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Sample records for cleaning solvent d-limonene

  1. Compatibility of Halthane 88-3 urethane adhesive with the replacement cleaning solvent D-Limonene

    SciTech Connect

    LeMay, J.D.; Mendoza, B.

    1991-08-01

    D-Limonene, (R)1-methyl-4-isopropenyl-1-cyclohexene, has been identified as a leading replacement for chlorinated solvents traditionally used to clean electrical assemblies and critical components in some phases of weapons production. Unfortunately, d-limonene has a much lower vapor pressure than the chlorinated solvents if replaces (<2 torr at ambient). This makes its complete elimination from cleaned subassemblies potentially difficult, and gives rise to concerns about the compatibility of d-limonene with materials in the warhead. During the past year many WR polymers and adhesives have been surveyed for their compatibility with d-limonene. Preliminary test results obtained at Sandia (Albuquerque) and Allied-Signal (KCD) showed that Aluminum/Halthanemore » 88-3/Aluminum joints were destroyed during exposure to saturated d-limonene vapor. The cause of bond failure appeared to be d-limonene induced swelling of the Halthane polymer. This report describes recent work performed at LLNL to study the swelling behavior and bond strength degradation of Halthane 88-3 resulting from exposure to d-limonene vapor.« less

  2. Aging of D-limonene-cleaned assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Somer, T.A.

    1994-04-01

    The performance of 2000 electronic circuit variables was monitored throughout a 5000-hour exposure to + 160{degrees}F. the 2000 variables involve 36 electronic assemblies, cleaned with various solvents, including d-limonene, as a replacement for TCE. The assemblies were divided into four groups, including a TCE-cleaned control group at room temperature. Of the three groups exposed at + 160{degrees}F, one was cleaned in TCE, one was cleaned in d-limonene, and one was kept in a saturated d-limonene atmosphere. No performance degradation was observed with any of the groups, including the worst case exposure in a saturated d-limonene atmosphere.

  3. Aging of d-Limonene-cleaned assemblies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Somer, T.A.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of 1600 electronic circuit variables was monitored throughout an 8000-hour exposure to +160{degrees}F. The variables involve 36 electronic assemblies, cleaned with various solvents, including d-Limonene, as a replacement for trichloroethylene (TCE). The assemblies were divided into four groups, including a TCE-cleaned control group at room temperature. Of the three groups exposed at +160{degrees}F, one was cleaned in TCE, one was cleaned in d-Limonene, and one was kept in a saturated d-Limonene atmosphere. No performance degradation was observed with any of the groups, including the worst-case exposure in a saturated d-Limonene atmosphere.

  4. Partitioning of residual D-limonene cleaner vapor among organic materials in weapons

    SciTech Connect

    LeMay, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    D-limonene is a replacement solvent selected by Sandia and Allied-Signal to clean solder flux from electronics assemblies in firesets and programmers. D-limonene is much slower drying than the solvents it has replaced and this has raised concerns that residual quantities of the cleaner could be trapped in the electronics assemblies and eventually carried into warhead assemblies. This paper describes a study designed to evaluate how vapors from residual d-limonene cleaner would be partitioned among typical organic materials in a Livermore device. The goal was to identify possible compatibility problems arising from the use of d-limonene and, in particular, any interactionsmore » it may have with energetic materials. To predict the partitioning behavior of d-limonene, a simple model was developed and its predictions are compared to the experimental findings.« less

  5. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Gerald J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, was selected as the solvent of choice, and it was found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally-safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  6. d-Limonene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    d - Limonene ; CASRN 5989 - 27 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  8. Thixotropic Low-Solvent, Non-Hap Wheel Well Cleaner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-28

    cleaning composition for cleaning aircraft wheel wells. The cleaning composition broadly comprises from about 0.1 to about 15% of a D- limonene composition...broadly comprises from about 0.1 to about 15% of a D- limonene composition, containing less than 0.5% of a stabilizing anti-oxidant acting as a solvent...well as effective from a cleaning 2Q ß ;s a further object of the present invention to provide a standpoint. D- limonene , a by-product of the

  9. REPLACING SOLVENT CLEANING WITH AQUEOUS CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents actions taken by Robert Bosch Corp., Charleston, SC, in replacing the cleaning solvents 1, 1, 2- trichloro-1, 2, 2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene (TCE) with aqueous solutions. Bosch has succeeded in eliminating all their CFC-113 use and so f...

  10. Determination of d-limonene in adipose tissue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica A.; Hakim, Iman A.; Thomson, Cynthia; Thompson, Patricia; Chow, H-H. Sherry

    2008-01-01

    We developed a novel method for analyzing d-limonene levels in adipose tissue. Fat samples were subjected to saponification followed by solvent extraction. d-Limonene in the sample extract was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selected ion monitoring. Linear calibration curves were established over the mass range of 79.0-2,529 ng d-limonene per 0.1 grams of adipose tissue. Satisfactory within day precision (RSD 6.7 to 9.6%) and accuracy (% difference of −2.7 to 3.8%) and between day precision (RSD 6.0 to 10.7%) and accuracy (% difference of 1.8 to 2.6%) were achieved. The assay was successfully applied to human fat biopsy samples from a d-limonene feeding trial. PMID:18571481

  11. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  12. Environmentally compatible hand wipe cleaning solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Catherine P.; Kovach, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Several solvents of environmental concern have previously been used for hand wipe cleaning of SRB surfaces, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, perchloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and MEK. USBI determined the major types of surfaces involved, and qualification requirements of replacement cleaning agents. Nineteen environmentally compatible candidates were tested on 33 material substrates with 26 types of potential surface contaminants, involving over 7,000 individual evaluations. In addition to the cleaning performance evaluation, bonding, compatibility, and corrosion tests were conducted. Results showed that one cleaner was not optimum for all surfaces. In most instances, some of the candidates cleaned better than the 1,1,1-trichloroethane baseline control. Aqueous cleaners generally cleaned better, and were more compatible with nonmetallic materials, such as paints, plastics, and elastomers. Organic base cleaners were better on metal surfaces. Five cleaners have been qualified and are now being implemented in SRB hand wipe cleaning operations.

  13. Alternative Solvents and Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Hintze, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Precision cleaning solvents for aerospace components and oxygen fuel systems, including currently used Vertrel-MCA, have a negative environmental legacy, high global warming potential, and have polluted cleaning sites. Thus, alternative solvents and technologies are being investigated with the aim of achieving precision contamination levels of less than 1 mg/sq ft. The technologies being evaluated are ultrasonic bath cleaning, plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide cleaning.

  14. Nonflammable, Nonaqueous, Low Atmospheric Impact, High Performance Cleaning Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    For many years, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and chlorocarbon solvents have played an important part in aerospace operations. These solvents found extensive use as cleaning and analysis (EPA) solvents in precision and critical cleaning. However, CFCs and chlorocarbon solvents have deleterious effects on the ozone layer, are relatively strong greenhouse gases, and some are suspect or known carcinogens. Because of their ozone-depletion potential (ODP), the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, as well as other environmental regulations, have resulted in the phaseout of CFC-113 and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Although alternatives have been recommended, they do not perform as well as the original solvents. In addition, some analyses, such as the infrared analysis of extracted hydrocarbons, cannot be performed with the substitute solvents that contain C-H bonds. CFC-113 solvent has been used for many critical aerospace applications. CFC-113, also known as Freon (registered) TF, has been used extensively in NASA's cleaning facilities for precision and critical cleaning, in particular the final rinsing in Class 100 areas, with gas chromatography analysis of rinse residue. While some cleaning can be accomplished by other processes, there are certain critical applications where CFC-113 or a similar solvent is highly cost-effective and ensures safety. Oxygen system components are one example where a solvent compatible with oxygen and capable of removing fluorocarbon grease is needed. Electronic components and precision mechanical components can also be damaged by aggressive cleaning solvents.

  15. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-05-04

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  16. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Simandl, Ronald F.; Thompson, Lisa M.

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140.degree. F. and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140.degree. F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  17. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  18. Clean amine solvents economically and online

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.; Burns, D.

    1995-08-01

    Using electrodialysis technology to clean amine solvents is economically competitive with traditional change-out or ``bleed and feed`` methods, even for small systems, because a unit shutdown is not necessary to perform the process. Electrodialysis also has advantages over other online cleanup processes like ion exchange and vacuum reclamation. Off gases and olefinic and saturate liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) streams generated during operation of fluid catalytic crackers (FCC), cokers and other refinery processing equipment must be treated to remove undesirable components like hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide before they can be sold or used in downstream processes. At an Arkansas City,more » Kansas, refinery, a classic amine-based chemical absorbent system is used for this purpose. It comprises two absorbing contacts for gas and two for liquids. The system is charged with an N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA)-based product that selectively absorbs contaminants. Amine is regenerated by removing contaminants with steam stripping. Lean amine is then recirculated to the absorbers. This case history demonstrates the effectiveness of electrodialysis technology for contaminant removal.« less

  19. d-Limonene-induced male rat-specific nephrotoxicity: Evaluation of the association between d-limonene and alpha 2u-globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman-McKeeman, L.D.; Rodriguez, P.A.; Takigiku, R.

    1989-06-15

    d-Limonene is a naturally occurring monoterpene, which when dosed orally, causes a male rat-specific nephrotoxicity manifested acutely as the exacerbation of protein droplets in proximal tubule cells. Experiments were conducted to examine the retention of (/sup 14/C)d-limonene in male and female rat kidney, to determine whether d-limonene or one or more of its metabolites associates with the male rat-specific protein, alpha 2u-globulin, and if so, to identify the bound material. The results indicated that, 24 hr after oral administration of 3 mmol d-limonene/kg, the renal concentration of d-limonene equivalents was approximately 2.5 times higher in male rats than in femalemore » rats. Equilibrium dialysis in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that approximately 40% of the d-limonene equivalents in male rat kidney associated with proteins in a reversible manner, whereas no significant association was observed between d-limonene equivalents and female rat kidney proteins. Association between d-limonene and male rat kidney proteins was characterized by high-performance gel filtration and reverse-phase chromatography. Gel filtration HPLC indicated that d-limonene in male rat kidney is associated with a protein fraction having a molecular weight of approximately 20,000. Separation of alpha 2u-globulin from other kidney proteins by reverse-phase HPLC indicated that d-limonene associated with a protein present only in male rat kidney which was definitively identified as alpha 2u-globulin by amino acid sequencing. The major metabolite associated with alpha 2u-globulin was d-limonene-1,2-oxide. Parent d-limonene was also identified as a minor component in the alpha 2u-globulin fraction.« less

  20. Machine Cleans And Degreases Without Toxic Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurguis, Kamal S.; Higginson, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    Appliance uses hot water and biodegradable chemicals to degrease and clean hardware. Spray chamber essentially industrial-scale dishwasher. Front door tilts open, and hardware to be cleaned placed on basket-like tray. During cleaning process, basket-like tray rotates as high-pressure "V" jets deliver steam, hot water, detergent solution, and rust inhibitor as required.

  1. NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation for d-Limonene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    of natural hydrocarbons referred to as terpenes (d-limonene is a monoterpene ). The other form of limonene is called 1-limonene, and a mixture of the...as a flavor and fragrance additive in perfumes, soaps, foods, chewing gum and beverages, and is the most widely distribiit. monoterpene ." 4’ The use of...effect and skin irritation of monocyclic monoterpenes . Drug Des Deliv 6:229-238. 29. Hooser SB, Beasley VR, Everitt J1 [1986]. Effects of an

  2. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES TO CHLORINATED SOLVENTS FOR METAL CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project report details results of investigations into alternatives to chlorinated solvents used for metal degreasing. Three companies participated in this project. The results reported for one company document a situation where the conversion to an aqueous cleaning system ha...

  3. Evaluation of Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning of Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Biesinger, Paul; Delgado, Rafael; Antin, Neil

    1999-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in a joint program with the Naval Sea Systems Command has evaluated a number of solvents as alternatives to the use of chlorofluorocarbons currently utilized for cleaning of oxygen systems. Particular attention has been given to the cleaning of gauges and instrumentation used in oxygen service, since there have been no identified aqueous alternatives. The requirements identified as selection criteria, include toxicity, physical properties consistent with application, flammability, oxygen compatibility, and cleaning ability. This paper provides a summary of results and recommendations for solvents evaluated to date.

  4. Solvent cleaning of pole transformers containing PCB contaminated insulating oil.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, H; Shibuya, M

    2001-01-01

    In 1989, it was discovered that the recycled insulation oil in pole transformers for electric power supply was contaminated with trace amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; maximum 50 mg-PCB/kg-insulation oil). In order to remove the PCBs from transformer components using n-hexane as a solvent, we investigated the relationship between progressive stages of dismantling and cleaning results. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Based on the cleaning test results, we made an estimate of the residual PCB amount on iron and copper components. By dismantling the test pole transformers into the "iron core and coil portion" and cleaning the components, we achieved a residual PCB amount that was below the limit of detection (0.05 mg-PCB/kg-material). To achieve a residual PCB amount below the limit of detection for the transformer paper component, it was necessary to cut the paper into pieces smaller than 5 mm. We were unable to achieve a residual PCB amount below the limit of detection for the wood component. (2) Compared to Japan's stipulated limited concentration standard values for PCBs, the results of the cleaning test show that cleaning iron or copper components with PCBs only on their surface with the solvent n-hexane will satisfy the limited concentration standard values when care is taken to ensure the component surfaces have adequate contact with the cleaning solvent.

  5. Formulation and optimization by experimental design of eco-friendly emulsions based on d-limonene.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis M; Trujillo-Cayado, Luis A; Carrillo, Francisco; Ramírez, Pablo; Muñoz, José

    2015-04-01

    d-Limonene is a natural occurring solvent that can replace more pollutant chemicals in agrochemical formulations. In the present work, a comprehensive study of the influence of dispersed phase mass fraction, ϕ, and of the surfactant/oil ratio, R, on the emulsion stability and droplet size distribution of d-limonene-in-water emulsions stabilized by a non-ionic triblock copolymer surfactant has been carried out. An experimental full factorial design 3(2) was conducted in order to optimize the emulsion formulation. The independent variables, ϕ and R were studied in the range 10-50 wt% and 0.02-0.1, respectively. The emulsions studied were mainly destabilized by both creaming and Ostwald ripening. Therefore, initial droplet size and an overall destabilization parameter, the so-called turbiscan stability index, were used as dependent variables. The optimal formulation, comprising minimum droplet size and maximum stability was achieved at ϕ=50 wt%; R=0.062. Furthermore, the surface response methodology allowed us to obtain the formulation yielding sub-micron emulsions by using a single step rotor/stator homogenizer process instead of most commonly used two-step emulsification methods. In addition, the optimal formulation was further improved against Ostwald ripening by adding silicone oil to the dispersed phase. The combination of these experimental findings allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the stability of these emulsions, which can be applied to the rational development of new formulations with potential application in agrochemical formulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. d-limonene exhibits antitumor activity by inducing autophagy and apoptosis in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Lin, Hongyan; Wang, Yu; Lv, Wenwen; Zhang, Shuo; Qian, Ying; Deng, Xiaobei; Feng, Nannan; Yu, Herbert; Qian, Biyun

    2018-01-01

    d-limonene is a plant extract with widespread application, and it has been recently reported to have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms by which d-limonene achieves these effects, especially in lung cancer, are not entirely clear. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of d-limonene on lung cancer and explore its mechanisms of action. We examined the therapeutic effects of d-limonene on lung cancer cells and in a xenograft animal model by characterizing its effects on the pathways of apoptosis and autophagy. Cell proliferation was measured using the Cell Counting Kit-8, and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Levels of LC3 puncta, an autophagy marker, were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Autophagy and apoptosis-related gene expression were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. d-limonene inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells and suppressed the growth of transplanted tumors in nude mice. Expression of apoptosis and autophagy-related genes were increased in tumors after treatment with d-limonene. Furthermore, the use of chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, and knockdown of the atg5 gene, suppressed the apoptosis induced by d-limonene. d-limonene may have a therapeutic effect on lung cancer as it can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells by promoting autophagy.

  7. Histopathological and biochemical assessment of d-limonene-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos Alberto F; Sá, Rita de Cássia da S; Alves, Mateus F; Benedito, Rubens B; de Sousa, Damião P; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima F M; Araújo, Maria Salete T; de Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a biochemical, histologic and immunohistochemical study about the potential hepatotoxic effect of d-limonene - a component of volatile oils extracted from citrus plants. Blood alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) from d-limonene-treated animals were determined and compared to morphologic hepatic lesions in order to investigate the possible physiopathologic mechanisms involved in the liver toxicity, in experimental animals treated with d-limonene. Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups: two control groups (untreated or receiving only vehicle, tween-80); one positive control (vehicle); two experimental groups treated with d-limonene at doses of 25 mg/kg/day and 75 mg/kg/day for 45 days, and two other groups treated with the same doses for 30 days and kept under observation during 30 more days. Biochemical data showed significant reduction in ALT levels in the animals treated with 75 mg/kg of d-limonene. Histological analysis revealed some hepatocyte morphological lesions, including hydropic degeneration, microvesicular steatosis and necrosis, Kupffer cell hyperplasia and incipient fibrosis. By immunohistochemistry, influx of T (CD3+) and cytotoxic (CD8+) lymphocytes was observed in the rats treated with d-limonene at both dose levels. In conclusion, it is possible that d-limonene has been directly responsible for hepatic parenchymal and matrix damage following subchronic treatment with d-limonene.

  8. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to D-limonene-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jidong; Zhu, Yibo; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the mode of cell response induced by D-limonene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. D-limonene treatment was found to be accompanied by intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since ROS impair cell membranes, an engineered strain with enhanced membrane biosynthesis exhibited a higher tolerance to D-limonene. Subsequent addition of an ROS scavenger significantly reduced the ROS level and alleviated cell growth inhibition. Thus, D-limonene-induced ROS accumulation plays an important role in cell death in S. cerevisiae. In D-limonene-treated S. cerevisiae strains, higher levels of antioxidants, antioxidant enzymes, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) were synthesized. Quantitative real-time PCR results also verified that D-limonene treatment triggered upregulation of genes involved in the antioxidant system and the regeneration of NADPH at the transcription level in S. cerevisiae. These data indicate that D-limonene treatment results in intracellular ROS accumulation, an important factor in cell death, and several antioxidant mechanisms in S. cerevisiae were enhanced in response to D-limonene treatment.

  9. Solvent Replacement for Hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 for Cleaning Oxygen System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. A.; Lowrey, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum is the result of a 2-year project funded by the Defense Logistics Agency-Aviation, Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, to identify and test two candidate solvents to replace hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) for cleaning oxygen systems. The solvents were also compared to a second solvent composed predominantly of perfluorobutyl iodide (PFBI), which had received limited approval by the United States Air Force (USAF) for hand wipe cleaning of components for aviators’ breathing oxygen systems. The tests performed for this study were based on those reported in AFRL-ML-WP-TR-2003-4040, “The Wipe Solvent Program,” the test program used to qualify Ikon® Solvent P for USAF applications.The study was completed in August 2014, prior to the completion of a more extensive study funded by the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) program. The results of the RPT project are reported in NASA/TP-2015-18207, “Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon–225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems.” The test methods used in this study for nonvolatile residue (NVR) background, materials compatibility, and cleaning effectiveness were different than those used for the RPT project; a smaller set of materials and contaminants were tested. The tests for this study were complementary to and provided supplementary information for the down-selection process during the course of the test program reported in NASA/TP-2015-218207.

  10. Reactivities of Precision Cleaning Solvents with Hypergolic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Delgado, Rafael H.; Williams, James H.

    1999-01-01

    The reactivities of several selected halogenated precision cleaning solvents with hypergolic propellants has been determined by analysis of the rates of formation of halide ion decomposition products. The solvents were Asahiklin AK 225, Asahiklin AK 225 AES, HFE 7100, HFE 7100 DE, Vertrel XF, Vertrel MCA, Vertrel MCA Plus, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113), and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE). The propellants were hydrazine (HZ), monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and mixed oxides of nitrogen (MON-3). The Vertrel solvents showed significant reactivity with HZ. All of the solvents except DCE exhibited significant reactivity with MMH, particularly HFE 7100 DE and CFC-113. HFE 7100 DE, Vertrel MCA, and Vertrel MCA Plus also showed significant reactivity with MON-3 oxidizer.

  11. Occupational contact dermatitis caused by D-limonene.

    PubMed

    Pesonen, Maria; Suomela, Sari; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina

    2014-11-01

    Limonene is widely used as a fragrance substance and solvent in cleansing products. Oxidized limonene is a frequent contact allergen among consumers of cosmetics, personal care products, and scented household cleaning products. Less is known about the sources of occupational exposure and occupational contact dermatitis caused by limonene. To report 14 patients with occupational contact allergy to limonene. The patients were examined in 2008-2013. An in-house preparation of oxidized limonene was patch tested as 3% and 5% in petrolatum from 2008 to August 2010, and after this as 3%, 1% and 0.3% pet. From 2012 onwards, a commercial test substance of limonene hydroperoxides was also used. We assessed the patients' occupational and domestic exposure to limonene. Occupational limonene allergy was observed in workers who used limonene-containing machine-cleaning detergents and hand cleansers, and in workers who used limonene-containing surface cleaners and dishwashing liquids similar to those used by consumers. In 3 cases, the occupational limonene allergy resulted from work-related use of limonene-containing, leave-on cosmetic products. Limonene is a frequent occupational sensitizer in hand cleansers and cleaning products. Occupational limonene contact allergy may also be caused by exposure to cosmetic products scented with limonene. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Development of a Replacement for Trichloroethylene in the Two-Stage Cleaning Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Auger-Determined Carbon/Iron Ratios of Set 4 ..................... 15 3 Abstract Isopropyl alcohol, d- limonene , and a synthetic mineral spirits were...found to be as clean as those alcohol, d- limonene , and a synthetic cleaned by the standard two-stage mineral spirits,- were chosen to be process...selected, therefore, was to soil test specimens with Another candidate was d- limonene . It has representative soils, clean them by the been extensively

  13. Water accelerated transformation of d-limonene induced by ultraviolet irradiation and air exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Li Jun; Hong, Peng; Jiang, Ze Dong; Yang, Yuan Fan; Du, Xi Ping; Sun, Hao; Wu, Li Ming; Ni, Hui; Chen, Feng

    2018-01-15

    d-Limonene is a fragrant chemical that widely exists in aromatic products. Isotopic labelling of water molecules plus GC-MS and GC-PCI-Q-TOF analyses were used to investigate the influence of water molecules on chemical transformation of d-limonene induced by UV irradiation and air exposure. The results showed that the synergistic effect of UV irradiation, air exposure and water presence could facilitate d-limonene transformation into the limonene oxides: p-mentha-2,8-dienols, hydroperoxides, carveols, l-carvone and carvone oxide. UV irradiation, air exposure, or water alone, however, caused negligible d-limonene transformation. With the aid of isotopic labelling of water and oxygen molecules, it was found that water molecules were split into hydrogen radicals and hydroxyl radicals, and the hydrogen radicals, in particular, promoted the transformation reactions. This study has elucidated the mechanism and factors that influence the transformation of d-limonene, which will benefit industries involved in production and storage of d-limonene-containing products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contact Allergy to Hydroperoxides of Linalool and D-Limonene in a US Population.

    PubMed

    Nath, Neel Som; Liu, Beiyu; Green, Cynthia; Atwater, Amber Reck

    Linalool and D-limonene are common fragrance ingredients that readily oxidize on exposure to air. The resulting hydroperoxides of linalool and D-limonene have been shown to have high frequencies of positive patch test reactions in several European and international studies. The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of contact allergy to the hydroperoxides of linalool and D-limonene in a US population. In this retrospective study, 103 patients with suspected fragrance allergy were patch tested to linalool 10% petrolatum (pet), hydroperoxides of linalool 1% pet, D-limonene 10% pet, and/or the hydroperoxides of D-limonene 0.3% pet between July 9, 2014, and October 25, 2016. In this study, the frequency of positive patch test reactions to the hydroperoxides of linalool is 20% (19/96), and the frequency of positive reactions to the hydroperoxides of D-limonene is 8% (7/90). These high frequencies suggest that patch testing to the hydroperoxides of linalool and limonene should be performed in all patients with suspected fragrance allergy.

  15. Release behavior and stability of encapsulated D-limonene from emulsion-based edible films.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzo, Eva; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Sensidoni, Alessandro; Tat, Lara; Beney, Laurent; Hambleton, Alicia; Peressini, Donatella; Voilley, Andrée

    2012-12-12

    Edible films may act as carriers of active molecules, such as flavors. This possibility confers to them the status of active packaging. Two different film-forming biopolymers, gluten and ι-carrageenans, have been compared. D-Limonene was added to the two film formulations, and its release kinetics from emulsion-based edible films was assessed with HS-SPME. Results obtained for edible films were compared with D-limonene released from the fatty matrix called Grindsted Barrier System 2000 (GBS). Comparing ι-carrageenans with gluten-emulsified film, the latter showed more interesting encapsulating properties: in fact, D-limonene was retained by gluten film during the process needed for film preparation, and it was released gradually during analysis time. D-Limonene did not show great affinity to ι-carrageenans film, maybe due to high aroma compound hydrophobicity. Carvone release from the three different matrices was also measured to verify the effect of oxygen barrier performances of edible films to prevent D-limonene oxidation. Further investigations were carried out by FT-IR and liquid permeability measurements. Gluten film seemed to better protect D-limonene from oxidation. Gluten-based edible films represent an interesting opportunity as active packaging: they could retain and release aroma compounds gradually, showing different mechanical and nutritional properties from those of lipid-based ingredients.

  16. ODC-Free Solvent Implementation for Phenolics Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurth, Laura; Biegert, Lydia; Lamont, DT; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During phenolic liner manufacture, resin-impregnated (pre-preg) bias tape of silica, glass, or carbon cloth is tape-wrapped, cured, machined, and then wiped with 1,1,1 tri-chloroethane (TCA) to remove contaminants that may have been introduced during machining and handling. Following the TCA wipe, the machined surface is given a resin wet-coat and over-wrapped with more prepreg and cured. A TCA replacement solvent for these wiping operations must effectively remove both surface contaminants, and sub-surface oils and greases while not compromising the integrity of this interface. Selection of a TCA replacement solvent for phenolic over-wrap interface cleaning began with sub-scale compatibility tests with cured phenolics. Additional compatibility tests included assessment of solvent retention in machined phenolic surfaces. Results from these tests showed that, while the candidate solvent did not degrade the cured phenolics, it was retained in higher concentrations than TCA in phenolic surfaces. This effect was most pronounced with glass and silica cloth phenolics with steep ply angles relative to the wiped surfaces.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... solvent cleaning machine? A. When they are clean B. At any time C. When dripping stops D. Either A or C is.... How do you ensure that parts enter and exit the solvent cleaning machine at the speed required in the.... Measure the time it takes the parts to travel a measured distance. ___ 3. Identify the sources of air...

  18. Skin permeation of D-limonene-based nanoemulsions as a transdermal carrier prepared by ultrasonic emulsification.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen-Chien; Chiang, Been-Huang; Huang, Da-Wei; Li, Po-Hsien

    2014-03-01

    Nanoemulsions can be used for transporting pharmaceutical phytochemicals in skin-care products because of their stability and rapid permeation properties. However, droplet size may be a critical factor aiding permeation through skin and transdermal delivery efficiency. We prepared D-limonene nanoemulsions with various droplet sizes by ultrasonic emulsification using mixed surfactants of sorbitane trioleate and polyoxyethylene (20) oleyl ether under different hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) values. Droplet size decreased with increasing HLB value. With HLB 12, the droplet size was 23 nm, and the encapsulated ratio peaked at 92.3%. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical droplets and the gray parts were D-limonene precipitation incorporated in spherical droplets of the emulsion system. Franz diffusion cell was used to evaluate the permeation of D-limonene nanoemulsion through rat abdominal skin; the permeation rate depended on droplet size. The emulsion with the lowest droplet size (54 nm) achieved the maximum permeation rate. The concentration of D-limonene in the skin was 40.11 μL/cm(2) at the end of 360 min. Histopathology revealed no distinct voids or empty spaces in the epidermal region of permeated rat skin, so the D-limonene nanoemulsion may be a safe carrier for transdermal drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of nisin on the antimicrobial activity of d-limonene and its nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijie; Vriesekoop, Frank; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao

    2014-05-01

    d-Limonene has been considered to be a safer alternative compared to synthetic antimicrobial food additives. However, its hydrophobic and oxidative nature has limited its application in foods. The purpose of this research was to study effects of nisin on the antimicrobial activity of d-limonene and its nanoemulsion and develop a novel antimicrobial delivery system by combining the positive effect of these two antibacterial agents at the same time. By the checkerboard method, both the synergistic and additive effects of d-limonene and nisin were found against four selected food-related microorganisms. Then, d-limonene nanoemulsion with or without nisin was prepared by catastrophic phase inversion method, which has shown good droplet size and stability. The positive effects and outstanding antimicrobial activity of d-limonene nanoemulsion with nisin were confirmed by MICs comparison, scanning electron microscopy and determination of cell constituents released. Overall, the research described in the current article would be helpful in developing a more effective antimicrobial system for the production and preservation of foods. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing the antimicrobial activity of d-limonene nanoemulsion with the inclusion of ε-polylysine.

    PubMed

    Zahi, Mohamed Reda; El Hattab, Mohamed; Liang, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng

    2017-04-15

    The objective of this research was to investigate the synergism between ε-polylysine and d-limonene and develop a novel nanoemulsion system by merging the positive effect of these two antimicrobial agents. Results from the checkerboard method showed that ε-polylysine and d-limonene exhibit strong synergistic and useful additive effects against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, d-limonene nanoemulsion with the inclusion of ε-polylysine was successfully prepared by high pressure homogenizer technology. Its antimicrobial efficiency was compared with pure d-limonene nanoemulsion by measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration, electronic microscope observation and the leakage of the intercellular constituents. The results demonstrated a wide improvement of the antimicrobial activity of d-limonene nanoemulsion following the inclusion of ε-polylysine. Overall, the current study may have a valuable contribution to make in developing a more efficient antimicrobial system in the food industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A High-Performance Recycling Solution for Polystyrene Achieved by the Synthesis of Renewable Poly(thioether) Networks Derived from d-Limonene

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Landon D.; Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Lonnecker, Alexander T.; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Wooley, Karen L.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposite polymers have been prepared using a new sustainable materials synthesis process in which d-Limonene functions simultaneously both as a solvent for recycling polystyrene (PS) waste and as a monomer that undergoes UV-catalyzed thiol-ene polymerization reactions with polythiol co-monomers to afford polymeric products comprised of precipitated PS phases dispersed throughout elastomeric poly(thioether) networks. These blended networks exhibit mechanical properties that greatly exceed those of either polystyrene or the poly(thioether) network homopolymers alone. PMID:24249666

  2. Technique for ultrasonic cleaning with volatile solvents eliminates need for hoods or condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipersky, E.

    1969-01-01

    Technique ultrasonically cleans small quantities of small mechanical parts in organic solvents without the need for vapor removal equipment. Parts are placed in a thin plastic bag with the solvent and then suspended in a cleaning tank containing the water-detergent solution.

  3. Development and characterization of electrosprayed Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum nanoparticles for encapsulation of d-limonene.

    PubMed

    Khoshakhlagh, Khadije; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Allafchian, Alireza

    2017-03-15

    In this study, the feasibility of developing Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum (AHSG) nanocapsules containing d-limonene by electrospraying has been investigated. d-limonene emulsions with constant AHSG (0.5% w/w) and various flavor concentrations (10-30% based on gum weight) with 0.1% Tween 20 were electrosprayed at 20kV and 0.1ml/h of flow rate. The effects of key parameters of emulsions (rheological properties, droplet size, surface tension and electrical conductivity) on the morphology of structures have been studied. The morphology of nanocapsules had strong dependency on solution properties. The aggregated irregular shaped nanoparticles were obtained from electrospraying of AHSG solution. After incorporation of 10 and 20% d-limonene, spherical nanocapsules were yielded. However, morphology of nanocapsules changed to nanofibers by increasing the flavor content to 30%. The encapsulation efficiency for 10 and 20% d-limonene loaded nanocapsules was around 87-93%. Attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were also employed to study the physicochemical characteristics of nanocapsules. These experiments provided evidences that electrosprayed AHSG nanoparticles introduce a novel and efficient carrier for encapsulation of bioactive ingredients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Organogel-nanoemulsion containing nisin and D-limonene and its antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Weiya; Zhou, Yan; Xing, Xuya; Zahi, Mohamed Reda; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a novel delivery system containing D-limonene and nisin by food organogel-nanoemulsion and study its effect on the antimicrobial activity. Organogel-nanoemulsion containing with D-limonene and nisin or without nisin was prepared by a homogenization method. Factors that may affect the droplet size and stability of organogel-nanoemulsion such as pressure and surfactant to oil ratio (SOR) were studied. The average droplet size decreased with pressure, and the organogel-nanoemulsion could achieve good stability at low SOR. Positive effects and outstanding antimicrobial activities of organogel-nanoemulsion containing with D-limonene and nisin were confirmed by minimal inhibitory concentrations comparison, growth curves of bacteria, scanning electron microscopy and determination of cell constituents’ release. Furthermore, the organogel-nanoemulsion applied as food preservative in milk also shown excellent antimicrobial performance. Overall, the research described in the current article show that organogel-nanoemulsion containing with D-limonene and nisin may be an effective antimicrobial system for the production and preservation of food. PMID:26441935

  5. Tunable d-Limonene Permeability in Starch-Based Nanocomposite Films Reinforced by Cellulose Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyuan; Li, Xiaoxi; Chen, Ling; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Zhu, Jie

    2018-01-31

    In order to control d-limonene permeability, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were used to regulate starch-based film multiscale structures. The effect of sphere-like cellulose nanocrystal (CS) and rod-like cellulose nanocrystal (CR) on starch molecular interaction, short-range molecular conformation, crystalline structure, and micro-ordered aggregated region structure were systematically discussed. CNC aspect ratio and content were proved to be independent variables to control d-limonene permeability via film-structure regulation. New hydrogen bonding formation and increased hydroxypropyl starch (HPS) relative crystallinity could be the reason for the lower d-limonene permeability compared with tortuous path model approximation. More hydrogen bonding formation, higher HPS relative crystallinity and larger size of micro-ordered aggregated region in CS0.5 and CR2 could explain the lower d-limonene permeability than CS2 and CR0.5, respectively. This study provided new insight for the control of the flavor release from starch-based films, which favored its application in biodegradable food packaging and flavor encapsulation.

  6. Protective effects of D-Limonene against transient cerebral ischemia in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xifeng; Li, Gang; Shen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death world-wide and there is currently a lack of effective treatments for acute stroke. D-Limonene is a common natural monocyclic monoterpene possessing various activities. The present study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of D-limonene against ischemia-associated cerebral injury in hypertensive SHRsp rats. Although systolic blood pressure was not altered by ischemia, D-Limonene decreased the systolic blood pressure of SHRsp rats following stroke. Induction of stroke resulted in increased escape latency time, decreased time spent in the target quadrant in the probe trial, decreased capacity to distinguish between familiar objects and novel objects, and increased sensory neglect in the SHRsp rat, however these symptoms were significantly inhibited by D-limonene. D-limonene also decreased the cerebral infarct size in the SHRsp rats following stroke. D-Limonene markedly decreased the mRNA expression of interleukin-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in SHRsp rats following stroke. The mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the brain of SHRsp rats following stroke was significantly increased by D-Limonene. D-Limonene increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, decreased the malondialdehyde level, increased glutathione content and reduced the DHE-staining in SHRsp rats following stroke. Overall, inhibition of cerebral inflammation, vascular remodeling and antioxidant activities of D-Limonene may be involved in the protective effects against ischemia-induced damage in SHRsp rats. The present study identified D-Limonene as a potential therapeutic candidate for treatment of stroke-associated cerebral and vascular damage under conditions of hypertension.

  7. Used Solvent Testing and Reclamation. Volume 2. Vapor Degreasing and Precision Cleaning Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of 5 to 500 ppm in halogenated solvents using Karl - Fischer reagent. Arbitrary criteria to identify a spent solvent have evolved in various industries... methods of managing waste solvent. Some DOD installations are reclaiming used solvents rather than discarding them. Reclamation is feasible because the...most E E CT E reliable methods for testing solvent quality. Further testing isnecessary for chlorinated solvents to determine the inhibitor con- FEB 24

  8. 40 CFR 52.246 - Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.246 Control of dry... cleaning establishment that uses solvents containing 4 percent or more by volume of any reactive organic...

  9. Halogenated Solvent Cleaning Compliance Assistance Memoranda for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains three documents, one from 1997, one from 1999, and one from 2001, that provide further clarification on complying with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning.

  10. d-limonene ameliorates diabetes and its complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Bacanlı, Merve; Anlar, Hatice Gül; Aydın, Sevtap; Çal, Tuğbagül; Arı, Nuray; Ündeğer Bucurgat, Ülkü; Başaran, A Ahmet; Başaran, Nurşen

    2017-12-01

    It is known that diabetes causes some complications including alterations in lipid profile, hepatic enzyme levels but also it causes oxidative stress. Limonene, a major component of Citrus oils, has important health beneficial effects in lowering the level of oxidative stress due to its antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of D-limonene on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in Wistar albino rats. For this purpose, DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Changes in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and the levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), total glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), insulin, total bilirubin and BCA protein, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol and triglyceride were also evaluated. D-limonene treatment was found to significantly decrease DNA damage, GR enzyme activities and MDA levels and significantly increase GSH levels and CAT, SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities and altered lipid and liver enzyme parameters in diabetic rats. According to our results, it seems that D-limonene might have a role in the prevention of the complication of diabetes in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ozone Depleting Chemical (ODC) Replacement - Alternative Cleaning Solvents and Lubricants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    surface. This phenomenon helps to explain why some aqueous based cleaners (such as Daraclean®) can effectively remove fluorinated greases (such as...structurally similar to hydrocarbon oils, waxes, and greases it removes. In some fluorinated greases such as Krytox®, only solvents identically similar to...the contaminant (such as Tribolube®, a fluorinated solvent) effectively dissolves them. Hexane and methanol, being members of different chemical

  12. Life of Pennzane and 815Z-Lubricated Instrument Bearings Cleaned with Non-CFC Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart H.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    1999-01-01

    Life tests were conducted on instrument scanner ball bearings cleaned with 3 types of non-ozone depleting solvents and compared with those cleaned with a conventional CFC-113 (Freon) solvent. The test bearings were lubricated with the standard space oil (Bray 815Z, Fomblin Z25) and a more recent synthetic space oil (Pennzane 2001). Lives with replacement solvents equaled or exceeded those obtained with CFC-113 baseline, indicating that alternate cleaning solvents were acceptable. Pennzane lubricated bearings enjoyed a significant life advantage (>5X) over those lubricated with Bray 815Z oil in these oscillatory gimbal bearing tests. Many of the Pennzane bearings are still exhibiting acceptable torque traces after more than 25,000 hr of test.

  13. The Search for Nonflammable Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen systems are susceptible to fires caused by particle and nonvolatile residue (NVR) contaminants, therefore cleaning and verification is essential for system safety. . Cleaning solvents used on oxygen system components must be either nonflammable in pure oxygen or complete removal must be assured for system safety. . CFC -113 was the solvent of choice before 1996 because it was effective, least toxic, compatible with most materials of construction, and non ]reactive with oxygen. When CFC -113 was phased out in 1996, HCFC -225 was selected as an interim replacement for cleaning propulsion oxygen systems at NASA. HCFC-225 production phase-out date is 01/01/2015. HCFC ]225 (AK ]225G) is used extensively at Marshall Space Flight Center and Stennis Space Center for cleaning and NVR verification on large propulsion oxygen systems, and propulsion test stands and ground support equipment. . Many components are too large for ultrasonic agitation - necessary for effective aqueous cleaning and NVR sampling. . Test stand equipment must be cleaned prior to installation of test hardware. Many items must be cleaned by wipe or flush in situ where complete removal of a flammable solvent cannot be assured. The search for a replacement solvent for these applications is ongoing.

  14. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Surface Preparation and... or more of the following measures to safeguard the health of employees exposed to these solvents. (1...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Surface Preparation and... or more of the following measures to safeguard the health of employees exposed to these solvents. (1...

  16. Synergistic inhibitory effect of berberine and d-limonene on human gastric carcinoma cell line MGC803.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Ling; Liu, Dong-Wu; Tang, Guang-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2014-09-01

    This study aims at evaluating the anticancer effects of berberine hydrochloride (berberine) and d-limonene, alone and in combination, on human gastric carcinoma cell line MGC803 to determine whether berberine and d-limonene work synergistically and elucidate their mechanisms. MGC803 cells were treated with berberine and d-limonene, alone and in combination, for 24-48 h. The inhibitory effects of these drugs on growth were determined by MTT assay. The combination index and drug reduction index were calculated with the Chou-Talalay method based on the median-effect principle. Flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy were employed to evaluate the effects of both drugs on cell-cycle perturbation and apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 in MGC803 cells. Berberine or d-limonene alone can inhibit the growth of MGC803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Berberine and d-limonene at a combination ratio of 1:4 exhibited a synergistic effect on anti-MGC803 cells. The two drugs distinctly induced intracellular ROS generation, reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), enhanced the expression of caspase-3, and decreased the expression of Bcl-2. The combination of berberine and d-limonene showed more remarkable effects compared with drugs used singly in MGC803 cells. The combination of berberine and d-limonene exerted synergistic anticancer effects on MGC803 cells by cell-cycle arrest, ROS production, and apoptosis induction through the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway.

  17. Synergistic Inhibitory Effect of Berberine and d-Limonene on Human Gastric Carcinoma Cell Line MGC803

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Liu, Dong-Wu; Tang, Guang-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aims at evaluating the anticancer effects of berberine hydrochloride (berberine) and d-limonene, alone and in combination, on human gastric carcinoma cell line MGC803 to determine whether berberine and d-limonene work synergistically and elucidate their mechanisms. MGC803 cells were treated with berberine and d-limonene, alone and in combination, for 24–48 h. The inhibitory effects of these drugs on growth were determined by MTT assay. The combination index and drug reduction index were calculated with the Chou–Talalay method based on the median-effect principle. Flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy were employed to evaluate the effects of both drugs on cell-cycle perturbation and apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 in MGC803 cells. Berberine or d-limonene alone can inhibit the growth of MGC803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Berberine and d-limonene at a combination ratio of 1:4 exhibited a synergistic effect on anti-MGC803 cells. The two drugs distinctly induced intracellular ROS generation, reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), enhanced the expression of caspase-3, and decreased the expression of Bcl-2. The combination of berberine and d-limonene showed more remarkable effects compared with drugs used singly in MGC803 cells. The combination of berberine and d-limonene exerted synergistic anticancer effects on MGC803 cells by cell-cycle arrest, ROS production, and apoptosis induction through the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway. PMID:25045784

  18. The Search for Nonflammable Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    To obtain a high degree of cleanliness without risk of corrosion or hazardous reactivity, hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)-225 is used for cleaning and cleanliness verification of oxygen system components used on NASA fs bipropellant launch vehicles, associated test stands and support equipment. HCFC-225 is a Class II Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS ]II) that was introduced to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113, a Class I ODS solvent that is now banned. To meet environmental regulations to eliminate the use of ozone depleting substances, a replacement solvent is required for HCFC ]225 that is effective at removing oils, greases, and particulate from large oxygen system components, is compatible with materials used in the construction of these systems, and is nonflammable and non ]reactive in enriched oxygen environments. A solvent replacement is also required for aviator fs breathing oxygen systems and other related equipment currently cleaned and verified with HCFC ]225 and stockpiled CFC -113. Requirements and challenges in the search for nonflammable replacement solvents are discussed.

  19. Used Solvent Testing and Reclamation. Volume 1. Cold-Cleaning Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    spectrometer, and specific gravity meter involve buying routine cleaning supplies , and should not exceed $50. Consequently, these methods were...in addition to routine cleaning supplies . The K13V measurement requires periodic supplies of Kauri-butanol solution. TLC analysis requires glass

  20. Selection of a Non-ODC Solvent for Rubber Processing Equipment Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Thornton, T. N.; Semmel, L.; Selvidge, S. A.; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has recently acquired new equipment for the manufacture and processing of rubber and rubber containing items that are used in the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor) system. Work with a previous generation of rubber equipment at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) in the 1970's had involved the use of ODC's such as 1,1,1-Trichloroethane or VOC's such as Toluene as the solvents of choice in cleaning the equipment. Neither of these options is practical today. This paper addresses the selection and screening of candidate cleaning solvents that are not only effective, but also meet the new environmental standards.

  1. Selection of a Non-ODC Solvent for Rubber Processing Equipment Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Thornton, T. N.; Semmel, L.; Selvidge, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has recently acquired new equipment for the manufacture and processing of rubber and rubber containing items that are used in the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) system. Work with a previous generation of rubber equipment at MSFC in the 1970's had involved the use of Oxygen Deficient Center (ODC's) such as 1,1,1-Trichloroethane or VOC's such as Toluene as the solvents of choice in cleaning the equipment. Neither of these options is practical today. This paper addresses the selection and screening of candidate cleaning solvents that are not only effective, but also meet the new environmental standards.

  2. Inhibition of growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer implanted in nude mice by d-limonene

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Guang; Zhan, Li-Bin; Feng, Bing-An; Qu, Ming-Yang; Yu, Li-Hua; Xie, Ji-Hong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanism of d-limonene on the growth and metastasis of gastric cancer in vivo. METHODS: Metastatic model simulating human gastric cancer was established by orthotopic implantation of histologically intact human tumor tissue into gastric wall of nude mice. One percent d-limonene was orally administered at dose of 15 ml/kg every other day for seven weeks. Eight weeks after implantation, tumor weight, inhibition rate, apoptotic index (AI), microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), variation of ultrastructure, and the presence of metastasis were evaluated, respectively, after the mice were sacrificed. RESULTS: The tumor weight was significantly reduced in 5-FU group (2.55 ± 0.28 g), d-limonene group (1.49 ± 0.09 g) and combined treatment group (1.48 ± 0.21 g) compared with the control group(2.73 ± 0.23 g, P < 0.05). In 5-FU group, d-limonene group, combined treatment group, the inhibition rates were 2.60%, 47.58% and 46.84% and 0, respectively; AI was (3.31 ± 0.33)%, (8.26 ± 1.21)%, (20.99 ± 1.84)% and (19.34 ± 2.19)%, respectively; MVD was (8.64 ± 2.81), (16.77 ± 1.39), (5.32 ± 4.26) and (5.86 ± 2.27), respectively; VEGF expression was (45.77 ± 4.79), (41.34 ± 5.41), (29.71 ± 8.92) and (28.24 ± 8.55), respectively. The incidences of peritoneal metastasis also decreased significantly in 5-FU group(77.8%), d-limonene group (20.0%) and combined group (22.2%) compared with control group (100%) versus 62.5%, 30% and 22.2%) (P < 0.05). Liver metastasis was also inhibited and the incidences decreased significantly in 5-FU group, d-limonene group and combined group than that in control group (87.5% vs 55.5%, 20.0% and 22.2% respectively) (P < 0.05). The incidence of ascites in control group, 5-FU group, d-limonene group and combined group was 25.0%, 22.2%, 0, 0, respectively and 12.5%, 11.1% 0, 0, with respect to the metastasis rate to other organs. CONCLUSION: d-limonene has antiangiogenic and

  3. Performance of semi-continuous membrane bioreactor in biogas production from toxic feedstock containing D-Limonene.

    PubMed

    Wikandari, Rachma; Youngsukkasem, Supansa; Millati, Ria; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-10-01

    A novel membrane bioreactor configuration containing both free and encased cells in a single reactor was proposed in this work. The reactor consisted of 120g/L of free cells and 120g/L of encased cells in a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. Microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and d-Limonene were used as the models of substrate and inhibitor for biogas production, respectively. Different concentrations of d-Limonene i.e., 1, 5, and 10g/L were tested, and an experiment without the addition of d-Limonene was prepared as control. The digestion was performed in a semi-continuous thermophilic reactor for 75 days. The result showed that daily methane production in the reactor with the addition of 1g/L d-Limonene was similar to that of control. A lag phase was observed in the presence of 5g/L d-Limonene; however, after 10 days, the methane production increased and reached a similar production to that of the control after 15 days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  5. Issues Related to Cleaning Complex Geometry Surfaces with ODC-Free Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Blake F.; Wurth, Laura A.; Nayate, Pramod D.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Implementing ozone depleting chemicals (ODC)-free solvents into full-scale reusable solid rocket motor cleaning operations has presented problems due to the low vapor pressures of the solvents. Because of slow evaporation, solvent retention is a problem on porous substrates or on surfaces with irregular geometry, such as threaded boltholes, leak check ports, and nozzle backfill joints. The new solvents are being evaluated to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane, which readily evaporates from these surfaces. Selection of the solvents to be evaluated on full-scale hardware was made based on results of subscale tests performed with flat surface coupons, which did not manifest the problem. Test efforts have been undertaken to address concerns with the slow-evaporating solvents. These concerns include effects on materials due to long-term exposure to solvent, potential migration from bolthole threads to seal surfaces, and effects on bolt loading due to solvent retention in threads. Tests performed to date have verified that retained solvent does not affect materials or hardware performance. Process modifications have also been developed to assist drying, and these can be implemented if additional drying becomes necessary.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Startup, shutdown, off D. None of the above ___ 5. When can parts or parts baskets be removed from the... that solvent drains from them freely. ___ 7. During startup, what must be turned on first, the primary... container C. Store in a bucket D. A or B ___ 11. What types of materials are prohibited from being cleaned...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Startup, shutdown, off D. None of the above ___ 5. When can parts or parts baskets be removed from the... that solvent drains from them freely. ___ 7. During startup, what must be turned on first, the primary... container C. Store in a bucket D. A or B ___ 11. What types of materials are prohibited from being cleaned...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Cleaning and Washoff Solvents Chemical name CAS No. 4-Aminobiphenyl 92671 Styrene oxide 96093 Diethyl...-chloroethyl) ether) 111444 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine 122667 Toxaphene (chlorinated camphene) 8001352 2,4...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1296 - Terpene Constituents α-terpinene, d-limonene and p-cymene, of the Extract of Chenopodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-limonene and p-cymene, of the Extract of Chenopodium ambrosioides near ambrosioides as Synthetically..., d-limonene and p-cymene, of the Extract of Chenopodium ambrosioides near ambrosioides as...-terpinene, d-limonene and p-cymene, of the Extract of Chenopodiumambrosioides near ambrosioides as...

  10. Life of Pennzane and 815Z-Lubricated Instrument Bearings Cleaned with Non-CFC Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Jones, William; Predmore, Roamer

    1999-01-01

    This report takes the form of two papers: (1) "Life of Pennzane and 815Z-Lubricated Instrument Bearings cleaned with Non-CFC Solvents" and (2) a published paper, entitled "Instrument bearing life with NON-CFC cleaners". Abstract for paper # 1 : Bearings used in spacecraft mechanisms have historically been cleaned with chlorofluorocarbon CFC-1 13 (Freon) solvents and lubricated with a perfluorinated polyalkylether (PFPE) oils like 815-Z. Little full-scale bearing life test data exists to evaluate the effects of the newer class environmental-friendly bearing cleaners or improved synthetic hydrocarbon space oils like Pennzane. To address the lack of data, a cooperative, bearing life test program was initiated between NASA, Lockheed Martin and MPB. The objective was to obtain comparative long-term, life test data for flight-quality bearings, cleaned with non-CFC solvents versus CFC-1 13 under flight-like conditions with two space oils. A goal was to gain a better understanding of the lubricant surface chemistry effects with such solvents. A second objective was to obtain well-controlled, full-scale bearing life test data with a relatively new synthetic oil (Pennzane), touted as an improvement to Bray 815Z, an oil with considerable space flight history. The second paper, which serves as an attachment, is abstracted below: Bearings used in spacecraft mechanisms have historically been cleaned with chlorofluorocarbon CFC-113 (Freon) solvents and lubricated with a perfluorinated polyalkylether (PFPE) oils like 815-Z. Little full-scale bearing life test data exists to evaluate the effects of the newer class environmental-friendly bearing cleaners or improved synthetic hydrocarbon space oils like Pennzane. To address the lack of data, a cooperative, bearing life test program was initiated between NASA, Lockheed Martin and MPB. The objective was to obtain comparative long-term, life test data for flight-quality bearings, cleaned with non-CFC solvents versus CFC-1 13 under

  11. Oral administration of d-limonene controls inflammation in rat colitis and displays anti-inflammatory properties as diet supplementation in humans.

    PubMed

    d'Alessio, Patrizia A; Ostan, Rita; Bisson, Jean-François; Schulzke, Joerg D; Ursini, Matilde V; Béné, Marie C

    2013-07-10

    To further explore the anti-inflammatory properties of d-Limonene. A rat model was used to compare evolution of TNBS (2,5,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-induced colitis after oral feeding with d-Limonene compared to ibuprofen. Peripheral levels of TNF-α (Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha) were assessed in all animals. Cell cultures of fibroblasts and enterocytes were used to test the effect of d-Limonene respectively on TNFα-induced NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappa B) translocation and epithelial resistance. Finally, plasmatic inflammatory markers were examined in an observational study of diet supplementation with d-Limonene-containing orange peel extract (OPE) in humans. Administered per os at a dose of 10mg/kg p.o., d-Limonene induced a significant reduction of intestinal inflammatory scores, comparable to that induced by ibuprofen. Moreover, d-Limonene-fed rats had significantly lowered serum concentrations of TNF-α compared to untreated TNBS-colitis rats. The anti-inflammatory effect of d-Limonene also involved inhibition of TNFα-induced NF-κB translocation in fibroblast cultures. The application of d-Limonene on colonic HT-29/B6 cell monolayers increased epithelial resistance. Finally, inflammatory markers, especially peripheral IL-6, markedly decreased upon OPE supplementation of elderly healthy subjects submitted or not to 56 days of dietary supplementation with OPE. In conclusion, d-Limonene indeed demonstrates significant anti-inflammatory effects both in vivo and in vitro. Protective effects on the epithelial barrier and decreased cytokines are involved, suggesting a beneficial role of d-Limonene as diet supplement in reducing inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Resistance to pathogens in terpene down-regulated orange fruits inversely correlates with the accumulation of D-limonene in peel oil glands.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Cervera, Magdalena; Redondo, Ana; Alquézar, Berta; Rodrigo, María Jesús; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Palou, Lluís; López, María M; Peña, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are secondary metabolites acting as a language for the communication of plants with the environment. In orange fruits, the monoterpene D-limonene accumulates at very high levels in oil glands from the peel. Drastic down-regulation of D-limonene synthase gene expression in the peel of transgenic oranges harboring a D-limonene synthase transgene in antisense (AS) configuration altered the monoterpene profile in oil glands, mainly resulting in reduced accumulation of D-limonene. This led to fruit resistance against Penicillium digitatum (Pd), Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) and other specialized pathogens. Here, we analyze resistance to pathogens in independent AS and empty vector (EV) lines, which have low, medium or high D-limonene concentrations and show that the level of resistance is inversely related to the accumulation of D-limonene in orange peels, thus explaining the need of high D-limonene accumulation in mature oranges in nature for the efficient attraction of specialized microorganism frugivores.

  13. Antifibrotic effects of D-limonene (5(1-methyl-4-[1-methylethenyl]) cyclohexane) in CCl4 induced liver toxicity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh Bilal; Rehman, Muneeb U; Fatima, Bilques; Ahmad, Bilal; Hussain, Ishraq; Ahmad, Sheikh Pervaiz; Farooq, Adil; Muzamil, Showkeen; Razzaq, Rahil; Rashid, Shahzada Mudasir; Ahmad Bhat, Showkat; Mir, Manzoor Ur Rahman

    2018-03-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential antifibrotic effect of D-Limonene-a component of volatile oils extracted from citrus plants. D-limonene is reported to have numerous therapeutic properties. CCl 4 -intduced model of liver fibrosis in Wistar rats is most widely used model to study chemopreventive studies. CCl 4 -intoxication significantly increased serum aminotransferases and total cholesterol these effects were prevented by cotreatment with D-Limonene. Also, CCl 4 -intoxication caused depletion of glutathione and other antioxidant enzymes while D-Limonene preserved them within normal values. Hydroxyproline and malondialdehyde content was increased markedly by CCl 4 treatment while D-Limonene prevented these alterations. Levels of TNF-α, TGF-β, and α-SMA were also assessed; CCl 4 increased the expression of α-SMA, NF-κB and other downstream inflammatory cascade while D-Limonene co-treatment inhibited them. Collectively these findings indicate that D-Limonene possesses potent antifibrotic effect which may be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Resistance to pathogens in terpene down-regulated orange fruits inversely correlates with the accumulation of D-limonene in peel oil glands

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Cervera, Magdalena; Redondo, Ana; Alquézar, Berta; Rodrigo, María Jesús; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Palou, Lluís; López, María M; Peña, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are secondary metabolites acting as a language for the communication of plants with the environment. In orange fruits, the monoterpene D-limonene accumulates at very high levels in oil glands from the peel. Drastic down-regulation of D-limonene synthase gene expression in the peel of transgenic oranges harboring a D-limonene synthase transgene in antisense (AS) configuration altered the monoterpene profile in oil glands, mainly resulting in reduced accumulation of D-limonene. This led to fruit resistance against Penicillium digitatum (Pd), Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) and other specialized pathogens. Here, we analyze resistance to pathogens in independent AS and empty vector (EV) lines, which have low, medium or high D-limonene concentrations and show that the level of resistance is inversely related to the accumulation of D-limonene in orange peels, thus explaining the need of high D-limonene accumulation in mature oranges in nature for the efficient attraction of specialized microorganism frugivores. PMID:26023857

  15. Preventive and ameliorating effects of citrus D-limonene on dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Shengjie; Gu, Ming; Guan, Yu; Lu, Xiong; Huang, Cheng; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2013-09-05

    D-limonene is a major constituent in citrus essential oil, which is used in various foods as a flavoring agent. Recently, d-limonene has been reported to alleviate fatty liver induced by a high-fat diet. Here we determined the preventive and therapeutic effects of d-limonene on metabolic disorders in mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity. In the preventive treatment, d-limonene decreased the size of white and brown adipocytes, lowered serum triglyceride (TG) and fasting blood glucose levels, and prevented liver lipid accumulations in high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6 mice. In the therapeutic treatment, d-limonene reduced serum TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance, and increased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in obese mice. Using a reporter assay and gene expression analysis, we found that d-limonene activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α signaling, and inhibited liver X receptor (LXR)-β signaling. Our data suggest that the intake of d-limonene may benefit patients with dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia and is a potential dietary supplement for preventing and ameliorating metabolic disorders. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biotransformation of d-Limonene to (+) trans-Carveol by Toluene-Grown Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duetz, Wouter A.; Fjällman, Ann H. M.; Ren, Shuyu; Jourdat, Catherine; Witholt, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    The toluene-degrading strain Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 was found to hydroxylate d-limonene exclusively in the 6-position, yielding enantiomerically pure (+) trans-carveol and traces of (+) carvone. This biotransformation was studied using cells cultivated in chemostat culture with toluene as a carbon and energy source. The maximal specific activity of (+) trans-carveol formation was 14.7 U (g of cells [dry weight])−1, and the final yield was 94 to 97%. Toluene was found to be a strong competitive inhibitor of the d-limonene conversion. Glucose-grown cells did not form any trans-carveol from d-limonene. These results suggest that one of the enzymes involved in toluene degradation is responsible for this allylic monohydroxylation. Another toluene degrader (Rhodococcus globerulus PWD8) had a lower specific activity but was found to oxidize most of the formed trans-carveol to (+) carvone, allowing for the biocatalytic production of this flavor compound. PMID:11375201

  17. Impact of d-limonene synthase up- or down-regulation on sweet orange fruit and juice odor perception.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Peris, Josep E; Redondo, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Costell, Elvira; Carbonell, Inmaculada; Rojas, Cristina; Peña, Leandro

    2017-02-15

    Citrus fruits are characterized by a complex mixture of volatiles making up their characteristic aromas, being the d-limonene the most abundant one. However, its role on citrus fruit and juice odor is controversial. Transgenic oranges engineered for alterations in the presence or concentration of few related chemical groups enable asking precise questions about their contribution to overall odor, either positive or negative, as perceived by the human nose. Here, either down- or up-regulation of a d-limonene synthase allowed us to infer that a decrease of as much as 51 times in d-limonene and an increase of as much as 3.2 times in linalool in juice were neutral for odor perception while an increase of only 3 times in ethyl esters stimulated the preference of 66% of the judges. The ability to address these questions presents exciting opportunities to understand the basic principles of selection of food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Hand Cleaning Solvent Replacement at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keen, Jill M.; DeWeese, Darrell C.; Key, Leigh W.

    1997-01-01

    At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Thiokol Corporation provides the engineering to assemble and prepare the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for launch. This requires hand cleaning over 86 surfaces including metals, adhesives, rubber and electrical insulations, various painted surfaces and thermal protective materials. Due to the phase-out of certain ozone depleting chemical (ODC) solvents, all RSRM hand wipe operations being performed at KSC using l,l,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were eliminated. This presentation summarizes the approach used and the data gathered in the effort to eliminate TCA from KSC hand wipe operations.

  19. D-limonene suppresses doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and inflammation via repression of COX-2, iNOS, and NFκB in kidneys of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Muneeb U; Tahir, Mir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Khan, Rehan; Oday-O-Hamiza; Lateef, Abdul; Hassan, Syed Kazim; Rashid, Sumaya; Ali, Nemat; Zeeshan, Mirza; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-04-01

    D-limonene is a naturally occurring monoterpene and has been found to posses numerous therapeutic properties. In this study, we used D-limonene as a protective agent against the nephrotoxic effects of anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox). Rats were given D-limonene at doses of 5% and 10% mixed with diet for 20 consecutive days. Dox was give at the dose of 20 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally. The protective effects of D-limonene on Dox-induced oxidative stress and inflammation were investigated by assaying oxidative stress biomarkers, lipid peroxidation, serum toxicity markers, proinflammatory cytokines, and expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Nitrite levels. Administration of Dox (20 mg/kg body weight) in rats enhanced renal lipid peroxidation; depleted glutathione content and anti-oxidant enzymes; elevated levels of kidney toxicity markers viz. kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine; enhanced expression of NFκB, COX-2, and iNOS and nitric oxide. Treatment with D-limonene prevented oxidative stress by restoring the levels of antioxidant enzymes, further both doses of 5% and 10% showed significant decrease in inflammatory response. Both the doses of D-limonene significantly decreased the levels of kidney toxicity markers KIM-1, BUN, and creatinine. D-limonene also effectively decreased the Dox induced overexpression of NF-κB, COX-2, and iNOS and nitric oxide. Data from the present study indicate the protective role of D-limonene against Dox-induced renal damage.

  20. Entrapment of a volatile lipophilic aroma compound (d-limonene) in spray dried water-washed oil bodies naturally derived from sunflower seeds (Helianthus annus)☆

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, Ian D.; Linforth, Robert; Trophardy, Gil; Gray, David

    2013-01-01

    Oil bodies are natural emulsions that can be extracted from oil seeds and have previously been shown to be stable after spray drying. The aim of the study was to evaluate for the first time if spray dried water-washed oil bodies are an effective carrier for volatile lipophilic actives (the flavour compound d-limonene was used as an example aroma compound). Water-washed oil bodies were blended with maltodextrin and d-limonene and spray dried using a Buchi B-191 laboratory spray dryer. Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89–93% and 24–27%. Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul. Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82–89%, 7.7–9.1% and 48–50%, 55–59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene. This indicates that whilst additional emulsifiers may be required for future applications of water-washed oil bodies as carriers of lipophilic actives, oil bodies are excellent agents for lipid encapsulation. PMID:24235784

  1. Identification of Organic Sulfate Esters in d-Limonene Ozonolysis SOA Under Acidic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Mueller, C.; Boege, O.; Herrmann, H.

    2006-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components from gas phase ozonolysis of d-limonene were investigated in a series of indoor chamber experiments. The compounds smaller than 300 Da were quantified using capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-ITMS). HPLC coupled to an ESI-TOFMS and an ESI-ITMS was used for structural study of dimmers and oligomers. Only 10% of the produced SOA could be attributed to low molecular weight carboxylic acids (Mw<300). The oxidation products which have molecular weights over 300 were detected regardless of the seed particle acidity but the concentrations of these compounds were much higher for acidic seed particle experiments. Strong signals of the compounds with mass to charge ratios (m/z) 281, 465 and 481 were detected when sulphuric acid was used in the seed particles. These compounds showed a strong fragment of m/z 97 in MS2 or MS3 spectra indicating the presence of sulfate in the structures. HPLC/ESI-TOFMS analysis suggests the elemental compositions of C10H17O7S-, C20H33O10S- and C20H33O11S- for m/z 281, 465 and 481, respectively. Based on MS^{n} and TOFMS results, they are most likely organic sulfate esters, possibly formed by a heterogeneous acid catalyzed reaction of a limonene oxidation product and sulfuric acid in the particle phase. The concentrations of the organic sulfate ester were as high as 3.7 μgm-3 for m/z 281.

  2. Systemic sclerosis and occupational risk factors: role of solvents and cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Maître, Anne; Hours, Martine; Bonneterre, Vincent; Arnaud, Joëlle; Arslan, Marie Tülin; Carpentier, Patrick; Bergeret, Alain; de Gaudemaris, Régis

    2004-12-01

    To analyze occupational and non-occupational exposure factors suspected of being associated with scleroderma (SSc), with a view to inculpating or excluding certain potentially toxic substances (e.g., solvents), thereby contributing to the recognition of such toxins in the field of occupational health. The study comprised 10 men and 83 women diagnosed with SSc between 1995 and 1999 (American College of Rheumatology criteria) and early SSc, and 206 age and sex matched controls. The SSc registry is all-inclusive in the French administrative departments of Isere and Savoie so controls were randomly selected from the general population (using telephone directories) in these departments to ensure full representation. Exposure factors were analyzed for each subject by a personal questionnaire, and an individual evaluation was carried out by an industrial expert. Data were analyzed by conditional logistical regression adjusting for educational level. Construction workers were at significantly higher risk of contracting SSc; odds ratio (OR) = 4.01 (95% confidence interval 1.14-14.09). Analysis by industrial experts identified exposure to certain toxic substances regularly used by these same workers as risk factors for SSc: cleaning products: OR = 1.66 (0.90-3.08) (both sexes) and OR = 1.71 (0.92-3.20) (women only); solvents: OR = 3.23 (1.58-6.63) (both sexes) and OR = 2.80 (1.28-6.11) (women only); synthetic adhesives: OR 25.36 (1.36-472.28) (on 3 exposed cases). Exposure to either cleaning products or solvents emerged as a risk factor for SSc. Exposure factors should be characterized and results of all studies compared to implement appropriate preventive measures in relevant workplaces.

  3. Plasma Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  4. An overview of NASA testing requirements for alternate cleaning solvents used in liquid and gaseous oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, John W.; Davis, S. Eddie

    1995-01-01

    The elimination of CFC-containing cleaning solvents for oxygen systems has prompted the development of a number of alternative cleaning solvents that must now be evaluated not only for cleanability, but compatibility as well. NASA Handbook 8060.1(NHB 8060.1) establishes the requirements for evaluation, testing, and selection of materials for use in oxygen rich environments. Materials intended for use in space vehicles, specified test facilities, and ground support equipment must meet the requirements of this document. In addition to the requirements of NHB 8060.1 for oxygen service, alternative cleaning solvents must also be evaluated in other areas (such as corrosivity, non-metals compatibility, non-volatile residue contamination, etc.). This paper will discuss the testing requirements of NHB 8060.1 and present preliminary results from early screening tests performed at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials Combustion Research Facility.

  5. Exposure to Organic Solvents Used in Dry Cleaning Reduces Low and High Level Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Barbosa, Ingrid Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether exposure to occupational levels of organic solvents in the dry cleaning industry is associated with neurotoxic symptoms and visual deficits in the perception of basic visual features such as luminance contrast and colour, higher level processing of global motion and form (Experiment 1), and cognitive function as measured in a visual search task (Experiment 2). Methods The Q16 neurotoxic questionnaire, a commonly used measure of neurotoxicity (by the World Health Organization), was administered to assess the neurotoxic status of a group of 33 dry cleaners exposed to occupational levels of organic solvents (OS) and 35 age-matched non dry-cleaners who had never worked in the dry cleaning industry. In Experiment 1, to assess visual function, contrast sensitivity, colour/hue discrimination (Munsell Hue 100 test), global motion and form thresholds were assessed using computerised psychophysical tests. Sensitivity to global motion or form structure was quantified by varying the pattern coherence of global dot motion (GDM) and Glass pattern (oriented dot pairs) respectively (i.e., the percentage of dots/dot pairs that contribute to the perception of global structure). In Experiment 2, a letter visual-search task was used to measure reaction times (as a function of the number of elements: 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 100) in both parallel and serial search conditions. Results Dry cleaners exposed to organic solvents had significantly higher scores on the Q16 compared to non dry-cleaners indicating that dry cleaners experienced more neurotoxic symptoms on average. The contrast sensitivity function for dry cleaners was significantly lower at all spatial frequencies relative to non dry-cleaners, which is consistent with previous studies. Poorer colour discrimination performance was also noted in dry cleaners than non dry-cleaners, particularly along the blue/yellow axis. In a new finding, we report that global form and motion thresholds for dry cleaners

  6. Cleaning painted surfaces: evaluation of leaching phenomenon induced by solvents applied for the removal of gel residues.

    PubMed

    Casoli, Antonella; Di Diego, Zaira; Isca, Clelia

    2014-12-01

    Cleaning is one of the most important, delicate, and at the same time controversial processes in the conservation treatment of paintings. Although a strict definition of cleaning would be the removal of dirt, grime, or other accretions (surface cleaning), in the conservation field, cleaning is used in the broader meaning to include thinning/removing altered or “unwanted layers” of materials without damaging or altering the physicochemical properties of the surfaces to be preserved. The cleaning of unvarnished paintings is one of the most critical issues that are currently discussed. Several studies exist regarding different cleaning tools, such as gels, soaps, enzymes, ionic liquids, and foams, as well as various dry methods and lasers, but only a few have been performed on the risk associated with the use of water and organic solvents for the cleaning treatments in relation to the original paint binder. The aim of the study is to verify analytically the behavior of water gelling agents during cleaning treatments and the interaction of the following elements: water or organic solvents applied for the removal of gel residues with the original lipid paint binder. For this purpose, the study was conducted on a fragment of canvas painting (sixteenth to seventeenth century) of Soprintendenza per i Beni Storici, Artistici ed Etnoantropologici del Friuli Venezia Giulia (Superintendence for the Historical, Artistic and Ethno-anthropological Heritage of Friuli Venezia Giulia), Udine by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Non-Volatile Residue (NVR) Contamination from Dry Handling and Solvent Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the testing for Non-Volatile Residue contamination transferred to surfaces from handling and solvent cleaning. Included in the presentation is a list of the items tested, formal work instructions dealing with NVR. There is an explanation of the Gravimetric determination method used to test the NVR in a variety of items, i.e., Gloves, Swabs, Garments, Bagging material, film and Wipes. Another method to test for contamination from NVR is the contact transfer method. The use of this method for testing gloves, garments, bagging material and film is explained. Certain equations use in NVR analysis and the use of a database for testing of NVR in consumables are reviewed.

  8. Testing of advanced liquefaction concepts in HTI Run ALC-1: Coal cleaning and recycle solvent treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    In 1991, the Department of Energy initiated the Advanced Liquefaction Concepts Program to promote the development of new and emerging technology that has potential to reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by direct coal liquefaction. Laboratory research performed by researchers at CAER, CONSOL, Sandia, and LDP Associates in Phase I is being developed further and tested at the bench scale at HTI. HTI Run ALC-1, conducted in the spring of 1996, was the first of four planned tests. In Run ALC-1, feed coal ash reduction (coal cleaning) by oil agglomeration, and recycle solvent quality improvement through dewaxing and hydrotreatmentmore » of the recycle distillate were evaluated. HTI`s bench liquefaction Run ALC-1 consisted of 25 days of operation. Major accomplishments were: 1) oil agglomeration reduced the ash content of Black Thunder Mine coal by 40%, from 5.5% to 3.3%; 2) excellent coal conversion of 98% was obtained with oil agglomerated coal, about 3% higher than the raw Black Thunder Mine coal, increasing the potential product yield by 2-3% on an MAF coal basis; 3) agglomerates were liquefied with no handling problems; 4) fresh catalyst make-up rate was decreased by 30%, with no apparent detrimental operating characteristics, both when agglomerates were fed and when raw coal was fed (with solvent dewaxing and hydrotreating); 5) recycle solvent treatment by dewaxing and hydrotreating was demonstrated, but steady-state operation was not achieved; and 6) there was some success in achieving extinction recycle of the heaviest liquid products. Performance data have not been finalized; they will be available for full evaluation in the new future.« less

  9. Protective Effect of D-Limonene against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Damage in Human Lens Epithelial Cells via the p38 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Gang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, as mediated by ROS, is a significant factor in initiating the development of age-associated cataracts; D-limonene is a common natural terpene with powerful antioxidative properties which occurs naturally in a wide variety of living organisms. It has been shown to have antioxidant effect; we found that D-limonene can effectively prevent the oxidative damage caused by H2O2 and propose that the main mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of D-limonene is the inhibition of HLECs apoptosis. In the present study, we used confocal-fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry analysis, Hoechst staining, H2DCFDA staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunoblot analysis; the results revealed that slightly higher concentrations of D-limonene (125–1800 μM) reduced the H2O2-induced ROS generation and inhibited the H2O2-induced caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation and decreased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Furthermore, it inhibited H2O2-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Thus, we conclude that D-limonene could effectively protect HLECs from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and that its antioxidative effect is significant, thereby increasing the cell survival rate. PMID:26682012

  10. Protective Effect of D-Limonene against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Damage in Human Lens Epithelial Cells via the p38 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Gang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, as mediated by ROS, is a significant factor in initiating the development of age-associated cataracts; D-limonene is a common natural terpene with powerful antioxidative properties which occurs naturally in a wide variety of living organisms. It has been shown to have antioxidant effect; we found that D-limonene can effectively prevent the oxidative damage caused by H2O2 and propose that the main mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of D-limonene is the inhibition of HLECs apoptosis. In the present study, we used confocal-fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry analysis, Hoechst staining, H2DCFDA staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunoblot analysis; the results revealed that slightly higher concentrations of D-limonene (125-1800 μM) reduced the H2O2-induced ROS generation and inhibited the H2O2-induced caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation and decreased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Furthermore, it inhibited H2O2-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Thus, we conclude that D-limonene could effectively protect HLECs from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and that its antioxidative effect is significant, thereby increasing the cell survival rate.

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Pollutants Excluded From Use in... Nickel subsulfide 12035722 Acrylamide 79061 Hexachlorobenzene 118741 Chlordane 57749 1,3-Propane sultone...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Pollutants Excluded From Use in... Nickel subsulfide 12035722 Acrylamide 79061 Hexachlorobenzene 118741 Chlordane 57749 1,3-Propane sultone...

  13. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Pollutants Excluded From Use in... Nickel subsulfide 12035722 Acrylamide 79061 Hexachlorobenzene 118741 Chlordane 57749 1,3-Propane sultone...

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Pollutants Excluded From Use in...

  15. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to d-Limonene Show Changes to the Cell Wall but Not to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Timothy C. R.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    Monoterpenes can, upon hydrogenation, be used as light-fraction components of sustainable aviation fuels. Fermentative production of monoterpenes in engineered microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has gained attention as a potential route to deliver these next-generation fuels from renewable biomass. However, end product toxicity presents a formidable problem for microbial synthesis. Due to their hydrophobicity, monoterpene inhibition has long been attributed to membrane interference, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unsolved. In order to gain a better understanding of the mode of action, we analyzed the composition and structural integrity of the cell envelope as well as the transcriptional response of yeast cells treated with an inhibitory amount of d-limonene (107 mg/liter). We found no alterations in membrane fluidity, structural membrane integrity, or fatty acid composition after the solvent challenge. A 4-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity per cell (using calcofluor white stain) and increased sensitivity to cell wall-degrading enzymes demonstrated that limonene disrupts cell wall properties. Global transcript measurements confirmed the membrane integrity observations by showing no upregulation of ergosterol or fatty acid biosynthesis pathways, which are commonly overexpressed in yeast to reinforce membrane rigidity during ethanol exposure. Limonene shock did cause a compensatory response to cell wall damage through overexpression of several genes (ROM1, RLM1, PIR3, CTT1, YGP1, MLP1, PST1, and CWP1) involved with the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. This is the first report demonstrating that cell wall, rather than plasma membrane, deterioration is the main source of monoterpene inhibition. We show that limonene can alter the structure and function of the cell wall, which has a clear effect on cytokinesis. PMID:23542628

  16. Role of D-Limonene in Autophagy Induced by Bergamot Essential Oil in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Rossella; Cassiano, Maria Gilda Valentina; Ciociaro, Antonella; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Varano, Giuseppe Pasquale; Chiappini, Carlotta; Berliocchi, Laura; Tassorelli, Cristina; Bagetta, Giacinto; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Bergamot (Citrus bergamia, Risso et Poiteau) essential oil (BEO) is a well characterized, widely used plant extract. BEO exerts anxiolytic, analgesic and neuroprotective activities in rodents through mechanisms that are only partly known and need to be further investigated. To gain more insight into the biological effects of this essential oil, we tested the ability of BEO (0.005–0.03%) to modulate autophagic pathways in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. BEO-treated cells show increased LC3II levels and appearance of dot-like formations of endogenous LC3 protein that colocalize with the lysosome marker LAMP-1. Autophagic flux assay using bafilomycin A1 and degradation of the specific autophagy substrate p62 confirmed that the observed increase of LC3II levels in BEO-exposed cells is due to autophagy induction rather than to a decreased autophagosomal turnover. Induction of autophagy is an early and not cell-line specific response to BEO. Beside basal autophagy, BEO also enhanced autophagy triggered by serum starvation and rapamycin indicating that the underlying mechanism is mTOR independent. Accordingly, BEO did not affect the phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser757) and p70S6K (Thr389), two downstream targets of mTOR. Furthermore, induction of autophagy by BEO is beclin-1 independent, occurs in a concentration-dependent manner and is unrelated to the ability of BEO to induce cell death. In order to identify the active constituents responsible for these effects, the two most abundant monoterpenes found in the essential oil, d-limonene (125–750 µM) and linalyl acetate (62.5–375 µM), were individually tested at concentrations comparable to those found in 0.005–0.03% BEO. The same features of stimulated autophagy elicited by BEO were reproduced by d-limonene, which rapidly increases LC3II and reduces p62 levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Linalyl acetate was ineffective in replicating BEO effects; however, it greatly enhanced LC3 lipidation triggered by d-limonene

  17. Role of D-Limonene in autophagy induced by bergamot essential oil in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rossella; Cassiano, Maria Gilda Valentina; Ciociaro, Antonella; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Varano, Giuseppe Pasquale; Chiappini, Carlotta; Berliocchi, Laura; Tassorelli, Cristina; Bagetta, Giacinto; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Bergamot (Citrus bergamia, Risso et Poiteau) essential oil (BEO) is a well characterized, widely used plant extract. BEO exerts anxiolytic, analgesic and neuroprotective activities in rodents through mechanisms that are only partly known and need to be further investigated. To gain more insight into the biological effects of this essential oil, we tested the ability of BEO (0.005-0.03%) to modulate autophagic pathways in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. BEO-treated cells show increased LC3II levels and appearance of dot-like formations of endogenous LC3 protein that colocalize with the lysosome marker LAMP-1. Autophagic flux assay using bafilomycin A1 and degradation of the specific autophagy substrate p62 confirmed that the observed increase of LC3II levels in BEO-exposed cells is due to autophagy induction rather than to a decreased autophagosomal turnover. Induction of autophagy is an early and not cell-line specific response to BEO. Beside basal autophagy, BEO also enhanced autophagy triggered by serum starvation and rapamycin indicating that the underlying mechanism is mTOR independent. Accordingly, BEO did not affect the phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser757) and p70(S6K) (Thr389), two downstream targets of mTOR. Furthermore, induction of autophagy by BEO is beclin-1 independent, occurs in a concentration-dependent manner and is unrelated to the ability of BEO to induce cell death. In order to identify the active constituents responsible for these effects, the two most abundant monoterpenes found in the essential oil, d-limonene (125-750 µM) and linalyl acetate (62.5-375 µM), were individually tested at concentrations comparable to those found in 0.005-0.03% BEO. The same features of stimulated autophagy elicited by BEO were reproduced by D-limonene, which rapidly increases LC3II and reduces p62 levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Linalyl acetate was ineffective in replicating BEO effects; however, it greatly enhanced LC3 lipidation triggered by D-limonene.

  18. Effect of Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycete), Cypermethrin, and D-limonene, alone and combined, on larval mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae Ma14 strain, D-limonene and cypermethrin, alone and combined, on the mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus larvae was evaluated. Eight groups with 25 tick larvae were inoculated with the fungus, eight groups were treated with cypermethrin, eight groups...

  19. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance chlorofluorocarbon-113 was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center and Stennis Space Center have relied upon the solvent Asahiklin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  20. Effect of Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycete), Cypermethrin, and D-Limonene, Alone and Combined, on Larval Mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Prado-Rebolledo, Omar Francisco; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Lezama-Gutiérrez, Roberto; García-Márquez, Luis Jorge; Minchaca-Llerenas, Yureida B; Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Tellez, Guillermo; Hargis, Billy; Skoda, Steven R; Foster, John E

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae Ma14 strain, D-limonene, and cypermethrin, alone and combined, on the mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille larvae was evaluated. Eight separate groups with 25 tick larvae were inoculated with the fungus, cypermethrin, and D-limonene, and four groups were used as untreated controls. The groups were inoculated with serial dilutions of each treatment material: for example, conidial concentrations were 1 × 101, 1 × 102, 1 × 103, 1 × 104, 1 × 105, 1 × 106, 1 × 107, and 1 × 108. A complete randomized experimental design was used. Significant differences were obtained between fungal concentrations, with larval mortalities ranging from 29 to 100%; the D-limonene concentrations showed significant differences, with mortalities that ranged from 47.9 to 82.6%, and cypermethrin mortalities ranged from 69.9 to 89.9% when each was applied alone. In the combined application, the serial dilution of the Ma14 fungus plus cypermethrin at 0.1% concentration caused mortalities ranging from 92.9 to 100%; the mix of serially diluted Ma14 plus D-limonene at 0.1% caused mortalities from 10.3 to 100%; and the mix consisting of serially diluted D-limonene plus cypermethrin at 0.1% caused mortalities from 7.4 to 35.9%. Further laboratory and field research could show that these materials, alone and in combinations, are useful in future tick management and control programs. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. High-oil-load encapsulation of medium-chain triglycerides and D-limonene mixture in modified starch by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Paramita, Vita; Furuta, Takeshi; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2012-02-01

    Oil mixtures of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) and D-limonene in mixing ratios from 10 to 100 wt% were encapsulated in modified starch (wall material) by spray drying to produce oil-rich powders. The oil load (mass ratio of oil mixture to wall material) of the infeed emulsion markedly influenced the properties of the infeed liquid and the characteristics of the resulting powder. The viscosity of the infeed liquid and the particle size of the powder exponentially decreased with increasing oil load, while the emulsion droplet size in the infeed liquid increased. In addition, retention of D-limonene during spray drying also decreased markedly with increasing oil load. Irrespective of the different oil loads and concentrations of the wall material, D-limonene retention was well correlated with the emulsion droplet diameter of the infeed liquid. The encapsulation efficiency of the oil mixture exhibited a maximum value (almost 100%) at an oil load between 0.5 and 1.0, before decreasing at higher oil loads. At an oil load of 2.0, the encapsulation efficiency of D-limonene was reduced to almost zero, while around 40% of the initial MCT was encapsulated in the powder. The increase in oil load also led to increased amounts of surface oil of MCT and D-limonene in the resulting powder due to the increasing emulsion droplet diameter of the infeed liquids. This study proposes the microencapsulation of medium-chain triglycerides under high-oil-load conditions by spray drying. The powders prepared by this process provide significant benefits in terms of rapid energy conversion after consumption without accumulation in the body. Important quality factors of the powder products such as the encapsulation efficiency and the amount of surface oil were examined to understand the optimum process conditions for spray drying. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. SAGE SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS FOR SELECTING INDUSTRIAL SURFACE CLEANING ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes computer software, called SAGE, that can provide not only cleaning recommendations but also general information on various surface cleaning options. In short, it is an advisory system which can provide users with vital information on the cleaning process optio...

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP): Halogenated Solvent Cleaning - 1993 Proposed Rule and Test Method & Notice of Public Hearing (58 FR 62566)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a copy of the Federal Register publication of the November 29, 1993 Proposed Rule and Test Method & Notice of Public Hearing for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP): Halogenated Solvent Cleaning.

  4. Halogenated Solvent Cleaning: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for halogenated solvent cleaner. Find the rule history information, federal register citations, legal authority, and additional resources.

  5. Clean Air Act Guidelines and Standards for Solvent Use and Surface Coating Industry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the solvent use and surface coating industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  6. In vivo immunomodulatory, cumulative skin irritation, sensitization and effect of d-limonene on permeation of 6-mercaptopurine through transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, N S; Hiremath, Shobha Rani Rajeev

    2008-04-01

    Using skin as a port for systemic drug administration, transdermal drug delivery has expanded greatly over the last two decades. Our aim was to formulate the single layer drug-in-adhesive transdermal patch for 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). In vitro permeation study was carried out using modified Franz diffusion cell with and without of different concentration of d-limonene in human cadaver skin. In vivo immunomodulatory was carried out in mice, cumulative skin irritation, sensitization and patch adherence study was done in both mice and human subjects. 6-MP flux increased from 43+/-12.2 microg/cm2h (control) to 162.8+/-32.2 microg/cm2h (6% w/v d-limonene) data was significant (p<0.05), with decrease in the lag time to 35+/-9.3 min compared to control of 90 +/-15.3 min. In vivo immunomodulatory effect was shown in the Balb/c mice with 100 mumol/kg/body wt of animal for 5d (one dose/d) of d-limonene. WBC count of 13469 cells/mm peak was observed on 12th day, bone marrow cells of 26.3 x 10(6) cells/femur and alpha-esterase positive cells of 1259+/-328.4 cells/4000 bone marrow cells. Cumulative skin irritation, sensitisation and patch adherence in animals and human subjects showed no skin irritation and sensitization. Patch adhesion was greater than 90.0% respectively in both human subjects and mice. The percentage of human subjects with adhesive residue was significantly less with scores of zero. d-Limonene proved as good chemical enhancer by increasing in the skin permeability with shortened the lag time. It proved that therapeutic amount of 6-MP can be delivered through transdermal drug delivery.

  7. Fat and fibre interfere with the dramatic effect that nanoemulsified d-limonene has on the heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Maté, Javier; Periago, Paula M; Ros-Chumillas, María; Grullón, Coralin; Huertas, Juan Pablo; Palop, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    The application of d-limonene in form of nanoemulsion has been proved to reduce dramatically the thermal resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in culture media. The present research shows very promising results on the application in food products. The thermal resistance of L. monocytogenes was reduced 90 times when 0.5 mM nanoemulsified d-limonene was added to apple juice. This is the biggest reduction in the heat resistance of a microorganism caused by an antimicrobial described ever. However, no effect was found in carrot juice. A carrot juice system was prepared in an attempt to unravel which juice constituents were responsible for the lack of effect. When fat and fibre were not included in the carrot juice system formulation, the thermal resistance of L. monocytogenes was, again, dramatically reduced in presence of nanoemulsified d-limonene, so these components were shown to interfere with the effect. Once this interaction with food constituents becomes solved, the addition of nanoemulsified antimicrobials would allow to reduce greatly the intensity of the thermal treatments currently applied in the food processing industry. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon the solvent AsahiKlin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  9. Validation of Alternatives to High Volatile Organic Compound Solvents Used in Aeronautical Antifriction Bearing Cleaning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-17

    Name, address, telephone number, and technical point of contact at company supplying product. (3) Material safety data sheet (MSDS) and label...existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments...Depot level maintenance cleaning. Data analysis and interpretation are based on analytical test results as well as visual inspections performed on

  10. X-Ray Fluorescence Solvent Detection at the Substrate-Adhesive Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurth, Laura; Evans, Kurt; Weber, Bart; Headrick, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    tag element can then be mapped by its characteristic x-ray emission using either x-ray fluorescence, or electron-beam energy-and wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The direct mapping techniques avoid issues of different diffusion or migration rates of solvents and elemental tags, while the indirect techniques avoid spectral resolution issues in cases where solvents and substrates have adjacent or overlapping peaks. In this study, cross-section component indirect mapping is being evaluated as a method for measuring migration of d-limonene based solvents in glass-cloth phenolic composite (GCP) prior to and during subsequent bonding and epoxy adhesive cure.

  11. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  12. Contamination of Critical Surfaces from NVR Glove Residues Via Dry Handling and Solvent Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Gloves are often used to prevent the contamination of critical surfaces during handling. The type of glove chosen for use should be the glove that produces the least amount of non-volatile residue (NVR). This paper covers the analysis of polyethylene, nitrile, latex, vinyl, and polyurethane gloves using the contact transfer and gravimetric determination methods covered in the NASA GSFC work instruction Gravimetric Determination and Contact Transfer of Non-volatile Residue (NVR) in Cleanroom Glove Samples, 541-WI-5330.1.21 and in the ASTM Standard E-1731M-95, Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Non-Volatile Residue from Cleanroom Gloves. The tests performed focus on contamination of critical surfaces at the molecular level. The study found that for the most part, all of the gloves performed equally well in the contact transfer testing. However, the polyethylene gloves performed the best in the gravimetric determination testing, and therefore should be used whenever solvent contact is a possibility. The nitrile gloves may be used as a substitute for latex gloves when latex sensitivity is an issue. The use of vinyl gloves should be avoided, especially if solvent contact is a possibility. A glove database will be established by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Code 541 to compile the results from future testing of new gloves and different glove lots.

  13. Engineering d-limonene synthase down-regulation in orange fruit induces resistance against the fungus Phyllosticta citricarpa through enhanced accumulation of monoterpene alcohols and activation of defence.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Kava, Vanessa; Latorre-García, Lorena; da Silva, Geraldo J; G Pereira, Rosana; Glienke, Chirlei; Ferreira-Maba, Lisandra S; Vicent, Antonio; Shimada, Takehiko; Peña, Leandro

    2018-03-24

    Terpene volatiles play an important role in the interactions between specialized pathogens and fruits. Citrus black spot (CBS), caused by the fungus Phyllosticta citricarpa, is associated with crop losses in different citrus-growing areas worldwide. The pathogen may infect the fruit for 20-24 weeks after petal fall, but the typical hard spot symptoms appear when the fruit have almost reached maturity, caused by fungal colonization and the induction of cell lysis around essential oil cavities. d-Limonene represents approximately 95% of the total oil gland content in mature orange fruit. Herein, we investigated whether orange fruit with reduced d-limonene content in peel oil glands via an antisense (AS) approach may affect fruit interaction with P. citricarpa relative to empty vector (EV) controls. AS fruit showed enhanced resistance to the fungus relative to EV fruit. Because of the reduced d-limonene content, an over-accumulation of linalool and other monoterpene alcohols was found in AS relative to EV fruit. A global gene expression analysis at 2 h and 8 days after inoculation with P. citricarpa revealed the activation of defence responses in AS fruit via the up-regulation of different pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes, probably as a result of enhanced constitutive accumulation of linalool and other alcohols. When assayed in vitro and in vivo, monoterpene alcohols at the concentrations present in AS fruit showed strong antifungal activity. We show here that terpene engineering in fruit peels could be a promising method for the development of new strategies to obtain resistance to fruit diseases. © 2018 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both NASA and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This presentation summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned. It also demonstrates the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  15. Clean synthesis of biolubricant range esters using novel liquid lipase enzyme in solvent free medium.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Jayati; Aila, Mounika; Sharma, Chandra Dutt; Gupta, Piyush; Kaul, Savita

    2015-01-01

    In view of the rising global problems of environment pollution and degradation, the present process provides a 'green solution' to the synthesis of higher esters of lubricant range, more specifically in the range C12-C36, using different combinations of acids and alcohols, in a single step reaction. The esters produced are biodegradable in nature and have a plethora of uses, such as in additives, as lubricating oils and other hydraulic fluids. The enzymatic esterification was performed using liquid (non-immobilized or free) lipase enzyme, without any additional organic solvent. Soluble lipase proves to be superior to immobilized enzymes as it is more cost effective and provides a faster process for the production of higher esters of lubricant range. An interesting finding was, that the lipase enzyme showed higher conversion rates with increasing carbon number of straight chain alcohols and acids. Reactions were carried out for the optimization of initial water concentration, temperature, pH of the substrate mixture and the chain length of the substrates. Under optimized conditions, the method was suitable to achieve ~ 99% conversion. Thus, the process provides an environment friendly, enzymatic alternative to the chemical route which is currently used in the industrial synthesis of lubricant components.

  16. α-Pinene, 3-carene and d-limonene in indoor air of Polish apartments: the impact on air quality and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia; Namieśnik, Jacek; Zabiegała, Bożena

    2014-01-15

    Monoterpenes are among most ubiquitous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to be detected in indoor air. Since the quality of indoor air is considered important for inhabitants' well-being, the present study aimed at investigating impact of human activity on levels of selected monoterpenes applying passive sampling technique followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry. One of the objectives of the present work was to identify and characterize main emission sources as well as to investigate relationship between selected monoterpenes in indoor air. Concentration levels obtained for studied monoterpenes varied from 3 μg m(-3) for 3-carene to 1261 μg m(-3) for d-limonene. D-limonene was reported the most abundant of studied monoterpenes in indoor air. The strong correlation observed between monoterpenes suggests that studied compounds originate from same emission sources, while the I/O >1 proves the strong contribution of endogenous emission sources. The in-depth study of day-night fluctuations in concentrations of monoterpenes lead to the conclusion that human presence and specific pattern of behavior strongly influences presence and concentrations of VOCs in indoor environment. The evaluation of human exposure to selected monoterpenes via inhalation of air revealed that infants, toddlers and young children were the highly exposed individuals. © 2013.

  17. Attenuation by d-limonene of sodium chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Yano, H; Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Baba, M; Sakai, N; Uedo, N

    1999-08-27

    The effects of prolonged administration of d-limonene, a monocyclic monoterpene, on sodium chloride-enhanced induction of gastric carcinogenesis by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, the labeling and apoptotic indices, and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity of gastric cancers were investigated in Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of carcinogen treatment, rats were given chow pellets containing 10% sodium chloride and 1% limonene ad libitum. In week 52, the incidence of gastric cancers, the labeling index and ODC activity were significantly higher and the apoptotic index was significantly lower in rats given sodium chlolide than in untreated control rats. However, in rats given both sodium chloride and d-limonene, the incidence of gastric cancers, the labeling index and ODC activity were significantly lower and the apoptotic index was significantly higher than in rats given sodium chloride alone. Our findings suggest that limonene attenuates the gastric carcinogenesis enhanced by sodium chloride via increased apoptosis and decreased ODC activity in gastric cancers. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Early LC3 lipidation induced by d-limonene does not rely on mTOR inhibition, ERK activation and ROS production and it is associated with reduced clonogenic capacity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berliocchi, Laura; Chiappini, Carlotta; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Gentile, Debora; Cerri, Silvia; Russo, Rossella; Bagetta, Giacinto; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana

    2018-02-01

    d-Limonene is a natural monoterpene abundant in Citrus essential oils. It is endowed with several biological activities, including inhibition of carcinogenesis and promotion of tumour regression. Recently, d-limonene has been shown to modulate autophagic markers in vitro at concentrations found in vivo, in clinical pharmacokinetic studies. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process serving as both an adaptive metabolic response and a quality control mechanism. Because autophagy defects have been linked to a wide range of human pathologies, including neurodegeneration and cancer, there is a need for new pharmacological tools to control deregulated autophagy. To better understand the effects of d-limonene on autophagy, to identify the molecular mechanisms through which this monoterpene rapidly triggers LC3 lipidation and to evaluate the role for autophagy in long-term effects of d-limonene. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells were used. Endogenous LC3-II levels were evaluated by western blotting. Autophagic flux assay was performed using bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine. Intracellular distribution of LC3 protein was studied by confocal microscopy analysis of LC3B-GFP transduced cells. Expression of lysosomal-membrane protein LAMP-1 was assessed by immunofluorescence analysis. Phosphorylated levels of downstream substrates of mTOR kinase (p70S6 kinase, 4E-BP1, and ULK1) and ERK were analyzed by western blotting. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by live confocal microscopy of cells loaded with CellROX ® Green Reagent. Clonogenic assay was used to evaluate the ability of treated cells to proliferate and form colonies. LC3 lipidation promoted by d-limonene correlates with autophagosome formation and stimulation of basal autophagy. LC3 lipidation does not rely on inhibition of mTOR kinase, which instead appears to be transiently activated. In addition, d-limonene rapidly activates ERK and

  19. Evaluation of AK-225(R), Vertrel(R) MCA and HFE A 7100 as Alternative Solvents for Precision Cleaning and Verification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, Orlando; Trizzino, Mary; Fedderson, Bryan

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Materials Science Division conducted a study to evaluate alternative solvents for CFC-113 in precision cleaning and verification on typical samples that are used in the KSC environment. The effects of AK-225(R), Vertrel(R), MCA, and HFE A 7100 on selected metal and polymer materials were studied over 1, 7 and 30 day test times. This report addresses a study on the compatibility aspects of replacement solvents for materials in aerospace applications.

  20. A green procedure using ozone for Cleaning-in-Place in the beverage industry.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Wataru; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-06-01

    Cleaning-in-Place (CIP) in the beverage industry is typically carried out in production lines with alkaline and acidic solutions with detergents. This cleaning not only produces alkaline and acidic wastewater with detergents but also takes significant time. One of the important targets for CIP is adsorbed odorous compounds on gaskets, hence, we have tried to establish a rapid and green CIP process to remove traces of such compounds, especially d-limonene, an odorous component of orange juice, using two approaches; an ozone cleaning method and a change of gasket material from ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber to silicone rubber. By changing the gasket material from EPDM rubber to silicone rubber, the removability of d-limonene by typical alkaline and acidic cleanings with detergents was improved. However, complete removal of 4 mg g(-1) of d-limonene on both EPDM and silicone gaskets could not be achieved even using a series of conventional cleaning procedures that included alkaline and acidic cleaning for 220 min. Ozone treatment dramatically improved the removability of d-limonene, removing 87% from the EPDM gasket at 60 min and 100% from the silicone gasket at 30 min. The combination of the silicone gasket and ozone treatment resulted in the most effective cleaning. The main removal mechanism for ozone treatment was confirmed to be oxidation by molecular ozone. Effectiveness of changing the gasket material from EPDM rubber to silicone rubber in reducing residual amounts of odorous compounds adsorbed on the gaskets was also confirmed for furfural and 4-vinylguaiacol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DETAILED ANALYSIS OF SOA ORIGINATING FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF D-LIMONENE IN THE PRESENCE OF NO X AND UV LIGHT AND ITS IMPLICATION TO AMBIENT PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed analysis was carried out of the aerosol phase originated from the photooxidation of d-limonene in the presence of NOx and artificial light with the analytical emphasis on the identification of oxygenated organic compounds. The major components included six ...

  2. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, H. D.; Mitchell, M. A.; McMillian, J. H.; Farner, B. R.; Harper, S. A.; Peralta, S. F.; Lowrey, N. M.; Ross, H. R.; Juarez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have used hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), a Class II ozone-depleting substance, to safety clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems and associated test facilities. In 2012 through 2014, test laboratories at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center-White Sands Test Facility collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify an environmentally preferred replacement for HCFC-225. Candidate solvents were selected, a test plan was developed, and the products were tested for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Honewell Soltice (TradeMark) Performance Fluid (trans-1-chloro-3,3, 3-trifluoropropene) was selected to replace HCFC-225 at NASA's MSFC and SSC rocket propulsion test facilities.

  3. Growth-arresting Activity of Acmella Essential Oil and its Isolated Component D-Limonene (1, 8 P-Mentha Diene) against Trichophyton rubrum (Microbial Type Culture Collection 296).

    PubMed

    Padhan, Diptikanta; Pattnaik, Smaranika; Behera, Ajaya Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Spilanthes acmella is used as a remedy in toothache complaints by the tribal people of Western part of Odisha, India. The objective of this study was to study the growth-arresting activity of an indigenous Acmella essential oil (EO) ( S. acmella Murr, Asteraceae ) and its isolated component, d-limonene against Trichophyton rubrum (microbial type culture collection 296). The EO was extracted from flowers of indigenous S. acmella using Clevenger's apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was carried out to isolate the major constituent. The isolated fraction was subjected to fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The antidermatophytic activity was screened for using "disc diffusion" and "slant dilution" method followed by optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. The molecular dockings were made between d-limonene with cell wall synthesis-related key enzymes (14 methyl deaminase and monooxygenase). The GC-MS analysis EO had inferred the presence of 7 number of major (≥2%) components. The component with highest peak area (%) was found to be 41.02. The HPLC-isolated fraction was identified as d-limonene (1,8 p-Mentha-diene) by FTIR and NMR. Qualitative and quantitative assays had suggested the growth inhibitory activity of Acmella EO and its component. Shrinkage, evacuation, cell wall puncture, and leakage of cellular constituents by the activity of Acmella oil and d-limonene were evidenced from optical, SEM, and TEM studies. The computer simulation had predicted the binding strengths of d-limonene and fluconazole with dermatophyte cell wall enzymes. There could have been synergistic action of all or some of compounds present in indigenous Acmella EO. There was presence of seven number of (d-limonene, ocimene, β-myrcene, cyclohexene, 3-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-6-methylene,

  4. I{ Relationship between source clean up and mass flux of chlorinated solvents in low permeability settings with fractures}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerg, P. L.; Chambon, J. C.; Christiansen, C. M.; Broholm, M. M.; Binning, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contamination by chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethylene (PCE), often occurs via leaching from complex sources located in low permeability sediments such as clayey tills overlying aquifers. Clayey tills are mostly fractured, and contamination migrating through the fractures spreads to the low permeability matrix by diffusion. This results in a long term source of contamination due to back-diffusion. Leaching from such sources is further complicated by microbial degradation under anaerobic conditions to sequentially form the daughter products trichloroethylene, cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. This process can be enhanced by addition of electron donors and/or bioaugmentation and is termed Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD). This work aims to improve our understanding of the physical, chemical and microbial processes governing source behaviour under natural and enhanced conditions. That understanding is applied to risk assessment, and to determine the relationship and time frames of source clean up and plume response. To meet that aim, field and laboratory observations are coupled to state of the art models incorporating new insights of contaminant behaviour. The long term leaching of chlorinated ethenes from clay aquitards is currently being monitored at a number of Danish sites. The observed data is simulated using a coupled fracture flow and clay matrix diffusion model. Sequential degradation is represented by modified Monod kinetics accounting for competitive inhibition between the chlorinated ethenes. The model is constructed using Comsol Multiphysics, a generic finite- element partial differential equation solver. The model is applied at well characterised field sites with respect to hydrogeology, fracture network, contaminant distribution and microbial processes (lab and field experiments). At one of the study sites (Sortebrovej), the source areas are situated in a clayey till with fractures and

  5. Quantitative Intensity Studies of Three Gas-Phase Monoterpenes in the Infrared: α-PINENE, β-PINENE and D-Limonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2013-06-01

    Monoterpenes are a class of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) whose general formula is C_{10}H_{16}. Like other VOCs, monoterpenes play an important role in the atmosphere as they are produced by vegetation in large quantities, and have recently been discovered in biomass burning plumes. Absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities are reported in the 600 - 6500 cm^{-1} region for three monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene and d-limonene. The pressure broadened (1 atmosphere N_2) spectra were recorded in a 19.96 cm path length cell with 0.112 cm^{-1} resolution at two temperatures and a minimum of six different partial pressures using a Bruker 66V FTIR. These data are part of the PNNL Spectral Database, which contains quantitative spectra of over 600 molecules. Potential atmospheric applications will be discussed Timothy J. Johnson, Luisa T. M. Profeta, Robert L. Sams, David W. T. Griffith, Robert L. Yokelson Vibrational Spectroscopy {53}(1);97-102 (2010).

  6. Principal component analysis (PCA) of volatile terpene compounds dataset emitted by genetically modified sweet orange fruits and juices in which a D-limonene synthase was either up- or down-regulated vs. empty vector controls.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Peris, Josep E; Redondo, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Peña, Leandro

    2016-12-01

    We have categorized the dataset from content and emission of terpene volatiles of peel and juice in both Navelina and Pineapple sweet orange cultivars in which D-limonene was either up- (S), down-regulated (AS) or non-altered (EV; control) ("Impact of D-limonene synthase up- or down-regulation on sweet orange fruit and juice odor perception"(A. Rodríguez, J.E. Peris, A. Redondo, T. Shimada, E. Costell, I. Carbonell, C. Rojas, L. Peña, (2016)) [1]). Data from volatile identification and quantification by HS-SPME and GC-MS were classified by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) individually or as chemical groups. AS juice was characterized by the higher influence of the oxygen fraction, and S juice by the major influence of ethyl esters. S juices emitted less linalool compared to AS and EV juices.

  7. "Solvent-free" ultrasound-assisted extraction of lipids from fresh microalgae cells: a green, clean and scalable process.

    PubMed

    Adam, Fanny; Abert-Vian, Maryline; Peltier, Gilles; Chemat, Farid

    2012-06-01

    In order to comply with criteria of green chemistry concepts and sustainability, a new procedure has been performed for solvent-free ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) to extract lipids from fresh Nannochloropsis oculata biomass. Through response surface methodology (RSM) parameters affecting the oil recovery were optimized. Optimum conditions for oil extraction were estimated as follows: (i) 1000 W ultrasonic power, (ii) 30 min extraction time and (iii) biomass dry weight content at 5%. Yields were calculated by the total fatty acids methyl esters amounts analyzed by GC-FID-MS. The maximum oil recovery was around 0.21%. This value was compared with the one obtained with the conventional extraction method (Bligh and Dyer). Furthermore, effect of temperature on the yield was also investigated. The overall results show an innovative and effective extraction method adapted for microalgae oil recovery, without using solvent and with an enable scaling up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A low viscosity, low boiling point, clean solvent system for the rapid crystallisation of highly specular perovskite films

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Nakita K.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Wenger, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite-based photovoltaics have, in recent years, become poised to revolutionise the solar industry. While there have been many approaches taken to the deposition of this material, one-step spin-coating remains the simplest and most widely used method in research laboratories. Although spin-coating is not recognised as the ideal manufacturing methodology, it represents a starting point from which more scalable deposition methods, such as slot-dye coating or ink-jet printing can be developed. Here, we introduce a new, low-boiling point, low viscosity solvent system that enables rapid, room temperature crystallisation of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite films, without the use of strongly coordinating aproticmore » solvents. Through the use of this solvent, we produce dense, pinhole free films with uniform coverage, high specularity, and enhanced optoelectronic properties. We fabricate devices and achieve stabilised power conversion efficiencies of over 18% for films which have been annealed at 100 degrees C, and over 17% for films which have been dried under vacuum and have undergone no thermal processing. This deposition technique allows uniform coating on substrate areas of up to 125 cm2, showing tremendous promise for the fabrication of large area, high efficiency, solution processed devices, and represents a critical step towards industrial upscaling and large area printing of perovskite solar cells.« less

  9. Cleaning products and air fresheners: emissions and resulting concentrations of glycol ethers and terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Singer, B C; Destaillats, H; Hodgson, A T; Nazaroff, W W

    2006-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify emissions and concentrations of glycol ethers and terpenoids from cleaning product and air freshener use in a 50-m3 room ventilated at approximately 0.5/h. Five cleaning products were applied full-strength (FS); three were additionally used in dilute solution. FS application of pine-oil cleaner (POC) yielded 1-h concentrations of 10-1300 microg/m3 for individual terpenoids, including alpha-terpinene (90-120), d-limonene (1000-1100), terpinolene (900-1300), and alpha-terpineol (260-700). One-hour concentrations of 2-butoxyethanol and/or d-limonene were 300-6000 microg/m3 after FS use of other products. During FS application including rinsing with sponge and wiping with towels, fractional emissions (mass volatilized/dispensed) of 2-butoxyethanol and d-limonene were 50-100% with towels retained, and approximately 25-50% when towels were removed after cleaning. Lower fractions (2-11%) resulted from dilute use. Fractional emissions of terpenes from FS use of POC were approximately 35-70% with towels retained, and 20-50% with towels removed. During floor cleaning with dilute solution of POC, 7-12% of dispensed terpenes were emitted. Terpene alcohols were emitted at lower fractions: 7-30% (FS, towels retained), 2-9% (FS, towels removed), and 2-5% (dilute). During air-freshener use, d-limonene, dihydromyrcenol, linalool, linalyl acetate, and beta-citronellol) were emitted at 35-180 mg/day over 3 days while air concentrations averaged 30-160 microg/m3. While effective cleaning can improve the healthfulness of indoor environments, this work shows that use of some consumer cleaning agents can yield high levels of volatile organic compounds, including glycol ethers--which are regulated toxic air contaminants--and terpenes that can react with ozone to form a variety of secondary pollutants including formaldehyde and ultrafine particles. Persons involved in cleaning, especially those who clean occupationally or often, might encounter

  10. Accelerated solvent extraction by using an 'in-line' clean-up approach for multiresidue analysis of pesticides in organic honey.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Luca Maria; Labella, Giuseppe Federico; Panseri, Sara; Britti, Domenico; Galbiati, Fabrizio; Villa, Roberto; Arioli, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The worldwide loss of honeybee colonies may be due to their exposure to several contaminants (i.e., pesticides); such contamination may also have impacts on consumers' health. Therefore, it is essential to develop quick and new methods to detect several pesticide residues in honey samples. In this study, the effectiveness of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was compared with QuEChERS methods for the analysis of 53 pesticides in organic honey by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Two simple and rapid ASE methods with 'in-line' clean-up were optimised and then compared with QuEChERS. Hexane-ethyl acetate (Hex:EtAc) and Florisil were chosen as extraction solvent and retainer for the first ASE method respectively; acetonitrile and a primary-secondary amine phase (ACN-PSA) were selected for the second ASE method. The methods were validated according to the European Union SANTE/11945/2015 guidelines. The validation parameters showed that QuEChERS and ASE with PSA as retainer had better repeatability than ASE with Hex:EtAc and Florisil. In particular, QuEChERS and ASE (ACN-PSA) showed good recovery, according to the SANTE criteria, for the majority of investigated pesticides. Conversely, when ASE with Hex:EtAc and Florisil was used as the retainer, several compounds showed recoveries lower than the acceptable value of 70%. The ASE in-line method was finally applied to evaluate pesticide concentration in organic honey samples.

  11. Genesis Solar Wind Sample 61422: Experiment in Variation of Sequence of Cleaning Solvent for Removing Carbon-Bearing Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Allums, K. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The recovered Genesis collector fragments are heavily contaminated with crash-derived particulate debris. However, megasonic treatment with ultra-pure-water (UPW; resistivity (is) greater than18 meg-ohm-cm) removes essentially all particulate contamination greater than 5 microns in size [e.g.1] and is thus of considerable importance. Optical imaging of Si sample 60336 revealed the presence of a large C-rich particle after UPW treatment that was not present prior to UPW. Such handling contamination is occasionally observed, but such contaminants are normally easily removed by UPW cleaning. The 60336 particle was exceptional in that, surprisingly, it was not removed by additional UPW or by hot xylene or by aqua regia treatment. It was eventually removed by treatment with NH3-H2O2. Our best interpretation of the origin of the 60336 particle was that it was adhesive from the Post-It notes used to stabilize samples for transport from Utah after the hard landing. It is possible that the insoluble nature of the 60336 particle comes from interaction of the Post-It adhesive with UPW. An occasional bit of Post-It adhesive is not a major concern, but C particulate contamination also occurs from the heat shield of the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) and this is mixed with inorganic contamination from the SRC and the Utah landing site. If UPW exposure also produced an insoluble residue from SRC C, this would be a major problem in chemical treatments to produce clean surfaces for analysis. This paper reports experiments to test whether particulate contamination was removed more easily if UPW treatment was not used.

  12. ODC-Free Solvent Implementation Issues for Vulcanized Rubber and Bond Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, James R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thiokol Propulsion has worked extensively to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) with ozone depleting chemicals (ODC)-free solvents for use in the manufacture of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for the Space Shuttle Program. As Thiokol has transitioned from sub-scale to full-scale testing and implementation of these new solvents, issues have been discovered which have required special attention. The original intent of Thiokol's solvent replacement strategy was to replace TCA with a single drop-in solvent for all equivalent applications. We have learned that a single candidate does not exist for replacing TCA. Solvent incompatibility with process materials has caused us to seek for niche solvents and/or processing changes that provide an ODC-free solution for special applications. This paper addresses some of the solvent incompatibilities, which have lead to processes changes and possible niche solvent usage. These incompatibilities were discovered during full-scale testing of ODC-free solvents and relate to vulcanized rubber and bond systems in the RSRM. Specifically, the following items are presented: (1) Cure effects of d-limonene based solvents on Silica Filled Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (SF-EPDM) rubber. During full-scale test operations, Thiokol discovered that d-limonene (terpene) based solvents inhibit the cure of EPDM rubber. Subsequent testing showed the same issue with Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR). Also discussed are efforts to minimize uncured rubber exposure to solvents; and (2) Cured bond system sensitivity to ODC-free solvents. During full scale testing it was discovered that a natural rubber to steel vulcanized bond could degrade after prolonged exposure to ODC-free solvents. Follow on testing showed that low vapor pressure and residence time seemed to be most likely cause for failure.

  13. A green analytical chemistry approach for lipid extraction: computation methods in the selection of green solvents as alternative to hexane.

    PubMed

    Cascant, Mari Merce; Breil, Cassandra; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne Silvie; Chemat, Farid

    2017-05-01

    There is a great interest in finding alternatives and green solvents in extraction processes to replace petroleum based solvents. In order to investigate these possibilities, computational methods, as Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) and conductor-like screening model for real solvent (COSMO-RS), were used in this work to predict the solvation power of a series of solvents in salmon fish lipids. Additionally, experimental studies were used to evaluate the performance in lipids extraction using 2-methyltetrahydrofurane, cyclopentyl methyl ether, dimethyl carbonate, isopropanol, ethanol, ethyl acetate, p-cymene and d-limonene compared with hexane. Lipid classes of extracts were obtained by using high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), whereas gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID) technique was employed to obtain fatty acid profiles. Some differences between theoretical and experimental results were observed, especially regarding the behavior of p-cymene and d-limonene, which separate from the predicted capability. Results obtained from HPTLC indicated that p-cymene and d-limonene extract triglycerides (TAGs) and diglycerides (DAGs) at levels of 73 and 19%, respectively, whereas the other studied extracts contain between 75 and 76% of TAGs and between 16 and 17% of DAGs. Fatty acid profiles, obtained by using GC-FID, indicated that saturated fatty acids (SFAs) between 19.5 and 19.9% of extracted oil, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the range between 43.5 and 44.9%, and PUFAs between 31.2 and 34.6% were extracted. p-Cymene and limonene extracts contained lower percentages than the other studied solvents of some PUFAs due probably to the fact that these unsaturated fatty acids are more susceptible to oxidative degradation than MUFAs. Ethyl acetate has been found to be the best alternative solvent to hexane for the extraction of salmon oil lipids. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Cleaning Products and Air Fresheners: Emissions and ResultingConcentrations of Glycol Ethers and Terpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Destaillat, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.

    2005-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify emissions and concentrations of glycol ethers and terpenoids from cleaning product and air freshener use in a 50-m{sup 3} room ventilated at {approx}0.5 h{sup -1}. Five cleaning products were applied full-strength (FS); three were additionally used in dilute solution. FS application of pine-oil cleaner (POC) yielded 1-h concentrations of 10-1300 {micro}g m{sup -3} for individual terpenoids, including {alpha}-terpinene (90-120), d-limonene (1000-1100), terpinolene (900-1300), and {alpha}-terpineol (260-700). One-hour concentrations of 2-butoxyethanol and/or dlimonene were 300-6000 {micro}g m{sup -3} after FS use of other products. During FS application including rinsing with sponge and wiping with towels, fractionalmore » emissions (mass volatilized/dispensed) of 2-butoxyethanol and d-limonene were 50-100% with towels retained, {approx}25-50% when towels were removed after cleaning. Lower fractions (2-11%) resulted from dilute use. Fractional emissions of terpenes from FS use of POC were {approx}35-70% with towels retained, 20-50% with towels removed. During floor cleaning with dilute solution of POC, 7-12% of dispensed terpenes were emitted. Terpene alcohols were emitted at lower fractions: 7-30% (FS, towels retained), 2-9% (FS, towels removed), and 2-5% (dilute). During air-freshener use, d-limonene, dihydromyrcenol, linalool, linalyl acetate, and {beta}-citronellol were emitted at 35-180 mg d{sup -1} over three days while air concentrations averaged 30-160 {micro}g m{sup -3}.« less

  15. Method for cleaning and passivating a metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, George B. (Inventor); Carpenter, Norman F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A cleaning solvent useful in the cleaning of metal surfaces, e.g. nickle-iron alloys, contains sulfamic acid, citric acid, a solvent for hydrocarbon residues, and a surfactant. Metal surfaces are cleaned by contacting the surface with the cleaning solvent and then passivated by contact with aqueous solutions of citric acid or sodium nitrite or a combination of the two.

  16. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  17. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  18. Cleaning With Supercritical CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide effective industrial cleaning agent. Replaces conventional halocarbon solvents for degreasing parts becoming coated with oil during such manufacturing procedures as forming and machining. Presents none of environmental threats and occupational hazards associated with halocarbon solvents. Spontaneously evaporates after use and leaves no waste to be disposed of. Evaporated gas readily collected and recycled.

  19. Use of Vacuum Degreasing for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Eric; Edwards, Kevin; Mitchell, Mark; Boothe, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly strict environmental regulations and the consequent phase out of many effective cleaning solvents has necessitated the development of novel cleaning chemistries and technologies. Among these is vacuum degreasing, a fully enclosed process that eliminates fugitive solvent emissions, thereby reducing cost, environmental, and health related exposure impacts. The effectiveness of vacuum degreasing using modified alcohol for common aerospace contaminants is reported and compared to current and legacy solvents.

  20. Green procedure with a green solvent for fats and oils' determination. Microwave-integrated Soxhlet using limonene followed by microwave Clevenger distillation.

    PubMed

    Virot, Matthieu; Tomao, Valérie; Ginies, Christian; Visinoni, Franco; Chemat, Farid

    2008-07-04

    Here is described a green and original alternative procedure for fats and oils' determination in oleaginous seeds. Extractions were carried out using a by-product of the citrus industry as extraction solvent, namely d-limonene, instead of hazardous petroleum solvents such as n-hexane. The described method is achieved in two steps using microwave energy: at first, extractions are attained using microwave-integrated Soxhlet, followed by the elimination of the solvent from the medium using a microwave Clevenger distillation in the second step. Oils extracted from olive seeds were compared with both conventional Soxhlet and microwave-integrated Soxhlet extraction procedures performed with n-hexane in terms of qualitative and quantitative determination. No significant difference was obtained between each extract allowing us to conclude that the proposed method is effective and valuable.

  1. Determination of 21 antibiotics in sea cucumber using accelerated solvent extraction with in-cell clean-up coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Zhao, Hongxia; Xia, Deming; Du, Juan; Xie, Huaijun; Chen, Jingwen

    2018-08-30

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with in-cell clean-up method coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed to determine 21 antibiotics in sea cucumber. The analytes include 10 sulfonamides, 4 fluoroquinolones, 3 amphenicols, 2 beta-lactams, 1 lincosamide and trimethoprim. Optimal parameters of ASE method were obtained at 80 °C, 1 static cycle of 5 min with methanol/acetonitrile (1/1, v/v) using 2 g of C18 as adsorbent. Recoveries at 50.1-129.2% were achieved with RSD under 20%. Method detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 2.9 μg kg -1 . Compared to the reported ultrasound-assisted extraction method, the proposed method offered comparable extraction efficiency for sulfonamides from sea cucumber, but higher for other categories of antibiotics. This validated method was then successfully applied to sea cucumber samples and 9 antibiotics were detected with the highest concentration up to 57.7 μg kg -1 for norfloxacin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  3. Characterization of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in cleaning reagents and air fresheners in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, Kin Fai; Lee, Shun Cheng; Gao, Yuan; Cheng, Yan; Chan, C. S.

    2011-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from cleaning products and air fresheners indoors are prone to oxidation resulting in the formation of secondary pollutants that can pose health risks on residents. In this study, a solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) method was applied for the determination of BVOCs compositions in three categories of cleaning products including floor cleaners (FC), kitchen cleaners (KC) and dishwashing detergents (DD), and also air fresheners (AF). The analysis results demonstrated that chemical composition and concentration of individual BVOC varied broadly with household products in the view of their different functions and scents as indicated on the labels. The concentration of total BVOCs for sample FC1 was the highest up to 4146.0 μg g -1, followed by FC2 of 264.6 μg g -1, FC4 of 249.3 μg g -1 and FC3 of 139.2 μg g -1. D-limonene was the most abundant detected BVOCs in KC samples with the chemical composition varying from 19.6 ± 1.0 to 1513.0 ± 37.1 μg g -1. For dishwashing detergents, only D-limonene was detected and quantified. The BVOCs compositions of air freshener samples are much more complicated. It was estimated that the consumption of floor cleaners contributed 51% of the total BVOCs amount indoors in Hong Kong, followed by air fresheners 42%, kitchen cleaners 5% and dishwashing detergents 2%.

  4. Aqueous Alkaline Cleaners: An Alternative to Organic Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    F021, F022, F023, F026, F027, F1028) Spent solvents (FOOl, F002, F003, F004, F005) July 8, 1987 California list wastes (Liquid hazardous wastes...installations and has been successful in developing a recycling program to reclaim spent Stoddard solvent and produce a material that meets Army specifications...metal parts it has cleaned. As the contamination level rises, it depletes the solvent’s effective cleaning power until the solvent becomes " spent

  5. Aqueous alternatives for metal and composite cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quitmeyer, Joann

    1994-01-01

    For many years the metalworking industry has cleaned metal and composite substrates with chlorinated solvents. Recently, however, health and disposal related environmental concerns have increased regarding chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, methylene chloride, or Freon'. World leaders have instituted a production ban of certain ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) by 1996. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has instituted worker vapor exposure limitations for virtually all of the solvents used in solvent-based cleaners. In addition, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has defined nearly all solvent-based cleaners as 'hazardous'. Cradle to grave waste responsibility is another reason manufacturers are trying to replace chlorinated solvents in their cleaning processes. Because of these factors, there now is a world wide effort to reduce and/or eliminate the use of chlorinated solvents for industrial cleaning. Waterbased cleaners are among the alternatives being offered to the industry. New technology alkaline cleaners are now available that can be used instead of chlorinated solvents in many cleaning processes. These waterbased cleaners reduce the release of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) by as much as 99 percent. (The definition and method of calculation of VOC's now varies from region to region.) Hazardous waste generation can also be significantly reduced or eliminated with new aqueous technology. This in turn can ease worker exposure restrictions and positively impact the environment. This paper compares the chemical and physical properties of this aqueous cleaners versus chlorinated solvents.

  6. Latest technologies on ultrasonic cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, Hans U.

    2007-05-01

    UCM-AG manufactures Ultrasonic Cleaning Machines for highest quality requirements. The company has the know-how for cleaning and supplies cleaning systems together with the cleaning process. With a UCM of Switzerland Cleaning System, the customer gets the system itself, the cleaning process with a guarantee for the specified result but also all auxiliary equipment needed for perfect results. Therefore UCM also supplies fixtures, linkage to existing automated fabrication facilities water treatment plants etc. Thus the UCM customer gets a turnkey installation - ready to operate and including know-how. UCM of Switzerland will describe the latest technology in ultrasonic precision cleaning on the example of a recent and sophisticated installation. The installation consists of three interlinked cleaning systems which operate completely automated. The 1st system is designed for pre-cleaning to remove waxes, pitch and protection lacquers with environmentally friendly solvents which are non hazardous to the health of the operators. The 2nd system cleans the parts prior to inspection and operates with neutral or slightly alkaline detergents. The 3rd system is designed for final cleaning prior to vacuum coating and perfect results are required. It combines cleaning tanks and DI-Water rinse with lift out and vacuum dryer. The installation combines the latest technologies in ultrasonic cleaning for precision optical components. The system employs multi frequency immersed ultrasonic transducers and special rinsing technologies The complete installation will be explained in detail; the concept in its whole, the lay out, the particular setup of each cleaning system etc. will be shown and explained together with construction particulars of the complete installation.

  7. Brushless Cleaning of Solar Panels and Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1982-01-01

    Machine proposed for cleaning solar panels and reflectors uses multiple vortexes of air, solvent, and water to remove dust and dirt. Uses no brushes that might abrade solar surfaces and thereby reduce efficiency. Machine can be readily automated and can be used on curved surfaces such as aparbolic reflectors as well as on flat ones. Cleaning fluids are recycled, so that large quantities of water and solvent are not needed.

  8. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  9. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  10. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  11. Assessment of subsurface chlorinated solvent contamination using tree cores at the front street site and a former dry cleaning facility at the Riverfront Superfund site, New Haven, Missouri, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumacher, John G.; Struckhoff, Garrett C.; Burken, Joel G.

    2004-01-01

    Tree-core sampling has been a reliable and inexpensive tool to quickly assess the presence of shallow (less than about 30 feet deep) tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in soils and ground water at the Riverfront Superfund Site. This report presents the results of tree-core sampling that was successfully used to determine the presence and extent of chlorinated solvent contamination at two sites, the Front Street site (operable unit OU1) and the former dry cleaning facility, that are part of the overall Riverfront Superfund Site. Traditional soil and ground-water sampling at these two sites later confirmed the results from the tree-core sampling. Results obtained from the tree-core sampling were used to design and focus subsequent soil and ground-water investigations, resulting in substantial savings in time and site assessment costs. The Front Street site is a small (less than 1-acre) site located on the Missouri River alluvium in downtown New Haven, Missouri, about 500 feet from the south bank of the Missouri River. Tree-core sampling detected the presence of subsurface PCE contamination at the Front Street site and beneath residential property downgradient from the site. Core samples from trees at the site contained PCE concentrations as large as 3,850 mg-h/kg (micrograms in headspace per kilogram of wet core) and TCE concentrations as large as 249 mg-h/kg. Soils at the Front Street site contained PCE concentrations as large as 6,200,000 mg/kg (micrograms per kilogram) and ground-water samples contained PCE concentrations as large as 11,000 mg/L (micrograms per liter). The former dry cleaning facility is located at the base of the upland that forms the south bank of the Missouri River alluvial valley. Tree-core sampling did not indicate the presence of PCE or TCE contamination at the former dry cleaning facility, a finding that was later confirmed by the analyses of soil samples collected from the site. The lateral extent of PCE

  12. MINIMIZING POLLUTION IN CLEANING AND DEGREASING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to examine approaches to decreasing rates of loss by evaporation and extend@ the useful lifetime of metal-cleaning solvents in service as means to decrease the generation of pollutant emissions and residues from Air Force cleaning and degreasing op...

  13. 75 FR 34673 - Approval of the Clean Air Act, Section 112(l), Authority for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Halogenated Solvent Cleaning Machines: State of Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management AGENCY... machines in Rhode Island, except for continuous web cleaning machines. This approval would grant RI DEM the... Halogenated Solvent NESHAP for organic solvent cleaning machines and would make the Rhode Island Department of...

  14. Occupational contact dermatitis to a limonene-based solvent in a histopathology technician.

    PubMed

    Foti, Caterina; Zambonin, Carlo G; Conserva, Anna; Casulli, Claudia; D'Accolti, Lucia; Angelini, Gianni

    2007-02-01

    Recently, D-limonene-based solvents are used as a safe alternative to xylene for histological and cytological application to dissolve paraffin. We report the case of a histopathology technician with a recalcitrant hand contact dermatitis strictly related to the use of a limonene-based solvent agent. Patch tests with SIDAPA (Italian Society of Allergological, Professional and Environmental Dermatology) standard series, limonene-based solvent used by the patient and D- and L-limonene (both oxidized and nonoxidized form) and with Giemsa and methylene blue stains were performed. Patch testing gave positive results to oxidized D- and L-limonene. The patient retired from work and promptly improved and healed the hand eczema. Subsequently, the potential occurrence of limonene oxidation products in the incriminated preparation was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. While patch test showed positive reaction to oxidized limonene, chemical analysis failed to detect oxidized limonene in the preparations used by the patient. Considering the strict relation between the use of the preparations and the appearance of symptoms, we can assume that oxidized limonene may be produced during the handling of limonene-based products, especially in the presence of oxidants stains, frequently used in histological laboratories.

  15. Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) recently entered into a nonexclusive license agreement with Applied Cryogenic Solutions (ACS), Inc. (Galveston, TX) to commercialize its Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System technology. This technology, developed by KSC, is a critical component of processes being developed and commercialized by ACS to replace current mechanical and chemical cleaning and descaling methods used by numerous industries. Pilot trials on heat exchanger tubing components have shown that the ACS technology provides for: Superior cleaning in a much shorter period of time. Lower energy and labor requirements for cleaning and de-scaling uper.ninih. Significant reductions in waste volumes by not using water, acidic or basic solutions, organic solvents, or nonvolatile solid abrasives as components in the cleaning process. Improved energy efficiency in post-cleaning heat exchanger operations. The ACS process consists of a spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, a source of liquid gas; a novel, proprietary pumping system that permits pumping liquid nitrogen, liquid air, or supercritical carbon dioxide to pressures in the range of 20,000 to 60,000 psi; and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. The size and number of nozzles can be varied so the system can be built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. The system also can be used to verify if a part has been adequately cleaned.

  16. Towards sustainable and safe apparel cleaning methods: A review.

    PubMed

    Troynikov, Olga; Watson, Christopher; Jadhav, Amit; Nawaz, Nazia; Kettlewell, Roy

    2016-11-01

    Perchloroethylene (PERC) is a compound commonly used as a solvent in dry cleaning, despite its severe health and environmental impacts. In recent times chemicals such as hydrocarbons, GreenEarth(®), acetal and liquid carbon dioxide have emerged as less damaging substitutes for PERC, and an even more sustainable water-based wet cleaning process has been developed. We employed a systematic review approach to provide a comprehensive overview of the existing research evidence in the area of sustainable and safe apparel cleaning methods and care. Our review describes traditional professional dry cleaning methods, as well as those that utilise solvents other than PERC, and their ecological attributes. In addition, the new professional wet cleaning process is discussed. Finally, we address the health hazards of the various solvents used in dry cleaning and state-of-the-art solvent residue trace analysis techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Super Clean, Super Safe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas/Liquid Cleaning System (SS-GLCS) has applications ranging from cleaning circuit boards to scouring building exteriors. The system does not abrade the surface of the hardware being cleaned, and it requires much lower levels of pressure while using very little water. An alternative to CFC-based solvents, the system mixes air and water from separate pressurized tanks, ejecting the gas- liquid mixture at supersonic speeds from a series of nozzles at the end of a hand-held wand. The water droplets have the kinetic energy to forcibly remove the contaminant material. The system leaves very little fluid that must be handled as contaminated waste. It can be applied in the aerospace, automotive, and medical industries, as well as to circuit boards, electronics, machinery, metals, plastics, and optics. With a nozzle that can be oriented in any direction, the system is adjustable to allow all sides of a part to be cleaned without reorientation. It requires minimal training and is easily moved on built-in casters

  18. Supersonic gas-liquid cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    A system to perform cleaning and cleanliness verification is being developed to replace solvent flush methods using CFC 113 for fluid system components. The system is designed for two purposes: internal and external cleaning and verification. External cleaning is performed with the nozzle mounted at the end of a wand similar to a conventional pressure washer. Internal cleaning is performed with a variety of fixtures designed for specific applications. Internal cleaning includes tubes, pipes, flex hoses, and active fluid components such as valves and regulators. The system uses gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the object to be cleaned. Compressed air or any inert gas may be used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid. The converging-diverging nozzles accelerate the gas-liquid mixture to supersonic velocities. The liquid being accelerated may be any solvent including water. This system may be used commercially to replace CFC and other solvent cleaning methods widely used to remove dust, dirt, flux, and lubricants. In addition, cleanliness verification can be performed without the solvents which are typically involved. This paper will present the technical details of the system, the results achieved during testing at KSC, and future applications for this system.

  19. Supersonic gas-liquid cleaning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1994-02-01

    A system to perform cleaning and cleanliness verification is being developed to replace solvent flush methods using CFC 113 for fluid system components. The system is designed for two purposes: internal and external cleaning and verification. External cleaning is performed with the nozzle mounted at the end of a wand similar to a conventional pressure washer. Internal cleaning is performed with a variety of fixtures designed for specific applications. Internal cleaning includes tubes, pipes, flex hoses, and active fluid components such as valves and regulators. The system uses gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the object to be cleaned. Compressed air or any inert gas may be used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid. The converging-diverging nozzles accelerate the gas-liquid mixture to supersonic velocities. The liquid being accelerated may be any solvent including water. This system may be used commercially to replace CFC and other solvent cleaning methods widely used to remove dust, dirt, flux, and lubricants. In addition, cleanliness verification can be performed without the solvents which are typically involved. This paper will present the technical details of the system, the results achieved during testing at KSC, and future applications for this system.

  20. Clean Diesel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Diesel Program offers DERA funding in the form of grants and rebates as well as other support for projects that protect human health and improve air quality by reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines.

  1. Precision Cleaning of Oxygen Systems and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Russell

    2009-01-01

    Currently, NASA uses Dichloropentafluoropropane (HCFC-225), a Class II ozone depleting substance (ODs), to clean contaminated oxygen systems. Starting in 20 15, the Montreal Protocols and Clean Air Act prohibit the production and importation of all hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC), except for limited use in refrigeration applications. Thus, a new non-ozone depleting solvent needs to be developed for use in cleaning. Optimally, such a solvent should also be environmentally benign or green to avoid needing to replace the new solvent with yet another solvent in the future due to other environmental concerns. Work for the first year consisted of two parts. The first part was developing a method of testing the cleaning efficiency of potential solvents. Stainless steel coupons were contaminated with a known weight of various contaminants and contaminant combinations and then immersed in solvent for ten minutes. The coupons were then removed and dried in an oven until all solvent had evaporated. Once dry, the coupons were weighed and the mass of the non-volatile residue (NVR) left on the coupon was determined. The cleaning efficiency of the solvents is reported as percent cleaning, with 100% cleaning being zero NVR left on the test coupon. The second half of the first goal was to use the develop method to perform baseline testing on current solvents. The second part of the work was to begin exploring alternative cleaning solvents. A variety of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were tested. Preliminary testing was also performed with ionic liquids and aqueous surfactant solutions. Once potential solvents were identified, an analysis of the performance and environmental characteristics of each was to be conducted. Four contaminants were specified for use in testing. These are Mil-Spec-H-5606 (5606), a hydraulic fluid, Mil-H-83282B (83282), another hydraulic fluid, diethylhexyl sebacate (Sebacate), and WD-40. The structures of these contaminants are all similar, with long aliphatic

  2. Cleaning devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Horst W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Cleaning devices are described which include a vacuum cleaner nozzle with a sharp rim for directing incoming air down against the floor; a vacuum cleaner wherein electrostatically charged brushes that brush dirt off a floor, are electrically grounded to remove charges that could tend to hold dirt to the brushes; a vacuum cleaner head having slots that form a pair of counter-rotating vortices, and that includes an outlet that blows a stream of air at the floor region which lies between the vortices; a cleaning device that sweeps a group of brushes against the ground along a first direction, and then sweeps them along the same ground area but in a second direction angled from the first by an amount such as 90.degree., to sweep up particles lying in crevices extending along any direction; a device that gently cleans a surface to remove bacteria for analysis, including an inclined wall along which cleaning fluid flows onto the surface, a vacuum chamber for drawing in the cleaning fluid, and a dividing wall spaced slightly from the surface to separate the fluid source from the vacuum cleaner chamber; and a device for providing pulses of pressured air including a chamber to which pressured air is supplied, a ball that circulates around the chamber to repeatedly close an outlet, and an air source that directs air circumferentially to move the ball around the chamber.

  3. Organic solvents in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Grodowska, Katarzyna; Parczewski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Organic solvents are commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry as reaction media, in separation and purification of synthesis products and also for cleaning of equipment. This paper presents some aspects of organic solvents utilization in an active pharmaceutical ingredient and a drug product manufacturing process. As residual solvents are not desirable substances in a final product, different methods for their removal may be used, provided they fulfill safety criteria. After the drying process, analyses need to be performed to check if amounts of solvents used at any step of the production do not exceed acceptable limits (taken from ICH Guideline or from pharmacopoeias). Also new solvents like supercritical fluids or ionic liquids are developed to replace "traditional" organic solvents in the pharmaceutical production processes.

  4. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash... production of oil-base paint where the tank cleaning is performed using solvents. When a plant is subject to...

  5. Contamination removal using various solvents and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeppsen, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Critical and non-critical bonding surfaces must be kept free of contamination that may cause potential unbonds. For example, an aft-dome section of a redesigned solid rocket motor that had been contaminated with hydraulic oil did not appear to be sufficiently cleaned when inspected by the optically stimulated electron emission process (Con Scan) after it had been cleaned using a hand double wipe cleaning method. As a result, current and new cleaning methodologies as well as solvent capability in removing various contaminant materials were reviewed and testing was performed. Bonding studies were also done to verify that the cleaning methods used in removing contaminants provide an acceptable bonding surface. The removal of contaminants from a metal surface and the strength of subsequent bonds were tested using the Martin Marietta and double-wipe cleaning methods. Results are reported.

  6. Cleaning Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpton, James L.

    This curriculum guide provides cleaning services instructional materials for a ninth- and tenth-grade Coordinated Vocational Education and Training: Home and Community Services program. It includes 2 sections and 11 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities,…

  7. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  8. New procedure for extraction of algal lipids from wet biomass: a green clean and scalable process.

    PubMed

    Dejoye Tanzi, Celine; Abert Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2013-04-01

    A new procedure, called Simultaneous Distillation and Extraction Process (SDEP), for lipid extraction from wet microalgae (Nannochloropsis oculata and Dunaliella salina) was reported. This method does not require a pre-drying of the biomass and employs alternative solvents such as d-limonene, α-pinene and p-cymene. This procedure has been compared with Soxhlet extraction (Sox) and Bligh & Dyer method (B&D). For N. oculata, results showed that SDEP-cymene provided similar lipid yields to B&D (21.45% and 23.78%), while SDEP-limonene and pinene provided lower yields (18.73% and 18.75% respectively). For D. salina, SDEP-pinene provided the maximum lipid yield (3.29%) compared to the other solvents, which is quite close to B&D result (4.03%). No significant differences in terms of distribution of lipid classes and fatty acid composition have been obtained for different techniques. Evaluation of energy consumption indicates a substantial saving in the extraction cost by SDEP compared to the conventional extraction technique, Soxhlet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  10. SAGE 2.1: SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives GuidE) software system, version 2.1. SAGE recommends solvent replacements in cleaning and degreasing operations. It leads the user through a question-and-answer session. The user's responses allow the system ...

  11. Effect of ammonia on ozone-initiated formation of indoor secondary products with emissions from cleaning products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Lee, Shun Cheng; Ho, Kin Fai; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Nanying; Cheng, Yan; Gao, Yuan

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from cleaning products and air fresheners indoors are prone to oxidation resulting in the formation of secondary pollutants that can pose health risks on residents. Ammonia (NH3) is ubiquitous in ambient and indoor environments. In this study, we investigated the effect of ammonia (NH3) on secondary pollutants formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from cleaning products including floor cleaner (FC), kitchen cleaner (KC) and dishwashing detergent (DD) in a large environmental chamber. Our results demonstrated that the presence of NH3 (maximum concentration is 240 ppb) could significantly enhance secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) formation from the ozonolysis of all the three categories of cleaning products. For example, for the FC sample, the maximum total particle concentration was up to 2.0 × 104 # cm-3 in the presence of NH3, while it was 1.3 × 104 # cm-3 which was 35% lower without NH3. However, it was found that the extent of NH3 effect on SOAs formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emissions was component-dependent. The presence of NH3 in the reaction systems could increase the consumptions of d-limonene that is the dominant BVOC species as identified in cleaning products. The percent yields (%) of secondary carbonyl compounds generated from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from three categories of cleaning products were identified in the presence and absence of NH3, respectively. The increase in SOAs particle number concentration can be attributed to the formation of condensable salts from reactions between NH3 and organic compounds generated from the BVOCs ozonolysis processes. By investigating the NH3 effect on the ozonolysis of BVOCs mixtures in contrast to the chemistry of individual compounds, a better assessment can be made of the overall impact cleaning products have on real indoor environments.

  12. 6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. SCRAPS OF ENRICHED URANIUM FROM MACHINING OPERATIONS WERE CLEANED IN A SOLVENT BATH, THEN PRESSED INTO BRIQUETTS. THE BRIQUETTS WERE USED AS FEED MATERIAL FOR THE FOUNDRY. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Chemical cleaning re-invented: clean, lean and green.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Margaret; Vangeel, Michel

    2014-01-01

    A project undertaken in the Central Cleaning Department of Janssen, a Johnson and Johnson pharmaceutical company, demonstrates how ergonomics, environmental and industrial hygiene risks and quality concerns can be tackled simultaneously. The way equipment was cleaned was re-designed by an in-house cross-functional team to ensure a 'clean, lean and green' process. Initiatives included a new layout of the area, and new work processes and equipment to facilitate cleaning and handling items. This resulted in significant improvements: all ergonomics high risk tasks were reduced to moderate or low risk; hearing protection was no longer required; respirator requirement reduced by 67%; solvent use reduced by 73%; productivity improved, with 55% fewer operator hours required; and quality improved 40-fold. The return on investment was estimated at 3.125 years based on an investment of over €1.5 million (2008 prices). This win-win intervention allowed ergonomics, environmental, industrial hygiene, productivity and quality concerns all to be addressed.

  14. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PAINT FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash... production of oil-base paint where the tank cleaning is performed using solvents. When a plant is subject to...

  15. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  16. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  17. Alternative, Green Processes for the Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.; Grandelli, Heather Eilenfield; Devor, Robert; Hintze, Paul E.; Loftin, Kathleen B.; Tomlin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Precision cleaning is necessary to ensure the proper functioning of aerospace hardware, particularly those systems that come in contact with liquid oxygen or hypergolic fuels. Components that have not been cleaned to the appropriate levels may experience problems ranging from impaired performance to catastrophic failure. Traditionally, this has been achieved using various halogenated solvents. However, as information on the toxicological and/or environmental impacts of each came to light, they were subsequently regulated out of use. The solvent currently used in Kennedy Space Center (KSC) precision cleaning operations is Vertrel MCA. Environmental sampling at KSC indicates that continued use of this or similar solvents may lead to high remediation costs that must be borne by the Program for years to come. In response to this problem, the Green Solvents Project seeks to develop state-of-the-art, green technologies designed to meet KSCs precision cleaning needs.Initially, 23 solvents were identified as potential replacements for the current Vertrel MCA-based process. Highly halogenated solvents were deliberately omitted since historical precedents indicate that as the long-term consequences of these solvents become known, they will eventually be regulated out of practical use, often with significant financial burdens for the user. Three solvent-less cleaning processes (plasma, supercritical carbon dioxide, and carbon dioxide snow) were also chosen since they produce essentially no waste stream. Next, experimental and analytical procedures were developed to compare the relative effectiveness of these solvents and technologies to the current KSC standard of Vertrel MCA. Individually numbered Swagelok fittings were used to represent the hardware in the cleaning process. First, the fittings were cleaned using Vertrel MCA in order to determine their true cleaned mass. Next, the fittings were dipped into stock solutions of five commonly encountered contaminants and were

  18. Comparative Mirror Cleaning Study: 'A Study on Removing Particulate Contamination'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Karrie

    2007-01-01

    The cleanliness of optical surfaces is recognized as an industry-wide concern for the performance of optical devices such as mirrors and telescopes, microscopes and lenses, lasers and interferometers, and prisms and optical filters. However, no standard has been established for optical cleaning and there is no standard definition of a 'clean' optical element. This study evaluates the effectiveness of commonly used optical cleaning techniques based on wafer configuration, contamination levels, and the number and size of removed particles. It is concluded that cleaning method and exposure time play a significant factor in obtaining a high removal percentage. The detergent bath and solvent rinse method displayed an increase in effective removal percentage as the contamination exposure increased. Likewise, CO2 snow cleaning showed a relatively consistent cleaning effectiveness. The results can help ensure mission success to flight projects developed for the NASA Origins Program. Advantages and disadvantages of each of the optical cleaning methods are described.

  19. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam; Daniels, Edward; Libera, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam.

  20. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jody, B.; Daniels, E.; Libera, J.A.

    1999-03-16

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam. 4 figs.

  1. Improved Detection Technique for Solvent Rinse Cleanliness Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, S. D.; Beeson, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has an ongoing effort to reduce or eliminate usage of cleaning solvents such as CFC-113 and its replacements. These solvents are used in the final clean and cleanliness verification processes for flight and ground support hardware, especially for oxygen systems where organic contaminants can pose an ignition hazard. For the final cleanliness verification in the standard process, the equivalent of one square foot of surface area of parts is rinsed with the solvent, and the final 100 mL of the rinse is captured. The amount of nonvolatile residue (NVR) in the solvent is determined by weight after the evaporation of the solvent. An improved process of sampling this rinse, developed at WSTF, requires evaporation of less than 2 mL of the solvent to make the cleanliness verification. Small amounts of the solvent are evaporated in a clean stainless steel cup, and the cleanliness of the stainless steel cup is measured using a commercially available surface quality monitor. The effectiveness of this new cleanliness verification technique was compared to the accepted NVR sampling procedures. Testing with known contaminants in solution, such as hydraulic fluid, fluorinated lubricants, and cutting and lubricating oils, was performed to establish a correlation between amount in solution and the process response. This report presents the approach and results and discusses the issues in establishing the surface quality monitor-based cleanliness verification.

  2. Surfactant/Supercritical Fluid Cleaning of Contaminated Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    CFC's and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents have been the solvents of choice to degrease and otherwise clean precision metal parts to allow proper function. Recent regulations have, however, rendered most of these solvents unacceptable for these purposes. New processes which are being used or which have been proposed to replace these solvents usually either fail to remove water soluble contaminants or produce significant aqueous wastes which must then be disposed of. In this work, a new method for cleaning surfaces will be investigated. Solubility of typical contaminants such as lubricating greases and phosphatizing bath residues will be studied in several surfactant/supercritical fluid solutions. The effect of temperature, pressure, and the composition of the cleaning mixture on the solubility of oily, polar, and ionic contaminants will be investigated. A reverse micellar solution in a supercritical light hydrocarbon solvent will be used to clean samples of industrial wastes. A reverse micellar solution is one where water is dissolved into a non-polar solvent with the aid of a surfactant. The solution will be capable of dissolving both water-soluble contaminants and oil soluble contaminants. Once the contaminants have been dissolved into the solution they will be separated from the light hydrocarbon and precipitated by a relatively small pressure drop and the supercritical solvent will be available for recycle for reuse. The process will be compared to the efficacy of supercritical CO2 cleaning by attempting to clean the same types of substrates and machining wastes with the same contaminants using supercritical CO2. It is anticipated that the supercritical CO2 process will not be capable of removing ionic residues.

  3. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  4. Pluronic lecithin organogel (PLO) of diltiazem hydrochloride: effect of solvents/penetration enhancers on ex vivo permeation.

    PubMed

    Parhi, Rabinarayan; Suresh, Podilam; Pattnaik, Subasini

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, pluronic lecithin organogel (PLO) of diltiazem hydrochloride (DZH) was developed by taking different ratios of organic phase to aqueous phase (1:3, 1:4, and 1:5) with varying concentration of soya lecithin (20, 30, and 40 % w/w) in organic phase (isopropyl myristate, IPM) and pluronic (20, 25, and 30 % w/w) in aqueous phase, respectively, and characterized for in vitro parameters and ex vivo permeation study. The results of in vitro parameters were found to be within permissible limit and all the PLOs were physically stable at refrigeration and ambient temperature. The influence of phase ratio and different concentrations of soya lecithin on DZH release from the PLOs was found to be significant (p < 0.05), whereas the influences of different concentrations of pluronic were insignificant. The effect of different solvents/penetration enhancers viz. IPM, propylene glycol (PG), dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and D-limonene, in combination and alone, on the permeation of DZH across the dorsal skin of rat was studied. Among all, formulation containing IPM (PLO6) exhibited highest flux of 147.317 μg/cm(2)/h. Furthermore, histopathology section of treated skin sample illustrated that lipid bilayer disruption was the mechanism for the DZH permeation. The above results indicated that PLO6 may serve as a promising alternative delivery system for DZH in the effective treatment of hypertension.

  5. Critical Surface Cleaning and Verification Alternatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald M.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As a result of federal and state requirements, historical critical cleaning and verification solvents such as Freon 113, Freon TMC, and Trichloroethylene (TCE) are either highly regulated or no longer 0 C available. Interim replacements such as HCFC 225 have been qualified, however toxicity and future phase-out regulations necessitate long term solutions. The scope of this project was to qualify a safe and environmentally compliant LOX surface verification alternative to Freon 113, TCE and HCFC 225. The main effort was focused on initiating the evaluation and qualification of HCFC 225G as an alternate LOX verification solvent. The project was scoped in FY 99/00 to perform LOX compatibility, cleaning efficiency and qualification on flight hardware.

  6. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  7. MARE CLEAN 200

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: this solvent-based dispersant for oil spill cleanups is not affected by salinity, and is effective on any liquid hydrocarbon. Solvent is paraffinic hydrocarbons, surfactants include sorbitan fatty acid esters and polysorbates.

  8. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... space. (2) Either natural ventilation or mechanical exhaust ventilation shall be used to remove the vapor at the source and to dilute the concentration of vapors in the working space to a concentration which is safe for the entire work period. (3) Employees shall be protected against toxic vapors by...

  9. Biofiltration of solvent vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Young-sook.

    1993-01-01

    For various industrial solvent vapors, biofiltration promises to offer a cost-effective emission control technology. Exploiting the full potential of this technology will help attain the goals of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Concentrating on large volumes of volatile industrial solvents, stable multicomponent microbial enrichments capable of growing a mineral medium with solvent vapors as their only source of carbon and energy were obtained from soil and sewage sludge. These consortia were immobilized on an optimized porous solid support (ground peat moss and perlite). The biofilter material was packed in glass columns connected to an array of pumps andmore » flow meters that allowed the independent variation of superficial velocity and solvent vapor concentrations. In various experiments, single solvents, such as methanol, butanol, acetonitrile, hexane and nitrobenzene, and solvent mixtures, such as benzene-toluene-xylene (BTX) and chlorobenzene-o-dichlorobenzene (CB/DCB) were biofiltered with rates ranging from 15 to334 g solvent removed per m[sup 3] filter volume /h. Pressure drops were low to moderate (0-10 mmHg/m) and with periodic replacement of moisture, the biofiltration activity could be maintained for a period of several months. The experimental data on methanol biofiltration were subjected to mathematical analysis and modeling by the group of Dr. Baltzis at NJIT for a better understanding and a possible scale up of solvent vapor biofilters. In the case of chlorobenzenes and nitrobenzene, the biofilter columns had to be operated with water recirculation in a trickling filter mode. To prevent inactivation of the trickling filter by acidity during CB/DCB removal, pH control was necessary, and the removal rate of CB/DCB was strongly influenced by the flow rate of the recyling water. Nitrobenzene removal in a trickling filter did not require pH control, since the nitro group was reduced and volatilized as ammonia.« less

  10. Clean Watersheds Needs Survey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Watershed Needs Survey is a national assessment of the future capital cost for publicly owned wastewater collection and treatment facilities to meet the Clean Water Act's water quality goals.

  11. California Clean Tech

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The California Clean Air Technology Initiative is a partnership to develop clean air technologies for the San Joaquin Valley and South Coast Air Basins through collaborative projects in technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

  12. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  13. A Green Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravitz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In the professional cleaning industry, green cleaning has been much discussed in the past few years. Usually, the information pertains to the many reasons why a green cleaning program should be started, the steps involved to get the program off the ground, and the potential benefits. However, although many facility managers and school…

  14. An assessment of alternatives for replacing Freon 113 in bench type electrical circuit board cleaning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Isakson, K.; Vessell, A.L.

    1994-07-01

    Fermilab is presently phasing out all solvents containing Freon-113 (CFC-113) as part of the continuing Waste Minimization Program. These solvents are used primarily in cleaning the flux off of electronic circuit boards after soldering, specifically in bench type work. Title VI of the Clean Air Act mandates a production phase-out for ozone depleting substances, like CFC-113, by the year 2000. Our study addresses this issue by evaluating and choosing alternative non-CFC solvents to replace the CFC-1 13 solvents at Fermilab. Several potential non-CFC cleaning solvents were tested. The evaluation took place in three parts: controlled experimental evaluation, chemical composition evaluation,more » and employee performed evaluation. First, we performed a controlled nine-step procedure with the potential solvents where each was evaluated in categories such as cleaning effectiveness, odor, residue, type of output and drying time. Next, we listed the chemical composition of each solvent. We noted which solvents contained hydrochlorofluorocarbons because they are targeted for phase-out in the future and will be recognized as interim solutions only. Finally, after preliminary testing, five solvents were chosen as the best options. These solvents were sent to be tested by Fermilab employees who use such materials. Their opinions are valuable not only because they are knowledgeable in this field, but also because they will be using the solvents chosen to replace the CFC-113 solvents. The results favored two ``best alternatives``: Safezone Solvent Flux Remover by Miller-Stephenson and E-Series CFC Free Flux-Off 2000 by Chemtech. Another possible solution also pursued is the no-clean solder option. In our study, we were not able to thoroughly investigate the many types of no-clean solders because of time and financial constraints. The testing that was done, however, showed that no-clean solder was a viable alternative in many cases.« less

  15. Solvent extraction of diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.

    1984-07-24

    There is provided a method of extracting hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore. The particle size of the ore is first reduced to form a processed ore. The processed ore is then mixed with a substantially irregular granular material to form an unstratified ore mixture having increased permeability to an extracting solvent. The unstratified ore mixture is then permeated with an extracting solvent to obtain a hydrocarbon-solvent stream from which hydrocarbons are subsequently separated. The irregular granular material may be sand.

  16. Terpenes as green solvents for extraction of oil from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Dejoye Tanzi, Celine; Abert Vian, Maryline; Ginies, Christian; Elmaataoui, Mohamed; Chemat, Farid

    2012-07-09

    Herein is described a green and original alternative procedure for the extraction of oil from microalgae. Extractions were carried out using terpenes obtained from renewable feedstocks as alternative solvents instead of hazardous petroleum solvents such as n-hexane. The described method is achieved in two steps using Soxhlet extraction followed by the elimination of the solvent from the medium using Clevenger distillation in the second step. Oils extracted from microalgae were compared in terms of qualitative and quantitative determination. No significant difference was obtained between each extract, allowing us to conclude that the proposed method is green, clean and efficient.

  17. How clean is your clean room?

    PubMed

    Govier, J

    2006-01-01

    After investment in a clean room, cleanliness, sanitisation or sterility is essential to ensuring it operates at the highest standard. This article advises on the products and maintenance procedures to achieve this.

  18. Airing 'clean air' in Clean India Mission.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Kumar, M; Mall, R K; Singh, R S

    2017-03-01

    The submission explores the possibility of a policy revision for considering clean air quality in recently launched nationwide campaign, Clean India Mission (CIM). Despite of several efforts for improving availability of clean household energy and sanitation facilities, situation remain still depressing as almost half of global population lacks access to clean energy and proper sanitation. Globally, at least 2.5 billion people do not have access to basic sanitation facilities. There are also evidences of 7 million premature deaths by air pollution in year 2012. The situation is even more disastrous for India especially in rural areas. Although, India has reasonably progressed in developing sanitary facilities and disseminating clean fuel to its urban households, the situation in rural areas is still miserable and needs to be reviewed. Several policy interventions and campaigns were made to improve the scenario but outcomes were remarkably poor. Indian census revealed a mere 31% sanitation coverage (in 2011) compared to 22% in 2001 while 60% of population (700 million) still use solid biofuels and traditional cook stoves for household cooking. Further, last decade (2001-2011) witnessed the progress decelerating down with rural households without sanitation facilities increased by 8.3 million while minimum progress has been made in conversion of conventional to modern fuels. To revamp the sanitation coverage, an overambitious nationwide campaign CIM was initiated in 2014 and present submission explores the possibility of including 'clean air' considerations within it. The article draws evidence from literatures on scenarios of rural sanitation, energy practises, pollution induced mortality and climatic impacts of air pollution. This subsequently hypothesised with possible modification in available technologies, dissemination modes, financing and implementation for integration of CIM with 'clean air' so that access to both sanitation and clean household energy may be

  19. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tara E.; Scherman, Carl; Martin, David

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilitiesmore » and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.« less

  20. Solvent exposure and cognitive function in automotive technicians.

    PubMed

    Bates, Michael N; Reed, Bruce R; Liu, Sa; Eisen, Ellen A; Hammond, S Katharine

    2016-12-01

    Automotive technicians are commonly exposed to organic and chlorinated solvents, particularly through use of cleaning products. Occupational solvent exposures have been associated with deficits in cognitive function but, to our knowledge, no previous studies have investigated automotive technicians. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether previous exposures to n-hexane, in particular, or general solvents posed a persistent neurotoxic hazard to automotive workers. Enrolled in the study were 830 San Francisco Bay Area automotive repair workers. Each participant underwent a battery of cognitive function tests to investigate central nervous system impairment, with a primary focus on the domains of psychomotor speed, fine motor function, memory and mood. Cognitive test results regressed against estimated hexane and total solvent exposures showed little evidence of associations. Exposures to both solvents and hexane were well below the occupational exposure limits. Our results provide some reassurance about persistent neuropsychological effects in automotive workers who use solvent-based products and those who previously used hexane-containing automotive cleaning products, since this solvent is believed no longer to be used in automotive cleaning products. The lack of observed effect in this study may be attributable to low exposures, or it may reflect improved cognitive function since hexane use in automotive cleaning products was discontinued. However, impacts on results of exposure misclassification and/or the healthy worker survivor effect cannot be discounted. Irrespective of the outcome of this study, the main known neurologic effect of n-hexane is peripheral neuropathy, and such an association in automotive technicians is not excluded by these results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of alternatives for trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113) to clean and verify liquid oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Michelle L.

    1996-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) investigated several alternatives to the use of tri-chloro-tri-fluoroethane(CFC-113) in oxygen cleaning and verification. Alternatives investigated include several replacement solvents, Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analysis. Among the solvents, 1, 1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC 141b) and di-chloro-penta-fluoro-propane (HCFC 225) are the most suitable alternatives for cleaning and verification. However, use of HCFC 141b is restricted, HCFC 225 introduces toxicity hazards, and the NDE and TOC methods of verification are not suitable for processes at LaRC. Therefore, the interim recommendation is to sparingly use CFC-113 for the very difficult cleaning tasks where safety is critical and to use HCFC 225 to clean components in a controlled laboratory environment. Meanwhile, evaluation must continue on now solvents and procedures to find one suited to LaRCs oxygen cleaning needs.

  2. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  3. PARIS II THE SEARCH FOR CLEANER SOLVENT REPLACEMENTS FOR RCRA CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the growing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use, ...

  4. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base... the production of oil-base paint where the tank cleaning is performed using solvents. When a plant is... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the oil...

  5. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base... the production of oil-base paint where the tank cleaning is performed using solvents. When a plant is... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the oil...

  6. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base... the production of oil-base paint where the tank cleaning is performed using solvents. When a plant is... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the oil...

  7. In-Situ Bioremediation of Solvent Saturated Soils Using Methane, Propane, and Butane-Oxidizers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-02

    used as a degreasing agent, dry cleaning agent and solvent in various industries. It also can be found in household products such as spot cleaner...solvent widely used in various industries and can be found in many household products . 1,1,1-TCA is considered relatively highly soluble, therefore

  8. Analyzing Environmental Policies for Chlorinated Solvents with a Model of Markets and Regulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    electronics, aerospace, fabricated metal products, and dry cleaning depend heavily on chlorinated solvents in their production processes . For example...production processes . The second of the model’s components is a group of economic equations that represents all of the solvent substitutions in...Instead, the process for numerically specifying the substitution parameters involves eliciting expert judgments and then normalizing the parameters

  9. Clean Air Excellence Awards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These non-monetary awards honor sustainable efforts toward pollutant emissions reduction from innovators in clean air technology, community action and outreach, policy development, and transportation efficiency.

  10. Cleaning Products Pilot Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This 1997 case study documents a three-year effort to identify and compare environmentally preferable commercial cleaning products and to implement the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program (EPP).

  11. Clean Hands Count

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed ...

  12. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  13. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  14. Air filtration media from electrospun waste high-impact polystyrene fiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfi, Akmal; Miftahul Munir, Muhammad; Hapidin, Dian Ahmad; Rajak, Abdul; Edikresnha, Dhewa; Iskandar, Ferry; Khairurrijal, Khairurrijal

    2018-03-01

    Nanofiber membranes were synthesized from waste high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) using electrospinning method and then applied as air filtration media. The waste HIPS precursor solution with the concentration of 20 wt.% was prepared by dissolving waste HIPS into the mixture of d-limonene and DMF solvents. Beaded or fine nanofibers could be achieved by adjusting the ratio of solvents mixture (d-limonene and DMF). Using the ratios of solvents (d-limonene: DMF) of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3, it was obtained beaded HIPS nanofibers with the average diameter of 272 nm, beaded HIPS nanofibers with the average diameter of 937, and fine HIPS nanofibers with the average diameter of 621 nm, respectively. From the FTIR spectral analysis, it was found that the FTIR peaks of the HIPS nanofiber membranes are the same as those of the cleaned waste HIPS and there are no FTIR peaks of DMF and d-limonene solvents. These findings implied that the electrospinning process allows the recycling of waste HIPS into HIPS nanofibers without any trapped solvent phases or apparent degradation of the original material. From the contact angle measurement, it was confirmed that the HIPS nanofiber membranes are hydrophobic and the presence of the beads in the HIPS nanofiber membranes varies their contact angles. From the air-filtration test, it was shown that the fiber morphology (beaded or fine nanofibers) considerably affects the filtration performance of the membranes. The presence of beads increased the distance between the fibers so that the pressure drop decreased. Moreover, the basis weight of the membrane greatly affected the filtration efficiency. The HIPS nanofiber membrane with the basis weight of 12.22 g m‑2 had the efficiency greater than 99.999%, which was equivalent to that of the HEPA filter.

  15. Anodic Oxidation of Furans in Aprotic Solvents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-06

    dissolved in 70 mL acetonitrile (0.003% water , K.F. titration) containing 0.1 M tetra-n-butyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (TBAF). The solution was...solvent evaporated on a rotary evaporator at 25°C ( water bath temperature). The residue was extracted with 3 x 20 mL portions of diethylether, and the...results for a clean electrode in the same solution after presaturation with oxygen. To make the film conductive for the electrolyses , the voltage was

  16. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  17. SOLVENT WASTE REDUCTION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication contains edited versions of presentations on this subject made at five Technology Transfer seminars in 1988. Chapters are included on land disposal regulations and requirements; waste solvent disposal alternatives from various industries such as process equipment...

  18. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  19. Cleaning agents and asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Barranco, P

    2010-01-01

    Although cleaners represent a significant part of the working population worldwide, they remain a relatively understudied occupational group. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between cleaning work and asthma, but the risk factors are uncertain. Cleaning workers are exposed to a large variety of cleaning products containing both irritants and sensitizers, as well as to common indoor allergens and pollutants. Thus, the onset or aggravation of asthma in this group could be related to an irritant-induced mechanism or to specific sensitization. The main sensitizers contained in cleaning products are disinfectants, quaternary ammonium compounds (such as benzalkonium chloride), amine compounds, and fragrances.The strongest airway irritants in cleaning products are bleach (sodium hypochlorite), hydrochloric acid, and alkaline agents (ammonia and sodium hydroxide), which are commonly mixed together. Exposure to the ingredients of cleaning products may give rise to both new-onset asthma, with or without a latency period, and work-exacerbated asthma. High-level exposure to irritants may induce reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Cleaning workers may also have a greater relative risk of developing asthma due to prolonged low-to-moderate exposure to respiratory irritants. In addition, asthma-like symptoms without confirmed asthma are also common after exposure to cleaning agents. In many cleaners, airway symptoms induced by chemicals and odors cannot be explained by allergic or asthmatic reactions. These patients may have increased sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin, which is known to reflect sensory reactivity, and this condition is termed airway sensory hyperreactivity.

  20. Green Cleaning Label Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balek, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Green cleaning plays a significant and supportive role in helping education institutions meet their sustainability goals. However, identifying cleaning products, supplies and equipment that truly are environmentally preferable can be daunting. The marketplace is inundated with products and services purporting to be "green" or environmentally…

  1. Cleaning Physical Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses techniques to help create clean and inviting school locker rooms. Daily, weekly or monthly, biannual, and annual cleaning strategies for locker room showers are highlighted as are the specialized maintenance needs for aerobic and dance areas, running tracks, and weight training areas. (GR)

  2. Clean Air Act Text

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act is the law that defines EPA's responsibilities for protecting and improving the nation's air quality and the stratospheric ozone layer. The last major change in the law, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, enacted in 1990 by Congress.

  3. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2013-04-01

    The initiative will strategically focus and rally EERE’s clean energy technology offices and Advanced Manufacturing Office around the urgent competitive opportunity for the United States to be the leader in the clean energy manufacturing industries and jobs of today and tomorrow.

  4. Electrostatic Hazard Considerations for ODC Solvent Replacement Selection Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbourn, Brad

    1999-01-01

    ODC solvents are used to clean many critical substrates during solid rocket motor production operations. Electrostatic charge generation incidental to these cleaning operations can pose a major safety issue. Therefore, while determining the acceptability of various ODC replacement cleaners, one aspect of the selection criteria included determining the extent of electric charge generation during a typical solvent cleaning operation. A total of six candidate replacement cleaners, sixteen critical substrates, and two types of cleaning swatch materials were studied in simulated cleaning operations. Charge generation and accumulation effects were investigated by measuring the peak voltage and brush discharging effects associated with each cleaning process combination. In some cases, charge generation was found to be very severe. Using the conductivity information for each cleaner, the peak voltage data could in some cases, be qualitatively predicted. Test results indicated that severe charging effects could result in brush discharges that could potentially result in flash fire hazards when occurring in close proximity to flammable vapor/air mixtures. Process controls to effectively mitigate these hazards are discussed.

  5. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  6. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  7. Correlating Cleaning Thoroughness with Effectiveness and Briefly Intervening to Affect Cleaning Outcomes: How Clean Is Cleaned?

    PubMed Central

    Hosford, Eve; Ong, Ana; Richesson, Douglas; Fraser, Susan; Kwak, Yoon; Miller, Sonia; Julius, Michael; McGann, Patrick; Lesho, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The most efficient approach to monitoring and improving cleaning outcomes remains unresolved. We sought to extend the findings of a previous study by determining whether cleaning thoroughness (dye removal) correlates with cleaning efficacy (absence of molecular or cultivable biomaterial) and whether one brief educational intervention improves cleaning outcomes. Design Before-after trial. Setting Newly built community hospital. Intervention 90 minute training refresher with surface-specific performance results. Methods Dye removal, measured by fluorescence, and biomaterial removal and acquisition, measured with culture and culture-independent PCR-based assays, were clandestinely assessed for eight consecutive months. At this midpoint, results were presented to the cleaning staff (intervention) and assessments continued for another eight consecutive months. Results 1273 surfaces were sampled before and after terminal room cleaning. In the short-term, dye removal increased from 40.3% to 50.0% (not significant). For the entire study period, dye removal also improved but not significantly. After the intervention, the number of rooms testing positive for specific pathogenic species by culturing decreased from 55.6% to 36.6% (not significant), and those testing positive by PCR fell from 80.6% to 53.7% (P = 0.016). For nonspecific biomaterial on surfaces: a) removal of cultivable Gram-negatives (GN) trended toward improvement (P = 0.056); b) removal of any cultivable growth was unchanged but acquisition (detection of biomaterial on post-cleaned surfaces that were contaminant-free before cleaning) worsened (P = 0.017); c) removal of PCR-based detection of bacterial DNA improved (P = 0.046), but acquisition worsened (P = 0.003); d) cleaning thoroughness and efficacy were not correlated. Conclusion At this facility, a minor intervention or minimally more aggressive cleaning may reduce pathogen-specific contamination, but not without unintended consequences. PMID

  8. Correlating Cleaning Thoroughness with Effectiveness and Briefly Intervening to Affect Cleaning Outcomes: How Clean Is Cleaned?

    PubMed

    Clifford, Robert; Sparks, Michael; Hosford, Eve; Ong, Ana; Richesson, Douglas; Fraser, Susan; Kwak, Yoon; Miller, Sonia; Julius, Michael; McGann, Patrick; Lesho, Emil

    2016-01-01

    The most efficient approach to monitoring and improving cleaning outcomes remains unresolved. We sought to extend the findings of a previous study by determining whether cleaning thoroughness (dye removal) correlates with cleaning efficacy (absence of molecular or cultivable biomaterial) and whether one brief educational intervention improves cleaning outcomes. Before-after trial. Newly built community hospital. 90 minute training refresher with surface-specific performance results. Dye removal, measured by fluorescence, and biomaterial removal and acquisition, measured with culture and culture-independent PCR-based assays, were clandestinely assessed for eight consecutive months. At this midpoint, results were presented to the cleaning staff (intervention) and assessments continued for another eight consecutive months. 1273 surfaces were sampled before and after terminal room cleaning. In the short-term, dye removal increased from 40.3% to 50.0% (not significant). For the entire study period, dye removal also improved but not significantly. After the intervention, the number of rooms testing positive for specific pathogenic species by culturing decreased from 55.6% to 36.6% (not significant), and those testing positive by PCR fell from 80.6% to 53.7% (P = 0.016). For nonspecific biomaterial on surfaces: a) removal of cultivable Gram-negatives (GN) trended toward improvement (P = 0.056); b) removal of any cultivable growth was unchanged but acquisition (detection of biomaterial on post-cleaned surfaces that were contaminant-free before cleaning) worsened (P = 0.017); c) removal of PCR-based detection of bacterial DNA improved (P = 0.046), but acquisition worsened (P = 0.003); d) cleaning thoroughness and efficacy were not correlated. At this facility, a minor intervention or minimally more aggressive cleaning may reduce pathogen-specific contamination, but not without unintended consequences.

  9. A Commercial IOTV Cleaning Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-12

    manufacturer’s list price without taking into consideration of possible volume discount.  Equipment depreciation cost was calculated based on...Laundering with Prewash Spot Cleaning) 32 Table 12 Shrinkage Statistical Data (Traditional Wet Laundering without Prewash Spot Cleaning...Statistical Data (Computer-controlled Wet Cleaning without Prewash Spot Cleaning) 35 Table 15 Shrinkage Statistical Data (Liquid CO2 Cleaning

  10. Trichloroethylene and stoddard solvent reduction alternatives in a small shop. 1989 summer intern report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.

    1989-12-31

    Aero Precision Engineering Corp. is a small screw machine shop which produces precision parts for industry located in St. Paul Park, MN. The project focused on identifying satisfactory water-based substitutes for trichloroethylene (TCE) used both as a vapor degreaser and as a cold solvent in a small covered container. At the time of the project, the company used about 500 gallons of trichloroethylene with approximately 165 gallons shipped off site as waste annually. The solvent was used primarily to remove cutting oil and metal chips from production parts. In identifying a standard for evaluating alterantives to the solvent for cleaning,more » it was noted that parts cleaned in the cold bucket were definitely not as clean as those cleaned in the vapor degreaser.« less

  11. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Cox, Jack A.; McGee, Kathleen A.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, MSFC is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which require a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated within MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Laboratory. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Environmental and Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that have been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  12. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, the Center is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which requires a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated with-in MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Division. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that has been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research Center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  13. Cleaning of titanium substrates after application in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fingerle, Mathias; Köhler, Oliver; Rösch, Christina; Kratz, Fabian; Scheibe, Christian; Davoudi, Neda; Müller-Renno, Christine; Ziegler, Christiane; Huster, Manuel; Schlegel, Christin; Ulber, Roland; Bohley, Martin; Aurich, Jan C

    2015-03-10

    Plain and microstructured cp-titanium samples were studied as possible biofilm reactor substrates. The biofilms were grown by exposition of the titanium samples to bacteria in a flow cell. As bacteria the rod shaped gram negative Pseudomonas fluorescens and the spherical gram negative Paracoccus seriniphilus were chosen. Afterward, the samples were cleaned in subsequent steps: First, with a standard solvent based cleaning procedure with acetone, isopropanol, and ultrapure water and second by oxygen plasma sputtering. It will be demonstrated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy that oxygen plasma cleaning is a necessary and reliant tool to fully clean and restore titanium surfaces contaminated with a biofilm. The microstructured surfaces act beneficial to biofilm growth, while still being fully restorable after biofilm contamination. Scanning electron microscopy images additionally show, that the plasma process does not affect the microstructures. The presented data show the importance of the cleaning procedure. Just using solvents does not remove the biofilm and all its components reliably while a cleaning process by oxygen plasma regenerates the surfaces.

  14. The Economic and Environmental Benefits of Product Substitution for Organic Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    ALPHA.TERPINEOL LINALOOL MENTHOL O Figure 3.1 - Molecular Structures of Selected Terpenes?3 20 Commercial grades of d-limonene can cause dermatitis due...Permitted GRAS Limited Menthol Permitted GRAS Limited a-Pinene Permitted GRAS Permitted P-Pinene Permitted GRAS Permitted u-Terpinene Permitted GRAS Not

  15. Cleaning method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Darryl D.; Hollen, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A new automatable cleaning apparatus which makes use of a method of very thoroughly and quickly cleaning a gauze electrode used in chemical analyses is given. The method generates very little waste solution, and this is very important in analyzing radioactive materials, especially in aqueous solutions. The cleaning apparatus can be used in a larger, fully automated controlled potential coulometric apparatus. About 99.98% of a 5 mg. plutonium sample was removed in less than 3 minutes, using only about 60 ml. of rinse solution and two main rinse steps.

  16. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  17. Cleaning method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, D.D.; Hollen, R.M.

    1981-02-27

    A method of very thoroughly and quikcly cleaning a guaze electrode used in chemical analyses is given, as well as an automobile cleaning apparatus which makes use of the method. The method generates very little waste solution, and this is very important in analyzing radioactive materials, especially in aqueous solutions. The cleaning apparatus can be used in a larger, fully automated controlled potential coulometric apparatus. About 99.98% of a 5 mg plutonium sample was removed in less than 3 minutes, using only about 60 ml of rinse solution and two main rinse steps.

  18. Methods for recovering a polar solvent from a fluid stream contaminated with at least one polar impurity

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Wendt, Daniel S.

    2012-11-13

    A method of removing a polar solvent from a fluid volume contaminated with at least one polar impurity, such as a free fatty acid, is provided. The method comprises providing a fluid volume that includes at least one polar impurity dissolved in at least one solvent. The fluid volume is contacted with an expanding gas to remove the at least one solvent. The expanding gas may be dissolved into the at least one solvent in the fluid volume to form a gas-expanded solvent. The immiscibility of the polar impurities in the gas-expanded solvent enables separation of the polar impurities from the gas-expanded solvent. After separation of the polar impurities, at least one of the temperature and pressure may be reduced to separate the solvent from the expanding gas such that the clean solvent may be reused.

  19. Wiltech Component Cleaning and Refurbishment Facility CFC Elimination Plan at NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Steve; Aman, Bob; Aurigema, Andrew; Melendez, Orlando

    1999-01-01

    The Wiltech Component Cleaning & Refurbishment Facility (WT-CCRF) at NASA Kennedy Space Center performs precision cleaning on approximately 200,000 metallic and non metallic components every year. WT-CCRF has developed a CFC elimination plan consisting of aqueous cleaning and verification and an economical dual solvent strategy for alternative solvent solution. Aqueous Verification Methodologies were implemented two years ago on a variety of Ground Support Equipment (GSE) components and sampling equipment. Today, 50% of the current workload is verified using aqueous methods and 90% of the total workload is degreased aqueously using, Zonyl and Brulin surfactants in ultrasonic baths. An additional estimated 20% solvent savings could be achieved if the proposed expanded use of aqueous methods are approved. Aqueous cleaning has shown to be effective, environmentally friendly and economical (i.e.. cost of materials, equipment, facilities and labor).

  20. Surface Analysis Evaluation of Handwipe Cleaning for the Space Shuttle RSRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesley, Michael W.; Anderson, Erin L.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the role of surface-sensitive spectroscopy (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, or ESCA) in the selection of solvents to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane in handwipe cleaning of bonding surfaces on NASA's Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Removal of common process soils from a wide variety of metallic and polymeric substrates was characterized. The cleaning efficiency was usually more dependent on the type of substrate being cleaned and the specific process soil than on the solvent used. A few substrates that are microscopically rough or porous proved to be difficult to clean with any cleaner, and some soils were very tenacious and difficult to remove from any substrate below detection limits. Overall, the work showed that a wide variety of solvents will perform at least as well as 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

  1. Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative (MCDI) is a collaboration of federal, state and local agencies, along with communities, non-profit organizations and private companies working together by reducing exposure to emissions from diesel engines

  2. Clean Cookstove Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is an international leader in clean cookstove research and provides independent scientific data on cookstove emissions and energy efficiency to support the development of cleaner sustainable cooking technologies.

  3. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  4. Clean Diesel National Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National Funding Assistance Program administers competitive grants for clean diesel projects. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  5. Learn About Clean Diesel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The clean diesel program is designed to aggressively reduce the pollution emitted from diesel engines across the country through the implementation of varied control strategies and the aggressive involvement of national, state, and local partners.

  6. Clean Air Markets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Clean Air Markets implements regulatory programs such as the Acid Rain Program and the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule to reduce air pollution from the power sector that contributes to human health and environmental issues.

  7. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  8. Clean Air Technology Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  9. Clean Energy Finance Tool

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    State and local governments interested in developing a financing program can use this Excel tool to support energy efficiency and clean energy improvements for large numbers of buildings within their jurisdiction.

  10. Plant Habitat Facility Clean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-12

    iss055e001931 (Mar. 12, 2018) --- Dwarf wheat plants during routine cleaning in the Advanced Plant Habitat Facility, a facility to conduct plant bioscience research on the International Space Stations (ISS).

  11. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  12. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  13. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  14. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  15. #CleanTechNow

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2013-09-17

    Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into sharper focus. Yesterday's visionary goals are now hard data -- tangible evidence that our energy system is undergoing a transformation. The Energy Department's new paper "Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies" highlights these changes and shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and super efficient lighting.

  16. #CleanTechNow

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest

    2018-01-16

    Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into sharper focus. Yesterday's visionary goals are now hard data -- tangible evidence that our energy system is undergoing a transformation. The Energy Department's new paper "Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies" highlights these changes and shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and super efficient lighting.

  17. Clean Energy Solutions Center: Assisting Countries with Clean Energy Policy

    Science.gov Websites

    Energy Solutions Center: Assisting Countries with Clean Energy Policy NREL helps developing countries and adapting to climate change impacts, developing countries are looking for clean energy solutions supports clean energy scale-up in the developing world are knowledge, capacity, and cost. The Clean Energy

  18. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: A New Process for Chemically Cleaning Savannah River Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, Edward; Spires, Renee; Davis, Neil

    2009-02-11

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) there are 49 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks that eventually must be emptied, cleaned, and closed. The current method of chemically cleaning SRS HLW tanks, commonly referred to as Bulk Oxalic Acid Cleaning (BOAC), requires about a half million liters (130,000 gallons) of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to clean a single tank. During the cleaning, the oxalic acid acts as the solvent to digest sludge solids and insoluble salt solids, such that they can be suspended and pumped out of the tank. Because of the volume and concentration of acid used, amore » significant quantity of oxalate is added to the HLW process. This added oxalate significantly impacts downstream processing. In addition to the oxalate, the volume of liquid added competes for the limited available tank space. A search, therefore, was initiated for a new cleaning process. Using TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch or roughly translated as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination with Ultraviolet Light (CORD-UV{reg_sign}), a mature technology used in the commercial nuclear power industry was identified as an alternate technology. Similar to BOAC, CORD-UV{reg_sign} also uses oxalic acid as the solvent to dissolve the metal (hydr)oxide solids. CORD-UV{reg_sign} is different, however, since it uses photo-oxidation (via peroxide/UV or ozone/UV to form hydroxyl radicals) to decompose the spent oxalate into carbon dioxide and water. Since the oxalate is decomposed and off-gassed, CORD-UV{reg_sign} would not have the negative downstream oxalate process impacts of BOAC. With the oxalate destruction occurring physically outside the HLW tank, re-precipitation and transfer of the solids, as well as regeneration of the cleaning solution can be performed without adding additional solids, or a significant volume of liquid to the process. With a draft of the pre-conceptual Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) flowsheet, taking

  19. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  20. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  1. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  2. Cleaning with Bulk Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; An, Hongjie; Alheshibri, Muidh; Liu, Lvdan; Terpstra, Paul M J; Liu, Guangming; Craig, Vincent S J

    2016-11-01

    The electrolysis of aqueous solutions produces solutions that are supersaturated in oxygen and hydrogen gas. This results in the formation of gas bubbles, including nanobubbles ∼100 nm in size that are stable for ∼24 h. These aqueous solutions containing bubbles have been evaluated for cleaning efficacy in the removal of model contaminants bovine serum albumin and lysozyme from surfaces and in the prevention of the fouling of surfaces by these same proteins. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces were investigated. It is shown that nanobubbles can prevent the fouling of surfaces and that they can also clean already fouled surfaces. It is also argued that in practical applications where cleaning is carried out rapidly using a high degree of mechanical agitation the role of cleaning agents is not primarily in assisting the removal of soil but in suspending the soil that is removed by mechanical action and preventing it from redepositing onto surfaces. This may also be the primary mode of action of nanobubbles during cleaning.

  3. Hazardous substances in frequently used professional cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Gerster, Fabian Melchior; Vernez, David; Wild, Pascal Pierre; Hopf, Nancy Brenna

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies have identified cleaners as a group at risk for adverse health effects of the skin and the respiratory tract. Chemical substances present in cleaning products could be responsible for these effects. Currently, only limited information is available about irritant and health hazardous chemical substances found in cleaning products. We hypothesized that chemical substances present in cleaning products are known health hazardous substances that might be involved in adverse health effects of the skin and the respiratory tract. We performed a systematic review of cleaning products used in the Swiss cleaning sector. We surveyed Swiss professional cleaning companies (n = 1476) to identify the most used products (n = 105) for inclusion. Safety data sheets (SDSs) were reviewed and hazardous substances present in cleaning products were tabulated with current European and global harmonized system hazard labels. Professional cleaning products are mixtures of substances (arithmetic mean 3.5 +/- 2.8), and more than 132 different chemical substances were identified in 105 products. The main groups of chemicals were fragrances, glycol ethers, surfactants, solvents; and to a lesser extent, phosphates, salts, detergents, pH-stabilizers, acids, and bases. Up to 75% of products contained irritant (Xi), 64% harmful (Xn) and 28% corrosive (C) labeled substances. Hazards for eyes (59%) and skin (50%), and hazards by ingestion (60%) were the most reported. Cleaning products potentially give rise to simultaneous exposures to different chemical substances. As professional cleaners represent a large workforce, and cleaning products are widely used, it is a major public health issue to better understand these exposures. The list of substances provided in this study contains important information for future occupational exposure assessment studies.

  4. Hazardous substances in frequently used professional cleaning products

    PubMed Central

    Gerster, Fabian Melchior; Vernez, David; Wild, Pascal Pierre; Hopf, Nancy Brenna

    2014-01-01

    Background: A growing number of studies have identified cleaners as a group at risk for adverse health effects of the skin and the respiratory tract. Chemical substances present in cleaning products could be responsible for these effects. Currently, only limited information is available about irritant and health hazardous chemical substances found in cleaning products. We hypothesized that chemical substances present in cleaning products are known health hazardous substances that might be involved in adverse health effects of the skin and the respiratory tract. Methods: We performed a systematic review of cleaning products used in the Swiss cleaning sector. We surveyed Swiss professional cleaning companies (n = 1476) to identify the most used products (n = 105) for inclusion. Safety data sheets (SDSs) were reviewed and hazardous substances present in cleaning products were tabulated with current European and global harmonized system hazard labels. Results: Professional cleaning products are mixtures of substances (arithmetic mean 3.5±2.8), and more than 132 different chemical substances were identified in 105 products. The main groups of chemicals were fragrances, glycol ethers, surfactants, solvents; and to a lesser extent, phosphates, salts, detergents, pH-stabilizers, acids, and bases. Up to 75% of products contained irritant (Xi), 64% harmful (Xn) and 28% corrosive (C) labeled substances. Hazards for eyes (59%) and skin (50%), and hazards by ingestion (60%) were the most reported. Conclusions: Cleaning products potentially give rise to simultaneous exposures to different chemical substances. As professional cleaners represent a large workforce, and cleaning products are widely used, it is a major public health issue to better understand these exposures. The list of substances provided in this study contains important information for future occupational exposure assessment studies. PMID:24804339

  5. Causes of death among laundry and dry cleaning workers.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, A; Decoufle, P; Grauman, D

    1979-01-01

    To make a preliminary determination as to whether a potential health hazard exists for workers exposed to dry cleaning solvents (carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene), we analyzed the causes of death of 330 deceased laundry and dry cleaning workers by the proportionate mortality method. The increased risk for malignant neoplasms resulted primarily from an excess of lung and cervical cancer and slight excesses of leukemia and liver cancer. Although the number of deaths was small, the increased risk of cancer noted in this investigation underscores the need for additional epidemiologic studies of this occupational group. PMID:434285

  6. Cleaning By Blasting With Pellets Of Dry Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fody, Jody

    1993-01-01

    Dry process strips protective surface coats from parts to be cleaned, without manual scrubbing. Does not involve use of flammable or toxic solvents. Used to remove coats from variety of materials, including plastics, ceramics, ferrous and nonferrous metals, and composites. Adds no chemical-pollution problem to problem of disposal of residue of coating material. Process consists of blasting solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) pellets at surface to be cleaned. Pellets sublime on impact and pass into atmosphere as carbon dioxide gas. Size, harness, velocity, and quantity of pellets adjusted to suit coating material and substrate.

  7. Aging of clean foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Stewart, Peter S.

    2014-11-01

    Aging is an inevitable process in living systems. Here we show how clean foams age with time through sequential coalescence events: in particular, foam aging resembles biological aging. We measure population dynamics of bubbles in clean foams through numerical simulations with a bubble network model. We demonstrate that death rates of individual bubbles increase exponentially with time, independent on initial conditions, which is consistent with the Gompertz mortality law as usually found in biological aging. This consistency suggests that clean foams as far-from-equilibrium dissipative systems are useful to explore biological aging. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  8. [Effect of manual cleaning and machine cleaning for dental handpiece].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Huang, Hao; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Xiaoying

    2013-08-01

    Comparing the dental handpiece' s cleaning effect between manual cleaning and machine cleaning. Eighty same contaminated dental handpieces were randomly divided into experimental group and control group, each group contains 40 pieces. The experimental group was treated by full automatic washing machine, and the control group was cleaned manually. The cleaning method was conducted according to the operations process standard, then ATP bioluminescence was used to test the cleaning results. Average relative light units (RLU) by ATP bioluminescence detection were as follows: Experimental group was 9, control group was 41. The two groups were less than the recommended RLU value provided by the instrument manufacturer (RLU < or = 45). There was significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). The cleaning quality of the experimental group was better than that of control group. It is recommended that the central sterile supply department should clean dental handpieces by machine to ensure the cleaning effect and maintain the quality.

  9. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  10. Clean Air Act, TRI drive emission reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, K.

    1994-06-22

    When asked to rank priority environmental engineering projects, many chemical firms put emissions reduction first. The chief motivators are the need to comply with rules governing major sources of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAA), along with the need to reduce the volumes of chemicals on EPA`s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). Deep-welling of toxics is getting special attention as the practice adds considerably to TRI numbers. {open_quotes}We want to eliminate our air toxics so that we can get entirely out of the [CAA] Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements,{close_quotes} says Thomas Zosel, manager/pollutionmore » prevention programs for 3M (St. Paul, MN). He estimates that 3M`s 1993 total research expenditures for environmental improvements were at least $200 million, out of an annual research budget of a little more than $1 billion. And, he says, the spending level is not expected to drop. Among its many efforts, 3M is striving to move away from solvents in all of its processes. To help reach that goal, the company developed a {open_quotes}waste measurement metric{close_quotes} that calculates the wastes produced by each of the company`s 50 operating divisions. In the case of Magic Tape, the company eliminated solvent emission by switching to a water-based adhesive that does not require a solvent.« less

  11. Environmental cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Traverse, Michelle; Aceto, Helen

    2015-03-01

    The guidelines in this article provide veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and veterinary health care workers with an overview of evidence-based recommendations for the best practices associated with environmental cleaning and disinfection of a veterinary clinic that deals with small animals. Hospital-associated infections and the control and prevention programs necessary to alleviate them are addressed from an environmental perspective. Measures of hospital cleaning and disinfection include understanding mechanisms and types of contamination in veterinary settings, recognizing areas of potential concern, addressing appropriate decontamination techniques and selection of disinfectants, the management of potentially contaminated equipment, laundry, and waste management, and environmental surveillance strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  13. Solvent Recycling for Shipyards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Suvey results are included in Section 5) Survey manufacturers and compile information on available equipment and features . (Data is summarized in Section...should be placed on safety features . Important safety features include explosion-proof electricals and grounding protection, overpressure relief valves...solvent can dissolve a polymer plastic liner, or extract water from a clay liner, resulting in liner leakage. The threat is compounded by the ability

  14. Precision cleaning apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, T.W.; Frye, G.C.; Martin, S.J.

    1998-01-13

    A precision cleaning apparatus and method are disclosed. The precision cleaning apparatus includes a cleaning monitor further comprising an acoustic wave cleaning sensor such as a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), a flexural plate wave (FPW) sensor, a shear horizontal acoustic plate mode (SH--APM) sensor, or a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH--SAW) sensor; and measurement means connectable to the sensor for measuring in-situ one or more electrical response characteristics that vary in response to removal of one or more contaminants from the sensor and a workpiece located adjacent to the sensor during cleaning. Methods are disclosed for precision cleaning of one or more contaminants from a surface of the workpiece by means of the cleaning monitor that determines a state of cleanliness and any residual contamination that may be present after cleaning; and also for determining an effectiveness of a cleaning medium for removing one or more contaminants from a workpiece. 11 figs.

  15. Precision cleaning apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Thomas W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Martin, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    A precision cleaning apparatus and method. The precision cleaning apparatus includes a cleaning monitor further comprising an acoustic wave cleaning sensor such as a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), a flexural plate wave (FPW) sensor, a shear horizontal acoustic plate mode (SH--APM) sensor, or a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH--SAW) sensor; and measurement means connectable to the sensor for measuring in-situ one or more electrical response characteristics that vary in response to removal of one or more contaminants from the sensor and a workpiece located adjacent to the sensor during cleaning. Methods are disclosed for precision cleaning of one or more contaminants from a surface of the workpiece by means of the cleaning monitor that determines a state of cleanliness and any residual contamination that may be present after cleaning; and also for determining an effectiveness of a cleaning medium for removing one or more contaminants from a workpiece.

  16. Road-Cleaning Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Roadways are literally soaked with petrochemical byproducts, oils, gasoline, and other volatile substances that eventually run off into sewers and end up in rivers, waterways, and other undesirable places. Can the roads be cleaned of these wastes, with their proper disposal? Can vehicles, robots, or other devices be designed that could be driven…

  17. The Clean Air Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalone-King, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Clean Air game which teaches about air quality and its vital importance for life. Introduces students to air pollutants, health of people and environment, and possible actions individuals can take to prevent air pollution. Includes directions for the game. (YDS)

  18. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  19. Low extractable wipers for cleaning space flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijerina, Veronica; Gross, Frederick C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for low extractable wipers for solvent cleaning of space flight hardware. Soxhlet extraction is the method utilized today by most NASA subcontractors, but there may be alternate methods to achieve the same results. The need for low non-volatile residue materials, the history of soxhlet extraction, and proposed alternate methods are discussed, as well as different types of wipers, test methods, and current standards.

  20. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  1. Supercritical CO2 Cleaning System for Planetary Protection and Contamination Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Zhong, Fang; Aveline, David C.; Anderson, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Current spacecraft-compatible cleaning protocols involve a vapor degreaser, liquid sonication, and alcohol wiping. These methods are not very effective in removing live and dead microbes from spacecraft piece parts of slightly complicated geometry, such as tubing and loosely fitted nuts and bolts. Contamination control practices are traditionally focused on cleaning and monitoring of particulate and oily residual. Vapor degreaser and outgassing bakeout have not been proven to be effective in removing some less volatile, hydrophilic biomolecules of significant relevance to life detection. A precision cleaning technology was developed using supercritical CO2 (SCC). SCC is used as both solvent and carrier for removing organic and particulate contaminants. Supercritical fluid, like SCC, is characterized by physical and thermal properties that are between those of the pure liquid and gas phases. The fluid density is a function of the temperature and pressure. Its solvating power can be adjusted by changing the pressure or temperature, or adding a secondary solvent such as alcohol or water. Unlike a regular organic solvent, SCC has higher diffusivities, lower viscosity, and lower surface tension. It readily penetrates porous and fibrous solids and can reach hard-to-reach surfaces of the parts with complex geometry. Importantly, the CO2 solvent does not leave any residue. The results using this new cleaning device demonstrated that both supercritical CO2 with 5% water as a co-solvent can achieve cleanliness levels of 0.01 mg/cm2 or less for contaminants of a wide range of hydrophobicities. Experiments under the same conditions using compressed Martian air mix, which consists of 95% CO2, produced similar cleaning effectiveness on the hydrophobic compounds. The main components of the SCC cleaning system are a high-pressure cleaning vessel, a boil-off vessel located downstream from the cleaning vessel, a syringe-type high-pressure pump, a heat exchanger, and a back pressure

  2. Evaluation of HCFC AK 225 Alternatives for Precision Cleaning and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Maintaining qualified cleaning and verification processes are essential in an production environment. Environmental regulations have and are continuing to impact cleaning and verification processing in component and large structures, both at the Michoud Assembly Facility and component suppliers. The goal of the effort was to assure that the cleaning and verification proceeds unimpeded and that qualified, environmentally compliant material and process replacements are implemented and perform to specifications. The approach consisted of (1) selection of a Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System; (2) selection and evaluation of three cleaning and verification solvents as candidate alternatives to HCFC 225 (Vertrel 423 (HCFC), Vertrel MCA (HFC/1,2-Dichloroethylene), and HFE 7100DE (HFE/1,2 Dichloroethylene)); and evaluation of an analytical instrumental post cleaning verification technique. This document is presented in viewgraph format.

  3. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  4. Clean Transfer of Wafer-Scale Graphene via Liquid Phase Removal of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ho; Kang, Boseok; Suk, Ji Won; Li, Nannan; Kim, Kwang S; Ruoff, Rodney S; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-05-26

    Pentacene (C22H14), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, was used as both supporting and sacrificing layers for the clean and doping-free graphene transfer. After successful transfer of graphene to a target substrate, the pentacene layer was physically removed from the graphene surface by using intercalating organic solvent. This solvent-mediated removal of pentacene from graphene surface was investigated by both theoretical calculation and experimental studies with various solvents. The uses of pentacene and appropriate intercalation solvent enabled graphene transfer without forming a residue from the supporting layer. Such residues tend to cause charged impurity scattering and unintentional graphene doping effects. As a result, this clean graphene exhibited extremely homogeneous surface potential profiles over a large area. A field-effect transistor fabricated using this graphene displayed a high hole (electron) mobility of 8050 cm(2)/V·s (9940 cm(2)/V·s) with a nearly zero Dirac point voltage.

  5. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning, Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, S.

    1978-07-01

    United Nuclear Industries (UNI) entered into a subcontract with Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Ed) on August 8, 1977, for the purpose of developing methods to chemically clean the secondary side tube to tube support crevices of the steam generators of Indian Point Nos. 1 and 2 PWR plants. This document represents the first reporting on activities performed for Phase I of this effort. Specifically, this report contains the results of a literature search performed by UNI for the purpose of determining state-of-the-art chemical solvents and methods for decontaminating nuclear reactor steam generators. The results of the searchmore » sought to accomplish two objectives: (1) identify solvents beyond those proposed at present by UNI and Con Ed for the test program, and (2) confirm the appropriateness of solvents and methods of decontamination currently in use by UNI.« less

  6. Solar panel cleaning robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalladhimmu, Pavan Kumar Reddy; Priyadarshini, S.

    2018-04-01

    As the demand of electricity is increasing, there is need to using the renewable sources to produce the energy at present of power shortage, the use of solar energy could be beneficial to great extent and easy to get the maximum efficiency. There is an urgent in improving the efficiency of solar power generation. Current solar panels setups take a major power loss when unwanted obstructions cover the surface of the panels. To make solar energy more efficiency of solar array systems must be maximized efficiency evaluation of PV panels, that has been discussed with particular attention to the presence of dust on the efficiency of the PV panels have been highlighted. This paper gives the how the solar panel cleaning system works and designing of the cleaning system.

  7. Electrostatically clean solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore Garry (Inventor); Krumweide, Duane Eric (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Provided are methods of manufacturing an electrostatically clean solar array panel and the products resulting from the practice of these methods. The preferred method uses an array of solar cells, each with a coverglass where the method includes machining apertures into a flat, electrically conductive sheet so that each aperture is aligned with and undersized with respect to its matched coverglass sheet and thereby fashion a front side shield with apertures (FSA). The undersized portion about each aperture of the bottom side of the FSA shield is bonded to the topside portions nearest the edges of each aperture's matched coverglass. Edge clips are attached to the front side aperture shield edges with the edge clips electrically and mechanically connecting the tops of the coverglasses to the solar panel substrate. The FSA shield, edge clips and substrate edges are bonded so as to produce a conductively grounded electrostatically clean solar array panel.

  8. Cleaning Processes across NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, John M.

    2010-01-01

    All significant surfaces of the hardware must be pre-cleaned to remove dirt, grit, scale, corrosion, grease, oil and other foreign matter prior to any final precision cleaning process. Metallic parts shall be surface treated (cleaned, passivated, pickled and/or coated) as necessary to prevent latent corrosion and contamination.

  9. Cleaning of optical surfaces by excimer laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, K.; Wolff-Rottke, B.; Müller, F.

    1996-04-01

    The effect of particle removal from Al mirror surfaces by the influence of pulsed UV laser radiation has been studied. The investigations are closely related to the demands of astronomers, who are looking for a more effective way to clean future very large telescope (VLT) mirrors [1]. A systematic parameter study has been performed in order to determine the irradiation conditions which yield the highest dust removal efficiency (i.e. reflectivity increase) on contaminated samples. The particle removal rate increases with increasing laser fluence, being limited however by the damage threshold of the coating. Data indicate that on Al coated BK7 and Zerodur samples KrF laser radiation yields the optimum result, with cleaning efficiencies comparable to polymer film stripping. The initial reflectivity of the clean coating can nearly be restored, in particular when an additional solvent film on the sample surface is applied.

  10. Validation of Alternative to Ozone-Depleting Chemicals Used in Oxygen Line Cleaning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    concentration in air purge stream is continuously below 600 ppm ASTM G88 Leak testing B-1B mock-up and actual 2.9 To be determined from system...to determine the effectiveness of the solvent: the solvent chosen, its concentration , and the shear stress exerted on the surface by the cleaning...operators must be trained in its use. 11 3.0 DEMONSTRATION DESIGN 3.1 PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES The objective for this project was to produce a

  11. Gas cleaning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Richard Allen

    2006-06-06

    A gas cleaning system for removing at least a portion of contaminants, such as halides, sulfur, particulates, mercury, and others, from a synthesis gas (syngas). The gas cleaning system may include one or more filter vessels coupled in series for removing halides, particulates, and sulfur from the syngas. The gas cleaning system may be operated by receiving gas at a first temperature and pressure and dropping the temperature of the syngas as the gas flows through the system. The gas cleaning system may be used for an application requiring clean syngas, such as, but not limited to, fuel cell power generation, IGCC power generation, and chemical synthesis.

  12. Replacement Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware for Propellant Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-l13- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. Replacement technologies are being investigated for aerospace hardware and for gauges and instrumentation. This paper includes the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification of aerospace hardware using known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils. The results correlate nonvolatile residue with CFC 113. The studies also include enhancements to aqueous sampling for organic and particulate contamination. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon 225 (HCFC 225), HCFC 141b, HFE 7100(R), and Vertrel MCA(R) was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC 113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autogenous ignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  13. Markets for Clean Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerman, A. Denny; Joskow, Paul L.; Schmalensee, Richard; Montero, Juan-Pablo; Bailey, Elizabeth M.

    2000-06-01

    Markets for Clean Air provides a comprehensive, in-depth description and evaluation of the first three years' experience with the U.S. Acid Rain Program. This environmental control program is the world's first large-scale use of a tradable emission permit system for achieving environmental goals. The book analyzes the behavior and performance of the market for emissions permits, called allowances in the Acid Rain Program, and quantifies emission reductions, compliance costs, and cost savings associated with the trading program. The book also includes chapters on the historical context in which this pioneering program developed and the political economy of allowance allocations.

  14. Clean Room Apparel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    American Hospital Supply Corporation (AHSC), Baxter Healthcare Corporation's predecessor, used the NASA informational base on contamination control technology to improve industrial contamination control technology. When a study determined that microscopic body particles escaping through tiny "windows" in woven garments worn by workers were the greatest source of contamination, AHSC developed TYVEK. This non-woven material filters 99% of all particulate matter larger than half a micron. Baxter Healthcare added a polyimide coating which seals and ties down any loose fibers, providing greater durability. Stress points along seams have been minimized to make the garment almost tearproof. Micro-Clean 212 garments are individually packaged and disposable.

  15. Clean fuels from biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.-Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the U.S. resources to provide fuels from agricultural products, the present status of conversion technology of clean fuels from biomass, and a system study directed to determine the energy budget, and environmental and socioeconomic impacts. Conversion processes are discussed relative to pyrolysis and anaerobic fermentation. Pyrolysis breaks the cellulose molecules to smaller molecules under high temperature in the absence of oxygen, wheras anaerobic fermentation is used to convert biomass to methane by means of bacteria. Cost optimization and energy utilization are also discussed.

  16. Evaluation of various cleaning methods to remove bacillus spores from spacecraft hardware materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm x 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 x 10(3) cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  17. Evaluation of Various Cleaning Methods to Remove Bacillus Spores from Spacecraft Hardware Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm × 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 × 103 cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  18. Evaluation of various cleaning methods to remove bacillus spores from spacecraft hardware materials.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm x 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 x 10(3) cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  19. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  20. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  1. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME II: PROCESS OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume presents initial results of a study to identify the issues and barriers associated with retrofitting existing solvent-based equipment to accept waterbased adhesives as part of an EPA effort to improve equipment cleaning in the coated and laminated substrate manufactur...

  2. KEY NON-PROCESS SOLVENT USES TARGETED AS POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an EPA assessment of non-process solvent emissions from 15 industrial and commercial source categories in support of the Consumer and Commercial Products Report to Congress which was mandated in Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. hese prod...

  3. Bringing Catalysis with Gold Nanoparticles in Green Solvents to Graduate Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Wendt, Robert; O'Neill, Maeve; Ochmann, Miguel; Som, Tirtha; Fenger, Robert; Mohrmann, Marie; Hoell, Armin; Rademann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate here a novel laboratory experiment for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a low energy gold-sputtering method together with a modern, green, and biofriendly deep eutectic solvent (DES). The strategy is straightforward, economical, ecofriendly, rapid, and clean. It yields uniform AuNPs of 5 nm in diameter with high…

  4. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  5. Quick and clean cloning.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Frank; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    Identification of unknown sequences that flank known sequences of interest requires PCR amplification of DNA fragments that contain the junction between the known and unknown flanking sequences. Since amplified products often contain a mixture of specific and nonspecific products, the quick and clean (QC) cloning procedure was developed to clone specific products only. QC cloning is a ligation-independent cloning procedure that relies on the exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase to generate single-stranded extensions at the ends of the vector and insert. A specific feature of QC cloning is the use of vectors that contain a sequence called catching sequence that allows cloning specific products only. QC cloning is performed by a one-pot incubation of insert and vector in the presence of T4 DNA polymerase at room temperature for 10 min followed by direct transformation of the incubation mix in chemo-competent Escherichia coli cells.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF A LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS FOR CLEANING METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) as an alternative to chlorinated solvents for cleaning metal parts. It describes the LCO2 process, the parts tested, the contaminants removed, and results from preliminary laboratory testing and on-site d...

  7. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Tim; Thom, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based solvents, such as CFC-113 and 1,1,1, trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanism bearings. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change requiring the use of ODC-free cleaners for precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises; what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life? The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0 x 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90 C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing, the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition, the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  8. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy Raymond; Thom, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC ) based solvents, such as Freon and 1,1,1, Trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanisms. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change to new ODC-free cleaners for the precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0* 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  9. Supercritical CO2 Cleaning for Planetary Protection and Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Zhong, Fang; Aveline, David; Anderson, Mark; Chung, Shirley; Mennella, Jerami; Schubert, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and built a prototype Supercritical CO? Cleaning (SCC) system at JPL. The key features of the system are: 1) the parts inside a high-pressure vessel can be rotated at high speeds; 2) the same thermodynamic condition is maintained during First-In First-Out flushing to keep solvent power constant; and 3) the boil-off during decompression is induced in a separate vessel downstream. Our goal is to demonstrate SCC's ability to remove trace amounts of microbial and organic contaminants down to parts per billion levels from spacecraft material surfaces for future astrobiology missions. The initial cleaning test results showed that SCC can achieve cleanliness levels of 0.01 microgram/cm(sup 2) or less for hydrophobic contaminants such as dioctyl phthalate and silicone and it is less effective in the removal and inactivation of the hydrophilic bacterial spores as expected. However, with the use of a polar co-solvent, the efficacy may improve dramatically. The same results were obtained using liquid CO?. This opens up the possibility of using subcritical cleaning conditions, which may prove to be more compatible with certain spacecraft hardware.

  10. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To meet the great need of replacing many harmful solvents commonly used by industry and the public with environmentally benign substitute solvents, the PARIS II solvent design software has been developed. Although the difficulty of successfully finding replacements increases with...

  11. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1996-05-07

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene or terpineol cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  12. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfurly alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  13. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carter, R.D.; Hand, T.E.; Powers, M.T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  14. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    PubMed

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Extending the solvent-free MALDI sample preparation method.

    PubMed

    Hanton, Scott D; Parees, David M

    2005-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important technique to characterize many different materials, including synthetic polymers. MALDI mass spectral data can be used to determine the polymer average molecular weights, repeat units, and end groups. One of the key issues in traditional MALDI sample preparation is making good solutions of the analyte and the matrix. Solvent-free sample preparation methods have been developed to address these issues. Previous results of solvent-free or dry prepared samples show some advantages over traditional wet sample preparation methods. Although the results of the published solvent-free sample preparation methods produced excellent mass spectra, we found the method to be very time-consuming, with significant tool cleaning, which presents a significant possibility of cross contamination. To address these issues, we developed an extension of the solvent-free method that replaces the mortar and pestle grinding with ball milling the sample in a glass vial with two small steel balls. This new method generates mass spectra with equal quality of the previous methods, but has significant advantages in productivity, eliminates cross contamination, and is applicable to liquid and soft or waxy analytes.

  16. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast,more » the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with

  17. Clean Energy Business Plan Competition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxted, Sara Jane; Lojewski, Brandon; Scherson, Yaniv

    Top Students Pitch Clean Energy Business Plans The six regional finalists of the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition pitched their business plans to a panel of judges June 13 in Washington, D.C. The expert judges announced NuMat Technologies from Northwestern University as the grand prize winner.

  18. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This health technology policy assessment will answer the following questions: When should in-room air cleaners be used? How effective are in-room air cleaners? Are in-room air cleaners that use combined HEPA and UVGI air cleaning technology more effective than those that use HEPA filtration alone? What is the Plasmacluster ion air purifier in the pandemic influenza preparation plan? The experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) locally, nationally, and internationally underscored the importance of administrative, environmental, and personal protective infection control measures in health care facilities. In the aftermath of the SARS crisis, there was a need for a clearer understanding of Ontario’s capacity to manage suspected or confirmed cases of airborne infectious diseases. In so doing, the Walker Commission thought that more attention should be paid to the potential use of new technologies such as in-room air cleaning units. It recommended that the Medical Advisory Secretariat of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care evaluate the appropriate use and effectiveness of such new technologies. Accordingly, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee asked the Medical Advisory Secretariat to review the literature on the effectiveness and utility of in-room air cleaners that use high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) air cleaning technology. Additionally, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee prioritized a request from the ministry’s Emergency Management Unit to investigate the possible role of the Plasmacluster ion air purifier manufactured by Sharp Electronics Corporation, in the pandemic influenza preparation plan. Clinical Need Airborne transmission of infectious diseases depends in part on the concentration of breathable infectious pathogens (germs) in room air. Infection control is achieved by a combination of administrative, engineering

  19. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  20. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: HALOGENATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Halogenated Solvent Degreasing Facilities. These assessments utilize existing models and d...

  1. Clean then Assemble Versus Assemble then Clean: Several Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, Roger W.

    2004-01-01

    Cleanliness of manufactured parts and assemblies is a significant issue in many industries including disk drives, semiconductors, aerospace, and medical devices. Clean manufacturing requires cleanroom floor space and cleaning technology that are both expensive to own and expensive to operate. Strategies to reduce these costs are an important consideration. One strategy shown to be effective at reducing costs is to assemble parts into subassemblies and then clean the subassembly, rather than clean the individual parts first and then assemble them. One advantage is that assembly outside of the cleanroom reduces the amount of cleanroom floor space and its associated operating cost premium. A second advantage is that this strategy reduces the number of individual parts that must be cleaned prior to assembly, reducing the number of cleaning baskets, handling and, possibly, reducing the number of cleaners. The assemble then clean strategy also results in a part that is significantly cleaner because contamination generated during the assembly steps are more effectively removed that normally can be achieved by hand wiping after assembly in the cleanroom.

  2. 40 CFR 180.539 - d-Limonene; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... used in insect-repellent tablecloths and in insect-repellent strips used in food- or feed-handling establishments. (2) To assure safe use of the insect repellent, its label and labeling shall conform to that...

  3. 40 CFR 180.539 - d-Limonene; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... used in insect-repellent tablecloths and in insect-repellent strips used in food- or feed-handling establishments. (2) To assure safe use of the insect repellent, its label and labeling shall conform to that...

  4. 40 CFR 180.539 - d-Limonene; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... used in insect-repellent tablecloths and in insect-repellent strips used in food- or feed-handling establishments. (2) To assure safe use of the insect repellent, its label and labeling shall conform to that...

  5. 40 CFR 180.539 - d-Limonene; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... used in insect-repellent tablecloths and in insect-repellent strips used in food- or feed-handling establishments. (2) To assure safe use of the insect repellent, its label and labeling shall conform to that...

  6. 40 CFR 180.539 - d-Limonene; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... used in insect-repellent tablecloths and in insect-repellent strips used in food- or feed-handling establishments. (2) To assure safe use of the insect repellent, its label and labeling shall conform to that...

  7. Ionic cleaning after wave solder and before conformal coat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguygen, Tochau N.; Sutherland, Thomas H.

    An account is given of efforts made by a military electronics manufacturer to upgrade product reliability in response to the printed writing board (PWB) ionic cleanliness requirements recently set out in MIL-P-28809 Rev. A. These requirements had to be met both after wave soldering, involving the immediate removal of ionically active RA flux, and immediately before conformal coating, in order to remove the less active RMA flux and bonding contaminants. Attention is given to the results of a test program which compared the effectiveness with which five different solvents and two (batch and conveyorized vapor degreasing) cleaning methods cleaned representative PWBs containing many components. Alcohol-containing fluorocarbon blends were adequate, but the most densely packed PWBs required a supplemental water rinse.

  8. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  9. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  10. METHOD OF CLEANING METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Winkler, H.W.; Morfitt, J.W.; Little, T.H.

    1959-05-19

    Cleaning fluids for removing deposits from metal surfaces are described. The cleaning agents of the invention consist of aqueous nitric acid and an amhydrous nitrate salt of a metal which is lower in the electromotive series than the element of the deposit to be removed. In general, the salt content of thc cleaning agents ranged from 10 to 90%, preferably from 10 to 40% by weight; and the balance of the composition comprises nitric acid of any strength from extremely dilute up to concentrated strength.

  11. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS asmore » a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.« less

  12. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  13. Carbonated Science Cleans Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Roger; Heldebrant, David; Glezakou, Vand

    Similar to the properties of soda, liquid solvents can efficiently capture and convert carbon dioxide from coal power plants. Researchers at PNNL explain this process and how this method can turn captured carbon into plastic or fuel.

  14. Field Equipment Cleaning and Decontamination

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD), Nov. 1, 2007, document describes general and specific procedures, methods and considerations when cleaning and decontaminating sampling equipment during the course of field investigations.

  15. Clean Diesel National Grants Awarded

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National Funding Assistance Program administers competitive grants for clean diesel projects. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  16. Clean Air Excellence Award Recipients

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recipients are organized by award category within each year: Clean Air Technology, Community Action, Education/Outreach, Regulatory/Policy Innovations, Transportation Efficiency Innovations, Thomas W. Zosel individual, and Gregg Cooke Visionary Program.

  17. Clean Air Technology Center Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  18. Dry Cleaning Sector (NAICS 8123)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The dry cleaning sector includes establishments engaged in providing laundry services and industrial launderers. Find environmental regulatory information for perchloroethylene (PERC) cleaners as well as hazardous waste regulations for dry cleaners.

  19. Clean Water State Revolving Fund

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How the Clean Water State Revolving Fund works, how to obtain funding, program eligibility, innovative ways to use the funds to get the greatest water quality benefits and leverage financial resources of the program, and share success stories.

  20. Clean Water Act Analytical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA publishes laboratory analytical methods (test procedures) that are used by industries and municipalities to analyze the chemical, physical and biological components of wastewater and other environmental samples required by the Clean Water Act.

  1. Energy 101: Clean Energy Manufacturing

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    Most of us have a basic understanding of manufacturing. It's how we convert raw materials, components, and parts into finished goods that meet our essential needs and make our lives easier. But what about clean energy manufacturing? Clean energy and advanced manufacturing have the potential to rejuvenate the U.S. manufacturing industry and open pathways to increased American competitiveness. Watch this video to learn more about this exciting movement and to see some of these innovations in action.

  2. Clean access platform for orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, H.; Harris, J.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Clean Access Platform at the Kennedy Space Center, beginning with the design requirements and tracing the effort throughout development and manufacturing is described. Also examined are: (1) A system description; (2) Testing requirements and conclusions; (3) Safety and reliability features; (4) Major problems experienced during the project; and (5) Lessons learned, including features necessary for the effective design of mechanisms used in clean systems.

  3. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the followingmore » efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable

  4. Automated carbon dioxide cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1991-01-01

    Solidified CO2 pellets are an effective blast media for the cleaning of a variety of materials. CO2 is obtained from the waste gas streams generated from other manufacturing processes and therefore does not contribute to the greenhouse effect, depletion of the ozone layer, or the environmental burden of hazardous waste disposal. The system is capable of removing as much as 90 percent of the contamination from a surface in one pass or to a high cleanliness level after multiple passes. Although the system is packaged and designed for manual hand held cleaning processes, the nozzle can easily be attached to the end effector of a robot for automated cleaning of predefined and known geometries. Specific tailoring of cleaning parameters are required to optimize the process for each individual geometry. Using optimum cleaning parameters the CO2 systems were shown to be capable of cleaning to molecular levels below 0.7 mg/sq ft. The systems were effective for removing a variety of contaminants such as lubricating oils, cutting oils, grease, alcohol residue, biological films, and silicone. The system was effective on steel, aluminum, and carbon phenolic substrates.

  5. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    factors of three to five times, leading to a more rapid clean-up of the DNAPL zone. The most favored electron donor to add is one which partitions well with the chlorinated solvent or can be concentrated near it. Unfortunately, an ideal electron donor, such as vegetable oil, is difficult to introduce and mix with DNAPL in the ground, doing this properly remains an engineering challenge. Numerical model studies have indicated that several factors may significantly influence the rate and extent of enhancement, including the inhibitory effects of PCE and cDCE, the level of ED concentration, DNAPL configuration, and competition for ED. Such factors need to be considered when contemplating engineered DNAPL bioremediation. Pseudomonas stuzeri KC is an organism that transforms CT to carbon dioxide and chloride without the formation of the hazardous intermediate, chloroform. This is accomplished by production and secretion of a molecule called PDTC. This study was direct ed towards determining how PDTC works. Cu (II) at a ratio of 1:1 Cu to PDTC was found to result in the most rapid CT transformation, confirming that the PDTC-Cu complex is both a reactant and a catalyst in CT transformation. CT degradation requires that the PDTC be in a reduced form, which is generated by contact with cell components. Fe(II) inhibits CT transformation by PDTC. Studies indicated that this inhibition is enhanced by some compound or factor in the supernatant with molecular weight greater than 10,000 Da. We have made progress in determining what this factor might be, but have not yet been able to identify it. In related studies, we found that CT transformation by another organism, Shewanella oneidensis MR1, also involves an excreted factor, but this factor is different from PDTC and results in chloroform transformation as an intermediate. Our studies have indicated that this factor is similar to vitamin K2, and we have also confirmed that vitamin K2 does transform C T into chloroform.« less

  6. Implementation of a solvent management program to control paint shop volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Floer, M.M.; Hicks, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    The majority of automobile assembly plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are generated from painting operations. Typical paint operations generate more than 90 percent of the total plant emissions and, up to, 50 percent can be released by cleaning sources. Plant practices which contribute to the release of VOC emissions include the cleaning of paint lines and equipment, tanks, spray booths, floors and vehicles. Solvents continue to be the largest contributing source of VOC emissions in an automotive paint shop. To reduce overall VOC emissions, environmental regulations and guidelines were introduced under the Clean Air Act; Pollution Prevention and Wastemore » Minimization programs, Control Techniques, and special air permit conditions. The introduction of these regulations and guidelines has driven industry toward continual refinement of their present cleaning methods while pursuing new techniques and technologies. Industry has also shown a proactive approach by introducing new waterborne and powder coating paint technologies to reduce overall emissions. As new paint technologies are developed and introduced, special attention must be given to the types of materials utilized for cleaning. The development and implementation of a solvent management program allows a facility to standardize a program to properly implement materials, equipment, technologies and work practices to reduce volatile organic compound emissions, meet strict cleaning requirements posed by new paint technologies and produce a vehicle which meets the high quality standards of the customer. This paper will assess the effectiveness of a solvent management program by examining pollution prevention initiatives and data from four different painting operations.« less

  7. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  8. Development of novel purifiers with appropriate functional groups based on solvent polarities at bulk filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Tetsu; Kaneko, Fumiya; Ly, Saksatha; Hamzik, James; Jaber, Jad; Yamada, Yoshiaki

    2017-03-01

    Weak-polar solvents like PGMEA (Propylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether Acetate) or CHN (Cyclohexanone) are used to dissolve hydrophobic photo-resist polymers, which are challenging for traditional cleaning methods such as distillation, ion-exchange resins service or water-washing processes. This paper investigated two novel surface modifications to see their effectiveness at metal removal and to understand the mechanism. The experiments yielded effective purification methods for metal reduction, focusing on solvent polarities based on HSP (Hansen Solubility Parameters), and developing optimal purification strategies.

  9. Organic solvent desorption from two tegafur polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Bobrovs, Raitis; Actiņš, Andris

    2013-11-30

    Desorption behavior of 8 different solvents from α and β tegafur (5-fluoro-1-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)uracil) has been studied in this work. Solvent desorption from samples stored at 95% and 50% relative solvent vapor pressure was studied in isothermal conditions at 30 °C. The results of this study demonstrated that: solvent desorption rate did not differ significantly for both phases; solvent desorption in all cases occurred faster from samples with the largest particle size; and solvent desorption in most cases occurred in two steps. Structure differences and their surface properties were not of great importance on the solvent desorption rates because the main factor affecting desorption rate was sample particle size and sample morphology. Inspection of the structure packing showed that solvent desorption rate and amount of solvent adsorbed were mainly affected by surface molecule arrangement and ability to form short contacts between solvent molecule electron donor groups and freely accessible tegafur tetrahydrofuran group hydrogens, as well as between solvents molecule proton donor groups and fluorouracil ring carbonyl and fluoro groups. Solvent desorption rates of acetone, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate and tetrahydrofuran multilayers from α and β tegafur were approximately 30 times higher than those of solvent monolayers. Scanning electron micrographs showed that sample storage in solvent vapor atmosphere promotes small tegafur particles recrystallization to larger particles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Ultrasonic cleaning: Fundamental theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, F. John

    1995-01-01

    This presentation describes: the theory of ultrasonics, cavitation and implosion; the importance and application of ultrasonics in precision cleaning; explanations of ultrasonic cleaning equipment options and their application; process parameters for ultrasonic cleaning; and proper operation of ultrasonic cleaning equipment to achieve maximum results.

  12. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  13. Optimization of Ultrasonic Fabric Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.

    The fundamental purpose of this project was to research and develop a process that would reduce the cost and improve the environmental efficiency of the present dry-cleaning industry. This second phase of research (see report KCP-94-1006 for information gathered during the first phase) was intended to allow the optimal integration of all factors of ultrasonic fabric cleaning. For this phase, Garment Care performed an extensive literature search and gathered data from other researchers worldwide. The Garment Care-AlliedSignal team developed the requirements for a prototype cleaning tank for studies and acquired that tank and the additional equipment required to use itmore » properly. Garment Care and AlliedSignal acquired the transducers and generators from Surftran Martin-Walter in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Amway's Kelly Haley developed the test protocol, supplied hundreds of test swatches, gathered the data on the swatches before and after the tests, assisted with the cleaning tests, and prepared the final analysis of the results. AlliedSignal personnel, in conjunction with Amway and Garment Care staff, performed all the tests. Additional planning is under way for future testing by outside research facilities. The final results indicated repeatable performance and good results for single layered fabric swatches. Swatches that were cleaned as a ''sandwich,'' that is, three or more layers.« less

  14. A new approach involving a multi transducer ultrasonic system for cleaning turbine engines' oil filters under practical conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Ngo, Huu Hao; Yoon, Yong Soo; Chang, Soon Woong; Bui, Hong Ha

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a green technology that can clean turbine engine oil filters effectively in ships using ultrasound, with ultrasonic devices having a frequency of 25kHz and different powers of 300W and 600W, respectively. The effects of temperature, ultrasonic cleaning times, pressure losses through the oil filter, solvent washing, and ultrasonic power devices were investigated. In addition, the cleaning efficiency of three modes (hand washing, preliminary washing and ultrasonic washing) were compared to assess their relative effectiveness. Experimental results revealed that the necessary ultrasonic time varied significantly depending on which solvent was used for washing. For instance, the optimum ultrasonic cleaning time was 50-60min when the oil filter was cleaned in a solvent of kerosene oil (KO) and over 80min when in a solvent of diesel oil (DO) using the same ultrasonic generator device (25kHz, 600W) and experimental conditions. Furthermore, microscopic examination did not reveal any damage or breakdown on or within the structure of the filter after ultrasonic cleaning, even in the filter's surfaces at a constantly low frequency of 25kHz and power specific capacity (100W/gal). Overall, it may be concluded that ultrasound-assisted oil filter washing is effective, requiring a significantly shorter time than manual washing. This ultrasonic method also shows promise as a green technology for washing oil filters in turbine engines in general and Vietnamese navy ships in particular, because of its high cleaning efficiency, operational simplicity and savings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hazards of household cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J N; Jenkins, H L; Volans, G N

    1982-10-01

    1 All enquiries received by the London Centre of the National Poisons Information Service [NPIS(L)] relating to household cleaning products were followed up by questionnaire for a 4-month period from November 1978 to February 1979. 2 130 reports (43% of total followed-up) were received. 3 The incidence of misuse of household cleaning products has remained largely unchanged since a less detailed survey was performed in 1974-1975. 4 The source of enquiries, age groups and products involved were similar to the earlier survey. 5 Sixty-two per cent of cases were asymptomatic and no serious or life-threatening reactions were reported. 6 Although an increasing number of patients were admitted to hospital, little treatment was needed and the use of gastric lavage and aspiration had declined markedly. 7 Household cleaning products in the UK still cause no serious poisoning when misused or accidentally ingested.

  16. Senate passes clean air bill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In an 89 to 11 vote the Senate passed a clean air bill aimed at reducing pollution by the turn of the century by imposing tougher controls on American industry. The bill is the first revision of the Clean Air Act of 1970 in 13 years and calls for new limits on auto pollution to clean up smog in most U.S. cities, decreasing by half emissions by power plants that cause acid rain to protect the ecology, and increasing technological controls on factories to protect against cancer-causing and toxic substances. The bill will add about $20 billion per year to the estimated $33 billion cost of complying with current pollution laws.

  17. Cleaning and dewatering fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Eraydin, Mert K.; Freeland, Chad

    Fine coal is cleaned of its mineral matter impurities and dewatered by mixing the aqueous slurry containing both with a hydrophobic liquid, subjecting the mixture to a phase separation. The resulting hydrophobic liquid phase contains coal particles free of surface moisture and droplets of water stabilized by coal particles, while the aqueous phase contains the mineral matter. By separating the entrained water droplets from the coal particles mechanically, a clean coal product of substantially reduced mineral matter and moisture contents is obtained. The spent hydrophobic liquid is separated from the clean coal product and recycled. The process can also bemore » used to separate one type of hydrophilic particles from another by selectively hydrophobizing one.« less

  18. Stethoscope Cleaning During Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Ghumman, Ghazi Wahla; Ahmad, Nina; Pop-Vicas, Aurora; Iftikhar, Sadia

    2018-05-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey of healthcare workers in two community teaching hospitals to better understand clinicians' beliefs and practices related to cleaning of their stethoscopes. The study was conducted from September 2015 to May 2016. Among the total 358 responses received, 45%, 40%, 10% and 5% were from attending physicians, medical students, nurses, and resident physicians, respectively. Although the majority of the respondents (76%) frequently used a stethoscope at work, and almost all (93%) believed that stethoscopes can be involved in pathogen transmission, only 29% of participants reported cleaning their stethoscopes after every use. Hospitals should include stethoscope cleaning into their overall infection prevention efforts. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2018-05.asp].

  19. Extraction and identification of cyclobutanones from irradiated cheese employing a rapid direct solvent extraction method.

    PubMed

    Tewfik, Ihab

    2008-01-01

    2-Alkylcyclobutanones (cyclobutanones) are accepted as chemical markers for irradiated foods containing lipid. However, current extraction procedures (Soxhlet-florisil chromatography) for the isolation of these markers involve a long and tedious clean-up regime prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry identification. This paper outlines an alternative isolation and clean-up method for the extraction of cyclobutanones in irradiated Camembert cheese. The newly developed direct solvent extraction method enables the efficient screening of large numbers of food samples and is not as resource intensive as the BS EN 1785:1997 method. Direct solvent extraction appears to be a simple, robust method and has the added advantage of a considerably shorter extraction time for the analysis of foods containing lipid.

  20. Laser paper cleaning: the method of cleaning historical books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekou, Evangelini; Tsilikas, Ioannis; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of cultural heritage treasures is the most important issue for transferring knowledge to the public through the next generation of students, academics, and researchers. Although this century is authenticating e-books and information by means of electronic text, still historical manuscripts as content as well as objects are the main original recourses of keeping a record of this transformation. The current work focuses on cleaning paper samples by the application of pulsed light, which is interventional. Experiments carried out using paper samples that are artificially colonized with Ulocladium chartarum. Paper is treated by Nd:YAG laser light. The available wavelength is 1064 nm, at various fluences, repetition rates and number of pulses. Two types of paper are stained with fungi colonies, which grow on substrates of clean paper, as well as on paper with ink text. The first type of paper is Whatman No.1056, which is closer to pure cellulose. The second type of paper is a page of a cultural heritage book published in 1926. Cleaning is performed using laser irradiation, thus defining the damage threshold of each sample. The treatment on paper Watman showed a yellowing, especially on areas with high concentration of fungi. The second sample was more durable to the exposure, performing the best results at higher fluences. Eventually, the paper samples are characterized, with optical microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses, prior to and after cleaning.

  1. Sleep disturbances and exposure to organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lindelof, B.; Almkvist, O.; Goethe, C.

    An inquiry about sleep habits and sleep disturbances revealed a significantly higher prevalence of insomnia in a solvent-exposed group than in a comparable group that had no occupational exposure to organic solvents. The solvent-exposed group has also registered an increased consumption of hypnotics, and a significant increase occurred in the number of individuals who had consulted physicians because of sleep disorders. The results indicate that solvent exposure could induce sleep disturbances.

  2. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  3. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  4. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initialmore » phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.« less

  5. A first French assessment of population exposure to tetrachloroethylene from small dry-cleaning facilities.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, L; Delery, L; Leoz, E; Brouard, B; Fagault, Y

    2009-06-01

    Used as a solvent in the dry-cleaning industry, tetrachloroethylene (C(2)Cl(4)) can be a pollutant of residential indoor air, which can cause long-term harmful exposures because of its neurotoxicity and probable carcinogenicity. In France, dry-cleaning facilities are integrated in urban environments (shopping malls, residential buildings) and can contribute to C(2)Cl(4) exposure for customers and residents. This exploratory work presents the results from five studies carried out in one shopping mall and four residential buildings housing a dry-cleaning facility. These studies involved dry-cleaning machines fitted with a Carbon Adsorber and unfitted, with or without Air Exhaust System. Samples were collected in the cleaning facilities and in the apartments located above with passive samplers allowing measurement of time-integrated concentrations on a 7 days sampling period. It has obviously shown the degradation of indoor air quality in these environments and underlined the contributing role of the machine technology and ventilation system on the amount of released C(2)Cl(4) in the indoor air. To temper these results, it must be pointed out that some parameters (building insulation, amount of solvent used...) which would influence C(2)Cl(4) fugitive release have not been quantified and should be looked at in further studies. In France, dry-cleaning facilities are frequently integrated in urban environments (large shopping malls or residential buildings) and can significantly contribute to tetrachloroethylene (C(2)Cl(4)) population exposure. The amount of fugitive releases in these environments depends on several parameters such as the dry-cleaning machine technology (fitted or unfitted with a carbon adsorber) and the ventilation (air exhaust system). To reduce C(2)Cl(4) exposure in residential buildings and other indoor environments with on-site dry cleaners, carbon adsorber unequipped machine should be replaced by newer technology and dry cleaners should be

  6. Sociology: Clean-energy conservatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCright, Aaron M.

    2017-03-01

    US conservatives receive a steady stream of anti-environmental messaging from Republican politicians. However, clean-energy conservatives sending strong counter-messages on energy issues could mobilize moderate conservatives to break away from the dominant right-wing defence of fossil fuels.

  7. Portable sandblaster cleans small areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severin, H. J.

    1966-01-01

    Portable sandblasting unit rapidly and effectively cleans localized areas on a metal surface. The unit incorporates a bellows enclosure, masking plate, sand container, and used sand accummulator connected to a vacuum system. The bellows is equipped with an inspection window and light for observation of the sanding operation.

  8. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.

  9. Clean coal initiatives in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, B.H.; Irwin, M.W.; Sparrow, F.T.; Mastalerz, Maria; Yu, Z.; Kramer, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - Indiana is listed among the top ten coal states in the USA and annually mines about 35 million short tons (million tons) of coal from the vast reserves of the US Midwest Illinois Coal Basin. The implementation and commercialization of clean coal technologies is important to the economy of the state and has a significant role in the state's energy plan for increasing the use of the state's natural resources. Coal is a substantial Indiana energy resource and also has stable and relatively low costs, compared with the increasing costs of other major fuels. This indigenous energy source enables the promotion of energy independence. The purpose of this paper is to outline the significance of clean coal projects for achieving this objective. Design/methodology/approach - The paper outlines the clean coal initiatives being taken in Indiana and the research carried out at the Indiana Center for Coal Technology Research. Findings - Clean coal power generation and coal for transportation fuels (coal-to-liquids - CTL) are two major topics being investigated in Indiana. Coking coal, data compilation of the bituminous coal qualities within the Indiana coal beds, reducing dependence on coal imports, and provision of an emissions free environment are important topics to state legislators. Originality/value - Lessons learnt from these projects will be of value to other states and countries.

  10. Toward clean suspended CVD graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Yulaev, Alexander; Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD; Cheng, Guangjun; ...

    2016-08-26

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using a Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspendedmore » graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain a larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Lastly, our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.« less

  11. Prepsolv (TM): The optimum alternative to 1,1,1-trichloroethane and methyl ethyl ketone for hand-wipe cleaning of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. Scott; Purvis, John A.; Moran, Wade W.

    1995-01-01

    Engineers at Hercules Aerospace, a rocket motor manufacturer in Utah, have worked closely with chemists at Glidco Organics to study the feasibility of using terpenes for zero-residue wipe cleaning. The result of this work is a technological breakthrough, in which the barrier to ultra-low non-volatile residue formation has been broken. After 2 years of development and testing, SCM Glidco Organics has announced the availability of Glidsafe(registered trademark) Prepsolv(TM): a state-of-the-art ultra-low residue terpene wipe cleaning agent that does not require rinsing. Prepsolv(TM) can successfully be used in simple hand-wipe cleaning processes without fear of leaving surface residues. Industry testing has confirmed that Prepsolv(TM) is not only highly effective, but can even be less expensive to use than traditional cleaning solvents like methyl chloroform. This paper addresses the features and benefits of Prepsolv(TM), and presents performance and material compatibility data that characterizes this unique cleaning agent. Since its commercialization, Hercules Aerospace has chosen Prepsolv(TM) as the optimum cleaning agent to replace ozone-depleting solvents in their weapons factory in Magna, UT. Likewise, Boeing has approved Prepsolv(TM) for cleaning components in the manufacture of commercial aircraft at their facilities in Seattle, WA and Wichita, KS. Additional approvals are forthcoming for this uniquely safe and effective solvent.

  12. Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, Kevin; Menart, James; Gilbert, Robert

    2012-08-31

    The Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative represents a collaborative effort by the University of Dayton, Wright State University and Sinclair Community College. This effort above all aimed to establish energy related programs at each of the universities while also providing outreach to the local, state-wide, and national communities. At the University of Dayton, the grant has aimed at: solidfying a newly created Master's program in Renewable and Clean Energy; helping to establish and staff a regional sustainability organization for SW Ohio. As well, as the prime grantee, the University of Dayton was responsible for insuring curricular sharing between WSU andmore » the University of Dayton. Finally, the grant, through its support of graduate students, and through cooperation with the largest utilities in SW Ohio enabled a region-wide evaluation of over 10,000 commercial building buildings in order to identify the priority buildings in the region for energy reduction. In each, the grant has achieved success. The main focus of Wright State was to continue the development of graduate education in renewable and clean energy. Wright State has done this in a number of ways. First and foremost this was done by continuing the development of the new Renewable and Clean Energy Master's Degree program at Wright State . Development tasks included: continuing development of courses for the Renewable and Clean Energy Master's Degree, increasing the student enrollment, and increasing renewable and clean energy research work. The grant has enabled development and/or improvement of 7 courses. Collectively, the University of Dayton and WSU offer perhaps the most comprehensive list of courses in the renewable and clean energy area in the country. Because of this development, enrollment at WSU has increased from 4 students to 23. Secondly, the grant has helped to support student research aimed in the renewable and clean energy program. The grant helped to solidify new

  13. Mechanisms of single bubble cleaning.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Fabian; Mettin, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of collapsing bubbles close to a flat solid is investigated with respect to its potential for removal of surface attached particles. Individual bubbles are created by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses focused into water close to glass plates contaminated with melamine resin micro-particles. The bubble dynamics is analysed by means of synchronous high-speed recordings. Due to the close solid boundary, the bubble collapses with the well-known liquid jet phenomenon. Subsequent microscopic inspection of the substrates reveals circular areas clean of particles after a single bubble generation and collapse event. The detailed bubble dynamics, as well as the cleaned area size, is characterised by the non-dimensional bubble stand-off γ=d/Rmax, with d: laser focus distance to the solid boundary, and Rmax: maximum bubble radius before collapse. We observe a maximum of clean area at γ≈0.7, a roughly linear decay of the cleaned circle radius for increasing γ, and no cleaning for γ>3.5. As the main mechanism for particle removal, rapid flows at the boundary are identified. Three different cleaning regimes are discussed in relation to γ: (I) For large stand-off, 1.8<γ<3.5, bubble collapse induced vortex flows touch down onto the substrate and remove particles without significant contact of the gas phase. (II) For small distances, γ<1.1, the bubble is in direct contact with the solid. Fast liquid flows at the substrate are driven by the jet impact with its subsequent radial spreading, and by the liquid following the motion of the collapsing and rebounding bubble wall. Both flows remove particles. Their relative timing, which depends sensitively on the exact γ, appears to determine the extension of the area with forces large enough to cause particle detachment. (III) At intermediate stand-off, 1.1<γ<1.8, only the second bubble collapse touches the substrate, but acts with cleaning mechanisms similar to an effective small γ collapse: particles are removed by

  14. Coal cleaning: An underutilized solution?

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Custom Coals Corporation is based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is involved in the construction and operation of advanced coal cleaning facilities. The company has initially chosen to focus on Pennsylvania`s vast reserves of coal, because these coal provide a superior feedstock for the Technology. In a $76 million project co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Custom Coals is constructing its first coal cleaning facility. The DOE chose to participate with the company in the project pursuant to a competition it sponsored under Round IV of Its Clean Cod Technology program. Thirty-one companies submitted 33 projects seeking approximately $2.3 billionmore » of funding against the $600 million available. The company`s project was one of nine proposals accepted and was the only pre-combustion cleaning technology awarded. The project includes both the construction of a 500 ton per hour coal cleaning facility utilizing the company`s proprietary technologies and a series of power plant test bums on a variety of U.S. coals during a 12-month demonstration program. Three U.S. coal seams - Sewickley, Lower Freeport and Illinois No. 5 - will supply the initial feedstock for the demonstration project. These seams represent a broad range of raw cod qualifies. The processed coals will then be distributed to a number of generating stations for combustion. The 300 megawatt Martins Creek Plant of Pennsylvania Power & Light Co., near Allentown, Pennsylvania, will burn Carefree Coal, the 60 megawatt Whitewater Valley Power Station of Richmond Power and Light (in Indiana) and the Ashtabula, Ohio unit of Centerior Energy will burn Self-Scrubbing Coal. Following these demonstrations, the plant will begin full-scale commercial operation, providing two million tons of Pennsylvania compliance coals to electric power utilities.« less

  15. Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sandor, Debra; Chung, Donald; Keyser, David

    The Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing sheds light on several fundamental questions about the global clean technology manufacturing enterprise: How does clean energy technology manufacturing impact national economies? What are the economic opportunities across the manufacturing supply chain? What are the global dynamics of clean energy technology manufacturing?

  16. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    PubMed

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans.

  17. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  18. Clean vehicles as an enabler for a clean electricity grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coignard, Jonathan; Saxena, Samveg; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Wang, Dai

    2018-05-01

    California has issued ambitious targets to decarbonize transportation through the deployment of electric vehicles (EVs), and to decarbonize the electricity grid through the expansion of both renewable generation and energy storage. These parallel efforts can provide an untapped synergistic opportunity for clean transportation to be an enabler for a clean electricity grid. To quantify this potential, we forecast the hourly system-wide balancing problems arising out to 2025 as more renewables are deployed and load continues to grow. We then quantify the system-wide balancing benefits from EVs modulating the charging or discharging of their batteries to mitigate renewable intermittency, without compromising the mobility needs of drivers. Our results show that with its EV deployment target and with only one-way charging control of EVs, California can achieve much of the same benefit of its Storage Mandate for mitigating renewable intermittency, but at a small fraction of the cost. Moreover, EVs provide many times these benefits if two-way charging control becomes widely available. Thus, EVs support the state’s renewable integration targets while avoiding much of the tremendous capital investment of stationary storage that can instead be applied towards further deployment of clean vehicles.

  19. Advanced Testing of Safe-Solvent Replacements for CFC-113 for Use in Cleaning Oxygen Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    2 -(trifluoromethyl)-3,3,3- trifluoropropene 2 Reactions/28 Impacts Failed 4-bromo- 3 - chloro -3,4,4-trifluoro-1-butene 2 ...bromo- 3 - chloro -3,4,4-trifluoro-1-butene, CH2=CH-CFCl-CF2Br § 1- chloro -2,2,2-trifluoroethyl difluoromethyl ether, CHF2-O-CHCl-CF3 § 2 - chloro -1,1,2...3,3,3- trifluoropropene 725°F Recommended 4-bromo- 3 - chloro -3,4,4-trifluoro-1-butene 378°F Caution 1- chloro -2,2,2-trifluoroethyl difluoromethyl ether

  20. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE.... Measure the time it takes the parts to travel a measured distance. ___ 3. Identify the sources of air... condenser or the sump heater? A. Primary condenser B. Sump heater C. Turn both on at same time D. Either A...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... condenser or the sump heater? A. Primary condenser B. Sump heater C. Turn both on at same time D. Either A or B is correct ___ 8. During shutdown, what must be turned off first, the primary condenser or the sump heater? A. Primary condenser B. Sump heater C. Turn both off at same time D. Either A or B is...

  2. CHLORINATED SOLVENT IMPACT AND REMEDIATION STRATEGIES FOR THE DRY CLEANING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Additional funding has been received from the Advanced Technologies Program of the State of Texas by collaborators on this project, Dr. Herb Ward and Dr. Joseph Hughes. This follow-up study will provide a further in depth analysis of the benefits of bioremediation for...

  3. 40 CFR 52.246 - Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Regions (the “Regions”), as described in 40 CFR part 81, dated July 1, 1979, except as follows: (1) In the following portions of the Sacramento Valley Region... Basin portion). (iii) Yuba County APCD. (iv) Sutter County APCD. (2) In the following portions of the...

  4. 40 CFR 52.246 - Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Regions (the “Regions”), as described in 40 CFR part 81, dated July 1, 1979, except as follows: (1) In the following portions of the Sacramento Valley Region... Basin portion). (iii) Yuba County APCD. (iv) Sutter County APCD. (2) In the following portions of the...

  5. 40 CFR 52.246 - Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Regions (the “Regions”), as described in 40 CFR part 81, dated July 1, 1979, except as follows: (1) In the following portions of the Sacramento Valley Region... Basin portion). (iii) Yuba County APCD. (iv) Sutter County APCD. (2) In the following portions of the...

  6. 40 CFR 52.246 - Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor losses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Joaquin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Regions (the “Regions”), as described in 40 CFR part 81, dated July 1, 1979, except as follows: (1) In the following portions of the Sacramento Valley Region... Basin portion). (iii) Yuba County APCD. (iv) Sutter County APCD. (2) In the following portions of the...

  7. Developing clean fuels: Novel techniques for desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehlsen, James P.

    The removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum is crucial to producing clean burning fuels. Sulfur compounds poison emission control catalysts and are the source of acid rain. New federal regulations require the removal of sulfur in both gasoline and diesel to very low levels, forcing existing technologies to be pushed into inefficient operating regimes. New technology is required to efficiently produce low sulfur fuels. Two processes for the removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum have been developed: the removal of alkanethiols by heterogeneous reaction with metal oxides; and oxidative desulfurization of sulfides and thiophene by reaction with sulfuric acid. Alkanethiols, common in hydrotreated gasoline, can be selectively removed and recovered from a hydrocarbon stream by heterogeneous reaction with oxides of Pb, Hg(II), and Ba. The choice of reactive metal oxides may be predicted from simple thermodynamic considerations. The reaction is found to be autocatalytic, first order in water, and zero order in thiol in the presence of excess oxide. The thiols are recovered by reactive extraction with dilute oxidizing acid. The potential for using polymer membrane hydrogenation reactors (PEMHRs) to perform hydrogenation reactions such as hydrodesulfurization is explored by hydrogenating ketones and olefins over Pt and Au group metals. The dependence of reaction rate on current density suggests that the first hydrogen addition to the olefin is the rate limiting step, rather than the adsorption of hydrogen, for all of the metals tested. PEMHRs proved unsuccessful in hydrogenating sulfur compounds to perform HDS. For the removal of sulfides, a two-phase reactor is used in which concentrated sulfuric acid oxidizes aromatic and aliphatic sulfides present in a hydrocarbon solvent, generating sulfoxides and other sulfonated species. The polar oxidized species are extracted into the acid phase, effectively desulfurizing the hydrocarbon. A reaction scheme is proposed for this

  8. 7 CFR 51.570 - Clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.570 Clean. Clean means that the stalk is practically free from dirt or other foreign material. Stalks shall be permitted to have a small amount of dirt on the inside of the...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2965 - Fairly clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2965 Fairly clean. Fairly clean means that... foreign matter, and that individual walnuts are not coated or caked with dirt or foreign matter. Both the...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1581 - Fairly clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1581 Fairly clean. Fairly clean means that from the... foreign matter, and that individual potatoes are not materially caked with dirt or materially stained. ...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2965 - Fairly clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2965 Fairly clean. Fairly clean means that... foreign matter, and that individual walnuts are not coated or caked with dirt or foreign matter. Both the...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2956 - Practically clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2956 Practically clean. Practically clean... dirt or other foreign matter, and that individual walnuts are not damaged by such means. A slightly... or foreign matter. ...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2956 - Practically clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2956 Practically clean. Practically clean... dirt or other foreign matter, and that individual walnuts are not damaged by such means. A slightly... or foreign matter. ...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1581 - Fairly clean.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1581 Fairly clean. Fairly clean means that from the... foreign matter, and that individual potatoes are not materially caked with dirt or materially stained. ...

  15. Clean Cities Now Vol. 17, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2013-05-24

    Biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on advanced vehicle deployment, idle reduction, and articles on Clean Cities coalition successes across the country.

  16. Cleaning to prevent the spread of germs

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the furniture. Use the disinfectant or cleaning solution your workplace provides for these purposes. Carefully put ... to clean up spills: Paper towels. Diluted bleach solution (be sure you know how to make this ...

  17. Clean Cities Now Vol. 16.1

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2012-05-01

    Biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on advanced vehicle deployment, idle reduction, and articles on Clean Cities coalition successes across the country.

  18. Recreational Vessels and the Clean Boating Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Homepage for content on the Clean Boating Act, which requires the EPA to develop best management practices for discharges from recreational vessels. The page links to information about the Clean Water Act amendment, its history and public participation.

  19. Clean Air Act Permitting in Nevada

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on Clean Air Act permitting in Nevada in Nevada and EPA's oversight. Clean Air Act permitting in Nevada is the shared responsibility of one state and two local agencies, along with EPA Region 9.

  20. The Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Dissolving Silos

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, David; Orr, Lynn; Sarkar, Reuben

    2016-06-15

    DOE’s work is closely tied to manufacturing because manufacturing is an important part of technology innovation and commercialization. Find out how DOE – through the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative – is helping America lead the clean energy revolution.

  1. Environmental life cycle assessment on the separation of rare earth oxides through solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Ehsan; Zhao, Fu

    2017-12-01

    Over the past decade, Rare Earth Elements (REEs) have gained special interests due to their significance in many industrial applications, especially those related to clean energy. While REEs production is known to cause damage to the ecosystem, only a handful of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) investigations have been conducted in recent years, mainly due to lack of data and information. This is especially true for the solvent extraction separation of REEs from aqueous solution which is a challenging step in the REEs production route. In the current investigation, an LCA is carried out on a typical REE solvent extraction process using P204/kerosene and the energy/material flows and emissions data were collected from two different solvent extraction facilities in Inner Mongolia and Fujian provinces in China. In order to develop life cycle inventories, Ecoinvent 3 and SimaPro 8 software together with energy/mass stoichiometry and balance were utilized. TRACI and ILCD were applied as impact assessment tools and LCA outcomes were employed to examine and determine ecological burdens of the REEs solvent extraction operation. Based on the results, in comparison with the production of generic organic solvent in the Ecoinvent dataset, P204 production has greater burdens on all TRACI impact categories. However, due to the small amount of consumption, the contribution of P204 remains minimal. Additionally, sodium hydroxide and hydrochloric acid are the two impactful chemicals on most environmental categories used in the solvent extraction operation. On average, the solvent extraction step accounts for 30% of the total environmental impacts associated with individual REOs. Finally, opportunities and challenges for an enhanced environmental performance of the REEs solvent extraction operation were investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Southwest Regional Clean Energy Incubation Initiative (SRCEII)

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Michael

    The Austin Technology Incubator’s (ATI’s) Clean Energy Incubator at the University of Texas at Austin (ATI-CEI) utilized the National Incubator Initiative for Clean Energy (NIICE) funding to establish the Southwest Regional Clean Energy Incubation Initiative, composed of clean energy incubators from The University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin), The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), and Texas A&M University (TAMU).

  3. Choosing Polymer Solvents for Microlithography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-24

    of poly(methylmethacrylate) ( PMMA ) were spin coated on three-inch silicon wafers with a native oxide layer. The PMMA used was Formula 950K from KTI...exposure as measured by GPC are shown in Table 3. Viscosities of solutions containing 1% PMMA by weight were measured at 30 0C in an Ubbelohde viscometer...for each of the solvents studied. The PMMA used was first precipitated from a commercial 6% solution of PMMA (Mw-950K) in chlorobenzene obtained from

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  5. Magnetic pulse cleaning of products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolentsev, V. P.; Safonov, S. V.; Smolentsev, E. V.; Fedonin, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with the application of a magnetic impact for inventing new equipment and methods of cleaning cast precision blanks from fragile or granular thickened surface coatings, which are difficult to remove and highly resistant to further mechanical processing. The issues relating to a rational use of the new method for typical products and auxiliary operations have been studied. The calculation and design methods have been elaborated for load-carrying elements of the equipment created. It has been shown, that the application of the magnetic pulse method, combined with a low-frequency vibration process is perspective at enterprises of general and special machine construction, for cleaning lightweight blanks and containers, used for transporting bulk goods.

  6. Clean and Cold Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Agee, C. B.; Beer, R.; Cooper, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Curation of Mars samples includes both samples that are returned to Earth, and samples that are collected, examined, and archived on Mars. Both kinds of curation operations will require careful planning to ensure that the samples are not contaminated by the instruments that are used to collect and contain them. In both cases, sample examination and subdivision must take place in an environment that is organically, inorganically, and biologically clean. Some samples will need to be prepared for analysis under ultra-clean or cryogenic conditions. Inorganic and biological cleanliness are achievable separately by cleanroom and biosafety lab techniques. Organic cleanliness to the <50 ng/sq cm level requires material control and sorbent removal - techniques being applied in our Class 10 cleanrooms and sample processing gloveboxes.

  7. Apparel for Cleaner Clean Rooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In the 1960s NASA pioneered contamination control technology, providing a base from which aerospace contractors could develop control measures. NASA conducted special courses for clean room technicians and supervisors, and published a series of handbooks with input from various NASA field centers. These handbooks extended aerospace experience to the medical, pharmaceutical, electronics, and other industries where extreme cleanliness is important. American Hospital Supply Company (AHSC) felt that high technology products with increasingly stringent operating requirements in aerospace, electronics, pharmaceuticals and medical equipment manufacturing demanded improvement in contamination control techniques. After studying the NASA handbooks and visiting NASA facilities, the wealth of information gathered resulted in Micro-clean non-woven garments and testing equipment and procedures for evaluating effectiveness.

  8. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, D.; Odell, C.

    1994-03-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figures.

  9. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.

    2002-06-03

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abortmore » gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.« less

  10. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning method for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  11. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  12. Waterless Clothes-Cleaning Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Glenn; Ganske, Shane

    2013-01-01

    A waterless clothes-cleaning machine has been developed that removes loose particulates and deodorizes dirty laundry with regenerative chemical processes to make the clothes more comfortable to wear and have a fresher smell. This system was initially developed for use in zero-g, but could be altered for 1-g environments where water or other re sources are scarce. Some of these processes include, but are not limited to, airflow, filtration, ozone generation, heat, ultraviolet light, and photocatalytic titanium oxide.

  13. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  14. BUY CLEAN MANUAL INTERACTIVE CD-ROM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This interactive CD-ROM contains exercises and opportunities to help users develop a Buy Clean Program for janitorial cleaning products. CD users can learn about Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), complete an inventory list, and compare cleaning products to see which have the le...

  15. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (French Translation)

    SciTech Connect

    This is a French translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  16. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 18, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2015-01-19

    This is version 18.2 of Clean Cities Now, the official biannual newsletter of the Clean Cities program. Clean Cities is an initiative designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by advancing the use of alternative and renewable fuels, fuel economy improvements, idle-reduction measures, and new technologies, as they emerge.

  17. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Chinese Translation)

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    This is a Mandarin translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  18. Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Policymakers and industry leaders seek CEMAC insights to inform choices to promote economic growth and the transition to a clean energy economy.

  19. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Vietnamese Translation)

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    This is a Vietnamese translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  20. RUNNING A CONFERENCE AS A CLEAN PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than 1000 attended the International Conference on Pollution Prevention: Clean Technologies and Clean Products, held in Washington, DC, June 10-13, 1990. With support from the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the International Association for Clean Techn...

  1. 49 CFR 174.615 - Cleaning cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cleaning cars. 174.615 Section 174.615... Requirements for Division 6.1 (Poisonous) Materials § 174.615 Cleaning cars. (a) [Reserved] (b) After Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials are unloaded from a rail car, that car must be thoroughly cleaned unless...

  2. 49 CFR 174.615 - Cleaning cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cleaning cars. 174.615 Section 174.615... Requirements for Division 6.1 (Poisonous) Materials § 174.615 Cleaning cars. (a) [Reserved] (b) After Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials are unloaded from a rail car, that car must be thoroughly cleaned unless...

  3. 49 CFR 174.615 - Cleaning cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cleaning cars. 174.615 Section 174.615... Requirements for Division 6.1 (Poisonous) Materials § 174.615 Cleaning cars. (a) [Reserved] (b) After Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials are unloaded from a rail car, that car must be thoroughly cleaned unless...

  4. 49 CFR 174.615 - Cleaning cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cleaning cars. 174.615 Section 174.615... Requirements for Division 6.1 (Poisonous) Materials § 174.615 Cleaning cars. (a) [Reserved] (b) After Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials are unloaded from a rail car, that car must be thoroughly cleaned unless...

  5. 49 CFR 174.615 - Cleaning cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cleaning cars. 174.615 Section 174.615... Requirements for Division 6.1 (Poisonous) Materials § 174.615 Cleaning cars. (a) [Reserved] (b) After Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials are unloaded from a rail car, that car must be thoroughly cleaned unless...

  6. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation)

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    This is an Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  7. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Portuguese Translation)

    SciTech Connect

    This is a Portuguese translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  8. Low cost, high tech seed cleaning

    Treesearch

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2013-01-01

    Clean seeds are a great asset in native plant restoration. However, seed cleaning equipment is often too costly for many small operations. This paper introduces how several tools and materials intended for other purposes can be used directly or made into simple machines to clean seeds.

  9. An evaluation of alternative cleaning methods for removing an organic contaminant from a stainless steel part

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    As of December 1995, the manufacture of Freon, along with many other chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), was prohibited by the Clean Air Act of 1990 (CAA). The ban of CFC solvents has forced manufacturers across the country to search for alternative metal cleaning techniques. The objective of this study was to develop a thorough, scientific based approach for resolving one specific manufacturer`s problem of removing organic contamination from a stainless steel part. This objective was accomplished with an approach that involved: (1) defining the problem, (2) identifying the process constraints, (3) researching alternate cleaning methods, (4) researching applicable government regulations, (5) performingmore » a scientific evaluation and (6) drawing conclusions.« less

  10. Dry cleaning of Turkish coal

    SciTech Connect

    Cicek, T.

    2008-07-01

    This study dealt with the upgrading of two different type of Turkish coal by a dry cleaning method using a modified air table. The industrial size air table used in this study is a device for removing stones from agricultural products. This study investigates the technical and economical feasibility of the dry cleaning method which has never been applied before on coals in Turkey. The application of a dry cleaning method on Turkish coals designated for power generation without generating environmental pollution and ensuring a stable coal quality are the main objectives of this study. The size fractions of 5-8,more » 3-5, and 1-3 mm of the investigated coals were used in the upgrading experiments. Satisfactory results were achieved with coal from the Soma region, whereas the upgrading results of Hsamlar coal were objectionable for the coarser size fractions. However, acceptable results were obtained for the size fraction 1-3 mm of Hsamlar coal.« less

  11. 'How To' Clean Room Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Kaley Corinne

    2013-01-01

    One of the projects that I am completing this summer is a Launch Services Program intern 'How to' set up a clean room informational video. The purpose of this video is to go along with a clean room kit that can be checked out by employees at the Kennedy Space Center and to be taken to classrooms to help educate students and intrigue them about NASA. The video will include 'how to' set up and operate a clean room at NASA. This is a group project so we will be acting as a team and contributing our own input and ideas. We will include various activities for children in classrooms to complete, while learning and having fun. Activities that we will explain and film include: helping children understand the proper way to wear a bunny suit, a brief background on cleanrooms, and the importance of maintaining the cleanliness of a space craft. This project will be shown to LSP management and co-workers; we will be presenting the video once it is completed.

  12. Theory of polyelectrolytes in solvents.

    PubMed

    Chitanvis, Shirish M

    2003-12-01

    Using a continuum description, we account for fluctuations in the ionic solvent surrounding a Gaussian, charged chain and derive an effective short-ranged potential between the charges on the chain. This potential is repulsive at short separations and attractive at longer distances. The chemical potential can be derived from this potential. When the chemical potential is positive, it leads to a meltlike state. For a vanishingly low concentration of segments, this state exhibits scaling behavior for long chains. The Flory exponent characterizing the radius of gyration for long chains is calculated to be approximately 0.63, close to the classical value obtained for second order phase transitions. For short chains, the radius of gyration varies linearly with N, the chain length, and is sensitive to the parameters in the interaction potential. The linear dependence on the chain length N indicates a stiff behavior. The chemical potential associated with this interaction changes sign, when the screening length in the ionic solvent exceeds a critical value. This leads to condensation when the chemical potential is negative. In this state, it is shown using the mean-field approximation that spherical and toroidal condensed shapes can be obtained. The thickness of the toroidal polyelectrolyte is studied as a function of the parameters of the model, such as the ionic screening length. The predictions of this theory should be amenable to experimental verification.

  13. Turbine-Driven Pipe-Cleaning Brush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Rowell, David E.

    1994-01-01

    Simple pipe-cleaning device includes small turbine wheel axially connected, by standoff, to circular brush. Turbine wheel turns on hub bearing attached to end of upstream cable. Turbine-and-brush assembly inserted in pipe with cable trailing upstream and brush facing downstream. Water or cleaning solution pumped through pipe. Cable held at upstream end, so it holds turbine and brush in pipe at location to be cleaned. Flow in pipe turns turbine, which turns wheel, producing desired cleaning action. In addition to brushing action, device provides even mixing of cleaning solution in pipe.

  14. RM-CLEAN: RM spectra cleaner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George

    2017-08-01

    RM-CLEAN reads in dirty Q and U cubes, generates rmtf based on the frequencies given in an ASCII file, and cleans the RM spectra following the algorithm given by Brentjens (2007). The output cubes contain the clean model components and the CLEANed RM spectra. The input cubes must be reordered with mode=312, and the output cubes will have the same ordering and thus must be reordered after being written to disk. RM-CLEAN runs as a MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) task and a Python wrapper is included with the code.

  15. [Myelofibrosis in a benzene-exposed cleaning worker].

    PubMed

    Bausà, Roser; Navarro, Lydia; Cortès-Franch, Imma

    Long-term exposure to benzene has been associated with several blood malignancies, including aplastic anemia, myeloproliferative neoplasms, and different leukemias. We present a case of primary myelofibrosis in a 59-year-old woman who worked as a cleaner at a car dealership and automobile mechanic shop. For 25 years, she used gasoline as a degreaser and solvent to clean engine parts, floors and work desks on a daily basis. She was referred by her primary care provider to the Occupational Health Unit of Barcelona to assess whether her illness was work-related. Review of her job history and working conditions revealed chronic exposure to benzene in the absence of adequate preventive measures. An association between benzene exposure and myeloproliferative disease was established, suspicious for an occupational disease. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Salut Laboral.

  16. Recovery, Reuse, and Recycle of Solvents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Program ------------------------------------------------------ 1I In e t v s P o r m - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Soncentves Pr ogram...not known. . . ,o. .’* • . .~i 8 A M FIGURE 1 WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING WASTE SOLVENT ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Activity/Complex: Preparer:_________ Location...annual f. operating cost of $890 18 V-7 C.6 M . SOLVENT RENTAL APPLICATIONS Solvent rental may be the most cost effective method for complying with both

  17. Supercritical solvent extraction of oil sand bitumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Tileuberdi, Ye.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Golovko, A. K.; Rudyk, S.

    2017-08-01

    The supercritical solvent extraction of bitumen from oil sand studied with organic solvents. The experiments were performed in autoclave reactor at temperature above 255 °C and pressure 29 atm with stirring for 6 h. The reaction resulted in the formation of coke products with mineral part of oil sands. The remaining products separated into SARA fractions. The properties of the obtained products were studied. The supercritical solvent extraction significantly upgraded extracted natural bitumen.

  18. Femtosecond dynamics in hydrogen-bonded solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, E.W. Jr.; Chang, Y.J.

    1993-09-01

    We present results on the ultrafast dynamics of pure hydrogen-bonding solvents, obtained using femtosecond Fourier-transform optical-heterodyne-detected, Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. Solvent systems we have studied include the formamides, water, ethylene glycol, and acetic acid. Inertial and diffusive motions are clearly resolved. We comment on the effect that such ultrafast solvent motions have on chemical reactions in solution.

  19. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation, frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness, the two types of transducers, and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  20. True Cost of Amateur Clean rooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the cost factors for clean rooms that are not professionally built, monitored or maintained. These amateur clean rooms are built because scientist and engineers desire to create a clean room to build a part of an experiment that requires a clean room, and the program manager is looking to save money. However, in the long run these clean rooms may not save money, as the cost of maintenance may be higher due to the cost of transporting the crews, and if the materials were of lesser quality, the cost of modifications may diminish any savings, and the product may not be of the same quality. Several examples are shown of the clean rooms that show some of the problems that can arise from amateur clean rooms.

  1. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Div. of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation; frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness; the two types of transducers; and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  2. Diesel exhaust, solvents, and other occupational exposures as risk factors for wheeze among farmers.

    PubMed

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; London, Stephanie J; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2004-06-15

    Farmers engage in activities that result in exposure to diesel exhaust, solvents, welding fumes, and other respiratory irritants. Using the Agricultural Health Study, a cohort of pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina, we evaluated the odds of wheeze associated with nonpesticide occupational exposures. We used logistic regression models controlling for age, state, smoking, and history of asthma or atopy to evaluate odds of wheeze in the past year among the 20898 farmers who provided complete information on all covariates. Driving diesel tractors was associated with elevated odds of wheeze (odds ratio = 1.31; 95% confidence interval = 1.13, 1.52); the odds ratio for driving gasoline tractors was 1.11 (95% confidence interval = 1.02, 1.21). A duration-response relationship was observed for driving diesel tractors but not for driving gasoline tractors. Activities involving solvent exposure, including painting and use of solvents for cleaning, were associated with an increased odds of wheeze in a duration-dependent fashion. The highest odds of wheeze for farm activities were for daily painting (odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval = 0.89, 3.73), an indication of daily solvent exposure. These results add to the growing body of evidence of adverse respiratory effects of diesel exposure on the lung and suggest exposure to solvents may contribute as well.

  3. Non-steady state partitioning of dry cleaning surfactants between tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and water in porous media.

    PubMed

    Hoggan, James L; Bae, Keonbeom; Kibbey, Tohren C G

    2007-08-15

    Trapped organic solvents, in both the vadose zone and below the water table, are frequent sources of environmental contamination. A common source of organic solvent contamination is spills, leaks, and improper solvent disposal associated with dry cleaning processes. Dry cleaning solvents, such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are typically enhanced with the addition of surfactants to improve cleaning performance. The objective of this work was to examine the partitioning behavior of surfactants from PCE in contact with water. The relative rates of surfactants partitioning and PCE dissolution are important for modeling the behavior of waste PCE in the subsurface, in that they influence the interfacial tension of the PCE, and how (or if) interfacial tension changes over time in the subsurface. The work described here uses a flow-through system to examine simultaneous partitioning and PCE dissolution in a porous medium. Results indicate that both nonylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and a sulfosuccinate anionic surfactant partition out of residual PCE much more rapidly than the PCE dissolves, suggesting that in many cases interfacial tension changes caused by partitioning may influence infiltration and distribution of PCE in the subsurface. Non-steady-state partitioning is found to be well-described by a linear driving force model incorporating measured surfactant partition coefficients.

  4. Aminosilicone solvent recovery methods and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spiry, Irina Pavlovna; Perry, Robert James; Wood, Benjamin Rue

    The present invention is directed to aminosilicone solvent recovery methods and systems. The methods and systems disclosed herein may be used to recover aminosilicone solvent from a carbon dioxide containing vapor stream, for example, a vapor stream that leaves an aminosilicone solvent desorber apparatus. The methods and systems of the invention utilize a first condensation process at a temperature from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C. and a second condensation process at a temperature from about 5.degree. C. to about 75.degree. C. The first condensation process yields recovered aminosilicone solvent. The second condensation process yields water.

  5. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  6. IDEA Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Robert P.

    The DOE Clean Energy Application Centers were launched with a goal of focusing on important aspects of our nation’s energy supply including Efficiency, Reliability and Resiliency. Clean Energy solutions based on Combined Heat & Power (CHP), District Energy and Waste Heat Recovery are at the core of ensuring a reliable and efficient energy infrastructure for campuses, communities, and industry and public enterprises across the country. IDEA members which include colleges and universities, hospitals, airports, downtown utilities as well as manufacturers, suppliers and service providers have long-standing expertise in the planning, design, construction and operations of Clean Energy systems. They representmore » an established base of successful projects and systems at scale and serve important and critical energy loads. They also offer experience, lessons learned and best practices which are of immense value to the sustained growth of the Clean Energy sector. IDEA has been able to leverage the funds from the project award to raise the visibility, improve the understanding and increase deployment CHP, District Energy and Waste Heat Recovery solutions across the regions of our nation, in collaboration with the regional CEAC’s. On August 30, 2012, President Obama signed an Executive Order to accelerate investments in industrial energy efficiency (EE), including CHP and set a national goal of 40 GW of new CHP installation over the next decade IDEA is pleased to have been able to support this Executive Order in a variety of ways including raising awareness of the goal through educational workshops and Conferences and recognizing the installation of large scale CHP and district energy systems. A supporting key area of collaboration has involved IDEA providing technical assistance on District Energy/CHP project screenings and feasibility to the CEAC’s for multi building, multi-use projects. The award was instrumental in the development of a first-order screening

  7. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  8. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  9. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    SciTech Connect

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2013-11-21

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  10. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  11. Cleaning Insertions and Collimation Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redaelli, S.; Appleby, R. B.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Lechner, A.; Losito, R.

    High-performance collimation systems are essential for operating efficiently modern hadron machine with large beam intensities. In particular, at the LHC the collimation system ensures a clean disposal of beam halos in the superconducting environment. The challenges of the HL-LHC study pose various demanding requests for beam collimation. In this paper we review the present collimation system and its performance during the LHC Run 1 in 2010-2013. Various collimation solutions under study to address the HL-LHC requirements are then reviewed, identifying the main upgrade baseline and pointing out advanced collimation concept for further enhancement of the performance.

  12. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

  13. New cleaning technologies advance coal

    SciTech Connect

    Onursal, B.

    1984-05-01

    Alternative options are discussed for reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coal burning utility and industrial sources. Test results indicate that it may be most advantageous to use the AED Process after coal preparation or on coals that do not need much ash removal. However, the developer claims that research efforts after 1981 have led to process improvements for producing clean coals containing 1.5% to 3% ash. This paper describes the test facility where a full-scale test of the AED Process is underway.

  14. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    ScienceCinema

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2018-05-16

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  15. Morphological control in polymer solar cells using low-boiling-point solvent additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevapuram, Rakesh C.

    In the global search for clean, renewable energy sources, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have recently been given much attention. Popular modern-day OPVs are made from solution-processible, carbon-based polymers (e.g. the model poly(3-hexylthiophene) that are intimately blended with fullerene derivatives (e.g. [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester) to form what is known as the dispersed bulk-heterojunction (BHJ). This BHJ architecture has produced some of the most efficient OPVs to date, with reports closing in on 10% power conversion efficiency. To push efficiencies further into double digits, many groups have identified the BHJ nanomorphology---that is, the phase separations and grain sizes within the polymer: fullerene composite---as a key aspect in need of control and improvement. As a result, many methods, including thermal annealing, slow-drying (solvent) annealing, vapor annealing, and solvent additives, have been developed and studied to promote BHJ self-organization. Processing organic photovoltaic (OPV) blend solutions with high-boiling-point solvent additives has recently been used for morphological control in BHJ OPV cells. Here we show that even low-boiling-point solvents can be effective additives. When P3HT:PCBM OPV cells were processed with a low-boiling-point solvent tetrahydrafuran as an additive in parent solvent o-dichlorobenzene, charge extraction increased leading to fill factors as high as 69.5%, without low work-function cathodes, electrode buffer layers or thermal treatment. This was attributed to PCBM demixing from P3HT domains and better vertical phase separation, as indicated by photoluminescence lifetimes, hole mobilities, and shunt leakage currents. Dependence on solvent parameters and applicability beyond P3HT system was also investigated.

  16. Can Beach Cleans Do More Than Clean-Up Litter? Comparing Beach Cleans to Other Coastal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wyles, Kayleigh J.; Pahl, Sabine; Holland, Matthew; Thompson, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal visits not only provide psychological benefits but can also contribute to the accumulation of rubbish. Volunteer beach cleans help address this issue, but may only have limited, local impact. Consequently, it is important to study any broader benefits associated with beach cleans. This article examines the well-being and educational value of beach cleans, as well as their impacts on individuals’ behavioral intentions. We conducted an experimental study that allocated students (n = 90) to a beach cleaning, rock pooling, or walking activity. All three coastal activities were associated with positive mood and pro-environmental intentions. Beach cleaning and rock pooling were associated with higher marine awareness. The unique impacts of beach cleaning were that they were rated as most meaningful but linked to lower restorativeness ratings of the environment compared with the other activities. This research highlights the interplay between environment and activities, raising questions for future research on the complexities of person-environment interactions. PMID:28546642

  17. Collection and analysis of NASA clean room air samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, L. S.; Keever, J.

    1985-01-01

    The environment of the HALOE assembly clean room at NASA Langley Research Center is analyzed to determine the background levels of airborne organic compounds. Sampling is accomplished by pumping the clean room air through absorbing cartridges. For volatile organics, cartridges are thermally desorbed and then analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, compounds are identified by searching the EPA/NIH data base using an interactive operator INCOS computer search algorithm. For semivolatile organics, cartridges are solvent entracted and concentrated extracts are analyzed by gas chromatography-electron capture detection, compound identification is made by matching gas chromatogram retention times with known standards. The detection limits for the semivolatile organics are; 0.89 ng cu m for dioctylphlhalate (DOP) and 1.6 ng cu m for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). The detection limit for volatile organics ranges from 1 to 50 parts per trillion. Only trace quantities of organics are detected, the DOP levels do not exceed 2.5 ng cu m and the PCB levels do not exceed 454 ng cu m.

  18. Bio-Inspired Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    Self-cleaning surfaces have drawn a lot of interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review focuses on the recent progress in mechanism, preparation, and application of self-cleaning surfaces. To date, self-cleaning has been demonstrated by the following four conceptual approaches: (a) TiO2-based superhydrophilic self-cleaning, (b) lotus effect self-cleaning (superhydrophobicity with a small sliding angle), (c) gecko setae-inspired self-cleaning, and (d) underwater organisms-inspired antifouling self-cleaning. Although a number of self-cleaning products have been commercialized, the remaining challenges and future outlook of self-cleaning surfaces are also briefly addressed. Through evolution, nature, which has long been a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers, has arrived at what is optimal. We hope this review will stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration among material science, chemistry, biology, physics, nanoscience, engineering, etc., which is essential for the rational design and reproducible construction of bio-inspired multifunctional self-cleaning surfaces in practical applications.

  19. Clean Water for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Aniruddha B; Kumar, Jyoti Kishen

    2015-01-01

    Availability of safe drinking water, a vital natural resource, is still a distant dream to many around the world, especially in developing countries. Increasing human activity and industrialization have led to a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological pollutants entering water bodies and affecting human lives. Efforts to develop efficient, economical, and technologically sound methods to produce clean water for developing countries have increased worldwide. We focus on solar disinfection, filtration, hybrid filtration methods, treatment of harvested rainwater, herbal water disinfection, and arsenic removal technologies. Simple, yet innovative water treatment devices ranging from use of plant xylem as filters, terafilters, and hand pumps to tippy taps designed indigenously are methods mentioned here. By describing the technical aspects of major water disinfection methods relevant for developing countries on medium to small scales and emphasizing their merits, demerits, economics, and scalability, we highlight the current scenario and pave the way for further research and development and scaling up of these processes. This review focuses on clean drinking water, especially for rural populations in developing countries. It describes various water disinfection techniques that are not only economically viable and energy efficient but also employ simple methodologies that are effective in reducing the physical, chemical, and biological pollutants found in drinking water to acceptable limits.

  20. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K.

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. Themore » objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.« less

  1. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  2. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  3. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the systemmore » reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.« less

  4. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  5. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  6. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  7. Classification of Solvents according to Interaction Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Wasi

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a model for solvent effects based on the observation that the excitation energy of all-trans-N-Retinylidenmethyl-n-butylammonium iodide is directly related to the dielectric constant of a series of aromatic and aliphatic solvents as the dielectric constant (e) ranges from 2 to 10.5. (BT)

  8. Optimizing surface finishing processes through the use of novel solvents and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, M.; Holbrook, P.; Moore, J.

    2007-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to implement the ITRS (International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors) node targets that go beyond 45nm [1], the need for improved cleanliness between repeated process steps continues to grow. Wafer cleaning challenges cover many applications such as Cu/low-K integration, where trade-offs must be made between dielectric damage and residue by plasma etching and CMP or moisture uptake by aqueous cleaning products. [2-5] Some surface sensitive processes use the Marangoni tool design [6] where a conventional solvent such as IPA (isopropanol), combines with water to provide improved physical properties such as reduced contact angle and surface tension. This paper introduces the use of alternative solvents and their mixtures compared to pure IPA in removing ionics, moisture, and particles using immersion bench-chemistry models of various processes. A novel Eastman proprietary solvent, Eastman methyl acetate is observed to provide improvement in ionic, moisture capture, and particle removal, as compared to conventional IPA. [7] These benefits may be improved relative to pure IPA, simply by the addition of various additives. Some physical properties of the mixtures were found to be relatively unchanged even as measured performance improved. This report presents our attempts to cite and optimize these benefits through the use of laboratory models.

  9. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  10. METHOD FOR SOLVENT-ISOSTATIC PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Archibald, P.B.

    1962-09-18

    This invention provides a method for producing densely compacted bodies having relatively large dimensions. The method comprises the addition of a small quantity of a suitable solvent to a powder which is to be compacted. The solvent- moistened powder is placed inside a flexible bag, and the bag is suspended in an isostatic press. The solvent is squeezed out of the powder by the isostatic pressure, and the resulting compacted body is recovered. The presence of the solvent markedly decreases the proportion of void space in the powder, thereby resulting in a denser, more homogeneous compact. Another effect of the solvent is that it allows the isostatic pressing operation to be conducted at substantially lower pressures than are conventionally employed. (AEC)

  11. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  12. Thermoplastic composite matrices with improved solvent resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve solvent resistance of aromatic thermoplastic polymers, ethynyl-terminated aromatic sulfone polymers (ETS), sulfone/ester polymers (SEPE) containing pendent ethynyl groups, and phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups are synthesized. Cured polysulfones and phenoxy resins containing ethynyl groups on the ends or pendent on the molecules exhibited systematic behavior in solvent resistance, film flexibility, and toughness as a function of crosslink density. The film and composite properties of a cured solvent-resistant ETS were better than those of a commercially available solvent sensitive polysulfone. The study was part of a NASA program to better understand the trade-offs between solvent resistance, processability and mechanical properties which may be useful in designing composite structures for aerospace vehicles.

  13. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Provides an overview of Clean Cities National Clean Fleets Partnership (NCFP). The NCFP is open to large private-sector companies that have fleet operations in multiple states. Companies that join the partnership receive customized assistance to reduce petroleum use through increased efficiency and use of alternative fuels. This initiative provides fleets with specialized resources, expertise, and support to successfully incorporate alternative fuels and fuel-saving measures into their operations. The National Clean Fleets Partnership builds on the established success of DOE's Clean Cities program, which reduces petroleum consumption at the community level through a nationwide network of coalitions that work with localmore » stakeholders. Developed with input from fleet managers, industry representatives, and Clean Cities coordinators, the National Clean Fleets Partnership goes one step further by working with large private-sector fleets.« less

  14. Glow discharge cleaning of vacuum switch tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.; Toya, H.

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports that glow discharge cleaning has ben advancing as a means of degassing vacuum chambers constructed for a large accelerator or for nuclear fusion research. To clean the whole surface of parts inside a vacuum switch tube (VST), a new technique is tried which generates glow discharge between the inner electrodes and copper grid surrounding it. Photographic observation reveals that the glow discharge spreads out and cleans the whole surface inside the VST. A breakdown test between the inner electrodes shows the effect of the cleaning with this technique. Higher breakdown voltage between the inner electrodes is attainedmore » by performing this glow discharge cleaning in argon rather than hydrogen gas. The difference of the cleaning effect seems to be attributed to that of the energy transfer from ion species to the absorbed molecules and microprotrusions on the surfaces.« less

  15. Conservation of artists' acrylic emulsion paints: XPS, NEXAFS and ATR-FTIR studies of wet cleaning methods

    DOE PAGES

    Willneff, E. A.; Ormsby, B. A.; Stevens, J. S.; ...

    2014-02-17

    Works of art prepared with acrylic emulsion paints became commercially available in the 1960s. It is increasingly necessary to undertake and optimise cleaning and preventative conservation treatments to ensure their longevity. Model artists' acrylic paint films covered with artificial soiling were thus prepared on a canvas support and exposed to a variety of wet cleaning treatments based on aqueous or hydrocarbon solvent systems. This included some with additives such as chelating agents and/or surfactants, and microemulsion systems made specifically for conservation practice. The impact of cleaning (soiling removal) on the paint film surface was examined visually and correlated with resultsmore » of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared, XPS and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analyses – three spectroscopic techniques with increasing surface sensitivity ranging from approximately $-$ 1000, 10 and 5 nm, respectively. Visual analysis established the relative cleaning efficacy of the wet cleaning treatments in line with previous results. X-ray spectroscopy analysis provided significant additional findings, including evidence for (i) surfactant extraction following aqueous swabbing, (ii) modifications to pigment following cleaning and (iii) cleaning system residues.« less

  16. The successful of finite element to invent particle cleaning system by air jet in hard disk drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jai-Ngam, Nualpun; Tangchaichit, Kaitfa

    2018-02-01

    Hard Disk Drive manufacturing has faced very challenging with the increasing demand of high capacity drives for Cloud-based storage. Particle adhesion has also become increasingly important in HDD to gain more reliability of storage capacity. The ability to clean on surfaces is more complicated in removing such particles without damaging the surface. This research is aim to improve the particle cleaning in HSA by using finite element to develop the air flow model then invent the prototype of air cleaning system to remove particle from surface. Surface cleaning by air pressure can be applied as alternative for the removal of solid particulate contaminants that is adhering on a solid surface. These technical and economic challenges have driven the process development from traditional way that chemical solvent cleaning. The focus of this study is to develop alternative way from scrub, ultrasonic, mega sonic on surface cleaning principles to serve as a foundation for the development of new processes to meet current state-of-the-art process requirements and minimize the waste from chemical cleaning for environment safety.

  17. Conservation of artists' acrylic emulsion paints: XPS, NEXAFS and ATR-FTIR studies of wet cleaning methods

    SciTech Connect

    Willneff, E. A.; Ormsby, B. A.; Stevens, J. S.

    Works of art prepared with acrylic emulsion paints became commercially available in the 1960s. It is increasingly necessary to undertake and optimise cleaning and preventative conservation treatments to ensure their longevity. Model artists' acrylic paint films covered with artificial soiling were thus prepared on a canvas support and exposed to a variety of wet cleaning treatments based on aqueous or hydrocarbon solvent systems. This included some with additives such as chelating agents and/or surfactants, and microemulsion systems made specifically for conservation practice. The impact of cleaning (soiling removal) on the paint film surface was examined visually and correlated with resultsmore » of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared, XPS and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analyses – three spectroscopic techniques with increasing surface sensitivity ranging from approximately $-$ 1000, 10 and 5 nm, respectively. Visual analysis established the relative cleaning efficacy of the wet cleaning treatments in line with previous results. X-ray spectroscopy analysis provided significant additional findings, including evidence for (i) surfactant extraction following aqueous swabbing, (ii) modifications to pigment following cleaning and (iii) cleaning system residues.« less

  18. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  19. Environmental cleaning and disinfection of patient areas.

    PubMed

    Doll, Michelle; Stevens, Michael; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2018-02-01

    The healthcare setting is predisposed to harbor potential pathogens, which in turn can pose a great risk to patients. Routine cleaning of the patient environment is critical to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections. While many approaches to environmental cleaning exist, manual cleaning supplemented with ongoing assessment and feedback may be the most feasible for healthcare facilities with limited resources. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-01-01

    Clean Cities' National Clean Fleets Partnership establishes strategic alliances with large fleets to help them explore and adopt alternative fuels and fuel economy measures to cut petroleum use. The initiative leverages the strength of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, nearly 18,000 stakeholders, and more than 20 years of experience. It provides fleets with top-level support, technical assistance, robust tools and resources, and public acknowledgement to help meet and celebrate fleets' petroleum-use reductions.

  1. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Frank J.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    1999-01-01

    A cleaning process for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  2. Maryland Cleaning & Abatement Services Corp. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Maryland Cleaning & Abatement Services Corp. (the Company) is located in Baltimore, Maryland. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Baltimore, Maryland.

  3. Exposure of German residents to ethylene and propylene glycol ethers in general and after cleaning scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Nitschke, L; Boehmer, S; Kiranoglu, M; Göen, T

    2013-03-01

    Glycol ethers are a class of semi-volatile substances used as solvents in a variety of consumer products like cleaning agents, paints, cosmetics as well as chemical intermediates. We determined 11 metabolites of ethylene and propylene glycol ethers in 44 urine samples of German residents (background level study) and in urine samples of individuals after exposure to glycol ethers during cleaning activities (exposure study). In the study on the background exposure, methoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) could be detected in each urine sample with median (95th percentile) values of 0.11 mgL(-1) (0.30 mgL(-1)) and 0.80 mgL(-1) (23.6 mgL(-1)), respectively. The other metabolites were found in a limited number of samples or in none. In the exposure study, 5-8 rooms were cleaned with a cleaner containing ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE), propylene glycol monobutyl ether (PGBE), or ethylene glycol monopropyl ether (EGPE). During cleaning the mean levels in the indoor air were 7.5 mgm(-3) (EGBE), 3.0 mgm(-3) (PGBE), and 3.3 mgm(-3) (EGPE), respectively. The related metabolite levels analysed in the urine of the residents of the rooms at the day of cleaning were 2.4 mgL(-1) for butoxyacetic acid, 0.06 mgL(-1) for 2-butoxypropionic acid, and 2.3 mgL(-1) for n-propoxyacetic acid. Overall, our study indicates that the exposure of the population to glycol ethers is generally low, with the exception of PhAA. Moreover, the results of the cleaning scenarios demonstrate that the use of indoor cleaning agents containing glycol ethers can lead to a detectable internal exposure of residents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ACCELERATED SOLVENT EXTRACTION COMBINED WITH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A research project was initiated to address a recurring problem of elevated detection limits above required risk-based concentrations for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds in high moisture content solid samples. This project was initiated, in cooperation with the EPA Region 1 Laboratory, under the Regional Methods Program administered through the ORD Office of Science Policy. The aim of the project was to develop an approach for the rapid removal of water in high moisture content solids (e.g., wetland sediments) in preparation for analysis via Method 8270. Alternative methods for water removal have been investigated to enhance compound solid concentrations and improve extraction efficiency, with the use of pressure filtration providing a high-throughput alternative for removal of the majority of free water in sediments and sludges. In order to eliminate problems with phase separation during extraction of solids using Accelerated Solvent Extraction, a variation of a water-isopropanol extraction method developed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, CO is being employed. The concentrations of target compounds in water-isopropanol extraction fluids are subsequently analyzed using an automated Solid Phase Extraction (SPE)-GC/MS method developed in our laboratory. The coupled approaches for dewatering, extraction, and target compound identification-quantitation provide a useful alternative to enhance sample throughput for Me

  5. The NOXSO clean coal project

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.B.; Woods, M.C.; Friedrich, J.J.

    1997-12-31

    The NOXSO Clean Coal Project will consist of designing, constructing, and operating a commercial-scale flue-gas cleanup system utilizing the NOXSO Process. The process is a waste-free, dry, post-combustion flue-gas treatment technology which uses a regenerable sorbent to simultaneously adsorb sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from flue gas from coal-fired boilers. The NOXSO plant will be constructed at Alcoa Generating Corporation`s (AGC) Warrick Power Plant near Evansville, Indiana and will treat all the flue gas from the 150-MW Unit 2 boiler. The NOXSO plant is being designed to remove 98% of the SO{sub 2} and 75% ofmore » the NO{sub x} when the boiler is fired with 3.4 weight percent sulfur, southern-Indiana coal. The NOXSO plant by-product will be elemental sulfur. The elemental sulfur will be shipped to Olin Corporation`s Charleston, Tennessee facility for additional processing. As part of the project, a liquid SO{sub 2} plant has been constructed at this facility to convert the sulfur into liquid SO{sub 2}. The project utilizes a unique burn-in-oxygen process in which the elemental sulfur is oxidized to SO{sub 2} in a stream of compressed oxygen. The SO{sub 2} vapor will then be cooled and condensed. The burn-in-oxygen process is simpler and more environmentally friendly than conventional technologies. The liquid SO{sub 2} plant produces 99.99% pure SO{sub 2} for use at Olin`s facilities. The $82.8 million project is co-funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of the Clean Coal Technology program. The DOE manages the project through the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC).« less

  6. Development of eco-friendly submicron emulsions stabilized by a bio-derived gum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis María; Ramírez, Pablo; Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Santos, Jenifer; Muñoz, José

    2014-11-01

    Many traditional organic solvents are being gradually replaced by ecofriendly alternatives. D-Limonene is a terpenic (bio)-solvent that fulfils the requirements to be considered a green solvent. D-Limonene sub-micron emulsions suffer from Ostwald ripening destabilization. In this study, we examined the influence of the addition of a natural gum (rosin gum) to D-limonene in order to prevent Ostwald ripening. This contribution deals with the study of emulsions formulated with a mixture of D-limonene and rosin gum as dispersed phase and Pluronic PE9400 as emulsifier. The procedure followed for the development of these formulations was based on the application of product design principles. This led to the optimum ratio rosin gum/D-limonene and subsequently to the optimum surfactant concentration. The combination of different techniques (rheology, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering) was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to assist in the prediction of the emulsions destabilization process. Not only did the addition of rosin gum highly increase the stability of these emulsions by inhibiting the Ostwald ripening, but it also reduced the emulsions droplet size. Thus, we found that stable sub-micron D-limonene-in-water emulsions have been obtained in the range 3-6 wt% Pluronic PE-9400 by means of a single-step rotor/stator homogenizing process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Webinar: Green Cleaning for Improved Health: The Return on Investment of Green Cleaning in Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A page to register to view the June 22, 2017, webinar in the IAQ Knowledge-to-Action Professional Training Webinar Series: Green Cleaning for Improved Health: The Return on Investment of Green Cleaning in Schools

  8. Auditory dysfunction associated with solvent exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of studies have demonstrated that solvents may induce auditory dysfunction. However, there is still little knowledge regarding the main signs and symptoms of solvent-induced hearing loss (SIHL). The aim of this research was to investigate the association between solvent exposure and adverse effects on peripheral and central auditory functioning with a comprehensive audiological test battery. Methods Seventy-two solvent-exposed workers and 72 non-exposed workers were selected to participate in the study. The test battery comprised pure-tone audiometry (PTA), transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), Random Gap Detection (RGD) and Hearing-in-Noise test (HINT). Results Solvent-exposed subjects presented with poorer mean test results than non-exposed subjects. A bivariate and multivariate linear regression model analysis was performed. One model for each auditory outcome (PTA, TEOAE, RGD and HINT) was independently constructed. For all of the models solvent exposure was significantly associated with the auditory outcome. Age also appeared significantly associated with some auditory outcomes. Conclusions This study provides further evidence of the possible adverse effect of solvents on the peripheral and central auditory functioning. A discussion of these effects and the utility of selected hearing tests to assess SIHL is addressed. PMID:23324255

  9. Rudimentary Cleaning Compared to Level 300A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpin, Christina Y. Pina; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A study was done to characterize the cleanliness level achievable when using a rudimentary cleaning process, and results were compared to JPR 5322.1G Level 300A. While it is not ideal to clean in a shop environment, some situations (e.g., field combat operations) require oxygen system hardware to be maintained and cleaned to prevent a fire hazard, even though it cannot be sent back to a precision cleaning facility. This study measured the effectiveness of basic shop cleaning. Initially, three items representing parts of an oxygen system were contaminated: a metal plate, valve body, and metal oxygen bottle. The contaminants chosen were those most likely to be introduced to the system during normal use: oil, lubricant, metal shavings/powder, sand, fingerprints, tape, lip balm, and hand lotion. The cleaning process used hot water, soap, various brushes, gaseous nitrogen, water nozzle, plastic trays, scouring pads, and a controlled shop environment. Test subjects were classified into three groups: technical professionals having an appreciation for oxygen hazards; professional precision cleaners; and a group with no previous professional knowledge of oxygen or precision cleaning. Three test subjects were in each group, and each was provided with standard cleaning equipment, a cleaning procedure, and one of each of the three test items to clean. The results indicated that the achievable cleanliness level was independent of the technical knowledge or proficiency of the personnel cleaning the items. Results also showed that achieving a Level 300 particle count was more difficult than achieving a Level A nonvolatile residue amount.

  10. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  11. The Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC): Providing Analysis and Insights on Clean Technology Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Nicholi S

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Policymakers and industry leaders seek CEMAC insights to inform choices to promote economic growth and the transition to a clean energy economy.

  12. How Do We Clean Our Water and How Clean Does It Need to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitburn, Niki

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, in the United Kingdom, citizens take for granted clean water pumped directly into their homes, but it was not always the case, and is still not so in many countries. Could people clean water themselves if they had to and what could they then use it for? Would it actually be "clean enough" to drink? The author presents children…

  13. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  14. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  15. Exploring Hamiltonian dielectric solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Hamiltonian dielectric solvent (HADES) is a recent method [7,25], which enables Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric continua. Sample simulations of an α-helical decapeptide with and without explicit solvent demonstrate the high efficiency of HADES-MD. Addressing the folding of this peptide by replica exchange MD we study the properties of HADES by comparing melting curves, secondary structure motifs and salt bridges with explicit solvent results. Despite the unoptimized ad hoc parametrization of HADES, calculated reaction field energies correlate well with numerical grid solutions of the dielectric Poisson equation.

  16. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  17. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G [Kingston, CA; Eckert, Charles A [Atlanta, GA; Liotta, Charles L [Atlanta, GA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA

    2011-07-19

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  18. Solvent recovery opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Barton, P I

    2000-11-01

    Opportunities for recovering and recycling waste solvent streams in the pharmaceutical industry are reviewed. A major obstacle to solvent recovery and recycling is the existence of azeotropic compositions, and thus separation barriers, in the mixtures in question. Advances in the understanding of these complex separation problems are discussed. Recent progress on novel designs for small-scale, flexible azeotropic separation processes is reviewed. Also considered is the alternative and complementary approach of integrating solvent use within a batch process so that the formation of hard-to-separate azeotropic compositions is prevented.

  19. Clean Cities Now Vol. 20, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2017-01-13

    Clean Cities Now is the official semi-annual newsletter of Clean Cities, an initiative designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by advancing the use of alternative and renewable fuels, fuel economy improvements, idle-reduction measures, and new technologies, as they emerge.

  20. Guidelines for qualifying cleaning and verification materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D.

    1995-01-01

    This document is intended to provide guidance in identifying technical issues which must be addressed in a comprehensive qualification plan for materials used in cleaning and cleanliness verification processes. Information presented herein is intended to facilitate development of a definitive checklist that should address all pertinent materials issues when down selecting a cleaning/verification media.