particle aspect ratio. Templates are evaluated by their ability to induce orientational and translational order, while maximizing pattern multiplication effects.

  6. Object-oriented particle simulation on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Reynders, J.V.W.; Forslund, D.W.; Hinker, P.J.; Tholburn, M.; Kilman, D.G.; Humphrey, W.F.

    1994-04-01

    A general purpose, object-oriented particle simulation (OOPS) library has been developed for use on a variety of system architectures with a uniform high-level interface. This includes the development of library implementations for the CM5, Intel Paragon, and CRI T3D. Codes written on any of these platforms can be ported to other platforms without modifications by utilizing the high-level library. The general character of the library allows application to such diverse areas as plasma physics, suspension flows, vortex simulations, porous media, and materials science.

  7. MD Simulation of Particle Orientation in Magnetic Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher; Günal

    1997-03-01

    We have done molecular-dynamics type simulations of particle re-orientation in a magnetic colloid, by a magnetic field during tape and disk manufacture. The model takes into account switching (in a Stoner- Wohlfarth model) as well as particle translation and rotation in response to magnetic, steric, Brownian, and hydrodynamic drag forces and torques. Magnetic interactions are fully included; hysteresis loops with and without magnetic interaction will be displayed, with corresponding Δ M curves. Images of the network structure at various points of the hysteresis loop will be shown. Further information is available at http:// www.mint.ua.edu/colloids/march.html.

  8. The Effect of Clay Chemistry and Particle Size Distribution on Carbon Storage from Two Forest Types in Piedmont Soils in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvoort, A.; Werts, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    In most soils, there is a general positive correlation between clay and carbon content laterally through the landscape. Clay serves to both physically and chemically protect carbon from decompositional processes. However, in some of the highly weathered, naturally acidic soils, such as those located in the southern piedmont area of the US, these trends do not necessarily hold true. We conducted two transects through a clay rich soil dominated by montmorillonite and another through a soil dominated by non-active clays and iron oxides in order to compare trends in both particle size distributions and carbon and nitrogen content using both a laser particle size distribution system and an elemental analyzer. The montmorillonite rich soils contain a higher pH due to the alkaline nature of the parent rock (gabbro) and reveal a negative correlation between clay content and carbon storage. The trends also hold true for the non-active clay soils suggesting that the negative correlations are not necessarily linked to clay chemistry. The absence of a difference in nitrogen and carbon percentages within the different clays proves to be significant because it shows that the clay chemistry is not solely responsible for a positive correlation between clay and carbon content. These results reiterate the complexity of carbon storage processes within the piedmont soil system.

  9. Interactions of DNA with clay minerals and soil colloidal particles and protection against degradation by DNase.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Huang, Qiao-Yun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2006-05-01

    Adsorption, desorption, and degradation by nucleases of DNA on four different colloidal fractions from a Brown soil and clay minerals were studied. The adsorption of DNase I and the structures of native DNA, adsorbed and desorbed, were also investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy, to determine the protection mechanism of DNA molecules by soil colloids and minerals against enzymatic degradation. Kaolinite exhibited the highest adsorption affinity for DNA among the examined soil colloids and clay minerals. In comparison with organomineral complexes (organic clays), DNA was tightly adsorbed by H2O2-treated clays (inorganic clays). FTIR spectra showed that the binding of DNA on kaolinite and inorganic clays changed its conformation from the B-form to the Z-form, whereas montmorillonite and organic clays retained the original B-form of DNA. A structural change from the B- to the C-form in DNA molecules desorbed from kaolinite was observed by CD spectroscopy and confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The presence of soil colloids and minerals provided protection to DNA against degradation by DNase I. The higher level of protection was found with montmorillonite and organic clays compared to kaolinite and inorganic clays. The protection of DNA against nuclease degradation by soil colloids and minerals is apparently not controlled by the adsorption affinity of DNA molecules for the colloids and the conformational change of bound DNA. The higher stability of DNA seemed to be attributed mainly to the presence of organic matter in the system and the adsorption of nucleases on soil colloids and minerals. The information obtained in this study is of fundamental significance for the understanding of the behavior of extracellular DNA in soil environment.

  10. Burnt clay magnetic properties and palaeointensity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova, Mariya; Lesigyarski, Deyan

    2014-05-01

    Burnt clay structures found in situ are the most valuable materials for archaeomagnetic studies. From these materials the full geomagnetic field vector described by inclination, declination and intensity can be retrieved. The reliability of the obtained directional results is related to the precision of samples orientation and the accuracy of characteristic remanence determination. Palaeointensity evaluations depend on much more complex factors - stability of carried remanent magnetization, grain-size distribution of magnetic particles and mineralogical transformations during heating. In the last decades many efforts have been made to shed light over the reasons for the bad success rate of palaeointensity experiments. Nevertheless, sometimes the explanation of the bad archaeointensity results with the magnetic properties of the studied materials is quite unsatisfactory. In order to show how difficult is to apply a priory strict criteria for the suitability of a given collection of archaeomagnetic materials, artificial samples formed from four different baked clays are examined. Two of the examined clay types were taken from clay deposits from different parts of Bulgaria and two clays were taken from ancient archaeological baked clay structures from the Central part of Bulgaria and the Black sea coast, respectively. The samples formed from these clays were repeatedly heated in known magnetic field to 700oC. Different analyses were performed to obtain information about the mineralogical content and magnetic properties of the samples. The obtained results point that all clays reached stable magnetic mineralogy after the repeated heating to 700oC, the main magnetic mineral is of titano/magnetite type and the magnetic particles are predominantly with pseudo single domain grain sizes. In spite that, the magnetic properies of the studied clays seem to be very similar, reliable palaeointensity results were obtained only from the clays coming from clay deposits. The

  11. Effect of Joule heating on orientation of spheroidal particle in alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Yu.; Elperin, T.

    2008-07-01

    We study the change of orientation of a spheroidal particle immersed into a liquid or gaseous host medium under the action of the alternating external electric field. It is assumed that the particle and the host medium have different electric conductivities. We show that the rate of Joule heating of the particle depends on the orientation of its axis of symmetry with respect to the direction of the electric field. If electric conductivity of particle strongly varies with temperature, the Joule heating of the particle affects orientation dynamics and results in the appearance of the new equilibrium orientations. We investigate the dependence of the dynamics of particle rotation and the direction of the equilibrium orientation on the frequency of the electric field.

  12. The effect of clay particles on the activity of suspended autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and on the performance of an air-lift reactor.

    PubMed

    Vieira, M J; Pacheco, A P; Pinho, I A; Melo, L F

    2001-02-01

    Clay minerals have some properties, namely a high surface area and the ability of ion exchange that may exert some effects on microbial systems. It is often difficult to know the way the clay is exerting its influence and whether its presence improves a given metabolic process. The present work concerns the study of the effect of the addition of powdered kaolin to autotrophic nitrification systems, and includes the study of the effects of the particles on the activity of a suspended nitrifying bacteria consortium and on the performance of an air-lift biofilm reactor used for tertiary nitrification. Concerning the suspended culture, kaolin particles produced stimulation on the specific endogenous and exogenous respiration rates of the bacteria, probably due to a nutritional effect supplied by the clay. This effect was more pronounced for the ammonia oxidation rates, although nitrite oxidation was also enhanced but to a lesser extent. In respect to the presence of kaolin particles in the air-lift reactor, the results obtained indicate that the clay particles become incorporated in the biofilm pellets, but do not change significantly their thickness or their shape. However, nitrate production decreased when the concentration of particles increased. The low adsorption of ammonia by the kaolin indicated that the clay particles embedded in the biofilm did not probably retain the ions. Although it was not proved, precipitation of salts may have occurred.

  13. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  14. Investigating particle orientation in cirrus clouds by measuring backscattering phase matrices with lidar.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Bruno V; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V; Volkov, Sergei N

    2004-12-20

    The relation between the orientation of particles in ice-crystal clouds and backscattering phase matrices (BSPMs) is considered. Parameters characterizing the predominant orientation of particles in the azimuthal direction and in the horizontal position are presented. The parameters are expressed through BSPM elements. A technique for measuring BSPM elements with lidar is described. Examples of some measurements are presented along with a statistical generalization of the results from more than 400 BSPM measurements. It is found that the orientation of coarse particles with large diameters in an azimuthal direction and in a horizontal position is more probable than in a random direction. However, the orientation of large particles is often masked by small particles that are not subject to the effect of orienting factors. Thus the mean parameters characterizing the state of orientation of particles in clouds as a whole correspond to weak orientation. It is supposed that the orientation of particles in the azimuthal direction is caused by wind-velocity pulsations.

  15. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  16. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  17. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of −3.0 ± 0.4 nN and −330 ± 43 aJ (10−18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions. PMID:26585552

  18. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10-18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  19. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10(-18) J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  20. Stereological estimation of particle shape and orientation from volume tensors.

    PubMed

    Rafati, A H; Ziegel, J F; Nyengaard, J R; Jensen, E B Vedel

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, we describe new robust methods of estimating cell shape and orientation in 3D from sections. The descriptors of 3D cell shape and orientation are based on volume tensors which are used to construct an ellipsoid, the Miles ellipsoid, approximating the average cell shape and orientation in 3D. The estimators of volume tensors are based on observations in several optical planes through sampled cells. This type of geometric sampling design is known as the optical rotator. The statistical behaviour of the estimator of the Miles ellipsoid is studied under a flexible model for 3D cell shape and orientation. In a simulation study, the lengths of the axes of the Miles ellipsoid can be estimated with coefficients of variation of about 2% if 100 cells are sampled. Finally, we illustrate the use of the developed methods in an example, involving neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of rat.

  1. Stereological estimation of particle shape and orientation from volume tensors.

    PubMed

    Rafati, A H; Ziegel, J F; Nyengaard, J R; Jensen, E B Vedel

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, we describe new robust methods of estimating cell shape and orientation in 3D from sections. The descriptors of 3D cell shape and orientation are based on volume tensors which are used to construct an ellipsoid, the Miles ellipsoid, approximating the average cell shape and orientation in 3D. The estimators of volume tensors are based on observations in several optical planes through sampled cells. This type of geometric sampling design is known as the optical rotator. The statistical behaviour of the estimator of the Miles ellipsoid is studied under a flexible model for 3D cell shape and orientation. In a simulation study, the lengths of the axes of the Miles ellipsoid can be estimated with coefficients of variation of about 2% if 100 cells are sampled. Finally, we illustrate the use of the developed methods in an example, involving neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of rat. PMID:26823192

  2. The Use of Small-Particle Sized TiO2 Supported on Clays as Photocatalytic Materials: A Low- Cost Alternative Technology for the Degradation of Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibanova, D.; Trejo, M.; Destaillats, H.; Cervini-Silva, J.

    2007-05-01

    Assisted photocatalysis by TiO2 is an advanced oxidation process that has been employed for air and water remediation. Clays are natural porous materials bearing high surface areas and interlayer spacing that allows entrapment of small-sized particles. Pillared clays exchanged with small-sized TiO2 can constitute materials with interesting photocatalytic properties because high surface area values and large contents of mesospores, which enables analyte trapping. Furthermore, intercalation at the clay interlayer enables TiO2 to become more resistant to aggregation when in solution. Just recently it has been reported that clays can lead to increases in the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 when the mesopores size is adequate to host organic solutes and ensure their effective interaction with the TiO2 particles. In this paper we study the photocatalytic properties of small-sized TiO2 supported on the following clay samples: Montmorillonite [SWy-2, Na0.2Ca0.1Al2Si4O10(OH)2(H2O)10 ] from Crook Country, Wyoming, USA; Hectorite [SHCa-1, Na0.4Mg2.7Li0.3Si4O10(OH)2 ] from San Bernardino. Country, California, USA; Kaolinite [KGa-1b, Al2Si2O5(OH)4 ] from Washington Country, Georgia, USA. Deposition of TiO2 on the clay surface was conducted by using a sol-gel synthetic method. Anatase TiO2 particles transformation at the clay interlayer was achieved by thermic treatment at 180 °C. Material characterization was conducted using FTIR microspectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and XRD analysis. The organic compound used as probe was ethanol

  3. Dry oil powders and oil foams stabilised by fluorinated clay platelet particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Sekine, Tomoko; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2014-01-28

    A series of platelet sericite particles coated to different extents with a fluorinating agent has been characterised and their behaviour in mixtures with air and oil studied. The material which forms by vigorous shaking depends on both the surface tension of the oil and the surface energy of the particles which control their degree of wetting. Oil dispersions are formed in liquids of relatively low tension (<22 mN m(-1)), e.g. hexane and cyclomethicone, for all particles. Particle-stabilised air-in-oil foams form in liquids of higher tension, e.g. dodecane and phenyl silicone, where the advancing three-phase contact angle θ, measured on a planar substrate composed of the particles into the liquid, lies between ca. 65° and 120°. For oils of tension above 27 mN m(-1) like squalane and liquid paraffin with particles for which θ > 70°, we have discovered that dry oil powders in which oil drops stabilised by particles dispersed in air (oil-in-air) can be prepared by gentle mixing up to a critical oil : particle ratio (COPR) and do not leak oil. These powders, containing up to 80 wt% oil, release the encapsulated oil when sheared on a substrate. For many of the systems forming oil powders, stable liquid oil marbles can also be prepared. Above the COPR, catastrophic phase inversion occurs yielding an ultra-stable air-in-oil foam. We thus demonstrate the ability to disperse oil drops or air bubbles coated with particles within novel materials.

  4. Accretion rate of extraterrestrial particles determined from osmium isotope systematics of pacific pelagic clay and manganese nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, B.K.; Turekian, K.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Pelagic clay and Mn nodules from DOMES sites in the North Pacific and a varved glacial lake deposit from Connecticut were analyzed for Os concentration and isotopic composition by isotope-dilution secondary ion mass spectrometry after treatment by NiS fusion of oxalic acid leaching. Bulk pelagic clay from DOMES site C has {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 6.5 and Os = 0.14 ng/g. Oxalic acid leaches of this same sediment and of Mn nodules for DOMES sites A and C have more radiogenic {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratios which average 8.3. Bulk glacial Lake Hitchcock sediment has {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 12.5 and Os = 0.06 ng/g. The total Os flux to North Pacific pelagic clay is 7 to 10 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sup 6} y. Lake Hitchcock sediment provides an integrated value for the local crustal {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratio. The oxalic acid leaches are assumed to attack hydrogenous phases selectively. A simple model in which the only sources of Os to the ocean are continental crust with the isotopic composition of Lake Hitchcock and extraterrestrial particles with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.1 results in a cosmic flux of osmium to the sediment of 4.9 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sub 6} y of which 20% is hydrogenous. A model in which the sources of Os to the ocean are continental crust with an {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratio of 30, oceanic mantle or crust with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.04 and extraterrestrial particles with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.1 results in a cosmic flux of Os to the sediment of 5.7 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sup 6} y of which none is hydrogenous. These extraterrestrial Os fluxes correspond to maximum C-1 chondrite accretion rates of between 4.9 {times} 10{sub 4} and 5.6 {times}10{sub 4} tonnes/y.

  5. Useful oriented immobilization of antibodies on chimeric magnetic particles: direct correlation of biomacromolecule orientation with biological activity by AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Marciello, Marzia; Filice, Marco; Olea, David; Velez, Marisela; Guisan, José M; Mateo, Cesar

    2014-12-16

    The preparation and performance of a suitable chimeric biosensor based on antibodies (Abs) immobilized on lipase-coated magnetic particles by means of a standing orienting strategy are presented. This novel system is based on hydrophobic magnetic particles coated with modified lipase molecules able to orient and further immobilize different Abs in a covalent way without any previous site-selective chemical modification of biomacromolecules. Different key parameters attending the process were studied and optimized. The optimal preparation was performed using a controlled loading (1 nmol Ab g(-1) chimeric support) at pH 9 and a short reaction time to recover a biological activity of about 80%. AFM microscopy was used to study and confirm the Abs-oriented immobilization on lipase-coated magnetic particles and the final achievement of a highly active and recyclable chimeric immune sensor. This direct technique was demonstrated to be a powerful alternative to the indirect immunoactivity assay methods for the study of biomacromolecule-oriented immobilizations.

  6. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  7. A new method to evaluate polydisperse kaolinite clay particle removal in roughing filtration using colloid filtration theory.

    PubMed

    Lin, Edwin; Page, Declan; Pavelic, Paul

    2008-02-01

    Previous application of colloid filtration theory to roughing filtration has not considered a reliable method for determining a representative attachment factor for a polydisperse suspension (of constant particle density). Establishment of such a method would broaden the application of trajectory modelling in roughing filtration, and progress the development of a comprehensive database of attachment factors and surface charge potentials for various particle and fluid types. This study establishes a methodology for the application of colloid filtration theory to roughing filtration and incorporates recent advancements in theoretical single-collector efficiency. A polydisperse kaolinite clay suspension was passed through a series of four gravel upflow roughing filters and removal efficiencies were calculated. Both the classical and Tufenkji and Elimelech's more recent correlation equations were used to calculate theoretical single-collector efficiencies and associated attachment factors for three different filter media sizes, flow rates, and suspended solids concentrations (0.137+/-0.023). The use of Tufenkji and Elimelech's modified correlation equation resulted in reduced variability in the estimation of theoretical single-collector efficiencies. PMID:17884131

  8. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  9. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  10. Methods for Measuring the Orientation and Rotation Rate of 3D-printed Particles in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brendan C; Marcus, Guy G; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental methods are presented for measuring the rotational and translational motion of anisotropic particles in turbulent fluid flows. 3D printing technology is used to fabricate particles with slender arms connected at a common center. Shapes explored are crosses (two perpendicular rods), jacks (three perpendicular rods), triads (three rods in triangular planar symmetry), and tetrads (four arms in tetrahedral symmetry). Methods for producing on the order of 10,000 fluorescently dyed particles are described. Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four synchronized videos of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with Rλ = 91. In this relatively low-Reynolds number flow, the advected particles are small enough that they approximate ellipsoidal tracer particles. We present results of time-resolved 3D trajectories of position and orientation of the particles as well as measurements of their rotation rates. PMID:27404898

  11. Interface deformations affect the orientation transition of magnetic ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gary B; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V; Harting, Jens; Bresme, Fernando

    2014-09-21

    Manufacturing new soft materials with specific optical, mechanical and magnetic properties is a significant challenge. Assembling and manipulating colloidal particles at fluid interfaces is a promising way to make such materials. We use lattice-Boltzmann simulations to investigate the response of magnetic ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at liquid-liquid interfaces to external magnetic fields. We provide further evidence for the first-order orientation phase transition predicted by Bresme and Faraudo [Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 2007, 19, 375110]. We show that capillary interface deformations around the ellipsoidal particle significantly affect the tilt-angle of the particle for a given dipole-field strength, altering the properties of the orientation transition. We propose scaling laws governing this transition, and suggest how to use these deformations to facilitate particle assembly at fluid-fluid interfaces. PMID:25069609

  12. Interface deformations affect the orientation transition of magnetic ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gary B; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V; Harting, Jens; Bresme, Fernando

    2014-09-21

    Manufacturing new soft materials with specific optical, mechanical and magnetic properties is a significant challenge. Assembling and manipulating colloidal particles at fluid interfaces is a promising way to make such materials. We use lattice-Boltzmann simulations to investigate the response of magnetic ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at liquid-liquid interfaces to external magnetic fields. We provide further evidence for the first-order orientation phase transition predicted by Bresme and Faraudo [Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 2007, 19, 375110]. We show that capillary interface deformations around the ellipsoidal particle significantly affect the tilt-angle of the particle for a given dipole-field strength, altering the properties of the orientation transition. We propose scaling laws governing this transition, and suggest how to use these deformations to facilitate particle assembly at fluid-fluid interfaces.

  13. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  14. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  15. Clay-oil droplet suspensions in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Kjerstad, Knut; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene

    2012-02-01

    Silicone oil droplets containing synthetic smectite clay submerged in immiscible organic oil have been studied by observing clay particle movement and oil circulation when an electric field is applied. Results show how electric field strength, dielectric and electrorheological properties as well as electrohydrodynamics determine the fluid flow and clay particle formation. In a presence of the DC electric fields the clay particles formed a ribbon-like structure onto the inner surface of the droplet. The structure consists of short chain-like clay elements orienting parallel to the electric field direction. It is suggested that a combination of two phenomena, namely the induced viscous flow (electrohydrodynamic effect) and the polarization of the clay particles (dielectric effect), contribute to the ribbon-like structure formation. -/abstract- References [1] G. Taylor, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A. Mathematical and Physical Sciences 291 (1966) 159--166. [2] J. R. Melcher and G. I. Taylor, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 1 (1969) 111--146. [3] H. Sato, N. Kaji, T. Mochizuki, and Y. H. Mori, Physics of Fluids 18 (2006) 127101. [4] D. A. Saville, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 29 (1997) 27--64. [5] J. O. Fossum, Y. M'eheust, K. P. S. Parmar, K. D. Knudsen, K. J. Måløy, and D. M. Fonseca Europhysics Letters 74

  16. Prediction of particle orientation in simple upsetting process of NdFeB magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chao-Cheng; Hsiao, Po-Jen; You, Jr-Shiang; Chen, Yen-Ju; Chang, Can-Xun

    2013-12-16

    The magnetic properties of NdFeB magnets are strongly affected by crystallographic texture which is highly associated with particle orientation. This study proposed a method for predicting the particle orientation in the simple upsetting process of NdFeB magnets. The method is based on finite element simulation with flow net analysis. The magnets in a cylindrical form were compressed by two flat dies in a chamber filled with argon at 750°C. Three forming speeds were taken into account in order to obtain flow stress curves used in simulations. The micrographs of the cross sections of the deformed magnets show that the particle deformation significantly increases with the compression. The phenomenon was also predicted by the proposed method. Both simulated and experimental results show that the inhomogeneity of the texture of the NdFeB magnets can be increased by the simple upsetting process. The predicted particle orientations were in a good agreement with those examined in the deformed magnets. The proposed method for predicting particle orientations can also be used in other forming processes of NdFeB magnets.

  17. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  18. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  19. High-resolution images of Pd particles supported on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Yasushi; Naoi, Katsuo; Yahikozawa, Kiyochika; Takasu, Yoshio . Dept. of Fine Materials Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Ultrafine metal particles dispersed on supporting materials have been developed as catalysts for the oxidation of automobile exhaust gas, the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and electrodes of fuel cells. Both activities and selectivities of these reactions depend on the morphology of the dispersed metal. The morphology of palladium particles supported on both highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The particles on the HOPG were linked with neighboring particles to agglomerate, while the particles on the glassy carbon were circular. AFM data with tapping mode for the palladium particles on HOPG were consistent with the high-resolution SEM image. Although the lateral resolution of the AFM image was lower than that for the high-resolution SEM data, the AFM image clearly indicated the height distribution of the agglomerates.

  20. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices.

  1. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices. PMID:27460190

  2. Influence of magnetic field on the orientation of anisotropic magnetic particles at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Newton, Bethany J; Brakke, Kenneth A; Buzza, D Martin A

    2014-12-21

    We study theoretically the influence of an external magnetic field on the orientation of an ellipsoidal magnetic particle adsorbed at a liquid interface. Using the finite element program Surface Evolver, we calculate the equilibrium meniscus shape around the ellipsoidal particle and its equilibrium tilt angle with respect to the undeformed interface θt when a magnetic field B is applied perpendicular to the interface. We find that as we increase field strength, θt increases and at a critical magnetic field Bc1 and tilt angle θc1, the particle undergoes a discontinuous transition to the 'perpendicular' orientation (θt = 90°). Our results agree qualitatively with the simplified theory of Bresme and Faraudo [F. Bresme and J. Faraudo, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 2007, 19, 375110] which assumes that the liquid interface is flat, while they agree quantitatively with recent lattice-Boltzmann simulations of Davies et al. [G. Davies et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 6742] which account for the deformation of the liquid meniscus. We also show for the first time that upon reducing the external magnetic field, at a critical magnetic field Bc2 < Bc1, the particle undergoes a second discontinuous transition from the perpendicular orientation to a finite tilt angle θc2 < θc1. In other words, for micron-sized particles where the thermal energy kBT is negligible compared to the interfacial energy, the tilt angle vs. magnetic field curve exhibits hysteresis behaviour. Due to the higher degree of accuracy of the Surface Evolver method, we are able to analyse the behaviour of the particles near these orientational transitions accurately and study how the critical quantities Bc1, Bc2, θc1 and θc2 vary with particle aspect ratio and contact angle.

  3. Structural diversity in iron oxide nanoparticle assemblies as directed by particle morphology and orientation.

    PubMed

    Disch, Sabrina; Wetterskog, Erik; Hermann, Raphaël P; Korolkov, Denis; Busch, Peter; Boesecke, Peter; Lyon, Olivier; Vainio, Ulla; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Bergström, Lennart; Brückel, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The mesostructure of ordered arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles is controlled by a combination of packing constraints and interparticle interactions, two factors that are strongly dependent on the particle morphology. We have investigated how the degree of truncation of iron oxide nanocubes controls the mesostructure and particle orientation in drop cast mesocrystal arrays. The combination of grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy shows that mesocrystals of highly truncated cubic nanoparticles assemble in an fcc-type mesostructure, similar to arrays formed by iron oxide nanospheres, but with a significantly reduced packing density and displaying two different growth orientations. Strong satellite reflections in the GISAXS pattern indicate a commensurate mesoscopic superstructure that is related to stacking faults in mesocrystals of the anisotropic nanocubes. Our results show how subtle variation in shape anisotropy can induce oriented arrangements of nanoparticles of different structures and also create mesoscopic superstructures of larger periodicity.

  4. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1991--February 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The investigation of methods for the production and testing of iron-pillared clay catalysts was continued in this quarter. The surface area of the mixed alumina/iron pillared clay catalyst decreased to 51 m{sup 2}/g on sulfidation. Thus the stability of the alumina pillars during the sulfidation and thermal treatments prevented the total collapse that occurred in the case of the iron-pillared clays. Previously the mixed alumina/iron pillared clays were tested for hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl. This testing was extended to a determination of activity with a second model compound substrate (pyrene), representative of the polynuclear aromatic systems present in coal. Testing of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts with 1-methylnaphthalene gave interesting results that demonstrate shape selectivity. The clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts prepared by impregnation of iron species on acidic clays were further investigated. Sulfidation of these catalysts using the carbon disulfide in situ method gave hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl that were somewhat less than those obtained by presulfidation with H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S mixtures. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was very successful with the iron impregnated clay catalyst, giving a highly soluble product. High conversions were also obtained with the mixed alumina/iron-pillared clay catalyst, but the yield of oil-solubles was considerably lower. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. These catalysts were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars. Finally the iron component was added either before or after thermal removal of organic pillars.

  5. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  6. Heat conduction in metal-filled polymers - The role of particle size, shape, and orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, D.; Tomkiewicz, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of analysis for predicting the thermal conductivity of disperse composites from the properties of the component phases and elementary characterizations of particle shapes and orientation. This analysis successfully predicted the sensitivity to particle shape which was confirmed by experiments also reported in this paper. These results suggest that highly elongated particles may be used to achieve dramatic modifications of thermal conductivity and the analysis presented here may be a useful tool in the design or development of disperse composites of specific thermal conductivity. The analysis may also apply to other properties such as electrical conductivity or magnetic permeability.

  7. Modeling emissivity of low-emissivity coating containing horizontally oriented metallic flake particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuai; Yuan, Le; Weng, Xiaolong; Deng, Longjiang

    2014-11-01

    The scattering and absorption cross sections of horizontally oriented metallic flake particles are estimated by extended geometric optics that includes diffraction and edge effects. Emissivity of the coating containing those particles is calculated using Kubelka-Munk theory. The dependence of emissivity of the coating on the radius, thickness, content of metallic flake particles and coating thickness is discussed. Finally, theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements with Al/acrylic resin coating system and the results show that simulation values are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  8. Application of randomly oriented spheroids for retrieval of dust particle parameters from multiwavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Dubovik, O.; Kolgotin, A.; Lapyonok, T.; di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Whiteman, D. N.; Mishchenko, M.; Tanré, D.

    2010-11-01

    Multiwavelength (MW) Raman lidars have demonstrated their potential to profile particle parameters; however, until now, the physical models used in retrieval algorithms for processing MW lidar data have been predominantly based on the Mie theory. This approach is applicable to the modeling of light scattering by spherically symmetric particles only and does not adequately reproduce the scattering by generally nonspherical desert dust particles. Here we present an algorithm based on a model of randomly oriented spheroids for the inversion of multiwavelength lidar data. The aerosols are modeled as a mixture of two aerosol components: one composed only of spherical and the second composed of nonspherical particles. The nonspherical component is an ensemble of randomly oriented spheroids with size-independent shape distribution. This approach has been integrated into an algorithm retrieving aerosol properties from the observations with a Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser. Such a lidar provides three backscattering coefficients, two extinction coefficients, and the particle depolarization ratio at a single or multiple wavelengths. Simulations were performed for a bimodal particle size distribution typical of desert dust particles. The uncertainty of the retrieved particle surface, volume concentration, and effective radius for 10% measurement errors is estimated to be below 30%. We show that if the effect of particle nonsphericity is not accounted for, the errors in the retrieved aerosol parameters increase notably. The algorithm was tested with experimental data from a Saharan dust outbreak episode, measured with the BASIL multiwavelength Raman lidar in August 2007. The vertical profiles of particle parameters as well as the particle size distributions at different heights were retrieved. It was shown that the algorithm developed provided substantially reasonable results consistent with the available independent information about the observed aerosol event.

  9. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  10. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  11. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  12. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  13. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 9, 1992--August 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of mixed pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported catalysts and determination of their catalytic activities were continued in this quarter. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the preparative method for high activity iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite catalysts, a new batch of the catalyst was prepared and tested for hydrocracking activity with bibenzyl. This preparation gave conversion and product distribution similar to that reported previously. The mixed iron/alumina-pillared clay was also prepared using a pillaring solution that was aged for longer period of time. To determine the importance of the type of pillaring support in hydrocracking activity, iron/zirconia-pillared montmorillonite was prepared using the same technique as that for iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite. The reaction of bibenzyl with the sulfided iron/zirconia-pillared catalyst gave a lower hydrocracking conversion than the iron/alumina-pillared catalyst. Addition of a second catalytic metal to the clay support was attempted to determine if a synergistic effect could improve liquefaction. Ferric nitrate and stannous chloride were added to the clay, but the resulting catalyst was relatively poor for hydrocracking and hydrogenation compared with ferric nitrate supported on the clay. New disposable iron catalysts with high acidity and surface area are desired for coal liquefaction. Synthetic iron aluminosilicates were prepared by methods similar to those used for the nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM) catalysts, which are very effective for hydrogenation and reforming of hydrocarbons. The iron aluminosilicate catalysts were tested for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of bibenzyl, naphthalene and pyrene. Pyrene hydrogenation was effectively catalyzed by the sulfided synthetic iron catalyst.

  14. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  15. Orientation control of liquid crystals using carbon-nanotube-magnetic particle hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Youn, Sang Cheon; Kim, Yun Ho; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-06-28

    We have developed a simple yet versatile method for aligning liquid crystals (LCs) by using magnetic-field oriented single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) that were modified with magnetic particles. A high degree of homeotropic/planar LC alignment was achieved by SWNTs being exposed to a very low strength magnetic field, combined with strong π-π interactions between the biphenyl group in the LCs and the wall of the SWNTs. PMID:23676827

  16. The effects of particle shape, orientation and size distribution on the conductivity of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S. P.; Jones, S. B.; Robinson, D. A.

    2003-04-01

    Understanding the relationship between the effective electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of soils and rocks and their porosity and volumetric water content is important because measurements of electrical properties are used to determine porosity and water content. In this lecture we are going to report experimental and theoretical studies aimed at improving our understanding of the way the geometrical attributes of granular materials determine their effective conductivity and permittivity (2--5). In order to avoid surface conductivity and bound water effects we have used coarse granular materials of low surface area such as glass beads, quartz sand grains, tuff and mica particles. Accurate measurements of the effective conductivity (4,5) and permittivity (2,3,5) of anisotropic packings of mica particles (2,4) and isotropic packings of glass beads, sand grains and tuff particles (3,5) have demonstrated: 1, an alteration of the directional effective conductivities and permittivities of anisotropic packings attributed to particle shape and orientation; 2, a reduction in the permittivity of isotropic packings due to deviation from a spherical particle shape and an increased broadness of particle size distribution. The measured effective conductivities and permittivities are predicted reasonably well by modified classical mixing formulas (2,3,5), reviewed in e.g. (1), and by percolation concepts (4). (1) Sihvola, A., Electromagnetic mixing formulas and applications, IEE Electromagnetic Waves Series No. 47., Institution of Electrical Engineers, Stevenage, Herts. UK., 1999. (2) Jones, S. B. and Friedman, S. P., Particle shape effects on the effective permittivity of anisotropic or isotropic media consisting of aligned o randomly oriented ellipsoidal particles, Water Resour. Res., 36:2821--2833, 2000. (3) Robinson, D.A. and Friedman, S. P., Effect of particle size distribution on the effective dielectric permittivity of saturated granular media. Water

  17. Electro-phoretic rotation and orientation of polarizable spheroidal particles in AC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloh, Touvia; Goldstein, Ben Weis

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical study is provided for determining the angular rotation rate of an ideally polarized (metallic) spheroidal particle freely suspended in a symmetric electrolyte under general alternating current ambient electric excitations. In particular, we discuss cases of electro-rotation (ROT) and electro-orientation (EOR) of such nano/micro particles incited by two orthogonal electric field components which may be out of phase. The analysis is carried under the Poisson-Nernst-Planck approximation and the "weak" field model. The analytic expressions thus obtained are valid for a conducting prolate spheroid with arbitrary eccentricity including the limiting cases of isotropic spheres and infinitely long cylindrical rods. The total dipolophoretic (DIP) angular velocity is decomposed from contributions due to dielectrophoresis (DEP) induced by the dipole-moment within the particle and by the induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP) mechanism near the conducting surface. It is demonstrated that the explicit expressions for the DIP angular velocities reduce to the well-known ROT solution for the sphere as well as to the recently found expressions (based on slender-body approximation) for both ROT and EOR of metal nanowires [Arcenegui et al., "Electro-orientation and electrorotation of metal nanowires," Phys. Rev. E 88(6), 063018 (2013)]. Some comparisons with available experimental data are also provided for slender spheroidal geometries including a detailed discussion of DEP and ICEP effects and their relative contributions to the overall DIP rotational velocity.

  18. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1992--February 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron catalysts have been shown in previous reports of this project to significantly improve yields of heptane-soluble products obtained in the liquefaction of both as received and acid-exchanged Wyodak subbituminous coal and Blind Canyon bituminous coal. In this quarter, the soluble product (LSW) obtained from the noncatalytic low-severity liquefaction of Wyodak coal was used as a feed to determine the activity of iron based catalysts for the hydrogenation and depolymerization steps. Comparison data for liquefaction of the soluble LSW with other catalysts were desired, and these data were obtained for a dispersed form of iron sulfide, prepared via iron hydroxyoxide (PETC method). The iron oxyhydroxide catalyst was directly precipitated on LSW product using either water or ethanol as the solvent. An insight into the functioning of the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay in coal liquefaction was investigated by preparing and studying an iron oxoaluminate structure. An investigation of new methods for the production of tetralin soluble iron oxometallate catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. The hydrogenation activity of iron oxoaluminate was investigated using pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene as the test compounds, and results were compared with thermal reactions. In order to determine the loss of activity, recovered catalyst was recycled a second time for the hydrotreating of pyrene. Reaction of 1-methylnaphthalene with iron oxoaluminate also gave very high conversion to 1- and 5-methyltetralins and small amount of 2- and 6-methyltetralins. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous and Blind Canyon bituminous coal was investigated using an in situ sulfided soluble iron oxoaluminate catalyst.

  19. Mechanisms behind injecting the combination of nano-clay particles and polymer solution for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili Nezhad, Seyyed Shahram; Cheraghian, Goshtasp

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory investigations and field applications have proved injection of polymer solution to be an effective means to improve oil recovery for reservoirs of medium oil viscosity. The incremental oil produced in this case is the result of an increase in areal and vertical sweep efficiencies. Biopolymers and synthetic polymers are the major categories used in the petroleum industry for specific reasons. Biopolymers like xanthan are limited in their application as they are more susceptible to biodegradation. Synthetic polymers like Hydrolyzed PolyAcrylaMide (HPAM) have a much wider application as they are less susceptible to biodegradation. Furthermore, development of nanotechnology has successfully provided technical and economical viable alternatives for present materials. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of combining clay nanoparticles with polymer solution on oil recovery. This paper includes a history match of both one-dimensional and two-dimensional polymer floods using a three-dimensional numerical model for fluid flow and mass transport. Results indicated that the amount of polymer adsorption decreased when clay nanoparticles were added to the PolyAcrylaMide solution; however, mobility ratio improvement is believed to be the main contributor for the proposed method in order to enhance much oil recovery compared to xanthan flood and HPAM flood.

  20. Sorption and desorption characteristics of a packed bed of clay-CaCl{sub 2} desiccant particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, C.S.; Abdallah, N. Ben

    2009-10-15

    Desiccants can be used in conjunction with solar energy to provide a viable alternative to traditional air conditioning techniques. A desiccant consisting of clay and calcium chloride was developed and tested using multiple sorption and desorption cycles. During sorption, inlet air temperatures from 23 to 36 C with corresponding relative humidities of 42-66% were tested. Additionally, superficial air velocities from 0.17 to 0.85 m/s were tested. During desorption, inlet air temperatures from 50 to 57 C and superficial air velocities of approximately 0.30 and 0.60 m/s were tested. A regression equation was determined for the mass of water sorbed by the clay-CaCl2 desiccant with a R{sup 2} value of 0.917. The desorption data was regressed to an exponential function and significant k-values were determined. An equation for pressure drop through the desiccant was determined and compared to existing models. The desiccant was found to perform well during the repeated test cycles though small masses of desiccant were lost due to surface disintegration of the desiccant spheres. (author)

  1. Angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Severijns, N.; Golovko, V.V.; Kraev, I.S.; Phalet, T.; Belyaev, A.A.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Noga, V.I.; Erzinkyan, A.L.; Parfenova, V.P.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Herzog, P.; Tramm, C.; Filimonov, V.T.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Zotov, E.; Gurevich, G.M.; Rusakov, A.V.; Vyachin, V.N.; Zakoucky, D.

    2005-04-01

    The anisotropy in the angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei, which are among the strongest deformed {alpha} emitters, was measured. Large {alpha} anisotropies have been observed for all three nuclei. The results are compared with calculations based on {alpha}-particle tunneling through a deformed Coulomb barrier.

  2. Light scattering by size-shape distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles of a size comparable to a wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    1993-01-01

    Rigorously light scattering by size-shape distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles are calculated by the T-matrix method, as extended to randomly oriented scatterers. The computational scheme is described along with a newly developed convergence procedure that makes it possible to substantially reduce computer time and storage requirements. The elements of the Stokes scattering matrix for a power-law size distribution of randomly oriented moderately aspherical spheroids are shown to be much smoother than and differ substantially from those of equivalent monodisperse spheroids; averaging over orientations does not eliminate the necessity of averaging over particle sizes. The angular-scattering behavior of the ensembles of nonspherical particles is found to be significantly different from that of the equivalent polydisperse spheres.

  3. Orientational kinetics of dipolar particles in a Maxwell fluid matrix: inertialess limit for the rotary microrheology.

    PubMed

    Raikher, Yu L; Rusakov, V V

    2005-12-01

    We study magnetic response of an assembly of ferroparticles suspended in a viscoelastic matrix which is modeled by a Maxwell fluid with a unique stress relaxation time. The problem refers to the magnetic microrheology approach where deformational properties of a complex fluid are tested with the aid of embedded nanoparticle probes set to motion by an external ac magnetic field. A possibility is considered to simplify the description of the orientational kinetics of the system at the expense of neglecting inertia effects in particle rotary motion. It is shown that in this aspect a Maxwell matrix differs essentially from the Newtonian one. In the latter the inertialess approximation for the particles of the approximately 10nm size is valid practically unboundedly. For a viscoelastic matrix the inertialess approximation means an important restriction on the value of the stress relaxation time. Assuming weak nonequilibrium, the magneto-orientational relaxation times are found and low-frequency magnetic spectra of a viscoelastic suspension are determined in the presence of a constant (magnetizing) field. PMID:16485946

  4. Detection of preferential particle orientation in the atmosphere. Development of an alternative polarization lidar system

    SciTech Connect

    Geier, Manfred; Arienti, Marco

    2014-07-19

    Increasing interest in polarimetric characterization of atmospheric aerosols has led to the development of complete sample-measuring (Mueller) polarimeters that are capable of measuring the entire backscattering phase matrix of a probed volume. The Mueller polarimeters consist of several moving parts, which limit measurement rates and complicate data analysis. In this paper, we present the concept of a less complex polarization lidar setup for detection of preferential orientation of atmospheric particulates. On the basis of theoretical considerations of data inversion stability and propagation of measurement uncertainties, an optimum optical configuration is established for two modes of operation (with either a linear or a circular polarized incident laser beam). We discovered that the conceptualized setup falls in the category of incomplete sample-measuring polarimeters and uses four detection channels for simultaneous measurement of the backscattered light. Likewise, the expected performance characteristics are discussed through an example of a typical aerosol with a small fraction of particles oriented in a preferred direction. As a result, the theoretical analysis suggests that achievable accuracies in backscatter cross-sections and depolarization ratios are similar to those with conventional two-channel configurations, while in addition preferential orientation can be detected with the proposed four-channel system for a wide range of conditions.

  5. Defects, Entropy, and the Stabilization of Alternative Phase Boundary Orientations in Battery Electrode Particles

    DOE PAGES

    Heo, Tae Wook; Tang, Ming; Chen, Long-Qing; Wood, Brandon C.

    2016-01-04

    Using a novel statistical approach that efficiently explores the space of possible defect configurations, our present study investigates the chemomechanical coupling between interfacial structural defects and phase boundary alignments within phase-separating electrode particles. Applied to the battery cathode material LiXFePO4 as an example, the theoretical analysis reveals that small, defect-induced deviations from an ideal interface can lead to dramatic shifts in the orientations of phase boundaries between Li-rich and Li-lean phases, stabilizing otherwise unfavorable orientations. Significantly, this stabilization arises predominantly from configurational entropic factors associated with the presence of the interfacial defects rather than from absolute energetic considerations. The specificmore » entropic factors pertain to the diversity of defect configurations and their contributions to rotational/orientational rigidity of phase boundaries. Comparison of the predictions with experimental observations indicates that the additional entropy contributions indeed play a dominant role under actual cycling conditions, leading to the conclusion that interfacial defects must be considered when analyzing the stability and evolution kinetics of the internal phase microstructure of strongly phase-separating systems. Possible implications for tuning the kinetics of (de)lithiation based on selective defect incorporation are discussed. Ultimately, this understanding can be generalized to the chemomechanics of other defective solid phase boundaries.« less

  6. Detection of preferential particle orientation in the atmosphere. Development of an alternative polarization lidar system

    DOE PAGES

    Geier, Manfred; Arienti, Marco

    2014-07-19

    Increasing interest in polarimetric characterization of atmospheric aerosols has led to the development of complete sample-measuring (Mueller) polarimeters that are capable of measuring the entire backscattering phase matrix of a probed volume. The Mueller polarimeters consist of several moving parts, which limit measurement rates and complicate data analysis. In this paper, we present the concept of a less complex polarization lidar setup for detection of preferential orientation of atmospheric particulates. On the basis of theoretical considerations of data inversion stability and propagation of measurement uncertainties, an optimum optical configuration is established for two modes of operation (with either a linearmore » or a circular polarized incident laser beam). We discovered that the conceptualized setup falls in the category of incomplete sample-measuring polarimeters and uses four detection channels for simultaneous measurement of the backscattered light. Likewise, the expected performance characteristics are discussed through an example of a typical aerosol with a small fraction of particles oriented in a preferred direction. As a result, the theoretical analysis suggests that achievable accuracies in backscatter cross-sections and depolarization ratios are similar to those with conventional two-channel configurations, while in addition preferential orientation can be detected with the proposed four-channel system for a wide range of conditions.« less

  7. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  8. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1993--May 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production and utilization of tetralin-soluble iron oxometallate precursors for coal liquefaction catalysts was continued in this quarter. Further descriptions of the catalytic activities of the sulfided forms were obtained. The hydrogenation activities of catalysts derived from iron oxotitanate and cobalt oxoaluminate were investigated using pyrene as a the test compound, and results were compared with thermal reactions. The hydrogenation activity of iron oxotitanate was superior to other catalysts including iron oxoaluminate. The hydrogenation activity of cobalt oxoaluminate was similar to that of iron oxoaluminate reported in previous quarterly report. The liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was investigated using in situ sulfided iron oxotitanate catalyst. In order to improve the usefulness of iron oxoaluminate as a liquefaction catalyst, iron oxoaluminate was supported on acid-treated montmorillonite (K-10). Supporting the iron oxoaluminate on an acidic support significantly improved the hydrogenation activity of iron oxoaluminate. The hydrocracking activity was increased by a large factor. Thus the aluminate and titanate structures surrounding the pyrrhotite that forms during sulfidation have a beneficial effect in preventing deactivation of the iron sites, and the presence of the acidic sites in the clay results in effective catalytic synergism between catalyst and support. These clay-supported iron oxometallates are highly promising catalysts for coal liquefaction. Iron oxyhydroxide and triiron supported on acid-treated montmorillonite (K-10) were tested for the liquefaction of ion-exchanged Wyodak (IEW) to minimize effects of the coal mineral matter. Both sulfided catalysts gave very high conversions of coal to THF-soluble and heptane-soluble (oils) products.

  9. Application and advantages of novel clay ceramic particles (CCPs) in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Yue, Qinyan; Wu, Suqing; Zhao, Yaqin; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Utilization of clay ceramic particles (CCPs) as the novel filter media employed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) was investigated. After a series of tests and operations, CCPs have presented higher total porosity and roughness, meanwhile lower bulk and grain density. When CCPs were utilized as fillers, the reactor had a shorter start up period of 45 days comparing with conventional reactors, and removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) still reached about 76% at a relatively lower temperature during the stable state. In addition, degradation of COD and ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) at different media height along the reactor was evaluated, and the dates showed that the main reduction process happened within the first 30 cm media height from the bottom flange. Five phases were observed according to different organic loadings during the experiment period, and the results indicated that COD removal increased linearly when the organic loading was increased.

  10. Preferred orientation of phyllosilicates: Effects of composition and stress on resedimented mudstone microfabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, Ruarri J.; Schleicher, Anja M.; Schneider, Julia; Flemings, Peter B.; Germaine, John T.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    2011-09-01

    Development of a preferred orientation of clay minerals is investigated in response to changes in vertical effective stress and composition in resedimented material (Boston Blue Clay). Boston Blue Clay (BBC), an illitic glacio-marine clay composed of 57% clay-sized particles (<2 μm) was resedimented and step-loaded to a vertical effective stress of 0.1 MPa, 1 MPa, 6 MPa, and 10 MPa. These four samples show a small increase in preferred orientation of mica and chlorite with increasing vertical effective stress. Furthermore, pure BBC powder was admixed with silica (silt-sized quartz) in five different ratios of BBC:silica to form sediments with 57%, 52%, 48%, 44%, and 36% < 2 μm particles and were loaded to a maximum vertical effective stress of 2.4 MPa. Mica preferred orientation decreases significantly with decreasing clay content at one stress state. We used and compared three different techniques to characterize and quantify the preferred orientation of phyllosilicates: transmission-mode X-ray texture goniometry, reflection-mode X-ray texture goniometry, and grain and pore networks imaged using secondary and backscattered electron micrographs gathered on argon-ion-milled surfaces. Preferred orientation of the clay minerals shows good agreement between transmission-mode X-ray texture goniometry and reflection-mode X-ray texture goniometry. Mercury porosimetry further illuminates vertical effective stress and compositional controls on microfabric.

  11. Obtaining Approximate Values of Exterior Orientation Elements of Multi-Intersection Images Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, S. W.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, an efficient global optimization algorithm in the field of artificial intelligence, named Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), is introduced into close range photogrammetric data processing. PSO can be applied to obtain the approximate values of exterior orientation elements under the condition that multi-intersection photography and a small portable plane control frame are used. PSO, put forward by an American social psychologist J. Kennedy and an electrical engineer R.C. Eberhart, is a stochastic global optimization method based on swarm intelligence, which was inspired by social behavior of bird flocking or fish schooling. The strategy of obtaining the approximate values of exterior orientation elements using PSO is as follows: in terms of image coordinate observed values and space coordinates of few control points, the equations of calculating the image coordinate residual errors can be given. The sum of absolute value of each image coordinate is minimized to be the objective function. The difference between image coordinate observed value and the image coordinate computed through collinear condition equation is defined as the image coordinate residual error. Firstly a gross area of exterior orientation elements is given, and then the adjustment of other parameters is made to get the particles fly in the gross area. After iterative computation for certain times, the satisfied approximate values of exterior orientation elements are obtained. By doing so, the procedures like positioning and measuring space control points in close range photogrammetry can be avoided. Obviously, this method can improve the surveying efficiency greatly and at the same time can decrease the surveying cost. And during such a process, only one small portable control frame with a couple of control points is employed, and there are no strict requirements for the space distribution of control points. In order to verify the effectiveness of this algorithm, two experiments are

  12. Clay Formation and Fabric Development in the DFDP-1 Borehole, Central Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, A.; Sutherland, R.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2015-12-01

    Samples retrieved by shallow drilling into two principal slip zones of the central Alpine Fault, New Zealand, offer an excellent opportunity to investigate clay formation, fabric development and fluid-rock interaction in an active fault zone. Here, we provide lithological and structural observations of five samples from borehole DFDP-1B, drilled during Phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011. Each sample's mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the preferred orientation of the clays was analyzed by x-ray texture goniometry (XTG). The dominant clay mineral phases are illite and chlorite/kaolinite. Newly formed smectitic clays are observed solely in the cm-thick zones of fault gouge, indicating that these mineral reactions are restricted to the fault zone. We observe that smectite forms by transformation of very fine-grained material produced by cataclasis during slip. Clay fabric intensity of both illite and chlorite reveal that relatively strong fabrics are present in the cataclasites above the principal slip zone, but that the clay minerals in the gouge have a very weak preferred orientation. The weak fabric supports the notion that clay orientation is a result of authigenic mineral growth and not of strain-induced particle reorientation. It also indicates that fluids are able to pass through the gouge, presumably along variably spaced and interconnected fracture networks or between particle boundaries. Our analysis of samples retrieved by DFDP-1 drilling and sampling demonstrates intimate association of localized shear, comminution, and rapid fluid-rock interaction. It thus contributes to a growing body of evidence that alteration processes, particularly formation of frictionally weak smectitic clay minerals, may be a significant weakening mechanism within active shallow faults.

  13. Influence of smectite suspension structure on sheet orientation in dry sediments: XRD and AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L

    2010-06-15

    The structure-building phenomena within clay aggregates are governed by forces acting between clay particles. Measurements of such forces are important to understand in order to manipulate the aggregate structure for applications such as dewatering of mineral processing tailings. A parallel particle orientation is required when conducting XRD investigation on the oriented samples and conduct force measurements acting between basal planes of clay mineral platelets using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate how smectite clay platelets were oriented on silicon wafer substrate when dried from suspension range of methods like SEM, XRD and AFM were employed. From these investigations, we conclude that high clay concentrations and larger particle diameters (up to 5 microm) in suspension result in random orientation of platelets in the substrate. The best possible laminar orientation in the clay dry film, represented in the XRD 001/020 intensity ratio of 47 was obtained by drying thin layers from 0.02 wt.% clay suspensions of the natural pH. Conducted AFM investigations show that smectite studied in water based electrolytes show very long-range repulsive forces lower in strength than electrostatic forces from double-layer repulsion. It was suggested that these forces may have structural nature. Smectite surface layers rehydrate in water environment forms surface gel with spongy and cellular texture which cushion approaching AFM probe. This structural effect can be measured in distances larger than 1000 nm from substrate surface and when probe penetrate this gel layer, structural linkages are forming between substrate and clay covered probe. These linkages prevent subsequently smooth detachments of AFM probe on way back when retrieval. This effect of tearing new formed structure apart involves larger adhesion-like forces measured in retrieval. It is also suggested that these effect may be enhanced by the nano-clay particles interaction.

  14. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 8, 1993--August 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    High hydrocracking and liquefaction activity can be achieved with 10 wt.% of sulfided clay-supported iron catalysts. Further tests and demonstrations of this activity were required. Iron hydroxyoxide was generated on acid-treated montmorillonite. The new batch of catalyst exhibited high hydrocracking activity, Three hour tests with the solubilized intermediate from low-severity treatment of Wyodak coal (LSW) gave a high conversion (45%) of the heptane-insoluble LSW intermediate to heptane-soluble products. An investigation of new methods for the production of catalysts from tetralin-soluble iron oxometallates and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Iron oxotitanate and iron oxoaluminate gave very high conversions of LSW to heptane solubles (61% and 54%, respectively). The high yields of heptane soluble products obtained with these catalysts offers a potential for use in liquefaction stages with solubilized coal, or at least serve as a model for producing active catalysts via mixed metal oxides. Methods for successfully testing dispersed iron catalysts with the low-severity intermediate were also devised. Catalyst recovered from the dispersed iron hydroxyoxide-catalyzed reaction of ion-exchanged Wyodak gave a high conversion (47%) of LSW to heptane solubles.

  15. Magnetic manipulation of actin orientation, polymerization, and gliding on myosin using superparamagnetic iron oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Guzik, Stephanie; Sumner, James P; Moreland, John; Koretsky, Alan P

    2011-02-11

    The actin cytoskeleton controls cell shape, motility, as well as intracellular molecular trafficking. The ability to remotely manipulate actin is therefore highly desirable as a tool to probe and manipulate biological processes at the molecular level. We demonstrate actin manipulation by labeling actin filaments with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (IOPs) and applying a uniform magnetic field to affect actin orientation, polymerization and gliding on myosin. We show for the first time magnetic manipulation of magnetizable actin filaments at the molecular level while gliding on a bed of myosin molecules and during polymerization. A model for the magnetic alignment and guiding mechanism is proposed based on the torque from the induced molecular anisotropy due to interactions between neighboring IOPs distributed along magnetically labeled actin molecules.

  16. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  17. Impoundment liner repair by electrophoresis of clay

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, A.T.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Stallard, W.M.; Chung, M.

    1997-10-01

    Electrophoresis of clay particles from dilute suspensions is an innovative technology to seal leaks in operating surface impoundments that does not require removal of impoundment contents, exposure of workers to contaminants, or prior knowledge of the leak locations. A suspension of clay particles is added to the impoundment liquid. A cathode (negative electrode) is placed inside and an anode (positive electrode) is placed outside the leaking impoundment. A direct current (DC) electric field is imposed externally across the geomembrane liner through the leaks. The clay particles migrate to the leaks under the influence of the imposed electric field to form a clay cake seal. The results of laboratory experiments to evaluate the use of a DC electric field to direct migration of clay particles into a leak and the hydraulic integrity of the resulting seal are presented in this paper. The effects of clay type, clay particle concentration in suspension, size of leak, and electric field strength on the migration of clay particles and process of cake formation are evaluated. The sealing effectiveness and internal structure of the resulting clay cakes are examined by hydraulic conductivity measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Electrophoretic mobilities of bentonite particles in different chemical environments were also measured to evaluate the feasibility of the technology in practical situations.

  18. Acoustic metafluid with anisotropic mass density and tunable sound speed: An approach based on suspensions of orientable anisotropic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitel, Mark; Tse, Stephen; Shan, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    We investigate liquid suspensions of micron-scale, anisotropic particles as potential acoustic metafluids having anisotropic and actively controllable acoustic properties. The effective mass density (and hence the sound propagation speed) of these metafluids can vary because the added mass of an anisotropic particle suspended in the fluid changes with the particle's orientation relative to the direction of the wave propagation. A suspension with disc-like particles oriented broadside to the direction of wave propagation is thus expected to have higher effective inertia and lower sound speed than a suspension with particles with end-on alignment. To test these predictions, sound speed is measured with a time-of-flight method in suspensions of micron-size nickel flakes suspended in oil, with and without magnetic-field-induced alignment of the particles. The sound speed, relative to the unaligned case, is found to decrease for particles oriented broadside to the sound wave, and increase for edgewise alignment. We also investigate the frequency dependence of the effective sound speed, since the added mass effect is expected to diminish as the flow becomes steady at low frequencies. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of a model proposed by Ahuja & Hardee (J. Acoust. Soc. Am 1978) for the acoustic properties of aligned oblate-spheroid suspensions.

  19. Coherent diffraction of a single virus particle: The impact of a water layer on the available orientational information

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Weckert, E.; Ziaja, B.; Larsson, D. S. D.; Spoel, D. van der

    2011-03-15

    Coherent diffractive imaging using x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) may provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution structural analysis of single particles sprayed from an aqueous solution into the laser beam. As a result, diffraction images are measured from randomly oriented objects covered by a water layer. We analyze theoretically how the thickness of the covering water layer influences the structural and orientational information contained in the recorded diffraction images. This study has implications for planned experiments on single-particle imaging with XFELs.

  20. Mechanisms of sequential particle transfer and characteristics of light neutron-excess and oriented nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanina, L. I.; Zelenskaya, N. S.

    2012-03-01

    The procedure for evaluating the second-order corrections to the matrix elements of the reaction A( x, y) B, which are obtained using the method of distorted waves with a finite radius of intercluster interaction (DWBAFR), is developed. It is based on the assumption of a virtual cluster structure of light nuclei and uses integral equations for a four-body problem in the Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas formalism. These corrections are related with the mechanisms of sequential particles transfer. The latter are represented by the quadrangle diagrams. Their matrix elements are summed up coherently with those given by the pole and triangle diagrams which were calculated by using DWBAFR. The computer code QUADRO is written for the numerical implementation of the method proposed. The statistical tensors of nucleus B formed in the reaction A( x, y) B at incident particle energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon in the center of mass frame are determined. Specific calculations allowed for description of both the experimental cross sections (0-rank statistical tensors) of various reactions (including those where nucleus B has some excess neutrons) and polarized characteristics of nucleus B* (in the case of the latter produced in the exited state). A two-neutron periphery of nuclei 6He, 10Be, 12B (both in dineutron and cigarlike configurations) is restored by analyzing the differential cross sections of elastic alpha-6He-scattering and 9Be( d, p)10Be and 10B( t, p)12B reactions. It is shown that the structure of neutron peripheries is fundamentally different for these nuclei and its feature depends on the way those neutron-excess nuclei are formed: in 6He both configurations contribute to a two-neutron halo, while in 10Be there is a barely noticeable one-neutron halo, and in 12B there is a "dineutron skin". Orientation characteristics of nuclei B* are calculated. Their comparison with experimental data made it possible to draw important conclusions about a contribution to the statistical

  1. Electric alignment of plate shaped clay aggregates in oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castberg, Rene; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the rotation of plate shaped aggregates of clay mineral particles immersed in silicone oil. The rotation is induced by an external electric field. The rotation time is measured as a function of the following parameters: electric field strength, the plate geometry (length and width) and the dielectric properties of the plates. We find that the plates always align with their longest axis parallel to the direction of the electric field (E), independently of the arrangement of individual clay ‑2 mineral particles within the plate. The rotation time is found to scale as E and is proportional to the viscosity (μ), which coincides well with a model that describes orientation of dipoles in electric fields. As the length of the plate is increased we quantify a difference between the longitudinal and transverse polarisability. Finally, we show that moist plates align faster. We attribute this to the change of the dielectric properties of the plate due to the presence of water.

  2. Clay Swelling and Particle Redistribution in a Saw-Cut Fracture in the Paintbrush Nonwelded Unit of the Topopah Spring Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Salve, R.

    2001-12-01

    Flow through the altered nonwelded tuffs of the Paintbrush unit (PTn) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is thought to be primarily through the highly porous rock matrix. Due to matrix flow and the sloping structure of the unit, the PTn is thought to divert downward-flowing water laterally. However, large fractures and faults in the PTn may also provide pathways for flow through the unit and these may prevent or interrupt lateral flow through the unit. In field tests where water was released directly into a fault in the altered PTn, flow rates declined over time. To evaluate processes such as matrix swelling and particle redistribution that might explain this decline, we performed a laboratory experiment using a 12 cm diameter x 21.6 cm long core with an axial saw-cut fracture. The core was extracted from the argillic Tpbt2C layer. We monitored permeability, inlet and outlet flow rate, and the volume change of the rock core (contained in a pressure vessel) while flow occurred through the fracture and matrix. Water containing various sodium chloride concentrations (1 M, 0.5 M, 0 M, and 1M) was flowed through the fracture to observe the effect of salt concentration on fracture permeability in the smectite-rich rock core. The sample swelled initially, despite the high salt concentration (1 M) of the inlet water. The permeability of the fracture decreased with declining salt concentration and increased with increasing salt concentration indicating that clay swelling decreased fracture aperture and reduced the flow rate. Particle redistribution (dispersion and flocculation) was indicated by particles in the effluent. Particles from lower salinity flows remained suspended in the effluent container, while those from higher salinity flows settled more easily, were larger, and more compact. If particle redistribution were controlling the flow, the permeability should have increased during low salinity water flow because of particle erosion. This work was supported by the Director

  3. Platelet-like hexagonal SrFe12O19 particles: Hydrothermal synthesis and their orientation in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Peng, Xiaoling; Li, Jing; Yang, Yanting; Xu, Jingcai; Wang, Panfeng; Jin, Dingfeng; Jin, Hongxiao; Hong, Bo; Wang, Xinqing; Ge, Hongliang

    2016-08-01

    Platelet-like hexagonal SrFe12O19 particles were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and the effects of molar ratio of Fe/Sr (RFe/Sr) on the phase compositions, morphologies and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated. The optimum RFe/Sr is identified as 8:1. The hexagonal platelet-like particles are nano-scale in thickness and micro-scale in diameter. The low coercivity is a consequence of the large shape anisotropy of the as-synthesized particles. The platelet-like hexagonal SrFe12O19 particles were then dispersed in epoxy resin and formed ordered arrangement structure which took root in the curing epoxy matrix under an external magnetic field of 8000 Oe. The microstructures, morphologies and magnetic properties of the bulk samples orientated and nonaligned were studied. The platelet-like particles arrange with the platelet perpendicular to the magnetic field direction in the orientated samples. This demonstrates that the easy axis of the particle is perpendicular to the platelet, and that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy still plays a leading role in the changing effective anisotropy with the rapidly growing shape anisotropy. The remanence (Mr) of the bulk samples is changed obviously after orientation, while the coercivity nearly remains constant. That is, the maximum energy products (BH)max can be effectively adjusted by given a suitable magnetic field.

  4. On the orientational characteristics and transport coefficients of an oblate spheroidal hematite particle in a simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Akira

    2012-09-01

    We have developed the basic equation of the orientational distribution function of oblate spheroidal hematite particles with rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow under an applied magnetic field. An oblate spheroidal hematite particle has an important characteristic in that it is magnetized in a direction normal to the particle axis. Since a dilute dispersion is addressed in the present study, we have taken into account only the friction force (torque) whilst neglecting the hydrodynamic interactions among the particles. This basic equation has been solved numerically in order that we may investigate the dependence of the orientational distribution on the magnetic field strength, shear rate and rotational Brownian motion and the relationship between the orientational distribution and the transport coefficients such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We found that if the effect of the magnetic field is more dominant, the particle inclines in such a way that the oblate surface aligns in the magnetic field direction. If the Peclet number increases and the effect of the shear flow becomes more dominant, the particle inclines such that the oblate surface tilts in the shear flow direction. The viscosity due to the magnetic torque is shown to increase as the magnetic field increases, since the magnetic torque due to the applied magnetic field becomes the more dominant effect. Moreover, the viscosity increase is shown to be more significant for a larger aspect ratio or for a more oblate hematite particle. We have applied the analysis to the problem of particle sedimentation under gravity in the presence of a magnetic field applied in the sedimentation direction. The particles are found to sediment with the oblate surface aligning more significantly in the sedimentation direction as the applied magnetic field strength increases.

  5. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  6. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  7. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  8. Tensile and burning properties of clay/phenolic/GF composite and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Armunanto, V. Bram; Kristiawan, S. Adi

    2016-03-01

    Composite material has been widely used in automotive due to its properties can be improved by combining with reinforcement, like fiber and particle to enhance mechanical properties and burning resistance. This study aims to investigate the tensile and burning properties of hybrid composite combining glass fiber and clay in phenolic resin. The clay was produced from roof tile rejected by tile industries in Sokka, Kebumen, Indonesia. The composite was made using a press mold method for different number of laminates and orientation of woven-roving-glass-fiber/ WRGF (0/90 and ±45), and the total volume fraction of fiber and clay is constant 40%. The specimens were tested using universal testing machine for tensile properties and burning tests apparatus for burning resistance (time to ignite/ TTI and burning rate/ BR). The enhancing of the Clay/Penolic/GF composite can be performed by the increasing of GF laminates, and the composite with 0/90 orientation of WRGF has higher tensile strength and modulus compared to that with ±45 orientation of WRGF. Both composite with 0/90 and ±45 orientation of WRGF have similar burning resistance (TTI and BR) and the composite containing 13 laminates of WR-GF shows the best burning resistance. According to these properties, this composite has good opportunity to be applied as car body panels or other structure in industries due to save weight and high burning resistance.

  9. Networking and rheology of concentrated clay suspensions "matured" in mineral medicinal water.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Carola; Sánchez-Espejo, Rita; Cerezo, Pilar; Machado, José; Bonferoni, Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Salcedo, Inmaculada; Viseras, César

    2013-09-10

    This work studied the influence of "maturation" conditions (time and agitation) on aggregation states, gel structure and rheological behaviour of a special kind of pharmaceutical semisolid products made of concentrated clay suspensions in mineral medicinal water. Maturation of the samples was carried out in distilled and sulphated mineral medicinal water, both in static conditions (without agitation) and with manual stirring once a week, during a maximum period of three months. At the measured pH interval (7.5-8.0), three-dimensional band-type networks resulting from face/face contacts were predominant in the laminar (disc-like) clay suspensions, whereas the fibrous (rod-like) particles formed micro-aggregates by van der Waals attractions. The high concentration of solids in the studied systems greatly determined their behaviour. Rod-like sepiolite particles tend to align the major axis in aggregates promoted by low shearing maturation, whereas aggregates of disc-like smectite particles did not have a preferential orientation and their complete swelling required long maturation time, being independent of stirring. Maturation of both kinds of suspensions resulted in improved rheological properties. Laminar clay suspensions became more structured with time, independently from static or dynamic maturation conditions, whereas for fibrous clay periodic agitation was also required. Rheological properties of the studied systems have been related to aggregation states and networking mechanisms, depending on the type of clay minerals constituents. Physical stability of the suspensions was not impaired by the specific composition of the Graena medicinal water.

  10. An investigation of the stable orientations of orthorhombic particles in a thin film and their effect on its critical failure pressure.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-09-01

    The effects of shape and contact angle on the behaviour of orthorhombic particles at an interface and in thin films were investigated using Surface Evolver. It is shown that the energetically stable orientations of the particle change with its aspect ratio. Long, wide, flat particles with low contact angles are more stable in flat orientations, i.e. with two faces parallel to the flat film surface. More cubic particles with higher contact angles are more stable in twisted orientations, where the opposite sides of the film can be drawn together at the sharp edges of the particle. The combination of contact angle and orientation has been found to have a large effect on the capillary pressure required to rupture the film. A film containing a particle in a flat orientation will rupture at a capillary pressure up to three times greater than one containing an identical particle in a twisted orientation. Wider, flatter particles with low contact angles stabilise thin liquid films to a greater extent than cubic particles with high contact angles.

  11. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  12. Morphology and orientational behavior of silica-coated spindle-type hematite particles in a magnetic field probed by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Reufer, Mathias; Dietsch, Hervé; Gasser, Urs; Hirt, Ann; Menzel, Andreas; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2010-04-15

    Form factor and magnetic properties of silica-coated spindle-type hematite nanoparticles are determined from SAXS measurements with applied magnetic field and magnetometry measurements. The particle size, polydispersity and porosity are determined using a core-shell model for the form factor. The particles are found to align with their long axis perpendicular to the applied field. The orientational order is determined from the SAXS data and compared to the orientational order obtained from magnetometry. The direct access to both, the orientational order of the particles, and the magnetic moments allow one to determine the magnetic properties of the individual spindle-type hematite particles. We study the influence of the silica coating on the magnetic properties and find a fundamentally different behavior of silica-coated particles. The silica coating reduces the effective magnetic moment of the particles. This effect is enhanced with field strength and can be explained by superparamagnetic relaxation in the highly porous particles.

  13. A tilt-pair based method for assigning the projection directions of randomly oriented single-particle molecules.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yutaka; Mine, Shouhei; Kawasaki, Kazunori

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we describe an improved method to assign the projection angle for averaged images using tilt-pair images for three-dimensional reconstructions from randomly oriented single-particle molecular images. Our study addressed the so-called 'initial volume problem' in the single-particle reconstruction, which involves estimation of projection angles of the particle images. The projected images of the particles in different tilt observations were mixed and averaged for the characteristic views. After the ranking of these group average images in terms of reliable tilt angle information, mutual tilt angles between images are assigned from the constituent tilt-pair information. Then, multiples of the conical tilt series are made and merged to construct a network graph of the particle images in terms of projection angles, which are optimized for the three-dimensional reconstruction. We developed the method with images of a synthetic object and applied it to a single-particle image data set of the purified deacetylase from archaea. With the introduction of low-angle tilt observations to minimize unfavorable imaging conditions due to tilting, the results demonstrated reasonable reconstruction models without imposing symmetry to the structure. This method also guides its users to discriminate particle images of different conformational state of the molecule.

  14. Vector Radiative Transfer Equation for Arbitrarily Shaped and Arbitrarily Oriented Particles: A Microphysical Derivation from Statistical Electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    We use the concepts of statistical electromagnetics to derive the general radiative transfer equation (RTE) describing multiple scattering of polarized light by sparse discrete random media consisting of arbitrarily shaped and arbitrarily oriented particles. The derivation starts from the volume integral and Lippmann-Schwinger equations for the electric field scattered by a fixed N-particle system and proceeds to the vector form of the Foldy-Lax equations and their approximate far-field version. We then assume that particle positions are completely random and derive the vector RTE by applying the Twersky approximation to the coherent electric field and the Twersky and ladder approximations to the coherency dyad of the diffuse field in the limit N -> infinity. The concluding section discusses the physical meaning of the quantities entering the general vector RTE and the assumptions made in its derivation.

  15. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  16. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  17. Structure and orientation of small particles of platinum deposited on NaCl and mica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renou, A.; Gillet, M.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of small platinum particles condensed in vacuum onto NaCl (001), NaCl (111) and mica substrates was studied by electron diffraction and electron microscopy. Results show that above a certain substrate temperature decahedral or icosahedral particles are formed. These particles are practically absent with substrates cleaved in high vacuum. They are always much less numerous than in gold films prepared under the same conditions. Assumptions made to explain this phenomenon are: (1) the initial growth of an abnormal structure of the nuclei as opposed by the substrate; (2) the particles disappear before they attain a size which corresponds to the observations; and (3) the particles result from a coalescence mechanism leading to multiple twinned particles.

  18. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  19. Orientation of embedded Y2BaCuO5 particles within the YBa2Cu3Ox matrix in melt-textured YBCO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Babu, N. Hari; Cardwell, D. A.; Mücklich, F.; Murakami, M.

    2005-03-01

    Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was employed to study the local orientations of embedded Y2BaCuO5 (Y-211) particles within the YBa2Cu3Ox (Y-123) superconducting matrix of large grain, melt-textured Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) samples. High-quality Kikuchi patterns were obtained, enabling automated mapping of the individual crystal orientations and a two-phase analysis of the samples. Investigations were performed on a variety of melt-textured YBCO samples, including samples with different element additions. We observe from the maps that the embedded Y-211 particles do not have any preferred orientation in melt-textured YBCO with (001) orientation, and that the YBCO growth is not altered for certain orientations of the Y-211 particles. In samples with (100) orientation, on the other hand, we observe only a small misorientation within the YBCO matrix, and the embedded Y-211 particles do not exhibit any texture. We can conclude from the EBSD maps obtained that the formation of small Y-211 particles does not disturb the Y-123 matrix growth, whereas the presence of large Y-211 particles leads, significantly, to the formation of subgrains.

  20. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  1. Ni clay neoformation on montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Dähn, R; Scheidegger, A; Manceau, A; Schlegel, M; Baeyens, B; Bradbury, M H

    2001-03-01

    Polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (P-EXAFS) was used to study the sorption mechanism of Ni on the aluminous hydrous silicate montmorillonite at high ionic strength (0.3 M NaClO4), pH 8 and a Ni concentration of 0.66 mM. Highly textured self-supporting clay films were obtained by slowly filtrating a clay suspension after a reaction time of 14 days. P-EXAFS results indicate that sorbed Ni has a Ni clay-like structural environment with the same crystallographic orientation as montmorillonite layers.

  2. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  3. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  4. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species.

  5. Multishell Au/Ag/SiO2 nanorods with tunable optical properties as single particle orientation and rotational tracking probes

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Kuangcai; Lin, Chia -Cheng; Vela, Javier; Fang, Ning

    2015-04-07

    In this study, three-layer core–shell plasmonic nanorods (Au/Ag/SiO2–NRs), consisting of a gold nanorod core, a thin silver shell, and a thin silica layer, were synthesized and used as optical imaging probes under a differential interference contrast microscope for single particle orientation and rotational tracking. The localized surface plasmon resonance modes were enhanced upon the addition of the silver shell, and the anisotropic optical properties of gold nanorods were maintained. The silica coating enables surface functionalization with silane coupling agents and provides enhanced stability and biocompatibility. Taking advantage of the longitudinal LSPR enhancement, the orientation and rotational information of the hybridmore » nanorods on synthetic lipid bilayers and on live cell membranes were obtained with millisecond temporal resolution using a scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The results demonstrate that the as-synthesized hybrid nanorods are promising imaging probes with improved sensitivity and good biocompatibility for single plasmonic particle tracking experiments in biological systems.« less

  6. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  7. The Polarization Signature of Cirrus Clouds At Mm and Sub-mm Wavelength: Effect of Particle Size, Shape, and Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, J.

    Cirrus clouds can be found globally from the tropics to polar regions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. They are composed primarily of ice crystals in various shapes, with or without preferred orientation. Research shows that they have significant effects on the radiation budget of the Earth, on the water budget of the atmosphere, and therefore on the global climate. Information on the microphysical parameters of cirrus clouds is crucial to the understanding of the cirrus clouds impact on our climate. Recent work in both simulations and measurements has demonstrated the usefulness of passive millimeter and sub-millimeter radiometric measurements from space in determining cirrus cloud parameters such as the integrated ice water content (or ice water path) and the characteristic size of ice particles. However, these studies were mainly concerned with the information content of the radiometric inten- sity measurements, albeit some brief discussions on the potential of the polarization measurements were given in some literature. Frankly speaking, there is a shortage of systematic studies on the polarization signature from cirrus clouds at the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, i.e., how the polarization difference measured at two orthogonal polarizations is related to the ice particle size, the shape, and the orienta- tion. Here we present some results of a systematic analysis on the polarization effect of non-spherical ice particles. Three types of particles are considered: nearly spherical, cylindrical, and plate-like particles. Studies are carried out at the following 7 frequen- cies: 90, 157, 220, 340, 463, 683, and 874 GHz. Among these frequencies some (e.g. 90, 157, 220, and 340 GHz) have been tested in space-borne or air-borne sensors and some (e.g. 463, 683, and 874 GHz) are proved by simulations to be well suited for cirrus clouds measurements and therefore planned currently for a future satellite mis- sion.

  8. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  9. Synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid gel with acid activated clay after γ-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hoik; Sohn, Daewon

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid gel was prepared from acid activated clay (AA clay) and acrylic acid by gamma ray irradiation. Irradiated inorganic particles which have peroxide groups act as initiator because it generates oxide radicals by increasing temperature. Inorganic nanoparticles which are rigid part in hybrid gel also contribute to increase the mechanical property as a crosslinker. We prepared two hybrid gels to compare the effect of acid activated treatment of clay; one is synthesized with raw clay particles and another is synthesized with AA clay particles. The composition and structure of AA clay particles and raw clay particles were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence instrument and surface area analyzer. And chemical and physical property of hybrid gel with different ratios of acrylic acid and clay particle was tested by Raman spectroscope and universal testing machine (UTM). The synthesized hydrogel with 76% gel contents can elongated approximately 1000% of its original size.

  10. Effects of nasal drug delivery device and its orientation on sprayed particle deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xuwen; Dong, Jingliang; Shang, Yidan; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of nasal drug delivery device and the spray nozzle orientation on sprayed droplets deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity were numerically studied. Prior to performing the numerical investigation, an in-house designed automated actuation system representing mean adults actuation force was developed to produce realistic spray plume. Then, the spray plume development was filmed by high speed photography system, and spray characteristics such as spray cone angle, break-up length, and average droplet velocity were obtained through off-line image analysis. Continuing studies utilizing those experimental data as boundary conditions were applied in the following numerical spray simulations using a commercially available nasal spray device, which was inserted into a realistic adult nasal passage with external facial features. Through varying the particle releasing direction, the deposition fractions of selected particle sizes on the main nasal passage for targeted drug delivery were compared. The results demonstrated that the middle spray direction showed superior spray efficiency compared with upper or lower directions, and the 10µm agents were the most suitable particle size as the majority of sprayed agents can be delivered to the targeted area, the main passage. This study elaborates a comprehensive approach to better understand nasal spray mechanism and evaluate its performance for existing nasal delivery practices. Results of this study can assist the pharmaceutical industry to improve the current design of nasal drug delivery device and ultimately benefit more patients through optimized medications delivery. PMID:27509293

  11. Effects of nasal drug delivery device and its orientation on sprayed particle deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xuwen; Dong, Jingliang; Shang, Yidan; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of nasal drug delivery device and the spray nozzle orientation on sprayed droplets deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity were numerically studied. Prior to performing the numerical investigation, an in-house designed automated actuation system representing mean adults actuation force was developed to produce realistic spray plume. Then, the spray plume development was filmed by high speed photography system, and spray characteristics such as spray cone angle, break-up length, and average droplet velocity were obtained through off-line image analysis. Continuing studies utilizing those experimental data as boundary conditions were applied in the following numerical spray simulations using a commercially available nasal spray device, which was inserted into a realistic adult nasal passage with external facial features. Through varying the particle releasing direction, the deposition fractions of selected particle sizes on the main nasal passage for targeted drug delivery were compared. The results demonstrated that the middle spray direction showed superior spray efficiency compared with upper or lower directions, and the 10µm agents were the most suitable particle size as the majority of sprayed agents can be delivered to the targeted area, the main passage. This study elaborates a comprehensive approach to better understand nasal spray mechanism and evaluate its performance for existing nasal delivery practices. Results of this study can assist the pharmaceutical industry to improve the current design of nasal drug delivery device and ultimately benefit more patients through optimized medications delivery.

  12. Vibrational spectra of saccharin nitranion and its orientation on the surface of silver metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Yoshika; Kamada, Jun-ichi

    2005-02-01

    Infrared-reflectance spectra of the saccharin nitranion adsorbed on silver powder was observed. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectra of the saccharin nitranion were also recorded using cellulose acetate films doped with fine silver particles. The spectra suggested that the saccharin nitranion is bonded to the silver metal surface through the oxygen atom of carbonyl and the nitrogen atom of the imide ring groups and that the nitranion tilts at the surface.

  13. Swelling transition of a clay induced by heating.

    PubMed

    Hansen, E L; Hemmen, H; Fonseca, D M; Coutant, C; Knudsen, K D; Plivelic, T S; Bonn, D; Fossum, J O

    2012-01-01

    Clays are of paramount importance for soil stability, but also in applications ranging from oil recovery to composites and hydrogels. Generically, clays are divided into two subclasses: macroscopically swelling, 'active' clays that have the capacity for taking up large amounts of water to form stable gels, and 'passive' or non-swelling clays; the former stabilize soils whereas the latter are known to lead to landslides. However, it has been unclear so far what mechanisms underlie clay swelling. Here, we report the first observation of a temperature-induced transition from a passive to an active, swelling clay. We propose a simple description of the swelling transition; while net attractive interactions are dominant at low temperatures so that the clay particles remain attached to each other in stacks, at higher temperatures it is energetically favourable for the clay to swell due to the entropy that is gained by counterions which are liberated during swelling.

  14. Swelling transition of a clay induced by heating.

    PubMed

    Hansen, E L; Hemmen, H; Fonseca, D M; Coutant, C; Knudsen, K D; Plivelic, T S; Bonn, D; Fossum, J O

    2012-01-01

    Clays are of paramount importance for soil stability, but also in applications ranging from oil recovery to composites and hydrogels. Generically, clays are divided into two subclasses: macroscopically swelling, 'active' clays that have the capacity for taking up large amounts of water to form stable gels, and 'passive' or non-swelling clays; the former stabilize soils whereas the latter are known to lead to landslides. However, it has been unclear so far what mechanisms underlie clay swelling. Here, we report the first observation of a temperature-induced transition from a passive to an active, swelling clay. We propose a simple description of the swelling transition; while net attractive interactions are dominant at low temperatures so that the clay particles remain attached to each other in stacks, at higher temperatures it is energetically favourable for the clay to swell due to the entropy that is gained by counterions which are liberated during swelling. PMID:22943004

  15. Source apportionment of fine particles in Tennessee using a source-oriented model.

    PubMed

    Doraiswamy, Prakash; Davis, Wayne T; Miller, Terry L; Fu, Joshua S

    2007-04-01

    Source apportionment of fine particles (PM2.5, particulate matter < 2 microm in aerodynamic diameter) is important to identify the source categories that are responsible for the concentrations observed at a particular receptor. Although receptor models have been used to do source apportionment, they do not fully take into account the chemical reactions (including photochemical reactions) involved in the formation of secondary fine particles. Secondary fine particles are formed from photochemical and other reactions involving precursor gases, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ammonia, and volatile organic compounds. This paper presents the results of modeling work aimed at developing a source apportionment of primary and secondary PM2.5. On-road mobile source and point source inventories for the state of Tennessee were estimated and compiled. The national emissions inventory for the year 1999 was used for the other states. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Models3/Community Multi-Scale Air Quality modeling system was used for the photochemical/secondary particulate matter modeling. The modeling domain consisted of a nested 36-12-4-km domain. The 4-km domain covered the entire state of Tennessee. The episode chosen for the modeling runs was August 29 to September 9, 1999. This paper presents the approach used and the results from the modeling and attempts to quantify the contribution of major source categories, such as the on-road mobile sources (including the fugitive dust component) and coal-fired power plants, to observed PM2.5 concentrations in Tennessee. The results of this work will be helpful in policy issues targeted at designing control strategies to meet the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards in Tennessee.

  16. Orientational Coherent Effects of High-Energy Particles in a LiNbO3 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagli, E.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Sytov, A. I.; De Salvador, D.; Argiolas, A.; Bazzan, M.; Carnera, A.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2015-07-01

    A bent lithium niobate strip was exposed to a 400 -GeV /c proton beam at the external lines of CERN Super Proton Synchrotron to probe its capabilities versus coherent interactions of the particles with the crystal such as channeling and volume reflection. Lithium niobate (LiNbO3 ) exhibits an interplanar electric field comparable to that of Silicon (Si) and remarkable piezoelectric properties, which could be exploited for the realization of piezo-actuated devices for the control of high-energy particle beams. In contrast to Si and germanium (Ge), LiNbO3 shows an intriguing effect; in spite of a low channeling efficiency (3%), the volume reflection maintains a high deflection efficiency (83%). Such discrepancy was ascribed to the high concentration (1 04 per cm2 ) of dislocations in our sample, which was obtained from a commercial wafer. Indeed, it has been theoretically shown that a channeling efficiency comparable with that of Si or Ge would be attained with a crystal at low defect concentration (less than ten per cm2 ). To better understand the role of dislocations on volume reflection, we have worked out computer simulation via dynecharm++ Monte Carlo code to study the effect of dislocations on volume reflection. The results of the simulations agree with experimental records, demonstrating that volume reflection is more robust than channeling in the presence of dislocations.

  17. A Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Heuristic for Market-Oriented Task-Level Scheduling in Cloud Workflow Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejun; Xu, Jia; Yang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Cloud workflow system is a kind of platform service based on cloud computing. It facilitates the automation of workflow applications. Between cloud workflow system and its counterparts, market-oriented business model is one of the most prominent factors. The optimization of task-level scheduling in cloud workflow system is a hot topic. As the scheduling is a NP problem, Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) have been proposed to optimize the cost. However, they have the characteristic of premature convergence in optimization process and therefore cannot effectively reduce the cost. To solve these problems, Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization (CPSO) algorithm with chaotic sequence and adaptive inertia weight factor is applied to present the task-level scheduling. Chaotic sequence with high randomness improves the diversity of solutions, and its regularity assures a good global convergence. Adaptive inertia weight factor depends on the estimate value of cost. It makes the scheduling avoid premature convergence by properly balancing between global and local exploration. The experimental simulation shows that the cost obtained by our scheduling is always lower than the other two representative counterparts. PMID:26357510

  18. A Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Heuristic for Market-Oriented Task-Level Scheduling in Cloud Workflow Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejun; Xu, Jia; Yang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Cloud workflow system is a kind of platform service based on cloud computing. It facilitates the automation of workflow applications. Between cloud workflow system and its counterparts, market-oriented business model is one of the most prominent factors. The optimization of task-level scheduling in cloud workflow system is a hot topic. As the scheduling is a NP problem, Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) have been proposed to optimize the cost. However, they have the characteristic of premature convergence in optimization process and therefore cannot effectively reduce the cost. To solve these problems, Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization (CPSO) algorithm with chaotic sequence and adaptive inertia weight factor is applied to present the task-level scheduling. Chaotic sequence with high randomness improves the diversity of solutions, and its regularity assures a good global convergence. Adaptive inertia weight factor depends on the estimate value of cost. It makes the scheduling avoid premature convergence by properly balancing between global and local exploration. The experimental simulation shows that the cost obtained by our scheduling is always lower than the other two representative counterparts.

  19. A fast object-oriented Matlab implementation of the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Ettore; Meo, Michele

    2012-05-01

    Novel numerical methods, known as Meshless Methods or Meshfree Methods and, in a wider perspective, Partition of Unity Methods, promise to overcome most of disadvantages of the traditional finite element techniques. The absence of a mesh makes meshfree methods very attractive for those problems involving large deformations, moving boundaries and crack propagation. However, meshfree methods still have significant limitations that prevent their acceptance among researchers and engineers, namely the computational costs. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of computational techniques to speed-up the computation of the shape functions in the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method and Moving Least Squares, with particular focus on their bottlenecks, like the neighbour search, the inversion of the moment matrix and the assembly of the stiffness matrix. The paper presents numerous computational solutions aimed at a considerable reduction of the computational times: the use of kd-trees for the neighbour search, sparse indexing of the nodes-points connectivity and, most importantly, the explicit and vectorized inversion of the moment matrix without using loops and numerical routines.

  20. Silt-clay aggregates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1979-01-01

    Viking observations suggest abundant silt and clay particles on Mars. It is proposed that some of these particles agglomerate to form sand size aggregates that are redeposited as sandlike features such as drifts and dunes. Although the binding for the aggregates could include salt cementation or other mechanisms, electrostatic bonding is considered to be a primary force holding the aggregates together. Various laboratory experiments conducted since the 19th century, and as reported here for simulated Martian conditions, show that both the magnitude and sign of electrical charges on windblown particles are functions of particle velocity, shape and composition, atmospheric pressure, atmospheric composition and other factors. Electrical charges have been measured for saltating particles in the wind tunnel and in the field, on the surfaces of sand dunes, and within dust clouds on earth. Similar, and perhaps even greater, charges are proposed to occur on Mars, which could form aggregates of silt and clay size particles

  1. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  2. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires—Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45–50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  3. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires--Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Caroline; Whiticar, Alexander; Dick, Kimberly A; Sköld, Niklas; Nygård, Jesper; Bolinsson, Jessica

    2016-04-13

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45-50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV.

  4. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires--Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Caroline; Whiticar, Alexander; Dick, Kimberly A; Sköld, Niklas; Nygård, Jesper; Bolinsson, Jessica

    2016-04-13

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45-50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  5. Preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy in shales.

    SciTech Connect

    Lonardelli, I.; Wenk, H.-R.; Ren, Y.; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2007-03-01

    Anisotropy in shales is becoming an important issue in exploration and reservoir geophysics. In this study, the crystallographic preferred orientation of clay platelets that contributes to elastic anisotropy was determined quantitatively by hard monochromatic X-ray synchrotron diffraction in two different shales from drillholes off the coast of Nigeria. To analyze complicated diffraction images with five different phases (illite/smectite, kaolinite, quartz, siderite, feldspar) and many overlapping peaks, we applied a methodology based on the crystallographic Rietveld method. The goal was to describe the intrinsic physical properties of the sample (phase composition, crystallographic preferred orientation, crystal structure, and microstructure) and compute macroscopic elastic properties by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution for each phase. Our results show that elastic anisotropy resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of the clay particles can be determined quantitatively. This provides a possible way to compare measured seismic anisotropy and texture-derived anisotropy and to estimate the contribution of the low-aspect ratio pores aligned with bedding.

  6. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  7. Finicky clay divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  8. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  9. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  10. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  11. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  12. Equilibrium orientations of non-spherical and chemically anisotropic particles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the effect on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Nicholas; Bon, Stefan A F

    2015-06-15

    The effective stabilization of emulsions by solid particles, a phenomenon known as Pickering stabilization, is well known to be highly dependent on the wettability and the adhesion energy of the stabilizer employed at the liquid-liquid interface. We present a user-friendly computational model that can be used to determine equilibrium orientations and the adhesion energy of colloidal particles at interfaces. The model determines the free energy profile of particle adsorption at liquid-liquid interfaces using a triangular tessellation scheme. We demonstrate the use of the model, using a variety of anisotropic particles and demonstrate its ability to predict and explain experimental observations of particle behaviour at interfaces. In particular, we show that the concept of hydrophilic lipophilic balance commonly applied to molecular surfactants is insufficient to explain the complexity of the activity of colloidal particles at interfaces. In addition, we show the importance of the knowledge of the free energy adsorption profile of single particles at interfaces and the impact on overall free energy of emulsification of packed ensembles of particles. The delicate balance between optimization of adhesion energy, adsorption dynamics and particle packing is shown to be of great importance in the formation of thermodynamically stable emulsions. In order to use the model, the code is implemented by freely available software that can be readily deployed on personal computers. PMID:25792476

  13. Equilibrium orientations of non-spherical and chemically anisotropic particles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the effect on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Nicholas; Bon, Stefan A F

    2015-06-15

    The effective stabilization of emulsions by solid particles, a phenomenon known as Pickering stabilization, is well known to be highly dependent on the wettability and the adhesion energy of the stabilizer employed at the liquid-liquid interface. We present a user-friendly computational model that can be used to determine equilibrium orientations and the adhesion energy of colloidal particles at interfaces. The model determines the free energy profile of particle adsorption at liquid-liquid interfaces using a triangular tessellation scheme. We demonstrate the use of the model, using a variety of anisotropic particles and demonstrate its ability to predict and explain experimental observations of particle behaviour at interfaces. In particular, we show that the concept of hydrophilic lipophilic balance commonly applied to molecular surfactants is insufficient to explain the complexity of the activity of colloidal particles at interfaces. In addition, we show the importance of the knowledge of the free energy adsorption profile of single particles at interfaces and the impact on overall free energy of emulsification of packed ensembles of particles. The delicate balance between optimization of adhesion energy, adsorption dynamics and particle packing is shown to be of great importance in the formation of thermodynamically stable emulsions. In order to use the model, the code is implemented by freely available software that can be readily deployed on personal computers.

  14. Syntheses of single-crystal apatite particles with preferred orientation to the a- and c-axes as models of hard tissue and their applications.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mamoru; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Zhuang, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2; HAp] is the mineral component of vertebrate hard tissues and an important raw material for biomaterials. The HAp crystal belongs to a hexagonal system and has two types of crystal plane with different atomic arrangements: positively charged calcium ions are mainly present in the a(b)-planes, while negatively charged phosphate ions and hydroxyl groups are mainly present in the c-planes. In vertebrate long bone surfaces, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, which leads to the development of the a(b)-plane; while in tooth enamel surfaces, they have an a(b)-axis orientation, which leads to the development of the c-plane. However, it is not clear why the orientations of long bone and tooth enamel are in different crystal planes. In order to clarify this question, we have synthesized single-crystal apatite particles with preferred orientation to the a- and c-axes as models for bone and teeth enamel. This review first describes the syntheses process of single-crystal apatite particles with preferred orientation to a(b)- and c-axes and then discusses specific protein adsorption to the crystal surface of the resulting plate- and fiber-shaped apatite particles with different surface charges. In addition, porous apatite-fiber scaffolds (AFSs) fabricated using the fiber-shaped apatite particles and their application to tissue engineering of bone are described on the basis of the three-dimensional cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat bone marrow using the AFS settled into a radial-flow bioreactor.

  15. Effect of melt convection at various gravity levels and orientations on the forces acting on a large spherical particle in the vicinity of a solidification interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Sen, Subhayu; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Catalina, Adrian; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2000-04-01

    Numerical modeling was undertaken to analyze the influence of both radial and axial thermal gradients on convection patterns and velocities during solidification of pure Al and an Al-4 wt% Cu alloy. The objective of the numerical task was to predict the influence of convective velocity on an insoluble particle near a solid/liquid (s/l) interface. These predictions were then be used to define the minimum gravity level ( g) required to investigate the fundamental physics of interactions between a particle and a s/l interface. This is an ongoing NASA funded flight experiment entitled "particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces (PEP)". Steady-state calculations were performed for different gravity levels and orientations with respect to the gravity vector. The furnace configuration used in this analysis is the quench module insert (QMI-1) proposed for the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS). The general model of binary alloy solidification was based on the finite element code FIDAP. At a low g level of 10 -4g 0 ( g 0=9.8 m/s 2) maximum melt convection was obtained for an orientation of 90°. Calculations showed that even for this worst case orientation the dominant forces acting on the particle are the fundamental drag and interfacial forces.

  16. Effect of Melt Convection at Various Gravity Levels and Orientations on the Forces Acting on a Large Spherical Particle in the Vicinity of a Solidification Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Sen, Subhayu; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Catalina, Adrian; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical modeling was Undertaken to analyze the influence of both radial and axial thermal gradients on convection patterns and velocities claiming solidification of pure Al and an Al-4 wt% Cu alloy. The objective of the numerical task was to predict the influence of convective velocity on an insoluble particle near a solid/liquid (s/l) interface. These predictions were then be used to define the minimum gravity level (q) required to investigate the fundamental physics of interactions between a particle and a s/l interface. This is an ongoing NASA founded flight experiment entitled "particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces (PEP)". Steady-state calculations were performed for different gravity levels and orientations with respect to the gravity vector The furnace configuration used in this analysis is the quench module insert (QMI-1) proposed for the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS). The general model of binary alloy solidification was based on the finite element code FIDAP. At a low g level of 10(exp -4) g(sub o) (g(sub o) = 9.8 m/square s) maximum melt convection was obtained for an orientation of 90 deg. Calculations showed that even for this worst case orientation the dominant forces acting on the particle are the fundamental drag and interfacial forces.

  17. Particle size distribution of typical ceramic raw materials by laser granulometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojnarovitsne, I. H.; Lenkel, M.

    1984-01-01

    The principles of the method are explained and the working of the CILAS 715 laser granulometer is described. The particle size distributions of milled glazes, quartz, feldspar and china clay were determined by this instrument and by Andreasen sedimentation. The agreement was good for isometric particles, but the china clay appears finer by sedimentation, because the platelets arrange themselves horizontally during sedimentation, while in the laser granulometer preferred orientation is prevented by circulation between the sample holder and the vibrated and stirred reservoir of the slip.

  18. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    PubMed Central

    David Walter, W.; Walsh, Daniel P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Miller, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors—especially soil properties—have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. PMID:21326232

  20. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  1. Shape memory starch-clay bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Coativy, Gildas; Gautier, Nicolas; Pontoire, Bruno; Buléon, Alain; Lourdin, Denis; Leroy, Eric

    2015-02-13

    1-10% starch/clay bionanocomposites with shape memory properties were obtained by melt processing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TEM evidenced the presence of a major fraction of clay tactoids, consisting of 4-5 stacked crystalline layers, with a thickness of 6.8 nm. A significant orientation of the nanoparticles induced by extrusion was also observed. Tensile tests performed above the glass transition of the materials showed that the presence of clay nanoparticles leads to higher elastic modulus and maximum stress, without significant loss in elongation at break which typically reached 100%. Samples submitted to a 50% elongation and cooled below the glass transition showed shape memory behavior. Like unreinforced starch, the bionanocomposites showed complete shape recovery in unconstrained conditions. In mechanically constrained conditions, the maximum recovered stress was significantly improved for the bionanocomposites compared to unreinforced starch, opening promising perspectives for the design of sensors and actuators. PMID:25458305

  2. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  3. Intercalated clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.

    1983-04-22

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  4. Intercalated Clay Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1983-04-01

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  5. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  6. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner.

  8. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. PMID:24718363

  9. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  10. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  11. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of polymer/clay nanocomposites has been invented in an attempt to develop transparent, lightweight, durable materials for a variety of aerospace applications. As their name suggests, polymer/ clay nanocomposites comprise organic/ inorganic hybrid polymer matrices containing platelet-shaped clay particles that have sizes of the order of a few nanometers thick and several hundred nanometers long. Partly because of their high aspect ratios and high surface areas, the clay particles, if properly dispersed in the polymer matrix at a loading level of 1 to 5 weight percent, impart unique combinations of physical and chemical properties that make these nanocomposites attractive for making films and coatings for a variety of industrial applications. Relative to the unmodified polymer, the polymer/ clay nanocomposites may exhibit improvements in strength, modulus, and toughness; tear, radiation, and fire resistance; and lower thermal expansion and permeability to gases while retaining a high degree of optical transparency.

  12. Designing in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1977-01-01

    What can be done to transform a lump of wet clay into something more than a lump of glaze-fired clay? It is at this point when forming techniques have been mastered that good design becomes most important. Discusses six criteria involved in the search for good design so that students can discover what good design is and how important it is.…

  13. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  14. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  15. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-10-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. PMID:19419808

  16. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.

    2013-12-01

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features.

  17. Investigation of Four Different Laponite Clays as Stabilizers in Pickering Emulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Brunier, Barthélémy; Sheibat-Othman, Nida; Chniguir, Mehdi; Chevalier, Yves; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2016-06-21

    Clay-armored polymer particles were prepared by emulsion polymerization in the presence of Laponite platelets that adsorb at the surface of latex particles and act as stabilizers during the course of the polymerization. While Laponite RDS clay platelets are most often used, the choice of the type of clay still remains an open issue that is addressed in the present article. Four different grades of Laponite were investigated as stabilizers in the emulsion polymerization of styrene. First, the adsorption isotherms of the clays, on preformed polystyrene particles, were determined by ICP-AES analysis of the residual clay in the aqueous phase. Adsorption of clay depended on the type of clay at low concentrations corresponding to adsorption as a monolayer. Adsorption of clay particles as multilayers was observed for all the grades above a certain concentration under the considered ionic strength (mainly due to the initiator ionic species). The stabilization efficiency of these clays was investigated during the polymerization reaction (free of any other stabilizer). The clays did not have the same effect on stabilization, which was related to differences in their compositions and in their adsorption isotherms. The different grades led to different polymer particles sizes and therefore to different polymerization reaction rates. Laponite RDS and S482 gave similar results, ensuring the best stabilization efficiency and the fastest reaction rate; the number of particles increased as the clay concentration increased. Stabilization with Laponite XLS gave the same particles size and number as the latter two clays at low clay concentrations, but it reached an upper limit in the number of nucleated polymer particles at higher concentrations indicating a decrease of stabilization efficiency at high concentrations. Laponite JS did not ensure a sufficient stability of the polymer particles, as the polymerization results were comparable to a stabilizer-free polymerization system.

  18. Partitioning of Laponite Clay Platelets in Pickering Emulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Brunier, Barthélémy; Sheibat-Othman, Nida; Chevalier, Yves; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2016-01-12

    Partitioning of laponite disklike clay platelets between polymer particles and bulk aqueous phase was investigated in Pickering surfactant-free emulsion polymerization of styrene. Adsorption of laponite clay platelets plays an important role in the stabilization of this system, influencing the particle size and the number of particles, and, hence, the reaction rate. Adsorption isotherms show that, while the laponite clay platelets are almost fully exfoliated in water, they form multilayers on the surface of the polymer particles by the end of polymerization, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This observation is supported by quartz crystal microbalance, conductivity, and TEM measurements, which reveal interactions between the clay and polystyrene, as a function of the ionic strength. The strong adsorption of clay platelets leaves a low residual concentration in the aqueous phase that cannot cause further nucleation of polymer particles, as demonstrated during seeded emulsion polymerization experiments in the presence of a high excess of clay. A Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-type model for laponite adsorption on polystyrene particles matches the adsorption isotherms.

  19. [Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same]. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--August 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen-Shaw, M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective is to license the present technology for replacing thermally structured clay (calcined clay) with chemically structured clay. Composite layered pigments using Titanium dioxide and {number_sign}1 standard clay have already been shown to have activity in replacing calcined clay. In this past quarter the effect of clay particle size and distribution as raw materials for making the layered pigment have been investigated.

  20. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grundl, T.; Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A.

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  1. Morphology and thermal properties of clay/PMMA nanocomposites obtained by miniemulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    García-Chávez, Karla I; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G; Soriano-Corral, Florentino; Saucedo-Salazar, Esmeralda; Zaragoza-Contreras, E Armando

    2013-06-01

    Miniemulsion polymerization was used as the synthetic method to produce clay/poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites. Two kinds of interfacial interactions clay-polymer particle were observed by electron microscopy, one where the polymer particles are adhered on the surface of the larger fragments of clay, and another where nanometric fragments of clay are encapsulated by polymer particles. Variations in the glass transition temperature (T(g)) and thermomechanical properties of the matrix, as function of clay content, were observed. In particular, at the highest clay loading (1.0 wt%) depression of T(g) and thermomechanical properties were observed. The increased clay-polymer matrix interfacial area appears to be the conditioning factor that determines such behavior.

  2. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-07-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all of these properties should be accounted for in the remote sensing of dust, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations common with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite). Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-sized chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the evaluation of radiation effects

  3. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-03-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all these properties should be accounted for in dust remote sensing, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures or mineral composition of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations commonly with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite). Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-size chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the evaluation of

  4. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  5. Inter-layered clay stacks in Jurassic shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pye, K.; Krinsley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron mode is used together with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to show that Lower Jurassic shales from the North Sea Basin contain large numbers of clay mineral stacks up to 150 microns in size. Polished shale sections are examined to determine the size, shape orientation, textural relationships, and internal compositional variations of the clays. Preliminary evidence that the clay stacks are authigenic, and may have formed at shallow burial depths during early diagenesis, is presented.

  6. Strategies for modulating the luminescence properties of pyronin Y dye-clay films: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Epelde-Elezcano, Nerea; Martínez-Martínez, Virginia; Duque-Redondo, Eduardo; Temiño, Inés; Manzano, Hegoi; López-Arbeloa, Iñigo

    2016-03-28

    The aggregation process, particularly the type and extent of pyronin Y (PY) laser dye intercalated into supported thin films of two different trioctahedral clay minerals, LAPONITE® (Lap) and saponite (Sap), at different dye loadings is studied: (i) experimentally by means of electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and (ii) theoretically by modeling the distribution of the dye into the interlayer space of these layered silicates. According to the results, H-type aggregates of the PY dye are favoured in Lap even at very low dye loading while a much lower molecular aggregation tendency in J-type geometry is found in Sap films. The aggregation state of PY in each clay mineral is likely attributed to different strengths of the electrostatic interactions between the dye and the layered silicate in the interlayer space due to their distinctive charge localization on the TOT clay layer (i.e. net negative charge in octahedral layers for Lap vs. in tetrahedral layers for Sap), as well as the interlaminar water distribution in each clay mineral, although other factors such as their CEC and particle size cannot be discarded. To reduce the huge aggregation processes of PY dye into Lap films, surfactant molecules (DDTAB) are co-adsorbed in the interlayer space of the clay. At an optimized surfactant concentration, the aggregation tendency of PY dye in Lap is considerably reduced enormously improving the fluorescence efficiency of the PY/Lap films. Finally, by means of anisotropic response from the hybrid films to the plane of the polarized light, the orientation of the PY molecules with respect to the normal axis of the clay layer is determined for all films (with and without surfactant) at different dye loadings. PMID:26954470

  7. Strategies for modulating the luminescence properties of pyronin Y dye-clay films: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Epelde-Elezcano, Nerea; Martínez-Martínez, Virginia; Duque-Redondo, Eduardo; Temiño, Inés; Manzano, Hegoi; López-Arbeloa, Iñigo

    2016-03-28

    The aggregation process, particularly the type and extent of pyronin Y (PY) laser dye intercalated into supported thin films of two different trioctahedral clay minerals, LAPONITE® (Lap) and saponite (Sap), at different dye loadings is studied: (i) experimentally by means of electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and (ii) theoretically by modeling the distribution of the dye into the interlayer space of these layered silicates. According to the results, H-type aggregates of the PY dye are favoured in Lap even at very low dye loading while a much lower molecular aggregation tendency in J-type geometry is found in Sap films. The aggregation state of PY in each clay mineral is likely attributed to different strengths of the electrostatic interactions between the dye and the layered silicate in the interlayer space due to their distinctive charge localization on the TOT clay layer (i.e. net negative charge in octahedral layers for Lap vs. in tetrahedral layers for Sap), as well as the interlaminar water distribution in each clay mineral, although other factors such as their CEC and particle size cannot be discarded. To reduce the huge aggregation processes of PY dye into Lap films, surfactant molecules (DDTAB) are co-adsorbed in the interlayer space of the clay. At an optimized surfactant concentration, the aggregation tendency of PY dye in Lap is considerably reduced enormously improving the fluorescence efficiency of the PY/Lap films. Finally, by means of anisotropic response from the hybrid films to the plane of the polarized light, the orientation of the PY molecules with respect to the normal axis of the clay layer is determined for all films (with and without surfactant) at different dye loadings.

  8. A multiple-common-lines method to determine the orientation of snapshot diffraction patterns from single particles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Liu, Zhong-Chuan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2014-07-01

    With the development of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), it is possible to determine the three-dimensional structures of noncrystalline objects with coherent X-ray diffraction imaging. In this diffract-and-destroy mode, many snapshot diffraction patterns are obtained from the identical objects which are presented one by one in random orientations to the XFEL beam. Determination of the orientation of an individual object is essential for reconstruction of a three-dimensional structure. Here a new method, called the multiple-common-lines method, has been proposed to determine the orientations of high- and low-signal snapshot diffraction patterns. The mean errors of recovered orientations (α, β, γ) of high- and low-signal patterns are about 0.14, 0.06, 0.12 and 0.77, 0.31, 0.60°, respectively; both sets of errors can meet the requirements of the reconstruction of a three-dimensional structure. PMID:25970194

  9. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  10. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  11. Modeling in Ceramic Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1976-01-01

    Modeling is an additive process of building up a sculpture with some plastic material like clay. It affords the student an opportunity to work in three dimensions, a creative relief from the general two-dimensional drawing and design activities that occupy a large segment of time in the art curriculum. (Author/RK)

  12. Magnificent Clay Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  13. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    Color is a problem for scientific study. One aspect is the vocabulary one used to describe color. Mint green, bottle green, and Kelly green are nice names but not of great utility in that people's physical perception of color is not always the same. In some industries, such as colored fabric manufacture, current use is to send a set of standard colors which are matched by the producer. This is similar to the use of the Munsell color charts in geology. None of these processes makes use of physical optical spectral studies. The reason is that they are difficult to obtain and interpret. For a geologist, color is very important but we rarely have the possibility to standardize the method of our color perception. One reason is that color is both a reflective and transmission phenomenon. The thickness of the sample is critical to any transmission characteristics. Hence, a field color determination is different from one made by using a petrographic microscope. Green glauconite in a hand specimen is not the same color in 30 μm thick thin section seen with a microscope using transmitted light.A second problem is that color in a spectral identification is the result of several absorption emissions,with overlapping signal, forming a complicated spectrum. Interpretation depends very greatly on the spectrum of the light source and the conditions of transmission-reflection of the sample. As a result, for this text, we will not attempt to analyze the physical aspect of green in green clays. In the discussion which follows, reference is made concerning color, to thin section microscopic perception.Very briefly, green clay minerals are green, because they contain iron. This is perhaps not a great revelation to mineralogists, but it is the key to understanding the origin and stability of green clay minerals. In fact, iron can color minerals either red or green or in various shades of orange and brown. The color most likely depends upon the relative abundance of the iron ion valence

  14. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  15. SAXS Study of Reversibly Crosslinked Isotactic Polypropylene/clay Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, S.; Cagiao, M; Benachour, D; Djellouli, B; Rong, L; Hsiao, B; Baltá-Calleja, F

    2010-01-01

    A new route based on reversibly crosslinking reactive extrusion is applied for the development of iPP/clay nanocomposites. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) reflections of isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/clay nanocomposites, prepared by two different mixing and chemical crosslinking methods (i.e., conventional and in situ), is presented and results are compared with preceding wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) results. It is shown that the presence of clay significantly affects the value of long spacing in iPP, as well as the coherence length of lamellar stacks. Results show that the size of the coherently diffracting nanodomains decreases in two stages, first rapidly and then slowly as a function of increasing clay content. This can be attributed to the influence of confined iPP lamellae under the effect of rising number of clay particles. The appearance of the {gamma}-crystalline form in the crosslinked iPP/clay nanocomposites is related with the difficulty in chain folding of iPP chains introduced by the chemical crosslinking process, as well as by the presence of clay particles.

  16. An Ion Diffusion Model in Semi-Permeable Clay Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-08-01

    Ion diffusion in semi-impermeable clay materials dynamically interacts with electrostatic fields (or diffuse double layers) associated with clay particles. Current theory of ion transport in porous media containing fixed charges on solid materials, however, cannot explicitly account for the dynamic interactions. Here we proposed a model by coupling electrodynamics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics to describe ion diffusion in the clay materials. The developed model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured apparent ion diffusion coefficients in clay materials as a function of ionic strength, which affects the overlap extent of the electrostatic double layers associated with adjacent clay particles. The model shows that ion diffusion in clay materials is a complex function of factors including surface charge density, tortuosity, porosity, chemico-osmotic coefficient, and ion self-diffusivity. At transitional states, ion diffusive fluxes are dynamically related to the electrostatic fields, which shrink or expand as ion diffusion. At steady states, the electrostatic fields are time-invariant and ion diffusive fluxes conform to flux and concentration gradient relationships; and apparent diffusivity can be expressed by the ion diffusivity in bulk electrolytes corrected by a tortuosity factor and concentration gradient variations at the interfaces between clay materials and bulk solutions.

  17. Clay-Enriched Silk Biomaterials for Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Llamas, Jabier Gallego; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Kadakia, Madhavi P.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of silk protein/clay composite biomaterials for bone tissue formation is described. Silk fibroin serves as an organic scaffolding material offering mechanical stability suitable for bone specific uses. Clay montmorillonite (Cloisite ® Na+) and sodium silicate are sources of osteoinductive silica-rich inorganic species, analogous to bioactive bioglass-like bone repair biomaterial systems. Different clay particle-silk composite biomaterial films were compared to silk films doped with sodium silicate as controls for support of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic culture. The cells adhered and proliferated on the silk/clay composites over two weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col I) osteogenic markers in the cells cultured on the silk/clay films in comparison to the controls. Early evidence for bone formation based on collagen deposition at the cell-biomaterial interface was also found, with more collagen observed for the silk films with higher contents of clay particles. The data suggest that the silk/clay composite systems may be useful for further study toward bone regenerative needs. PMID:21549864

  18. Adsorption coefficients for TNT on soil and clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Rosángela; Pabón, Julissa; Pérez, Omarie; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mina, Nairmen

    2007-04-01

    To understand the fate and transport mechanisms of TNT from buried landmines is it essential to determine the adsorption process of TNT on soil and clay minerals. In this research, soil samples from horizons Ap and A from Jobos Series at Isabela, Puerto Rico were studied. The clay fractions were separated from the other soil components by centrifugation. Using the hydrometer method the particle size distribution for the soil horizons was obtained. Physical and chemical characterization studies such as cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area, percent of organic matter and pH were performed for the soil and clay samples. A complete mineralogical characterization of clay fractions using X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the presence of kaolinite, goethite, hematite, gibbsite and quartz. In order to obtain adsorption coefficients (K d values) for the TNT-soil and TNT-clay interactions high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used. The adsorption process for TNT-soil was described by the Langmuir model. A higher adsorption was observed in the Ap horizon. The Freundlich model described the adsorption process for TNT-clay interactions. The affinity and relative adsorption capacity of the clay for TNT were higher in the A horizon. These results suggest that adsorption by soil organic matter predominates over adsorption on clay minerals when significant soil organic matter content is present. It was found that, properties like cation exchange capacity and surface area are important factors in the adsorption of clayey soils.

  19. Multishell Au/Ag/SiO2 nanorods with tunable optical properties as single particle orientation and rotational tracking probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kuangcai; Lin, Chia -Cheng; Vela, Javier; Fang, Ning

    2015-04-07

    In this study, three-layer core–shell plasmonic nanorods (Au/Ag/SiO2–NRs), consisting of a gold nanorod core, a thin silver shell, and a thin silica layer, were synthesized and used as optical imaging probes under a differential interference contrast microscope for single particle orientation and rotational tracking. The localized surface plasmon resonance modes were enhanced upon the addition of the silver shell, and the anisotropic optical properties of gold nanorods were maintained. The silica coating enables surface functionalization with silane coupling agents and provides enhanced stability and biocompatibility. Taking advantage of the longitudinal LSPR enhancement, the orientation and rotational information of the hybrid nanorods on synthetic lipid bilayers and on live cell membranes were obtained with millisecond temporal resolution using a scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The results demonstrate that the as-synthesized hybrid nanorods are promising imaging probes with improved sensitivity and good biocompatibility for single plasmonic particle tracking experiments in biological systems.

  20. Influence of clay incorporation on the physical properties of polyethylene/Brazilian clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, R; Araújo, E M; Melo, T J A; Ito, E N; Hage, E Júnior

    2008-04-01

    High density polyethylene/Brazilian clay nanocomposites were prepared by the melt intercalation technique. A montmorillonite sample from Boa Vista/PB, Northeast of Brazil, was organically modified with esthearildimethylammonium chloride (Praepagen WB) quaternary ammonium salt. The unmodified and modified clays with the quaternary ammonium salt were introduced in 1, 2, 3 and 5 wt% in a PE polymer matrix. The dispersion analysis and the interlayer distance of the clay particles were obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanical properties of tensile and the flammability of the nanocomposites were studied. In general, the mechanical properties of the systems presented superior values compared to the matrix. The systems showed a reduction on the burning rate, indicating that the flammability resistance of nanocomposites was improved.

  1. Rheology of Supercritical CO2 dispersed Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Horsch, Steven; Subramanium, Ganapathy; Gulari, Esin

    2006-03-01

    Effective dispersion of the fillers in a polymer matrix has been a key challenge in the field of nanocomposites. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) appears , PS/clay, The nanocomposites are characterized using WAXD, SEM, TEM, Rheology and DSC. The high degree of dispersion achieved through sc-CO2 appears to result in an order of magnitude increase in the rheological properties of PS, associated with an increase in the Tg of around 13 C, at 10% clay loading. These moduli improvements are significant better than those obtained with conventional, chemically-modified intercalated clay nanocomposites. The degree of enhancement in the properties appears to be strongly dependant on the polymer-clay interactions, and how it is promoted by the supercritical fluid. In the case of PDMS nanocomposites, where the clay-polymer interactions were weak, the modulus increase at low frequencies (for sc-CO2 processed system) was only a factor of 2. In the case of PVME- I30P clay nanocomposites, the modulus increase was substantial even at moderate loadings and dispersions, perhaps to be hydrogen-bonding interactions. The clay and the polymer orientation and interactions in these nanocomposites are also being probed using rheo-optical FTIR spectroscopy.

  2. Weak Polyelectrolyte-Clay Assemblies: Physical Mechanisms of Biological Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhishvili, Svetlana; Pavlukhina, Svetlana; Zhuk, Iryna

    2014-03-01

    We report on a highly efficient, non-leachable antibacterial coating, consisting of an ultrathin nanocomposite hydrogel capable of hosting, protecting and delivering antibiofilm agents in response to bacterial infection. Constructed using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of clay nanoplatelets and a weak polyelectrolyte and loaded with an antimicrobial agent (AmA), the coatings was highly resistant to colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. The high antibiofilm activity of the coating results from a combination of highly localized, bacteria-triggered AmA release and hydrogel swelling, as well as retention of AmA by clay nanoplatelets. We discuss the dependence of rheological and swelling properties of weak polyelectrolyte-clay assemblies on film thickness, clay platelet orientation and environmental pH.

  3. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  4. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  5. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    within the host rock and the undeformed sample shows that the sample underwent compaction prior shearing that results in a change of power law exponent of the pore size distribution within the clay matrix and a slight reorientation of clastic grains' long axis perpendicular to σ1. Microstructures in the shear zone indicate ductile behavior before the specimen's failure. Deformation mechanisms are bending of clay plates and sliding along clay-clay contacts. Strain is strongly localised in thin, anastomosing zones of strong preferred orientation, producing slickensided shear surfaces common in shallow clays. There is no evidence for intragranular cracking.We propose that the deformation localizes in regions without hard quartz grains.

  6. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  7. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  8. The effect of shear flow on the rotational diffusivity of a single axisymmetric particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian; Koch, Donald; Cohen, Itai

    2014-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of nonspherical particles abound in the world around us, from red blood cells in arteries to kaolinite discs in clay. Understanding the orientation dynamics of these particles is important for suspension rheology and particle self-assembly. However, even for the simplest case of dilute suspensions in simple shear flow, the orientation dynamics of Brownian nonspherical particles are poorly understood at large shear rates. Here, we analytically calculate the time-dependent orientation distributions of particles confined to the flow-gradient plane when the rotary diffusion is small but nonzero. For both startup and oscillatory shear flows, we find a coordinate change that maps the convection-diffusion equation to a simple diffusion equation with an enhanced diffusion constant, simplifying the orientation dynamics. For oscillatory shear, this enhanced diffusion drastically alters the quasi-steady orientation distributions. Our theory of the unsteady orientation dynamics provides an understanding of a nonspherical particle suspension's rheology for a large class of unsteady flows. For particles with aspect ratio 10 under oscillatory shear, the rotary diffusion and intrinsic viscosity vary with amplitude by a factor of ~ 40 and ~ 2 , respectively.

  9. Ultrasonically assisted single screw extrusion, film blowing and film casting of LLDPE/clay and PA6/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknezhad, Setareh

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasonic treatment on the dispersion of modified clay particles in LLDPE and PA6 matrices and the final properties of nanocomposites. LLDPE and PA6 are two polymers that are widely used in packaging industry. Blown and cast films were manufactured from the prepared nanocomposites. To achieve one step film processing, an online ultrasonic film casting was developed. Ultrasonic waves caused high-energy mixing and dispersion due to the acoustic cavitation, causing the clay agglomorates to separate into individual platelets in polymer matrix. Ultrasonic waves also broke down the polymer molecular chains reducing viscosity of the melt, facilating dispersion of the clay platelets throughout the matrix. Ultrasound also led to a breakage of the clay platelets reducing the particle size and improving their distribution. Clay particles acted as a heterogenous nucleation agent generating smaller size polymer crystals. In turn, these improved different properties including mechanical properties, oxygen permeability and transparency of films. In LLDPE/clay 20A nanocomposites, the effect of ultrasound was more obvious at higher clay loadings. Exfoliated structure for ultrasonically treated nanocomposites containing 2.5, 5 and 7.5 wt% of clay 20A and highly intercalated structure for ultrasonically treated nanocomposites containing 10 wt% of clay 20A were achieved. However, in blown films, the exfoliated structure transferred to the intercalated structure due to the addition of more shear and thermal degradation of surfactants of the clay particles. While, manufacturing cast films using the new developed online ultrasonic cast film machine revealed the exfoliated structure with ultrasonic treatment till 7.5 wt% of clay loadings. Cast films of nanocomposites containing 5 wt% of clay loadings were also prepared with addition of different compatibilizers. The compatibilizer containing higher amount of grafted

  10. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assessment of organomodified clays potentially used in food packaging.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Aucejo, Susana; Jos, Ángeles

    2015-09-01

    Modern food packaging has made great advances as result of global trends and consumer preferences, which are oriented to obtain improved food quality and safety. In this regard, clay minerals, and mainly Montmorillonite (Mt) are attracting considerable interest in food packaging because of the improvements developed in mechanical and barrier properties. Hence, the present work aim to assess the toxicity of four Montmorillonite-based clay minerals, an unmodified clay, Cloisite®Na+ (CNa+), and three modified Mt clays: Cloisite®30B (C30B), a commercial clay, and Clay1 and Clay2, two novel modified organoclays developed by the Packaging, Transport, & Logistics Research Institute (ITENE). First, the cytotoxic effects were studied in the Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). In addition, the potential mutagenicity of the clays was evaluated by the Ames test. Clay1 did not induce any cytotoxic effects in HUVEC, although it exhibited potential mutagenicity in TA98 Salmonella typhimurium strain. In contrast, Clay2 produced cytotoxicity in endothelial cells but no mutagenicity was recorded. However, CNa+ was not cytotoxic neither mutagenic. And finally, C30B showed positive results in both assays. Therefore, results showed that clay minerals have a different toxicity profile and a case by case toxicity evaluation is required.

  11. Novel convergence-oriented approach for evaluation and optimization of workflow in single-particle two-dimensional averaging of electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Mio, Kazuhiro; Sato, Chikara

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) protein structures facilitate the understanding of their biological functions and provide valuable information for developing medicines. Single-particle analysis (SPA) from electron microscopy (EM) is a structure determination method suitable for macromolecules. To achieve a high resolution using combinations of several SPA software packages, 'workflow' optimization and comparative evaluation by scoring results are essential. Two-dimensional (2D) averaging is a key step for 3D reconstruction. The integrated convergence-evaluation oriented system (IC-EOS) proposed here provides an effective tool for customizing 2D averaging. This assesses the behavior and characteristics of workflows and evaluates the convergence of iteration steps without human intervention. We chose five base measurements for quantifying convergence: resolution, variance, similarity, shift-distance and rotation-angle. Curve fitting to history graphs scored their stability. We call this score 'fluctuation'. The number of particle images discarded from the library and the number of classification groups were examined to see their effects on optimization levels and fluctuation of measurements, allowing the IC-EOS to select the most appropriate workflow for the target. A case study using a bacterial sodium channel and a simulation study using GroEL showed that resolution of 2D averaging improved with relatively stricter particle selection. With fewer groups, resolutions of class averages improved, but similarities between class-averages and their constituent particle images degraded. Fluctuation was useful for selecting adequate conditions, even when achieved values alone were not conclusive. The vote method, using fluctuation, was robust against noise and enabled a decision without exhaustive search trials. Thus, the IC-EOS is a step toward full automation of SPA. PMID:23625506

  12. Application of particle image velocimetry and the background-oriented schlieren technique in the high-enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmse, T.; Agocs, J.; Schröder, A.; Martinez Schramm, J.; Karl, S.; Hannemann, K.

    2011-06-01

    The applicability of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) techniques in the high-enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center, DLR is demonstrated. As a part of this feasibility study two different experiments are performed. The velocity field past a wedge in a Mach 6 flow at a total specific enthalpy of 1.5 MJ/kg is determined by means of PIV and the results are compared to numerical predictions. The BOS technique is applied to investigate the density field in the shock layer of a sphere at 12 and 22 MJ/kg total specific enthalpies. Using a ray tracer method, the BOS results are compared to the data obtained by corresponding numerical computations.

  13. Heteroaggregation of Silver Nanoparticles with Clay Minerals in Aqueous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Burrow, E.; Hwang, Y.; Lenhart, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being used in industrial processes and consumer products that exploit their beneficial properties and improve our daily lives. Nevertheless, they also attract attention when released into natural environment due to their potential for causing adverse effects. The fate and transport of nanoparticles in aqueous systems have been the focus of intense study. However, their interactions with other natural particles have received only limited attention. Clay minerals are ubiquitous in most aquatic systems and their variably charged surfaces can act as deposition sites that can alter the fate and transport of nanoparticles in natural aqueous environments. In this study, we investigated the homoaggregation of silver nanoparticles with different coating layers and their heteroaggregation behavior with clay minerals (illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite) in neutral pH solutions. Silver nanoparticles with a nominal diameter of 80 nm were synthesized with three different surface coating layers: uncoated, citrate-coated and Tween-coated. Illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), and montmorillonite (SWy-2) were purchased from the Clay Mineral Society (Indiana) and pretreated to obtain monocationic (Na-clay) and dicationic (Ca-clay) suspensions before the experiments. The change in hydrodynamic diameter as a function of time was monitored using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements in order to evaluate early stage aggregation as a function of electrolyte concentration in both the homo- and heteroaggregation scenarios. A shift in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values to lower electrolyte concentrations was observed in binary systems, compared to single silver nanoparticle and clay systems. The results also suggest more rapid aggregation in binary system during the early aggregation stage when compared to the single-particle systems. The behavior of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles was similar to that of the bare particles, while the

  14. Functionalized synthetic clays designed for polymer-clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastek, Thuy Truong

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have many advantageous properties such as their light weight, transparency, flame retardency, barrier properties, and low cost. Exfoliation of natural clays into commercially important non-polar polymers such as polystyrene (PS) and polypropylene (PP) melts has been limited due to the immiscibility of these polymers with highly polar clays. Current means of addressing this problem, such as treating clays with surfactants, has met with limited success. Motivated by the need for synthetic clays that can be dispersed and exfoliated in non-polar polymer melts without added compatibilizers, we synthesized lamellar silicates and aluminosilicates to act as clay analogs. The flexibility of the sol-gel syntheses allowed hexadecyl and isobutyl functional groups to be covalently attached to the surface of the clays. Incorporating a high content of octahedral aluminum also strengthened the clay layers. The strength and surface functionalities of the layered silicates improved exfoliation during melt blending with PS and PP. We studied the effects of clay layer composition (silicate and alumino-silicate), layer thickness, organic functional groups, aluminum coordination, and covalent linking of surfactants on the performance of the nanocomposites. The lamellar morphology was determined from XRD and TEM. Organic functionalization was determined with solid state NMR and IR spectroscopy. The synthetic clays were mixed with various solvents to help predict their miscibility with PS and PP. Composites were prepared with different molecular weight polymers, which subjected the clays to a wide range of shear stresses. The clays were also pretreated by mixing in a master batch or dispersing in an organic solvent. The effects of PS and PP molecular weight, master batch, and solvent dispersion on the exfoliation of synthetic clays in PS are examined. Rheology and TEM were used to observe the quality of exfoliation and the final aspect ratio of the clay layers

  15. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  16. Porous networks derived from synthetic polymer-clay complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Elder, D.L.

    1995-05-12

    Synthetic hectorites were hydrothermally crystallized with direct incorporation of a cationic polymer poly(dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA), and two neutral cellulosic polymers hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC). Synthetic PDDA-hectorite displays the lowest d-spacing at 15.8 {Angstrom} along with less polymer incorporation (7.8 wt % organic) than the neutral polymers (18--22 wt % organic). Thermal analysis and small angle neutron scattering were used to further examine the polymer-clay systems. Clay platelets of the largest size and best stacking order occur when cationic PDDA polymer is used. PDDA also enhances these properties over the crystallites prepared for a control mineral, where no polymer is used. HEC acts to aggregate the silica, leaving less to react to form clay. The clay platelets which result from HEC are small, not stacked to a large degree, and oriented randomly. Neutral HPMC acts more like cationic PDDA in that larger clay platelets are allowed to form. The extended microstructure of the clay network remains undisturbed after polymer is removed by calcination. When no polymer is used, the synthetic hectorite has a N{sub 2} BET surface area of 200 M{sup 2}/gm, even after calcination. This increases by 20--50% for the synthetic polymer-hectorites after the polymer is removed by calcination.

  17. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  18. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering from Self-organized Soft Nanostructures in Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    . Gog, C. Venkataraman, Observations of orientational ordering in aqueous suspensions of a nano-layered silicate, ENERGY The International Journal 30, 873 (2005). 2. D. M. Fonseca, Y. Méheust, J. O. Fossum, K. D. Knudsen, K. J. Måløy and K. P. S. Parmar, Phase behavior of platelet-shaped nanosilicate colloids in saline solutions: A small-angle X-ray scattering study J. Appl. Cryst. 40 292 (2007) 3. E. N. de Azevedo, M. Engelsberg, J. O. Fossum, R. E. de Souza, Anisotropic water diffusion in nematic self-assemblies of clay nano-platelets suspended in water, Langmuir 23, 5100 (2007) 4. Nils Ivar Ringdal, Master thesis, Department of Physics, NTNU (2008) 5. J.O. Fossum, Y. Meheust, K.P.S. Parmar, K.D. Knudsen, K.J. Maloy, D.d.M. Fonseca, Intercalation-enhanced electric polarization and chain formation of nano-layered particles, Europhys. Lett., 74, 438 (2006), and in the Scientific Highlights 2006 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility - ESRF (2007) 6. K.P.S. Parmar, Y. Meheust, B. Schelderupsen and J.O. Fossum, Electrorheological suspensions of laponite in oil: rheometry studies, Langmuir 24,1814 (2008) 7. F. Bergaya, B. K. G. Theng, and G. Lagaly, editors. Handbook of Clay Science. Elsevier (2006)

  19. Organic Pillared Clays.

    PubMed

    Meier, L. P.; Nueesch, R.; Madsen, F. T.

    2001-06-01

    Commonly used organophilic clays are modified by alkylammonium cations which hold apart the aluminosilicate layers permanently. The cations fill the interlayer space and are contemplated as flexible pillars, resulting from the mobility of the alkyl chains. Therefore, the interlayer distance varies depending on the layer charge and on the alkyl chain length. Contrary to these cations, rigid pillaring cations guarantee a constant interlayer distance without occupying the interlayer by themselves and show special adsorption properties such as hydrophilic behavior contrary to the generally hydrophobic ones. Smectites were modified by flexible organic cations, e.g., dimethyldioctadecylammonium, and by rigid ones, e.g., tetraphenylphosphonium. Their adsorption properties are compared. Our investigations showed improved adsorption properties for rigid organic cations on smectites using 2-chlorophenol as pollutant. Best adsorption results are achieved using pillaring cations in combination with low charged smectites, especially at low pollutant concentrations. The properties of organic modified smectites are discussed by a pollution intercalation model. The intercalation process of an organic pollutant into an organic modified smectite is expressed by a two-step Born-Haber cycle process: (i) the formation of an adsorbing position by layer expansion and (ii) the occupation of the adsorbing position by the pollutant. The first step of the formation of the adsorbing position is an endothermal transition state which lowers the total intercalation energy and therefore worsens the adsorption behavior. Thus, an already expanded organophilic smectite will show improved adsorption behavior. The formed adsorbing position state on organic modified smectites is comparable to the pillared state of inorganic pillared clays. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11350131

  20. Improving the schemes for preparing chamotte-clay mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V.I.; Bulakh, V.L.; Korchakov, V.G.

    1988-07-01

    Based on data obtained on the combined milling, particle size, density, and sinterability of chamotte and clay and the energy and productivity parameters of the requisite equipment, a number of schemes are recommended for preparing finely milled chamotte and clay mixtures. The schemes call for prior separate milling and particle size classification of the chamotte followed by the addition of surfactants and the combined milling of the chamotte and clay. Charging and mixing techniques were evaluated for the batch preparation of firebrick and for lowering equipment energy consumption and producing high-grade nondust mixtures. Schematic diagrams depicting the configuration of the mills, hoppers, feed lines, and pneumatic classifiers are given. The introduction of such schemes into refractory practice is expected to stabilize service properties, increase the utilization of raw materials, reduce production costs, and reduce dust in the work space.

  1. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  2. Preparation of Clay Brick Using Coal Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jung W.; Jung, Jin H.; Kim, Jae M.; Lee, Sung M.; Kim, Hyung T.

    2004-03-31

    A great deal of coal waste produced during the development of a mine was accumulated around the mine, which caused many problems such as traffic, acid mine drainage and damage of forest and scenery. Carbon in the coal waste helps calcination of the brick even at low temperature. Considering the reuse of natural waste and energy saving, clay brick was prepared using coal waste under various conditions, including particle size, amount of coal waste mixed, calcination temperature and pressing pressure. The specimens were characterized by XRD, SEM and TG-DTA and interpreted in terms of water absorption and compressive strength.

  3. Neutron diffraction on polymer nanocomposites - A tool for structural and orientation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapalidis, A. A.; Katsaros, F. K.; Steriotis, Th A.; Kanellopoulos, N. K.; Dante, S.; Hauss, T.

    2012-02-01

    A series of Polyvinyl alcohol (Mowiol 5-88) - Bentonite nanocomposite films with predefined clay loading (up to 0-20%), were prepared via solvent casting technique. The developed films, due to the favourable polymer-particle interactions, revealed excellent dispersion of the clay particles in the polymer matrix and improved properties. Furthermore, the properties of PVA/clay nanocomposites as well as their structural changes as a function of the relative humidity were thoroughly investigated using neutron membrane diffraction experiments. The samples prior their measurement were equilibrated at different relative humidity levels (%RH) using either H2O or D2O. The application of contrast variation technique enabled us to investigate the contribution of both the polymer and the clay particles to the diffraction spectra. Thus, the use of H2O enlightened the low Q region, providing information about the structure of the inorganic phase and specifically the stacking of the clay platelets. The diffraction patterns in this region obtained from perpendicular and in-plane sample positions revealed that there is a specific orientation of bentonite plates, parallel to the film surface. This conclusion is in agreement with the results obtained from XRD and gas permeability technique, in which the well organized and dispersed impermeable inorganic layers, increase the resistance in flow through the nanocomposites film, acting as gas barriers. On the other hand, diffraction experiments on pre-equilibrated with D2O samples revealed the structural changes in polymeric matrix, due to hydration. The obtained peak revealed the presence of a new crystalline phase, presumably induced by the presence of the silicates, which is in agreement with DSC data reported in previous studies.

  4. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  5. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  6. Effect of gravity on virus and clay colloid cotransport through vertical water-saturated columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2015-04-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columnspacked with glass beadswas investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (kGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in bothvertical upward (VU) and vertically downward (VD) flowdirections. For most of the cases examined in this study, estimated mass recovery values were higher for VD than VU flows, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influenced particle deposition.KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow conditions,while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow conditions. Moreover, KGa-1b hindered,while STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in all of thecases examined. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages, and virus surface concentrations for virus diffusion-limited adsorption, and virus adsorption by sedimentation. The sedimentation limited virus adsorption was higher for VD than VU flows, and the diffusion-limited adsorption was higher for MS2 than ΦX174.

  7. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of clays and clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Hughes, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the configuration, texture, and fabric of clay samples. Growth mechanics of crystalline units-interpenetration and interlocking of crystallites, crystal habits, twinning, helical growth, and topotaxis-also are uniquely revealed by the SEM. Authigenic kaolins make up the bulk of the examples because their larger crystallite size, better crystallinity, and open texture make them more suited to examination by the SEM than most other clay mineral types. ?? 1971.

  9. Preparation of PEO/Clay Nanocomposites Using Organoclay Produced via Micellar Adsorption of CTAB

    PubMed Central

    Gürses, Ahmet; Ejder-Korucu, Mehtap; Doğar, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of polyethylene oxide (PEO)/clay nanocomposites using organoclay produced via micellar adsorption of cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and their characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, and the investigation of certain mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that the basal distance between the layers increased with the increasing CTAB/clay ratio as parallel with the zeta potential values of particles. By considering the aggregation number of CTAB micelles and interlayer distances of organo-clay, it could be suggested that the predominant micelle geometry at lower CTAB/clay ratios is an ellipsoidal oblate, whereas, at higher CTAB/clay ratios, sphere-ellipsoid transition occurs. The increasing tendency of the exfoliation degree with an increase in clay content may be attributed to easier diffusion of PEO chains to interlayer regions. FT-IR spectra show that the intensity of Si-O stretching vibrations of the organoclays (1050 cm−1) increased, especially in the ratios of 1.0 g/g clay and 1.5 g/g clay with the increasing CTAB content. It was observed that the mechanical properties of the composites are dependent on both the CTAB/clay ratios and clay content of the composites. PMID:23365515

  10. Processes and controls in swelling anhydritic clay rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Referring to the swelling of anhydritic clay rocks in tunneling, Leopold Müller-Salzburg noted in the third volume on tunneling of his fundamental text book on rock engineering that "a truly coherent explanation of these phenomena is still owing" (Müller-Salzburg 1978, p. 306). This valuation is still true after more than three decades of research in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of such rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical controls of the swelling. In this contribution, a review of processes in swelling anhydritic clay rocks and of associated controls is presented. Also numerical models that aim at simulating the swelling processes and controls are included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-oriented work in this review, the presentation intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical engineering projects. Keywords: swelling; anhydritic clay rocks; review

  11. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  12. A novel system for reducing leaching from formulations of anionic herbicides: clay-liposomes.

    PubMed

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Mishael, Yael Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Rubin, Baruch; Morillo, Esmeralda; Maqueda, Celia

    2003-10-01

    A new approach was developed for reducing leaching of herbicides and contamination of groundwater. Liposome-clay formulations of the anionic herbicides sulfometuron and sulfosulfuron were designed for slow release by incorporating the herbicide in positively charged vesicles of didodecyldimethylammonium (DDAB), which were adsorbed on the negatively charged clay, montmorillonite. Freeze fracture electron microscopy demonstrated the existence of DDAB vesicles and aggregated structures on external clay surfaces. X-ray diffraction results for DDAB with montmorillonite imply the existence of DDAB bilayers with an oblique orientation to the basal plane within the clay interlayer space at adsorbed amounts beyond the cation exchange capacity of the clay. Adding DDAB with sulfometuron or sulfosulfuron to montmorillonite yielded 95% or 83% adsorption of the herbicide at optimal ratios. Liposome-clay formulations exhibited slow release of the herbicides in water. Analytical measurements in soil columns demonstrated 2-10-fold reduction in leaching of the herbicides from liposome-clay formulations in comparison with commercial formulations. Percents of root growth inhibition of a test plant in the upper soil depths were severalfold higher for the liposome-clay formulations than for the commercial ones. Consequently, liposome-clay formulations of anionic herbicides can solve environmental and economical problems by reducing their leaching.

  13. Thermomechanical model of hydration swelling in smectitic clays: I two-scale mixture-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Márcio A.

    1999-06-01

    A thermomechanical theory of hydration swelling in smectitic clays is proposed. The clay is treated as a three-scale swelling system wherein macroscopic governing equations are derived by upscaling the microstructure. At the microscale the model has two phases, the disjoint clay platelets and adsorbed water (water between the platelets). At the intermediate (meso) scale (the homogenized microscale) the model consists of clay particles (adsorbed water plus clay platelets) and bulk water. At the macroscale the medium is treated as an homogenized swelling mixture of clay particles and bulk-phase water with thermodynamic properties defined everywhere within the macroscopic body. In Part I, the mesoscopic model governing the swelling of the clay particles is derived using a mixture-theoretic approach and the Coleman and Noll method of exploitation of the entropy inequality. Application of this procedure leads to two-scale governing equations which generalize the classical thermoelastic consolidation model of non-swelling media, as they exhibit additional physico-chemical and viscous-type terms accounting for hydration stresses between the adsorbed fluid and the clay minerals. In Part II the two-scale model is applied to a bentonitic clay used for engineered barrier of nuclear waste repository. The clay buffer is assumed to have monomodal character with most of the water essentially adsorbed. Further, partial results toward a three-scale thermomechanical macroscopic model including the bulk phase next to the swelling particles are derived by homogenizing the two-scale model with the bulk water. A notable consequence of this three-scale approach is that it provides a rational basis for the appearance of a generalized inter-phase mass transfer between adsorbed and bulk water.

  14. Prions, Radionuclides and Clays: Impact of clay interlayer "acidity" on toxic compound speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, L.; Hureau, C.; Sobolev, O.; Cuello, G.; Chapron, Y.

    2007-05-01

    . The speciation of the Cu-ligand complex was found to be different, in bulk water (Hureau et al., 2006) and in clay suspensions, where n increases. This new speciation of the copper metal ions, used as a molecular probe, allows to "measure" the pH of interlayer water which is shown to be significantly lower than in bulk water pH. Molecular models for PrP attachment to the clay basal plane and Sm location within the clay interlayer were obtained by MD computations. Implications on PrP pathogenicity, following carcase burial and particle ingestions, and on radionuclide mobility, following nuclear waste burial in clay rich repository sites, will be discussed.

  15. New magnetic organic inorganic composites based on hydrotalcite-like anionic clays for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carja, Gabriela; Chiriac, Horia; Lupu, Nicoleta

    2007-04-01

    The structural "memory effect" of anionic clays was used to obtain layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with tailored magnetic properties, by loading iron oxides and/or spinel structures on iron partially substituted hydrotalcite-like materials. The obtained magnetic layered structures were further used as precursors for new hybrid nanostructures, such as aspirin-hydrotalcite-like anionic clays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis shows that small iron oxide or spinel nanoparticles coexist with the fibrous drug particles on the surface of partially aggregated typical clay-like particles. The specific saturation magnetization of the loaded LDHs can be increased up to 70 emu/g by using specific post-synthesis treatments.

  16. Magnetic fabric from red clay sediments in the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hujun; Zhang, Rui; Yue, Leping; Zhang, Yunxiang; Li, Jianxing

    2015-04-27

    Well-distributed eolian red clay in a wide area of northern China is believed to imply the onset of an ancient East Asian monsoon system since Late Miocene. Two continuous red clay sequences spanning the time interval 7-2.6 Ma and 11-2.6 Ma in the Chinese Loess Plateau was investigated to determine the magnetic orientation and grain alignment in the primary fabric of eolian sediments. The north-westerly orientation of the AMS of the eolian red clay sequences parallels the material transportation direction, which differs from the model that suggests that airborne dust from overlying loess-paleosol sequences were transported by the East Asian winter monsoon and fixed by the East Asian summer monsoon. Our results further reveal that present-day climate and air circulation patterns differ from those of the pre-Quaternary, and may provide evidence of a prevailing wind during deposition of the red clay.

  17. Release of surfactant cargo from interfacially-active halloysite clay nanotubes for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Owoseni, Olasehinde; Nyankson, Emmanuel; Zhang, Yueheng; Adams, Samantha J; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Bose, Arijit; Gupta, Ram B; John, Vijay T

    2014-11-18

    Naturally occurring halloysite clay nanotubes are effective in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions and can serve as interfacially-active vehicles for delivering oil spill treating agents. Halloysite nanotubes adsorb at the oil-water interface and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions that are stable for months. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) imaging of the oil-in-water emulsions shows that these nanotubes assemble in a side-on orientation at the oil-water interface and form networks on the interface through end-to-end linkages. For application in the treatment of marine oil spills, halloysite nanotubes were successfully loaded with surfactants and utilized as an interfacially-active vehicle for the delivery of surfactant cargo. The adsorption of surfactant molecules at the interface serves to lower the interfacial tension while the adsorption of particles provides a steric barrier to drop coalescence. Pendant drop tensiometry was used to characterize the dynamic reduction in interfacial tension resulting from the release of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS) from halloysite nanotubes. At appropriate surfactant compositions and loadings in halloysite nanotubes, the crude oil-saline water interfacial tension is effectively lowered to levels appropriate for the dispersion of oil. This work indicates a novel concept of integrating particle stabilization of emulsions together with the release of chemical surfactants from the particles for the development of an alternative, cheaper, and environmentally-benign technology for oil spill remediation.

  18. Release of surfactant cargo from interfacially-active halloysite clay nanotubes for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Owoseni, Olasehinde; Nyankson, Emmanuel; Zhang, Yueheng; Adams, Samantha J; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Bose, Arijit; Gupta, Ram B; John, Vijay T

    2014-11-18

    Naturally occurring halloysite clay nanotubes are effective in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions and can serve as interfacially-active vehicles for delivering oil spill treating agents. Halloysite nanotubes adsorb at the oil-water interface and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions that are stable for months. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) imaging of the oil-in-water emulsions shows that these nanotubes assemble in a side-on orientation at the oil-water interface and form networks on the interface through end-to-end linkages. For application in the treatment of marine oil spills, halloysite nanotubes were successfully loaded with surfactants and utilized as an interfacially-active vehicle for the delivery of surfactant cargo. The adsorption of surfactant molecules at the interface serves to lower the interfacial tension while the adsorption of particles provides a steric barrier to drop coalescence. Pendant drop tensiometry was used to characterize the dynamic reduction in interfacial tension resulting from the release of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS) from halloysite nanotubes. At appropriate surfactant compositions and loadings in halloysite nanotubes, the crude oil-saline water interfacial tension is effectively lowered to levels appropriate for the dispersion of oil. This work indicates a novel concept of integrating particle stabilization of emulsions together with the release of chemical surfactants from the particles for the development of an alternative, cheaper, and environmentally-benign technology for oil spill remediation. PMID:25346266

  19. Polyimide-Clay Composite Materials for Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.; Connell, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of nanometer-sized clay particles into a polyimide matrix has been shown to enhance the physical properties of specific polymer systems. The clay comprises large stacked platelets of the oxides of aluminum and silicon. These sheets have long dimensions on the order of tenths of a micrometer and thicknesses of several nanometers. Homogeneous dispersion of the clay platelets in the polymer matrix is necessary to achieve those enhancements in polymer properties. Natural montmorillonite with the empirical formula Na0.33Mg0.33Al1.67(OH)2(Si4O10) contains exchangeable inorganic cations. The clay lamellae stack together with the positive sodium ions situated between the surfaces of the individual sheets to balance negatively charged oxygen atoms that are on the surfaces of the sheets. These surface charges contribute to strong electrostatic forces which hold the sheets together tightly. Exfoliation can be accomplished only with unusual measures. In preparing clay nanocomposites, we have taken two steps to try to reduce these interlamellar forces in order to promote the separation (exfoliation) of the sheets and the dispersion of the individual clay particles throughout the organic polymer matrix. In the first step, some of the surface Na(+) ions are replaced with Li(+) ions. Unlike sodium cations, the lithium cations migrate into the interior of the lamellae when the system is heated. Their departure from the surface reduces the surface charge and therefore the attractive forces between the sheets. The loss of alkali metal cations from the surface can be measured as the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay. For example, we found that the CEC of montmorillonite clay was reduced by almost two thirds by treating it with lithium ions and heating to 250 C for 24 hr. Lesser heating has a smaller effect on the CEC. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the d-spacing decreased from ca. 1.34 to 0.97 nm, apparently a consequence of a collapse of the clay

  20. Investigating the Influence of Clay Mineralogy on Stream Bank Erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, R. K.; Stine, M. B.

    2005-12-01

    Soil scientists concerned with erosion of agricultural fields and geotechnical engineers concerned with the mechanical behavior of soils under different conditions have both examined the role of clay mineralogy in controlling soil/sediment properties. Fluvial geomorphologists studying stream channel erosion and stability have focused more on the effects of particle-size distribution, vegetation and rooting. The clay mineralogy of bed and bank sediment has the potential to influence cohesiveness and erodibility, however. The goal of this study is to determine the influence of clay mineralogy on the erodibility of natural stream bank sediment, utilizing techniques drawn from pedology and soil mechanics. Bank samples were collected from eleven sites in small watersheds in central and western Virginia. To obtain sediment containing a range of different clay minerals, watersheds with different types of bedrock were chosen for sampling. Rock types included mafic to felsic metamorphic and igneous rocks, shale, sandstone, and limestone. Where stream bank materials were clearly stratified, different layers were sampled separately. X-ray diffraction of the clay-fraction of the sediment indicates the presence of kaolinite, illite, vermiculite, and mixed-layer clay minerals in various abundances in the different samples. Clay content is 9-46%, as determined by the hydrometer method, and textures range from silty clay and silt loam to clay loam and sandy loam. Organic mater contents range from 1-5% by the loss-on-ignition method. Bulk density of intact sediment samples averages 1.5 g/cc. Liquid limits range from 23-41 with one sample having a value of 65; plasticity indices range from 15-22. While these tests predict that the samples would show a range of mechanical behaviors, the channel morphology at the sampling sites was not strikingly different, all having steep cut banks eroded primarily by scour with no evidence of mass movement and most having a width/depth ratio around

  1. Potential bioavailability of mercury in humus-coated clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Daiwen; Zhong, Huan

    2015-10-01

    It is well-known that both clay and organic matter in soils play a key role in mercury biogeochemistry, while their combined effect is less studied. In this study, kaolinite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite were coated or not with humus, and spiked with inorganic mercury (IHg) or methylmercury (MeHg). The potential bioavailability of mercury to plants or deposit-feeders was assessed by CaCl2 or bovine serum albumin (BSA) extraction. For uncoated clay, IHg or MeHg extraction was generally lower in montmorillonite, due to its greater number of functional groups. Humus coating increased partitioning of IHg (0.5%-13.7%) and MeHg (0.8%-52.9%) in clay, because clay-sorbed humus provided more strong binding sites for mercury. Furthermore, humus coating led to a decrease in IHg (3.0%-59.8% for CaCl2 and 2.1%-5.0% for BSA) and MeHg (8.9%-74.6% for CaCl2 and 0.5%-8.2% for BSA) extraction, due to strong binding between mercury and clay-sorbed humus. Among various humus-coated clay particles, mercury extraction by CaCl2 (mainly through cation exchange) was lowest in humus-coated vermiculite, explained by the strong binding between humus and vermiculite. The inhibitory effect of humus on mercury bioavailability was also evidenced by the negative relationship between mercury extraction by CaCl2 and mercury in the organo-complexed fraction. In contrast, extraction of mercury by BSA (principally through complexation) was lowest in humus-coated montmorillonite. This was because BSA itself could be extensively sorbed onto montmorillonite. Results suggested that humus-coated clay could substantially decrease the potential bioavailability of mercury in soils, which should be considered when assessing risk in mercury-contaminated soils.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on strength of clays

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, R.C.; Achari, G. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Horsfield, D. ); Nagaraj, T.S. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Thermal treatment alters the physical and mechanical properties of clayey soils. Thermally treated soils have been used since primitive times for making trails for access and bricks for dwellings. In comparison with other soil-improvement methods, thermal stabilization produces immediate results. Thermal treatment of clays alters several material characteristics, such as strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, and resistance to abrasion. Furthermore, thermal treatment causes decrease in cation exchange and compressibility and increase in particle size. Aggregates produced by thermal treatment provide durable and economic substitutes for gravel and crushed rock. These are then used for pavement construction particularly in areas where construction materials have to be imported at excessive costs. Thus, in the Western Beaufort Sea area where large quantities of granular fill for artificial island and undersea-berm construction are required, but not readily available, thermally treated clays may be a solution. Granular material produced from a clayey soil must retain strength when wetted and be durable under wetting and drying conditions. Beyond fusion temperatures of clays, i.e. above 900 C, these conditions are known to be met. However, it is not clear from existing information, if heating below fusion temperatures may also satisfy these requirements. This study examines the relationship between the strength of selected clays and clay mixtures heated from 300 C to 700 C and the factors that influence such a relationship.

  3. Exfoliation restacking route to Au nanoparticle-clay nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Seung-Min; Jang, Jae-Up; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2006-05-01

    A novel gold-pillared aluminosilicate (Au-PILC) were synthesized with positively charged gold nanoparticles capped by mercaptoammonium and exfoliated silicate layers. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH4 reduction of AuCl4- in the presence of N,N,N-Trimethyl (11-mercaptoundecyl)ammonium (HS(CH2)11NMe3+) protecting ligand in an aqueous solution, and purified by dialysis. The resulting positively charged and water-soluble gold nanoparticles were hybridized with exfoliated silicate sheets by electrostatic interaction. The formation of Au clay hybrids could be easily confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction with the increased basal spacing of clay upon insertion of Au nanoparticles. TEM image clearly revealed that the Au particles with an average size of 4 nm maintain their structure even after intercalation. The Au nanoparticles supported by clay matrix were found to be thermally more stable, suggesting that the Au nanoparticles were homogeneously protected with clay nanoplates. The present synthetic route could be further applicable to various hybrid systems between metal nanoparticles and clays.

  4. Biodegradable pectin/clay aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2013-03-13

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The addition of multivalent cations (Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) resulted in apparent cross-linking of the polymer and enhancement of aerogel properties. The compressive properties increased as the solid contents (both pectin and clay) increased; moduli in the range of 0.04-114 MPa were obtained for materials with bulk densities ranging from 0.03 g/cm(3) to 0.19 g/cm(3), accompanied by microstructural changes from a lamellar structure to a cellular structure. Biodegradability of the aerogels was investigated by detecting CO2 release for 4 weeks in compost media. The results revealed that pectin aerogels possess higher biodegradation rates than wheat starch, which is often used as a standard for effective biodegradation. The addition of clay and multivalent cations surprisingly increased the biodegradation rates. PMID:23406325

  5. Interaction of polymer with clays.

    SciTech Connect

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-07-02

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labelling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains.

  6. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  7. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  8. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  9. A Novel Prime and Boost Regimen of HIV Virus-Like Particles with TLR4 Adjuvant MPLA Induces Th1 Oriented Immune Responses against HIV.

    PubMed

    Poteet, Ethan; Lewis, Phoebe; Li, Feng; Zhang, Sheng; Gu, Jianhua; Chen, Changyi; Ho, Sam On; Do, Thai; Chiang, SuMing; Fujii, Gary; Yao, Qizhi

    2015-01-01

    HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) present the HIV envelope protein in its native conformation, providing an ideal vaccine antigen. To enhance the immunogenicity of the VLP vaccine, we sought to improve upon two components; the route of administration and the additional adjuvant. Using HIV VLPs, we evaluated sub-cheek as a novel route of vaccine administration when combined with other conventional routes of immunization. Of five combinations of distinct prime and boost sequences, which included sub-cheek, intranasal, and intradermal routes of administration, intranasal prime and sub-cheek boost (IN+SC) resulted in the highest HIV-specific IgG titers among the groups tested. Using the IN+SC regimen we tested the adjuvant VesiVax Conjugatable Adjuvant Lipid Vesicles (CALV) + monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) at MPLA concentrations of 0, 7.5, 12.5, and 25 μg/dose in combination with our VLPs. Mice that received 12.5 or 25 μg/dose MPLA had the highest concentrations of Env-specific IgG2c (20.7 and 18.4 μg/ml respectively), which represents a Th1 type of immune response in C57BL/6 mice. This was in sharp contrast to mice which received 0 or 7.5 μg MPLA adjuvant (6.05 and 5.68 μg/ml of IgG2c respectively). In contrast to IgG2c, MPLA had minor effects on Env-specific IgG1; therefore, 12.5 and 25 μg/dose of MPLA induced the optimal IgG1/IgG2c ratio of 1.3. Additionally, the percentage of germinal center B cells increased significantly from 15.4% in the control group to 31.9% in the CALV + 25 μg MPLA group. These mice also had significantly more IL-2 and less IL-4 Env-specific CD8+ T cells than controls, correlating with an increased percentage of Env-specific central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Our study shows the strong potential of IN+SC as an efficacious route of administration and the effectiveness of VLPs combined with MPLA adjuvant to induce Env specific Th1-oriented HIV-specific immune responses. PMID:26312747

  10. Crystal chemistry and Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis of clays around Riyadh for brick industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Mutasim I.

    2013-04-01

    A total of 30 clay samples were collected from the area around Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. A complete chemical analysis was carried out using different techniques. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the clay samples were mainly of the smectite group with traces of the kaolinite one. The samples studied were classified as nontronite clay minerals. One of the clay fraction has been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy as raw clay fraction and after being fired at 950-1,000 °C. The Mössbauer spectra showed accessory iron compounds in the form of hematite and goethite. The structural iron contents disintegrate on firing transforming into magnetic iron oxide and a paramagnetic small particles iron oxide.

  11. Rheological properties of purified illite clays in glycerol/water suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenkova, I.; Malers, J.; Berzina-Cimdina, L.

    2015-04-01

    There are many studies about rheological properties of clay-water suspensions, but no published investigations about clay-glycerol suspensions. In this work apparent viscosity of previously purified illite containing clay fraction < 2 μm and glycerol/water suspensions were investigated. Carbonates were removed by dissolution in hydrochloric and citric acids and other non-clay minerals were almost totally removed by centrifugation. All obtained suspensions behaved as shear-thinning fluids with multiple times higher viscosity than pure glycerol/water solutions. Reduction of clay fraction concentration by 5% decreased the apparent viscosity of 50% glycerol/water suspensions approximately 5 times. There was basically no difference in apparent viscosity between all four 50% glycerol/water suspensions, but in 90% glycerol/water suspensions samples from Iecava deposit showed slightly higher apparent viscosity, which could be affected by the particle size distribution.

  12. Bacteria-clay interactions investigated by light scattering and phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimova, Alexandra; Block, Karin; Rudolph, Elizabeth; Katz, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Gottlieb, P.; Alfano, R. R.

    2006-02-01

    Light scattering experiments and phase contrast microscopy are used to evaluate the aggregate-forming characteristics of simple clay-bacteria mixtures. Colloidal suspensions of negatively charged Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) and Mg 2+-, Li + - or Ca 2+ -exchanged smectite (and non-exchanged smectite) are flocculated in neutral (pH 7) aqueous media. Aggregate formation is monitored using changes in optical transmission. Clustering is observed in all the clay-bacteria preparations. The Li +-substituted clay aggregates average 50-300 microns in diameter, in contrast to the Ca 2+- substituted clay that produces aggregates of 10-50 microns in diameter. Light scattering measurements indicate that aggregates begin forming 3 hours after mixing and that the (larger sized) aggregates exhibit less scattering than a mixture with an equivalent concentration of unattached Ps and clay particles.

  13. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study. PMID:25269317

  14. Chemical mechanism of flocculation and deposition of clay colloids in coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Qiu, Lixia; Lin, Guoqing; Yan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xiaolan; Pang, Honglu

    2016-10-01

    Seawater intrusion has become one of serious environmental problems in coastal areas. During the replacement of saline water by fresh water in the aquifers, in-situ clay could be released, transport and deposit in the porous media due to the change of hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which resulted in the increasing of particle size, plugging of pores and reduction of the permeability. Batch experiments and sand column experiments were explored to study the relationships between the flocculation of in-situ clay and geochemical conditions, by changing ionic strength and ionic type of clay suspension. Column outflow was analyzed for suspended particles and electrical conductivity. The total percentage of colloid straining and interception distribution in porous media was calculated. The results indicate that porous media had an effect on the interception of clay colloid particles with about 10 percent clay colloids captured due to the rough surfaces and spatial structure of porous media. Ionic strength played a key role on the permeability reductions. The higher ionic strength is, the greater the amount of colloidal particles trapped. Ionic type also had a significant effect on the interception of clay colloid particles. Ripening was the main mechanism for the interception within porous media when the bulk solution was potassium chloride while blocking happened when the bulk solution was sodium chloride. The distribution of clay colloids in porous media was heterogeneous. The closer to the sand column inlet was the less interception of clay colloids was. The results can provide the scientific basis for preventing the water sensitivity during the process of salty aquifer restoration.

  15. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  16. Amitriptyline removal using palygorskite clay.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yo-Lin; Chang, Po-Hsiang; Gao, Zong-You; Xu, Xiao-Yuan; Chen, Yan-Hsin; Wang, Zheng-Hong; Chen, Xin-Yu; Yang, Zheng-Ying; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Li, Zhaohui; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2016-07-01

    With the increased detections of commonly used pharmaceuticals in surface water and wastewater, extensive attentions were paid recently to the fate and transport of these pharmaceuticals in the environment. Amitriptyline (AMI) is a tricyclic antidepressant widely applied to treat patients with anxiety and depression. In this study, the removal of AMI with palygorskite clay (PFl-1) was investigated under different physico-chemical conditions and supplemented by instrumental analyses. The uptake of AMI on PFl-1 was well fitted by the Langmuir isotherm with an adsorption capacity of 0.168 mmol g(-1) at pH 6-7. The AMI uptake was fast and reached equilibrium in 15 min. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed no shift of the (110) peak position of palygorskite after AMI uptake. However, the (001) peak position of the minor component smectite (about 10%) shifted to lower angle as the amounts of AMI input increased. These results suggested surface uptake of AMI on palygorskite and interlayer uptake of AMI in smectite. As smectite is a common component of palygorskite clays, its role in assessing the properties and performances of palygorskite clays for the uptake and removal of contaminants should not be neglected. Overall, the high affinity of AMI for PFl-1 and strong retention of AMI on PFl-1 suggested that it could be a good adsorbent to remove AMI from wastewater. Palygorskite clays can also be a sink for many cationic pharmaceuticals in the environmental of the arid regions. PMID:27131449

  17. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  18. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  19. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  20. An investigative study of polymer adsorption onto montmorillonite clay

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, C.L.; Lochhead, R.Y.

    1996-10-01

    Few studies have been geared towards the study of the mechanisms governing stabilization and flocculation of polymers and clay particles. The overall goal of this research is to relate these mechanisms to properties above and below the critical overlap concentration, c*, of the polymer/clay species. Initially, phase behavior and sedimentation studies were conducted to screen for anionic, cationic and nonionic polymers capable of both flocculation and restabilization. As a result three polymers were selected for further testing: polyacrylamide, poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) and poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Polyacrylamide and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) have been synthesized and characterized by viscometry and {sup 13}C NMR. C* of the polymers was determined by viscometry via Huggins` plots and dynamic light scattering measurements have shown variations in the mean particle size as a function of polymer concentration.

  1. Identification of iron oxide and hydroxide in soil clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, S. P.; Raj, D.

    1993-04-01

    Clay fractions of soils collected at different depths from the foothills of Karbi Anglong, Assam (India), have been analysed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mössbauer data, recorded at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, show the presence of iron oxide (α-Fe 2O 3, hematite) and iron oxyhydroxide (α-FeOOH, goethite) in the form of fine particles/Al-substituted. All samples exhibited strong superparamagnetism, characteristic of the fine size of the oxide particles and the effect of aluminum substitution. Both hematite and goethite are present in the lower horizon while only goethite occurs in the upper horizon. In addition, silicate clay minerals e.g. kaolinite and illite are also identified.

  2. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  3. Phosphonium modified clay/polyimide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Hatice; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, octyltriphenylphosphonium bromide [OTPP-Br] was prepared from the reaction of triphenylphosphine and 1 -bromooctane. The modification of clay was done by ion exchange reaction using OTPP-Br in water medium. Poly(amic acid) was prepared from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-Oxydianiline (ODA). Polyimide(PI)/clay hybrids were prepared by blending of poly(amic acid) and organically modified clay as a type of layered clays. The morphology of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structures of polyimide and Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  4. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  5. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and....1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain varying quantities of alkalies...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  9. Mathematical modelling of undrained clay behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevost, J. H.; Noeg, K.

    1976-01-01

    The proposed general analytical model describes the anisotropic, elastoplastic, path-dependent, stress-strain properties of inviscid saturated clays under undrained conditions. Model parameters are determined by using results from strain-controlled simple shear tests on a saturated clay. The model's accuracy is evaluated by applying it to predict the results of other tests on the same clay, including monotonic and cyclic loading. The model explains the very anisotropic shear strength behavior observed for weak marine clays.

  10. Brownian dynamics simulation of orientational behavior, flow-induced structure, and rheological properties of a suspension of oblate spheroid particles under simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suga, Takanori; Mori, Noriyasu

    2005-08-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations were carried out for suspensions of oblate spheroid particles interacting via the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. The oblate spheroid particles were applied as a model of disc-like particles and the system of suspension of the particles was considered. Numerically analyzed were both the change in phase with the number density of the particles at equilibrium state and the behavior of the particles in simple shear flows. The system changed from isotropic phase to nematic one with increasing the particle concentration. In the simulation of shear flows, the shear was imposed upon the systems in nematic phase at equilibrium. The systems exhibited various motions of the director depending on the shear rate, e.g. the continuous rotation of director at low shear rates, the wagging at moderate shear rates, and the flow aligning at high shear rates. Temporal change in inner structure of suspensions was also analyzed and collapse of initial particle configurations due to shear was found. Moreover, rheological properties of the suspension were investigated. The numerical simulation predicted the shear-thinning in viscosity, negative first normal stress difference, and positive second normal stress difference, and these results qualitatively agreed with the predictions using a constitutive equation for discotic nematics. The present study proved that the BD simulation using spheroid particles interacting via the GB potential is an effective approach for investigating the flow behavior and flow-induced structure of suspensions of disklike particles at a particulate level.

  11. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  12. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  13. Recycling of sugarcane bagasse ash waste in the production of clay bricks.

    PubMed

    Faria, K C P; Gurgel, R F; Holanda, J N F

    2012-06-30

    This work investigates the recycling of sugarcane bagasse ash waste as a method to provide raw material for clay brick bodies, through replacement of natural clay by up 20 wt.%. Initially, the waste sample was characterized by its chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, particle size, morphology and pollution potential. Clay bricks pieces were prepared, and then tested, so as to determine their technological properties (e.g., linear shrinkage, water absorption, apparent density, and tensile strength). The sintered microstructure was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the sugarcane bagasse ash waste is mainly composed by crystalline silica particles. The test results indicate that the sugarcane bagasse ash waste could be used as a filler in clay bricks, thus enhancing the possibility of its reuse in a safe and sustainable way.

  14. The Use of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites in Wastewater Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Rytwo, Giora

    2012-01-01

    Some agricultural effluents are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants: their pretreatment is necessary to avoid clogging of the filtering devices by colloidal matter. The colloidal stability of the effluents is mainly due to mutual repulsive forces that keep charged particles in suspension. Pretreatment processes are based on two separate stages: (a) neutralization of the charges (“coagulation”) and (b) bridging between several small particles to form larger aggregates that sink, leaving clarified effluent (“flocculation”). The consequent destabilization of the colloidal suspension lowers total suspended solids (TSSs), turbidity, and other environmental quality parameters, making the treatments that follow more efficient. Clay-based materials have been widely used for effluent pretreatment and pollutant removal. This study presents the use of nanocomposites, comprised of an anchoring particle and a polymer, as “coagoflocculants” for the efficient and rapid reduction of TSS and turbidity in wastewater with a high organic load. The use of such particles combines the advantages of coagulant and flocculant by neutralizing the charge of the suspended particles while bridging between them and anchoring them to a denser particle (the clay mineral), enhancing their precipitation. Very rapid and efficient pretreatment is achieved in one single treatment step. PMID:22454607

  15. Effects of clay dispersion on aquifer storage and recovery in coastal aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; August, L.L.; Voss, C.I.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of freshwater in brackish aquifers is a form of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) that can beneficially supplement water supplies in coastal areas. A 1970s field experiment in Norfolk, Virginia, showed that clay dispersion in the unconsolidated sedimentary aquifer occurred because of cation exchange on clay minerals as freshwater displaced brackish formation water. Migration of interstitial clay particles clogged pores, reduced permeability, and decreased recovery efficiency, but a calcium preflush was found to reduce clay dispersion and lead to a higher recovery efficiency. Column experiments were performed in this study to quantify the relations between permeability changes and clay mineralogy, clay content, and initial water salinity. The results of these experiments indicate that dispersion of montmorillonite clay is a primary contributor to formation damage. The reduction in permeability by clay dispersion may be expressed as a linear function of chloride content. Incorporating these simple functions into a radial, cross-sectional, variable-density, ground-water flow and transport model yielded a satisfactory simulation of the Norfolk field test - and represented an improvement over the model that ignored changes in permeability. This type of model offers a useful planning and design tool for ASR operations in coastal clastic aquifer systems.

  16. Evaluation of the healing activity of therapeutic clay in rat skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Dário, Giordana Maciel; da Silva, Geovana Gomes; Gonçalves, Davi Ludvig; Silveira, Paulo; Junior, Adilson Teixeira; Angioletto, Elidio; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2014-10-01

    The use of clays for therapeutic practice is widespread in almost all regions of the world. In this study the physicochemical and microbiological healing characteristics of a clay from Ocara, Brazil, popularly used for therapeutic uses, were analyzed. The presence of Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and Si was observed, which initially indicated that the clay had potential for therapeutic use. The average particle size of the clay (26.3 μm) can induce the microcirculation of the skin and the XRD analysis shows that the clay is formed by kaolinite and illite, a swelling clay. During the microbiological evaluation there was the need to sterilize the clay for later incorporation into the pharmaceutical formula. The accelerated stability test at 50°C for 3 months has showed that the pharmaceutical formula remained stable with a shelf life of two years. After the stability test the wound-healing capacity of the formulation in rats was evaluated. It was observed that the treatment made with the formulation containing the Ocara clay showed the best results since the formula allowed greater formation of collagen fibers and consequent regeneration of the deep dermis after seven days of treatment and reepithelialization and continuous formation of granulation tissue at the 14th day.

  17. Clay flocculation improved by cationic poly(vinyl alcohol)/anionic polymer dual-component system.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yizhou; Xiao, Huining

    2008-10-15

    The synthesis of cationically modified poly(vinyl alcohol), CPVA, by copolymerization of vinyl acetate and diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride (DADMAC), followed by alkaline hydrolysis was systematically studied. The application of the resulting polymer to the fine clay flocculation was also reported. The charge density and the structure of the resulting CPVA were characterized by polyelectrolyte titration and NMR. A photometric dispersion analyzer was used to conduct the dynamic flocculation experiments. Under fine clay experimental conditions, the CPVA alone contributed little to inducing clay flocculation. However, in conjunction with anionic polyacrylamide-based polymer with high molecular weight and low charge density, significant improvement in the flocculation of fine clay particles was achieved. The influence of factors such as pH and shear force on clay flocculation was also investigated to identify optimum application conditions for clay flocculation. The electrostatic interactions between the clay and CPVA, as well as those between the CPVA pre-treated clay and anionic polymer, were studied to explore the flocculation mechanism.

  18. Clay flocculation improved by cationic poly(vinyl alcohol)/anionic polymer dual-component system.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yizhou; Xiao, Huining

    2008-10-15

    The synthesis of cationically modified poly(vinyl alcohol), CPVA, by copolymerization of vinyl acetate and diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride (DADMAC), followed by alkaline hydrolysis was systematically studied. The application of the resulting polymer to the fine clay flocculation was also reported. The charge density and the structure of the resulting CPVA were characterized by polyelectrolyte titration and NMR. A photometric dispersion analyzer was used to conduct the dynamic flocculation experiments. Under fine clay experimental conditions, the CPVA alone contributed little to inducing clay flocculation. However, in conjunction with anionic polyacrylamide-based polymer with high molecular weight and low charge density, significant improvement in the flocculation of fine clay particles was achieved. The influence of factors such as pH and shear force on clay flocculation was also investigated to identify optimum application conditions for clay flocculation. The electrostatic interactions between the clay and CPVA, as well as those between the CPVA pre-treated clay and anionic polymer, were studied to explore the flocculation mechanism. PMID:18657822

  19. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  20. Orientation of FePt nanoparticles on top of a-SiO2/Si(001), MgO(001) and sapphire(0001): effect of thermal treatments and influence of substrate and particle size

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Martin; Ziemann, Paul; Zhang, Zaoli; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-01-01

    effect of annealing on particle orientation was found to be strongest. From a random orientation in the as-prepared state observed for both, small and large FePt NPs, annealing at 650 °C for 30 min reorients the small particles towards a cube-on-cube epitaxial orientation with a minor fraction of (111)-oriented particles. In contrast, large FePt NPs keep their as-prepared random orientation even after doubling the annealing period at 650 °C to 60 min. PMID:27335749

  1. Tunable Exfoliation of Synthetic Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöter, Matthias; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Breu, Josef

    2015-07-01

    The large hydration enthalpy of inorganic interlayer cations sandwiched between moderately negatively charged silicate layers endows to smectites (e.g., hectorite) remarkably rich intracrystalline reactivity compared with most other layered materials. Moreover, they are transparent and inert in most potential suspension media. Upon suspension in water, smectites readily swell. For homogeneous, melt-synthesized smectites, the degree of swelling can be tuned by choice of interlayer cation and charge density of the layer. Because swelling renders the clay stacks more shear labile, the efficiency of exfoliation by applying shearing forces can in turn be adjusted. Certain smectites even spontaneously delaminate into clay platelets of uniform thickness of 1 nm by progressive osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling can also be applied to produce well-defined double stacks when one starts with ordered, interstratified heterostructures. Nanocomposites made with high-aspect-ratio fillers obtained this way show superior mechanical, flame retardancy, and permeability properties.

  2. ESEM study of the humidity-induced swelling of clay film.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Benoit; Wang, Linlin; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Bornert, Michel; Tanguy, Alexandre; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-10-15

    We measured the humidity-induced swelling of thin self-standing films of montmorillonite clay by a combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image correlation (DIC). The films were about 40 μm thick. They were prepared by depositing and evaporating a suspension of clay and peeling off the highly oriented deposits. The rationale for creating such original samples was to obtain mesoscopic samples that could be used to bridge experimentally the gap between the scale of the clay layer and the engineering scale of a macroscopic clay sample. Several montmorillonite samples were used: the reference clay Swy-2, the same clay homoionized with sodium or calcium ions, and a sodium-exchanged Cloisite. The edges of the clay films were observed by ESEM at various relative humidity values between 14% and 95%. The ESEM images were then analyzed by DIC to measure the swelling or the shrinkage of the films. We also measured the adsorption/desorption isotherms by weighing the film samples in a humidity-controlled environment. In order to analyze our results, we compared our swelling/shrinkage and adsorption/desorption data with previously published data on the interlayer spacing obtained by X-ray diffraction and with numerical estimates of the interlayer water obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. The swelling and the hysteresis of this swelling were found to be comparable for the overall macroscopic films and for the interlayer space. The same correspondence between film and interlayer space was observed for the amount of adsorbed water. This suggests that, in the range of relative humidities values explored, the films behave like freely swelling oriented stacks of clay layers, without any significant contribution from the mesoporosity. The relevance of this result for the behavior of clayey sedimentary rocks and the differences with the behavior of nonoriented samples (powders or compacted powders) are briefly discussed. PMID:24044513

  3. ESEM study of the humidity-induced swelling of clay film.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Benoit; Wang, Linlin; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Bornert, Michel; Tanguy, Alexandre; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-10-15

    We measured the humidity-induced swelling of thin self-standing films of montmorillonite clay by a combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image correlation (DIC). The films were about 40 μm thick. They were prepared by depositing and evaporating a suspension of clay and peeling off the highly oriented deposits. The rationale for creating such original samples was to obtain mesoscopic samples that could be used to bridge experimentally the gap between the scale of the clay layer and the engineering scale of a macroscopic clay sample. Several montmorillonite samples were used: the reference clay Swy-2, the same clay homoionized with sodium or calcium ions, and a sodium-exchanged Cloisite. The edges of the clay films were observed by ESEM at various relative humidity values between 14% and 95%. The ESEM images were then analyzed by DIC to measure the swelling or the shrinkage of the films. We also measured the adsorption/desorption isotherms by weighing the film samples in a humidity-controlled environment. In order to analyze our results, we compared our swelling/shrinkage and adsorption/desorption data with previously published data on the interlayer spacing obtained by X-ray diffraction and with numerical estimates of the interlayer water obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. The swelling and the hysteresis of this swelling were found to be comparable for the overall macroscopic films and for the interlayer space. The same correspondence between film and interlayer space was observed for the amount of adsorbed water. This suggests that, in the range of relative humidities values explored, the films behave like freely swelling oriented stacks of clay layers, without any significant contribution from the mesoporosity. The relevance of this result for the behavior of clayey sedimentary rocks and the differences with the behavior of nonoriented samples (powders or compacted powders) are briefly discussed.

  4. Fundamental investigations of clay/polymer nanocomposites and applications in co-extruded microlayered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Jeremy John

    The second and fourth generations of hydroxylated dendritic polyesters (HBP2, HBP4) were combined with unmodified sodium montmorillonite clay (Na +MMT) in water to generate a broad range of polymer clay nanocomposites from 0 to 100% wt/wt Na+MMT. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate intercalation states of the clay galleries. It was shown that interlayer spacings were independent of generation number and changed over the composition range from 0.5 nm to 3.5 nm in 0.5 nm increments that corresponded to a flattened HBP conformation within the clay tactoids. The HBP4/Na+MMT systems were investigated to study the vitrified Rigid Amorphous Fraction (RAF) induced by the clay surfaces. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed changes in heat capacity, Delta Cp, at Tg, that decreased with clay content, until completely suppressed at 80 wt% Na+MMT due to confinement. RAF was quantified from these changes in heat capacity and verified by the analysis of orthopositronium lifetime temperature scans utilizing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): verifying the glassy nature of the RAF at elevated temperatures. Mathematical relationships allowed for correlation of the interlayer spacings with DeltaC p. RAF formation correlated to intercalated HBP4, and external surfaces of the clay tactoids. The interdiffusion of a polymer pair in microlayers was exploited to increase the concentration of nanoclay particles. When microlayers of a nanocomposite composed of organically modified montmorillonite (M2(HT)2 ) inside maleic anhydride grafted linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE-g-MA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were taken into the melt, the greater mobility of the linear LLDPE-g-MA chains compared to the branched LDPE chains caused shrinkage of the nanocomposite microlayers, concentrating the M 2(HT)2 contained within. Analysis of the clay morphology within these layers demonstrated an increase in clay

  5. Modernity and putty-clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  6. Effect of iron diagenesis on the transport of colloidal clay in an unconfined sand aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.N.; Gschwend, P.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The role of Fe diagenesis in the transport of clay colloids was investigated in the Cohansey Sand, an Fe(III) oxide-coated quartz arenite that covers most of the New Jersey Coastal Plain. Based on the authors' past work, they hypothesized that clay had been transported into the sediments, that the clay distribution was controlled by attachment to surface Fe(III) oxides, and that anoxic water infiltrating from a swamp had dissolved Fe(III) oxides and released clay colloids into flowing groundwater. Sediment cores were collected from upland and swamp terrains, and the composition and distribution of the clay-sized and heavy mineral fractions were examined by X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, separations, and elemental analyses. The clay-sized content of the oxidized sediments was roughly double that of the reduced sediments. Electron microscopy revealed that coatings on the quartz grains had the appearance of infiltrated clay particles. The relationship between clay and surface Fe content indicated that the onset of reducing conditions below the swamp remobilized clay colloids by dissolving Fe(III) oxide cement. Surface Fe(III) oxides were derived from weathering of ilmenite and pseudorutile, Fe-Ti oxides found in the heavy mineral fraction. In the oxidized sediments, Fe was transported from the Fe-Ti oxide grains to quartz surfaces, where it was deposited as surface Fe(III) oxides mixed with kaolinite. Thus, the weathering of Fe-bearing minerals and the formation and dissolution of secondary Fe(III) oxides influenced the mobility of colloidal clay in the Cohansey Sand.

  7. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  8. Les argiles bleues du Cambrien inférieur de Saint-Pétersbourg et leur fissuration. Implications pour des stockages souterrainsLower Cambrian Saint Petersburg blue clays and their fissuration. Implication for underground stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, Marcel; Boisson, Jean-Yves; Ivanov, Ivan P.

    2002-12-01

    The Lower Cambrian Saint Petersburg blue clays are composed of predominant illite and chlorite, sometimes accompanied by kaolinite. The <0.1 μm fraction has a high content of illite-smectite mixed layers. Particle-size distribution is more than 50% of clay particles and about 30% of silts. These blue clays correspond to plastic (and soft) clays; they may be compared to the Callovian clays of Bure (France), where storage of natural waste is envisaged. To cite this article: M. Arnould et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 1135-1140.

  9. Microstructural evolution of an incipient fault zone in Opalinus Clay: Insights from an optical and electron microscopic study of ion-beam polished samples from the Main Fault in the Mt-Terri Underground Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurich, Ben; Urai, Janos L.; Desbois, Guillaume; Vollmer, Christian; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Slickensided shear surfaces are ubiquitous in many fault zones. However the internal structure, the micromechanics and the evolution of these structures are not fully understood and the contributions of crystal plasticity, grain-boundary sliding, microfracturing, solution-precipitation and mineral transformation under different conditions are subject of debate. We studied well- preserved core samples from the Main Fault, an up to 3 m wide zone of approximately 10 m offset in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (CH), a site to evaluate long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal. The drill core breaks easily along many slickensided shear surfaces indicating reverse slip, which form an anastomosing network connected by branch lines. Broad ion beam polishing and scanning electron microscopy shows that the slickensides are invariably revealed by fracture of the drill core along a few μm thick shear zone, which acts as a crack guide for fracturing the samples. In this zone, a complex set of processes is inferred, leading to extreme localization of strain, development of strong particle preferred orientation, the formation of nanoparticles, and local precipitation of calcite veins in releasing sections. In lenses between shear zones, homogeneous gouge is formed with a well-developed oblique foliation and removal of calcite grains by pressure solution. We infer that with progressive deformation, the number and density of slickensided shear surfaces increases, generating tectonically derived scaly clay and more homogeneous gouge. In all deformed elements of the Main Fault, porosity is much smaller than in the undeformed Opalinus Clay. An interesting observation is the almost complete absence of cataclastic microstructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of focused ion beam lamellae of this micron-wide shear zone shows a strong preferred orientation of clay minerals, including nano-sized illite particles. In TEM, the shear zones envelop hard particles

  10. Montmorillonite clay alters toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-11-01

    An exponential development in the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has accelerated their release in aquatic environment. As the AgNPs enters into the aquatic systems, their fate may change due to interactions with abiotic (e.g. clay particles) or biotic factors. The abundantly present clay particles are expected to more prone for interaction with nanoparticles in aquatic systems. In the present study, it is demonstrated that AgNPs interacts with clay particles and forms heteroagglomerates. Furthermore, an impact on toxicity potential of AgNPs after interactions with clay particles was assessed by using zebrafish eleutheroembryos (72 h post hatching) as an in vivo model. The mortality rate of zebrafish eleutheroembryos was higher in case of exposure to AgNPs-clay complexes (pH 4.0 and 7.0) as compared to bare AgNPs. In addition, at earlier time points, the eleutheroembryos expressed higher levels of morphological changes in tail, yolk and pericardia, but the edema in yolk sac was followed by cell death. It can be concluded from the observations made in the present study that the inorganic colloids in the aquatic matrices can alter the fate and toxicity potential of nanoparticles. PMID:27537402

  11. Montmorillonite clay alters toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-11-01

    An exponential development in the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has accelerated their release in aquatic environment. As the AgNPs enters into the aquatic systems, their fate may change due to interactions with abiotic (e.g. clay particles) or biotic factors. The abundantly present clay particles are expected to more prone for interaction with nanoparticles in aquatic systems. In the present study, it is demonstrated that AgNPs interacts with clay particles and forms heteroagglomerates. Furthermore, an impact on toxicity potential of AgNPs after interactions with clay particles was assessed by using zebrafish eleutheroembryos (72 h post hatching) as an in vivo model. The mortality rate of zebrafish eleutheroembryos was higher in case of exposure to AgNPs-clay complexes (pH 4.0 and 7.0) as compared to bare AgNPs. In addition, at earlier time points, the eleutheroembryos expressed higher levels of morphological changes in tail, yolk and pericardia, but the edema in yolk sac was followed by cell death. It can be concluded from the observations made in the present study that the inorganic colloids in the aquatic matrices can alter the fate and toxicity potential of nanoparticles.

  12. Physicochemical interaction of Escherichia coli cell envelopes and Bacillus subtilis cell walls with two clays and ability of the composite to immobilize heavy metals from solution.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S G; Flemming, C A; Ferris, F G; Beveridge, T J; Bailey, G W

    1989-01-01

    Isolated Escherichia coli K-12 cell envelopes or Bacillus subtilis 168 cell walls were reacted with smectite or kaolinite clay in distilled deionized water (pH 6.0); unbound envelopes or walls were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the extent of adsorption was calculated. At saturation, both clays adsorbed approximately 1.0 mg (dry weight) of envelopes or walls per mg (dry weight) of clay. Clays showed a preference for edge-on orientation with both walls and envelopes, which was indicative of an aluminum polynuclear bridging mechanism between the wall or envelope surface and the clay edge. The addition of heavy metals increased the incidence of planar surface orientations, which suggested that multivalent metal cation bridging was coming into play and was of increasing importance. The metal-binding capacity of isolated envelopes, walls, clays, and envelope-clay or wall-clay mixtures was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy after exposure to aqueous 5.0 mM Ag+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cr3+ nitrate salt solutions at pHs determined by the buffering capacity of wall, envelope, clay, or composite system. The order of metal uptake was walls greater than envelopes greater than smectite clay greater than kaolinite clay for the individual components, and walls plus smectite greater than walls plus kaolinite greater than envelopes plus smectite greater than envelopes plus kaolinite for the mixtures. On a dry-weight basis, the envelope-clay and wall-clay mixtures bound 20 to 90% less metal than equal amounts of the individual components did.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2516433

  13. Effect of Hygrothermal Aging on the Mechanical Properties of Fluorinated and Nonfluorinated Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Hamim, Salah U.; Singh, Raman P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophilic nature of epoxy polymers can lead to both reversible and irreversible/permanent changes in epoxy upon moisture absorption. The permanent changes leading to the degradation of mechanical properties due to combined effect of moisture and elevated temperature on EPON 862, Nanomer I.28E, and Somasif MAE clay-epoxy nanocomposites are investigated in this study. The extent of permanent degradation on fracture and flexural properties due to the hygrothermal aging is determined by drying the epoxy and their clay-epoxy nanocomposites after moisture absorption. Significant permanent damage is observed for fracture toughness and flexural modulus, while the extent of permanent damage is less significant for flexural strength. It is also observed that permanent degradation in Somasif MAE clay-epoxy nanocomposites is higher compared to Nanomer I.28E clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that both clays retained their original chemical structure after the absorption-desorption cycle without undergoing significant changes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the fracture surfaces provide evidence that Somasif MAE clay particles offered very little resistance to crack propagation in case of redried specimens when compared to Nanomer I.28E counterpart. The reason for the observed higher extent of permanent degradation in Somasif MAE clay-epoxy system has been attributed to the weakening of the filler-matrix interface. PMID:27379285

  14. Performance evaluation of indirect evaporative cooler using clay pot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, R.; Ragupathy, A.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the experimental study is to investigate the performance of indirect evaporator cooler in hot and humid regions. A novel approach is implemented in the cooler using clay pot with different position (single, double and three pots) and different orientation as aligned and staggered position for potential and feasibility study. The clay pot is the ceramic material where the water filled inside the pot and due to the property of porosity, the water comes outer surface of the pot and contact with the air passing over the pot surface and air get cooled. A test rig was designed and fabricated to collect experimental data. The clay pots were arranged in aligned and staggered position. In our study heat transfer was analysed with various air velocity of 1m/s to 5m/s. The air temperature, relative humidity, pressure drop and effectiveness were measured and the performance of the evaporative cooler was evaluated. The analysis of the data indicated that cooling effectiveness improve with decrease of air velocity at staggered position. It was shown that staggered position has the higher performance (57%) at 1 m/s air velocity comparison with aligned position values at three pots position.

  15. Clarification of olive mill and winery wastewater by means of clay-polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Rytwo, Giora; Lavi, Roy; Rytwo, Yuval; Monchase, Hila; Dultz, Stefan; König, Tom N

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted effluents from olive mills and wineries, among others, are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants due to the large amounts of organic and suspended matter. Efficiency of all management practices for such effluents depends on an effective pretreatment that lowers the amount of suspended solids. Such pretreatments are usually based on three separate stages, taking a total of 2 to 6h: coagulation-neutralizing the colloids, flocculation-aggregating the colloids into larger particles, and separation via filtration or decanting. Previous studies have presented the concept of coagoflocculation based on the use of clay-polymer nanocomposites. This process adds a higher density clay particle to the flocs, accelerating the process to between 15 and 60 min. This study examined suitable nanocomposites based on different clays and polymers. The charge of the compounds increased proportionally to the polymer-to-clay ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that in sepiolite-based nanocomposites there is no change in the structure of the mineral, whereas in smectite-based nanocomposites, the polymer intercalates between the clay layers and increases the spacing depending on the polymer-to-clay ratio. Efficiency of the coagoflocculation process was studied with a dispersion analyzer. Sequential addition of olive mill or winery effluents with a boosting dose of nanocomposites may yield a very efficient and rapid clarification pretreatment.

  16. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  17. Morphological Evolution of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries: The Critical Effects of Surface Orientations and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Dong; Qi, Xin; Qiu, Bao; Fang, Jianhui; Kloepsch, Richard; Schumacher, Gerhard; Liu, Zhaoping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    An evolution panorama of morphology and surface orientation of high-voltage spinel LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 cathode materials synthesized by the combination of the microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique and a postcalcination process is presented. Nanoparticles, octahedral and truncated octahedral particles with different preferential growth of surface orientations are obtained. The structures of different materials are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The influence of various morphologies (including surface orientations and particle size) on kinetic parameters, such as electronic conductivity and Li(+) diffusion coefficients, are investigated as well. Moreover, electrochemical measurements indicate that the morphological differences result in divergent rate capabilities and cycling performances. They reveal that appropriate surface-tailoring can satisfy simultaneously the compatibility of power capability and long cycle life. The morphology design for optimizing Li(+) transport and interfacial stability is very important for high-voltage spinel material. Overall, the crystal chemistry, kinetics and electrochemical performance of the present study on various morphologies of LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 spinel materials have implications for understanding the complex impacts of electrode interface and electrolyte and rational design of rechargeable electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The outstanding performance of our truncated octahedral LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 materials makes them promising as cathode materials to develop long-life, high energy and high power lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  19. Relevance of pore fluid composition for the drained strength of clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Fernández-Steeger, Tomás.; Arnhardt, Christian; Stanjek, Helge; Azzam, Rafig; Feinendegen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Classical soil mechanics based on the effective stress concept with water as second phase does not apply anymore for fine-grained materials. Since clays particles are per definition colloidal in size, their properties are determined and dominated by their large surface area and hence, by their surface forces. Therefore, other mechanism plays a role. Geotechnical properties of soils with different pore fluid are especially important for clays used in hydraulic barriers for landfills. Also in the petroleum engineering or in tunnelling engineering the mechanical properties of clays with different pore fluids could be very useful. Since for clays physical and chemical interactions are decisive, the pure mechanical model (e.g. shearing and contact among the particles) is coupled by other forces, typical for colloidal sized materials. If the diffuse double layer develops from the surface of the clay particles, the interactions of the layers should develop a repulsion. That would resist part of the normal stress and producing no shearing resistance. However, the clays show different properties, dependent on their mineralogy, which complicates their behaviour. Several drained shear stress with shear box have been performed on pure Kaolinite, Illite, Na-Smectite and Ca-smectite. Since the shear behaviour of clays is also controlled by chemical interactions, the clays were mixed with pore fluids with different dielectric constant (water, ethanol), electrolyte concentration (NaCl and CaCl2) and pH (ranging from 3 to 8). Different consolidation pressures (from 15 kPa to 400 kPa) have been used in order to better understand the influence of the pore fluids on the drained cohesion (c') and on friction angle (φ'). The materials were mixed with different consistency to form a paste. The consistency ranges from 0.65 to 0.85. The results show how the sensitive the clays to different pore fluids are. Besides, Kaolinite and Illite shows a shearing behaviour almost entirely controlled

  20. Characteristics of mineralogy and clay fabric on the petrophysical variation of the Southeastern Yellow Sea Mud (SEYSM), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narantsetseg, Buyanbat; Kim, Gil Young; Chang, Tae Su; Choi, Hun Soo; Kim, Jin Wook

    2013-04-01

    , illite, chlorite+kaolinite, and kaolinite. Illite was identified as the most abundant clay mineral. The clay fabric analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on splitter core samples (at core depth of 10 cm and 290 cm considering physical property data) of station P15. The clay fabric at 10 cm depth shows typical card-house structure and random arrangement of particles. And the clay particles have abundant edge-to-face (EF) and edge to edge (EE) contacts. The sediments at 290 cm depth of station P15 are characterized by decreased porosity (to 58%) and water content (to 36%). And wet bulk density and shear strength are gradually increased (1.65 g/cm3, 11 kPa). Accordingly the clay fabric shows well-oriented arrangements with dominant face-to face (FF) contacts, due to natural sediment compaction caused by overburden pressure.

  1. Microtectonic analysis of an incipient thrust fault in Opalinus Clay.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurich, B.; Urai, J. L.; Desbois, G.; Vollmer, C.; Nussbaum, C.

    2014-12-01

    The microfabric of a fault rock controls the fault's mechanical and hydrological properties. Knowing the fabric is thus essential for estimating seismic behavior and potential fluid flow. We studied well-preserved core and outcrop samples from the Main Fault, an up to 3 m wide zone of approximately 10 m offset in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (CH), a site to evaluate long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal. We found four main structural elements: (1) slickensided shear surfaces, (2) veins, (3) fine-grained gouge, and (4) scaly clay fabric. We investigated each element by ultra-thin section microscopy, by broad-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (BIB-SEM) and focused-ion-beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM), by X-ray diffraction crystallography (XRD) and by naked-eye analysis. We found extremely thin shear zones (<4μm) along which several samples broke, revealing slickensides. BIB-SEM and FIB-TEM showed that these thin shear zones comprise strongly aligned nano-sized clay particles. The porosity of the shear zones is dramatically reduced compared to the protolith. The strong alignment of clay particles, which wrap larger grains as quartz, calcite fossils and feldspar, yields a shiny, smooth surface morphology of the slickensides. Occasionally, calcite and celestite veins are associated to releasing sections such as risers of the slickenside. Gouge comprises much finer particles, a higher fabric intensity and a strong reduction in porosity and calcite content compared to the protolith. These findings suggest that gouge evolved by a cataclastic deformation mechanism aided by pressure solution of calcite. Scaly clay occurs in varying intensity and comprises thin shear zones, which sometimes act as flexural-slip faults of microfolds and C'-type shear bands. We propose that next to cataclastic processes, pressure solution and precipitation are important micro-scale mechanisms in faulting in Opalinus Clay and thus need to be

  2. Influence of clay swelling on the mechanical behaviour of Egyptian Helwan limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Nevin

    2016-04-01

    Clay minerals exist naturally in the majority of different Egyptian limestones types. Changes in the dimensions of clays during swelling / shrinking process induced by changes in the environmental conditions can result in acceleration the deterioration of the hosting stone. Petrographic investigation by scanning - electron microscope (SEM) of Helwan limestone (biomicritic limestone) revealed distribution of a typical smectite morphology (curled - leaf shape) beside abundance of glauconite pellets within the stone material. The clay frication extracted from Helwan reached 10% and oriented aggregates samples were analyzed by X- ray diffraction (XRD) and confirmed the identification of smectite as the main mineral in the clay frication. To study the effect of the clay content on the mechanical behavior of Helwan limestone, hygric swelling test was performed at first by using displacement sensor and then the effect of multiple wetting/ drying cycles on the stone strength was determined using unconfined compressive strength (UCS). Results revealed that there was a significant correlation between degree of swelling of the clay and strength of the limestone.

  3. Incorporation of phthalocyanines by cationic and anionic clays via ion exchange and direct synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.; Botto, R.E.; Winans, R.E. ); Forman, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) and metallophthalocyanines were incorporated into the galleries of anionic and cationic clays via ion exchange and in situ crystallization of the synthetic clay layers. Intercalation compounds between the layered magnesium silicate clay hectorite and cationic phthalocyanines were directly prepared by refluxing for 2 days aqueous solutions of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide, lithium flouride, and either alcian blue dyes (Cu(II)Pc) or 15-crown-5 tetra-substituted phthalocyanine (15C5Pc). The CuPc dyes are tetrapositively charged through peripheral quaternary ammonium groups, whereas the 15C5Pc is electrically neutral. Anionic clays prepared by hydrolysis of mixed solutions of aluminum nitrate, magnesium nitrate, and copper(II) phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid, tetrasodium salt (CuPcTs) in sodium hydroxide resulted in crystallization of an intercalation compound between a layered double hydroxide (LDH) and this anionic Pc. The material prepared by ion exchange of CuPcTs into a wet, freshly prepared LDH was superior in crystallinity. The phthalocyanines are oriented parallel to cationic hectorite clay layers (gallery heights 4.5-6.5[angstrom]) and perpendicular to anionic layered double hydroxide clay layers (gallery height 18,2[angstrom]) in correlation with their hosts' respective layer charge densities. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Analysis of Oligonucleotide DNA Binding and Sedimentation Properties of Montmorillonite Clay Using Ultraviolet Light Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Gary W.; Sowersby, Drew S.; Roberts, Rachel D.; Robson, Michael H.; Lewis, L. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Smectite clays such as montmorillonite form complexes with a variety of biomolecules, including the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. Most previous studies of DNA adsorption onto clay have relied upon spectrophotometric analysis after separation of free nucleic acids from bound complexes by centrifugation. In the current work we demonstrate that such studies produce a consistent error due to (a) incomplete sedimentation of montmorillonite and (b) strong absorbance of the remaining clay at 260 nm. Clay sedimentation efficiency was strongly dependent upon cation concentration (Na+ or Mg2+) and on the level of dispersion of the original suspension. An improved clay:DNA adsorption assay was developed and utilized to assess the impact of metal counterions on binding of single-stranded DNA to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction demonstrated, for the first time, formation of intercalated structures consistent with orientation of the DNA strands parallel to the clay surface. Observed gallery spacings were found to closely match values calculated utilizing atomistic modeling techniques. PMID:19061334

  5. Whose Orientations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." While the "menu" Levisohn describes in his groundbreaking work on orientations to the teaching of rabbinic texts will almost certainly be refined over time, even as it stands this article should be of…

  6. Magnetic alignment experiment of fine graphite-crystals dispersed in He gas oriented to study alignment of crystalline-axes of nano-sized non-magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, C; Skakibara, M; Tanaka, K; Takashima, R

    2005-01-01

    The ensemble of nano-sized crystals is expected to attain additional physical properties when preferential alignments of certain crystal-axes are achieved by a magnetic field. The reduction of temperature T may realize alignment even if the mole number of the particle N and the diamagnetic anisotropy per mole (Deltachi)(DIA) are considerably small for the nano-sized diamagnetic oxides, since alignment proceeds by the balance between the energy of rotational Brownian motion and field-induced anisotropy energy. Alignment of various basic inorganic oxides such as gypsum, quartz, forsterite, KDP or calcite, having a size of 20 nm diameter, is expected to occur by a field intensity of approximately 50 T at T = 10 K; this intensity is presently available at a high magnetic-field laboratory. It is expected that the magnetic alignment of nano-sized particles can be observed by dispersing the particles in He gas, as achieved recently for micron-sized graphite crystals; a cryogenic liquid cannot be used as a dispersing medium. Measured (Deltachi)(DIA) values accumulated for basic inorganic-oxides are explained quantitatively by assuming that individual bonding-orbital composing the material possesses a constant amount of diamagnetic anisotropy; hence the majority of diamagnetic nano-sized insulators are expected to show magnetic alignment at finite field intensity.

  7. On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100°C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

  8. Painting with Clay Van Gogh Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Vincent Van Gogh's painting "Starry Night" and describes a lesson where fifth- and sixth-grade students created their own version of the artwork. Explains that the students utilized four colors of Permoplast clay, using their hands and fingers as brushes and blending tools and the clay as paint. (CMK)

  9. Clay smear: Review of mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrolijk, Peter J.; Urai, Janos L.; Kettermann, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Clay smear is a collection of fault processes and resulting fault structures that form when normal faults deform layered sedimentary sections. These elusive structures have attracted deep interest from researchers interested in subsurface fluid flow, particularly in the oil and gas industry. In the four decades since the association between clay-smear structures and oil and gas accumulations was introduced, there has been extensive research into the fault processes that create clay smear and the resulting effects of that clay smear on fluid flow. We undertake a critical review of the literature associated with outcrop studies, laboratory and numerical modeling, and subsurface field studies of clay smear and propose a comprehensive summary that encompasses all of these elements. Important fault processes that contribute to clay smear are defined in the context of the ratio of rock strength and in situ effective stresses, the geometric evolution of fault systems, and the composition of the faulted section. We find that although there has been progress in all avenues pursued, progress has been uneven, and the processes that disrupt clay smears are mostly overlooked. We highlight those research areas that we think will yield the greatest benefit and suggest that taking these emerging results within a more process-based framework presented here will lead to a new generation of clay smear models.

  10. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  11. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  12. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  13. Desert varnish: the importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Potter, R M; Rossman, G R

    1977-06-24

    Desert varnish has been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. It is a distinct morphological entity having an abrupt boundary with the underlying rock. Clay minerals comprise more than 70 percent of the varnish. Iron and manganese oxides constitute the bulk of the remainder and are dispersed throughout the clay layer. PMID:17776923

  14. Desert varnish: the importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Potter, R M; Rossman, G R

    1977-06-24

    Desert varnish has been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. It is a distinct morphological entity having an abrupt boundary with the underlying rock. Clay minerals comprise more than 70 percent of the varnish. Iron and manganese oxides constitute the bulk of the remainder and are dispersed throughout the clay layer.

  15. Clay Corner: Light up a Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Presents two activities that enable students to work with clay: a tile project and turkey candle-holders. Explains that before students actually create their own projects, they get an opportunity to experience the clay itself. Asserts that the new vocabulary, unusual equipment, and intriguing techniques make ceramics a motivating activity. (CMK)

  16. Swelling and Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of Smectitic Clay in the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield/California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, H.; Schleicher, A. M.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing agreement that smectitic clays play a key role in the behavior of fault rocks from the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) borehole at Parkfield, California. In this study, we focus on the swelling behavior of Mg-rich smectite from the central deformation zone at 3298.4 m, in order to evaluate the occurrence and intake of water in smectite, and its relation to fault zone weakening processes. Understanding swelling behavior is also critical for meaningful laboratory experiments on clay-rich fault rocks. A textured sample of the clay size fraction (< 2 micron) of the sample was measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) under controlled temperature and humidity conditions, at temperatures of 25°C, 50°C, 75°C, and 95°C, and humidity ranging from 10% Relative Humidity (RH) to 98 %RH. The air-dried sample shows a smectite phase with a characteristic interlayer distance (d-value) of 1.1 nm that increases to 1.4 nm after ethylene glycolization, indicating 1 to 1.5 H2O in the interlayer. With increasing temperatures to 95°C and humidity up to 95 %RH, all samples show similar x-ray patterns, with a stable smectite phase during the entire hydration/heating process. With increasing humidity under isothermal conditions, the hydration of interlayer cations and the particle orientation increases, indicated by increasing d-values and increasing intensities. On the other hand, the intensities under stable humidity and increasing temperature decrease due to lattice distortion and scattering effects. At 25°C and 10 %RH, the sample is a mix of dehydrated smectite (1.1 nm) and 1H2O (1.2 nm) in the interlayer space, which increases to 1.3 nm at 20 % and 30 %RH. Between 30 and 95 %RH, there is a slow transition from 1.3 nm to 1.4 nm (1 H2O to 1.5 H2O). The patterns at 50°C, 75°C and 95°C show similar behavior with slightly lower interlayer spacing. At 95°C, an additional peak appeared with increasing humidity, indicating the formation of an additional

  17. Pozzolan Obtained by Mechanochemical Treatment of Kaolinite Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, Aleksandra A.

    2011-12-01

    Pozzolans are supplementary materials added to Portland cement in order to increase the mechanical strength and durability of concrete structures. A number of thermal, mechanical and chemical methods have been used to activate the reactive potential of pozzolanic materials. The aim of the study is to obtain pozzolana, from Serbian kaolinite clay by mechanochemical treatment. Kaolinite clay Garaši was subjected to mechanical treatment during different times of milling. The changes were monitored using particle size distribution (PSD) analyses, thermal methods [thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis (DTA)] and X-ray diffraction methods (XRD). The pozzolanic activity was determined using Chapelle method. Milling withing 20 min influences particle size decrease and after that time continuous increase. XDR analysis indicates gradual decrease of cristallinity with prolonged milling time. The higher values for pozzolanic activitie, expressed through consumption of gCa(OH)2 per gPozzolana are 0.78 and 0.77, and they were obtained for milling times 20 and 40 min, respectively. The values are comparable with commercial pozzolan—metakaolin. The results indicates that milling has caused the disintegration of particles and the consequent formation of new active surfaces in addition to changes in its physico-chemical properties that decrease its crystallinity (through amorphization) and increase it reactivity.

  18. Ultrasonic Velocities in Unconsolidated Sand/Clay Mixtures at Low Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Aracne-Ruddle, C.M.; Bonner, B.P.; Trombino, C.N.; Hardy, E.D.; Berge, P.A.; Boro, C.O.; Wildenschild, D.; Rowe, C.D.; Hart, D.J.

    1999-10-15

    Effective seismic interrogation of the near subsurface requires that measured parameters, such as compressional and shear velocities and attenuation, be related to important soil properties. Porosity, composition (clay content), fluid content and type are of particular interest. The ultrasonic (100-500 kHz) pulse transmission technique was used to collect data for highly attenuating materials appropriate to the vadose zone. Up to several meters of overburden were simulated by applying low uniaxial stress of 0 to about 0.1 MPa to the sample. The approach was to make baseline measurements for pure quartz sand, because the elastic properties are relatively well known except at the lowest pressures. Clay was added to modify the sample microstructure and ultrasonic measurements were made to characterize the effect of the admixed second phase. Samples were fabricated from Ottawa sand mixed with a swelling clay (Wyoming bentonite). The amount of clay added was 1 to 40% by mass. Compressional (P) velocities are low (228-483 m/s), comparable to the sound velocity in air. Shear (S) velocities are about half of the compressional velocity (120-298 m/s), but show different sensitivity to microstructure. Adding clay increases the shear amplitude dramatically with respect to P, and also changes the sensitivity of the velocities to load. These experiments demonstrate that P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount of clay added, even at low concentrations. Other properties of the transmitted signals including the ratio of S and P amplitudes, velocity gradient with depth, and the frequency content of transmitted pulses, provide additional information about the clay content. Direct observation of sand-clay microstructure indicated that the clay particles electrostatically cling to the sand grains but do not form a coating. Instead, in the dry mixture clay particles tended to bridge the gaps between grains, influencing how stresses were carried across grain contacts. Because of

  19. Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and increasing accumulations of antibiotics in reclaimed water, drive the quest for new natural antimicrobials. We are studying the antibacterial mechanism(s) of clays that have shown an ability to destroy bacteria or significantly inhibit their growth. One possible mode of action is from soluble transition metal species, particularly reduced Fe, capable of generating deleterious oxygen radical species. Yet another possibility is related to membrane damage as a consequence of physical or electrostatic interaction between clay and bacteria. Both mechanisms could combine to produce cell death. This study addresses a natural antibacterial clay from the NW Amazon basin, South America (AMZ clay). Clay mineralogy is composed of disordered kaolinite (28.9%), halloysite (17.8%) illite (12%) and smectite (16.7%). Mean particle size is 1.6μm and total and specific surface area 278.82 and 51.23 m2/g respectively. The pH of a suspension (200mg/ml) is 4.1 and its Eh is 361mV after 24h of equilibration. The ionic strength of the water in equilibrium with the clay after 24 h. is 6 x10-4M. These conditions, affect the element solubility, speciation, and interactions between clay and bacteria. Standard microbiological methods were used to assess the viability of two model bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) after incubation with clay at 37 degC for 24 hrs. A threefold reduction in bacterial viability was observed upon treatment with AMZ clay. We separated the cells from the clay using Nycodenz gradient media and observed the mounts under the TEM and SEM. Results showed several membrane anomalies and structural changes that were not observed in the control cells. Additionally, clay minerals appeared in some places attached to cell walls. Experiments showed that exchanging AMZ clay with KCl caused loss of antibacterial property. Among the exchangeable -and potentially toxic- ions we measured Al+3, Cu+2, Zn+2, Ba+2 and Co+2

  20. Preconsolidation versus aging behavior of kaolinite clay

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasopoulos, G.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Results of resonant column tests were used to determine the effects of overconsolidation ratio (OCR) and of aging on the normalized rate of secondary increase N[sub G] of low-amplitude shear modulus G[sub 0] of a remolded kaolinite clay. The value of N[sub G] decreased approximately linearly with the logarithm of OCR and with the logarithm of duration of aging of the clay. The similarity of behavior provided a basis for establishing an equivalency between age-and-stress-induced equivalent overconsolidation for the clay in question. It was concluded that up to a certain limiting duration of aging the age-induced OCR increases linearly with elapsed time, whereas the effect starts diminishing for longer durations of aging. It is suggested that the results of similar studies on natural clay soils be used for predicting the long-term behavior of clays from the results of short-duration tests.

  1. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  2. Utilization potential of silica fume in fired clay bricks.

    PubMed

    Baspinar, M Serhat; Demir, Ismail; Orhan, Mehmet

    2010-02-01

    Silica fume (SF) is an inorganic waste material which is generated during the elemental silicon and ferro-silicon alloy production. Due to the unique properties, it is utilized in several industries. However, very little information is available on the utilization potential of SF in traditional clay brick industry. In this study, the effect of different quantities of SF addition on the properties of fired clay brick was investigated. Test samples were produced by uniaxial pressing and fired at 800, 900, 1000 and 1100 degrees C. The microstructures of the samples were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The strength of the fired samples at 1000 and 1100 degrees C were significantly improved with SF addition. It was concluded that the reactive amorphous nature of SF particles enhances the sintering action locally and this gives better strength behaviour. SF addition also improved the efflorescence behaviour of the bricks. It was concluded that the effect of SF addition on the fired clay brick mainly depends on the firing temperature. At low firing temperatures, SF addition has a tendency to decrease the bulk density. However at higher firing temperatures, SF addition allows better sintering action with a drastic increase in bulk density.

  3. Cluster, glass, and gel formation and viscoelastic phase separation in aqueous clay suspensions.

    PubMed

    Shalkevich, Andrey; Stradner, Anna; Bhat, Suresh Kumar; Muller, François; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2007-03-27

    We have systematically investigated the phase diagram of clay particles in water to understand the relation between the local and macroscopic properties and the structures of clay suspensions. We focused, in particular, on sodium Cloisite (CNa) particles at concentrations typically used in nanocomposites (concentrations from 1 to 4 wt %) and at an extended range of ionic strengths (10(-5) to 10(-2) M NaCl). The suspensions have been characterized using rheology and a combination of scattering techniques (neutrons, X-rays, and light). We demonstrate the existence of a liquid cluster phase at low clay and intermediate salt concentrations and provide new insight into the nature of the solid-like dispersions at low and high ionic strengths.

  4. Ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals in the immersion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, V.; Marcolli, C.; Zobrist, B.; Hoyle, C. R.; Peter, T.

    2012-07-01

    Emulsion and bulk freezing experiments were performed to investigate immersion ice nucleation on clay minerals in pure water, using various kaolinites, montmorillonites, illites as well as natural dust from the Hoggar Mountains in the Saharan region. Differential scanning calorimeter measurements were performed on three different kaolinites (KGa-1b, KGa-2 and K-SA), two illites (Illite NX and Illite SE) and four natural and acid-treated montmorillonites (SWy-2, STx-1b, KSF and K-10). The emulsion experiments provide information on the average freezing behaviour characterized by the average nucleation sites. These experiments revealed one to sometimes two distinct heterogeneous freezing peaks, which suggest the presence of a low number of qualitatively distinct average nucleation site classes. We refer to the peak at the lowest temperature as "standard peak" and to the one occurring in only some clay mineral types at higher temperatures as "special peak". Conversely, freezing in bulk samples is not initiated by the average nucleation sites, but by a very low number of "best sites". The kaolinites and montmorillonites showed quite narrow standard peaks with onset temperatures 238 Kparticles on the basis of freezing onset temperatures from bulk experiments, as has been done in some atmospheric studies, is not appropriate. Our investigations demonstrate that immersion freezing temperatures of clay minerals strongly depend on the amount of clay mineral present per droplet and on

  5. Effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A. Chander, S.; Dhaka, M. S.; Hameed, A.; Singh, P.; Nehra, S. P.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay is undertaken. The wet grinding treatment was performed employing ball and vibro mills for different time spells of 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours. The structural properties were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of ground samples is found to be simple cubic. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and slight change in lattice constant, inter planner spacing and particle size is observed with grinding treatment. The results are in agreement with the available literature.

  6. Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

  7. Color measurement of methylene blue dye/clay mixtures and its application using economical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosevic, Maja; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Logar, Mihovil

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the clay mineral components of clay materials by staining tests is rapid and simple, but their applicability is restricted because of the mutual interference of the common components of clay materials and difficulties in color determination. The change of color with concentration of the dye is related to the use of colorants as a field test for identifying clay minerals and has been improved over the years to assure the accuracy of the tests (Faust G. T., 1940). The problem of measurement and standardization of color may be solved by combination of colors observed in staining tests with prepared charts of color chips available in the Munsell Book of Color, published by Munsell Color Co. Under a particular set of illumination conditions, a human eye can achieve an approximate match between the color of the dyed clay sample and that of a standard color chip, even though they do have different spectral reflectance characteristics. Experiments were carried out with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy on selected clay samples (three montmorillonite, three kaolinite and one mix-layer clay samples) saturated with different concentration of methylene blue dye solution. Dominant wavelength and purity of the color was obtained on oriented dry samples and calculated by use of the I. C. I. (x, y) - diagram in the region of 400-700 nm (reflectance spectra) without MB and after saturation with different concentrations of MB solutions. Samples were carefully photographed in the natural light environment and processed with user friendly and easily accessible applications (Adobe color CC and ColorHexa encyclopedia) available for android phones or tablets. Obtained colors were compared with Munsell standard color chips, RGB and Hexa color standards. Changes in the color of clay samples in their interaction with different concentration of the applied dye together with application of economical methods can still be used as a rapid fieldwork test. Different types of clay

  8. Phosphates in some missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Foord, E.E.; Keller, D.J.; Keller, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays. The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspora, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore ("burley" clay). The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality. The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore host

  9. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. PMID:26542073

  10. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills.

  11. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dust particles. Cross-sectional slices of dust particles were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). TEM images of FIB slices revealed that clay minerals occurred as either nano-thin platelets or relatively thick plates. The nano-thin platelets included illite, smectite, illite-smectite mixed layers and their nanoscale mixtures (illite-smectite series clay minerals, ISCMs) which could not be resolved with an electron microbeam. EDXS chemical analysis of the clay mineral grains revealed that the average Fe content was 5.8% in nano-thin ISCM platelets assuming 14% H2O, while the Fe content of illite and chlorite was 2.8 and 14.8%, respectively. In addition, TEM and EDXS analyses were performed on clay mineral grains dispersed and loaded on microgrids. The average Fe content of clay mineral grains was 6.7 and 5.4% in Asian and Saharan dusts, respectively. A comparative X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk dusts showed that Saharan dust was more enriched in clay minerals than in Asian dust, while Asian dust was more enriched in chlorite. The average Fe / Si, Al / Si and Fe / Al molar ratios of the clay minerals, compared to previously reported chemistries of mineral dusts and leached solutions, indicated that dissolved Fe originated from clay minerals. Clay minerals, in particular nanocrystalline ISCMs and Fe-rich chlorite are important sources of available Fe in

  12. Natural Ferrihydrite as an Agent for Reducing Turbidity Caused by Suspended Clays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The turbidity of water can be reduced by the addition of positively charged compounds which coagulate negatively charged clay particles in suspension causing them to flocculate. This research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Fe oxide mineral ferrihydrite as a flocculating agent fo...

  13. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  14. Polyacrylamide effects on aggregate and structure stability of soils with different clay mineralogy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adding anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) to soils stabilizes existing aggregates and improves bonding between and aggregation of soil particles. However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent with soils having different clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil samples...

  15. Wave-induced ripple development in mixed clay-sand substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuxu; Parsons, Daniel; Baas, Jaco H.; Mouazé, Dominique; McLelland, Stuart; Amoudry, Laurent; Eggenhuisen, Jorris; Cartigny, Matthieu; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments that aim to provide a fuller understanding of ripple development within clay-sand mixture substrates under oscillatory flow conditions. The work was conducted in the Total Environment Simulator at the University of Hull and constituted 6 separate runs, in which 5 runs were conducted under identical sets of regular waves (an additional run was conducted under irregular waves, but is not discussed in present paper). The bed content was systematically varied in its composition ranging from a pure sand bed through to a bed comprising 7.4% clay. A series of state-of-the-art measurements were employed to quantify interactions of near-bed hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and turbulence over rippled beds formed by wave action, during and after, each run. The experimental results demonstrate the significant influence of the amount of cohesive clay materials in the substrate on ripple evolution under waves. Most importantly, addition of clay in the bed dramatically slowed down the rate of ripple development and evolution. The equilibrium time of each run increased exponentially from 30 minutes under the control conditions of a pure sand bed, rising to ~350 minutes for the bed with the highest fraction of clay. The paper discusses the slower ripple growth rates with higher cohesive fractions, via an influence on critical shear, but highlights that the end equilibrium size of ripples is found to be independent of increasing substrate clay fraction. The suspended particles mass (SPM) concentration indicates that clay particles were suspended and winnowed by wave action. Additionally, laser granulometry of the final substrates verified that ripple crests were composed of pure sand layers that were absent at ripple troughs, reflecting a relatively higher winnowing efficiency at wave ripples crest. The winnowing process and its efficiency is inexorably linked to wave ripple development and evolution. The implications of the results

  16. Chromate adsorption on acid-treated and amines-modified clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjaji, M.; Beraa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Acid-treated montmorillonite-rich clay and amines (methylamine, morpholine, and aniline)-modified clay adsorbents were investigated and their abilities to remove chromate from aqueous solution were studied. For the later purpose, kinetic studies were carried out under different operating conditions (chromate concentration, adsorbent content, and temperature), and adsorption isotherm measurements were performed. It was found that the kinetic of adsorption was fast and the data followed the pseudo-second rate equation. The rate of adsorption was controlled by the intra-particle diffusion and mass transfer through the liquid film, and the relative importance of these limiting steps depended on the operating conditions. Chromate adsorption was an endothermic process and took place spontaneously by physisorption. The free energy at 25 ≤ T ≤ 40 °C varied from -1.5 to -46 kJ/mol. Adsorption isotherms of Na+-saturated clay (AN), acid-treated clay (AA), and methylamine-clay and morpholine-clay (A-Me, A-Mo) were type V, whereas those of aniline-clay (A-An) were type III. The estimated maximum uptakes were 105, 29, 15, 11, and 10 mmol/kg for A-An, AN, A-Mo, AA, and A-Me, respectively. The mechanism of chromate adsorption was discussed based on the shape of the isotherms. Considering for instance the most efficient absorbent (A-An), the isotherm followed the Freundlich equation and hydrogen chromate (the main stable form at working pH) adsorbed to solid particles once aniline species were entirely desorbed.

  17. Release of nanoclay and surfactant from polymer-clay nanocomposites into a food simulant.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yining; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Release assessment of organo-modified montmorillonite (O-MMT) nanoclay and the organo-modifiers (surfactants) was performed on two types of polymer–clay nanocomposites: polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) with O-MMT. In accordance with ASTM D4754-11, nanocomposite films were exposed to ethanol as a fatty-food simulant at 70 °C. The release of O-MMT, with Si and Al used as the nanoclay markers, was evaluated by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The nanoclay particles released in ethanol were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). More nanoclay particles were released from PP–clay films (0.15 mg L(–1)) than from PA6–clay films (0.10 mg L(–1)), possibly due to the lack of interaction between the nanoclay and PP as indicated by the structure and morphology in the TEM images. The surfactant release was quantified by a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. A substantial amount of surfactant was released into ethanol (3.5 mg L(–1) from PP–clay films and 16.2 mg L(–1) from PA6–clay films), indicating changes in the nanoclay structure within the nanocomposite while it was exposed to ethanol. This research has provided information for the determination of exposure doses of nanoclay and surfactant in biosystems and the environment, which enabled the risk assessment. PMID:25369541

  18. Release of nanoclay and surfactant from polymer-clay nanocomposites into a food simulant.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yining; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Release assessment of organo-modified montmorillonite (O-MMT) nanoclay and the organo-modifiers (surfactants) was performed on two types of polymer–clay nanocomposites: polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) with O-MMT. In accordance with ASTM D4754-11, nanocomposite films were exposed to ethanol as a fatty-food simulant at 70 °C. The release of O-MMT, with Si and Al used as the nanoclay markers, was evaluated by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The nanoclay particles released in ethanol were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). More nanoclay particles were released from PP–clay films (0.15 mg L(–1)) than from PA6–clay films (0.10 mg L(–1)), possibly due to the lack of interaction between the nanoclay and PP as indicated by the structure and morphology in the TEM images. The surfactant release was quantified by a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. A substantial amount of surfactant was released into ethanol (3.5 mg L(–1) from PP–clay films and 16.2 mg L(–1) from PA6–clay films), indicating changes in the nanoclay structure within the nanocomposite while it was exposed to ethanol. This research has provided information for the determination of exposure doses of nanoclay and surfactant in biosystems and the environment, which enabled the risk assessment.

  19. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  20. Investigation of structure and properties of novel multi-layer clay nanocomposite films produced controllably by continuous chaotic advection blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesha, Chaitra

    A unique processing technique based on chaotic advection developed at Clemson University and shown to controllably produce structured materials in the past was employed to produce structured nanocomposites with a high degree of clay orientation as well as localization of platelets within layers of nanoscale thicknesses. Continuous lengths of nanocomposites with different clay contents were extruded in the form of films by feeding separately melts of virgin polyamide-6 polymer and polyamide 6-clay masterbatch into a continuous chaotic advection blender. A variety of composite structures were producible at fixed clay compositions. The internal structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Nanocomposites with novel in-situ multi-layered structures and a high degree of platelet orientation were formed by the recursive stretching and folding of the melt domains due to chaotic advection. Clay platelets were localized within discrete regions to form alternating virgin and platelet-rich layers leading to a hierarchical structure with multiple nano-scales. The thicknesses of the layers reduced with prolonged chaotic advection, eventually leading to nanocomposites in which the multi-layering was no longer discernible. The oriented platelets appeared to be homogenously dispersed through the bulk of the nanocomposite. Investigation of the morphology of the matrix by XRD showed that the homogeneity of the crystalline phase and the orientation of polymer chains parallel to the film surface increased with increased chaotic advection. Also, as the layer thickness reduced, the number of polymer chains restricted by clay platelets increased causing the gamma-crystalline fraction to increase. While XRD results suggested a change in total crystallinity with chaotic advection and clay content but without a specific trend, no change in crystallinity was measured by DSC. Such contradictions are

  1. Ion Exchange Resin and Clay Vitrification by Plasma Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz A., Laura V.; Pacheco S., Joel O.; Pacheco P., Marquidia; Monroy G., Fabiola; Emeterio H., Miguel; Ramos F., Fidel

    2006-12-01

    The lack of treatment of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) lead us to propose a vitrification process based on a plasma discharge; this technique incorporates LILRW into a matrix glass composed of ceramic clays material. The Mexican Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), uses an ion exchange resin IRN 150 (styrene-divinilbence copolymer) in the TRIGA MARK III nuclear reactor. The principal objective of this resin is to absorb particles containing heavy metals and low-level radioactive particles. Once the IRN 150 resin filter capacity has been exceeded, it should be replaced and treated as LILRW. In this work, a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify this resin taking advantage of its high power density, enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures. In order to characterize the morphological structure of these clay samples, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment.

  2. Neocrystallization, fabrics and age of clay minerals from an exposure of the Moab Fault, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Peacor, Donald R.

    2005-09-01

    Pronounced changes in clay mineral assemblages are preserved along the Moab Fault (Utah). Gouge is enriched up to ˜40% in 1M d illite relative to protolith, whereas altered protolith in the damage zone is enriched ˜40% in illite-smectite relative to gouge and up to ˜50% relative to protolith. These mineralogical changes indicate that clay gouge is formed not solely through mechanical incorporation of protolith, but also through fault-related authigenesis. The timing of mineralization is determined using 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of size fractions of fault rocks with varying detrital and authigenic clay content. We applied Ar dating of illite-smectite samples, as well as a newer approach that uses illite polytypes. Our analysis yields overlapping, early Paleocene ages for neoformed (1M d) gouge illite (63±2 Ma) and illite-smectite in the damage zone (60±2 Ma), which are compatible with results elsewhere. These ages represent the latest period of major fault motion, and demonstrate that the fault fabrics are not the result of recent alteration. The clay fabrics in fault rocks are poorly developed, indicating that fluids were not confined to the fault zone by preferentially oriented clays; rather we propose that fluids in the illite-rich gouge were isolated by adjacent lower permeability, illite-smectite-bearing rocks in the damage zone.

  3. Neocrystallization, fabrics and age of clay minerals from an exposure of the Moab Fault, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; van der Pluijm, B.A.; Peacor, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Pronounced changes in clay mineral assemblages are preserved along the Moab Fault (Utah). Gouge is enriched up to ???40% in 1Md illite relative to protolith, whereas altered protolith in the damage zone is enriched ???40% in illite-smectite relative to gouge and up to ???50% relative to protolith. These mineralogical changes indicate that clay gouge is formed not solely through mechanical incorporation of protolith, but also through fault-related authigenesis. The timing of mineralization is determined using 40Ar/39Ar dating of size fractions of fault rocks with varying detrital and authigenic clay content. We applied Ar dating of illite-smectite samples, as well as a newer approach that uses illite polytypes. Our analysis yields overlapping, early Paleocene ages for neoformed (1Md) gouge illite (63??2 Ma) and illite-smectite in the damage zone (60??2 Ma), which are compatible with results elsewhere. These ages represent the latest period of major fault motion, and demonstrate that the fault fabrics are not the result of recent alteration. The clay fabrics in fault rocks are poorly developed, indicating that fluids were not confined to the fault zone by preferentially oriented clays; rather we propose that fluids in the illite-rich gouge were isolated by adjacent lower permeability, illite-smectite-bearing rocks in the damage zone. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Canakcii, H.; Mavi, B.

    2011-12-26

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of different fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioactivity. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), external hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  5. The Basics in Pottery: Clay and Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joan

    1985-01-01

    Art teachers at the middle school or junior high school level usually find themselves in a program teaching ceramics. The most essential tools needed for a ceramics class are discussed. Different kinds of clay are also discussed. (RM)

  6. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, I.; ćanakciı, H.; Mavi, B.; Günoǧlu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of diferent fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioacitivty. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure 226Ra, 232Th and 40K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  7. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  8. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-01

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  9. Clay-mediated reactions of HCN oligomers - The effect of the oxidation state of the clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Alwis, K. W.; Edelson, E. H.; Mount, N.; Hagan, W. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays which contain Fe(III) inhibit the oligomerization of aqueous solutions of HCN. The inhibitory effect is due to the rapid oxidation of diaminomaleonitrile, a key intermediate in HCN oligomerization, by the Fe(III) incorporated into the aluminosilicate lattice of the clay. The Fe(III) oxidizes diaminomaleonitrile to diiminosuccinonitrile, a compound which is rapidly hydrolyzed to HCN and oxalic acid derivatives. Diaminomaleonitrile is not oxidized when Fe(III) in the montmorillonite is reduced with hydrazine. The oxidation state of the clay is an important variable in experiments designed to simulate clay catalysis on the primitive earth.

  10. Investigation of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays by {sup 129}Xe NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsaio, C.-J.; Carrado, K. A.; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

    1998-04-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays has been used to glean information on the interlayer gallery height of clays before and after pillaring. Two clay minerals were studied, a Ca{sup 2+}-montmorillonite and Bentonite L. The NMR results indicate that the effective interlamellar spacing of the montmorillonite increased from 5.4 to 8.0 Angstroms after pillaring with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. These data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in gallery height from 5.6 to 8.4 Angstroms.

  11. Role of clay minerals in the formation of atmospheric aggregates of Saharan dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadros, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, José L.; Sanchez-Navas, Antonio; Garcia-Casco, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Saharan dust can travel long distances in different directions across the Atlantic and Europe, sometimes in episodes of high dust concentration. In recent years it has been discovered that Saharan dust aerosols can aggregate into large, approximately spherical particles of up to 100 μm generated within raindrops that then evaporate, so that the aggregate deposition takes place most times in dry conditions. These aerosol aggregates are an interesting phenomenon resulting from the interaction of mineral aerosols and atmospheric conditions. They have been termed "iberulites" due to their discovery and description from aerosol deposits in the Iberian Peninsula. Here, these aggregates are further investigated, in particular the role of the clay minerals in the aggregation process of aerosol particles. Iberulites, and common aerosol particles for reference, were studied from the following periods or single dust events and locations: June 1998 in Tenerife, Canary Islands; June 2001 to August 2002, Granada, Spain; 13-20 August 2012, Granada; and 1-6 June 2014, Granada. Their mineralogy, chemistry and texture were analysed using X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, SEM and TEM. The mineral composition and structure of the iberulites consists of quartz, carbonate and feldspar grains surrounded by a matrix of clay minerals (illite, smectite and kaolinite) that also surrounds the entire aggregate. Minor phases, also distributed homogenously within the iberulites, are sulfates and Fe oxides. Clays are apparently more abundant in the iberulites than in the total aerosol deposit, suggesting that iberulite formation concentrates clays. Details of the structure and composition of iberulites differ from descriptions of previous samples, which indicates dependence on dust sources and atmospheric conditions, possibly including anthropic activity. Iberulites are formed by coalescence of aerosol mineral particles captured by precursor water droplets. The concentration of

  12. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynda B; Metge, David W; Eberl, Dennis D; Harvey, Ronald W; Turner, Amanda G; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T

    2011-04-15

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe(2+) solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe(2+). Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe(2+) overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe(3+) and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals.

  13. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  14. Clay: Arizona HSST/CDA Competency Based Training Module #32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Cheryl

    This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module indicates the values of craft activities with clay for preschool children. Classroom activities as well as instructional objectives for the CDA intern are provided. The module emphasizes (1) reasons for using clay in the preschool program, (2) types of clay and clay-like materials, and (3)…

  15. Industrial Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasor, Leslie; Brooks, Valerie

    These eight modules for an industrial orientation class were developed by a project to design an interdisciplinary program of basic skills training for disadvantaged students in a Construction Technology Program (see Note). The Drafting module overviews drafting career opportunities, job markets, salaries, educational requirements, and basic…

  16. Relationship between heavy metal contents and clay mineral properties in surface sediments: Implications for metal pollution assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueh-Min; Gao, Jin-bo; Yuan, Yong-Qiang; Ma, Jun; Yu, Shen

    2016-08-01

    Clay minerals in surface sediments can affect the adsorption of heavy metals. However, few historical studies have focused on the influence of fine clay mineral characteristics on metal sorption. Since the reactions between heavy metals and fine clay minerals in sediments remain obscure, this study investigates the influence of fine clay mineral characteristics on metal sorption in a typical urbanizing small watershed. Clay minerals, including nanoparticles with various size fractions ranging from 1000 to 2000 (clay), 450-1000 (fine clay), and 220-450 (very fine clay) nm were used to demonstrate their transformation from well crystalline to poorly crystalline. The nanoparticles were collected and evaluated by determination of their surface area, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analyses. The relationship between metal content and properties of the surface sediments was also revealed by canonical correlation analysis. With smaller particle sizes, nanoparticles (very fine clay) were observed to be poorly crystalline, possibly indicating few repetitions of unit cells as a result of preferential structural disruption of other crystal planes caused by pressure-induced phase transition in the fine-size fractions. The first canonical matrix (M) variables of metal contents can be predicted by both surface area and pore volume, followed by kaolinite and illite contents. On the other hand, the category of metal, i.e., Cu, Cr, Zn, or Pb, was significantly correlated with the first 'M' canonical variables. The data obtained in the present study are of fundamental significance in advancing our understanding of the reactions between heavy metals and fine clay minerals in the terrestrial ecosystem.

  17. Pier-scour depths affected by clay in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K. Van

    1998-01-01

    This paper briefly presents pier-scour depths measured during 1943-94, that are thought to have been affected by consolidated cohesive materials (clay) in Mississippi. MDOT soil reports were available for 29 measured pier-scour depths thought to be affected by clay. The cohesion and friction angles were approximated for the clay, and using the soil borings where clay was overlain by sand and(or) gravel, the top of the clay stratum was approximated in order to determine the net scour through the clay. Eight additional measured pier-scour depths were thought to be affected by clay, but no MDOT soil reports or borings were available. The net pier-scour depth through the clay is a rough approximation where sand and (or) gravel overlie a clay stratum and, therefore, only represents part of the total pier-scour depth. Limited data indicate the pier-scour depth decreases as shear strength of the clay increases.

  18. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to the Surface Charge Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. W.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories, iodine-129 is often the major contributor to dose at time scales ≥10,000 years. The breakthrough behavior of iodine is determined by the monovalent, anionic nature and the assumed lack of surface reactivity of the iodide ion. This assumption is corroborated by batch sorption data where iodide sorption to clays is typically very small, and only measurable under specific conditions. This result is consistent with charge repulsion arguments due to the fixed negative charge of clays repelling the anionic iodide. However, in compacted column diffusion experiments, iodide is routinely retarded relative to tritium, and is described with Kd values from ≈0.001-2.9ml/g. While small, these values can dramatically change the dose profile in performance assessment calculations. We hypothesize that contributions from the basal plane and edge charge of individual clay particles as well as the physical morphology of the clay particles are contributing to the conflicting behavior. In a series of experiments involving a wide range of clay minerals from the clay bank repository, both surface charge and iodide sorption were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments. The clay minerals studied include: kaolinite, ripidolite, illite, montmorillonite, palygorskite, sepiolite, and an illite/smectite mixed layer clay. Each of these clays was characterized using XRD, and surface titrations in 0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 M NaCl electrolyte. The titrations spanned the pH range from 2.5-10.5 and were automated using an autotitrator. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were interpreted using an inversion method to attain the pKa distribution for each clay and metal oxide at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly

  19. Parametric studies on effective elastic modulus of nano-clay/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Srinivas, J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a methodology of finding effective elastic properties of nanoclay-reinforced polymer composites with aligned clay particles. When interphase regions exist between nanoclay platelets and polymer, numerical homogenization is initially required to identify the properties of effective particle consisting of both clay and interface regions. Once the elastic properties of equivalent particle are obtained, Mori-Tanaka approach is employed to identify all the effective properties of resultant composite. The methodology is implemented with a modular based computer program developed in MATLAB and the variation of longitudinal modulus as a function of weight fraction of nanoclay, aspect ratio of fibers, number of stacks, nanoclay volume fraction etc is reported. The empirical results are validated with a numerical model developed in ANSYS using a representative volume element for prediction of the elastic modulus. Results are illustrated with two cases of exfoliated morphology.

  20. Structure-Property Correlation in Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Clay Hybrid Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Son, You-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Kun; Soong, Yee; Martello, Donald; Chyu, Minking

    2010-03-16

    Heterostructures between montmorillonite and embedded alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are explored to create new hybrid particles with high magnetic response and magnetic-field induced tunability. α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are hybridized to montmorillonite clays by using an intercalation technique. Also, stable aqueous fluids consisting of the heterostructured particles are prepared and the rheology of the fluids under external magnetic field is examined. When α-Fe2O3 a nanoparticles are embedded in the interlayer space of montmorillonite clays, the magnetization per Fe atom increases at most 60 times. This unique combination of the magnetization and the coercivity is traced to the suppressed growth of embedded α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles by the aluminosilicate layers, leading to the size control, anisotropic magnetic interaction, and uniaxial stress of two-dimensionally distributed α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Furthermore, high magnetization of heterostructured particles leads to strong dependence of fluids' viscosity on the external magnetic field. The present study indicates that the new heterostructured particles have unique magnetic fielddependent properties that are not attainable in individual clay or iron oxide particles.

  1. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  2. The mechanics of active clays circulated by salts, acids and bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajo, Alessandro; Loret, Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    A model that accounts for electro-chemo-mechanical couplings in clays, due to the presence of dissolved salts and acids and bases, is developed and applied to simulate experimental data. Chemically sensitive clays are viewed as two-phase multi-species saturated porous media circulated by an electrolyte. To the authors' best knowledge, no other comprehensive project to embody the effects of pH in the elastic-plastic behavior of geomaterials has been attempted so far. The developments are embedded in the framework of the thermodynamics of multi-phase multi-species porous media. This approach serves to structure the model, and to motivate constitutive equations. The present extension capitalizes upon the earlier developments by Gajo et al. [2002. Electro-chemo-mechanical couplings in saturated porous media: elastic-plastic behaviour of heteroionic expansive clays. Int. J. Solids Struct. 39, 4327-4362] and Gajo and Loret [2004. Transient analysis of ionic replacement in elastic-plastic expansive clays. Int. J. Solids Struct. 41(26), 7493-7531], which were devoted to modeling chemo-mechanical couplings at constant pH. Four transfer mechanisms between the solid and fluid phases are delineated in the model: (1) hydration, (2) ion exchange, (3) acidification, (4) alkalinization. Thus all fundamental exchanges at particle level are fully taken into account. Only mineral dissolution is neglected, since experimental observations indicate a negligible role of mineral dissolution for active clays at room temperature. In particular, the newly considered mechanisms of acidification and alkalinization directly affect the electrical charge of clay particles and thus have a key role in the electro-chemo-mechanical couplings. These four mechanisms are seen as controlling both elastic and elasto-plastic behaviors. Depending on concentrations and ionic affinities to the clay mineral, the transfer mechanisms either compete or cooperate to modify the compressibility and strength of the

  3. Electrically Insulative Performances of Ceramic and Clay Films Deposited via Supersonic Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Gun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Joshi, Bhavana N.; Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Kim, Jang-soo; Yang, Dae-ho; Kim, Woo-Young; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Yoon, Sam S.

    2016-04-01

    Supersonic spray coating techniques were applied to deposit ceramic and clay particles as films for use in electrical insulation. TiO2 and Al2O3 ceramics were aerosol-deposited under vacuum while kaolinite, montmorillonite, and bentonite clays were deposited by cold spraying in open air. The electrical resistivity of Al2O3 and TiO2 were ~109 and ~108 Ω cm, respectively. The resistivity of kaolinite and montmorillonite were ~1012 Ω cm. Bentonite showed the lowest electrical resistivity of ~109 Ω cm among the clays because of the high cation exchange capacity of the material. The film surface morphologies and mechanical properties in the form of hardness and scratchability were also investigated.

  4. Kinetic study of the immobilization of galvanic sludge in clay-based matrix.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Jorge M; Silva, João E; Castro, Fernando P; Labrincha, João A

    2005-05-20

    The viability of inertization of galvanic wastes through their incorporation in clay-based materials, such as common formulations for tiles and bricks, is here studied by determining the leaching kinetics in different media. Metals immobilization is assured by firing at reasonably high temperatures, since intimately contact and/or reaction between residue and clay particles is promoted but also due to formation of insoluble metal oxides that rest unreactive towards clay grains. For most metals, leaching rate follows a zero-order kinetic law, with values between 0.001 to 0.1 mg/(g day cm2). Leaching velocity tends to increase with rising atomic numbers: Zn < Cu < Ni < Cr. These values depend exponentially on the relative sludge content.

  5. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  6. Experimental study of MS2 and ΦX174 interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syngouna, V. I.; Chrysikopoulos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The transport and fate of viruses in subsurface formations are mainly governed by virus attachment onto the solid matrix and inactivation. Furthermore, virus attachment onto clay colloids is primarily controlled by electrostatic interactions between surfaces. Bacteriophage MS2 and ΦX174 were used as surrogates for human viruses in order to investigate the interaction between viruses and clay particles. The selected phyllosilicate clays were kaolinite and bentonite. Numerous reactor vessels were filled with 0.5 g of clay and 50 mL of sterile phosphate buffered at pH 7.0. A series of static and dynamic experiments for various bacteriophage concentrations were conducted at two different temperatures. Half of the reactor vessels were placed in a refrigerator at 4°C and the rest in a constant temperature room at 25°C. The dynamic batch experiments were performed with the reactor vessels attached to a small bench-top tube rotator. Appropriate adsorption isotherms were determined. Subsequently, the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory was applied in order to determine the interaction energies between the bacteriophage and clay surfaces. The electric properties of the viral surfaces were also obtained at different pH values and ionic strength levels. The experimental results show that virus adsorption increases linearly with suspended virus concentration. The observed distribution coefficient (Kd) was higher for MS2 than ΦX174. Also, the observed Kd values were higher for the dynamic than static experiments, and increased with temperature. Moreover, the results indicate that the electrostatic interactions between viruses and the clays are significantly influenced by the solution’s ionic strength and pH. At pH 7, bacteriophage-clay energy barriers were higher for MS2 than ΦX174.

  7. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  8. Natural ferrihydrite as an agent for reducing turbidity caused by suspended clays.

    PubMed

    Rhoton, F E; Bigham, J M

    2009-01-01

    Biologically impaired waters are often caused by the turbidity associated with elevated suspended sediment concentrations. Turbidity can be reduced by the addition of positively charged compounds that coagulate negatively charged particles in suspension, causing them to flocculate. This research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline Fe oxide, as a flocculating agent for suspended clays similar to those found in high-turbidity waters of the Mississippi delta. Clay concentrations of 100 mg L(-1) from a Dubbs silt loam (fine silty, mixed, active, thermic Typic Hapludalfs), a Forestdale silty clay loam (fine, smectitic, thermic Typic Hapludalfs), and a Sharkey clay (very fine, smectitic, thermic Chromic Epiaquerts) were suspended in 0.0005 mol L(-1) CaCl(2) solutions at pH 5, 6, 7, or 8. Natural ferrihydrite with a zero point of charge at pH 5.8 was acquired from a drinking water treatment facility and mixed with the suspension at concentrations of 0, 10, 25, and 50 mg L(-1). After settling periods of 24 and 48 h, percent transmittance was measured at a wavelength of 420 nm using a 3-mL sample collected at a depth of 2 cm. The greatest reductions in turbidity after 24-h equilibration were recorded for the pH 5 suspensions of the Dubbs (31%) and Forestdale (37%) clays at a ferrihydrite concentration of 10 mg L(-1) and for the Sharkey clay at a ferrihydrite concentration of 25 mg L(-1) (relative to the 0 ferrihydrite treatment). Water clarity for all samples further increased after 48 h. These results indicate that the effectiveness of ferrihydrite, as a means of reducing turbidity associated with suspended clays, is greatest at pH values below its zero point of charge. PMID:19643754

  9. Modeling near-infrared reflectance spectra of clay and sulfate mixtures and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, K. M.; Milliken, R. E.

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution mapping by visible and near-infrared orbital spectrometers has revealed a diversity of hydrated mineral deposits on the surface of Mars. Quantitative analysis of mineral abundances within these deposits has the potential to distinguish depositional and diagenetic processes. Such analysis can also provide important constraints on the nature of putative global and local-scale mineralogical transitions on Mars. However, the ability of models to extract quantitative mineral abundances from spectra of mixtures relevant to sedimentary rocks remains largely untested. This is particularly true for clay and sulfate minerals, which often occur as fine-grained components of terrestrial sedimentary rocks and are known to occur in a number of sedimentary deposits on Mars. This study examines the spectral properties of a suite of mixtures containing the Mg-sulfate epsomite mixed with varying proportions of smectitic clay (saponite, nontronite, and montmorrilonite). The goal of this work is to test the ability of checkerboard (linear) and intimate (non-linear) mixing models to obtain accurate estimates of mineral abundances under ideal and controlled laboratory conditions. The results of this work suggest that: (1) spectra of clay-sulfate mixtures can be reproduced by checkerboard and intimate mixing models to within 2% absolute reflectance or single scattering albedo, (2) clay and epsomite abundance can be modeled to within 5 wt.% when particle diameter is optimized, and (3) the lower threshold for modeling clay in spectra of clay-epsomite mixtures is approximately 10 wt.%, below which the models often fail to recognize the presence of clay.

  10. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  11. Biodegradation of pyrene in sand, silt and clay fractions of sediment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinyi; Hunter, Wesley; Yang, Yu; Chen, Yingxu; Gan, Jay

    2011-04-01

    Microbial degradation is the dominant pathway for natural attenuation of PAHs in environmental compartments such as sediments, which in turn depends on the bioavailability of PAHs. The bioavailability of PAHs has seldom been studied at the sediment particle size scale. We evaluated biodegradation of pyrene by Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 as a function of sediment particle sizes, and investigated the relationship between the rate of degradation on sand, silt and clay particles with their individual desorption kinetics measured with the Tenax extraction method. Regression analysis showed that the total organic carbon (TOC), black carbon (BC), and specific surface area (SSA) of the specific particle size fractions, instead of the particle size scale itself, were closely related (P<0.01) with the mineralization rate. While the fraction in the rapid desorption pool (F (rapid)) ranged from 0.11 to 0.38 for the whole sediments and different size groups, the fractions mineralized after 336-h incubation (0.52 to 0.72) greatly surpassed the F (rapid) values, suggesting utilization of pyrene in the slow desorption pool (F (slow)). A biodegradation model was modified by imbedding a two-phase desorption relationship describing sequential Tenax extractions. Model analysis showed that pyrene sorbed on silt and clay aggregates was directly utilized by the degrading bacteria. The enhanced bioavailability may be attributed to the higher chemical concentration, higher TOC or larger SSA in the silt and clay fractions, which appeared to overcome the reduced bioavailability of pyrene due to sorption, making pyrene on the silt and clay particles readily available to degrading microbes. This conjecture merits further investigation.

  12. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  13. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries (including shape characterization). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, H.P.; Goetz, P.J.; Sharma, A.; Han, W; Bliss, T.C.

    1996-10-01

    The overall goal of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) sensor projects was to develop and commercialize a sensor system capable of particle analysis, in terms of size distributions, using concentrated suspensions at high solids concentrations. The early research was focused on application of ultrasonic spectroscopy of inorganic pigment slurries (e.g. titanium dioxide) commonly encountered on paper industry. During the project prototypes were tested in both academic and industrial laboratories. Work also involved successful field tests of the on-line prototype at a pigment manufacturing facility. Pen Kem continued the work at its cost beyond the initial funded period from March `92 to September `94. The first project (DE- FC05-88CE40684), which began in September 1988, culminated in a commercial laboratory instrument, Pen Kem AcoustoPhor {trademark} 8000, put on the market in June 1993. The follow-on project was aimed at investigation of shape and orientation effects on ultrasonic spectroscopy. A new cooperative agreement was awarded in September 1994 (DE-FC05-94CE40005) to develop shape characterization capabilities deemed critical by the clay industry. This follow-on project achieved following successes: A theoretical model was developed to account for the effects of size-dependent aspect ratios of spheroid particles under different orientations on ultrasound attenuation spectra of concentrated slurries. The theoretical model was confirmed by laboratory tests on kaolin slurries. An algorithm was developed to simulate evolution of particle orientation fields in simple squeezing flows.

  14. Clay nanocomposites for use in Li batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory John

    1999-11-01

    Nanocomposites, materials made of more than one component and combined in an ordered manner on the nanometer scale, were synthesized using clay mineral hosts with various types of guests. The guests include polymers such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyaniline (PANI), large molecules such as ethylmethyl sulfone, tetramethylene sulfone, and various length alkylamines. Vanadyl groups (VO 2+) were also incorporated with the clays. The otherwise non-swellable mica clay, synthetic Na-fluorophlogopite, was expanded by intercalation of acidic ions such as Cu2+ and Fe3+. As aqueous solutions, these ions caused the stable fluoromica to go from its dehydrated interlayer spacing of 9.8 A to over 14 A. This clay became a host for many other reactions including swelling with alkylamines to over 25 A. However, despite hydrated Cu2+ ions swelling fluorophlogopite, polymeric species such as PEO or PANI could not be inserted. Another clay that was used for formation of nanocomposites came from a procedure for the synthesis of Li-taeniolite, Li(Mg2Li)Si 4O10F2. The clay was synthesized following a high temperature method that led to a non-reactive product. Instead, a novel precursor route was employed that gave a clay product with a single hydration layer. Various chemical analyses gave a formula of Li0.8(Mg 2.2Li0.8)Si4O10(F1.6O 0.4)·H2O. For the purpose of forming nanocomposite electrolytes, ethylmethyl sulfone was synthesized and incorporated into the clay. For comparison of different shaped sulfones, tetramethylene sulfone also was inserted into the layers for electrolytic studies. To make a polymer-clay electrolyte, polyethylene oxide was intercalated into the Li-taeniolite. All of these new electrolyte materials were characterized using impedance spectroscopy for measurement of their conductivity. Syntheses and analyses are thoroughly discussed for all of these materials. Special attention is placed on powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric techniques to

  15. Adhesion of the clay minerals montmorillonite, kaolinite, and attapulgite reduces respiration of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, S; Stotzky, G

    1986-01-01

    The respiration of three phenotypes of Histoplasma capsulatum, the causal agent of histoplasmosis in humans, was markedly reduced by low concentrations of montmorillonite but was reduced less by even higher concentrations of kaolinite or attapulgite (palygorskite). The reduction in respiration followed a pattern that suggested saturation-type kinetics: an initial sharp reduction that occurred with low concentrations of clay (0.01 to 0.5% [wt/vol]), followed by a more gradual reduction with higher concentrations (1 to 8%). Increases in viscosity (which could impair the movement of O2) caused by the clays were not responsible for the reduction in respiration, and the clays did not interfere with the availability of nutrients. Scanning electron microscopy after extensive washing showed that the clay particles were tightly bound to the hyphae, suggesting that the clays reduced the rate of respiration of H. capsulatum by adhering to the mycelial surface and, thereby, interfered with the movement of nutrients, metabolites, and gases across the mycelial wall. Images PMID:3954340

  16. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron supply to the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-11-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dust particles. Cross-sectional slices of dust particles were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). TEM images of FIB slices revealed that clay minerals occurred as either nano-thin platelets or relatively thick plates. Chemical compositions and lattice fringes of the nano-thin platelets suggested that they included illite, smectite, illite-smectite mixed layers, and their nanoscale mixtures (illite-smectite series clay minerals, ISCMs) which could not be resolved with an electron microbeam. EDXS chemical analysis of the clay mineral grains revealed that the average Fe content was 5.8% in nano-thin ISCM platelets assuming 14% H2O, while the Fe content of illite and chlorite was 2.8 and 14.8%, respectively. In addition, TEM and EDXS analyses were performed on clay mineral grains dispersed and loaded on micro-grids. The average Fe content of clay mineral grains was 6.7 and 5.4% in Asian and Saharan dusts, respectively. A comparative X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk dusts showed that Saharan dust was more enriched in clay minerals than Asian dust, while Asian dust was more enriched in chlorite. Clay minerals, in particular nanocrystalline ISCMs and Fe-rich chlorite, are probably important sources of Fe to remote marine ecosystems. Further detailed analyses of the mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in global mineral dusts are required to evaluate the

  17. Structural testing of hollow clay tile units

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.D. ); Bennett, R.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1992-08-05

    This report presents the results of laboratory testing of hollow clay tile masonry units. The testing is part of an ongoing natural phenomena evaluation program of Hollow Clay Tile Wall (HCTW) facilities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary purpose of these tests is to determine structural properties of unit tiles of the same lot to be used in large-scale laboratory testing of HCTW structures. Light red (terra cotta) clay masonry units, taken from the construction supply yard of were sampled and tested in accordance with applicable ASTM standards. Measurement of size, measurement of void area, initial rate of absorption, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength procedures were performed. Evaluation of the test results along with comparison to other published clay tile data is provided. Volume 1 of this document contains a description of the testing, a summary of the results, comparison to other published clay tile data, and conclusion drawn from the results. Volume 2 contains the unreduced test data, data reduction software, and quality assurance aspects of the testing.

  18. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  19. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  20. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  1. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms. PMID:26218593

  2. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  3. Potential Sites for Ice Nucleation on Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-10-01

    Few aerosol particles in clouds nucleate the formation of ice. The surface sites available for nucleus formation, which can include surface defects and functional groups, determine in part the activity of an aerosol particle toward ice formation. Although ice nucleation on particles has been widely studied, exploration of the specific sites at which the initial germ forms has been limited, but is important for predicting the microphysical properties of clouds, which impact climate. This Perspective focuses on what is currently known about surface sites for ice nucleation on aluminosilicate clay minerals, which are commonly found in ice residuals, as well as related materials. PMID:26722881

  4. Potential Sites for Ice Nucleation on Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-10-01

    Few aerosol particles in clouds nucleate the formation of ice. The surface sites available for nucleus formation, which can include surface defects and functional groups, determine in part the activity of an aerosol particle toward ice formation. Although ice nucleation on particles has been widely studied, exploration of the specific sites at which the initial germ forms has been limited, but is important for predicting the microphysical properties of clouds, which impact climate. This Perspective focuses on what is currently known about surface sites for ice nucleation on aluminosilicate clay minerals, which are commonly found in ice residuals, as well as related materials.

  5. Polymer based nanocomposites with nanofibers and exfoliated clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2005-01-01

    Polymer solutions, containing clay sheets, were electrospun into nanofibers and microfibers that contained clay sheets inside. Controllable removal of polymer by plasma etching from the surface of fibers revealed the arrangement of clay. The shape, flexibility, size distribution and arrangement of clay sheets were observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The clay sheets were partially aligned in big fibers with normal direction of clay sheets perpendicular to fiber axis. Crumpling of clay sheets inside fibers was observed when the fiber diameter was comparable to the lateral size of clay sheets. Single sheets of clay were observed both by catching clay sheets dispersed in water with electrospun nanofiber mats and by the deliberate removal of most of the polymer in the fibers. Thin, flexible gas barrier films, that are reasonably strong, were assembled from clay sheets and polymer nanofibers. Structure of composite films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Continuous film of clay sheets were physically attached to the surface of fiber mats. Spincoating film of polymer and clay sheets was reinforced by electrospun fiber scaffold. Certain alignment of clay sheets was observed in the vicinity of fibers.

  6. Decomposition of organochlorine compounds in flue gas from municipal solid waste incinerators using natural and activated acid clays.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature particle control (HTPC) using a ceramic filter is a dust collection method without inefficient cooling and reheating of flue gas treatment; thus, its use is expected to improve the energy recovery efficiency of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However there are concerns regarding de novo synthesis and a decrease in the adsorptive removal efficiency of dioxins (DXNs) at approximately 300 degrees C. In this study, the effect of natural and activated acid clays on the decomposition of monochlorobenzene (MCB), one of the organochlorine compounds in MSW flue gas, was investigated. From the results of MCB removal tests at 30-300 degrees C, the clays were classified as adsorption, decomposition, and low removal types. More than half of the clays (four kinds of natural acid clays and two kinds of activated acid clays) were of the decomposition type. In addition, the presence of Cl atoms detached from MCB was confirmed by washing the clay used in the MCB removal test at 300 degrees C. Activated acid clay was expected to have high dechlorination performance because of its proton-rich-composition, but only two clays were classed as decomposition type. Conversely, all the natural acid clays used in this work were of the decomposition type, which contained relatively higher di- and trivalent metal oxides such as Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and CaO. These metal oxides might contribute to the catalytic dechlorination of MCB at 300 degrees C. Therefore, natural and activated acid clays can be used as alternatives for activated carbon at 300 degrees C to remove organochloride compounds such as DXNs. Their utilization is expected to mitigate the latent risks related to the adoption of HTPC, and also to contribute to the improvement of energy recovery efficiency of MSWI. Implications: The effect of natural and activated acid clays on MCB decomposition was investigated to evaluate their suitability as materials for the removal of organochlorine compounds, such as

  7. Effect of Water on Elastic and Creep Properties of Self-Standing Clay Films.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Benoit; Vandamme, Matthieu; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Bornert, Michel; Ferrage, Eric; Hubert, Fabien; Van Damme, Henri

    2016-02-01

    We characterized experimentally the elastic and creep properties of thin self-standing clay films, and how their mechanical properties evolved with relative humidity and water content. The films were made of clay montmorillonite SWy-2, obtained by evaporation of a clay suspension. Three types of films were manufactured, which differed by their interlayer cation: sodium, calcium, or a mixture of sodium with calcium. The orientational order of the films was characterized by X-ray diffractometry. The films were mechanically solicited in tension, the resulting strains being measured by digital image correlation. We measured the Young's modulus and the creep over a variety of relative humidities, on a full cycle of adsorption-desorption for what concerns the Young's modulus. Increasing relative humidity made the films less stiff and made them creep more. Both the elastic and creep properties depended significantly on the interlayer cation. For the Young's modulus, this dependence must originate from a scale greater than the scale of the clay layer. Also, hysteresis disappeared when plotting the Young's modulus versus water content instead of relative humidity. Independent of interlayer cation and of relative humidity greater than 60%, after a transient period, the creep of the films was always a logarithmic function of time. The experimental data gathered on these mesoscale systems can be of value for modelers who aim at predicting the mechanical behavior of clay-based materials (e.g., shales) at the engineering macroscopic scale from the one at the atomistic scale, for them to validate the first steps of their upscaling scheme. They provide also valuable reference data for bioinspired clay-based hybrid materials.

  8. Genesis of clay mineral assemblages and micropaleoclimatic implications in the Tertiary Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Weaver, J.N. ); Bossiroy, D.; Thorez, J. )

    1990-05-01

    An x-ray diffraction (XRD) study was undertaken on the clay mineralogy of the early Tertiary coal-bearing sequences of the Powder River basin. The vertical and lateral distribution of alternating fluvial conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones, shales, coals, and paleosols reveals a transition from alluvial fans along the basin margin to an alluvial plain and peat bogs basinward. Samples included unweathered shales and mudstones from a borehole and a variety of corresponding surface outcrop samples of Cambrian to Eocene age. Samples older than Tertiary were collected along the basin margin specifically to determine the potential source of parent material during Tertiary sedimentation. XRD analyses were performed on the <2-{mu}m fraction prepared as oriented aggregates. To investigate the materials in their natural state, no chemical pre-treatments the authors applied before the analysis. A series of specific post-treatments, consisting of catonic saturation (Li+, K+), a solution with polyalcohols, heating, acid attack and hydrazine saturation was selectively applied. These post-treatments permit a good discrimination between the mimetic clay minerals such as smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers that constitute the bulk of the clay fraction in the Tertiary rocks. When analyzed only using routine XRD, these swelling minerals are apparently uniformly distributed in the fluvial sedimentary rocks and are better interpreted as a single smectitic population. However, the post-treatments clearly differentiate both qualitatively and quantitatively this smectitic stock. Other clays include illite and kaolinite, which have different degrees of crystallinity, and minor interstratified clays (i.e., illite-chlorite, chlorite-smectite). The clay minerals in pre-Tertiary (and pedogenic) materials are different from those in the Tertiary rocks.

  9. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    PubMed Central

    Mutman, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation. PMID:23766671

  10. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange complex. Adsorption to the clays was essentially immediate and was correlated with the cation-exchange capacity of the clays, indicating that adsorption was primarily to negatively charged sites on the clays. Adsorption was greater with low concentrations of clays in estuarine water than in distilled water, as the higher ionic strength of the estuarine water reduced the electrokinetic potential of both clay and virus particles. The addition of cations (as chloride salts) to distilled water enhanced adsorption, with divalent cations being more effective than monovalent cations and 10(-2) M resulting in more adsorption than 10(-3) M. Potassium ions suppressed reovirus adsorption to montmorillonite, probably by collapsing the clay lattices and preventing the expression of the interlayer-derived cation-exchange capacity. More virus was adsorbed by montmorillonite made homoionic to various mono-, di-, and trivalent cations (except by montmorillonite homoionic to potassium) than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite homoionic to the same cations. The sequence of the amount of adsorption to homoionic montmorillonite was Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than Na greater than K; the sequence of adsorption to kaolinite was Na greater than Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than K. The constant partition-type adsorption isotherms obtained when the clay concentration was maintained constant and the virus concentration was varied indicated that a fixed proportion of the

  11. Clays as mineral dust aerosol: An integrated approach to studying climate, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemical effects of atmospheric clay minerals in an undergraduate research laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, C. D.; Crane, C. C.; Harris, K. J.; Thompson, C. E.; Miles, M. K.; Weingold, R. M.; Bucuti, T.

    2011-12-01

    Entrained mineral dust aerosol accounts for 45% of the global annual atmospheric aerosol load and can have a significant influence on important environmental issues, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, cloud formation, biogeochemical processes, visibility, and human health. 70% of all mineral aerosol mass originating from Africa consists of layered aluminosilicates, including illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite clays. Clay minerals are a largely neglected component of mineral aerosol, yet they have unique physiochemical properties, including a high reactive surface area, large cation exchange capacities, small particle sizes, and a relatively large capacity to take up adsorbed water, resulting in expansion of clay layers (and a larger reactive surface area for heterogeneous interactions) in some cases. An integrated laboratory research approach has been implemented at Hendrix College, a Primarily Undergraduate Institution, in which undergraduate students are involved in independent and interdisciplinary research projects that relate the chemical aging processes (heterogeneous chemistry) of clay minerals as a major component of mineral aerosol to their effects on climate (water adsorption), atmospheric chemistry (trace gas uptake), and biogeochemistry (iron dissolution and phytoplankton biomarker studies). Preliminary results and future directions will be reported.

  12. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  13. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  15. Study of Adsorption and Flocculation Properties of Natural Clays to Remove Prorocentrum lima.

    PubMed

    Louzao, Maria Carmen; Abal, Paula; Fernández, Diego A; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Legido, José Luis; Gómez, Carmen P; Pais, Jesus; Botana, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    High accumulations of phytoplankton species that produce toxins are referred to as harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs represent one of the most important sources of contamination in marine environments, as well as a serious threat to public health, fisheries, aquaculture-based industries, and tourism. Therefore, methods effectively controlling HABs with minimal impact on marine ecology are required. Marine dinoflagellates of the genera Dinophysis and Prorocentrum are representative producers of okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins responsible for the diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) which is a human intoxication caused by the consumption of shellfish that bioaccumulate those toxins. In this work we explore the use of natural clay for removing Prorocentrum lima. We evaluate the adsorption properties of clays in seawater containing the dinoflagellates. The experimental results confirmed the cell removal through the flocculation of algal and mineral particles leading to the formation of aggregates, which rapidly settle and further entrain cells during their descent. Moreover, the microscopy images of the samples enable one to observe the clays in aggregates of two or more cells where the mineral particles were bound to the outer membranes of the dinoflagellates. Therefore, this preliminary data offers promising results to use these clays for the mitigation of HABs. PMID:26426051

  16. Study of Adsorption and Flocculation Properties of Natural Clays to Remove Prorocentrum lima

    PubMed Central

    Louzao, Maria Carmen; Abal, Paula; Fernández, Diego A.; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Legido, José Luis; Gómez, Carmen P.; Pais, Jesus; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    High accumulations of phytoplankton species that produce toxins are referred to as harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs represent one of the most important sources of contamination in marine environments, as well as a serious threat to public health, fisheries, aquaculture-based industries, and tourism. Therefore, methods effectively controlling HABs with minimal impact on marine ecology are required. Marine dinoflagellates of the genera Dinophysis and Prorocentrum are representative producers of okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins responsible for the diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) which is a human intoxication caused by the consumption of shellfish that bioaccumulate those toxins. In this work we explore the use of natural clay for removing Prorocentrum lima. We evaluate the adsorption properties of clays in seawater containing the dinoflagellates. The experimental results confirmed the cell removal through the flocculation of algal and mineral particles leading to the formation of aggregates, which rapidly settle and further entrain cells during their descent. Moreover, the microscopy images of the samples enable one to observe the clays in aggregates of two or more cells where the mineral particles were bound to the outer membranes of the dinoflagellates. Therefore, this preliminary data offers promising results to use these clays for the mitigation of HABs. PMID:26426051

  17. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  18. Study of Adsorption and Flocculation Properties of Natural Clays to Remove Prorocentrum lima.

    PubMed

    Louzao, Maria Carmen; Abal, Paula; Fernández, Diego A; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Legido, José Luis; Gómez, Carmen P; Pais, Jesus; Botana, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    High accumulations of phytoplankton species that produce toxins are referred to as harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs represent one of the most important sources of contamination in marine environments, as well as a serious threat to public health, fisheries, aquaculture-based industries, and tourism. Therefore, methods effectively controlling HABs with minimal impact on marine ecology are required. Marine dinoflagellates of the genera Dinophysis and Prorocentrum are representative producers of okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins responsible for the diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) which is a human intoxication caused by the consumption of shellfish that bioaccumulate those toxins. In this work we explore the use of natural clay for removing Prorocentrum lima. We evaluate the adsorption properties of clays in seawater containing the dinoflagellates. The experimental results confirmed the cell removal through the flocculation of algal and mineral particles leading to the formation of aggregates, which rapidly settle and further entrain cells during their descent. Moreover, the microscopy images of the samples enable one to observe the clays in aggregates of two or more cells where the mineral particles were bound to the outer membranes of the dinoflagellates. Therefore, this preliminary data offers promising results to use these clays for the mitigation of HABs.

  19. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    PubMed

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  20. Dual-wavelength moisture meter for clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgia, Michele; Pesatori, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    An optical sensor for measuring the moisture level of clay has been realized by a couple of telecommunications lasers at 1300 and 1550 nm. The sensor can operate directly during building material production. The measurement principle is based on the measurement of the optical reflection at different wavelengths in the infrared region. Custom low-noise electronics allows rejecting disturbances of ambient light, and a digital processing makes the system independent on the clay distance. By means of a proper calibration, the sensor can monitor the moisture level during brick production, without moving parts or optical filters.

  1. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  2. Numerical Modelling of Embankment on Soft Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nujid, M. M.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to predict deformation of embankment on soft clay of Muar. The prediction performance focusing on displacement at critical fill height of 5.5 m. The study was based on reported result in 1992. With the aid of computer intelligence, the advanced constitutive soil models could be adopted to analyze the soft clay behavior. The COMSOL Multiphysics (v4.4) has been used to simulate the problem with coupled physics available in the software. The vertical displacements are in good agreement close to published result.

  3. Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have exhibited superior strength and thermo- oxidative properties as compared to pure polymers for use in air and space craft; however, there has often been difficulty completely dispersing the clay within the matrices of the polymer. In order to improve this process, the cation exchange capacity of lithium clay is first lowered using twenty-four hour heat treatments of no heat, 130 C, 150 C, or 170 C to fixate the lithium ions within the clay layers so that they are unexchangeable. Generally, higher temperatures have generated lower cation exchange capacities. An ion exchange involving dodecylamine, octadecylamine, or dimethyl benzidine (DMBZ) is then employed to actually expand the clay galleries. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy can be used to determine whether the clay has been successfully exfoliated. Finally, resins of DMBZ with clay are then pressed into disks for characterization using dynamic mechanical analyzer and oven- aging techniques in order to evaluate their glass transition, modulus strength, and thermal-oxidative stability in comparison to neat DMBZ. In the future, they may also be tested as composites for flexural and laminar shear strength.

  4. Strong orientational coordinates and orientational order parameters for symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in the synthesis of anisotropic macromolecules and nanoparticles have spurred an immense interest in theoretical and computational studies of self-assembly. The cornerstone of such studies is the role of shape in self-assembly and in inducing complex order. The problem of identifying different types of order that can emerge in such systems can, however, be challenging. Here, we revisit the problem of quantifying orientational order in systems of building blocks with non-trivial rotational symmetries. We first propose a systematic way of constructing orientational coordinates for such symmetric building blocks. We call the arising tensorial coordinates strong orientational coordinates (SOCs) as they fully and exclusively specify the orientation of a symmetric object. We then use SOCs to describe and quantify local and global orientational order, and spatiotemporal orientational correlations in systems of symmetric building blocks. The SOCs and the orientational order parameters developed in this work are not only useful in performing and analyzing computer simulations of symmetric molecules or particles, but can also be utilized for the efficient storage of rotational information in long trajectories of evolving many-body systems.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a PbO{sub 2}-clay nanocomposite: Removal of lead from water using montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Aroui, L.; Zerroual, L.; Boutahala, M.

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The replacement of Na by Pb in the interlayer space of the smectite leads to a decrease in the intensity of the the (0 0 1) reflection as the concentration of lead nitrate increases. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading probably to the exfoliation of the caly. In addition, the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities is significantly influenced. This leads to a lowering of the water content and a decrease in the ionic conductivity of the clay. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the clay, Pb replaces Na ions and a significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the clay with regard to its dehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the interlayer space, the exchange of Na by Pb leads to a decrease in the protonic conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A PbO{sub 2}-clay nanocomposite material with good conductivity is synthesized. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained with Pb(II) sorption on an Algerian Clay. The experiments were carried out using a batch process. Powder X-rays diffraction patterns (PXRD) prove that in the montmorillonite Pb replaces Na ions. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading to the disappearance of the d{sub 001} reflection of the clay at high concentrations of lead. The replacement of hydrated Na with Pb ions influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities with a lowering of the water content. A PbO{sub 2}-clay composite material with good electrical conductivity is synthesized.

  6. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 {Angstrom} to 8.0 {Angstrom} after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 {Angstrom} to 8.4 {Angstrom}.

  7. Orienting hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed.

  8. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  9. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  10. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  11. Zachariah's "Plants" and "Clay": A Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulat, Y. G.-M.

    1985-01-01

    Criticizes Zachariah's use of microlevel metaphors ("lumps of clay" and "growing plants") to explain major trends in theories of education and national development in developing countries. Discusses emergence of a neo-Marxist perspective on this area of comparative education. Suggests the need for a theoretical perspective incorporating elements…

  12. Palaeoceanographic approach to the Kimmeridge Clay Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G. )

    1988-08-01

    The Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) is northern Europe's premier source rock and can be understood using a new but relatively simple oceanographic model. This explains or accommodates most current observations about the KCF and its depositional environment and draws upon paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, geochemical, sedimentological, and paleontological evidence.

  13. Diffusion in Clay Layers and Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a collaborative SERDP-funded study, researchers from the Air Force Institute of Technology, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Michigan developed a numerical model that simulates the enhanced transport of CAHs into and out of low permeability clay ...

  14. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  15. Intermolecular dimerization with pillared layered clay templates.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G. P.; Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Seifert, S.; Chemistry

    2001-11-19

    Solutions of pyrene in the presence of a pillared, layered montmorillonite clay produce hybrid organic-inorganic materials with substantial molecular loading in the gallery regions between the clay layers. The results are in sharp contrast to other aromatics, such as benzene, naphthalene, or perylene, which show minimal incorporation of the molecules into the gallery regions of the clay. We present evidence that the unusual affinity for pyrene to form intermolecular dimers is the reason for the high loading. Pyrene monomers are easily introduced to the layers. Through steric hindrance, subsequent intermolecular dimer formation is allowed, and they are captured by the pillared, layered structure. CW and time-resolved emission spectra strongly indicate the presence of face-to-face intermolecular dimers (excimers) within the clay galleries. The combination of the ease of high molecular loading into an inorganic, high aspect ratio template and the collective optical properties of the organic layer may be useful as a new means to create hybrid structures.

  16. Clay Corner: Recreating Chinese Bronze Vessels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson where students make faux Chinese bronze vessels through slab or coil clay construction after they learn about the history, function, and design of these vessels. Utilizes a variety of glaze finishes in order to give the vessels an aged look. Gives detailed guidelines for creating the vessels. (CMK)

  17. Metal removal by thermally activated clay marl.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, R Y

    2001-01-01

    A sorption active product has been obtained from Bulgarian clay marl by thermal activation at 750 degrees C. The modified aluminosilicate material is characterized, as well as its use for the removal of metal ions. The effect of the initial metal ion concentration, the contact time, pH, the solution temperature and the ionic strength on the uptake of lead, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solutions were studied in batch experiments. The kinetics of removal of metal ions on modified clay marl appears dependent on the sorbate/sorbent ratio. At low cation concentrations sorption follows a Langmuir isotherm, while at higher sorbate/sorbent ratios the sorption isotherms of metal ions are described by Freundlich's equation. At the pH region of the sorption edge the removal of metal ions by surface complexation and surface precipitation mechanisms is indistinguishable. It is observed that the influence of temperature on the uptake ability of the clay marl is most considerable up to 40 degrees C. These studies show that the thermally modified clay marl can be successfully used for removal of metal ions from water solutions in a wide range of concentrations.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW ON SEVENTH FLOOR AT CORNER OF CLAY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW ON SEVENTH FLOOR AT CORNER OF CLAY AND 15TH STREETS. LARGE SECTIONS OF DEMOLISHED SHEET METAL CORNICE FROM BUILDING EXTERIOR VISIBLE FOREGROUND - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. INTERIOR VIEW ON MEZZANINE ALONG EAST (CLAY STREET) FRONT FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW ON MEZZANINE ALONG EAST (CLAY STREET) FRONT FACING OAKLAND CITY HALL. TYPICAL INTERIOR CONDITIONS OF PARTIAL DEMOLITION; WINDOWS, WINDOW FRAMES, SUSPENDED CEILING, AND MOVABLE PARTITION WALLS REMOVED - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. MSL at Gale Crater: What do the clays tell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, F.; Carter, J.; Bibring, J.; Murchie, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    One of the key reasons of the selection of Gale crater as the MSL landing site is the presence of clay minerals in several thin beds of its lower member (Milliken et al. 2010). The presence of sulfate-bearing beds below and above the clay-bearings beds however makes the origin of clay minerals at Gale ambiguous. Previous and ongoing analyses of CRISM and OMEGA show that the Martian clay minerals have very diverse compositions and geological settings. We will present new evidences of clay mineral formation cycles during early Mars, which have similarities with the present Earth clay cycles. We will thus connect the aqueous-related characteristics of Gale to the Martian global clay cycle in order to better constrain the formation processes of clays at Gale and to relate the future MSL observations to planetary scale processes relevant to past habitability.

  1. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  2. The impact of long-term irrigation on the degree of aggregation and the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction in dark chestnut soils of the Transvolga region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Baranovskaya, V. A.; Khitrov, N. B.

    2011-08-01

    Dark chestnut soils of the Ershov Experimental Station in the Transvolga region are characterized by the even distribution and aggregation of clay minerals in the profile. Hydromica, chlorite, kaolinite, and smectitic minerals predominate in the clay (<1 μm) fraction. The smectitic phase consists of randomly ordered mixed-layered minerals of the following types: mica-smectite with a low (<50%) content of smectite layers, mica-smectite with a high (>50%) content of smectite layers, and chlorite-smectite. In some horizons, the smectitic phase occurs in the superdispersed state. The long-term irrigation of these soils with fresh water of the Volga River has led to certain changes in the composition and properties of the clay particles. The weakening of bonds between them has taken place. As a result, the content of water-peptizable clay has increased by two times, and the content of aggregated clay of the first category (AC1) has increased by 1.5 times at the expense of a decrease in the contents of tightly bound clay (TBC) and aggregated clay of the second category (AC2). Also, the redistribution of organic matter bound with clay particles has taken place: its content in the AC1 fraction has decreased, whereas its content in the AC2 and TBC fractions has increased. In the topsoil horizon, the amount of the smectitic phase has lowered, whereas the contents of hydromica, kaolinite, and fine-dispersed quartz in the clay fraction have increased. In general, some amorphization of the clay material has occurred. The periodic alkalization of the soil solutions upon irrigation has led to the conversion of the smectitic phase into the superdispersed state in the entire soil profile.

  3. Aqueous suspensions of natural swelling clay minerals. 1. Structure and electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Paineau, Erwan; Bihannic, Isabelle; Baravian, Christophe; Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Davidson, Patrick; Levitz, Pierre; Funari, Sérgio S; Rochas, Cyrille; Michot, Laurent J

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we present a general overview of the organization of colloidal charged clay particles in aqueous suspension by studying different natural samples with different structural charges and charge locations. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments (SAXS) are first used to derive swelling laws that demonstrate the almost perfect exfoliation of clay sheets in suspension. Using a simple approach based on geometrical constraints, we show that these swelling laws can be fully modeled on the basis of morphological parameters only. The validity of this approach was further extended to other clay data from the literature, in particular, synthetic Laponite. For all of the investigated samples, experimental osmotic pressures can be properly described by a Poisson-Boltzmann approach for ionic strength up to 10(-3) M, which reveals that these systems are dominated by repulsive electrostatic interactions. However, a detailed analysis of the Poisson-Boltzmann treatment shows differences in the repulsive potential strength that are not directly linked to the structural charge of the minerals but rather to the charge location in the structure for tetrahedrally charged clays (beidellite and nontronites) undergoing stronger electrostatic repulsions than octahedrally charged samples (montmorillonites, laponite). Only minerals subjected to the strongest electrostatic repulsions present a true isotropic to nematic phase transition in their phase diagrams. The influence of ionic repulsions on the local order of clay platelets was then analyzed through a detailed investigation of the structure factors of the various clay samples. It appears that stronger electrostatic repulsions improve the liquidlike positional local order. PMID:21476528

  4. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  5. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  6. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Michael C; van Duin, Adri C T

    2012-02-15

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300-647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)(2)·nH(2)O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  7. Mineralogical variables that control the antibacterial effectiveness of a natural clay deposit.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Keith D; Underwood, Jennifer C; Metge, David W; Eberl, Dennis D; Williams, Lynda B

    2014-08-01

    As antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains emerge and pose increased global health risks, new antibacterial agents are needed as alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. Naturally occurring antibacterial clays have been identified which are effective in killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study examines a hydrothermally formed antibacterial clay deposit near Crater Lake, OR (USA). Our hypothesis is that antibacterial clays buffer pH and Eh conditions to dissolve unstable mineral phases containing transition metals (primarily Fe(2+)), while smectite interlayers serve as reservoirs for time release of bactericidal components. Model pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 14990) were incubated with clays from different alteration zones of the hydrothermal deposit. In vitro antibacterial susceptibility testing showed that reduced mineral zones were bactericidal, while more oxidized zones had variable antibacterial effect. TEM images showed no indication of cell lysis. Cytoplasmic condensation and cell wall accumulations of <100 nm particles were seen within both bacterial populations. Electron energy loss analysis indicates precipitation of intracellular Fe(3+)-oxide nanoparticles (<10 nm) in E. coli after 24 h. Clay minerals and pyrite buffer aqueous solutions to pH 2.5-3.1, Eh > 630 mV and contain elevated level (mM) of soluble Fe (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)) and Al(3+). Our interpretation is that rapid uptake of Fe(2+) impairs bacterial metabolism by flooding the cell with excess Fe(2+) and overwhelming iron storage proteins. As the intracellular Fe(2+) oxidizes, it produces reactive oxygen species that damage biomolecules and precipitates Fe-oxides. The ability of antibacterial clays to buffer pH and Eh in chronic non-healing wounds to conditions of healthy skin appears key to their healing potential and viability as an alternative to conventional antibiotics.

  8. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study of mineral-organic matter associations in pasture soil clay fractions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-06-17

    There is a growing acceptance that associations with soil minerals may be the most important overarching stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. However, direct investigation of organo-mineral associations has been hampered by a lack of methods that can simultaneously characterize organic matter (OM) and soil minerals. In this study, STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at the C 1s, Ca 2p, Fe 2p, Al 1s, and Si 1s edges was used to investigate C associations with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si species in soil clay fractions from an upland pasture hillslope. Bulk techniques including C and N NEXAFS, Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, and XRD were applied to provide additional information. Results demonstrated that C was associated with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si with no separate phase in soil clay particles. In soil clay particles, the pervasive C forms were aromatic C, carboxyl C, and polysaccharides with the relative abundance of carboxyl C and polysaccharides varying spatially at the submicrometer scale. Only limited regions in the soil clay particles had aliphatic C. Good C-Ca spatial correlations were found for soil clay particles with no CaCO3, suggesting a strong role of Ca in organo-mineral assemblage formation. Fe EXAFS showed that about 50% of the total Fe in soils was contained in Fe oxides, whereas Fe-bearing aluminosilicates (vermiculite and Illite) accounted for another 50%. Fe oxides in the soil were mainly crystalline goethite and hematite, with lesser amounts of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite. XRD revealed that soil clay aluminosilicates were hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, Illite, and kaolinite. C showed similar correlation with Fe to Al and Si, implying a similar association of Fe oxides and aluminosilicates with organic matter in organo-mineral associations. These direct microscopic determinations can help improve understanding of organo-mineral interactions in soils.

  9. Clays and clay minerals in Bikaner: Sources, environment pollution and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayatri, Sharma; Anu, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollution can also be caused by minerals which include natural as well as human activities. Rapid urbanization, consumerist life style, anthropogenic deeds are increasing environmental pollution day by day. Fluctuation in our ecosystem or polluted environment leads to many diseases and shows adverse effects on living organisms. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the environmental pollution from clays and clay minerals and their mitigation..

  10. Nematic textures in colloidal dispersions of Na-fluorohectorite synthetic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringdal, N. I.; Fonseca, D. M.; Hansen, E. L.; Hemmen, H.; Fossum, J. O.

    2010-04-01

    We have studied stable strata of gravity-induced phase separation in suspensions of synthetic Na-fluorohectorite clay in saline solutions. We have observed how the strata depend on clay concentration as well as on salt content. The mass distribution and density variation at the isotropic-nematic interface indicate that existing models and assumptions in existing simulations are able to relatively well account for the observed behavior. We suggest that discrepancies could be due to the high polydispersity and the irregular shape of our Na-fluorohectorite particles, as well as diffusive double-layer effects, which could result in a competition between nematic ordering and gelation. The dependence on ionic strength displays three main regimes irrespective of clay concentration. At low ionic strength ( ≈0.1-5mM NaCl), the Debye screening length is longer than the van der Waals force range. In this regime, the particles repel each other electrostatically and entropy-driven Onsager-type nematic ordering may occur, although gelation effects could also play a role. For ionic strengths above about 5 mM, we believe that the van der Waals force comes into play and that particles attract each other locally according to the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) model of colloid interactions, resulting in a small-domain regime of attractive nematiclike ordering. In the third regime, for ionic strengths above ≈10mM , the clay particles aggregate into larger assemblies, due to the dominant van der Waals force, and the observed birefringency is reduced. We have studied the nematic phase in detail between crossed polarizers and have found textures showing nematic Schlieren patterns. By rotating the polarizers as well as the samples, we have observed examples of disclinations of strengths -1 , -1/2 , and +1 .

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigations on the structures of purified clay and acid-activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Li, Junfen; Yang, Liming

    2006-07-01

    The purified and acidified montmorillonite clay were characterized by XRD, BET and TPD. These results show that acidified clay is provided with more surface area and acid sites. For NH 3-TPD, molecular NH 3 desorption on purified clay and acidified clay occurs at temperatures with 873 and 1000 K, respectively. It is shown for the existence for strong acid sites. By two reactions of the tetrahydropyranylation of n-propanol and the esterification of cyclo-2-pentene with acetic acid, it is shown that the acidified clay displays better catalytic activity for above two organic reactions. By density-functional theory (DFT) method, we have analyzed the structures of different substituted montmorillonite and the effect sorption behavior of Na + in different montmorillonite models. The result shows that the process of substitution will occur apart from octahedral aluminums. The adsorption of NH 3 on clay surfaces have been investigated using TPD and DFT. This is shown that acid sites locate at round the octahedral aluminums, and substitution of Al 3+ for tetrahedral Si will be favorable to NH 3 adsorption.

  12. FACING NORTH ALONG CLAY STREET, SHOWING BUILDINGS ON THE WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING NORTH ALONG CLAY STREET, SHOWING BUILDINGS ON THE WEST SIDE OF CLAY STREET, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: JOHN BREUNER AND COMPANY BUILDING (FOREGROUND), HOTEL TOURAINE (MIDDLE), AND THE PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. BUILDING - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Clay Menagerie: An Interview with Patricia Uchill Simons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with artist Patricia Uchill Simons, focusing on her history as a clay artist, why she uses clay, when she started making her menagerie of animals, her process for creating her artwork, her teaching experience, and why she believes clay is a good medium for students. (CMK)

  14. The location and extent of exfoliation of clay on the fracture mechanisms in nylon 66-based ternary nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yang, Mingshu

    2008-04-01

    The primary focus of this work is to elucidate the location and extent of exfoliation of clay on fracture (under both static and dynamic loading conditions) of melt-compounded nylon 66/clay/SEBS-g-MA ternary nanocomposites fabricated by different blending sequences. Distinct microstructures are obtained depending on the blending protocol employed. The state of exfoliation and dispersion of clay in nylon 66 matrix and SEBS-g-MA phase are quantified and the presence of clay in rubber is shown to have a negative effect on the toughness of the nanocomposites. The level of toughness enhancement of ternary nanocomposites depends on the blending protocol and the capability of different fillers to activate the plastic deformation mechanisms in the matrix. These mechanisms include: cavitation of SEBS-g-MA phase, stretching of voided matrix material, interfacial debonding of SEBS-g-MA particles, debonding of intercalated clay embedded inside the SEBS-g-MA phase, and delamination of intercalated clay platelets. Based on these results, new insights and approaches for the processing of better toughened polymer ternary nanocomposites are discussed. PMID:18572592

  15. Molecular Modeling of the Binding Structures in the Interlayer Adsorption of a Tetracycline Antibiotic by Smectite Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristilde, L.

    2009-12-01

    A controlling factor in the fate of antibiotics in the environment is their sequestration in soil particles including clay minerals. Of special interest is the interlayer adsorption by smectite clays, which has been shown to influence both the bioavailability and persistence of antibiotics in the soil environment. However, the interlayer structures of the bound antibiotics, essential to an accurate understanding of the adsorption mechanisms, are not well understood. Molecular simulations of oxytetracycline (OTC) with a model montmorillonite (MONT) clay were performed to gain insights into these structures for tetracycline antibiotics. Monte Carlo simulations were used for explorations of the clay layer spacing required for the adsorption of the antibiotic under different hydration states of the clay interlayer; these preliminary results were validated with previous X-ray diffraction patterns obtained following sorption experiments of OTC with MONT. Molecular dynamics relaxation simulations were performed subsequently in order to obtain geometry-optimized structures of the binding conformations of the intercalated antibiotic in the model MONT layers. This study contributes to a mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling the interlayer adsorption of the tetracycline antibiotics by the expandable smectite clay minerals. Figure 1. Optimized Monte Carlo simulation cell of OTC in the interlayer of MONT: perspective side view (top) and bottom view (bottom).

  16. [Effect of treatments of hydrogen peroxide and sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate on clay minerals of red earth sediments].

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Biao; Hong, Han-Lie; Yin, Ke; Wang, Chao-Wen; Gao, Wen-Peng; Han, Wen; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2013-04-01

    As classical procedures for pretreatment of soil sediments, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) treatment methods are very important in removing the organic matter and iron oxides acting as cementing agents in the soils. However, both of these methods have less been focused on the effect on the clay minerals when separating. Here, we report the comparable methods between H2O2 and DCB to reveal their effect on clay minerals in red earth sediments using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD results suggested that mineral particles can be totally decentralized by either H2O2 or DCB method in the soils and high purity clay minerals can be obtained by separating quartz and other impurities from clay minerals effectively. However, the XRD data were distorted by the DCB treatment owning to the cation exchange between Na+ and interlayer cation. On the contrary, the authentic data can be obtained by H2O2 treatment. Therefore, the H2O2 treatment seems to be a more appropriate method to obtain authentic information of clay mineralogy when separating of clay minerals from red earth sediments.

  17. Acidic and Hydrophobic Microporous Clays Pillared with Mixed Metal Oxide Nano-Sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang-Su; Yamanaka, Shoji; Choy, Jin-Ho

    1999-04-01

    Silica-metal oxide sol pillared clays have been synthesized from montmorillonite by exchanging interlamellar (Na+) ions with silica sol particles modified with polyhydroxy metal cations. Though the silica sol particle itself is negatively charged in the pH range used in present experiment, 1.5-2.7, the ion-exchange-type intercalation of the silica sol into montmorillonite was realized by modifying the surface charge of the sol particles from negative to positive. The positively charged silica sol particles were prepared by titrating metal aqueous solutions (Mz+=Fe3+, Al3+, Cr3+, and Zr4+) with NaOH in the presence of silica sol particles, which were easily intercalated inbetween the silicate layers of clay. On pillaring of oxide sols and subsequent calcining at 400°C, new porous materials were obtained with high BET surface areas of 320-720 m2/g, pore volumes of 0.24-0.50 ml/g, and basal spacings in the range 40-60 Å. Furthermore, their thermal stability could be remarkably improved up to 700°C. According to the adsorption measurements of nitrogen and solvent vapors, the micropores in the samples of size 9-13 Å dominate due to the multilayer stacking of interlayer sol particles inbetween silicate layers. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectra of ammonia revealed that the microporous samples are weakly acidic, but with different strengths, depending on the doped metal species.

  18. Phage f2 desorption from clay in estuarine water using nonionic detergents, beef extract, and chaotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Armon, R; Cabelli, V J

    1988-08-01

    Experimentally adsorbed bacteriophage f2 was eluted from clay particles in estuarine water using 1% Tween, 80.3% beef extract, and 0.3 M NaNO3 with 54% recovery. Replacing sodium nitrate with tetrasodium pyrophosphate (0.4 M) increased the recovery to 81%. Estuarine sediments treated with 1% Tween 80 revealed significantly higher male-specific phage elutions.

  19. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  20. The origin and early genesis of clay bands in youthful sandy soils along lake Michigan, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A beach ridge and dune complex with good radiocarbon control sampling the last 3500 radiocarbon years B.P. provides new insights on the early genesis of clay bands in sandy soils. Soil profiles were sampled by age groups, described in the field, and then subjected to laboratory analyses for particle-size distribution, pH, organic carbon, carbonate minerals, and extractable iron and manganese. This study suggests that small increases in pH, brought about by small increases in carbonate content within the soil profile, are responsible for flocculating small amounts of illuviated clay. This process, along with a transition to a greater hydraulic conductivity with soil depth due to coarser textures in any given profile, partly explains the existence and possible reason for the initiation of illuvial zones and eventually for clay-band horizons. A pronounced increase in the thickness of incipient clay-band horizons in soils older than 2300 years appears due to finer textures in the parent materials than are present in younger soils. Because of slightly reduced porosity and lower permeability, carbonates and a high pH are retained in both illuvial and eluvial horizons of some of these older soils. In addition, only in those profiles older than 2300 years do clay and iron oxide concentrations coincide and is there some suggestion of greater amounts of extractable manganese in horizons of minimum iron and clay. A pronounced segregation of clay-iron bands is not apparent at the study area but should occur in future years as additional amounts of iron and clay are deposited. ?? 1984.

  1. Interfacial reactions between humic-like substances and lateritic clay: application to the preparation of "geomimetic" materials.

    PubMed

    Goure-Doubi, Herve; Martias, Céline; Lecomte-Nana, Gisèle Laure; Nait-Ali, Benoît; Smith, Agnès; Thune, Elsa; Villandier, Nicolas; Gloaguen, Vincent; Soubrand, Marilyne; Konan, Léon koffi

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the strengthening of "geomimetic" materials, especially the chemical bonding between clay and humic substances. The mineral matter is lateritic clay which mainly consists in kaolinite, goethite, hematite and quartz. The other starting products are fulvic acid (FA) and lime. The preparation of these geomimetic materials is inspired from the natural stabilization of soils by humic substances occurring over thousands of years. The present process involves acidic and alkaline reactions followed by a curing period of 18days at 60°C under a water saturated atmosphere. The acceleration of the strengthening process usually observed in soils makes this an original process for treatment of soils. The consolidation of the "geomimetic" materials could result from two major phenomena: (i) chemical bonding at the interface between the clay particles and iron compounds and the functional groups of the fulvic acid, (ii) a partial dissolution of the clay grains followed by the precipitation of the cementitious phases, namely calcium silicate hydrates, calcium aluminate hydrates and mixed calcium silicum and aluminum hydrates. Indeed, the decrease of the BET specific area of the lateritic clay after 24 h of reaction with FA added to the structural reorganization observed between 900 and 1000°C in the "geomimetic" material, and to the results of adsorption measurements, confirm the formation of organo-ferric complexes. The presence of iron oxides in clay, in the form of goethite, appears to be another parameter in favor of a ligand exchange process and the creation of binding bridges between FA and the mineral matter. Indeed all faces of goethite are likely to be involved in complexation reactions whereas in lateritic clay only lateral faces could be involved. The results of the adsorption experiments realized at a local scale will improve our understandings about the process of adsorption of FA on lateritic

  2. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  3. Chemical disaggregation of kaolinitic claystones (tonsteins and flint clays)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triplehorn, D.M.; Bohor, B.F.; Betterton, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The coarse, non-clay fraction of many flint-like kaolinitic claystones often contains mineral grains diagnostic of the claystone's origin and, in the case of tonsteins (altered volcanic ashes), may also provide minerals suitable for radiometric dating. Separation of the non-clay mineral fraction is often difficult because flint clays and flint-like clays resist slaking in water and thus are difficult to disaggregate. Chemical disaggregation of resistant kaolinitic claystones may be achieved by immersion in either hydrazine monohydrate or DMSO for periods ranging from one day to several weeks. Generally, hydrazine monohydrate works more quickly and efficiently than DMSO to disaggregate most kaolinitic claystones and flint clays.

  4. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  5. Formation of polygonal fault systems as a result of hydrodynamical instabilities in clay-rich deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Teodolina; Antoine, Raphael; Rabinowicz, Michel; Baratoux, David; Darrozes, José; Kurita, Kei; D'Uston, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    Fine grained deposits as chalks and clays are characterised by the development of polygonal fault systems [1]. For the clay-rich deposits, two different environments are associated with their formation. First, on continents, dewatering leads to the development of polygonal desiccation cracks which have a centimetric to metric size [2]. Polygonal faults are also observed in sub-marine sedimentary deposits and here, can reach hectometric to kilometric size [3]. Since the giant polygons develop on basins with no clear evidences of tectonic stresses, the fracturing is attributed to stresses due to horizontal density variations generated during the basin subsidence. Several models have been proposed to explain the formation of the giant polygons and the two main hypotheses are the syneresis (spontaneous horizontal contraction) proposed by [4] and the low coefficient of friction of clay proposed by [5]. However, new understandings in the clay rheology and in the hydrodynamical instabilities, controlling the development of compaction in unconsolidated and consolidated clay deposits, permit us to propose an alternative hypothesis. We consider that the development of giant polygons results from the superposition of hydrodynamical instabilities leading to the formation of (i) mm-size agglomerates of clay particles while the deposit is unconsolidated [6], followed after by the consolidation of this layer, then (ii) hectometric to kilometric compaction spheres develop [7] and (iii) finally ends with the occurrence of hydrothermal and plastic convections. We show that the crucial conditions for the development of hectometric to kilometric size polygonal fault systems are: 1) the high permeability of the clay-rich deposit composed of mm-size agglomerates and 2) the dramatic increase of the strength of the clay as the deposit consolidates. [1] Dewhurst et al., (1999), Mar. Petr. Geol., 16 (8), 793-810. [2] Weinberger (1999), J. Struct. Geol., 21, 379-386. [3] Andresen and Huuse

  6. Influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Nagan; Latha, Srinivasan; Sudha, Persu N; Renganathan, N Gopalan

    2013-02-01

    The influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan from simulated industrial wastewater is evaluated. Chitosan-clay blend with ratio of (1:1), (1:2), and (2:1) have been prepared, and these were used as membranes to remove copper and cadmium ions from synthetic industrial wastewater. The chemical parameters for quantities of adsorption of heavy metal contamination have been done, and the kinetics of adsorption has also been carried out. Clay provides enough absorbable sites to overcome mass transfer limitations. The number of absorbable sites for cadmium is more compared to copper, and thus the rate of recovery of cadmium is faster than copper, and the percentage removal of cadmium is more than copper at all times on clay over nylon 6. This difference indicates the influence of clay in the adsorption of heavy metals in comparison to synthetic polymer nylon 6. Rate constant for first-order kinetics of adsorption, k (1), for copper and cadmium is less than that of clay, which clearly indicates that clay, which is a natural polymer, is more kinetically favored compared to synthetic polymer. The difference in the intraparticle diffusion in both the natural and synthetic polymer is not much, and it suggests that the particle diffusion mechanism is the same in both cases. Copper and cadmium recovery is parallel at all times. The percentage of removal of copper increased with an increase in pH from 3 to 5. In the case of cadmium containing wastewater, the maximum removal of metal occurred at pH 5. The uptake amount of Cu(2+) ions on chitosan increased rapidly with increasing the contact time from 0 to 360 min and then reaches equilibrium after 360 min, and the equilibrium constant for copper and cadmium ions are more or less the same for the adsorption reaction. There are more adsorption sites for cadmium in the presence of clay and mass transfer limitation is avoided without resorting to rotation, which is the highlight of the

  7. Advanced clay nanocomposites based on in situ photopolymerization utilizing novel polymerizable organoclays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon Ki

    Polymer nanocomposite technology has had significant impact on material design. With the environmental advantages of photopolymerization, a research has recently focused on producing nanocomposites utilizing inexpensive clay particles based on in situ photopolymerization. In this research, novel polymerizable organoclays and thiol-ene photopolymerization have been utilized to develop advanced photopolymer clay nanocomposites and to overcome several limitations in conventional free radical photopolymers. To this end, factors important in nanocomposite processes such as monomer composition, clay dispersion, and photopolymerization behavior in combination with the evolution of ultimate nanocomposite properties have been investigated. For monomer-organoclay compositions, higher chemical compatibility of components induces enhanced clay exfoliation, resulting in photopolymerization rate increases due to an amplified clay template effect. Additionally, by affecting the stoichiometric ratio between thiol and acrylate double bond in the clay gallery, thiolated organoclays enhance thiol-ene copolymerization with increased final thiol conversion while acrylated organoclays encourage acrylate homopolymerization. In accordance with the reaction behavior, incorporation of thiolated organoclays makes polymer chains more flexible with decreased glass transition temperature due to higher formation of thio-ether linkages while adding acrylated organoclays significantly increases the modulus. Photopolymer nanocomposites also help overcome two major drawbacks in conventional free radical photopolymerization, namely severe polymerization shrinkage and oxygen inhibition during polymerization. With addition of a low level of thiol monomers, the oxygen inhibition in various acrylate systems can be overcome by addition of only 5wt% thiolated organoclay. The same amount of polymerizable organoclay also induces up to 90% decreases in the shrinkage stress for acrylate or thiol

  8. Characteristics and potential applications of coarse clay fractions from Puolanka, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiviskä, Tiina; Gehör, Seppo; Eijärvi, Erkki; Sarpola, Arja; Tanskanen, Juha

    2012-06-01

    Characterization of coarse fractions of kaolin clay from two locations in Puolanka (Pihlajavaara and Poskimäki) was performed in order to find potential applications for these materials in water and wastewater treatment as low-cost adsorbents or as a raw material for other uses. The effects of wet and dry fractionation methods and the annealing of the sample on the properties of the coarse fractions were studied. The coarse fractions contained mainly quartz, while the kaolinite content was considered low. The Poskimäki (PM) clay had a higher specific surface area (SSA) and cation exchange capacities (CEC) than the Pihlajavaara (PV) clay due to a higher amount of iron. Annealing (800°C) decreased the SSA and CEC. The fractionation method had only a minor effect on particle size distribution. PV and PM colloidal suspensions had a negative zeta potential at natural pH values. Very small amounts of contained elements (Al, Si, Ca, Mg, K, Cd, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ba) were dissolved from samples at natural pH values. PM clay could be utilized in water treatment for example as a raw material in iron oxide-coated sands. For this purpose, the wet fractionated samples had a higher content of iron than the dry fractionated samples.

  9. Exfoliated Pt-clay/Nafion nanocomposite membrane for self-humidifying polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Martin Ka Shing; Yue, Po-Lock; Gao, Ping

    2008-03-18

    Monolayers of Pt nanoparticles of diameters of 2-3 nm with a high crystallinity were successfully anchored onto exfoliated nanoclay surfaces using a novel chemical vapor deposition process. Chemical bonding of Pt to the oxygen on the clay surface ensured the stability of the Pt nanoparticles, and hence, no leaching of Pt particles was observed after a prolonged ultrasonication and a rigorous mechanical agitation of Pt-clay in the Nafion solution during the membrane casting process. Systematic analysis using WAXD and TEM showed that the recasting process produced a new self-humidifying exfoliated Pt-clay/Nafion nanocomposite membrane with a high crystallinity and proton conductivity. In situ water production for humidification of the dry membranes without any external humidification was characterized by a combined water uptake and FTIR analysis of the as-prepared membrane after a single cell testing without using electrodes. The power density at 0.5 V of a single cell made of a Pt-clay/Nafion nanocomposite membrane was 723 mW/cm2, which is 170% higher than that made of a commercial Nafion 112 membrane of similar thickness. No compromise in mechanical properties was observed.

  10. Effect of electrolytes on the microstructure and yielding of aqueous dispersions of colloidal clay.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-14

    Na-montmorillonite is a natural clay mineral and is available in abundance in nature. The aqueous dispersions of charged and anisotropic platelets of this mineral exhibit non-ergodic kinetically arrested states ranging from soft glassy phases dominated by interparticle repulsions to colloidal gels stabilized by salt induced attractive interactions. When the salt concentration in the dispersing medium is varied systematically, viscoelasticity and yield stress of the dispersion show non-monotonic behavior at a critical salt concentration, thus signifying a morphological change in the dispersion microstructures. We directly visualize the microscopic structures of these kinetically arrested phases using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy. We observe the existence of honeycomb-like network morphologies for a wide range of salt concentrations. The transition of the gel morphology, dominated by overlapping coin (OC) and house of cards (HoC) associations of clay particles at low salt concentrations to a new network structure dominated by face-face coagulation of platelets, is observed across the critical salt concentration. We further assess the stability of these gels under gravity using electroacoustics. This study, performed for concentrated clay dispersions for a wide concentration range of externally added salt, is useful in our understanding of many geophysical phenomena that involve the salt induced aggregation of natural clay minerals.

  11. Humidity Dependent Extinction of Clay Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, M. E.; Attwood, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the Earth’s radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of aerosol forcing can be altered by changes in relative humidity which cause aerosol size, shape and refractive index to vary. To quantify these effects, a custom cavity ring down instrument operated at 532 nm with two sample channels measures aerosols extinction under dry conditions and at elevated humidity. The optical growth, fRH(ext), is determined as a ratio of the extinction cross section at high relative humidity to that under dry conditions. Three key clay components of mineral dust and mixtures of clay components with ammonium sulfate are investigated using this method. Experimentally obtained optical growth is compared with physical growth factors from the literature and our work determined using several different techniques. Further, Mie theory calculations based on published optical constants are compared with experimental results. Differences between theory and experiment will be discussed.

  12. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  13. Sediment management and renewability of floodplain clay for structural ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meulen, M. J.; Wiersma, A. P.; Middelkoop, H.; van der Perk, M.; Bakker, M.; Maljers, D.; Hobo, N.; Makaske, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Netherlands have vast resources of clay that are exploited for the fabrication of structural ceramic products such as bricks and roof tiles. The extraction of clay creates land surface lowerings of about 1.5 m, of which the majority are located in the embanked floodplains of the rivers Rhine and Meuse. At these surface lowerings, clay is replenished within several decades. This study explores to which extent the clay can be regarded as a renewable resource, with potential for sustainable use. For this purpose, first the current and past clay consumption is calculated. Subsequently, clay deposition in the floodplains is estimated from literature data on clay accumulation using sediment traps, heavy metal and radionuclide distribution in soil profiles, and from morphological modelling studies. These estimates of clay-deposition and consumption are then compared following three approaches that consider various temporal and spatial scales of clay deposition. This allows us to establish the extent to which man determines sedimentary processes in the Dutch floodplains. Consequently, using the sediment response to the land surface lowering resulting from clay extraction, we explore sediment management options for the Dutch Rhine and Meuse. Altogether we argue that clay has been, probably is, and certainly can be managed as a renewable mineral resource.

  14. Characterization and adsorptive properties of pharmaceutical grade clays.

    PubMed

    Browne, J E; Feldkamp, J R; White, J L; Hem, S L

    1980-07-01

    The adsorption of tetracycline by clays commonly used in pharmacy can be predicted if the identity and character of the commerical clay sample are established. X-ray diffraction. IR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis were used to identify the clay component and any nonclay diluents present in a series of commerical pharmaceutical grade clays. The major clay components were montmorillonite, hectorite, attapulgite, saponite, and kaolinite. The clay structure, the nature of the exchangeable cation, and the presence of nonclay components are important factors affecting the tetracycline-clay interaction. In general, clay structures with a high surface charge lead to a greater interaction with the protonated form of tetracycline, while interaction with the zwitterionic form of tetracycline occurs in clay structures with minimal surface charge. The presence of multivalent, exchangeable cations on the clay surface diminishes interaction with the protonated form of tetracycline. Nonclay components such as calcite and dolomite increase the interactions of the zwitterionic and anionic forms of tetracycline with the clay.

  15. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  16. CLAY MINERALOGY OF INSOLUBLE RESIDUES IN MARINE EVAPORITES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodine, Marc W.

    1985-01-01

    Insoluble residues from three sequences of Paleozoic marine evaporites (Retsof salt bed in western New York, Salado Formation in south-eastern New Mexico, and Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation in southeastern Utah) are rich in trioctahedral clays. Chlorite (clinochlore), corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite-trioctahedral smectite), talc, and illite (the only dioctahedral clay) are the dominant clay minerals; serpentine, discrete trioctahedral smectite (saponite), and interstratified talc-trioctahedral smectite are sporadically abundant. These clay-mineral assemblages differ chemically and mineralogically from those observed in most continental and normal marine rocks, which commonly contain kaolinite, dioctahedral smectite (beidellite-montmorillonite), illite, mixed-layer illite-dioctahedral smectite, and, in most cases, no more than minor quantities of trioctahedral clay minerals. The distinctive clay mineralogy in these evaporite sequences suggests a largely authigenic origin. These clay minerals are thought to have formed during deposition and early diagenesis through interaction between argillaceous detritus and Mg-rich marine evaporite brines.

  17. Feasibility of classification of clay minerals by using PAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2015-06-01

    After the nuclear power plant disaster, the evaluation of radioactive Cs kept in soil, especially in clay minerals and the elucidation of its movement are urgent subjects to promote decontamination. It is known that the extractable level of Cs depends on the sort of clay minerals. We tried to find the characteristics of clay minerals belonging to phillosilicate group using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and the relationship between the results of PAS and the amounts of substantially extracted Cs from the clay minerals. The results showed that each clay mineral was found to be distinguishable from other clay minerals by PAS and the extraction rate of Cs was different among those clay minerals, however the direct correlation between the results of PAS and the extraction rates of Cs was not found.

  18. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  19. Application of modulus degradation model of clays.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, A.T.F.

    1982-01-01

    A degradation model is applied in conjunction with different soil models and stress-strain relations to site response analyses during earthquakes. To evaluate the effects of degradation, computations on two clay deposits subjected to both high and low-level input excitations are conducted. Where surface response differs, the use of degradation with strength reduction is less conservative when compared to the use of degradation without strength reduction.- from ASCE Publications Abstracts

  20. Synchrotron texture analysis of clay-rich sediments from the Nankai trench and accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Kai; Stipp, Michael; Leiss, Bernd; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich

    2013-04-01

    Synchrotron diffraction is the most suitable tool for fast multi-mineral phase texture analysis of water-containing clay rich sediment samples due to short wavelengths (in the range of 0.12 Å), high energy radiation and a resulting mm- to cm-scale sample penetration. We carried out synchrotron texture analysis on a sample set from the Nankai trench and accretionary prism offshore Japan. Samples were encountered by IODP Expeditions 315, 316 and 333 of the NanTroSEIZE project from a depth range between 25 mbsf (meters below seafloor) and 522 mbsf. The accretionary prism sediments have a relatively uniform composition of approximately 40% clay minerals, 25% quartz, 25% feldspar, and up to 10% calcite. A first sample set analyzed was taken as recovered from drilling; a second sample set was additionally experimentally deformed in a triaxial deformation apparatus up to axial strains of 60%. Measurements were carried out at DESY (German Electron Synchrotron source) in Hamburg. In order to measure complete pole figures sample cylinders of 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length were measured in a phi angle-range from -90 to +90° in 5° steps. Rietveld refinement results using the MAUD program package show that the composition of the IODP Expedition 333 samples from the incoming plate differs slightly from the relatively uniform IODP Expedition 315 and 316 samples of the accretionary prism. They contain ~35% clay minerals, ~30% quartz and ~35% feldspar. For IODP Expedition 315 and 316 samples the Rietveld refinement results correspond to the standard XRD data. The synchrotron texture results of the recovered samples without experimental deformation show an increasingly strong preferred orientation of the clay minerals with increasing sediment depth for the incoming plate. Interestingly, also feldspar shows a significant texture, which is likely due to a shape fabric of the grains. The sediment texture can be explained by compaction and porosity reduction with increasing