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Sample records for cleft palate surgery

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  2. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Justin, Grant A; Brietzke, Scott E

    2017-01-01

      This study examined malpractice claims related to cleft lip and cleft palate surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and reviewed financial outcomes.   The WestlawNext legal database was analyzed for all malpractice lawsuits and settlements related to the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.   Inclusion criteria included patients undergoing surgical repair of a primary cleft lip or palate or revision for complications of previous surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes.   A total of 36 cases were identified, with 12 unique cases from 1981 to 2006 meeting the inclusion criteria. Six cases (50%) were decided by a jury and six by settlement. Five cases involved complications related to the specific surgery, and the other seven were associated with any surgery and perioperative care of children and adults. Cleft palate repair (50%) was the most frequently litigated surgery. Postoperative negligent supervision was the most common allegation (42%) and resulted in a payout in each case (mean = $3,126,032). Death (42%) and brain injury (25%) were the most frequent injuries reported. Financial awards were made in nine cases (after adjusting for inflation, mean = $2,470,552, range = $0 to $7,704,585). The awards were significantly larger for brain injury than other outcomes ($4,675,395 versus $1,368,131 after adjusting for inflation, P = .0101).   Malpractice litigation regarding cleft lip and palate surgery is uncommon. However, significant financial awards involving perioperative brain injury have been reported.

  3. Orthognathic surgery in the cleft lip and palate patient.

    PubMed

    Herber, S C; Lehman, J A

    1993-10-01

    Orthognathic surgery for the cleft lip and palate patient should be designed to achieve good facial aesthetics and a stable, functional occlusion. Maxillary and mandibular osteotomies, which benefit cleft lip and palate patients with associated dentofacial deformities, should be modified to meet the needs of the individual patient. Soft-tissue correction of the upper lip and nose adds to the overall aesthetic result, but should be performed as a separate procedure.

  4. Palatal changes after lip surgery in different types of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G J; Hoeksma, J B; Prahl-Andersen, B

    1994-09-01

    This study concerns palatal development during 6 months following primary lip closure. The sample consisted of 75 children with different forms of cleft lip and palate and 51 noncleft children. The palate was measured at 3 months of age, just before lip surgery, after surgery at 6 months, and again at 9 months of age. The results showed that lip closure has a strong effect in the anterior alveolar region. This effect was restricted to 3 months after surgery. The changes in complete clefts were more explicit than in incomplete cleft forms. Furthermore, the data showed that arch depth reduction due to lip surgery was compensated for by continued anteroposterior palatal growth. Early orthopedics appeared to prevent major palatal collapse immediately after lip surgery. Finally simultaneous closure of the alveolar cleft at the nasal side resulted in continued reduction of anterior cleft width.

  5. Fetal Cleft Lip/Palate Surgery: End of a Dream?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih; Inangil, Gökhan; Kara, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Recognition that a fetus can scarlessly heal in intrauterine life led to various animal studies in the mid 1980s exploring the possibility of fetal cleft lip/palate surgery. The idea of scarless cleft repair seemed like a possible dream after the promising results from the early animal studies. In this review, we analyze the progress made in the 30 years since our first experience with animal models.

  6. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  7. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  8. Frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patients undergoing cleft lip and palate surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu L.; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O.; Desalu, Ibironke; Ladeinde, Akinola L.; Adeyemo, Titilope A.; Mofikoya, Bolaji O.; Hassan, Olakunle O.; Akanmu, Alani S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to determine the frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patientsundergoing cleft lip and palate surgery at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Setting and Design: A prospective study of transfusion rate in cleft surgery conducted at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Material and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients who required cleft lip and palate surgery were recruited into the study. Data collected included age, sex and weight of patients, type of cleft defects, type of surgery done, preoperative haematocrit, duration of surgery, amount of blood loss during surgery, the number of units of blood cross-matched and those used. Each patient was made to donate a unit of homologous blood prior to surgery. Results: There were 52 females and 48 males with a mean age of 64.4 ± 101.1 months (range, 3-420 months). The most common cleft defect was isolated cleft palate (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip (28%). Cleft palate repair was the most common procedure (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip repair (41%). The mean estimated blood loss was 95.8 ± 144.9 ml (range, 2-800ml). Ten (10%) patients (CL=2; CP=5, BCL=1; CLP=2) were transfused but only two of these were deemed appropriate based on percentage blood volume loss. The mean blood transfused was 131.5 ± 135.4ml (range, 35-500ml). Six (60%) of those transfused had a preoperative PCV of < 30%. Only 4.9% of patients who had unilateral cleft lip surgery were transfused as compared with 50% for CLP surgery, 11% for CP surgery, and 10% for bilateral cleft lip surgery. Conclusions: The frequency of blood transfusion in cleft lip and palate surgery was 10% with a cross-match: transfusion ratio of 10 and transfusion index of 0.1. A "type and screen" policy is advocated for cleft lip and palate surgery. PMID:20924451

  9. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... side. There are three primary types of clefts: • Cleft lip/palate refers to the condition when both the palate ... one in 1,000 babies are born with cleft lip/palate. About 50 percent of all clefts More common ...

  10. Cleft palate - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cleft palate ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cleft palate : Cleft Palate Foundation -- www.cleftline.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1210.asp ...

  11. [Cleft palate surgery with ENT-pathology correction].

    PubMed

    Radkevich, A A; Vakhrushev, S G; Gantimurov, A A; Ivanov, V A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the cases of cleft palate surgical treatment with simultaneous intervention in ENT organs (bypass of the tympanic cavity, segmental or total adenotomy, etc.) with the restoration of vomer anatomy and hard palate reconstruction by means of super-elastic low-profile nickel titanium implant. The article describes the advantages of the method in comparison with the conventional ones.

  12. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cesar A

    2012-07-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life.

  13. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Cesar A.

    2012-01-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life. PMID:23483117

  14. Not All Clefts Are Created Equal: Patterns of Hospital-Based Care Use among Children with Cleft Lip and Palate within 4 Years of Initial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ligh, Cassandra A; Fox, Justin P; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason W; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    This study compares hospital-based care and associated charges among children with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, and identifies subgroups generating the greatest cumulative hospital charges. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and palate who underwent initial surgery from 2006 to 2008 in four U.S. states. Primary outcome was hospital-based care-emergency, outpatient, inpatient-within 4 years of surgery. Regression models compared outcomes and classification tree analysis identified patients at risk for being in the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. The authors identified 4571 children with cleft lip (18.2 percent), cleft palate (39.2 percent), or cleft lip and palate (42.6 percent). Medical comorbidity was frequent across all groups, with feeding difficulty (cleft lip, 2.4 percent; cleft palate, 13.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 6.0 percent; p < 0.001) and developmental delay (cleft lip, 1.8 percent; cleft palate, 9.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 3.6 percent; p < 0.001) being most common. Within 30 days of surgery, those with cleft palate were most likely to return to the hospital (p < 0.001). Hospital-based care per 100 children within 4 years was lowest among the cleft lip group, yet comparable among those with cleft palate and cleft lip and palate (p < 0.001). Cumulative 4-year charges, however, were highest among the cleft palate cohort (cleft lip, $56,966; cleft palate, $106,090; cleft lip and palate, $91,263; p < 0.001). Comorbidity, diagnosis (cleft lip versus cleft palate with or without cleft lip), and age at initial surgery were the most important factors associated with the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. Cleft lip and palate children experience a high rate of hospital-based care early in life, with degree of medical comorbidity being a significant burden. Understanding this relationship and associated needs may help deliver more efficient, patient

  15. Improving Surgeons' Comfort With Prismatic Glasses During Cleft Palate Surgery: Preliminary Findings.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Hai; Chen, Guosheng; Wen, Qitao; Li, Shuai; Chen, Lei; Liang, Feixin

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to observe the effect of prismatic glasses on improving surgeons' comfort during cleft palate surgery. A within-subjects design was used. We included 3 oral-maxillofacial surgeons and 6 patients with complete cleft palate in the study. One group of cleft palate patients (3 complete cleft palates) was allocated to each of the 3 surgeons not wearing prismatic glasses, and another similar group of cleft palate patients was allocated to the same 3 surgeons wearing prismatic glasses. The push-back method was performed in all cleft palate patients by all surgeons. The degree of neck flexion exhibited by all surgeons was digitally video recorded. Screen-capture images of the video recordings were collected, and neck flexion in all video recordings was analyzed. All surgeons completed a questionnaire based on a visual analog scale to assess their discomfort symptoms of the neck, shoulders, and back. Operative time and bleeding volume were recorded to assess operational efficiency. Use of prismatic glasses significantly reduced surgeons' working time spent in pronounced neck flexion during cleft palate surgery (P < .05), and there was a statistically significant reduction in the visual analog scale discomfort scores for the neck, back, and shoulders with the use of prismatic glasses (P < .05). However, no significant difference was found in operational time (P = .337) and bleeding volume (P = .183) attributable to the presence or absence of prismatic glasses. An ergonomic approach to cleft palate surgery in which surgeons wore prismatic glasses improved neck, back, and shoulder comfort. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... and advocacy priorities National Network of Perinatal Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? ... how the body develops or how the body works. Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth ...

  17. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001051.htm Cleft lip and palate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that affect the upper lip ...

  18. The Rate of Oronasal Fistula Following Primary Cleft Palate Surgery: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bykowski, Michael R; Naran, Sanjay; Winger, Daniel G; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Despite decades of craniofacial surgeons repairing cleft palates, there is no consensus for the rate of fistula formation following surgery. The authors present a meta-analysis of studies that reported on primary cleft palate to determine the rate of oronasal fistula and to identify risk factors for their development. A literature search for the period between 2000 and 2012 was performed. Articles were queried and strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to focus on primary cleft palate repair. A meta-analysis of these data was conducted. The meta-analysis included 11 studies, comprising 2505 children. The rate of oronasal fistula development was 4.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.8% to 6.1%). When analyzing a larger cohort, there was a significant relationship between Veau classification and the occurrence of a fistula (P < .001), with fistulae most prevalent in patients with a Veau IV cleft. The most common location for a fistula was at the soft palate-hard palate junction. One study used decellularized dermis in cleft repair with a fistula rate of 3.2%. Using 11 studies comprising 2505 children, we find the rate of reported fistula occurrence to be 4.9%. Furthermore, patients with a Veau IV cleft are significantly more likely to develop an oronasal fistula. When fistulae do occur, they do so most often at the soft palate-hard palate junction. A deeper understanding of fistula formation will help cleft palate surgeons improve their outcomes in the operating room and will allow them to effectively communicate expectations with patients' families in the clinic.

  19. Calvarial periosteal graft for second-stage cleft palate surgery: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Neiva, Cecilia; Dakpe, Stephanie; Gbaguidi, Cica; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of cleft palate surgery are to achieve optimal outcomes regarding speech development, hearing, maxillary arch development and facial skull growth. Early two-stage cleft palate repair has been the most recent protocol of choice to achieve good maxillary arch growth without compromising speech development. Hard palate closure occurs within one year of soft palate surgery. However, in some cases the residual hard palate cleft width is larger than 15 mm at the age of two. As previously reported, integrated speech development starts around that age and it is a challenge since we know that early mobilization of the mucoperiosteum interferes with normal facial growth on the long-term. In children with large residual hard palate clefts at the age 2, we report the use of calvarial periosteal grafts to close the cleft. With a retrospective 6-year study (2006-2012) we first analyzed the outcomes regarding impermeability of hard palate closure on 45 patients who at the age of two presented a residual cleft of the hard palate larger than 15 mm and benefited from a periosteal graft. We then studied the maxillary growth in these children. In order to compare long-term results, we included 14 patients (age range: 8-20) treated between 1994 & 2006. Two analyses were conducted, the first one on dental casts from birth to the age of 6 and the other one based on lateral cephalograms following Delaire's principles and TRIDIM software. After the systematic cephalometric analysis of 14 patients, we found no evidence of retrognathia or Class 3 dental malocclusion. In the population of 45 children who benefited from calvarial periosteal grafts the rate of palate fistula was 17% vs. 10% in the overall series. Despite major advances in understanding cleft defects, the issues of timing and choice of the surgical procedure remain widely debated. In second-stage surgery for hard palate closure, using a calvarial periosteal graft could be the solution for large residual clefts

  20. Airway management: A comparative study in cleft lip and palate repair surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Sen, Jayashree; Sen, Bitan

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip with or without palate is one of the common congenital malformations. To evaluate the per-operative complications of anesthesia, a comparative study was conducted in children using the endotracheal tubes available in the Institute so that the complications can be averted in future procedures. The rural population of Tripura, India. Awareness was generated and the incidence of repair surgeries of cleft lip and palate was thus increased considerably in Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Memorial Teaching Hospital, Agartala, Tripura. The RAE tube has been found to be the choicest one and at a minimal risk for maintaining patients' patent airway and other related complications.

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... all the way to the back of your mouth. What's a Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate? The word cleft means a gap or split between two things. A cleft lip is a split in the upper lip. This can happen on one or ... a split in the roof of the mouth. This leaves a hole between the nose and ...

  2. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cleft palate. A cleft lip is a separation of the two sides of the lip. The separation often includes the bones of the upper jaw ... 5 Comments Miracle Flights Puts Care in the Air 11/20/15 , No Comments Connections to be ...

  3. Impact of 22q deletion syndrome on speech outcomes following primary surgery for submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Bezuhly, Michael; Fischbach, Simone; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David M

    2012-03-01

    Patients with 22q deletion syndrome are at increased risk of submucous cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency. The authors' aim is to evaluate speech outcomes following primary Furlow palatoplasty or pharyngeal flap for correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency in submucous cleft palate patients with and without 22q deletion syndrome. Records of submucous cleft palate patients who underwent primary surgery between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed. Data included 22q deletion syndrome diagnosis, age at surgery, procedure, preoperative nasopharyngoscopy and nasometry, speech outcomes, complications, and secondary surgery rates. Seventy-eight submucous cleft palate patients were identified. Twenty-three patients had 22q deletion syndrome. Fewer 22q deletion syndrome patients obtained normal resonance on perceptual assessment compared with nonsyndromic patients (74 percent versus 88 percent). A similar difference existed based on postoperative nasometric scores. Among 22q deletion syndrome patients, similar success rates were achieved with Furlow palatoplasty and pharyngeal flap. No difference in the proportion improved postoperatively was noted between 22q deletion syndrome and nonsyndromic groups. One complication was experienced per group. More revision operations were indicated in the 22q deletion syndrome group (17 percent) compared with the nonsyndromic group (4 percent). Median times to normal resonance for 22q deletion syndrome and nonsyndromic patients were 150 weeks and 34 weeks, respectively. Adjusting for multiple variables, 22q deletion syndrome patients were 3.6 times less likely to develop normal resonance. Careful selection of Furlow palatoplasty or pharyngeal flap for primary repair of submucous cleft palate is highly effective in 22q deletion syndrome patients and yields results approaching those of nonsyndromic patients. Therapeutic, III.

  4. Cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Crockett, David J; Goudy, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is the most common congenital malformation of the head and neck. Orofacial clefting could significantly affect the quality of life of the child and requires multiple steps of care to obtain an optimal outcome. Each patient should be evaluated for congenital anomalies, developmental delay, neurologic disorders, and psychosocial concerns. A multidisciplinary team is necessary to ensure that every aspect of the child's care is appropriately treated and coordination between providers is achieved. This article discusses the assessment and treatment recommendations for children born with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lip and palate Cleft lip and palate repair Review Date 5/9/2016 Updated by: David A. ... and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  6. Maxilla dimension in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Changes from birth until palate surgery at age three.

    PubMed

    Opitz, C; Kratzsch, H

    1997-01-01

    This study traces the changes in maxillary dimension in 44 unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients and 28 bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) patients from birth up to the time of palate surgery at age 3. Measurements on dental casts were carried out at 4 defined registration stages. The results revealed a continuous reduction in cleft dimension parallel to an increase in the transversal and sagittal maxillary dimensions. The inclination of the palatal slope displayed such a high degree of variability that no statement regarding the development in this variable could be made. Differences between the 2 types of cleft patients were found only in the maxillary sagittal dimension. Wearing an orthopedic plate after surgery appears to prevent transversal collapse in the anterior region and to counteract external transversal and sagittal forces. Only temporary inhibition of growth in the sagittal dimension of the maxilla was observed after lip surgery.

  7. Distraction osteogenesis and orthognathic surgery for a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Il Hong; Lee, Sang Min; Yang, Byoung Eun; Park, In Young

    2015-03-01

    Maxillary deficiency is a common feature in patients with repaired cleft lip and palate. Orthognathic surgery has been the conventional approach for the management of cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. However, for patients with a severe maxillary deficiency, orthognathic surgery alone has many disadvantages, such as high relapse rates of 25% to 40%, instability, limited amount of advancement, and a highly invasive surgical technique. As an alternative treatment method, distraction osteogenesis has been used successfully in the distraction of the mandible, the maxilla, the entire midface, and the orbits as well as the cranial bones, with stable outcomes. The type of distraction device, either external or internal, can be chosen based on the surgical goals set for the patient. In this study, we report on the use of a rigid external distraction device for maxillary advancement in a 22-year-old woman with a repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate and severe maxillary hypoplasia. After the distraction osteogenesis, 2-jaw surgery was performed to correct the maxillary yaw deviation and the mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Palate? What Do Doctors Do? en español Labio leporino y paladar hendido When Karly talks to her friends, most of them don't know it took years of hard work for her to develop her speech skills. Karly was born with a condition called cleft lip and palate. As a child, she had several ...

  9. Cleft palate repair and variations

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon

    2009-01-01

    Cleft palate affects almost every function of the face except vision. Today a child born with cleft palate with or without cleft lip should not be considered as unfortunate, because surgical repair of cleft palate has reached a highly satisfactory level. However for an average cleft surgeon palatoplasty remains an enigma. The surgery differs from centre to centre and surgeon to surgeon. However there is general agreement that palatoplasty (soft palate at least) should be performed between 6-12 months of age. Basically there are three groups of palatoplasty techniques. One is for hard palate repair, second for soft palate repair and the third based on the surgical schedule. Hard palate repair techniques are Veau-Wardill-Kilner V-Y, von Langenbeck, two-flap, Aleveolar extension palatoplasty, vomer flap, raw area free palatoplasty etc. The soft palate techniques are intravelar veloplasty, double opposing Z-plasty, radical muscle dissection, primary pharyngeal flap etc. And the protocol based techniques are Schweckendiek's, Malek's, whole in one, modified schedule with palatoplasty before lip repair etc. One should also know the effect of each technique on maxillofacial growth and speech. The ideal technique of palatoplasty is the one which gives perfect speech without affecting the maxillofacial growth and hearing. The techniques are still evolving because we are yet to design an ideal one. It is always good to know all the techniques and variations so that one can choose whichever gives the best result in one's hands. A large number of techniques are available in literature, and also every surgeon incorporates his own modification to make it a variation. However there are some basic techniques, which are described in details which are used in various centres. Some of the important variations are also described. PMID:19884664

  10. Remote Digital Preoperative Assessments for Cleft Lip and Palate May Improve Clinical and Economic Impact in Global Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christopher; Campbell, Jacob; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; McCormack, Susan; Silverman, Richard; Lalikos, Janice; Babigian, Alan; Castiglione, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructive surgical care can play a vital role in the resource-poor settings of low- and middle-income countries. Telemedicine platforms can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of surgical care. The purpose of this study is to determine whether remote digital video evaluations are reliable in the context of a short-term plastic surgical intervention. The setting for this study was a district hospital located in Latacunga, Ecuador. Participants were 27 consecutive patients who presented for operative repair of cleft lip and palate. We calculated kappa coefficients for reliability between in-person and remote digital video assessments for the classification of cleft lip and palate between two separate craniofacial surgeons. We hypothesized that the technology would be a reliable method of preoperative assessment for cleft disease. Of the 27 (81.4%) participants, 22 received operative treatment for their cleft disorder. Mean age was 11.1 ± 8.3 years. Patients presented with a spectrum of disorders, including cleft lip (24 of 27, 88.9%), cleft palate (19 of 27, 70.4%), and alveolar cleft (19 of 27, 70.4%). We found a 95.7% agreement between observers for cleft lip with substantial reliability (κ = .78, P < .01). There was an 82.6% agreement between observers for cleft palate, with a moderate interrater reliability (κ = .55, P = .01). We found only a 47.8% agreement between observers for alveolar cleft with a nonsignificant, weak kappa agreement (κ = .06, P = .74). Remote digital assessments are a reliable way to preoperatively diagnose cleft lip and palate in the context of short-term plastic surgical interventions in low- and middle-income countries. Future work will evaluate the potential for real-time, telemedicine assessments to reduce cost and improve clinical effectiveness in global plastic surgery.

  11. Anesthetic Techniques and Perioperative Complications of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery at Srinagarind Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bunsangjaroen, Piyaporn; Thongrong, Cattleya; Pannengpetch, Patt; Somsaad, Supakorn; Rojanapithayakorn, Nonthida; Polsena, Lumpai; Litu, Duangnate; Sriraj, Wimonrat; Kasemsiri, Pornthep

    2015-08-01

    Cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP) are common craniofacial abnormalities with an incidence of around 1:800. Surgical are corrections often performed during the first year of life. These patients have risks for difficult intubation and various perioperative complications due to their young age and craniofacial abnormalities. The purpose of the retrospective descriptive study is to report the data of anesthetic techniques and complications of repairing CLCP in Srinagarind Hospital. These results could improve the caring and services for these groups of patients. Data was retrieved from anesthetic records of patients undergoing correction of CLCP from the period January 2005 to January 2009. Demographic data, clinical diagnosis, type operation, anesthetic technique, total opiod were analyzed using direct laryngoscopic view, grading intubation, method of intubation, and as well perioperative complications were also analyzed. A total of 469 anesthetic records were obtained. The most common type of CLCP was unilateral side (45.48%). The highest incidence of difficult intubation was found in the CP and unilateral CLCP subgroup (4.48% and 4.48%, respectively). All patients were successfully intubated with a stylet except one patient, in whom retrograde intubation was used. Perioperative complications included desaturation, reintubation, postoperative bleeding, and post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). And the highest incidence of PONV was found in the CP (8.95%). Correlation between fentanyl using and postoperative desaturation was statistically significant when multivariate analysis was used (OR = 1.2; p = 0.01). Patients with unilateral CLCP or CP had a higher risk for difficult intubation. Fortunately, all of the patients were successfully intubated with advanced anesthetists' skill. Long operative periods and a large dose of opioid could contribute to the postoperative desaturation and PONV.

  12. A Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 1. Planning and management.

    PubMed

    Semb, Gunvor; Enemark, Hans; Friede, Hans; Paulin, Gunnar; Lilja, Jan; Rautio, Jorma; Andersen, Mikael; Åbyholm, Frank; Lohmander, Anette; Shaw, William; Mølsted, Kirsten; Heliövaara, Arja; Bolund, Stig; Hukki, Jyri; Vindenes, Hallvard; Davenport, Peter; Arctander, Kjartan; Larson, Ola; Berggren, Anders; Whitby, David; Leonard, Alan; Neovius, Erik; Elander, Anna; Willadsen, Elisabeth; Bannister, R Patricia; Bradbury, Eileen; Henningsson, Gunilla; Persson, Christina; Eyres, Philip; Emborg, Berit; Kisling-Møller, Mia; Küseler, Annelise; Granhof Black, Birthe; Schöps, Antje; Bau, Anja; Boers, Maria; Andersen, Helene Søgaard; Jeppesen, Karin; Marxen, Dorte; Paaso, Marjukka; Hölttä, Elina; Alaluusua, Suvi; Turunen, Leena; Humerinta, Kirsti; Elfving-Little, Ulla; Tørdal, Inger Beate; Kjøll, Lillian; Aukner, Ragnhild; Hide, Øydis; Feragen, Kristin Billaud; Rønning, Elisabeth; Skaare, Pål; Brinck, Eli; Semmingsen, Ann-Magritt; Lindberg, Nina; Bowden, Melanie; Davies, Julie; Mooney, Jeanette; Bellardie, Haydn; Schofield, Nina; Nyberg, Jill; Lundberg, Maria; Karsten, Agneta Linder-Aronson; Larson, Margareta; Holmefjord, Anders; Reisæter, Sigvor; Pedersen, Nina-Helen; Rasmussen, Therese; Tindlund, Rolf; Sæle, Paul; Blomhoff, Reidunn; Jacobsen, Gry; Havstam, Christina; Rizell, Sara; Enocson, Lars; Hagberg, Catharina; Najar Chalien, Midia; Paganini, Anna; Lundeborg, Inger; Marcusson, Agneta; Mjönes, Anna-Britta; Gustavsson, Annica; Hayden, Christine; McAleer, Eilish; Slevan, Emma; Gregg, Terry; Worthington, Helen

    2017-02-01

    Longstanding uncertainty surrounds the selection of surgical protocols for the closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate, and randomised trials have only rarely been performed. This paper is an introduction to three randomised trials of primary surgery for children born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It presents the protocol developed for the trials in CONSORT format, and describes the management structure that was developed to achieve the long-term engagement and commitment required to complete the project. Ten established national or regional cleft centres participated. Lip and soft palate closure at 3-4 months, and hard palate closure at 12 months served as a common method in each trial. Trial 1 compared this with hard palate closure at 36 months. Trial 2 compared it with lip closure at 3-4 months and hard and soft palate closure at 12 months. Trial 3 compared it with lip and hard palate closure at 3-4 months and soft palate closure at 12 months. The primary outcomes were speech and dentofacial development, with a series of perioperative and longer-term secondary outcomes. Recruitment of 448 infants took place over a 9-year period, with 99.8% subsequent retention at 5 years. The series of reports that follow this introductory paper include comparisons at age 5 of surgical outcomes, speech outcomes, measures of dentofacial development and appearance, and parental satisfaction. The outcomes recorded and the numbers analysed for each outcome and time point are described in the series. ISRCTN29932826.

  13. Use of three-dimensional computer graphic animation to illustrate cleft lip and palate surgery.

    PubMed

    Cutting, C; Oliker, A; Haring, J; Dayan, J; Smith, D

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer animation is not commonly used to illustrate surgical techniques. This article describes the surgery-specific processes that were required to produce animations to teach cleft lip and palate surgery. Three-dimensional models were created using CT scans of two Chinese children with unrepaired clefts (one unilateral and one bilateral). We programmed several custom software tools, including an incision tool, a forceps tool, and a fat tool. Three-dimensional animation was found to be particularly useful for illustrating surgical concepts. Positioning the virtual "camera" made it possible to view the anatomy from angles that are impossible to obtain with a real camera. Transparency allows the underlying anatomy to be seen during surgical repair while maintaining a view of the overlaying tissue relationships. Finally, the representation of motion allows modeling of anatomical mechanics that cannot be done with static illustrations. The animations presented in this article can be viewed on-line at http://www.smiletrain.org/programs/virtual_surgery2.htm. Sophisticated surgical procedures are clarified with the use of 3D animation software and customized software tools. The next step in the development of this technology is the creation of interactive simulators that recreate the experience of surgery in a safe, digital environment. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Simplifying cleft surgery by presurgical nasoalveolar molding (PNAM) for infant born with unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D; Sarin, Soumil P; Patil, Pravinkumar G; Kothari, Bhavesh

    2013-07-01

    A 2-day-old female infant with complete unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate (left side) was presented to the Department of Prosthodontics, Government Dental College and Hospital, Nagpur for evaluation and treatment with presurgical nasoalveolar molding (PNAM) prior to surgical intervention. The alignment of the alveolar segments creates the foundation upon which excellent results of primary lip and nasal surgery are dependent in the repair of the cleft lip, alveolus, and palate patient. Presurgical infant orthopedics has been employed since the 1950s as an adjunctive neonatal therapy for the correction of cleft lip and palate. One of the problems that the traditional approach failed to address was the deformity of the nasal cartilages and the deficiency of columella tissue in infants with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the step-by-step fabrication process of the PNAM prosthesis used to direct growth of the alveolar segments, lips, and nose in the presurgical treatment of cleft lip and palate. As a result, the primary surgical repair of the lip and nose heals under minimal tension, thereby reducing scar formation and improving the esthetic result. Frequent surgical intervention to achieve the desired esthetic results can be avoided by PNAM. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea following pharyngeal flap surgery in patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Fang; Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chen, Philip K T; Chen, Ning-Hung; Yun, Claudia; Huang, Chiung-Shing

    2002-05-01

    To investigate the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) associated with pharyngeal flap surgery in patients with cleft palate at least 6 months postoperatively and to determine whether age or the flap width had an effect on them. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the severity of OSA associated with pharyngeal flap surgery is greater in children than in adults. Ten adults, six men and four women, with a mean age of 28.0 years at pharyngeal flap (adult group). Twenty-eight children, 13 boys and 15 girls, with a mean age of 6.3 years at pharyngeal flap (child group). A prospective analysis. An overnight polysomnographic study was used to determine the incidence and severity of OSA 6 months after pharyngeal flap. The incidence of OSA following pharyngeal flap was high but not significantly different between these two groups (90% in adults and 93% in children, p = 1.000). When OSA was stratified into different levels of severity according to the values of respiratory disturbance index, there were noticeable differences between these two groups (p =.022). In the adult group, eight patients (89%) had mild OSA and 1 patient (11%) had moderate to severe OSA. In the child group, 11 patients (42%) were found to have mild OSA, and 15 patients (58%) had moderate to severe OSA. No relation was found between the flap width and the incidence (p =.435 in adults and.640 in children) or the severity (p =.325 in adults and.310 in children) of OSA in each group. Six months following pharyngeal flap surgery, more than 90% of the patients with cleft palate still had OSA. The severity of OSA associated with pharyngeal flap surgery tended to be greater in children than in adults. The flap width was unrelated to the incidence and severity of OSA, no matter in adults or in children.

  16. Prediction of the Need for Orthognathic Surgery in Patients With Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    PubMed

    Park, Heon-Mook; Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee; Kim, Sukwha; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cephalometric variables that can predict the future need for orthognathic surgery or distraction osteogenesis in Korean male patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and alveolus (CLA) and unilateral (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP). A total of 131 patients who were treated by one surgeon and one orthodontist using identical protocol were divided into CLA group (n = 35), UCLP group (n = 56), and BCLP group (n = 40). Lateral cephalograms were taken before secondary alveolar bone graft (T0; mean age, 9.3 years) and at the minimum of 15 years of age (T1; mean age, 17.3 years). The cephalometric variables of these cephalograms were measured. At T1 stage, 3 cephalometric criteria were used to divide the subjects into surgery and nonsurgery groups (ANB ≤ -3 degrees; Wits appraisal ≤ -5 mm; Harvold unit difference ≥ 34 mm for surgery group). The feature wrapping method was used to determine the cephalometric variables at T0 stage for a prediction model. At T1 stage, 27 (20.6%) of 131 subjects required surgical intervention to correct their sagittal skeletal discrepancies. Frequency was significantly different among the CLA, UCLP, and BCLP groups (8.5%, 21.4%, and 30.0%, respectively; P < 0.05; [CLA, UCLP] < [UCLP, BCLP]). A total of 10 cephalometric variables of T0 stage were selected as predictors, and weighted classification accuracy was 77.3%. The frequency of surgical intervention increased with cleft severity. Ten cephalometric variables might be regarded as effective predictors of the future need for surgery to correct their sagittal skeletal discrepancies.

  17. [Cleft lip and palate in Campeche Mayas].

    PubMed

    Weiss, K M; Georges, E; Levy, B; Aguirre, A; Portilla, R J; Gaitán, C L; Leyva, E; Rodríguez, T

    1988-07-01

    It has been suggested that among American Indians, as in some genetically-related Asiatic ethnic groups, incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate is higher than among people of Caucasian extraction. Such hypothesis, plus growing demand for services observed at a center for the surgery of cleft lip and cleft palate in Campeche state, led the authors to undertake research among the Maya residents of that region. However, neither careful review of case histories nor field research performed in several Indian communities could confirm the hypothesis of a higher incidence among this ethnic community.

  18. Oro-nasal fistula development and velopharyngeal insufficiency following primary cleft palate surgery--an audit of 148 children born between 1985 and 1997.

    PubMed

    Inman, D S; Thomas, P; Hodgkinson, P D; Reid, C A

    2005-12-01

    We present an audit of primary cleft palate surgery in our unit including rates of two important post-operative complications. Multidisciplinary audit clinics ran from March 1998 to April 2002 to follow up all local patients with a cleft lip or palate who had undergone primary palatal surgery in our unit. One hundred and forty eight patients were studied. Patient ages at follow-up ranged from 3 years and 10 months to 17 years and 4 months. Two surgeons performed the primary surgery. One hundred and twenty eight Wardill-Kilner and 20 Von Langenbeck repairs were performed. We found a 4.7% rate of oro-nasal fistula development requiring surgical closure, and a 26.4% rate of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) requiring subsequent pharyngoplasty. We noted that the type of cleft involved affected the rate of VPI, 16% of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate versus 29.2% of patients with a solitary cleft palate requiring secondary surgery. Outcome of surgery was determined by a 'Cleft Audit Protocol for Speech' (CAPS) speech therapy assessment at follow-up clinics. Only 14.9% of all patients assessed demonstrated any degree of hypernasality. Our results compare favourably with other recent studies including the Clinical Standards Advisory Group (CSAG) report into treatment of children with cleft lip and palate.

  19. Outcomes in facial aesthetics in cleft lip and palate surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V P; Bella, H; Cadier, M M; Pigott, R W; Goodacre, T E E; Richard, B M

    2012-09-01

    While there are internationally validated outcome measures for speech and facial growth in cleft lip and palate patients, there is no such internationally accepted system for assessing outcomes in facial aesthetics. A systematic critical review of the scientific literature from the last 30 years using PUBMED, Medline and Google Scholar was conducted in-line with the PRISMA statement recommendations. This encompassed the most relevant manuscripts on aesthetic outcomes in cleft surgery in the English language. Fifty-three articles were reviewed. Four main means of determining outcome measures were found: direct clinical assessment, clinical photograph evaluation, clinical videographic assessment and three-dimensional evaluation. Cropped photographs were more representative than full face. Most techniques were based on a 5-point scale, evolving from the Asher-McDade system. Multiple panel-based assessments compared scores from lay or professional raters, the results of which were not statistically significant. Various reports based on cohorts were poorly matched for gender, age, clinical condition and ethnicity, making their results difficult to reproduce. The large number of outcome measure rating systems identified, suggests a lack of consensus and confidence as to a reliable, validated and reproducible scoring system for facial aesthetics in cleft patients. Many template and lay panel scoring systems are described, yet never fully validated. Advanced 3D imaging technologies may produce validated outcome measures in the future, but presently there remains a need to develop a robust method of facial aesthetic evaluation based on standardised patient photographs. We make recommendations for the development of such a system. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cepstral analysis of voice in children with velopharyngeal insufficiency after cleft palate surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zengjie; Fan, Jincai; Tian, Jia; Liu, Liqiang; Gan, Cheng; Chen, Wenlin; Yin, Zhuming

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to survey the cepstral peak prominence (CPP) of vowel sounds and to compare objective data obtained from patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency after cleft palate surgery with objective data of those with normal healthy controls using acoustic analyzer. Participants were divided into a clinical group and a control group. Every participant was recorded phonating the sustained vowel /a/. Each participant in the clinical group was recorded before surgery, before and after speech therapy. All samples were subjected to acoustic analysis using Praat software. The vowels were analyzed acoustically by the measurement of smoothed cepstral peak prominence (CPPs). The results reveal lower values of CPPs in speakers with velopharyngeal insufficiency before and after the operation. And, the results also reveal that there is no significant difference across the control and the clinical groups after speech therapy. The results reveal lower values of CPPs in the clinical group before surgery and before speech therapy in comparison with the control group, which could be explained because of the body's compensation for the lack of normal intraoral pressure and habit of articulation. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of lip revision surgery on long-term orosensory function in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Essick, Greg; Phillips, Ceib; Chung, Yunro; Trotman, Carroll-Ann

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE : To determine whether secondary lip revision surgery impacts sensitivity of the upper lip. DESIGN : A three-group, parallel, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial. SETTING : University of North Carolina School of Dentistry. PATIENTS, PARTICIPANTS : Three groups: (1) patients with repaired cleft lip/palate who were scheduled for lip revision (revision; N = 20); (2) patients with repaired cleft lip/palate who did not receive a lip revision (non-revision; N = 13); and (3) non-cleft control subjects (non-cleft; N = 22). Interventions : Lip revision surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES : Measures of (1) two-point perception threshold (two-point), (2) warmth detection threshold (warm), and (3) cool detection threshold (cool) were obtained from two sites on the upper lip vermilion. The revision participants were tested approximately 1 week before surgery and then approximately 3 and 12 months after surgery. The non-revision and non-cleft participants were tested at similar times. RESULTS : There were no significant differences among the three groups at baseline for two-point, warm, or cool. The main effects of group, age, sex, and time were not statistically significant for the two-point or warm (p > .05). The mean differences between the 3- and 12-month follow-up visits and baseline for two-point and warm were small for all three groups. For cool, group was statistically significant (p = .04), the difference in the non-revision group between follow-up and baseline was 31% to 34% higher than in the non-cleft group (p = .01). CONCLUSIONS : Although at postsurgery revision participants exhibited threshold values comparable to presurgical values, the sensory differences observed among subgroups of participants with cleft lip are complex.

  2. Lip Repair Surgery for Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate in a Patient Diagnosed with Trisomy 13 and Holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Tadashi; Hanai, Ushio; Nakajima, Serina; Kobayashi, Megumi; Miyasaka, Muneo; Matsuda, Shinichi; Ikegami, Mariko

    2015-06-20

    We report a case of lip repair surgery performed for bilateral cleft lip and palate in a patient diagnosed with trisomy 13 and holoprosencephaly. At the age of 2 years and 7 months, the surgery was performed using a modified De Hann design under general anesthesia. The operation was completed in 1 h and 21 min without large fluctuations in the child's general condition. The precise measurement of the intraoperative design was omitted, and the operation was completed using minimal skin sutures. It is possible to perform less-invasive and short surgical procedures after careful consideration during the preoperative planning. Considering the recent improvements in the life expectancy of patients with trisomy 13, we conclude that surgical treatments for non-life threatening malformations such as cleft lip and palate should be performed for such patients.

  3. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis versus orthognathic surgery for cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Kloukos, Dimitrios; Fudalej, Piotr; Sequeira-Byron, Patrick; Katsaros, Christos

    2016-09-30

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common birth defects and can cause difficulties with feeding, speech and hearing, as well as psychosocial problems. Treatment of orofacial clefts is prolonged; it typically commences after birth and lasts until the child reaches adulthood or even into adulthood. Residual deformities, functional disturbances, or both, are frequently seen in adults with a repaired cleft. Conventional orthognathic surgery, such as Le Fort I osteotomy, is often performed for the correction of maxillary hypoplasia. An alternative intervention is distraction osteogenesis, which achieves bone lengthening by gradual mechanical distraction. To provide evidence regarding the effects and long-term results of maxillary distraction osteogenesis compared to orthognathic surgery for the treatment of hypoplastic maxilla in people with cleft lip and palate. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 16 February 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 16 February 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 16 February 2016), LILACS BIREME (1982 to 16 February 2016), the US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) (to 16 February 2016), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to 16 February 2016). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication in the electronic searches. We performed handsearching of six speciality journals and we checked the reference lists of all trials identified for further studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing maxillary distraction osteogenesis to conventional Le Fort I osteotomy for the correction of cleft lip and palate maxillary hypoplasia in non-syndromic cleft patients aged 15 years or older. Two review authors assessed studies for eligibility. Two review authors independently

  4. Changing strategy and implementation of a new treatment protocol for cleft palate surgery in "Maria Sklodowska Curie" (MSC) Children's Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.

    PubMed

    Spataru, Radu; Mark, Hans

    2014-12-01

    In "Maria Sklodowska Curie" (MSC) Children's Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, cleft palate repair has been performed according to von Langenbeck since 1984. The speech was good in most patients but wide clefts had a high percentage of fistulas, abnormal speech due to short length and limited mobility of the soft palate. In 2009, the protocol was changed to Gothenburg Delayed Hard Palate Closure, (DHPC) technique. The present evaluation was performed to study the implementation of this technique. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with cleft palate were admitted, 89 isolated cleft palate (ICP), 53 unilateral (UCLP) and 26 bilateral (BCLP). In these, 228 surgical interventions were performed. Soft Palate Repair (SPR) and Hard Palate Repair (HPR) were performed with the DHPC procedure. The transfer to this technique was successfully performed in three steps: one team visit to Gothenburg by a surgeon from MSC and two visits by surgeons from Gothenburg to the MSC. Patients with SPR and HPR were operated on without major complications and there were no differences in results between Gothenburg surgeons and MSC surgeons. The interventions with SPR and HPR technique were proven to be easy to teach and learn and successfully performed without major complications. For cleft patients at MSC hospital it has meant earlier surgery, less re-operations and complications. This report shows a successful change of strategy for palatal repair with improved outcome regarding surgery. In future, speech and growth will be followed on a regular basis and will be compared with results from the Gothenburg Cleft Team.

  5. Clinical performance of cuffed versus uncuffed preformed endotracheal tube in pediatric patients undergoing cleft palate surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Mukhopadhyay, S; Bhattacharya, D; Bandyopadhyay, BK; Mukherjee, M; Ganguly, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncuffed endotracheal tubes are commonly used in children but due to several decade preferred in paediatric oral surgery. Due to lack of conclusive evidences in this regard, we have conducted this study to compare post-operative morbidity following use of cuffed and uncuffed endotracheal tubes in paediatric patients undergoing cleft lip-palate surgery. Methods: This randomised controlled trial was conducted on children aged 2 to 12 years.110 patients were allocated in two parallel groups using computer generated list of random numbers. Post operative extubation stridor, sore throat, time to first oral intake and regaining of normal voice were compared between two groups. Results: The incidence of sore throat was significantly more (P value > 0.005) in patients of uncuffed group compared to cuffed group. The time to first oral intake and time to regain normal voice were significantly earlier in cuffed group compared to the other. Conclusion: With standard care, preformed cuffed ET tube has shown reduced incidence of post operative sore throat. Cuffed group has earlier oral intake and normal voice regain compared to uncuffed group. PMID:27051374

  6. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  7. Cleft palate in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Joan M; Rosen, Heather; Desai, Urmen; Mulliken, John B; Meara, John G; Rogers, Gary F

    2009-09-01

    The frequency of associated cleft palate is known to be high in some fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Apert syndrome. However, there is little information on the frequency of palatal clefts in the FGFR2-mediated disorder, that is, Pfeiffer syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of palatal clefts in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome. The records of patients with Pfeiffer syndrome managed in our craniofacial unit were reviewed. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome were included. Diagnostic criteria were as follows: characteristic mutations in FGFR1 or FGFR2 or, in the absence of genetic testing, clinical findings consistent with Pfeiffer syndrome as determined by a clinical geneticist or our most experienced surgeon (J.B.M.). Only 2 clefts were noted in 25 patients (8%), including 1 with a submucous cleft and 1 with an overt palatal cleft. Many patients (87%) were described as having a high-arched and narrow palate, and 1 had a low, broad palate. Nine patients were noted to have choanal atresia or stenosis. Clefting of the palate does occur in Pfeiffer syndrome but at a low frequency.

  8. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... If teasing or self-esteem issues arise at school, this can help your child feel safe in talking with you about it. After a baby is born with a cleft, parents are understandably concerned about the possibility of having another child with the same condition. While many cases of cleft lip and ...

  9. Surgical correction of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Rahul; Huppa, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Surgical cleft repair aims to restore function of the oro-nasal sphincter and oro-nasal soft tissues and re-establish the complex relationship between perioral and perinasal muscle rings without compromising subsequent mid-facial growth and development. Here we review the surgical anatomy of this region, optimal timing for surgical repair and current thinking on the use of surgical adjuncts. In addition, an overview of current surgical techniques available for the repair of cleft lip, cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency is presented. Finally, we briefly discuss nasal revision surgery and the use of osteotomy, including distraction osteogenesis in the cleft patient.

  10. Comparison of dental arch dimensions in models of preschool children with cleft lip/palate repaired by means of surgery alone versus controls.

    PubMed

    Burhan, Ahmad S; Nawaya, Fehmieh R

    2016-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) anomaly is one of the most prevalent congenital defects causing disturbances of dental arch dimensions. This study aimed at investigating differences in these dimensions between preschool children with cleft lip/palate and a matched control group representing healthy individuals with normal occlusion (NO). The sample of this cross-sectional analytical study consisted of 108 plaster models of children aged from 4 to 5.5 years. They were divided into five groups: the cleft lip group, the cleft palate (CP) group, the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, and the NO group. The NO group was used as a control group. All cleft-affected children were treated only with surgery. Dental arch length and widths were measured. The dental arch dimensions of the cleft lip group were nearly similar to those in the controls. Moreover, the mandibular transverse widths of the CP group were close to those in the controls. However, the mandibular arch length and all maxillary dimensions of the CP group were smaller than those in the controls. In the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws and the maxillary transverse widths were smaller than those in the controls, whereas the mandibular transverse widths were similar to those in the controls. In the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws were close to those in the controls, but both arches were narrower than those in the controls. The various types of CLP were found to be associated with differences in most maxillary and some mandibular arch dimensions. These data can be used for cleft patient counseling and treatment planning.

  11. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  12. Profile evaluation of patients with cleft lip and palate undergoing surgery at a reference center in rio de janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Franco, Diogo; Iani, Marcella; Passalini, Ronaldo; Demolinari, Ivan; Arnaut, Marcio; Franco, Talita

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, the classic timeline for operating on cleft lip and palate is three months old for cheiloplasty and is 12 to 18 months old for palatoplasty. As from Brazilian treatment centers are usually located in major cities, patients living in more remote areas are often unable to receive treatment at the ideal ages. Data were analyzed retrospectively on 45 patients with cleft lip and/or palate, consecutively operated at the Reference Center, Rio de Janeiro Federal University, Brazil. Particularly noteworthy among these data are gender, clinical presentation, operations performed, age of surgery, and the distance between their homes and the hospital. The average age of patients undergoing primary cheiloplasty was 9.4 months, with primary palatoplasties performed at an average age of 7.2 years. As 67% of these patients lived in other towns, they encountered difficulties in seeking and continuing specialized care. Despite attempts to decentralize cleft palate care in Brazil, suitable conditions are not yet noted for following the treatment protocols in a full and adequate manner.

  13. An Opportunity for Diagonal Development in Global Surgery: Cleft Lip and Palate Care in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pratik B.; Hoyler, Marguerite; Maine, Rebecca; Hughes, Christopher D.; Hagander, Lars; Meara, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Global cleft surgery missions have provided much-needed care to millions of poor patients worldwide. Still, surgical capacity in low- and middle-income countries is generally inadequate. Through surgical missions, global cleft care has largely ascribed to a vertical model of healthcare delivery, which is disease specific, and tends to deliver services parallel to, but not necessarily within, the local healthcare system. The vertical model has been used to address infectious diseases as well as humanitarian emergencies. By contrast, a horizontal model for healthcare delivery tends to focus on long-term investments in public health infrastructure and human capital and has less often been implemented by humanitarian groups for a variety of reasons. As surgical care is an integral component of basic healthcare, the plastic surgery community must challenge itself to address the burden of specific disease entities, such as cleft lip and palate, in a way that sustainably expands and enriches global surgical care as a whole. In this paper, we describe a diagonal care delivery model, whereby cleft missions can enrich surgical capacity through integration into sustainable, local care delivery systems. Furthermore, we examine the applications of diagonal development to cleft care specifically and global surgical care more broadly. PMID:23316355

  14. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  15. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  16. Perceptions, expectations, and reactions to cleft lip and palate surgery in native populations: a pilot study in rural India.

    PubMed

    Weatherley-White, R C A; Eiserman, William; Beddoe, Marie; Vanderberg, Richard

    2005-09-01

    Many charitable organizations conduct overseas missions to correct cleft lip and palate where surgical care is unavailable. However, little is known about cultural and societal attitudes regarding the cleft deformity. A 15-item questionnaire was designed to elicit from parents general knowledge concerning cleft lip and palate, beliefs regarding its causation, and expectations of what surgery would accomplish. Shorter second and third questionnaires were administered after the screening process and after surgery. The initial phase of this project was undertaken in Deesa, a midsized rural town in India. Fifty-two families were selected randomly for the initial questionnaire. These interviews were conducted verbally, assisted by translators. Children in 25 of these 52 families subsequently underwent surgery. The results of the interviews indicated that 64% of parents did not limit their child's social interaction and were not ashamed to be seen in public. Twenty-six percent exercised some constraints, and 10% kept their children totally isolated, not permitting them to leave the house or attend school. Regarding causation, the vast majority (84%) ascribed the cleft to "God's will" and 10% to sins committed in past lives. Only one parent acknowledged the influence of genetics, although several had a positive family history. Environmental factors were not an issue. Most families expected their child's life to be better when the facial deformity was corrected. Marriage prospects were the main concern, more so for girls than boys. Educational opportunity was a second strong theme. A greater understanding of the beliefs and expectations in this region was gained by means of this study.

  17. Results of speech improvement following simultaneous push-back together with velopharyngeal flap surgery in cleft palate patients.

    PubMed

    Wermker, Kai; Lünenbürger, Henning; Joos, Ulrich; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Jung, Susanne

    2014-07-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can be caused by a variety of disorders. The most common cause of VPI is the association with cleft palate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different surgical techniques for cleft palate patients with VPI: (1) velopharyngoplasty with an inferiorly based posterior pharyngeal flap (VPP posterior, Schönborn-Rosenthal), and (2) combination of VPP posterior and push-back operation (Dorrance). 41 subjects (26 females, 15 males) with VPI were analysed. Hypernasality was judged subjectively and nasalance data were assessed objectively using the NasalView system preoperative and 6 months postoperative. Subjective analysis showed improved speech results regarding hypernasality for all OP-techniques with good results for VPP posterior and VPP posterior combined with push-back with success rates of 94.4% and 87.7%, respectively. Objective analysis showed a statistically significant reduction of nasalance for both VPP posterior and VPP posterior combined with push-back (p < 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences concerning measured nasalance values postoperatively between the VPP posterior and VPP posterior combined with push-back. Based on our findings, both VPP posterior and VPP posterior combined with push-back showed good results in correction of hypernasality in cleft patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Maxillary distraction versus orthognathic surgery in cleft lip and palate patients: effects on speech and velopharyngeal function.

    PubMed

    Chua, H D P; Whitehill, T L; Samman, N; Cheung, L K

    2010-07-01

    This clinical randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effects of distraction osteogenesis (DO) and conventional orthognathic surgery (CO) on velopharyngeal function and speech outcomes in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients. Twenty-one CLP patients who required maxillary advancement ranging from 4 to 10 mm were recruited and randomly assigned to either CO or DO. Evaluation of resonance and nasal emission, nasoendoscopic velopharyngeal assessment and nasometry were performed preoperatively and at a minimum of two postoperative times: 3-8 months (mean 4 months) and 12-29 months (mean 17 months). Results showed no significant differences in speech and velopharyngeal function changes between the two groups. No correlation was found between the amount of advancement and the outcome measures. It was concluded that DO has no advantage over CO for the purpose of preventing velopharyngeal incompetence and speech disturbance in moderate cleft maxillary advancement.

  19. Strategies to Improve Regeneration of the Soft Palate Muscles After Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented. PMID:22697475

  20. Strategies to improve regeneration of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2012-12-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented.

  1. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP) - Part 3: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; CARVALHO, Roberta Martinelli; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira das; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassutaka Faria; SOARES, Simone; MAZZOTTINI, Reinaldo; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face. PMID:23329251

  2. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-USP (HRAC-USP)--part 3: oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Freitas, José Alberto de Souza; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Carvalho, Roberta Martinelli; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Lauris, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga de; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira das; Yaedú, Renato Yassutaka Faria; Soares, Simone; Mazzottini, Reinaldo; Pinto, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face.

  3. Distraction or orthognathic surgery for cleft lip and palate patients: which is better?

    PubMed

    Cheung, L K; Chua, Hannah Daile P

    2008-06-01

    Maxillary deformities of cleft lip and palate (CLP) can be treated by either conventional osteotomies (CO) or distraction osteogenesis (DO). Which one is better for CLP patients suffering from a moderate extent of maxillary hypoplasia? The aim of the study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of CO and compared with DO in correction of moderate maxillary hypoplasia. The results showed that CLP patients receiving DO were more anxious and depressed during the first three months but became happier in the long-term. The nasalance of DO and CO was found to be similar. However, on the skeletal stability, DO was shown to be significantly more stable when compared with CO in the horizontal plane within the first six months and in vertical plane during the first three months and between 1-2 year.

  4. Analysis of velopharyngeal morphology in adults with velopharyngeal incompetence after surgery of a cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Xiao, Wenlin; Li, Sheng

    2006-07-01

    This study analyzed the relationship of velopharyngeal morphology and velopharyngeal function among 13 adults with velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), 14 adults with velopharyngeal competence (VPC) after primary surgical treatment of cleft palate, and 20 noncleft adults. The measurements included velar length, pharyngeal depth, pharyngeal height, and the need ratio of pharyngeal depth to velar length. In addition, the cranial base, cervical vertebrae, posterior nasal spine, and also the position of the posterior pharyngeal wall (PPW) in the pharyngeal triangle were analyzed. All data were subjected to the Student t test of statistical significance. The results showed that the VPI group had normal pharyngeal depth and a significantly shorter velar length, resulting in a greater depth/length ratio than those of the VPC group and normal control subjects. The position of PPW in the pharyngeal triangle was located significantly more superior in the VPI group compared with the VPC group and normal control subjects. Measurements of the anteroposterior and the vertical dimensions in the regions of the cranial base and cervical vertebrae revealed no significant difference among the 3 groups. According to this study, the velopharyngeal morphology of adults with VPI is characterized by a shorter palate, greater need ratio, slightly counterclockwise-rotated pharyngeal triangle, and superiorly positioned PPW.

  5. Cleft Palate Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sequence, Crouzon Syndrome, and Treacher Collins Syndrome. Cleftline™ Bears Our Cleftline™ bears bring comfort to children with cleft lip and ... anxiety they experience from having facial differences. Each bear is custom-made with stitches across its upper ...

  6. The Management of Iatrogenic Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome Following Bimaxillary Surgery in a Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Gerbino, Giovanni; Gervasio, Fernando Carmine; Blythe, John; Bianchi, Francesca Antonella

    2016-07-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with a 6-year history of severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome followed a bimaxillary osteotomy procedure for a class III skeletal pattern. The patient was born with a unilateral cleft lip and palate and underwent primary lip and palate repair and later a pharyngeal flap for severe velopharyngeal insufficiency. Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome with conventional osteotomy, in cleft lip and palate patients, is a difficult problem. Distraction osteogenesis may provide a safer alternative. The authors describe and discuss the indications and the technical challenge of a multistage treatment protocol with distraction osteogenesis.

  7. 3D analysis of effects of primary surgeries in cleft lip/palate children during the first two years of life.

    PubMed

    Sakoda, Karine Laskos; Jorge, Paula Karine; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Valarelli, Fabrício Pinelli; Pinzan, Arnaldo; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2017-06-05

    This study aimed at monitoring the maxillary growth of children with cleft lip/palate in the first two years of life, and to evaluate the effects of primary surgeries on dental arch dimensions. The sample consisted of the three-dimensional digital models of 25 subjects with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and 29 subjects with isolated cleft palate (CP). Maxillary arch dimensions were measured at 3 months (before lip repair), 1 year (before palate repair), and at 2 years of age. Student's ttest was used for comparison between the groups. Repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to compare different treatment phases in the UCLP group. Paired ttest was used to compare different treatment phases in the CP group. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Decreased intercanine distance and anterior arch length were observed after lip repair in UCLP. After palate repair, maxillary dimensions increased significantly, except for the intercanine distance in UCLP and the intertuberosity distance in both groups. At the time of palate repair and at two years of age, the maxillary dimensions were very similar in both groups. It can be concluded that the maxillary arches of children with UCLP and CP changed as a result of primary surgery.

  8. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro.

  9. Interrelationship between implant and orthognathic surgery for the rehabilitation of edentulous cleft palate patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, José Fernando Scarelli; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira; LOPES, Monica Moraes Waldemarin; MAZOTTINI, Reinaldo; SOARES, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with a unilateral cleft lip and palate, presenting a totally edentulous maxilla and mandible with marked maxillomandibular discrepancy, attended the Prosthodontics section of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo for treatment. She could not close her mouth and was dissatisfied with her complete dentures. Treatment planning comprised placement of six implants in the maxilla, four in the mandible followed by prostheses installation and orthognathic surgery. The mandibular full arch prosthesis guided the occlusion for orthognathic positioning of the maxilla. The maxillary complete prosthesis was designed to assist the orthognathic surgery with a provisional prosthesis (no metal framework), allowing reverse treatment planning. Maxillary and mandibular realignment was performed. Three months later, a relapse in the position of the maxilla was observed, which was offset with a new maxillary prosthesis. This isa complex interdisciplinary treatment and two-year follow-up is presented and discussed. It should be considered that this type of treatment could also be applied in non-cleft patients. PMID:26018315

  10. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  11. Comparison of haemodynamic responses following different concentrations of adrenaline with and without lignocaine for surgical field infiltration during cleft lip and cleft palate surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Marimuthu; Arya, Virendra K; Mathew, Preety J; Sharma, Ramesh K

    2012-01-01

    Surgical field infiltration with adrenaline is common practice for quality surgical field during cleft lip and palate repair in children. Intravascular absorption of adrenaline infiltration often leads to adverse haemodynamic responses. In this prospective, double-blinded, randomised study the haemodynamic effects, quality of surgical field and postoperative analgesia following surgical field infiltration with different concentrations of adrenaline with and without lignocaine were compared in 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I children aged six months to seven years undergoing cleft lip/palate surgery. A standard anaesthesia protocol was used and they were randomised into four groups based on solution for infiltration: adrenaline 1:400,000 (group A), adrenaline 1:200,000 (group B), lignocaine + adrenaline 1:400,000 (group C) and lignocaine + adrenaline 1:200,000 (group D). Statistically significant tachycardia and hypertension occurred only in group B as compared to other groups (P <0.001). The peak changes in heart rate and mean arterial pressure following infiltration occurred at 4.3 ± 2.4, 3.8 ± 1.5, 5.7 ± 3.2 and 5.9 ± 4.9 minutes in groups A, B, C and D respectively. Surgical field was comparable among all groups. Postoperative pain scores and rescue analgesic requirements were lesser in the groups where lignocaine was added to the infiltrating solution (P <0.05). We found that 1:400000 or 1:200000 adrenaline with lignocaine 0.5 to 0.7% is most suitable for infiltration in terms of stable haemodynamics, quality of surgical field and good postoperative analgesia in children.

  12. Space Technology for Palate Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    University of Miami utilized NASA's spacecraft viewing technology to develop the optical profilometer provides more accurate measurements of cleft palate casts than has heretofore been possible, enabling better planning of corrective surgery. Lens like instrument electronically scans a palate cast precisely measuring its irregular contours by detecting minute differences in the intensity of a light beam reflected off the cast. Readings are computer processed and delivered to the surgeon by a teleprinter.

  13. Treatment of a patient with a bilateral cleft lip and palate with implants and surgery of the maxillary anterior region.

    PubMed

    Batra, Panchali; Agrawal, Vikas; Kiran, H Jyothi; Madanagowda, Shivalinga Barsapur

    2010-01-01

    Caring for patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates requires an interdisciplinary approach. The treatment of such a patient is described. Therapy comprised maxillary expansion, mini-implant insertion, premaxillary osteotomy, and vomeroplasty, which led to a drastic improvement of the occlusion and facial appearance.

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life and the Desire for Revision Surgery Among Children With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Kavitha; Shapiro, Danielle; Aliu, Oluseyi; Vercler, Christian J; Baker, Michaella; Kasten, Steven J; Warschausky, Seth A; Buchman, Steven R; Waljee, Jennifer F

    2016-10-01

    Children with cleft lip with or without palate (CLCP) require multiple reconstructive procedures, however, little is known about their desire for surgical revision. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the desire for revision. The authors surveyed children with CLCP (n = 71) and their caregivers regarding general and cleft-specific HRQOL and the desire for revision surgery. The authors used logistic regression models to evaluate the relationship between HRQOL and the desire for revision stratified by age, and determined the level of agreement between caregivers and children. In this cohort, 54.9% of children desired revision, primarily of the nose (n = 23), lip (n = 20), and dentoalveolar structures (n = 19). Children 11 years or older were more likely to desire revision than younger children (OR 3.39, 95% CI [1.19, 9.67], P <0.05). Children who reported poorer HRQOL with respect to appearance (OR 2.31, 95% CI [1.25-4.29], P = 0.008), social development (OR 0.91, 95% CI [0.84-0.99], P = 0.02), and communication (OR 0.94, 95% CI [0.89-0.99], P = 0.02) were significantly more likely to desire revision than children who reported more positive HRQOL. Caregivers' and children's desires for revision were only modestly correlated (r = 0.41). Children with CLCP who report poorer HRQOL are more likely to desire revision than children with higher HRQOL; these differences are further magnified among older children. Given the modest correlation between patient and caregiver goals for revision, it is important to evaluate both perspectives when considering revision surgery.

  15. Natal and neonatal teeth among cleft lip and palate infants

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Manjushree; Kadam, Dinesh; Bhandary, Sanath; Hukkeri, Rajesh Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Natal/neonatal teeth are reported to be more common among clefts and congenital anomalies. Data exclusively among clefts is sparse. The aim was to evaluate prevalence of natal teeth among cleft lip and palate neonates and review the causes, presentation, associated anomalies, complications and management. Materials and Methods: Out of 641operated patients, records of 151 infants with cleft lip and palate with less than three months of age presented to the department of plastic and reconstructive surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Out of which 107 were unilateral complete lip and palate (ULCP), 15 bilateral cleft lip and isolated cleft palate constituted 29. Results: Three patients among the studied records showed neonatal teeth. Two had paired central mandibular incisor teeth along with associated other anomalies and one had a single maxillary neonatal tooth. All were present in unilateral cleft lip and none of the bilateral or isolated cleft palate infants showed neonatal teeth. The overall incidence of neonatal teeth was 1.98% and 2.8% in unilateral Cleft lip. Conclusion: Our study supports the incidence of 2% natal teeth among UCLP. Involvement of mandibular central incisors in contrast to the notion that maxillary alveolus is more commonly affected suggest that it is not only the anatomical disturbance but also all those possible common multifactorial etiological factors contributing to the congenital anomalies as such. Natal/neonatal teeth are rather under-diagnosed and reported than a rare phenomenon and the prevalence is higher in certain population. Riga-Fede disease unlikely to be seen in clefts with neonatal teeth due to anatomical factors. The extraction of non mobile tooth if necessary can be done during the primary surgery for the cleft lip. PMID:24163556

  16. Natal and neonatal teeth among cleft lip and palate infants.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Manjushree; Kadam, Dinesh; Bhandary, Sanath; Hukkeri, Rajesh Y

    2013-01-01

    Natal/neonatal teeth are reported to be more common among clefts and congenital anomalies. Data exclusively among clefts is sparse. The aim was to evaluate prevalence of natal teeth among cleft lip and palate neonates and review the causes, presentation, associated anomalies, complications and management. Out of 641operated patients, records of 151 infants with cleft lip and palate with less than three months of age presented to the department of plastic and reconstructive surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Out of which 107 were unilateral complete lip and palate (ULCP), 15 bilateral cleft lip and isolated cleft palate constituted 29. Three patients among the studied records showed neonatal teeth. Two had paired central mandibular incisor teeth along with associated other anomalies and one had a single maxillary neonatal tooth. All were present in unilateral cleft lip and none of the bilateral or isolated cleft palate infants showed neonatal teeth. The overall incidence of neonatal teeth was 1.98% and 2.8% in unilateral Cleft lip. Our study supports the incidence of 2% natal teeth among UCLP. Involvement of mandibular central incisors in contrast to the notion that maxillary alveolus is more commonly affected suggest that it is not only the anatomical disturbance but also all those possible common multifactorial etiological factors contributing to the congenital anomalies as such. Natal/neonatal teeth are rather under-diagnosed and reported than a rare phenomenon and the prevalence is higher in certain population. Riga-Fede disease unlikely to be seen in clefts with neonatal teeth due to anatomical factors. The extraction of non mobile tooth if necessary can be done during the primary surgery for the cleft lip.

  17. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  18. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    PubMed

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Speech evaluation and treatment for patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, David P; Henne, Lisa J

    2003-02-01

    This compendium has been written in conjunction with a cleft lip and palate surgical mission that took place in Villahermosa, Mexico, February 4-9, 2001. Fifty children, 10 per day, received lip or palate surgery. This report, available in both English and Spanish, is intended as a practical and concise guide to basic aspects of evaluation and treatment of speech disorders associated with cleft palate. More detailed and comprehensive sources dealing with this topic are available and have been reviewed by D. P. Kuehn and K. T. Moller (2000).

  20. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Zuhaib, Mohammed; Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Parmar, Renu; Shetty, Pritham N; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1) To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (2) To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (3) To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Prospective study. A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, significant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle closure in unilateral clefts.

  1. Early hard palate closure using a vomer flap in unilateral cleft lip and palate: effects on cleft width.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Johanna P; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2014-05-01

    Although no universal consensus exists on treatment of cleft palates, early hard palate closure is commonly performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of a vomer flap for early hard palate closure on residual palatal cleft width in patients with a unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Forty-seven UCLP patients were retrospectively divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 25 patients who underwent early lip closure and simultaneous hard palate closure using a vomer flap. Group B included 22 patients who had lip closure only at first surgery. Palatal cleft widths of both groups were measured at two time points and were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test to examine the influence of vomerplasty in this very early stage. No significant difference of baseline characteristics between the groups was found, and comparison of age at the time of surgeries was not significantly different. Mean age at the time of vomerplasty was 4.0 months. After the first surgery, a significantly greater total cleft width reduction of 5.0 mm average was found in group A compared to only 1.5 mm reduction in group B. This reduction took place after an average of 7.1 and 7.0 months, respectively. Lip closure accompanied by early hard palate closure using a vomer flap is associated with a significant postoperative reduction of the residual cleft when compared to lip closure only. This study shows another great advantage of performing early hard palate closure using a vomer flap.

  2. Computer-Assisted Orthognathic Surgery for Patients with Cleft Lip/Palate: From Traditional Planning to Three-Dimensional Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonic, Daniel; Pai, Betty Chien-Jung; Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chortrakarnkij, Peerasak; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Background Although conventional two-dimensional (2D) methods for orthognathic surgery planning are still popular, the use of three-dimensional (3D) simulation is steadily increasing. In facial asymmetry cases such as in cleft lip/palate patients, the additional information can dramatically improve planning accuracy and outcome. The purpose of this study is to investigate which parameters are changed most frequently in transferring a traditional 2D plan to 3D simulation, and what planning parameters can be better adjusted by this method. Patients and Methods This prospective study enrolled 30 consecutive patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate (mean age 18.6±2.9 years, range 15 to 32 years). All patients received two-jaw single-splint orthognathic surgery. 2D orthodontic surgery plans were transferred into a 3D setting. Severe bony collisions in the ramus area after 2D plan transfer were noted. The position of the maxillo-mandibular complex was evaluated and eventually adjusted. Position changes of roll, midline, pitch, yaw, genioplasty and their frequency within the patient group were recorded as an alternation of the initial 2D plan. Patients were divided in groups of no change from the original 2D plan and changes in one, two, three and four of the aforementioned parameters as well as subgroups of unilateral, bilateral cleft lip/palate and isolated cleft palate cases. Postoperative OQLQ scores were obtained for 20 patients who finished orthodontic treatment. Results 83.3% of 2D plans were modified, mostly concerning yaw (63.3%) and midline (36.7%) adjustments. Yaw adjustments had the highest mean values in total and in all subgroups. Severe bony collisions as a result of 2D planning were seen in 46.7% of patients. Possible asymmetry was regularly foreseen and corrected in the 3D simulation. Conclusion Based on our findings, 3D simulation renders important information for accurate planning in complex cleft lip/palate cases involving facial asymmetry that is

  3. A Health Systems Perspective on the Mission Model for Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery: A Matter of Sustainability or Responsibility?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lucas Cummings; Hatcher, Kristin Ward; Vanderburg, Richard; Ayala, Ruben Eduardo; Mbugua Kabetu, Charles Edward; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2015-06-01

    One in 700 children around the world are born with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). Although reconstructive surgery is widely available in high-income settings, over 2 billion people in low- and middle-income countries lack access to essential surgical care. The mission model has been demonstrated to be highly effective in responding to the global surgical workforce crisis, but has been questioned in regard to its sustainability, value, and overall impact. Through effective health systems integration, the mission model presents abundant opportunities for streamlined delivery and horizontal impact. Still, the primary goal of the mission model is direct care delivery; and although the value of sustainability is indisputably vital, we contend that the mission model, when executed responsibly, creates high-value, sustained impact on the individual lives of those presently in need. We furthermore advocate for the sustained commitment of implementing organizations, patient safety, local integration, and a new focus on patient centeredness as key elements of the responsible mission model.

  4. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  5. Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 3. Descriptive study of postoperative nursing care following first stage cleft closure.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Patricia; Lindberg, Nina; Jeppesen, Karin; Elfving-Little, Ulla; Semmingsen, Ann-Margritt; Paganini, Anna; Gustavsson, Annica; Slevin, Emma; Jacobsen, Gry; Eyres, Phil; Semb, Gunvor

    2017-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common congenital anomalies requiring surgical treatment in children, normally commenced in the first year of life. Following the initiation of a group of multicentre surgical trials of primary surgery, variations in postoperative recovery and management became apparent. An agreement was made for a nurse-led survey in eight surgical centres to document postoperative care and recovery. A postoperative recovery clinical report form was developed to capture relevant data for the children participating in the four arms of the trials. This included the age and weight at admission, the postoperative recovery setting, pain management, postoperative feeding, post-operative complications, and length of hospital stay. Four hundred and three nursing forms from the first surgical procedure were returned for analysis. Differences in important aspects of care such as postoperative analgesia and postoperative feeding were evident. Postoperative care was influenced by local custom and practice, as little firm clinical evidence exists to guide optimal management. Postoperative recovery may play a significant role in the future selection of surgical protocols, and future trials need to consider cross-study site training to familiarise nurses, prior to any changes in surgical methods. ISRCTN29932826.

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate Repair: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Gian Luca; Freda, Nicola; Giacomina, Alessandro; Montemagni, Marina; Sisti, Andrea

    2017-09-12

    Cleft lip and palate is the most frequent congenital craniofacial deformity. In this article, the authors describe their experience with cleft lip and palate repair. Data regarding patients presenting with primary diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate, between 2009 and 2015, were reviewed. Details including demographics, type of cleft, presence of known risk factors, surgical details, and follow-up visits were collected. Documented complications were reported. Caregivers' satisfaction was assessed with a survey. The survey used to assess satisfaction with cleft-related features was based on the cleft evaluation profile (CEP). In addition, 4 assessors used visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the aesthetic satisfaction. Seven hundred fifty-two patients with primary diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate underwent surgical correction at "S. Chiara" Hospital, 432 (57.45%) male and 320 (42.55%) female. The most common cleft types in our study were incomplete cleft palate (152 patients) and left unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (152 patients). Associated syndromes were found in 46 patients (6.12%). Cleft lip was repaired using a modified Tennison-Randall technique when the defect was unilateral, whereas a modified Mulliken technique was used for bilateral cleft lip. Cleft palate was repaired using the Bardach technique or Von Langenbeck technique at 5 to 6 months of age. Cleft lip and palate was repaired in several surgical steps. In total, complications were reported in 81 of 752 patients (14.16%). Average fathers' satisfaction score assessed using CEP was 4.5 (lip), 4.8 (nose), 4.7 (teeth), 4.8 (bite), 4.2 (breathing), 4.6 (profile). Average mothers' satisfaction score assessed using CEP was 4.3 (lip), 4.6 (nose), 4.4 (teeth), 4.5 (bite), 4.1 (breathing), 4.4 (profile). Average level of aesthetic satisfaction, assessed using VAS, was 8.7 (fathers), 8.1 (mothers), 7.9 (lay person), and 8.0 (senior cleft surgeon). The multidisciplinary management of children with

  7. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date.

  8. [Cleft lip and palate--problematic cleft speech].

    PubMed

    Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M A

    1999-01-01

    The early restoration of facial and palatal morphology in patients with cleft of lip and/or palate provides the anatomical base for good speech outcome. The author gives the up todate overview of the main problems concerning cleft speech, such as velopalatal insufficiency and typical articulation errors. The article describes the modern methods for the evaluation of VPI and current trends in treatment modalities for VPI.

  9. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    PubMed

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  10. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more if they are having hearing problems. Dental Problems Children with a cleft lip and palate ... improve speech and breathing, overbites/underbites, and appearance. Dental and Orthodontic Treatment Maintaining healthy teeth and preventing ...

  11. Spectrographic measures of the speech of young children with cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Casal, C; Domínguez, C; Fernández, A; Sarget, R; Martínez-Celdrán, E; Sentís-Vilalta, J; Gay-Escoda, C

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive children with repaired cleft lip and/or palate [isolated cleft lip (CL) 6, isolated cleft palate (CP) 7, unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) 7, and bilateral cleft lip and palate 2] with a mean age of 27 months underwent spectrographic measures of tape-recorded speech (DSP Sona-Graph digital unit). Controls were 22 age- and sex-matched noncleft children. Data analyzed included (1) the Spanish vocalic variables [a, i, u, e, o]: first formant, second formant, duration, and context; (2) obstruent variables [p, t, k]: burst, voice onset time, and duration, and (3) nasal variables [m]: first formant, second formant, and duration. Statistically significant differences were observed between the CL group and the control group in the first formant of [e] and in the increase of the frequency of the [t] burst. Comparison between UCLP and controls showed differences in the second formant of [a], in the first formant of [o], and in the second formant of [o]. These results suggest a small but significant influence of either the cleft lip or its repair on lip rounding for [o] and [u]. In addition, tongue position differences were most likely responsible for the differences seen with [a] and [e]. Spectrographic differences in the current patients did not contribute to meaningful differences in speech sound development. Individualized care (orthodontics, surgery, speech therapy) in children with cleft lip and/or palate attended at specialized craniofacial units contributes to normalization of speech development.

  12. Feeding interventions for growth and development in infants with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Bessell, Alyson; Hooper, Lee; Shaw, William C; Reilly, Sheena; Reid, Julie; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-16

    modification. No difference was shown for infants fitted with a maxillary plate compared to no plate. However, there was some evidence of an effect on weight at 6 weeks post-surgery in favour of breastfeeding when compared to spoon-feeding (mean difference 0.47; 95% confidence interval 0.20 to 0.74). Squeezable bottles appear easier to use than rigid feeding bottles for babies born with clefts of the lip and/or palate, however, there is no evidence of a difference in growth outcomes between the bottle types. There is weak evidence that breastfeeding is better than spoon-feeding following surgery for cleft. There was no evidence to suggest that maxillary plates assist growth in babies with clefts of the palate. No evidence was found to assess the use of any types of maternal advice and/or support for these babies.

  13. Can we predict a difficult intubation in cleft lip/palate patients?

    PubMed

    Arteau-Gauthier, Isabelle; Leclerc, Jacques E; Godbout, Audrey

    2011-10-01

    To find predictors of a difficult intubation in infants with an isolated or a syndromic cleft lip/palate. Retrospective review: single-blind trial. Tertiary care centre. A total of 145 infants born with cleft lip/palate were enrolled. Three clinical and seven lip/palate anatomic parameters were evaluated. The grade of intubation was determined by the anesthesiologist at the time of the labioplasty/staphylorrhaphy surgery at 3 and 10 months, respectively. Intubation grade. The relative risk of a difficult intubation in the cleft lip, cleft palate without the Pierre Robin sequence, cleft lip-palate, and cleft palate with Pierre Robin sequence groups was 0, 2.7, 10, and 23%, respectively. The infants born with the Pierre Robin sequence had a statistically significant higher intubation grade. The degree of difficulty was increased in cases with early airway and feeding problems (p < .0001). Within the group of cleft palate patients without any lip malformation, a wider cleft was associated with a higher intubation grade with statistical significance (p  =  .0323). Infants born with Pierre Robin sequence have a statistically significantly higher risk of difficult intubation. Within this group, of all the studied factors, a clinical history of early airway and feeding problems was the best predictor of a difficult endotracheal intubation. In cleft palate patients without any cleft lip, larger width of the cleft is also a significant predictor.

  14. Influence of different palate repair protocols on facial growth in unilateral complete cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Yin, Heng; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    To address the question of whether one- or two-stage palatal treatment protocol has fewer detrimental effects on craniofacial growth in patients aged 5 years with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Forty patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCCLPs) who had received primary cleft lip repair at age 6-12 months and cleft palate repair at age 18-30 months were selected in this study. Eighteen UCCLP patients who received two-stage palate repair were selected as group 1, and 22 UCCLP patients who received one-stage palate repair were selected as group 2. The control group consisted of 20 patients with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL patients) whose age and gender matched with UCCLP patients. A one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to analyze the nature of data distribution. Bonferroni test and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used for multiple comparisons. Both case groups showed reduced maxillary sagittal length (ANS-PMP, A-PM, p < 0.05) and retrusion of the maxilla (S-Ptm, p < 0.05), A point and ANS point (Ba-N-A, Ba-N-ANS, p < 0.05). Patients treated with two-stage palate repair had a reduced posterior maxillary vertical height (R-PMP, p < 0.05). Our results indicated that maxillary sagittal length and position could be perturbed by both one- and two-stage palate repair. Vomer flap repair inhibited maxilla vertical growth. Delayed hard palate repair showed less detrimental effects on maxillary growth compared to early hard palate repair in UCCLP patients aged 5 years. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Receptive and expressive language performance in children with and without Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Silva-Mori, Mariana Jales Felix da; Ribeiro, Camila da Costa; Maximino, Luciana Paula

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance in the abilities of receptive and expressive language of children with cleft lip and palate with that of children without cleft lip and palate with typical 12 to 36-month chronological development. The sample consisted of 60 children aged 12 and 36 months: 30 with cleft lip and palate diagnosis and 30 without cleft lip and palate diagnosis with typical development. The groups were paired according to gender, age (in months), and socioeconomic level. The procedures consisted of analysis of medical records, anamnesis with family members, and valuation of the Early Language Milestone Scale (ELMS). The chart analysis showed 63.34% of the children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 16.66% with bilateral incisive transforamen cleft, and 20% with post-foramen cleft. Children with cleft lip and palate underwent surgeries (lip repair and/or palatoplasty) at the recommended ages and participated in early intervention programs; 40% presented recurrent otitis history, and 50% attended schools. Statistical analysis included the use of the Mann Whitney test with significance level of p <0.05. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding receptive and expressive skills. The group of children with cleft lip and palate showed statistically significant low performance in receptive and expressive language compared with children without cleft lip and palate.

  16. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Laub, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients. The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated. Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries (“Plan B”), approaches 100%. The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries. Furthermore, the academic visiting professor (“Plan A”: hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model (“Plan C”: to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance. The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful. PMID:26080114

  17. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Laub, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients.The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated.Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries ("Plan B"), approaches 100%.The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries.Furthermore, the academic visiting professor ("Plan A": hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model ("Plan C": to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance.The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful.

  18. Sagittal maxillary growth pattern in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with unrepaired cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Qi; Wu, Jun; Chen, Rong-Jing

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the sagittal maxillary growth pattern during the mixed and permanent dentition in unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients with unrepaired cleft palate. A total of 30 nonsyndromic UCLP patients with unrepaired cleft palate were included, 15 of whom were in mixed dentition and 15 in permanent dentition.Cephalograms were analyzed and compared in the patients with UCLP who have operatively undergone repair with both the lip and palate as well as normal subjects. The UCLP patients with unrepaired cleft palate in mixed dentition showed decreased anterior-posterior length of the maxilla. The UCLP patients with unrepaired cleft palate in permanent dentition demonstrated an almost normal maxillary growth. The operated-on patients both in mixed and permanent dentitions showed maxillary retrusion as well as decreased maxillary length. There appears that there may be the potential normal maxillary growth in UCLP patients, and early surgical repair of the cleft palate may affect sagittal maxillary growth pattern in patients with cleft.

  19. Cleft palate only: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    TETTAMANTI, L.; AVANTAGGIATO, A.; NARDONE, M.; SILVESTRE-RANGIL, J.; TAGLIABUE, A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Cleft palate only (CPO) is one of the most common congenital malformations worldwide. The etiopathogenesis of CPO is not completely understood. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of drugs during pregnancy, advanced paternal age, have been demonstrated to be a risk of CPO, but conflicting results have also been published. Insufficient intake of folic acid during the pregnancy has been suggested to increase the risk for CPO. The demonstrated risk for siblings and the higher risk for monozygotic twins suggest a genetic etiopathogenesis for CPO. In some cases of CPO a prevalent mode of inheritance has been reported, but oligogenic models with reduced penetrance, and the risk related to environmental factors have also been proved. One of the first manifestations associated with CPO is difficulty with feeding. Aerophagia is a problem in these infants with CPO and requires more frequent burping and slower feeding. The inability to generate intraoral breath pressure due to nasal air emission in CPO children frequently manifests as articulation difficulties, particularly consonant weakness, and unintelligible speech. Hearing disorders are prevalent among individuals with CPO, as a result of chronic otitis media with effusion due to eustachian tube dysfunction. A multidisciplinary team is essential to manage the many aspects of CPO. In treating CPO, the reconstructive surgeon works in cooperation with otolaryngologists, dentists and orthodontists, speech pathologists, audiologists, geneticists, psychiatrists, maxillofacial surgeons, social workers, and prosthodontists. CPO can be considered a genetically complex disease, but new knowledge and new therapeutic approaches have greatly improved the quality of life of these children. Prenatal diagnosis is an important step in the treatment of this disease. PMID:28757935

  20. Cleft palate only: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, L; Avantaggiato, A; Nardone, M; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Tagliabue, A

    2017-01-01

    Cleft palate only (CPO) is one of the most common congenital malformations worldwide. The etiopathogenesis of CPO is not completely understood. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of drugs during pregnancy, advanced paternal age, have been demonstrated to be a risk of CPO, but conflicting results have also been published. Insufficient intake of folic acid during the pregnancy has been suggested to increase the risk for CPO. The demonstrated risk for siblings and the higher risk for monozygotic twins suggest a genetic etiopathogenesis for CPO. In some cases of CPO a prevalent mode of inheritance has been reported, but oligogenic models with reduced penetrance, and the risk related to environmental factors have also been proved. One of the first manifestations associated with CPO is difficulty with feeding. Aerophagia is a problem in these infants with CPO and requires more frequent burping and slower feeding. The inability to generate intraoral breath pressure due to nasal air emission in CPO children frequently manifests as articulation difficulties, particularly consonant weakness, and unintelligible speech. Hearing disorders are prevalent among individuals with CPO, as a result of chronic otitis media with effusion due to eustachian tube dysfunction. A multidisciplinary team is essential to manage the many aspects of CPO. In treating CPO, the reconstructive surgeon works in cooperation with otolaryngologists, dentists and orthodontists, speech pathologists, audiologists, geneticists, psychiatrists, maxillofacial surgeons, social workers, and prosthodontists. CPO can be considered a genetically complex disease, but new knowledge and new therapeutic approaches have greatly improved the quality of life of these children. Prenatal diagnosis is an important step in the treatment of this disease.

  1. Speech evaluation for patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Ann W

    2014-04-01

    Children with cleft palate are at risk for speech problems, particularly those caused by velopharyngeal insufficiency. There may be an additional risk of speech problems caused by malocclusion. This article describes the speech evaluation for children with cleft palate and how the results of the evaluation are used to make treatment decisions. Instrumental procedures that provide objective data regarding the function of the velopharyngeal valve, and the 2 most common methods of velopharyngeal imaging, are also described. Because many readers are not familiar with phonetic symbols for speech phonemes, Standard English letters are used for clarity.

  2. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  3. Breastfeeding After Early Repair of Cleft Lip in Newborns With Cleft Lip or Cleft Lip and Palate in a Baby-Friendly Designated Hospital.

    PubMed

    Burianova, Iva; Kulihova, Katarina; Vitkova, Veronika; Janota, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Goals of treatment of orofacial cleft are to improve feeding, speech, hearing, and facial appearance. Early surgery brings faster healing, better cosmetic effect, and fewer complications. Breastfeeding rates after early surgery are unknown. Early repair of the cleft lip may influence breastfeeding rates. Research aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding after early repair of the cleft lip in a Baby-Friendly designated hospital. The rate of breastfeeding in newborns with cleft lip was compared to cleft lip and palate. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study group included infants with cleft lip and cleft lip and palate operated on in the first 2 weeks of life. Newborns and their mothers were supported by a team promoting breastfeeding. One hundred four infants (70 boys and 34 girls) were included. Isolated cleft lip was present in 56 (53.8%) infants, and cleft lip and palate in 48 (46.2%). Forty-four (78.6%) of the infants with a cleft lip were breastfed, 3 (5.4%) received human milk via bottle or syringe, and 9 (16.0%) were formula fed. Three (6.2%) of the infants with a cleft lip and palate were breastfed, 31 (64.6%) received human milk via bottle or Haberman feeder, and 14 (29.2%) were formula fed. The rate of breastfeeding in patients following early surgery of the cleft lip was high and comparable to the general population. The rate of breastfeeding in babies with cleft lip and palate after early repair of the cleft lip remained low.

  4. CIRPLAST: Cleft Lip and Palate Missions in Peru.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Carlos E

    2015-06-01

    The author presents a 20-year experience leading cleft lip and palate surgical volunteer missions in Peru for CIRPLAST, a nonprofit volunteer plastic surgery goodwill program that has provided free surgery for patients with cleft lip and palate deformities in remote areas of Peru. Surgical procedures were performed by the author, together with a group of experienced plastic surgeons, under the auspices of the Peruvian Plastic Surgery Society, and local health authorities. CIRPLAST missions are scheduled annually in different locations around Peru. Selected patients for surgery after adequate screening are photographed, and their cleft deformity is recorded. Scheduled patients or their parents, when they are minors, sign an informed consent form. Patients operated on in any given day are examined and photographed 1 day after surgery, before discharge. Between 30 and 35 patients are operated on at each mission site. About 2 weeks after the mission, patients are checked and photographed, and the outcome of surgery is recorded. Complications that may occur are recorded and treated by the CIRPLAST team as soon as possible. Almost all operations are performed under general endotracheal anesthesia coupled by local anesthesia containing a vasoconstrictor, to reduce bleeding and facilitate tissue dissection. All wounds of the lip and palate are closed with absorbable sutures, to avoid the need for suture removal. After cleft lip surgery, patients go to the recovery room for monitoring by nurses until they recover completely. A total of 6108 cleft lip and palate repairs, primary and secondary, were performed by CIRPLAST in 141 missions, between May 12, 1994, and October 15, 2014. The medical records of the 5162 patients (84.5%) who returned for follow-up (ranging from 12 days to 9 years) were reviewed retrospectively. Between 45% and 70% of the patients operated on a mission have returned for early follow-up and some the following year. There were 3176 males (51.9%) and 2932

  5. Cleft lip and palate care in Romania.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vanessa

    2011-11-01

    Vanessa Martin travelled with a surgical team to Romania over a period of 12 years to support nurses and improve practice in the treatment of cleft lip and palate. She recounts her experiences and the changes that took place during that time.

  6. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  7. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  8. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  9. Centre-based statistics of cleft lip with/without alveolus and palate as well as cleft palate only patients in Aden, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Ahlam Hibatulla Ali; Abdo, Muhgat Ahmed Ali; Krentz, Helga; Lenz, Jan-Hendrik; Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to report the types and patterns of cleft lip with/without cleft alveolus and palate as well as cleft palate only as seen in Aden, Yemen. Retrospective, centre-based study conducted at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Aden University, Yemen. Statistical evaluation of the data from all cleft patients who were registered at or referred to this centre during the years 2005-2011. A total of 1110 cleft patients were seen during the period studied (2005-2011). Amongst these there were 183 (16.48%) with a cleft lip and 144 (12.98) with a cleft of lip and alveolus, 228 (20.54%) had a cleft palate, and 555 (50%) had a combination of cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. The clefts were found more often in males than in females (56.5% boys versus 43.5% girls). This difference was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.001). Statistically significant sex differences were also noted when evaluating the various cleft types. Isolated cleft palates were found most often in females. Among the cleft palate cases there were 102 (9.2%) with a cleft soft palate only. The ages of the patients were between one day and 40 years. Two hundred and one children (18%) had a positive family history of clefts. Among the risk factors considered in this study, consanguineous marriages among cousins were found most frequently (in 48% of the cases). In contrast to this, only 10% of the mothers had reported to have been taking medication directly prior to or during the first trimester of their pregnancy. On average the mothers were neither very young nor very old. The prevalence rate of orofacial cleft types among this Yemeni sample was similar to prevalence rates previously reported in white Caucasians. The present study did neither find many cases with medication before, nor during, pregnancy; there were few young or very old mothers; and the incidence of positive family histories was similar to those found in other studies on clefts. However, consanguineous marriages were

  10. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  11. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  12. Genetics of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects and can occur as isolated, nonsyndromic events or as part of Mendelian syndromes. There is substantial phenotypic diversity in individuals with these birth defects and their family members: from subclinical phenotypes to associated syndromic features that is mirrored by the many genes that contribute to the etiology of these disorders. Identification of these genes and loci has been the result of decades of research using multiple genetic approaches. Significant progress has been made recently due to advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies, primarily through the use of whole exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies. Future progress will hinge on identifying functional variants, investigation of pathway and other interactions, and inclusion of phenotypic and ethnic diversity in studies. PMID:24124047

  13. Genetics of cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Marazita, Mary L

    2013-11-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects and can occur as isolated, nonsyndromic events or as part of Mendelian syndromes. There is substantial phenotypic diversity in individuals with these birth defects and their family members: from subclinical phenotypes to associated syndromic features that is mirrored by the many genes that contribute to the etiology of these disorders. Identification of these genes and loci has been the result of decades of research using multiple genetic approaches. Significant progress has been made recently due to advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies, primarily through the use of whole exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies. Future progress will hinge on identifying functional variants, investigation of pathway and other interactions, and inclusion of phenotypic and ethnic diversity in studies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Treatment of 4-5 year old patients with cleft lip and cleft palate in Tawanchai center.

    PubMed

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of Cleft Lip/Palate condition in Thailand reaches a rate of 2.49% of child births, with estimates of 800 new cases per year in the Northeastern region. The healthcare process emphasizes interdisciplinary teamwork at each stage of the planning of treatment and services with the primary goal of achieving patient satisfaction and ability to live normally in society. The first 5 years are particularly important, with a focus on quality of care and ability to adapt to the environment before entering school. To study the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate in Tawanchai center in the 4-5 year age range. A retrospective study of the clinical records was led, concerning the 123 cleft lip and cleft palate patients aged 4-5 years under treatment in Tawanchai center, Srinagarind Hospital. Data was collected during three months from October to December 2011, using the admission records of the interdisciplinary team. Percentages and mean values were calculated from these data. 120 of the 123 patients were operated, giving a ratio of 97.56%. 108 cases were under government universal health coverage regime, corresponding to 87.80% of cases. 74 cases (60.16%) presented both cleft lip and palate condition, and an average of 5-night stay in hospital per person. Medical services by the interdisciplinary team were provided as follows: (1) of 30 patients with cleft lip aged 3-4 months, 30 (100%) received pre and post-surgery care counseling, 29 (96.67%) received surgery; (2) of 19 patients with cleft palate aged 10-18 months, 17 (89.47%) received treatment information, pre and postsurgery counseling and were operated according to the protocols; (3) of 74 patients with cleft lip and palate, 53 (71.62%) received counseling for pre and post-surgery care for lip repair at the age of 3-4 months, 52 (70.27%) were operated following the protocols, while at the age of 10-18 months 63 patients (85.14%) received treatment information, pre and postsurgery care counseling

  15. Relationship between palate-vomer development and maxillary growth in submucous cleft palate patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shuxin; Ma, Lian; Sun, Zhipeng; Qian, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Objective : Experimental and clinical findings suggest that the vomer is involved in facial development and might contribute to the short and retrusive maxilla in cleft patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between vomer development and maxillary growth in unoperated submucous cleft palate (SMCP) patients. Design : Retrospective cohort study. Participants : Thirty unoperated SMCP patients were included. The criteria for clinical diagnosis were: bifid uvula, a translucent zone in the midline of the soft palate, and a touchable "V" notch on the posterior border of the bony palate. There were 19 female and 11 male patients, with an age range from 3 to 25 years. Interventions : All patients were imaged using spiral computed tomography (CT) while in centric occlusion before the surgeries. Main Outcome Measures : Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction models were created, and dentoalveolar relationships were rated by three experienced doctors according to the GOSLON score principles. The patients then were divided into three groups: 1 - normal occlusion, 2 - edge-to-edge bite, and 3 - crossbite. The vomer-palate fusion rate was calculated on 3D CT images and represented the vomer development. Results : The sagittal extent of the palatal cleft and the malformation of vomer in SMCP were greatly varied. The vomer-palate fusion rate in the crossbite group (occlusal score = 3) was significantly lower than that in the normal occlusion group (P = .027). Conclusions : Our findings suggest that correlation exists between vomer development and sagittal maxillary growth in unoperated SMCP patients.

  16. Cleft lip-cleft palate in Zimbabwe: estimating the distribution of the surgical burden of disease using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T; Shaye, David; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Mehdezadeh, Omid; Mahomva, Leonard; Chidzonga, Midion

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and unmet need for cleft lip-cleft palate reconstructive surgery by using incidence. Our hypotheses were that the age of presentation to screening clinics will decrease between 2006 and 2012, and the geospatial distribution of cases will expand to a more rural catchment area. Longitudinal cross-sectional/geospatial distribution study. An online, secure database was created from intake forms for children with cleft lip-cleft palate (N=604) in Zimbabwe (2006-2012). Univariate analysis was completed. A linear regression model was fitted to test the time trend of a child's age at the time of presentation. Unique patient addresses (n=411) were matched. Maps presenting cleft diagnosis and presentation year were created with geographic information systems (GIS) software. The median age of presentation was greater for isolated cleft palate (4.2 years, n=106) than isolated cleft lip (1.5 years, n=251) and cleft lip-cleft palate (2.0 years, n=175). Cleft lip cases were mostly left sided with equal gender distribution. The overall age of presentation remained stable (P=.83). The age of children with isolated cleft palate decreased by 0.8 years per surgical trip (P=.01), suggesting the prevalence of unrepaired cleft palate is decreasing due to local and visiting surgeons. The catchment area extended to a less populous area, but clustered around Harare and Bulawayo. This study gives Zimbabwe-specific evidence that supports reports of the persistent burden of disease requiring attention. The GIS software provided data for the primary needs assessment, which will direct communication to healthcare providers and prospective patients outside of the current catchment area. 3 © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Results: Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Conclusion: Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively. PMID:25954706

  18. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, N; John, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively.

  19. Algorithms for the treatment of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Stal, S; Klebuc, M; Taylor, T D; Spira, M; Edwards, M

    1998-10-01

    Developing standardized outcomes and algorithms of treatment is a constantly evolving task. This article examines four variables in this process: cleft type, operative technique, surgical experience, and timing. Input from international cleft lip and palate programs regarding techniques and treatment modalities provide a dynamic tool for assessment and the development of guidelines in the treatment of the cleft lip and palate patient.

  20. Incidence of cleft lip and palate in the northeast of Mexico: a 10-year study.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Davila, Feliciano

    2003-07-01

    In Latin American countries, studies on the incidence of cleft lip and palate are not widely available. A 10-year retrospective study was carried out to determine the incidence of cleft lip and palate at the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon's University Hospital. The study included data from patients who attended the plastic surgery outpatient clinic from January 1990 to December 1999. The author reviewed 10,843 files from which 376 patients were selected to identify the following variables: time of the year in which the first consultation took place, gender, birthplace, type of cleft, age of both parents, and medications taken during pregnancy. The highest incidence was found in patients aged 1 to 6 months. Ninety-four patients had a primary palate cleft; 76 had a secondary palate cleft; and 206 had primary and secondary palate clefts. The gender distribution of the 206 patients with primary and secondary clefts was 127 boys and 79 girls. The mean parent age was 29.5 years (father) and 25.7 years (mother). The incidence of cleft lip and palate in the cited hospital was 1.1:1000 births. Clefts of the left side occurred more often than of the right. Boys were affected more commonly than girls.

  1. Cleft palate in a male water buffalo calf.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Y; Ranjbar, R; Ghadiri, A R; Afsahr, F Saberi; Nejad, S Goorani; Mahabady, M Khaksary; Afrough, M; Karampoor, R; Tavakoli, A

    2007-12-15

    Congenital palatal defects are common in animals but there is only one report of water buffalo has been recorded in Iran. One died male water buffalo calf was examined after hysterotomy operation. At necropsy findings, brachygnathia, palate cleft and small lungs were diagnosed. It is the second report of water buffalo cleft palate in Iran.

  2. Muencke syndrome with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter J; Snell, Broughton; Moore, Mark H

    2013-07-01

    Muencke syndrome results from mutations in the FGFR3 gene, and although it is well recognized that the clinical presentation is variable, the important key finding includes coronal synostosis. We present a family where a mother with proven FGFR3 Pro250Arg mutation gave birth to identical twins both of whom had craniosynostosis but had coexisting bilateral cleft lip and palate. We believe that this is the first description of clefting occurring in conjunction with Muencke syndrome and so further extends the range of phenotypic variation that can occur in this syndrome.

  3. Cleft palate: players, pathways, and pursuits

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jeffrey C.; Schutte, Brian C.

    2004-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is a common human birth defect, and its causes are being dissected through studies of human populations and through the use of animal models. Mouse models in particular have made a substantial contribution to our understanding of the gene pathways involved in palate development and the nature of signaling molecules that act in a tissue-specific manner at critical stages of embryogenesis. Related work has provided further support for investigating the role of common environmental triggers as causal covariates. PMID:15199400

  4. Three-dimensional digital evaluation of dental arches in infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Viviane Mendes; Jorge, Paula Karine; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Gomide, Márcia Ribeiro; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and compare the dimensions of the dental arches on three-dimensional digital study models in children with and without cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery. The sample consisted of 223 digital models of children aged 3-9 months, divided into 5 groups: without craniofacial deformities, unilateral and bilateral incomplete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral and bilateral complete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Dental casts of the maxillary dental arches of the children were used. The dental casts underwent a process of scanning through 3D scanner and the measurements used for the correlation among groups were made on the scanned images. Statistical analysis was performed by t test and ANOVA followed by Tukey test. The results showed that the intercanine distance and anterior cleft width was wider in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. The intertuberosity distances and posterior cleft width was wider in children with bilateral cleft lip and palate among the groups. Children with cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery had wider maxillary arch dimensions than the children without cleft lip and palate.

  5. The burden of selected congenital anomalies amenable to surgery in low and middle-income regions: cleft lip and palate, congenital heart anomalies and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Hideki; Barendregt, Jan J; Kassebaum, Nicholas J; Weiser, Thomas G; Bickler, Stephen W; Vos, Theo

    2015-03-01

    To quantify the burden of selected congenital anomalies in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) that could be reduced should surgical programmes cover the entire population with access to quality care. Burden of disease and epidemiological modelling. LMICs from all global regions. All prevalent cases of selected congenital anomalies at birth in 2010. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Surgical programmes for three congenital conditions were analysed: clefts (lip and palate); congenital heart anomalies; and neural tube defects. Data from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study were used to estimate the combination of fatal burden that could be addressed by surgical care and the additional long-term non-fatal burden associated with increased survival. Of the estimated 21.6 million DALYs caused by these three conditions in LMICs, 12.4 million DALYs (57%) are potentially addressable by surgical care among the population born with such conditions. Neural tube defects have the largest potential with 76% of burden amenable by surgery, followed by clefts (59%) and congenital heart anomalies (49%). Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia have the greatest proportion of surgically addressable burden for clefts (68%), North Africa and Middle East for congenital heart anomalies (73%), and South Asia for neural tube defects (81%). There is an important and neglected role surgical programmes can play in reducing the burden of congenital anomalies in LMICs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Werker, C L; de Wilde, H; Mink van der Molen, A B; Breugem, C C

    2017-04-23

    The treatment approach for internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate differs from locally born children with cleft lip and/or palate. They are older at initial presentation, may have had treatment abroad of different quality, and are establishing new and still fragile relationships with their adoptive parents. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and initial care and treatment of this group. A retrospective cohort study was performed including all internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate presenting to the cleft team outpatient clinic in the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital between January 1994 and December 2014. Medical records of all patients were reviewed; information concerning demographic characteristics, characteristics at initial presentation, and treatment were obtained. A total number of 132 adopted patients were included: 15% had cleft lip, 7% had cleft palate, and 78% had cleft lip and palate. The average age at the time of adoption was 26.5 months. In most cases, China was the country of origin. Seventy-eight percent had surgery in their country of origin, primarily lip repair. Fistulae in need of revision surgery were found in 8% of the patients. Pharyngoplasty was needed in 48% of the patients. No significant differences were found for mean age at adoption, gender, cleft type, and one- or two-stage palatal closure. Internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate are a very diverse group of patients with challenging treatment. These children undergo surgery late and frequently need additional surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between velopharyngeal function and dental-consonant misarticulations in children with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, J; Haapanen, M L; Laitinen, J; Paaso, M; Ranta, R

    2001-06-01

    We studied the association between velopharyngeal function and misarticulation of the dental consonants /r/, /s/ and /l/ in children with cleft lip/palate. We assessed 278 6-year-old Finnish-speaking non-syndromic children (115 girls, 163 boys) with isolated cleft palate (n= 81), cleft lip/alveolus (n= 82) or unilateral (n= 84) or bilateral (n= 31) cleft lip and palate. Auditory analysis of speech and velopharyngeal function, the presence of fistulae, previous velopharyngoplasty and speech therapy, as well as surgical technique and timing of primary palatal surgery were obtained from the hospital records. The misarticulations of the sounds /r/, /s/ and /l/ were evaluated in spontaneous speech by two experienced speech pathologists from the cleft team. Velopharyngeal function was categorised, on the basis of the effect on speech, into competent, marginal incompetent and obvious incompetent. Nasal grimace and distortions due to palatal fistulae were registered. The results indicated that velopharyngeal function was not significantly associated with misarticulation of any of the sounds /r/, /s/ and /l/ or their combinations in any cleft groups. The technique and timing of primary palatal surgery, the presence of fistulae and previous pharyngoplasty were not associated with misarticulations. On the basis of these results we conclude that dental-consonant misarticulations occur independently of velopharyngeal function, primary palatal surgical technique and timing of palatoplasty.

  8. The middle ear in cleft palate children pre and post palatal closure.

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, R S

    1988-01-01

    A multicentre prospective trial was commenced in July 1984 to establish the incidence of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children born with a cleft of the palate. Additionally, the data recorded would allow an assessment of the effect of palatal closure on middle ear function. Prior to palatal closure, 97% of ears in a group of 50 patients had otitis media with effusion (OME). The insertion of a long-term ventilation tube provided a means of aeration of one ear with the non-ventilated ear acting as a control. Eighty percent of control ears had persistent OME during a 24-month follow-up period post palatal repair. It would seem that OME is universally present in children with a cleft palate prior to 4 months of age and this incidence is only marginally diminished by palatal surgery. The liaison between plastic surgical and ENT units should be even closer than before in order to manage these patients satisfactorily. PMID:3065499

  9. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  10. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  11. Primary treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate in children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yukari; Susami, Takafumi; Kochi, Shoko; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Takagi, Ritsuo; Tachimura, Takashi; Nakano, Yoko; Shibui, Takeo; Michi, Ken-ichi; Nishio, Juntaro; Hata, Yuiro

    2012-05-01

    To investigate current trends in primary treatment for children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate in Japan. Nationwide, retrospective study under the direction of the Academic Survey Committee of the Japanese Cleft Palate Association based on analysis of data obtained via a booklet-style questionnaire completed by institutions providing primary treatment for cleft lip and/or palate patients. PARTICIPANTS, PATIENTS: Patients were 4349 children undergoing primary repair for cleft lip and/or palate at 107 participating institutions between 1996 and 2000. Cleft type, laterality; use of infant palatal plate; and timing and technique of primary repair for cleft lip and/or palate were evaluated by cleft surgeons at 107 participating institutions. Of a total of 2874 patients with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only, infant palatal plates were used with 1087 (37.8%) and were not used with 1787 (62.2%). Primary unilateral lip repair was performed at the age of 2 to 6 months in more than 90% of patients. Bilateral cleft lip was treated by one-stage repair in 285 patients (44.5%) and by two-stage repair in 258 (40.2%). Primary one-stage palatal repair was performed in 2212 (76.9%) and two-stage palatal repair in 262 (9.1%) cleft palate patients. Information on treatment of the remaining 400 (14%) patients was unavailable. This investigation clarified current trends in primary treatment for cleft lip and/or palate in Japan. The results suggest the need for an increase in regional core hospitals and greater variation in treatment options.

  12. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  13. A Glance at Methods for Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolinejad, Sima; Ebrahimzadeh Bidskan, Alireza; Ashraf, Hami; Hamidi Alamdari, Daryoush

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cleft palate is the second most common birth defect and is considered as a challenge for pediatric plastic surgeons. There is still a general lack of a standard protocol and patients often require multiple surgical interventions during their lifetime along with disappointing results. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed search was undertaken using search terms including 'cleft palate repair', 'palatal cleft closure', 'cleft palate + stem cells', 'cleft palate + plasma rich platelet', 'cleft palate + scaffold', 'palatal tissue engineering', and 'bone tissue engineering'. The found articles were included if they defined a therapeutic strategy and/or assessed a new technique. Results: We reported a summary of the key-points concerning cleft palate development, the genes involving this defect, current therapeutic strategies, recently novel aspects, and future advances in treatments for easy and fast understanding of the concepts, rather than a systematic review. In addition, the results were integrated with our recent experience. Conclusions: Tissue engineering may open a new window in cleft palate reconstruction. Stem cells and growth factors play key roles in this field. PMID:25593724

  14. A model humanitarian cleft mission: 312 cleft surgeries in 7 days.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Ghulam Qadir; Gill, Nauman Ahmad; Ishaq, Irfan; Ganatra, Muhammad Ashraf; Mahmood, Farrakh; Kashif, Muhammad; Alam, Iftikhar; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Lo, Lun-Jou; Laub, Donald Rudolph

    2015-03-01

    There are many countries in the world where patients with cleft lip and palate cannot get access to specialized cleft care units. Cleft missions play an important role in providing surgical care to the areas of the world with limited resources. This article presents a model of cleft missions that can be adopted in many countries where expertise is available but resources are limited. Through proper utilization of local human resource, this type of mission can be a cost-effective and robust way of treating patients with cleft in countries with approximately 52% of the world's population. We present a case series of patients of one of our cleft missions carried out in Khairpur, Pakistan, in March 2014 over a period of 7 days. Specific details concerning the organization of mission, gathering of patients, preparation for surgery, and carrying out surgical procedures in a safe and swift manner are presented. A total of 312 patients were operated on in 7 days. There were 145 patients with cleft lip and 167 patients with cleft palate. There were 187 male and 125 female patients with mean age of 7 years. Contemporary operative techniques were utilized to repair different types of cleft lip and palate. Of 167 patients, only 16 developed fistula. A locoregional cleft team can be more effective to care for the patients with cleft in countries where surgical and other expertise can be utilized by proper organization of cleft missions on a national level.

  15. Timing of palate repair affecting growth in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue; Zheng, Qian; Lu, Dawei; Huang, Ning; Li, Jingtao; Li, Sheng; Wang, Yan; Shi, Bing

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the facial morphology characteristics of patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCCLPs) who had undergone cleft palate repair at different times. This study included 46 nonsyndromic UCCLPs and 38 age and sex matched non-cleft patients. 35 cephalometric measurements were used to evaluate the facial morphology. Student's t-test, one-way ANOVA and rank sum tests were used for comparison. Significant difference was defined at 95% level. The data showed that UCCLPs who had palatoplasty between 7 and 12 years had greater PMP-A, PMP-ANS, Ba-ANS, Ba-A, Ba-N-ANS than those operated on before 4 years of age, and UCCLPs who had palatoplasty at 4-12 years had smaller Y-axis angle than those operated on before 4 years of age. The maxillary sagittal length increased gradually as von Langenbeck repair was delayed. UCCLPs who underwent palate repair using von Langenbeck technique at 4-12 years had a more protrusive maxilla and less clockwise rotated mandible than those repaired before 4 years. UCCLPs operated using the von Langenbeck technique at 4-12 years had better head-face morphology than those operated on before 4 years. There was no difference in facial morphology among UCCLPs with palate repair at 4-12 years. Copyright © 2012 European Assocation for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modification of perioral stiffness in patients with repaired cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Steven M; Trotman, Carroll-Ann; Chu, Shin-Ying; Lee, Jaehoon

    2012-09-01

    To measure and compare the perioral stiffness among three groups of pediatric subjects: a group of patients with a repaired cleft lip (and palate) who had a secondary lip revision surgery (revision), another group of patients with repaired cleft lip (and palate) who did not have secondary surgery (nonrevision), and a group of noncleft "normal" patients (noncleft). A parallel, three-group, nonrandomized clinical trial. A total of 16 patients with repaired cleft lip/palate who did not have lip revision, 13 patients with repaired cleft lip/palate who had lip revision surgery and were tested at 18 to 24 months postsurgery, and 27 noncleft patients. Nonparticipatory perioral stiffness was sampled using a recently developed face-referenced measurement technology known as OroSTIFF. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force and interangle lip span, was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force for each of the three groups. This nonlinear stiffness growth function was significantly elevated in the nonrevision patients compared with the noncleft controls and is likely due to the presence of scar tissue in the upper lip; it was significantly lower among patients with cleft lip/palate who completed lip revision surgery. This study demonstrates the efficacy of applying an objective measurement to map differences in perioral tissue biomechanics among patients born with orofacial clefts.

  17. [Analysis of psychological condition of parents with cleft lip and/or palate children].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei-lei; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Shi, Wen-lan

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the psychological situations of cleft lip and/or palate children's parents, to discuss the relationship between psychological situations and cleft types, and to provide clinical treatment to improve the psychological situations of these parents. 100 parents whose children were proceeded the primary surgery treatment were selected as the study group, and other 34 parents whose children were normal as the control group. All parents were inquired and tested by the life event scale (LES) and self-rating anxiety scale (SAS). The LES total scores of the cleft lip and/or palate patients' parents were significantly high compared with the normal (P < 0.05). The SAS total scores of the cleft lip and/or palate patients' parents had no significant difference with the control group (P > 0.05). The scores of cleft lip and/or palate patients' parents were the highest and the scores of cleft palate patients' parents were the lowest. Most of the cleft lip and/or palate patients' parents were disturbed by a negative psychological situation. Some kind of negative psychological situation may manifest some body symptoms. Meanwhile,the three subgroups' data had the significant difference, which indicated that parents may much more care about the appearance abnormality.

  18. Long-Term Otologic and Audiometric Outcomes in Patients with Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Imbery, Terence E; Sobin, Lindsay B; Commesso, Emily; Koester, Lindsey; Tatum, Sherard A; Huang, Danning; Wang, Dongliang; Nicholas, Brian D

    2017-10-01

    Objective Describe longitudinal audiometric and otologic outcomes in patients with cleft palates. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Single academic medical center. Methods Charts of 564 patients with a diagnosis of cleft palate (59% syndromic etiology, 41% nonsyndromic) from 1998 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients without at least 1 audiometric follow-up were excluded from analysis. Patient demographics, surgeries, audiometric tests, and otologic data were recorded for 352 patients. Results Forty-five percent had isolated cleft palates, 34% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 21% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. Patients were followed for a mean of 50.3 months with a mean of 3.2 separate audiograms performed. Patients received a mean of 2.93 pressure equalization tubes. Increased number of pressure equalization tubes was not associated with incidence of cholesteatoma, which was identified in only 4 patients. Nine patients underwent eventual tympanoplasty with an 89% closure rate. Analysis of mean air-bone gap by cleft type did not reveal significant differences ( P = .08), but conductive losses and abnormal tympanometry persisted into teenage years. Conclusions Patients with cleft palates have eustachian tube dysfunction, which, in our cohort, resulted in persistent conductive hearing loss, highlighting the importance of long-term follow-up. Cholesteatoma incidence was low and not associated with number of tubes, which at our institution were placed prophylactically. Tympanoplasty was successful in those with persistent perforations.

  19. Subcutaneous C Shape Muscular Flap for Correcting the Depression of Alar Base in Affected Side in Patients With Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip/Palate During Primary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dandan; Wang, Guomin; Ouyang, Ningjuan; Lin, Yuhen; Chen, Yang; Dai, Jiewen

    2017-06-01

    The depression of alar base in affected side in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip/palate (CL/P) is one of common clinical features. In this study, the authors try to explore the effect of subcutaneous C shape muscular flap for correcting the depression of alar base in affected side in patients with unilateral complete CL/P during primary surgery. A total of 30 patients with unilateral complete CL/P who received primary correction of the lip nose deformity were included in this study. The C flap was used to drop and lengthen the height of upper lip in unaffected side, and the subcutaneous muscular flap was dissected from the C flap and positioned at the alar base in the affected side of upper lip to correct the depression. Then the surgical effect was evaluated based on clinical examination during follow-up. Alar base symmetry was obtained in 26 patients of this case series, and 4 patients showed slight improvement in alar base symmetry. No major complications such as flap necrosis, infection, or hypertrophic scars were observed during surgery and follow-up. No additional incisions and operative time were necessary. The subcutaneous C shape muscular flap described in this article could offer enough muscular support and markedly correct the depression of nostril and alar base in affected side in primary lip nose repair with no additional incisions and operative time for patients with unilateral complete CL/P.

  20. Hematological parameters in patients of cleft lip and cleft palate with special reference to eosinophil counts.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Shipra; Negi, Gita; Chandra, Harish; Chandra, Smita; Gaur, Dushyant Singh; Rajan, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Birth abnormalities like cleft lip and cleft palate account for about 1.4 per 1000 live births in India. These are seen to be associated with a high incidence of eosinophilia which delays the surgical management of these patients. The aim of this paper is to study the hematological parameters in patients of cleft lip and cleft palate. A total of 223 cases of cleft lip and cleft palate were taken up for the study. Hematological parameters including hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, absolute eosinophil count, and red cell indices were studied. Anemia was found in 182/223 (81.63%) cases which was most commonly of microcytic hypochromic type. Eosinophilia was seen in 46/223 (20.60%) cases. Many cleft lip and cleft palate patients show high eosinophil counts. Absolute eosinophil count was found to be a better parameter for assessment of eosinophils.

  1. Early Speech Production of Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, Theresa; Broen, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    The study comparing word-initial target phonemes and phoneme production of five toddlers with cleft palate and five normal toddlers found that the cleft palate children tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels and fewer words with word-initial stops, fricatives, and affricates than normal children. (Author/DB)

  2. Single-Word Intelligibility in Speakers with Repaired Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara; Chau, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Many speakers with repaired cleft palate have reduced intelligibility, but there are limitations with current procedures for assessing intelligibility. The aim of this study was to construct a single-word intelligibility test for speakers with cleft palate. The test used a multiple-choice identification format, and was based on phonetic contrasts…

  3. [Repair of palatal fistulae in cleft patients].

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Traoré, H; Gilliot, B; Taupin, A; Ory, L; Guillou Jamard, M-R; Labbé, D; Compère, J-F

    2011-06-01

    Treatment of oronasal fistulae in cleft patients remains a surgical challenge because of its high failure rate. The authors report the results of an aggressive surgical technique using the total elevation of palatal mucoperiosteum, even for small fistulae. This approach was used on twelve consecutive patients, from five to 33 years of age, presenting with a Pittsburgh classification type IV palatal fistulae. The surgical procedure was total elevation of the hard palate mucoperiosteum starting from the dental sulcus combined with sealed double layer sutures. Clinical and photographical control was made at least 6 months after to detect a possible relapse. The success rate was 100%. No relapsing fistula was observed with follow-up ranging from 6 to 36 months. This technique allows wide exposure and safe closure of the nasal layer. It is simple and leaves no raw bone surface exposed and no additional scar. The authors think it can be used in all type IV fistulae less than 1cm wide. Several other surgical techniques have been described to close palatal fistulae: local turnover flaps, pedicled flaps from adjacent oral tissue, tongue flaps, tissue expansion, and even free flaps. Obturator prostheses have also been used. The technique we report, even if more aggressive, seems to be more reliable with fewer relapse and sequelae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of rotation flap in repair of cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Durucu, Cengiz; Isik, Yasemin; Atik, Bekir; Kocak, Omer Faruk; Karatas, Erkan; Bekerecioglu, Mehmet

    2011-07-01

    Although cleft palate anomaly is frequent, the criterion standards in surgical treatment have not been determined yet. There are a few techniques described for cleft palate repair owing to the limited tissue in the palatal mucosa, the rigid structure of the palatal mucosa, and the limited vascularity of the hard palate. In this study, a novel cleft palate repair technique based on separating the soft palate from the hard palate as a musculomucosal flap and using it as a rotation flap has been described. The operation is evaluated individually for each anomaly because variations occur in the surgical technique according to the extension of the cleft toward the teeth in the palate. This operation was performed on a total of 28 patients (17 girls and 11 boys) aged between 1.5 and 16 years and presented to our clinic. Patients were assessed for speech analysis outcomes, tympanogram values, hearing functions, magnitude of palatal lengthening during the operation, and rate of fistulae. Statistically significant differences in values of the speech analysis and the audiometric assessment were determined between before and 6 months after surgery. Complete recovery of otitis was observed 1 month after surgery without another treatment in 9 (42.8%) of 21 patients who were detected to have serous otitis media preoperatively. Tension-free closure, lower risk of fistula, good restoration of velopharyngeal functions, ability to be performed on all types of cleft palate, ability to provide a good intraoperative exposure, and being a single stage seem to be the most important advantages of this technique.

  5. One-Stage Cleft Lip and Palate Repair in an Older Population.

    PubMed

    Guneren, Ethem; Canter, Halil Ibrahim; Yildiz, Kemalettin; Kayan, Resit Burak; Ozpur, Mustafa Aykut; Baygol, Emre Gonenc; Sagir, Haci Omer; Kuzu, Ismail Melih; Akman, Onur; Arslan, Serap

    2015-07-01

    In underdeveloped countries one-stage definitive repair of cleft lip and palate is considered for late-presenting patients. A total of 25 patients with unoperated cleft lip and palate more than 2 years of age were enrolled in this study for one-stage simultaneous repair of cleft lip and palate. According to Veau-Wardill-Kilner push-back technique, 2 flap palatoplasties were performed for palatal repairs; all of the lips were repaired with the Millard II rotation-advancement technique. The authors experienced no perioperative or postoperative life-threatening complications. With respect to the registered operation periods, longer times were required to perform these double operations, but this elongation is shorter than the sum of the periods if the 2 operations had been performed separately. Although the authors were unable to evaluate the late postoperative results because the authors could not follow-up the patients after they were discharged the day after surgery, the early results related to the success of the operation without any surgical complication were prone to meet the parents' and patients' expectations. The authors presented their experiences with many volunteer cleft lip and palate trips to third world countries; however the structure of this article is not a new hypothesis and data based to support a scientific study, but observations are objective to get a conclusion. To perform one-stage definitive repair of the cleft lip and palate in late-presented patients was the reality that they had only 1 chance to undergo these operations. According to the terms and conditions of this challenging operation, one-stage simultaneous repair of cleft lip and palate is a more demanding and time-consuming procedure than is isolated cleft lip repair or cleft palate repair. Although technically challenging, single-stage repair of the whole deformity in late-presenting patients is a feasible, reliable, successful, and safe procedure in authors' experience.

  6. Use of buccal myomucosal flap for palatal lengthening in cleft palate patient: Experience of 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Don; Datta, Shubharanjan; Varghese, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the buccal myomucosal flap in secondary repairs of cleft palate in 20 patients. Patients and Methods: Totally, 20 patients, who underwent secondary palatoplasty between 5 years and 8 years in which a buccal myomucosal flap was used, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients had undergone at least one previous attempted repair at other institutions. Indications for the secondary repair included velopharyngeal incompetence and/or oronasal fistula. Patients were evaluated preoperatively for oronasal fistula status, velopharyngeal competence, nasal resonance, speech quality, and nasal escape. Results: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased. In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive Conclusion: Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs. Minimum donor site morbidity and complication makes the buccal flap a useful armamentarium of a cleft surgeon. PMID:25821372

  7. Postoperative Speech Outcomes and Complications in Submucous Cleft Palate Patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Seo; Bae, Yong Chan; Nam, Su Bong; Kang, Kyung Dong; Sung, Ji Yoon

    2016-05-01

    The postoperative speech outcomes of submucous cleft palate (SMCP) surgery are known to be poorer than those of other types of cleft palate. We attempted to objectively characterize the postoperative complications and speech outcomes of the surgical treatment of SMCP through a comparison with the outcomes of incomplete cleft palate (ICP). This study included 53 SMCP patients and 285 ICP patients who underwent surgical repair from 1998 to 2015. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 3.9±1.9 years for the SMCP patients and 1.3±0.9 years for the ICP patients. A retrospective analysis was performed of the complications, the frequency of subsequent surgical correction for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), and speech outcomes. In both the SMCP and ICP patients, no cases of respiratory difficulty, bleeding, or wound disruption were noted. Delayed wound healing and fistula occurred in 18.9% and 5.7% of the SMCP patients and in 14% and 3.2% of the ICP patients, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference in either delayed wound healing or fistula occurrence was observed between the two groups. The rate of surgical correction for VPD in the SMCP group was higher than in the ICP group. In the subset of 26 SMCP patients and 62 ICP patients who underwent speech evaluation, the median speech score value was 58.8 in the SMCP group and 66 in the ICP group, which was a statistically significant difference. SMCP and ICP were found to have similar complication rates, but SMCP had significantly worse speech outcomes.

  8. Cleft Palate Habilitation; Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Cleft Palate Habilitation (5th, Syracuse University, New York, May 11-12, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencione, Ruth M., Ed.

    With emphasis on the growing interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of cleft palate, Ruth M. Lencione introduces the subject covering incidence, causes, and classification. Richard B. Stark discusses surgery of the primary pharyngeal flap and E. Harris Nober presents a review of the literature on hearing problems. Aubrey L. Ruess examined…

  9. Cleft Palate Habilitation; Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Cleft Palate Habilitation (5th, Syracuse University, New York, May 11-12, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencione, Ruth M., Ed.

    With emphasis on the growing interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of cleft palate, Ruth M. Lencione introduces the subject covering incidence, causes, and classification. Richard B. Stark discusses surgery of the primary pharyngeal flap and E. Harris Nober presents a review of the literature on hearing problems. Aubrey L. Ruess examined…

  10. Maxillary growth in patients with complete cleft lip and palate, operated on around 4-6 months of age.

    PubMed

    Ysunza, Antonio; Pamplona, Ma C; Quiroz, Julio; Yudovich, Manuel; Molina, Fernando; González, Stephanie; Chavelas, Katia

    2010-05-01

    The controversy about timing of cleft palate repair has been focused on early closure for improved speech versus delayed repair for enhancing maxillary growth. Early palatal repair enhances phonological development decreasing the frequency of articulation disorders associated with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). In contrast, it has been described that early surgery adversely affects maxillary growth. The purpose of this paper is to study maxillary growth in a group of cleft palate patients operated on around 4-6 months of age, and receiving further orthodontic treatment. A group of 20 cleft palate patients, who were subjected to early minimal incision palatopharyngoplasty around 4-6 months of age, were followed for a minimum of 10 years (range: 10-14 years). All patients received the same orthodontic management, starting at 4 years of age. None of the patients had orthognatic surgery or alveolar bone grafting. After orthodontic treatment, their cephalometric data were compared with a group of subjects without cleft lip and palate, matched by gender and who were within the age range of the cleft palate group. SNA, SNB, ANB, and WITS cephalometric measures were compared. A non-significant difference was found in all measurements between the two groups. Early cleft palate repair enhances phonological development. Although maxillary growth is affected in cleft palate patients, appropriate orthodontic treatment can achieve normal maxillary growth as measured during adolescence. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Otologic Concerns for Cleft Lip and Palate Patient.

    PubMed

    Berryhill, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Understanding eustachian tube physiology and anticipating probable eustachian tube dysfunction is an important component of cleft palate management. This article provides a brief summary of the otologic physiology and issues that may be of concern to cleft palate management. It is of critical importance not only to provide primary closure of the cleft palate, but also to recognize that along with speech, hearing has a critical component to the educational and social success of all individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  13. Anterior pillarplasty: a modification in cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Çelebiler, Özhan; Ersoy, Burak; Numanoğlu, Ayhan

    2011-07-01

    After the primary repair of cleft palate, surgeons are frequently confronted with a short soft palate and a wide velopharyngeal space, both of which are known to diminish the quality of speech. We introduce a new modification of the primary repair of cleft palate that lengthens the soft palate and helps to reduce the volume of the velopharyngeal space. Ten patients younger than 12 months with nonsyndromic cleft palate were operated on with this technique. The incision at the cleft margin extended behind the uvula as a modification to the classic design of mucoperiosteal flaps. The sagittally divided mucosal layers of each anterior tonsillar pillar are sutured at the midline 1 cm posterior to the new uvula. The rate of postoperative fistula formation and other complications were evaluated postoperatively. One patient had a uvular and partly pillar detachment at the postoperative period. All other clefts healed without complication. The primary repair of the cleft palate with the anterior pillarplasty technique is a safe and easy-to-perform procedure. This modification can effectively reduce the transverse diameter of the velopharyngeal space and increase the anteroposterior length of the palate.

  14. Evolution of my philosophy in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Brusati, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    At the end of 50-year-long clinical activity, the evolution of my approach to the treatment of unilateral cleft of the lip and palate is discussed. I had several teachers in this field (Rusconi, Reherman, Perko, Delaire, Talmant, Sommerlad and others) and I introduced in my approach what I considered to be improvements from all of them. My current protocol is related to the anatomy of the cleft: for wide clefts a two-stage protocol is applied (1° step: soft palate and lip and nose repair; 2° step: hard palate repair with gingivoalveoloplasty); for narrow cleft (less than 1 cm at the posterior border of hard palate) an "all in one" protocol is performed with or without gingivoalveoloplasty (in accordance to the presence or absence of contact between the stumps at alveolar level). The most important details regarding surgery of the lip and palate are discussed. Robust data collection on speech and skeletal growth is still needed to determine whether the "all in one" approach can be validated as the treatment of choice for unilateral complete lip and palate cleft in selected cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Initial cleft severity and maxillary growth in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Ting; Liao, Yu-Fang; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting

    2011-08-01

    Initial cleft severity in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) varies. This is reflected in the sizes of the cleft and the palate. The purpose of this retrospective study was to establish whether there is a relationship between cleft severity at birth and growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 29 infants with nonsyndromic complete UCLP were used to measure the sizes of the cleft and the palate. The later growth of the maxilla was determined by using cephalometric radiographs taken at age 9. Statistical analyses were performed with multiple linear regression. The results showed a relationship between cleft area and maxillary protrusion (SNA, P <0.05). Also, there was a relationship between palate area and maxillary width (P <0.05). These data suggest that in patients with complete UCLP there is a significant relationship between initial cleft severity and maxillary growth. Patients with a small cleft area have a more protruded maxilla than do those with a large cleft area. Patients with a large palate area have a wider maxilla than those with a small palate area. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is cleft severity related to maxillary growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate?

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Ting; Liao, Yu-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To study the relationship of cleft severity and maxillary growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. A systematic literature review. A literature survey from the PubMed database from January 1966 to December 2008 used the Medical Subject Headings terms facial growth, unilateral cleft lip palate, cephalometry, and cleft severity or cleft width. The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal from 1964 to November 2008 was hand searched. Studies published as full-length articles reporting quantitative data on the relationship of cleft severity and written in English were selected. Two reviewers selected and extracted the data independently and also assessed the quality of the studies. Four studies met the selection criteria and were included in the review. All were retrospective and longitudinal. Quality analysis revealed medium to low level of the included studies. Heterogeneity of the studies prevented major conclusions about the relationship of a severe cleft and unfavorable maxillary forward growth. The review has highlighted the importance of further research. Further well-designed controlled studies and long-term studies are needed, and researchers have to consider combined assessment of cleft size and palate size. Further studies should also focus on the cleft severity at birth and at the time of palate repair.

  17. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  18. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  19. Contributions within dental science to cleft lip/palate management: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J W; Russell, R

    1994-01-01

    Dentistry has consistently provided cleft lip/palate care with new advancements in management and technology. However, there is a significant disparity in the general knowledge base of the general dental and medical practitioner regarding this relatively common orofacial deformity. Fortunately, contributions from the dental arts continue to provide momentum and major influence in the cleft-care arena. Modifications in pharyngeal flap procedures for management of velopharyngeal incompetence have been advanced by oral and maxillofacial surgery. Application of contemporary integrated prosthesis technologies to cleft dental habilitation are now being used. Recently, significant contributions to cleft lip/palate science from the realm of fetal surgery and fetal wound healing may eventually have broader applications and benefit all facets of health care.

  20. A review of cleft lip and palate management: Experience of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Osunde, Otasowie Daniel; Akpasa, Izegboya Olohitae

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip (CL) and palate (CLP) management is multidisciplinary. A cleft team was formed in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital to address the health needs of cleft patients in the centre. Aim: This paper aims at documenting the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) management protocol for orofacial clefts and also to review our experience with CLP surgeries performed at AKTH since our partnering with Smile Train. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all the cleft patients surgically treated from January 2006 to December 2014 under Smile Train sponsorship was undertaken. A descriptive narrative of the cleft team protocol was also given. Results: One hundred and fifty-five patients (80 males, 75 females) had surgical repairs of either the lip or palate. CL patients were 83 (53.55%), while CLP patients were 45 (29.03%) and isolated cleft palate patients were 27 (17.42%). Conclusion: The inclusion of various specialities in the cleft team is highly desirable. Poverty level amongst our patients frequently limits our management to surgical treatment sponsored by the Smile Train, despite the presence of other residual problems. PMID:26712291

  1. A review of cleft lip and palate management: Experience of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Osunde, Otasowie Daniel; Akpasa, Izegboya Olohitae

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip (CL) and palate (CLP) management is multidisciplinary. A cleft team was formed in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital to address the health needs of cleft patients in the centre. This paper aims at documenting the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) management protocol for orofacial clefts and also to review our experience with CLP surgeries performed at AKTH since our partnering with Smile Train. A retrospective review of all the cleft patients surgically treated from January 2006 to December 2014 under Smile Train sponsorship was undertaken. A descriptive narrative of the cleft team protocol was also given. One hundred and fifty-five patients (80 males, 75 females) had surgical repairs of either the lip or palate. CL patients were 83 (53.55%), while CLP patients were 45 (29.03%) and isolated cleft palate patients were 27 (17.42%). The inclusion of various specialities in the cleft team is highly desirable. Poverty level amongst our patients frequently limits our management to surgical treatment sponsored by the Smile Train, despite the presence of other residual problems.

  2. Factors contributing to hearing impairment in patients with cleft lip/palate in Malaysia: A prospective study of 346 ears.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Jack Pein; Soo, Siew Shuin; Manuel, Anura Michelle

    2016-09-01

    To determine the factors contributing towards hearing impairment in patients with cleft lip/palate. A prospective analysis was conducted on 173 patients (346 ears) with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) who presented to the combined cleft clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) over 12 months. The patients' hearing status was determined using otoacoustic emission (OAE), pure tone audiometry (PTA) and auditory brainstem response (ABR). These results were analysed against several parameters, which included age, gender, race, types of cleft pathology, impact and timing of repair surgery. The patients' age ranged from 1-26 years old. They comprised 30% with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), 28% with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), 28% with isolated cleft palate (ICP) and 14% with isolated cleft lip (ICL). Majority of the patients (68.2%) had normal otoscopic findings. Out of the 346 ears, 241 ears (70%) ears had passed the hearing tests. There was no significant relationship between patients' gender and ethnicity with their hearing status. The types of cleft pathology significantly influenced the outcome of PTA and ABR screening results (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the repaired and unrepaired cleft groups and the outcome of hearing tests. However, hearing improvement occurred when palatal repair was performed at the age of <1year old (OR = 2.37, CI 1.2 = 4.6, p = 0.01). Majority of the cleft patients had normal hearing (70%). Hearing threshold varied significantly between the different types of cleft pathology. Surgery conferred no significant impact on the hearing outcome unless surgery was performed at the age of <1 year old. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cleft lip and palate: series of unusual clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Paranaíba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Miranda, Roseli Teixeira de; Martelli, Daniella Reis Barbosa; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Almeida, Hudson de; Orsi Júnior, Julian Miranda; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face, corresponding to approximately 65% of all malformations of the craniofacial region. to describe unusual clinical cases of non-syndromic CL/P (CL/PNS), diagnosed in a reference service in Minas Gerais, Brazil, and correlate these alterations with possible risk factors. we carried out a retrospective study, between the years of 1992 and the 1st half of 2009, from medical records. Among the 778 cases of CL/PNS diagnosed in the period of 17 years, 5 (0.64%) were unusual CL/PNS, and all patients were male. It was found that among the 5 patients, 2 had incomplete right cleft lip with incomplete cleft palate, 2 were affected by left incomplete cleft lip and incomplete cleft palate, and 1 had a cleft lip and palate associated with complete right cleft palate. Risk factors such as consanguinity, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption, medication usage during pregnancy, history of abortion and/or stillbirths and maternal diseases were not associated with unusual CL/PNS. This study described 5 unusual cases of CL/PNS in a Brazilian population; no associations with the risk factors analyzed were seen. It also confirmed the unusualness of the prevalence of such alterations.

  4. Multivariate analysis on unilateral cleft lip and palate treatment outcome by EUROCRAN index: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ching Ching; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Rahman, Shaifulizan Abdul

    2016-10-01

    This study is to evaluate the dental arch relationship and palatal morphology of unilateral cleft lip and palate patients by using EUROCRAN index, and to assess the factors that affect them using multivariate statistical analysis. A total of one hundred and seven patients from age five to twelve years old with non-syndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate were included in the study. These patients have received cheiloplasty and one stage palatoplasty surgery but yet to receive alveolar bone grafting procedure. Five assessors trained in the use of the EUROCRAN index underwent calibration exercise and ranked the dental arch relationships and palatal morphology of the patients' study models. For intra-rater agreement, the examiners scored the models twice, with two weeks interval in between sessions. Variable factors of the patients were collected and they included gender, site, type and, family history of unilateral cleft lip and palate; absence of lateral incisor on cleft side, cheiloplasty and palatoplasty technique used. Associations between various factors and dental arch relationships were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Dental arch relationship among unilateral cleft lip and palate in local population had relatively worse scoring than other parts of the world. Crude logistics regression analysis did not demonstrate any significant associations among the various socio-demographic factors, cheiloplasty and palatoplasty techniques used with the dental arch relationship outcome. This study has limitations that might have affected the results, example: having multiple operators performing the surgeries and the inability to access the influence of underlying genetic predisposed cranio-facial variability. These may have substantial influence on the treatment outcome. The factors that can affect unilateral cleft lip and palate treatment outcome is multifactorial in nature and remained controversial in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  5. Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and Palate: 9. Parental report of social and emotional experiences related to their 5-year-old child's cleft diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Feragen, Kristin Billaud; Rumsey, Nichola; Heliövaara, Arja; Boysen, Betty Marie; Johannessen, Emma Christine; Havstam, Christina; Marcusson, Agneta; Nyberg, Jill; Pedersen, Nina-Helen; Bogh-Nielsen, Joan; Eyres, Philip; Bradbury, Eileen; Semb, Gunvor

    2017-02-01

    Parents of children with a cleft lip and palate may be emotionally affected by the child's diagnosis. Their experiences and perceptions are important when evaluating the complexity of satisfactory treatment outcomes. The objective was to examine parents' social and emotional experiences related to their child's cleft diagnosis, and their perceptions of the child's adjustment to living with a visible difference. International multicentre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. A cohort of 448 children born with a non-syndromic UCLP were included. A total of 356 parents completed the Scandcleft Parent Questionnaire. The majority of parents experienced practical and emotional support from family, friends, and health professionals. Nevertheless, parents had to cope with other people's reactions to the cleft, experiences that were described as ranging from hurtful to neutral and/or positive. According to parents, 39% of the children had experienced cleft-related comments and/or teasing. More than half of the parents reported specific worries related to their child's future. While the majority of the parents experienced positive support and coped well with the child's diagnosis, some parents were at risk for psychological and emotional challenges that should be identified by the cleft team. To optimise outcomes and the child's adjustment, these parents should be offered psychological support when necessary. ISRCTN29932826.

  6. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  7. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  8. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (p<0.01). Usually, cleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  9. A descriptive epidemiology study of cleft lip and palate in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Lithovius, Riitta H; Ylikontiola, Leena P; Harila, Virpi; Sándor, George K

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate in a population uniquely from Northern Finland. The records of a total of 214 cleft patients treated between 1998-2011 at the Oulu Cleft Lip and Palate Center at the University of Oulu were assessed on a retrospective basis. Data regarding cleft type, sex and side of cleft was collected and analyzed. Family history of clefting was investigated. Cleft palate (68.7%) was most frequently found, followed by cleft lip and palate (18.7%) and cleft lip with or without alveolus (12.6%). Cleft palate occurred more frequently in females (63.3%) and cleft lip and palate was more frequently found in males (62.5%). The left side was more frequently affected in both male and female patients. Left-sided clefts were observed in 82% of patients compared to right-sided clefts in 18%. A family history of clefting was detected in 20.1% of patients. The incidence of clefts in Northern Finland is higher than the corresponding incidence in other European countries. Cleft palate was the most frequent cleft type and it was more frequent in females. In males, cleft lip and palate was more frequent. The left side was more frequently affected in both genders. One fifth of the patients had a family history of clefts.

  10. Roberts-SC syndrome, a rare syndrome and cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Jyotsna; Dewan, Madhu; Hussain, Altaf

    2008-07-01

    Roberts SC syndrome is a rare syndrome with only 17 previously recognized patients reported in medical literature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple malformations, particularly, symmetrical limb reduction, craniofacial anomalies such as bilateral cleft lip and palate, micrognathia, and severe growth and mental retardation. Our patient, a young child of five years having Roberts-SC, was successfully operated for cleft palate under general anesthesia. The main features of the syndrome and the technical problems of anesthesia and surgery are discussed in this report.

  11. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  12. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  13. Prosthetic management of soft palate cleft--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dosumu, O O; Ogunrinde, T J; Ogundipe, O T

    2006-09-01

    The treatment of cleft in the soft palate can be achieved essentially by surgical reconstruction or prosthetic obturation. The goals of prosthetic intervention are to prevent food and liquid leakage into the nose and to improve speech intelligibility by ensuring functional velopharyngeal port closure. In this report, the prosthetic management of a 5-year-old child with soft palatal cleft is presented. The impression of the cleft was taken with tissue conditioner, Visco -gel, TM (De Trey, Amalgamated Dental London) and the pharyngeal obturator (speech bulb) was made in clear acrylic resin. Patient tolerated the appliance well and was referred to speech therapist for speech articulation.

  14. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shaila; Chacko, Reena Annie; Thomas, Abi M; Singh, Namita; Thomas, Rodny; Abraham, Deena

    2014-01-01

    A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient's weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury.

  15. Proper size of endotracheal tube for cleft lip and palate patients and intubation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Abdollahifakhim, Shahin; Sheikhzadeh, Dariush; Shahidi, Nikzad; Nojavan, Gholamreza; Bayazian, Gholamreza; Aleshi, Hamideh

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify the proper size of endotracheal tube for intubation of cleft lip and palate patients and intubation outcomes in these patients. In this analytic cross-sectional study, 60 nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate patients were selected who had surgery between April 2010 and April 2012 at Pediatrics Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Demographic findings, previous admissions, and surgical history were registered. The proper tube size was measured by normal children formulas. Then tube size was confirmed by patients' minimum resistance to intubation, proper ventilation reported by anesthesiologist, and appropriate air leakage at an airway pressure of 15-20 cm H₂O. If intubation was unsuccessful then smaller size of endotracheal tube would be tried. Frequency of intubation trials and the biggest endotracheal tube size were recorded. Their average age, weight and height were 21.39 ± 4.95 months, 9.97 ± 1.18 kg and 74.30 ± 26.61 cm, respectively. The average tracheal tube size and frequency of intubation trials were 4.34 ± 0.78 and 1.63 ± 0.80, respectively. Seven cases required an endotracheal tube size smaller than the recommended size for that age including one case in unilateral cleft palate, three cases in unilateral cleft lip, one case in unilateral cleft lip and palate, and two cases in bilateral cleft lip and palate. Findings proved that considering subglottic stenosis incidence in these children, it is reasonable to determine the tube size for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate patients by applying the currently available standards for normal children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pre Surgical Nasoalveolar Molding: Changing Paradigms in Early Cleft Lip and Palate Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Prashanth Sadashiva; Deshmukh, Seema; Bhagyalakshmi, A; Srilatha, KT

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alveolar and nasal reconstruction for patients with cleft lip and palate is a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. Various procedures have been attempted to reduce the cleft gap so as to obtain esthetic results post surgically. Yet there is need of continuous exploration of newer and better methods. Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate generally requires a team approach with paedodontists playing a major role of performing nasoalveolar molding. Presurgical Nasoalveolar Molding (PNAM) was introduced to reshape the alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair. Over the time there have been changes in the concepts of the same. To assess these changing concepts a pubmed search was performed with different related terminologies and articles over a period of 30 years were obtained. Among the articles retrieved, studies performed over different concepts in early management of cleft lip and palate was selected for the systematic review. Aims This paper describes the changing paradigms in the management of patients with cleft lip and palate, focuses on the current concept of Presurgical nasoalveolar molding(PNAM) and discusses the long term benefits of the same. Conclusion The concept of the management of cleft lip and palate has changed over the time with more emphasis on the nasal and alveolar molding prior to the primary lip repair. This molding reduces the number reconstructive surgeries performed later for the purpose of esthetics. How to cite this article: Murthy P S, Deshmukh S, Bhagyalakshmi A, Srilatha K T. Pre Surgical Nasoalveolar Molding: Changing Paradigms in Early Cleft Lip and Palate Rehabilitation. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):76-86. PMID:24155594

  17. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  18. 3-D shape analysis of palatal surface in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Rusková, Hana; Bejdová, Sárka; Peterka, Miroslav; Krajíček, Václav; Velemínská, Jana

    2014-07-01

    Facial development of patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) is associated with many problems including deformity of the palate. The aim of this study was to evaluate palatal morphology and variability in patients with UCLP compared with Czech norms using methods of geometric morphometrics. The study was based on virtual dental cast analysis of 29 UCLP patients and 29 control individuals at the age of 15 years. The variability of palatal shape in UCLP patients was greater than that in nonclefted palates. Only 24% of clefted palates fell within the variability of controls. The palatal form of UCLP patients (range from 11.8 to 17.2 years) was not correlated with age. Compared with control palates, palates of UCLP patients were narrower, more anteriorly than posteriorly. Apart from the praemaxilla region, they were also shallower, and the difference increased posteriorly. The UCLP palate was characterised by the asymmetry of its vault. The maximum height of the palatal vault was anterior on the clefted side, whereas it was posterior on the nonclefted side. The slope of the UCLP palate was more inclined compared with the control group. The praemaxilla was therefore situated more inferiorly.

  19. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central guatemala.

    PubMed

    Matute, Jorge; Lydick, Elaine A; Torres, Olga R; Owen, Karen K; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the number of new cases of cleft lip and cleft palate in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, in 2012. Cross-sectional survey of midwives from communities identified through a two-stage cluster-sampling process. Midwives were asked how many babies they had delivered in the past year and how many of those newborns had various types of birth defects, as illustrated in pictures. Indigenous Mayan communities in rural north-central Guatemala. Midwives (n = 129) who had delivered babies in the previous year. Reports of babies born with cleft lip and cleft palate. A 1-year prevalence rate of 18.9 per 10,000 for cleft lip and 4.7 per 10,000 for cleft palate was estimated for Alta Verapaz. None of the cases of cleft lip also had cleft palate. The indigenous communities in north-central Guatemala might have a relatively high cleft lip prevalence rate compared with the global average.

  20. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:23213503

  1. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  2. Enhancing accessibility of patients with cleft lip/palate to healthcare services via a cleft birth registration system.

    PubMed

    Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2014-10-01

    Cleft lip/palate is a critical health problem in Thailand; with an incidence rate of 2.49/1,000 live births. To insure the best outcomes, surgery should be performed near the age of three months. However; during the years 1993-2007, only 39.7% of children with a cleft lip/palate underwent an operation by the age of 3-4 months and only 58.18% by the age of 9-12 months. The purpose of the study is to determine if a cleft birth registry might facilitate timely and proper treatment for children with a cleft lip/palate. A pilot cleft birth registry, developed by the Tawanchai Cleft Center, was made available to hospitals in Khon Kaen, Roi-et, Kalasin, and Mahasarakam provinces, Thailand. Ninety-eight personnel involved in the care of children with a cleft lip/palate were recruited from the participating hospitals to evaluate the system. Assigned to one offour focus groups, participants were asked to evaluate the pilot system in terms of satisfaction and benefit. Following the focus groups, those participants that were traditionally responsible for registration were asked to use the cleft birth registry to register any newborns with a cleft lip/palate that were encountered in the course of their duties. Records were examined to determine how many newborns were properly registered and for those registered, whether proper care was received in a timely manner With 78 focus group participants responding to the satisfaction survey, results indicated mostly high levels of satisfaction with 26 (33%) participants rating satisfaction as very good, 49 (63%) as good and 3 (4%) as fair No participant rated satisfaction below fair. Furthermore, a majority stated that the cleft birth registy would benefit patients and contribute to timely treatment. During two years of active use, one hundred and thirty-seven newborns with a cleft lip/palate were registered into this cleft birth registry. Subsequent examination showed that eighty-eight percent ofregistered cases received proper

  3. Aerodynamic studies of cleft-palate speech.

    PubMed

    Dickson, S; Barron, S; McGlone, R E

    1978-05-01

    The aerodynamic oral-nasal factors related to the speech of two groups of cleft-palate children were evaluated. One group presented hypernasality and the other group presented normal nasal resonance. The aerodynamic parameters evaluated were oral pressure, nasal flow, and flow-pressure ratio (nasal flow/oral pressure). Oral temperature readings were also obtained. These parameters were evaluated under three conditions (1) blowing, (2) vocalizing the vowel /i/, and (3) reading eight sentences representing two different rhythm patterns, two types of consonant loadings, and two conditions of syllable stress. The findings revealed significant differences between the hypernasal and normal resonance groups in flow-pressure ratio, oral pressure, and nasal flow while subjects were reading sentences. However, only a small proportion of the variability in these aerodynamic measurements could be accounted for based on the classification of hypernasality or normal nasal resonance. Oral-nasal aerodynamic studies done during speaking activity are more useful clinically than blowing activity or saying vowel sounds. No aerodynamic differences were noted between the two groups for the different rhythm and stress patterns and phonemic loadings within the sentences used.

  4. Width and elevation of the palatal shelves in unoperated unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients in the permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    Latief, Benny S; Lekkas, Kostas C; Schols, Jan G J H; Fudalej, Piotr S; Kuijpers, Mette A R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cleft left lip and palate (CLP) normally require extensive surgery from an early age up to the end of adolescence. These surgeries affect the growth of the maxillofacial complex. The degree to which the cleft itself affects growth of the maxillofacial complex remains poorly understood. By analysing the width and elevation of the palatal shelves in unoperated adolescents and adults with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP and BCLP, respectively) and a non-cleft control group, it is possible to gain more insight into the real intrinsic growth potential of the maxillary structures. In this study, dental casts of the full permanent dentition of individuals with unrepaired UCLP (n = 68) and BCLP (n = 13) and non-cleft controls (n = 24) from the same area of Indonesia were digitized three-dimensionally. Maxillary arch width in the canine, premolar and molar regions, and the width and elevation of the palatal shelves were measured. Results showed that in patients with UCLP, the width of the palatal shelves on the cleft side in all regions, and on the non-cleft side in the canine/first premolar region, was significantly smaller compared with the control group. BCLP subjects showed similar deviations. In the UCLP group, the palatal shelves were rotated cranially and positioned more vertically. In the BCLP group, the palatal shelves were inclined by almost 10 ° more than the control group. The width of the palatal shelf and width of the maxillary arch positively correlated in the canine and first premolar regions for both the cleft and non-cleft side in patients with UCLP, and in the canine region for patients with BCLP. This means that the wider the palatal shelf, the wider the maxillary arch. The elevation of palatal shelves correlated with the maxillary arch width in all regions in patients with UCLP, and only in the premolar region in the control group. Thus, the wider the arch width, the smaller the elevation angle (the maxillary shelves

  5. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P < .02). At time of palatoplasty, cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  6. Assessment of differentially expressed plasma microRNAs in nonsyndromic cleft palate and nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Gao, Yanli; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Bei; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as a new class of regulatory molecules that influence many biological functions. However, the expression profile of plasma microRNAs in nonsyndromic cleft palate (NSCP) or nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate (NSCLP) remains poorly investigated. In this study, we used Agilent human miRNA microarray chips to monitor miRNA levels in three NSCP plasma samples (mixed as the CP group), three NSCLP plasma samples (mixed as the CLP group) and three normal plasma samples (mixed as the Control group). Six selected plasma miRNAs were validated in samples from an additional 16 CP, 33 CLP and 8 healthy children using qRT-PCR. Using Venn diagrams, distinct and overlapping dysregulated miRNAs were identified. Their respective target genes were further assessed using gene ontology and pathway analysis. The results show that distinct or overlapping biological processes and signalling pathways were involved in CP and CLP. Our study showed that the common key gene targets reflected functional relationships to the Notch, Wnt, phosphatidylinositol and Hedgehog signalling pathways. Further studies should examine the mechanism of the potential target genes, which may provide new avenues for future clinical prevention and therapy. PMID:27863433

  7. Morphology of the auditory tube and palatal muscles in a case of bilateral cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Nohadani, N; Koch, K H H

    2005-03-01

    There is an increased incidence of otitis media in children with cleft palate, which may be related to the pathology of the auditory tube and palatal muscles. In the present study, the head of a human on term born fetus with bilateral palatal cleft was serially sectioned and the anatomy of the auditory tube and palatal muscles were studied by computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction. The results showed a nearly horizontal course of the auditory tube. The tensor veli palatini muscle had a bony attachment on either side. The levator veli palatini muscle also showed an abnormal course. This abnormal course may result in obstruction of the auditory tube during contraction. These pathological findings may explain the higher frequency of otitis media in children with cleft palate.

  8. Factors prognostic for phonetic development after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seok; Kim, Jae Bong; Lee, Jeong Woo; Yang, Jung Dug; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Choi, Kang Young

    2015-10-01

    Palatoplasty is aimed to achieve normal speech, improve food intake, and ensure successful maxillary growth. However, the velopharyngeal function is harder to control than other functions. Therefore, many studies on the prognostic factor of velopharyngeal insufficiency have been conducted. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between speech outcomes and multimodality based on intraoral and preoperative three-dimensional computerized tomographic (CT) findings. Among 73 children with cleft palate who underwent palatoplasty between April 2011 and August 2014 at Kyungpook National University Hospital (KNUH), 27 were retrospectively evaluated. The 27 cases were non-syndromic, for which successful speech evaluation was conducted by a single speech-language pathologist (Table 1). Successful speech evaluation was defined as performing the test three times in 6-month intervals. Three intraoral parameters were measured before and immediately after operation (Fig. 1). On axial- and coronal-view preoperative facial CT, 5 and 2 different parameters were analyzed, respectively (Figs. 2 and 3). Regression analysis (SPSS IBM 22.0) was used in the statistical analysis. Two-flap palatoplasty and Furlow's double opposing Z-plasty were performed in 15 and 12 patients, respectively. The operation was performed 11 months after birth on average. Children with a higher palatal arch and wider maxillary tuberosity distance showed hypernasality (p < 0.05; Table 2). The useful prognostic factors of velopharyngeal function after palatoplasty were palate width and height, rather than initial diagnosis, treatment method, or palate length. Therefore, a more active intervention is needed, such as orthopedic appliance, posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation, or early speech training. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Epidemiology of Cleft Lip and Palate in Canada, 1998 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jennifer L K; Oddone-Paolucci, Elizabeth; Harrop, Robertston A

    2015-07-01

    To examine the birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention for clefts in Canada (1998 to 2007). Also to highlight the difficulties associated with studying the epidemiology of clefts using the current data collection mechanisms. Epidemiologic data acquired from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Population-based study in Canada 1998 to 2007. All live births with an International Classification of Diseases (9th or 10th revision) diagnostic code for cleft palate or for cleft lip with or without cleft palate or with a surgical intervention code for repair of cleft lip or cleft palate. Birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention. There were 3,015,325 live births in Canada (1998 to 2007). The mean birth prevalence was 0.82 per 1000 live births for cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 0.58 per 1000 live births for cleft palate. The birth prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was significantly higher in boys, with a stable boy to girl ratio of 1.75:1. Cleft palate was significantly greater in girls; however, the boy to girl ratio decreased from 0.97:1 in 1998 to 0.59:1 in 2007. The median age of repair in Canada from 1998 to 2007 was 4.7 months for cleft lip and 11.6 months for cleft palate. Thirty percent of patients underwent cleft palate repair after age 1. The birth prevalence of cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate is stable in Canada. An increasing birth prevalence of cleft palate in girls is suggested. The timing of surgical intervention is consistent with current standards. The challenges associated with collecting these data in Canada are discussed.

  10. Craniofacial morphological outcome following treatment with three different surgical protocols for complete unilateral cleft lip and palate: a premilinary study.

    PubMed

    Kulewicz, M; Dudkiewicz, Z

    2010-02-01

    This study compared craniofacial morphology between three groups of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, treated with different surgical protocols. The study included 66 10-year-old children (42 boys and 20 girls) with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (22 patients in each of the three groups). Children aged 7 months underwent one-stage surgery, performed by a single surgeon. During surgery, the soft and hard palate and the lip underwent correction. The difference between the groups depended on the hard palate closure. Group I patients had the mucoperiosteal flap elevated on both sides of the cleft. Group II patients had the mucoperiosteal flap elevated on the non-cleft side, and had only a minimal 2-3mm mucoperiosteal flap elevated on the cleft side. Group III patients had mucoperiostium elevated from the septum vomer to create a single-layered caudally pedicled flap, and had only a minimal 2-3mm palatal flap elevated on the cleft side. Craniofacial morphology was defined using lateral cephalometric analysis. Significant craniofacial morphological differences were identified between groups I, II and III. Group III demonstrated the most favourable morphology. This indicates that the technique of hard palate closure has significant influence on craniofacial growth and development. Copyright 2009 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. One-flap Palatoplasty: A Cohort Study to Evaluate a Technique for Unilateral Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cotrinal-Rabanal, Omar; Caceres-Nano, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2-flap palatoplasty technique is actually the approach most commonly used in the United States for cleft palate repair. This is a one-time surgery that enables closure under minimal tension, lowering rates of subsequent fistula development. However, its primary disadvantage is potential detriment to maxillary growth (due to extent of dissection on both sides of the cleft and raw lateral surfaces). Since 2007, a surgical technique using only one mucoperiosteal flap from the noncleft side has been performed by us, reducing the extent of the surgery and its potential nondesirable effects over the palate. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility of this technique for unilateral cleft palate repair. Methods: This is a retrospective, simple-blinded cohort study between 2 groups of 120 patients each with unilateral cleft palate who were operated on using the 2-flap and 1-flap techniques by the Outreach Surgical Center Program Lima from 2007 to 2012. Data collection was accomplished by physical examination to evaluate the presence or absence of a fistula and to evaluate the presence of hypernasality. Postoperative bleeding was also studied. Results: We have observed no increase in the rate of fistulas and velopharyngeal insufficiency between these 2 studied groups (P = 0.801 and P = 1.000). Conclusions: Use of a 1-flap technique for unilateral cleft palate repair allowed us to achieve results comparable to those of a 2-flap technique in terms of postoperative fistula development and hypernasal speech. Additional studies are required to evaluate the effect of this technique on palatal growth. PMID:25973351

  12. A modified feeding plate for a newborn with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Mustafa; Karaçay, Seniz; Atay, Arzu; Günay, Yumuşhan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives : Cleft palate is a common congenital maxillofacial defect. We wish to present the fabrication of a modified feeding plate that will adapt to the changing palatal and velopharyngeal morphology during function. Case Report : A neonate with unilateral cleft lip and palate was referred to our clinic for the fabrication of a feeding plate. Intraoral examination revealed a cleft involving the uvula and the soft palate, with an alveolar defect on the left side. An impression was taken and a dental cast was obtained. A 1-mm Bioplast clear soft plate was pressed on the model. After trimming the edges of the plate, several retentive holes were made for its attachment to the hard plate. With the Bioplast soft plate replaced on the cast, plaster was used to cover parts of the soft plate that were not to come in contact with the hard plate. Biocryl resin was put on the retentive holes and 2-mm Biocryl C Rosa-transparent plate was pressed. The edges of the plate were cut, trimmed, and polished. Conclusion : This modified feeding plate effectively obstructed the soft palate defect. The adaptation of the flexible bulb of the appliance with the soft palate was excellent. Evaluation with nasoendoscopy revealed the synchronized movement of the bulb of the appliance with the soft palate during swallowing. Soft extension of the feeding plate eliminated the risk of irritation, and the baby accepted the appliance easily.

  13. FOXE1 association with both isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and isolated cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Lina M.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Busch, Tamara D.; Machida, Junichiro; Johnson, Marla K.; Brauer, David; Krahn, Katherine; Daack-Hirsch, Sandy; L'Heureux, Jamie; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Rivera, Dora; López, Ana Maria; Moreno, Manuel A.; Hing, Anne; Lammer, Edward J.; Jones, Marilyn; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Jugessur, Astanand; Wilcox, Allen J.; Chines, Peter; Pugh, Elizabeth; Doheny, Kim; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22–q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we undertook an iterative and complementary fine mapping strategy using family-based CL/P samples from Colombia, USA and the Philippines. Candidate genes within 9q22–q33 were sequenced, revealing 32 new variants. Concurrently, 397 SNPs spanning the 9q22–q33 2-LOD-unit interval were tested for association. Significant SNP and haplotype association signals (P = 1.45E − 08) narrowed the interval to a 200 kb region containing: FOXE1, C9ORF156 and HEMGN. Association results were replicated in CL/P families of European descent and when all populations were combined the two most associated SNPs, rs3758249 (P = 5.01E − 13) and rs4460498 (P = 6.51E − 12), were located inside a 70 kb high linkage disequilibrium block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5′ and 3′ of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated, indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically distinct. Foxe1 expression was found in the epithelium undergoing fusion between the medial nasal and maxillary processes. Mutation screens of FOXE1 identified two family-specific missense mutations at highly conserved amino acids. These data indicate that FOXE1 is a major gene for CL/P and provides new insights for improved counseling and genetic interaction studies. PMID:19779022

  14. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28393073

  15. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate.

    PubMed

    Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Mertas, Anna; Skucha-Nowak, Małgorzata; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Morawiec, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Early secondary alveoloplasty in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Arangio, Paolo; Marianetti, Tito M; Tedaldi, Massimiliano; Ramieri, Valerio; Cascone, Piero

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this study were to present a personal surgical technique throughout the review of international literature concerning surgical techniques, objectives, and outcomes in early secondary alveoloplasty and to describe our personal surgical techniques in alveolar bone defect repair in cleft lip and palate.Throughout a literature analysis, it is now settled that early secondary alveoloplasty could reestablish the continuity of alveolar bone and prevent upper dental arch collapse after presurgical orthopedic upper maxilla expansion; it also might give a good bone support for teeth facing the cleft and allow the eruption of permanent elements with the bone graft and rebalance the symmetry of dental arch, improve facial aesthetic, guarantee an adequate amount of bone tissue for a further prosthetic reconstruction with implant, and finally close the eventual oronasal fistula.The surgical technique we are presenting permitted a total number of 35 early secondary alveoloplasty on which a long-term follow-up is still taking place.We can assess that early secondary alveoloplasty must be performed before permanent canine eruption. Iliac crest is the suggested donor site for bone grafting; orthopedic and orthodontic treatments must be performed in association with surgery, and if there is the dental element agenesia, an implantation treatment must be considered.

  17. Parent-Controlled Analgesia in Children Undergoing Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Ho; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Sung Jin; Bai, Sun Jun; Lee, Su Hyun; Park, Beyoung Yun

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to find an optimal basal infusion dose of fentanyl for parent-controlled analgesia (PrCA) in children undergoing cleft palate repair and the degree of parents' satisfaction with PrCA. Thirty consecutive children between 6 months and 2 yr of age were enrolled. At the end of surgery, a PrCA device with a basal infusion rate of 2 mL/hr and bolus of 0.5 mL with lockout time of 15 min was applied. Parents were educated in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices, the Wong Baker face pain scoring system, and monitoring of adverse effects of fentanyl. Fentanyl was infused 0.3 µg/kg/hr at first, and we obtained a predetermined fentanyl regimen by the response of the previous patient to a larger or smaller dose of fentanyl (0.1 µg/kg/hr as the step size), using an up-and-down method. ED50 and ED95 by probit analysis were 0.63 µg/kg/hr (95% confidence limits, 0.55-0.73 µg/kg/hr) and 0.83 µg/kg/hr (95% confidence limits, 0.73-1.47 µg/kg/hr), respectively. Eighty seven percent of the parents were satisfied with participating in the PrCA modality. PrCA using fentanyl with a basal infusion rate of 0.63 µg/kg/hr can be applied effectively for postoperative pain management in children undergoing cleft palate repair with a high level of parents' satisfaction. PMID:18303211

  18. Prevalence of dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Rullo, R; Festa, V M; Rullo, R; Addabbo, F; Chiodini, P; Vitale, M; Perillo, L

    2015-09-01

    To examine the prevalence of different types of dental anomalies in children with nonsyndromic cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip-palate, and bilateral cleft lip-palate. A sample of 90 patients (aged 4-20 years) affected by isolated cleft lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was examined. Cleft patients were classified into one of three groups according to cleft type: (1) Unilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, (2) Bilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, and (3) Cleft Lip. Intraoral exams, panoramic radiographs and dental casts, were used to analyse the prevalence of the various dental anomalies included in this study. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip and palate and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The congenital absence of the cleft-side lateral incisor was observed in 40% of the sample, and a total of 30% patients showed supernumerary teeth at the incisors region. Second premolar agenesis was found in 4.4% of patients, whereas in 18.9% of the sample there was an ectopic dental eruption. Lateral or central incisors rotation was noted in 31.1% of the sample, while shape anomaly, lateral incisor microdontia, and enamel hypoplasia were detected respectively in 25.6%, 5.6% and 18.9% of cleft patients. High prevalence of different dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate has been confirmed. This study, in particular, shows the presence of ectopic and rotated teeth in the cleft area.

  19. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins.

  20. Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap for reconstruction of large palatal-alveolar fistulas in cleft patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large palatal fistula in cleft patients is a difficult situation, especially with previous multiple surgeries, which have led to severe scars in the palatal mucosa. Tongue flaps are useful aids in such situations. Materials and Methods: Seven cleft patients who were reconstructed by posteriorly based lateral tongue flap between 2005 and 2012 were studied. Variables such as flap-ability to close the fistula, remaining tongue shape at least 1 year after operation, and speech improvement (patients’ self-assessment) were evaluated. Results: Age range of the patients was 14‒45 years. The male-to-female ratio was 2/7. Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap effectively closed the large fistula in 6/7 of patients. The largest dimensions of fistula closed by this flap was 5 cm × 1.5 cm. Follow-up of 2‒7 years showed that the tongue never returned to the original size and remained asymmetrical. In addition, the nasal speech did not improve dramatically after the closure of large palatal/alveolar fistulas in this age group. Conclusion: Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap is an effective method to solve the problem of large palatal fistulas in adult cleft patients. The most useful indication for this flap is a large longitudinal palatal fistula, extending to the alveolar process. Asymmetrical tongue shape after surgery is the rule and speech improvement depends on patient's age and location of fistula. PMID:26981466

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and “type and cross” to check your child’s blood type) • Take a complete medical history of your child • Do a complete physical examination of your child Always tell your child’s ... hard for your child’s blood to clot. Ask your child’s doctor or OMS ...

  2. Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 8. Assessing naso-labial appearance in 5-year-olds - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mølsted, Kirsten; Humerinta, Kirsti; Küseler, Annelise; Skaare, Pål; Bellardie, Haydn; Shaw, William; Karsten, Agneta; Kåre Sæle, Paul; Rizell, Sara; Marcusson, Agneta; Eyres, Philip; Semb, Gunvor

    2017-02-01

    Facial appearance is one of the most relevant measures of success in cleft lip and palate treatment. The aim was to assess nasolabial appearance at 5 years of age in all children in the project. In this part of the project the local protocol for lip closure continued to be used because the primary lip and nose operations were not part of the randomisation. The great majority of the surgeons used Millard's technique together with McComb's technique for the nose. One center used Tennison-Randalls technique and in one center the centers own technique as well as nose plugs were used. Three hundred and fifty-nine children participated in this part of the project. Standardised photos according to a specific protocol developed for the Scandcleft project were taken. Only the nasolabial area was shown, the surrounding facial features were masked. Three components were scored using a 5-point ordinal scale. A new developed Scandcleft Yardstick was used. The reliability of the method was tested using the weighted kappa statistics. Both the interrater and intrarater reliability scores were good to very good. There were statistically significant differences between the three trials. The Millard procedure combined with McComb technique had been used in the majority of the cases in all three trials. There were statistically significant differences between the three trials concerning upper lip, nasal form, and cleft side profile. ISRCTN29932826.

  3. [Maxillary advancement osteotomy with sequelae cleft lip and palate: Dilemma between occlusion and aesthetic profile].

    PubMed

    Vigneron, A; Morand, B; Lafontaine, V; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Bettega, G

    2015-11-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common sequela of cleft lip and palate. Its surgical treatment consists in a maxillary advancement by distraction or by conventional orthognathic surgery but morphological results are unpredictable. Our goal in this study was to see if the esthetical results (on the lip and the nose) of maxillary advancement were correlated to the preservation of lateral incisor space of the cleft side. This retrospective study included 38 patients operated between 2002 and 2013. Unilateral clefts were studied independently from bilateral clefts. Profile aesthetics was evaluated independently and subjectively by two surgeons and scored on an 8-point scale. The result was classified as "good" if the score was superior or equal to 6. The score was correlated to the following parameters: amount of maxillary advancement, upper incisor axis, preservation of the missing lateral incisor space. In the "good result" group, the space of the lateral incisor was less often preserved. The nasolabial angle was more open and the upper central incisor axis more vertical. These results were more pronounced in bilateral clefts, but also found in unilateral clefts. Under reservation of the subjective evaluation and of the small number of patients, it seemed that lateral incisor space closure improved the profile of patients treated by maxillary advancement for cleft lip and palate sequelae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Parental satisfaction in Ugandan children with cleft lip and palate following synchronous lip and palatal repair.

    PubMed

    Luyten, Anke; D'haeseleer, Evelien; Budolfsen, Dorte; Hodges, Andrew; Galiwango, George; Vermeersch, Hubert; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present case control study was to assess parental satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Ugandan children with complete unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP), who underwent a synchronous lip and palatal closure. The results are compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. The experimental group consisted of the parents or guardians of 44 Ugandan patients (21 males, 23 females) with complete unilateral or bilateral CLP (mean age: 3;1 years). The control group included the foster mothers of 44 orphan children matched by age and gender (mean age: 3;7 years). A survey based on the Cleft Evaluation Profile was used to assess the perceived satisfaction for individual features related to cleft care. Overall high levels of satisfaction were observed in the experimental group for all features (range: 56-100%). No significant differences could be established regarding age, gender, age of lip and palatal closure, cleft type or maternal vs. paternal judgments. In participants who were dissatisfied with the appearance of the lip, the time period between the cleft closure and the survey was significantly larger compared with satisfied participants. Furthermore, significantly lower levels of satisfaction were observed in the cleft group for speech and the appearance of the teeth and the nose compared with the control group. Satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Ugandan children with cleft lip and/or palate is important since normal esthetics and speech predominantly determine the children's social acceptance in the Ugandan society. As a result of reading this manuscript, the reader will be able to explain the attitudes of parents toward the surgical repair of their children's cleft lip and palate. As a result of reading this manuscript, the reader will be able to identify differences in parental attitudes toward synchronous lip and palate repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers from Congenital Cleft Palates and Normal Palates of Spanish Goats

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Michael C.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Kuzon, William M.; Panter, Kip E.; Buchman, Steven R.; Faulkner, John A.; Yu, Deborah; Cederna, Paul S.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Analysis of the composition of muscle fibers constituent to a cleft palate could provide significant insight into the cause of velopharyngeal inadequacy. The authors hypothesized that levator veli palatini muscle dysfunction inherent to cleft palates could affect the timing and outcome of cleft palate repair. Methods Single, permeabilized muscle fibers from levator veli palatini muscles of three normal (n = 19 fibers) and three chemically induced congenital cleft palates (n = 21 fibers) of 14-month-old goats were isolated, and contractile properties were evaluated. The maximum isometric force and rate constants of tension redevelopment (ktr) were measured, and the specific force and normalized power were calculated for each fiber. Results The ktr measures indicate that cleft fibers are predominantly fast-fatigable; normal fibers are slow fatigue-resistant: after a 10-minute isometric contraction, fibers from cleft palates had a loss of force 16 percent greater than that from normal palates (p = 0.0001). The cross-sectional areas of the fibers from cleft palates (2750 ± 209 μm2) were greater (p = 0.05) than those from normal palates (2226 ± 143 μm2). Specific forces did not differ between the two groups. Maximum normalized power of fibers from cleft palates (11.05 ± 1.82 W/l) was greater (p = 0.0001) than fibers from normal palates (1.60 ± 0.12 W/l). Conclusions There are clear physiologic differences in single muscle fibers from cleft palates and normal palates: cleft palate fibers are physiologically fast, have greater fatigability, and have greater power production. Detection of functional and/or fiber type differences in muscles of cleft palates may provide preoperative identification of a patient's susceptibility to velopharyngeal inadequacy and permit early surgical intervention to correct this clinical condition. PMID:17440342

  6. Postpalatoplasty Eustachian tube function in young children with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Alper, Cuneyt M; Losee, Joseph E; Mandel, Ellen M; Seroky, James T; Swarts, J Douglas; Doyle, William J

    2012-07-01

    To characterize Eustachian tube function using the forced response test in young children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip after palatoplasty with tympanostomy tubes inserted prepalatoplasty and compare these results with those of a 1986 study that evaluated a similar population using identical methods. Outpatient research clinic. A total of 34 children with cleft palate were tested at an average age of 18.6 ± 4.0 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREs: Passive and active measures for the forced response test. Of the sample, 13 ears could not be tested, and tests on 24 ears were incomplete. The forced response test showed that the passive Eustachian tube function parameters were similar to those of normal adults and children. The percentage of ears that showed tubal dilation with swallowing was 60%. The active resistance and dilatory efficiency were similar to those of a normal adult population. A 1986 study of Eustachian tube function in postpalatoplasty subjects with cleft palate (37 ears) aged 15 to 26 months documented Eustachian tube dilation with swallowing in 84% of the ears. In the present study, which focused on a similar population, the frequency of tubal dilation was 60%. Nonetheless, both frequencies are significantly greater than the dilation frequency of 27% reported for 56 ears of subjects with cleft palate tested between 3 months and 18 years with tympanostomy tubes inserted for persistent otitis media with effusion. This suggests that dilation during the forced response test may be a prognostic marker for those children with cleft palate who will resolve their ear disease at an early age.

  7. A new technique for feeding dogs with a congenital cleft palate for surgical research.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Concepción; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Paradas, Irene; González-Meli, Beatriz; Maldonado, Estela; Maestro, Carmen; Prados, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2011-04-01

    In humans, cleft palate (CP) is one of the most common malformations. Although surgeons use palatoplasty to close CP defects in children, its consequences for subsequent facial growth have prompted investigations into other novel surgical alternatives. The animal models of CP used to evaluate new surgical treatments are frequently obtained by creating surgically induced clefts in adult dogs. This procedure has been ethically criticized due to its severity and questionable value as an animal model for human CP. Dogs born with a congenital CP would be much better for this purpose, provided they developed CP at a sufficient rate and could be fed. Up until now, feeding these pups carried the risk of aspiration pneumonia, while impeding normal suckling and chewing, and thus compromising orofacial growth. We developed a technique for feeding dog pups with CP from birth to the time of surgery using two old Spanish pointer dog pups bearing a complete CP. This dog strain develops CP in 15-20% of the offspring spontaneously. Custom-made feeding teats and palatal prostheses adapted to the pups' palates were made from thermoplastic plates. This feeding technique allowed lactation, eating and drinking in the pups with CP, with only sporadic rhinitis. To determine whether the use of this palatal prosthesis interferes with palatal growth, the palates of three littermate German shorthaired pointer pups without CP, either wearing or not wearing (controls) the prosthesis, were measured. The results showed that the permanent use of this prosthesis does not impede palatal growth in the pups.

  8. A mathematical function to evaluate surgical complexity of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Posadas, M R; Vega-Alvarado, L; Toni, B

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this work is to show the modeling of a similarity function adapted to the medical environment using the logical-combinatorial approach of pattern recognition theory, and its application comparing the condition of patients with congenital malformations in the lip and/or palate, which are called cleft-primary palate and/or cleft-secondary palate, respectively. The similarity function is defined by the comparison criteria determined for each variable, taking into account their type (qualitative or quantitative), their domain and their initial space representation. In all, we defined 18 variables, with their domains and six different comparison criteria (fuzzy and absolute difference type). The model includes, further, the importance of every variable as well as a weight which reflects the surgical complexity of the cleft. Likewise, the usefulness of this function is shown by calculating the similarity among three patients. This work was developed jointly with the Cleft Palate Team at the Reconstructive Surgery Service of the Pediatric Hospital of Tacubaya, which belongs to the Health Institute of the Federal District in Mexico City.

  9. Preoperative Cleft Lip Measurements and Maxillary Growth in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Tompson, Bryan D; Fisher, David M

    2016-11-01

    Maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate is highly variable. The authors' aim was to investigate associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and maxillary growth determined cephalometrically in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with cUCLP. Preoperative cleft lip measurements were made at the time of primary cheiloplasty and available for each patient. Maxillary growth was evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and alveolar bone grafting (8.5 ± 0.7 years). The presence of associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and cephalometric measures of maxillary growth was determined using regression analyses. In the 58 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 90% and in transverse width in 81% of patients. There was an inverse correlation between cleft lateral lip height and transverse width with a β coefficient of -0.382 (P = .003). Patients with a more deficient cleft lateral lip height displayed a shorter maxillary length (β coefficient = 0.336; P = .010), a less protruded maxilla (β coefficient = .334; P = .008), and a shorter anterior maxillary height (β coefficient = 0.306; P = .020) than those with a less deficient cleft lateral lip height. Patients with cUCLP present with varying degrees of lateral lip hypoplasia. Preoperative measures of lateral lip deficiency are related to later observed deficiencies of maxillary length, protrusion, and height.

  10. Cleft size at the time of palate repair in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate as an indicator of maxillary growth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-F; Prasad, N K K; Chiu, Y-T; Yun, C; Chen, P K-T

    2010-10-01

    Cleft size at the time of palate repair might affect the difficulty of surgical repair and, thus, indirectly postoperative maxillary growth. This retrospective study aimed to determine whether a correlation existed between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 39 infants with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, taken at the time of palate repair, were used to measure cleft size. Cleft size was defined as the percentage of the total palatal area. The later growth of the maxilla was determined using lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs taken at 9 years of age. The Pearson correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. The results showed negative correlations between cleft size and the maxillary length (PMP-ANS, PMP-A) and the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA). These data suggest that in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate there is a significant correlation between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the maxillary length and protrusion. Patients with a large cleft at the time of palate repair have a shorter and more retrusive maxilla than those with a small cleft by the age of 9 years. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporal characteristics of nasalization in speakers with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunghee; Kuehn, David P

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to compare the temporal characteristics of nasalization between speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and normal adult speakers and to investigate the relationship between acoustic temporal measures and perceived nasality. Fifteen speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and 15 speakers without cleft palate aged 13 to 45 years participated in this study. Two listeners judged the degree of nasality in speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Two distinct acoustic energies derived from the mouth and nose were recorded simultaneously while speakers were producing the speech tasks /pimip/, /pamap/, and /pumup/. Absolute and proportional measures related to nasalization duration were obtained. Speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip exhibited more extensive acoustic nasalization in the time domain than did speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip showed larger nasalization-duration ratios in the high vowel contexts than in the low vowel context. Speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip did not exhibit distinct differences in nasalization-duration ratios among the vowel contexts. The acoustic measurements reflecting temporal patterns of oral-nasal acoustic impedance were related to the perception of hypernasality. These results suggest that the speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip showed longer duration of acoustic nasalization than speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Temporal characteristics of acoustic nasalization grew longer as the degree of perceived hypernasality increased. The positive correlation between temporal measures of acoustic nasalization and degree of perceived nasality suggests that temporal measures of nasalization would provide supplementary diagnostic information in relation to the degree of hypernasality.

  12. Presurgical orthopedic premaxillary alignment in cleft lip and palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Motoki, D S; Yamashiro, D K

    1994-11-01

    Premaxillary malposition is a difficult problem in cleft lip and palate repair. Orthopedic palatal devices are excellent in positioning the premaxilla, though they are somewhat cumbersome and require complex techniques in adjusting precisely the position of the premaxilla prior to repair. A new technique has been developed for premaxillary repositioning in conjunction with palatal shelf expansion and obturation. The procedure implements microplate fixation anterior to the premaxillary segment and linked to a palatal splint by adjustable elastics. The microplate is inserted through a nasal floor incision and secured by a tight submucosal tunnel through minimal dissection between the prolabium and premaxilla. The last hole of each microplate protrudes through the mucosa and is attached to a pin-retained palatal splint by an elastic chain. Differential tension is applied to the chains to allow gradual repositioning of the protruding maxilla while the splint expands and maintains positioning of the lateral palatal segments. These elastic retractors can be adjusted by staff in the outpatient office. During the past 2 years, this technique has been used successfully in 21 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Its technical ease and design allows simple adjustments to control premaxillary positioning and growth before definitive surgical closure.

  13. Prevention of Communication Problems Associated with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannbacker, Mary

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews principles of preventative intervention and their application to communication problems associated with cleft palate. Ten specific suggestions (such as continuing professional education, identification of adenoidal atrophy, and prompt referral for secondary management) and activities are described. (Author/DB)

  14. Dominantly inherited syndrome of microcephaly and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Halal, F

    1983-05-01

    Two sisters and their mother had a syndrome of microcephaly, cleft palate, and variable anomalies such as unusual facial appearance, hypotelorism, abnormal retinal pigmentation, maxillary hypoplasia, goiter, camptodactyly, mild mental retardation, and abnormal dermatoglyphics. This is an evidently dominantly inherited trait, either autosomal or X-linked.

  15. [Lipid peroxidation indices in children with congenital cleft palate].

    PubMed

    Nagirnyĭ, Ia P

    1989-01-01

    Observed were 66 children with congenital palate clefts and a control group of 25 children. The data suggest that the disease involves the lipid peroxidation disorders and impairment of the antioxydative defence. The results can be used for designing the antioxydant and membrane-stabilizing therapies in out-patient departments.

  16. Production of Two Nasal Sounds by Speakers With Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Bressmann, Tim; Radovanovic, Bojana; Harper, Susan; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David; Kulkarni, Gajanan V

    2016-12-29

    Manyspeakers with cleft palate develop atypical consonant productions, especially for pressure consonants such as plosives, fricatives, and affricates. The present study investigated the nature of nasal sound errors. The participants were eight female and three male speakers with cleft palate between the ages of 6 to 20. Speakers were audio-recorded, and midsagittal tongue movement was captured with ultrasound. The speakers repeated vowel-consonant-vowel with the vowels /α/, /i/, and /u/ and the alveolar and velar nasal consonants /n/ and //. The productions were reviewed by three listeners. The participants showed a variety of different placement errors and insertions of plosives, as well as liquid productions. There was considerable error variability between and within speakers, often related to the different vowel contexts. Three speakers co-produced click sounds. The study demonstrated the wide variety of sound errors that some speakers with cleft palate may demonstrate for nasal sounds. Nasal sounds, ideally in different vowel contexts, should be included in articulation screenings for speakers with cleft palate, perhaps more than is currently the case.

  17. Speech and language in the patient with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Mildinhall, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the normal development of speech and speech problems that may arise for the child born with cleft lip and/or palate. It describes current trends and the importance of multidisciplinary working in this complex field. The contribution of the speech and language therapist to the management of this population is considered.

  18. One-stage palate repair improves speech outcome and early maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Pradel, W; Senf, D; Mai, R; Ludicke, G; Eckelt, U; Lauer, G

    2009-12-01

    There are several types of palatal surgery; each cleft centre chooses its own technique based on experience and treatment philosophy. The aim of this study was to compare speech outcome and maxillary growth in children with cleft lip and palate deformity after palate repair with either a one-stage or a two- stage procedure and to identify the better treatment protocol. In 24 children, speech outcome was assessed regarding resonance, nasal escape, compensatory articulations, facial grimace, and spontaneous speech. In addition, plaster models of 15 children were compared. In 12 children, a two-stage procedure was performed (group A): at the age of 9-12 months, an intravelar veloplasty for repair of the soft palate, and at the age of 24-36 months a bipedicled flap closure of the hard palate. In 12 children, the same techniques were used in a one-stage procedure, at the age of 9-12 months (group B). The children of group B showed less altered resonance and less nasal emission at 4 years of age compared to the children of group A. At 6 years, the children of group A had improved their speech skills, but they did not equal the results of group B. In the study models of group A at age 6 years, the transverse dimension (anterior and posterior width of the dental arch) was smaller than in the models of group B. The one-stage repair of cleft palate at the age of 9-12 months seems to have a more positive influence on speech development and early maxillary growth than the two-stage procedure.

  19. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created.

  20. Epidemiology of cleft lip and palate among Jews and Bedouins in the Negev.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Eldad; Silberstein, Tali; Elhanan, Emil; Bar-Droma, Eitan; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander; Rosenberg, Lior

    2012-06-01

    Clefts of the lip and palate are the most common significant congenital birth anomaly of the orofacial region. The condition may vary from a minor easily correctable cleft to a significant functional and cosmetic incapacitation. This is the first epidemiological study of orofacial clefts in the Negev region in Israel. To establish the frequency of cleft lip and palate in the population of the Negev, characterize the demographic features of affected individuals and find possible risk factors, compare the risk in two major population groups: Bedouin and Jewish in a well-defined geographic area, and determine whether there is a change overtime in the birth of babies with facial clefts. We conducted a retrospective survey of the Soroka Medical Center archives. The sample population comprised all 131,218 babies born at Soroka during the 11 year period 1 January 1996 to 31 December 2006. Statistical tests used Pearson's chi-square test, Student's t-test and Spearman's correlation coefficient test according to the type of parameter tested. During the study period 140 babies were born with orofacial cleft. The overall incidence of cleft lip and palate was 1.067/1000. The incidence of facial clefts was 1.54/1000 among Bedouins and 0.48/1000 among Jews (P < 0.001). Cleft palate was significantly more frequent in female than male babies (P = 0.002). Over the study years we found a significant decrease in the incidence of facial clefts in the Bedouin population, with Spearman's correlation coefficient rank -0.9 (P < 0.01). A significant decrease occurred in the incidence of facial clefts among Bedouin. This change may be attributed to prenatal care in the Bedouin Negev population as part of social and health-related behavior changes. The reduction in rates of congenital malformations, however, does not mean a reduction in the number of cases in a growing population. Also, with a modern western lifestyle, the expectancy and demand for reconstructive facial surgery and

  1. [Management of cleft lip and palate in university hospital of Rouen].

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Peron, J M; Delcampe, P; Duret, A; Kerbrat, J B; Andrieu, J; Dehesdin, D; Amstutz-Montadert, I; Betahar, S; Brière, A; Ternon-Bocquet, I

    2002-04-01

    Cleft lips and cleft palates are managed in the department of Pediatric surgery in Rouen for the last 30 years. From the antenatal diagnosis, the parents got in touch with the surgeon who will coordinate this management. Around thirty new patients are treated every year. The chronology of the treatment is of "classic" manner. The cleft lip is repaired at about 3 weeks of age and the palatoplasty is performed after the age of 1 year. In view to maintain the intimacy of the consultation we did not institute multidisciplinary consultations. The other members of the interdisciplinary team will intervene during the follow up depending on the form of the cleft and the encountered problems. The information and the files circulate freely and are discussed together.

  2. The lack of isolated palatal clefts in Czech Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Peterka, M; Peterková, R; Likovský, Z

    2006-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are usually divided into three basic types: isolated cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (CP). The incidence of specific cleft types in a population and their relative numbers show specific differences between ethnic groups and races. However, there are no available data about the incidence and relative numbers of orofacial cleft types (CL, CLP, CP) in the gypsy ethnic group. The aim of this study was to compare relative numbers of specific types of orofacial clefts between the Czech gypsy and non-gypsy populations. We conducted a retrospective epidemiological study using a set of all living patients with orofacial clefts born in the Czech Republic from 1964 until 2002. The cleft patients were subdivided into three groups: 5304 non-gypsy children, both parents of whom were non-gypsies (NN), 98 gypsy children, both parents of whom were gypsies (GG) and 18 children with one parent non-gypsy and one parent gypsy (NG). The relative number of isolated CP was 37.1% in NN children. However, the relative number of CP was significantly reduced to 5.1% (P < 0.01) in the GG group. Conversely, the relative number of CLP was higher (P < 0.01) in the GG group (62.2%) in comparison to the NN group (39.2%). The tendency to decrease in the relative number of CP and increase in the relative number of CLP was also apparent in the NG group, but not so well expressed. We hypothesize that the decrease in CP and increase in CLP and CL in gypsies might be caused by their genetic predis-position to CL. Since the CP originates later than CL during embryonic development, some CP arise in embryos with already existing CL giving rise to CLP. Consequently, the missing isolated CP might be hidden in the group of CLP patients postnatally.

  3. Initial counselling for cleft lip and palate: parents' evaluation, needs and expectations.

    PubMed

    Kuttenberger, J; Ohmer, J N; Polska, E

    2010-03-01

    During the first counselling after the birth of a child with cleft lip and palate (CLP) information about the malformation should be delivered and a long-standing relationship between the cleft team and the affected family must be established. The present study was conducted to evaluate the parents' experiences, needs and expectations with this first consultation. A questionnaire was sent to 105 parents at the cleft clinic, which could be answered anonymously. It collected demographic data, data on the parents' pre-existing level of information and the parents' assessment of the counselling at the cleft centre. Seventy percent of the questionnaires were returned. In 16% the clefts were diagnosed prenatally, in 32% there were relatives with clefts. Seventy-one percent of the parents received detailed counselling, 89% of which occurred in the first week. The parents requested that information about surgery (80%), feeding the child (63%) and the aetiology of clefts (44%) should be given. The quality of the consultation was rated very good or good by 87% of families. This study confirms the importance of initial counselling for CLP. The exceptional psychological situation of the family has to be considered and a close collaboration between cleft centre and maternity hospitals is mandatory.

  4. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Rodigues, Polyana Barbara; Marcello-Machado, Raissa Micaella; Pinto, Luciana Rezende; Faot, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult today to find older patients without their cleft palate prosthetically rehabilitated. This case report presents the rehabilitation by conventional dental prostheses of a cleft palate patient who had no prior treatment. A 52-year-old male presented himself to have his fissured palate obturated and occlusion restored. He reported difficulties in swallowing food and liquids, along with a severe speech disability. The patient's medical history revealed diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, low vision due to macular atrophic lesions, and xerostomia. The upper and lower arches were completely and partially edentulous, respectively. The treatment plan involved a conventional denture to be placed in the upper arch, and a removable partial denture to be placed in the lower arch.

  5. Simple Technique Overcoming a Persistent Problem in Cleft Palate Repair.

    PubMed

    Kotrashetti, S M; Dube, Gunjan; Thakkar, Bhushan; Ahuja, Manav

    2016-12-01

    Cleft palate repair mandates use of a mouth gag and Dingmans moth gag is the most commonly used for the same; but the use of Dingmans mouth gag may have the demerit of the suture getting tethered at various places of the instrument during cleft palate closure particularly in the hands of the beginner surgeon. This article discusses about a simple technique of using a rubber dam sheet to cover the frame of the mouth gag. The technique discussed in this article is simple, cost effective method to overcome the potential disadvantage of suture adherence during repair of palatal tissue. The technique also has the potential to reduce the total operative time which needs a further study to validate the same.

  6. Can Peripheral Hearing Justify the Speech Disorders in Children with Operated Cleft Palate?

    PubMed Central

    Cerom, Jaqueline Lourenço; Macedo, Camila de Cássia; Feniman, Mariza Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Any impairment in the hearing ability of a child with cleft lip and palate may cause difficulties in receptive and expressive language. Purpose Check the association between velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), compensatory articulation (CA), and peripheral hearing loss in children with cleft palate surgery. Methods Retrospective study with 60 children (group 1: presence of VPD and CA; group 2: absence of VPD, presence of CA; group 3: presence of VDP, absence of CA; group 4: absence of VPD and CA), age 4 to 5 years old, with cleft palate surgery, through the analysis of the hearing, VP, and speech evaluations. Results Group 4 presented 80% normal hearing; group 1 had 60% hearing loss. The conductive hearing loss type was the most frequent. The glottal stop was the most frequent in group 1 and the middorsum palatal plosive in group 2. There was no significant association (p = 0.05) between hearing loss and the presence of compensatory articulations (groups 2 and 4), nor between hearing loss and the presence of VPD (groups 3 and 4; p = 0.12). Statistical significance (p = 0.025) was found when the group with VPD was associated with the group with CA, that is, group 1 with the control group (group 4). Conclusion Significant association between peripheral hearing loss, compensatory articulations, and VPD was verified for the children in group 1, which not only presented compensatory articulations but also VPD. PMID:25992059

  7. Cleft lip and palate: a review for dentists.

    PubMed

    Precious, D S; Goodday, R H; Morrison, A D; Davis, B R

    2001-12-01

    The goals of primary closure of cleft lip and palate include not only re-establishing normal insertions for all of the nasolabial muscles but also restoring the normal position of all the other soft tissues, including the mucocutaneous elements. Conventional surgical wisdom, which recommends waiting until growth is complete before undertaking surgical correction of the postoperative sequelae of primary cheiloplasty, carries with it many disadvantages. If, after primary surgery of the lip, orolabial dysfunctions remain, they will exert their nefarious influences during growth and will themselves lead to long term dentofacial imbalances. These imbalances can significantly influence facial harmony. Unless accurate, symmetric and functional reconstruction of the nasolabial muscles is achieved during the primary surgery, not only will the existing dentoskeletal imbalances be exaggerated, but other deformities will be caused during subsequent growth, among which the most important are nasal obstruction and mouth breathing, reduced translation of the maxilla, dysymmetry of the nose and inability of the patient to symmetrically project the upper lip

  8. Occipital meningoencephalocele with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate and Limb Abnormalities- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Arthi; T, Sadeesh; Swer, Mary Hydrina; Rao, Sudha

    2014-12-01

    A 21-week-old still born female fetus with occipital encepholocele, cleft lip and cleft palate was received from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry and was studied in detail. It was born to Primigravida, of a second degree consanguineous marriage, with unremarkable family history. The biometric measurements were noted which corresponded to the age of the fetus. Further the fetus was embalmed and dissected. On examination an encephalocele of 2.7×1.5 cm was seen in the occipital region with a midline defect in the occipital bone and herniated brain tissue. Other anomalies observed were right unilateral cleft lip, right cleft palate, and bilateral syndactyly of the lower limbs and associated Congenital Talipus Equino Varus of the right foot. Other internal organs were developed appropriate for the age of the fetus.

  9. Occipital meningoencephalocele with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate and Limb Abnormalities- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    T, Sadeesh; Swer, Mary Hydrina; Rao, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    A 21-week-old still born female fetus with occipital encepholocele, cleft lip and cleft palate was received from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry and was studied in detail. It was born to Primigravida, of a second degree consanguineous marriage, with unremarkable family history. The biometric measurements were noted which corresponded to the age of the fetus. Further the fetus was embalmed and dissected. On examination an encephalocele of 2.7×1.5 cm was seen in the occipital region with a midline defect in the occipital bone and herniated brain tissue. Other anomalies observed were right unilateral cleft lip, right cleft palate, and bilateral syndactyly of the lower limbs and associated Congenital Talipus Equino Varus of the right foot. Other internal organs were developed appropriate for the age of the fetus. PMID:25653933

  10. A mutation in RYK is a genetic factor for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Akita, Sadanori; Tin, Nguyen Thi Duc; Natsume, Nagato; Nakano, Yoko; Niikawa, Norio; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro

    2006-05-01

    The RYK, EPHB2, and EPHB3 genes are attractive candidates for cleft lip and/or palate and cleft palate only pathogenesis. Both the Ryk-deficient mouse and Ephb2/Ephb3 (genes for interaction molecules with RYK) double-mutant mouse show cleft palate. Mutation searches for RYK, EPHB2, and EPHB3 were carried out in a large number of Japanese and Vietnamese patients with cleft lip and/or palate and cleft palate only. Case-control study and transmission disequilibrium tests were performed also, using three single nucleotide polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block in RYK. Seven haplotypes were constructed from the single nucleotide polymorphisms. A missense mutation, 1355G>A (Y452C), in RYK was identified in one Vietnamese patient with cleft lip and/or palate. This mutation was not found among 1646 Vietnamese, Japanese, and Caucasians, including 354 cleft lip and/ or palate and cleft palate only patients. Colony formation assay using NIH3T3 cells transfected with mutant cDNA revealed that mutant RYK had significantly reduced protein activity, compared with those with wild-type RYK, implying that the transformation ability of RYK is depleted by this mutation. Although a case-control study and transmission disequilibrium tests on three individual single nucleotide polymorphisms provided no evidence for association with oral clefts, a case-control study on one rare haplotype suggested a positive association in Japanese patients with cleft lip and/or palate and cleft palate only. No mutations in EPHB2 and EPHB3 were found in any patients examined. The findings suggested that a missense mutation, 1355G>A, and one rare single nucleotide polymorphisms haplotype may play a role in the development of cleft lip and/or palate in the Vietnamese, and cleft lip and/ or palate and cleft palate only in the Japanese.

  11. A bibliometric analysis of the 50 most cited papers in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Nicola A; Joyce, Cormac W

    2015-02-01

    Citation analysis is an established bibliometric method which catalogues papers according to the number of times they have been referenced. It is believed that the total number of citations an article receives reflects its importance among its peers. Never before has a bibliometric analysis been performed in the area of Cleft Lip and Palate. Our citation analysis creates a comprehensive list of the 50 most influential papers in this field. Journals specializing in Cleft Palate, Craniofacial, Plastic Surgery, Maxillofacial Surgery, Aesthetics and Radiology were searched to establish which articles most enriched the specialty over the past 70 years. The results show an interesting collection of papers which reveal developing trends in surgical techniques. These landmark papers mould and influence management and decision-making today.

  12. Modified Activation Technique for Nasal Stent of Nasoalveolar Molding Appliance for Columellar Lengthening in Bilateral Cleft Lip/Palate.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita P

    2016-03-22

    Bilateral cleft lip/cleft palate is associated with nasal deformities typified by a short columella. The presurgical nasoalveolar molding (NAM) therapy approach includes reduction of the size of the intraoral alveolar cleft as well as positioning of the surrounding deformed soft tissues and cartilages. In a bilateral cleft patient, NAM, along with columellar elongation, eliminates the need for columellar lengthening surgery. Thus the frequent surgical intervention to achieve the desired esthetic results can be avoided. This article proposes a modified activation technique of the nasal stent for a NAM appliance for columellar lengthening in bilateral cleft lip/palate patients. The design highlights relining of the columellar portion of the nasal stent and the wire-bending of the nasal stent to achieve desirable results within the limited span of plasticity of the nasal cartilages. With this technique the vertical taping of the premaxilla to the oral plate can be avoided.

  13. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S.; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P < 0.05. Results: The study showed different categories of clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely. PMID:27195223

  14. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-04-01

    The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P < 0.05. The study showed different categories of clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely.

  15. A digital approach to photographing and measuring cleft lip and palate dental study casts.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Nicky

    2007-06-01

    This paper discusses whether a digital photographic technique can be used to produce a measurably accurate image of a dental cast arch, in order to assist the outcome assessments of cleft lip and palate surgery. It describes the measurement techniques, and discusses the factors affecting reproducibility. The results indicate that measurements which were taken from a digital image, using an on-screen measuring tool, correlated significantly with measurements taken manually from a plaster dental cast arch.

  16. [Clinical characteristics in children with cleft palate associated with middle ear cholesteatoma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chen, M; Hao, J S; Liu, W; Zhang, J

    2017-05-07

    Objective: To summarize the characteristics of children diagnosed as cleft palate associated with middle ear cholesteatoma. Methods: There were five middle ear cholesteatoma cases who had previously received cleft palate repairment surgery. All of the patients were followed up for 17 to 47 months. Median follow-up time was 31 months. Results: There were three males and two females with three to eleven years old , and the average of age was seven years and ten months. The time of cleft palate repairment surgery was from six months to four years, and the average age was one year and nine months. No history of grommet insertion. Three cases were unilateral choleateatoma (right ear in two cases and left ear in one case, of which two cases of contralateral ear with secretory otitis media) and two cases were bilateral choleateatoma. Five cases(seven ears) received surgeries. Radical mastoidectomy + canal wall down tympanoplasty were performed in three ears, in which we found stapes disappeared. Radical mastoidectomy + canal wall up tympanoplasty were performed in four ears, in which we found intact foot plate, with recurrence occurred in one case nine months after the first surgery. No recurrence occurred after the second canal wall down tympanoplasty. The postoperative average hearing thresholds of air conduction were improved in different degrees. Conclusions: There may be a relationship between cleft palate associated with middle ear cholesteatoma and no grommet insertion history. The incidence of bilateral cases is relatively high, and otitis media with effusion may occur because of poor Eustachian tube function in the unilateral cases. Choice of surgical methods should be decided basing on combination of decreasing the recrudescence and improving the hearing.

  17. Preoperative lip measurement in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip/palate and its comparison with norms.

    PubMed

    Chou, Pang-Yun; Luo, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Chen, Yu-Ray; Samuel Noordhoff, M; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2013-04-01

    There is prominent lip asymmetry in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Measurement of the lip on cleft and non-cleft sides provides appraisal of the lip deformity and information for planning of surgical correction. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the degree of lip deformity and to compare it with normative data. From 1983 to 1997, data from a total of 168 patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate were collected. There were no other associated craniofacial anomalies in this patient group. The measurement was performed under general anaesthesia by a senior surgeon using a calliper prior to the first lip repair. Corresponding normative data were collected from 2002 to 2003 on 50 patients who had normal facial appearance prior to hernia repair. The measurements included lip height, lip width, philtrum length and vermilion thickness. Comparisons were made between the cleft side and the non-cleft side, as well as between cleft patients and norms. Comparisons between the cleft and the non-cleft sides revealed significantly longer lip on the non-cleft side, including lip height from alar base to Cupid's bow, lip width from Cupid's bow to commissure and the vermilion thickness. The lip measurements on the norms were longer than those on the cleft side of the lip, but were similar to the non-cleft side. A wide variety of tissue growth asymmetry is observed between the non-cleft and the cleft sides, indicating a deficiency of tissue development associated with the cleft deformity. These data can provide a fundamental basis for presurgical orthopaedic treatment, surgical planning, execution of surgery, postoperative assessment and may help to predict treatment outcome. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing an avoidable and dispensable reoperative entity: Self-referred flawed cleft lip and palate repair.

    PubMed

    Foroglou, Pericles; Tsimponis, Antonis; Goula, Olga-Christina; Demiri, Efterpi

    2015-01-01

    aesthetically improved outcome. Indications for surgery include widened scars, lip contour deformities, shortened lips, poorly defined and flattened nasal tip, short columella and irregularities of the nostrils (narrow or high-riding) and cartilages. Wound dehiscence, contractures, vermilion notching, white roll malalignment and orovestibular fistulas are possible unfavourable results after cleft lip repair. The psychological status of children and adults with repaired cleft lip and palate has been the subject of extensive research especially regarding the way of their evaluation facial appearance, satisfaction and need for secondary corrective surgical procedures in the hope of increasing their self-esteem and self-confidence. The aim of this study was to assess secondary CLP deformity management in an accredited present-day tertiary hospital facility with an existing infrastructure of a specialist teams however not formed in a multidisciplinary group. Equally, to answer questions of specific operation indications and choice as related to prior surgeries, hospitalization time and cost, provision of adequate preoperative information, correlation between paediatric and plastic surgeons and effect of post-plastic surgical care on patients' health and well-being. It also aims at presenting, beyond our current primary cleft lip and palate repair approach, appropriate indications and timing of secondary repair and achieved results.

  19. [Bilateral labio-maxillo-palatal clefts. Therapeutic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Raphaël, B; Morand, B; Bettega, G; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Lebeau, J

    2001-06-01

    The wide diversity of bilateral facial clefts makes it most difficult to assess surgical success, particularly in terms of long-term outcome. The aim of this work was to examine the rationale for the current protocol used for cleft surgery at the Grenoble University Hospital. In a first group of 28 children, a 3-step surgical protocol was applied. The first two steps were performed between 4 and 8 months with at least 3 months between each procedure. Skoog's unilateral cheilo-rhino-uranoplasty was used, associated with a periosteal tibial graft. The third step, performed between 10 and 12 months, was for staphylorraphy. Outcome was analyzed at 15 years and evidenced the deleterious effect of excessive and asymmetrical premaxillary scars, of the 2-step cheiloplasty and of columella lengthenings from the lip. The frequency of secondary revision of the superior labial vestibule and the medial labial tubercule (43%) was considered to be high; this procedure should be re-examined as should be osteotomy (32% revision). Palatine closure, acquired in 82% of the cases and premaxillary stability, achieved in 86%, would appear to favor use of the periosteal tibial graft. The osteogenic capacity of this graft tissue was less satisfactory after a second harvesting (from the same tibia three months later). These results have led us to modify our protocol, favoring early and total closure of the bony palate and continued use of the periosteal tibial graft. We now use the following operative protocol: premaxillary alignment using an active orthopedic plate at 2 months, lip adhesion associated with staphylorraphy and passive palatine contention plate at 3 months, definitive bilateral cheilo-uranoplasty associated with a single periosteal graft at 7 months. The preliminary results with this protocol in a group of 12 children have shown better quality scars, more harmonious maxillary arches, an excellent occlusion of the deciduous dentition, and preservation of the positive results

  20. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  1. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  2. Description of total population hospital admissions for cleft lip and/or palate in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Jonathan Y J; Kilpatrick, Nicky; Jacoby, Peter; Slack-Smith, Linda M

    2015-12-07

    Orofacial clefts are a group of frequently observed congenital malformations often requiring multiple hospital admissions over the lifespan of affected individuals. The aim of this study was to describe the total-population hospital admissions with principal diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate in Australia over a 10 year period. Data for admissions to hospitals were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Hospital Morbidity Database (July 2000 to June 2010). The outcome variable was a hospital separation with the principal diagnosis of cleft palate, cleft lip or cleft lip and palate (ICD-10-AM diagnosis codes Q35-Q37 respectively). Trends in rates of admission and length of stay by age, gender and cleft type were investigated. A total of 11, 618 admissions were identified; cleft palate (4,454; 0.22 per 10,000 people per year), cleft lip (2,251; 0.11) and cleft lip and palate (4,913; 0.25). Admission age ranged from birth to 79 years with males more frequently admitted. Most admissions occurred prior to adolescence in cleft palate and cleft lip and through to late teens in cleft lip and palate, declining for all groups after 25 years. This study identified population level trends in hospital separations for orofacial cleft diagnosis in Australia.

  3. Are cleft palate fistulae a cause of dental decay?

    PubMed

    Richards, Helen; van Bommel, Annelotte; Clark, Victoria; Richard, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    To investigate a possible correlation between fistula and dental decay in children at 5 years of age from a single-surgeon series of cleft palate repairs. Retrospective review of data over a 9-year period between 2003 and 2011 of cleft palate repairs performed by the senior author at Birmingham Children's Hospital, U.K. Data collected on age, sex, age at repair, presence of fistula, and number of decayed, missing, or filled primary teeth (i.e., decayed, missing, and filled teeth score) at age 5 years. The overall fistula rate for this patient population was 24.1%. Fistulae were more common in the more severe forms of cleft type, as was frequency of dental decay. Comparison of fistula versus nonfistula groups showed a higher rate of dental decay (40%) in the fistula group, compared with only 20% in the nonfistula group (P = .036). A positive association was established between dental decay and the presence of a fistula. Although not proven as causative, possible reasons for this include nasal mucus retaining sugary food in the mouth and an overall prolonged food-clearance time. The known association between severity of cleft and an increased likelihood of a fistula and severity of cleft and increased dental decay were again demonstrated but were not found to be the exclusive explanation for the new finding of an association between fistulae and higher dental decay rates.

  4. Definition of critical periods for Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced holoprosencephaly, cleft lip, and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Galen W; Melberg, Cal G; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Parins, Kia F; Kietzman, Henry W; Everson, Joshua L; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Lipinski, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO). Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD) 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in "non-syndromic" orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug.

  5. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  6. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  7. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  8. Psychological profile of Chinese with cleft lip and palate deformities.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lim K; Loh, John Ser Pheng; Ho, Samuel M Y

    2007-01-01

    To assess the psychological well-being of patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). Ninety-four Chinese CLP subjects between 10 and 40 years of age were recruited from the Discipline of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, between June and December 2003. They were divided into two groups for comparison: adolescents (10-16 years old) and adults (17- 40 years old). A control group of 116 healthy non-CLP patients was also recruited during the same period. All CLP and non-CLP patients were asked to complete a set of four questionnaires to assess their psychological status. The questionnaires included the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the Culture-Free Self-Esteem Inventory, and the Chinese Miller Behavioral Style Scale. Chinese CLP patients exhibited levels of subjective well-being and social anxiety that were similar to the published levels of a group of British CLP patients. They also had significantly lower general and social self-esteem but higher parental self-esteem than the non-CLP control group. CLP patients were generally satisfied with life and did not exhibit more social anxiety than the non-CLP control group. They also had a good relationship with their parents. Gender and educational level had no influence on their psychological profile. However, these CLP patients had lower self-esteem than non-CLP patients.

  9. Extending multidisciplinary management of cleft palate to the developing world.

    PubMed

    Furr, Maxwell C; Larkin, Elissa; Blakeley, Robert; Albert, Thomas W; Tsugawa, Lance; Weber, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    The needs of patients with a cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) extend beyond surgical repair. A multidisciplinary approach to the care of patients with CL/P is the widely accepted standard in most regions of the developed world. Patients with CL/P in developing countries have needs similar to those of patients in industrialized nations. However, the existing shortages of healthcare resources have precluded provision of the most basic care to those with a CL/P. Innovative applications of technology can facilitate the delivery of speech therapy, evaluation of audiometric data, and limited dental evaluation for these patients with a modest financial investment. One method by which this care might be provided is with the use of Internet-based modalities. This represents a near universally available method to fill a conspicuous gap in the preoperative evaluation and postoperative care of patients with CL/P in the developing world. With rapidly expanding access to the Internet, particularly with wireless-3G connectivity worldwide, it is time to expand our delivery of humanitarian care beyond surgery alone in treating patients with CL/P in medically underserved areas.

  10. Caregiver responses to early cleft palate care: A mixed method approach

    PubMed Central

    Sischo, Lacey; Clouston, Sean; Phillips, Ceib; Broder, Hillary L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study sought to understand caregivers’ (CGs’) responses to early cleft lip/palate care for their infants. Method A prospective, mixed methods multicenter longitudinal study was conducted among CGs (N=118) seeking treatment for their infants’ cleft lip and palate or cleft lip only at one of six cleft treatment centers in the United States. Participants were in one of two treatment groups: traditional care only or nasoalveolar molding (NAM) plus traditional care. The CGs completed semi-structured interviews and standardized questionnaires assessing psychosocial well-being and family impact at three time points: the beginning of treatment (~1 month of age), pre-lip surgery (~3–5 months of age), and post-palate surgery (~12–13 months of age). Multi-level modeling was used to longitudinally assess CGs’ psychosocial outcomes. Results While the first year was demanding for all CGs, NAM onset and the child’s lip surgery were particularly stressful times. CGs used optimism, problem-solving behavior, and social support to cope with this stress. Qualitatively, CGs’ ability to balance cleft treatment demands with their psychosocial resources and coping strategies influenced family adaptation. Qualitative and quantitative results indicated CGs of NAM-treated infants experienced more rapid declines in anxiety and depressive symptoms and better coping skills over time than CGs whose infants had traditional care. Conclusion CGs of NAM-treated infants experienced more positive psychosocial outcomes than CGs whose infants had traditional care. Results from the mixed model support the Family Adjustment and Adaptation Response Model as used in pediatric chronic condition research. PMID:26280177

  11. Radiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: Imaging for the Prenatal Period and throughout Life.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Zachary R; Peacock, Zachary S; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in prenatal imaging have made possible the in utero diagnosis of cleft lip and palate and associated deformities. Postnatal diagnosis of cleft lip is made clinically, but imaging still plays a role in detection of associated abnormalities, surgical treatment planning, and screening for or surveillance of secondary deformities. This article describes the clinical entities of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate and documents their prenatal and postnatal appearances at radiography, ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and computed tomography (CT). Imaging protocols and findings for prenatal screening, detection of associated anomalies, and evaluation of secondary deformities throughout life are described and illustrated. CLP and isolated cleft palate are distinct entities with shared radiologic appearances. Prenatal US and MR imaging can depict clefting of the lip or palate and associated anomalies. While two- and three-dimensional US often can depict cleft lip, visualization of cleft palate is more difficult, and repeat US or fetal MR imaging should be performed if cleft palate is suspected. Postnatal imaging can assist in identifying associated abnormalities and dentofacial deformities. Dentofacial sequelae of cleft lip and palate include missing and supernumerary teeth, oronasal fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hearing loss, maxillary growth restriction, and airway abnormalities. Secondary deformities can often be found incidentally at imaging performed for other purposes, but detection is necessary because they may have considerable implications for the patient.

  12. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, p<0.0001), bilateral complete CLP (p=0.0002) and bilateral incomplete CLP (p< 0.0001) were more affected by tooth agenesis than individuals with other cleft types. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most affected teeth (p<0.0001). The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P.

  13. Radical Dissection of Greater Palatine Artery and Dynamic Reconstruction of Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nauman Ahmad; Chaudry, Ayesha; Ishaq, Irfan; Aslam, Muhammad; Shamim, Romaisa; Kafeel, Mirza Muhammad; Aazam, Muhammad; Sailer, Hermann; Ganatra, Muhammad Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Restoration of proper anatomy and physiology is an integral part of cleft palate repair. The senior author has devised a new technique of radical release of greater palatine vessels, which helps in achieving tension-free closure of palatal cleft. In addition, release and transposition of palatal muscles is performed without the use of operative microscope, resulting in improved palatal function. This technique is applicable to all types of clefts of the palate and can be performed on adult patients as well. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective case series of cleft palate repairs performed over a period of 3 years. Single-stage repair with modified Bardach’s technique for complete cleft palate and von Langenbeck’s technique for incomplete cleft palate with radical release of greater palatine vessels and levator complex retropositioning was performed. The outcome measures were closure of palatal defect and speech production. A follow-up of at least 6 months was completed in each patient. Results: A total of 1568 patients were included in the study. Their age ranged from 9 months to 54 years. The overall fistula rate was 6.1%. Improvement of speech was observed even in adult patients. Conclusions: Radical release of greater palatine artery and levator complex transposition can dramatically improve results of cleft palate repair. This technique helps in dynamic reconstruction of cleft palate and can be effectively applied in all age groups. PMID:28280675

  14. Unilateral cleft lip and palate: Simultaneous early repair of the nose, anterior palate and lip

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Louise Caouette

    2007-01-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate is a defect involving the lip, nose and maxilla. These structures are inter-related, and simultaneous early correction of all the aspects of the defect is necessary to obtain a satisfactory result that will be maintained with growth. The surgical technique combining various procedures is presented and compared with previously published reports. PMID:19554125

  15. Weight Gain in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate without Use of Palatal Plates

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Freitas, Renato; Lopes-Grego, Andrey Bernardo; Dietrich, Helena Luiza Douat; Cerchiari, Natacha Regina de Moraes; Nakakogue, Tabatha; Tonocchi, Rita; Gabardo, Juarez; da Silva, Éder David Borges; Forte, Antonio Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Goals/Background. To evaluate children's growth in the first year of life, who have cleft palate and lip, without the use of palatal plates. Materials/Method. Chart review was conducted, retrospectively, in the Center for Integral Assistance of Cleft Lip and Palate (CAIF), in Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. Results for both genders were compared to the data published by the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding average weight gain in children during their first year of life. Results. Patients with syndromic diagnosis and with cleft classified as preforamen were excluded, resulting in a final number of 112 patients: 56 male and 56 female. Similar patterns were seen comparing the two genders. Although it was observed weight gain below the average until the 11th month in male patients and until 9 months in female patients, both genders remained at the 50th percentile (p50) and improved after the 4th month of age for boys and the 9th month of age for girls. Conclusion. Children with cleft palate weigh less than regular children during their first months of life. At the end of the first year, weight gain is similar comparing normal and affected children. However, factors that optimized weight gain included choosing the best treatment for each case, proper guidance, and multiprofessional integrated care. PMID:23304489

  16. [The orthodontist and the child with a cleft palate].

    PubMed

    Lesne, C

    2004-09-01

    Dealing with this type of malformation, the orthodontist is confronted with a three-level problem: inter-personal, social, and technical. Because families consider the birth of a cleft palate child to be a disaster, orthodontists who undertake their treatment should understand the genesis of the turbulence that families will have to endure. Most parents learn to deal with these difficulties, but the affected children are going to have to submit to the stares of those they encounter. Adolescence is a critical period for them and it is also the time when they will visit their orthodontist most frequently. Problems that accompany treatment of these patients are numerous and the treating orthodontists must point them out and explain them tactfully. The treating team must also establish a therapeutic alliance to envelop the cleft palate patients, ensuring maintenance of expert cooperation between specialists responsible for different aspects of their treatment.

  17. Ten-Year Cleft Surgery in Nepal: Achievements and Lessons Learned for Better Cleft Care Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Hans-Dieter; Koch, Heribert; Koller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate surgery abroad is devoid of global consensus regarding standards of therapy, follow-up, and outcome. Cleft surgery in Nepal during a 10-year sustained program provided the opportunity to inform on the need for such standards. Methods: Medical records were evaluated from the cleft clinic at Sushma Koirala Memorial Hospital, Sankhu, Kathmandu, Nepal, from 1997 to 2007. Four groups were identified for analysis: total cohort, total surgical cohort (TSC), primary program patients (PPP; patients had not been operated on before), and nonprimary program patients (non-PPP; patients operated on elsewhere before). Patient demographics, diagnostic, primary and secondary surgery (corrective surgery), and follow-up were evaluated. Results: One thousand forty-five patients were eligible for surgery. Three hundred twenty-three of 1,045 patients (30.9%) did not seek treatment, although scheduled for surgery. One thousand two hundred one procedures were performed in 722 patients [TSC; 845 PPP (70.4%); 356 non-PPP (29.64%)]. Corrective procedures were performed in 257 of 1,201 [3.5% (30 of 845 procedures in 509 patients) PPP vs 63.7% (227 of 356 procedures in 213 patients) non-PPP]. One hundred six lips were completely reoperated on (1 PPP vs 105 non-PPP), and 42 palates underwent a total revision (5 PPP vs 37 non-PPP). The surgical outcome of the TSC group in terms of complication rate was similar to the one in developed countries. Conclusions: The high rate of corrective surgery reveals the need for global regulatory mechanisms and the need for nongovernmental organizations to introduce strategies for delivering sustained cleft care until achieving full rehabilitation. The World Health Organization should establish standards for cleft care delivered in less developed countries. PMID:27579235

  18. Trans-oral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy does not worsen the speech after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Khalifa, Badawy; Shawky, Ahmed; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader; Abdel-Hameed, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid hypertrophy may play a role in velopharyngeal closure especially in patients with palatal abnormality; adenoidectomy may lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency and hyper nasal speech. Patients with cleft palate even after repair should not undergo adenoidectomy unless absolutely needed, and in such situations, conservative or partial adenoidectomy is performed to avoid the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency. Trans-oral endoscopic adenoidectomy enables the surgeon to inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy on the speech of children with repaired cleft palate. Twenty children with repaired cleft palate underwent transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy to relieve their airway obstruction. The procedure was completely visualized with the use of a 70° 4mm nasal endoscope; the upper part of the adenoid was removed using adenoid curette and St. Claire Thompson forceps, while the lower part was retained to maintain the velopharyngeal competence. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of speech was performed, subjectively by auditory perceptual assessment, and objectively by nasometric assessment. Speech was not adversely affected after surgery. The difference between preoperative and postoperative auditory perceptual assessment and nasalance scores for nasal and oral sentences was insignificant (p=0.231, 0.442, 0.118 respectively). Transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy is a safe method; it does not worsen the speech of repaired cleft palate patients. It enables the surgeon to strictly inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure with better determination of the adenoidal part that may contribute in velopharyngeal closure. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Creating long-term benefits in cleft lip and palate volunteer missions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Razura, A; Cronin, E D; Navarro, C E

    2000-01-01

    The authors present their experience with 15 years of organizing cleft lip and palate surgical volunteer missions in Latin America. The history, basic principles, and objectives of Operation San Jose, a volunteer goodwill program from Christus St. Joseph Hospital in Houston, Texas, are covered. This report addresses the different problems encountered and solutions found. Following the principles set by Operation San Jose, CIRPLAST is a Peruvian foundation for plastic surgery that travels to remote areas in Peru, operating on patients with cleft lip and palate deformities. This report highlights the importance of working with local plastic surgeons and their residents, and emphasizes that the program should be organized by and the operations performed by accredited plastic surgeons and with the auspices and support of the national plastic surgery society and the local medical board. Operation San Jose promotes the creation of long-term benefits by offering a program to teach local surgeons cleft lip and palate repair techniques and to set up guidelines to organize local surgeons so that they can continue this effort by treating their own patients in their own countries.

  20. Speech in Adults Treated for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: Long-Term Follow-Up After One- or Two-Stage Palate Repair.

    PubMed

    Morén, Staffan; Mani, Maria; Lilian, Stålhammar; Lindestad, Per Åke; Holmström, Mats

    2017-01-31

      To evaluate speech in adults treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate with one-stage or two-stage palate closure and compare the speech of the patients with that of a noncleft control group.   Cross-sectional study with long-term follow-up.   All unilateral cleft lip and palate patients born from 1960 to 1987 and treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden, were invited (n = 109). Participation rate was 67% (n = 73) at a mean of 35 years after primary surgery. Forty-seven had been treated according to one-stage palate closure and 26 according to two-stage palate closure. Pharyngeal flap surgery had been performed in 11 of the 73 patients (15%). The noncleft control group consisted of 63 age-matched volunteers.   Speech-language pathologists rated perceptual speech characteristics from blinded audio recordings.   Among patients, seven (10%) presented with hypernasality, 12 (16%) had audible nasal emission and/or nasal turbulence, five (7%) had consonant production errors, one (2%) had glottal reinforcements/substitutions, and one (2%) had reduced intelligibility. Controls had no audible signs of velopharyngeal insufficiency and no quantifiable problems with the other speech production variables. No significant differences were identified between patients treated with one-stage and two-stage palate closure for any of the variables.   The prevalence of speech outcome indicative of velopharyngeal insufficiency among adult patients treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate was low but higher compared with individuals without cleft. Whether palatal closure is performed in one or two stages does not seem to affect the speech outcome at a mean age of 35 years.

  1. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with non syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Material and Methods Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Results Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, p<0.0001), bilateral complete CLP (p=0.0002) and bilateral incomplete CLP (p< 0.0001) were more affected by tooth agenesis than individuals with other cleft types. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most affected teeth (p<0.0001). Conclusions The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P. Key words:Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate, dental anomaly, tooth agenesis, microdontia. PMID:26615505

  2. Velopharyngeal incompetence in patients with cleft palate, flexible video pharyngoscopy and perceptual speech assessment: a correlational pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S; Kurien, M; Gupta, A K; Mathews, S S; Albert, R R; Tychicus, D

    2014-11-01

    To assess the role of video endoscopy in evaluating velopharyngeal incompetence and investigate a possible relationship between velopharyngeal incompetence type and speech defect in cleft palate patients. A prospective study of 28 pre- or post-operative cleft palate patients with speech defects who attended Plastic Surgery-Cleft Palate and ENT out-patient clinics was performed. The velar defect type was determined using a flexible endoscope and findings were video recorded. Speech pathology was assessed using the cleft palate audit protocol for speech. A significant, clinically relevant relationship was noted between the perceived characteristics of hypernasality and velopharyngeal insufficiency type. Hypernasal speech was a definite clinical indicator of velopharyngeal incompetence, and the type 1 velopharyngeal defect was most common. Type 1 velopharyngeal coronal-type dysfunction was strongly associated with hypernasality (p < 0.05). When speech substitution was noted, type 2 velopharyngeal (or sagittal) incompetence could be predicted (p < 0.05). In the management of cleft palate patients, it is important that surgical correction of the defect and achieving velopharyngeal competency for speech are performed simultaneously. Pre-operative velopharyngeal endoscopy with speech assessment will define the anatomical and functional bases for velopharyngeal correction and assist in planning and tailoring the pharyngeal flap.

  3. Receptor-dependent mechanisms of glucocorticoid and dioxin-induced cleft palate.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R M

    1985-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (triamcinolone) and dioxins (TCDD) are highly specific teratogens in the mouse, in that cleft palate is the major malformation observed. Glucocorticoids and TCDD both readily cross the yolk sac and placenta and appear in the developing secondary palate. Structure-activity relationships for glucocorticoid- and TCDD-induced cleft palate suggest a receptor involvement. Receptors for glucocorticoids and TCDD are present in the palate and their levels in various mouse strains are highly correlated with their sensitivity to cleft palate induction. Receptors for glucocorticoids appear to be more prevalent in the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas those for TCDD are probably located in the palatal epithelial cells. Glucocorticoids exert their teratogenic effect on the palate by inhibiting the growth of the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas TCDD alters the terminal cell differentiation of the medial palatal epithelial cells. PMID:2998748

  4. Receptor-dependent mechanisms of glucocorticoid and dioxin-induced cleft palate

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    Glucocorticoids (triamcinolone) and dioxins (TCDD) are highly specific teratogens in the mouse, in that cleft palate is the major malformation observed. Glucocorticoids and TCDD both readily cross the yolk sac and placenta and appear in the developing secondary palate. Structure-activity relationships for glucocorticoid- and TCDD-induced cleft palate suggest a receptor involvement. Receptors for glucocorticoids and TCDD are present in the palate and their levels in various mouse strains are highly correlated with their sensitivity to cleft palate induction. Receptors for glucocorticoids appear to be more prevalent in the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas those for TCDD are probably located in the palatal epithelial cells. Glucocorticoids exert their teratogenic effect on the palate by inhibiting the growth of the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas TCDD alters the terminal cell differentiation of the media palatal epithelial cells. 71 references.

  5. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning.

  6. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning. PMID:26923345

  7. Postoperative alar base symmetry in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate:A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vyloppilli, Suresh; Krishnakumar, K S; Sayd, Shermil; Latheef, Sameer; Narayanan, Saju V; Pati, Ajit

    2017-06-09

    In the evolution of cleft lip repair, there have been continuous attempts to minimize local trauma and to improve lip and nasal appearances. In order to obtain an aesthetically balanced development of midface, the primary surgical correction of the nasolabial area is of paramount importance. In this study, the importance of a back-cut extending cephalically above the inferior turbinate at the mucocutaneous junction which elevates the nostril floor on the cleft side for the purpose of achieving symmetry of the alar bases are analyzed by pre and postoperative photographic anthropometry. This study comprised of fifty cases of the unilateral complete cleft lip. At the time of surgery, the patient age ranged from 3-9 months. The surgeries, performed by a single surgeon, employed the standard Millard technique, incorporating Mohler modifications of lip repair. Anthropometric analysis revealed that the preoperative mean difference between the normal side and the cleft side was 0.2056 with a standard deviation of 0.133. In the postoperative analysis, the mean difference was reduced to 0.0174 with a standard deviation of 0.141. The paired t-test showed that the p-value is <0.001, indicating high statistical significance. To conclude, in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, the geometrically placed nasal back-cut incision has a definite role in the correction of the alar base symmetry during primary surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cleft extension and risks of other birth defects in children with isolated cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Chetpakdeechit, Woranuch; Mohlin, Bengt; Persson, Christina; Hagberg, Catharina

    2010-03-01

    To study the risks of having other birth defects in children born with an isolated cleft palate (iCP) when the length of the cleft was taken into account. The hypothesis was that a newborn with an extensive cleft lesion may have an increased risk of other birth defects compared to a child with a less extensive cleft of the palate. All Caucasian children with iCP born between 1975 and 2005 in the southwestern region of Sweden were included. Data were collected from standardized medical records and the length of the cleft was checked on the pre-surgical dental cast for each child. A total of 343 children were born with an iCP. The incidence was 0.64/1000 live births. Thirty-four percent of children with either a total or partial iCP had other birth defects. The risk was 1.7 times higher for a total compared to a partial iCP. The two most common birth defects were congenital heart disease and intellectual disability. Ear problems related to infections were registered in 43% of cases. Fifteen percent of the children had the Pierre Robin sequence, which was analyzed as a separate variable and not included as a birth defect. The length of the iCP was found to influence the risk of having another birth defect as the total palatal clefts were more often combined with other birth defects compared to partial clefts. Careful medical check-ups are important for newborns with iCP since they have increased risks of other birth defects.

  9. The Primary Care Pediatrician and the Care of Children With Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Charlotte W; Jacob, Lisa S; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-05-01

    Orofacial clefts, specifically cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P), are among the most common congenital anomalies. CL/P vary in their location and severity and comprise 3 overarching groups: cleft lip (CL), cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP), and cleft palate alone (CP). CL/P may be associated with one of many syndromes that could further complicate a child's needs. Care of patients with CL/P spans prenatal diagnosis into adulthood. The appropriate timing and order of specific cleft-related care are important factors for optimizing outcomes; however, care should be individualized to meet the specific needs of each patient and family. Children with CL/P should receive their specialty cleft-related care from a multidisciplinary cleft or craniofacial team with sufficient patient and surgical volume to promote successful outcomes. The primary care pediatrician at the child's medical home has an essential role in making a timely diagnosis and referral; providing ongoing health care maintenance, anticipatory guidance, and acute care; and functioning as an advocate for the patient and a liaison between the family and the craniofacial/cleft team. This document provides background on CL/P and multidisciplinary team care, information about typical timing and order of cleft-related care, and recommendations for cleft/craniofacial teams and primary care pediatricians in the care of children with CL/P. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Assessment of the patient with cleft lip and palate. A developmental approach.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, E N; D'Antonio, L L; Hardesty, R A

    1993-10-01

    Children with cleft lip and palate require interdisciplinary team care from infancy through adolescence. An understanding of developmental stages allows the cleft palate team to adapt and integrate its services into the rapidly changing life of the child. This article discusses the maturational, developmental stages of childhood and the services the child with cleft lip and palate and the child's family deserve through each stage. Health care providers in all settings may continue to provide appropriate care for all patients with cleft lip and palate, despite the challenges of a changing health care environment, by emphasizing the needs of the child in all developmental stages.

  11. Oblique lip-alveolar banding in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, S; Bütow, K-W

    2015-04-01

    We report an oblique lip-alveolar band, a rare banding of soft tissue that involves the lip and alveolus, which we have found in five patients with cleft lip and palate (0.2%), compared with an incidence of the Simonartz lip-lip band of 5.7%). To our knowledge this has not been reported previously. In two patients the bands affected the cleft lip and alveolus bilaterally, with or without the palatal cleft, and in three the bands were unilateral cleft lip and alveolus with or without the palatal cleft. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Scope of Western surgical techniques to correct cleft lip and palate prior to the 18th century.

    PubMed

    Romero, Martín; Saez, José Miguel

    2014-09-01

    To present the state of knowledge and surgical practice concerning cleft lip and palate leading to the modern era. Bibliographical review. Analysis of the scientific medical, surgical, and odontological literature from the 16th to 18th centuries. Texts and art confirm the existence of cleft lip and palate from antiquity in all cultures; however, the first certain references in Western scientific literature did not appear until the works of Celsus (ca. 25 BC to AD 50) and Galen (AD 129 to 200). Indications for cleft lip surgery appear in the Middle Ages with Albucasis (936 to 1013) and Yperman (1260 to 1332). From the Renaissance period onward, and with the invention of the printing press, numerous authors described their own surgical methods. Given the limitations imposed by pain and infection, the authors of the Modern Age focus on correcting the functional and esthetic defect of the lip with techniques that do not differ greatly from those described in the Middle Ages. The treatment for cleft palate was limited to the creation of "obturators" and surgery for cleft palate was not possible until the 19th century.

  13. The developmental characteristics of mastoid pneumatisation in cleft palate children: the genetic influence.

    PubMed

    Srzentić, Mladen; Handzić, Jadranka; Trotić, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Physiologic and developmental role of mastoid pneumatisation in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) is still controversial. For measuring mastoid pneumatisation and examine developmental characteristics, we used children with orofacial malformation of high risk for long term negative pressure in the middle ear and are expected to have lower rate of size and growth of pneumatisation. Mastoid were measured on Schuller's mastoid X-ray pictures planimetrically in study group of 146 children with bilateral (BCLP), unilateral (UCLP) and isolated (ICP) cleft palate, and control group of non-cleft 52 children, both groups with confirmed otitis media with effusion and no previous otological surgery. The lowest pneumatisation found in BCLE, BCLP and UCLP showed no growth of mastoid with age and lower mastoid size than OME controls. ICP is the only cleft type with growth of mastoid with aging. OME patients has the highest size of mastoid and growth rate with aging.

  14. Palatal growth in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate patients following neonatal cheiloplasty: Classic and geometric morphometric assessment.

    PubMed

    Hoffmannova, Eva; Bejdová, Šárka; Borský, Jiri; Dupej, Ján; Cagáňová, Veronika; Velemínská, Jana

    2016-11-01

    A new method of early neonatal cheiloplasty has recently been employed on patients having complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). We aimed to investigate (1) their detailed palatal morphology before surgery and growth during the 10 months after neonatal cheiloplasty, (2) the growth of eight dimensions of the maxilla in these patients, (3) the development of these dimensions compared with published data on noncleft controls and on cUCLP patients operated using later operation protocol (LOP; 6 months of age). Sixty-six virtual dental models of 33 longitudinally evaluated cUCLP patients were analysed using metric analysis, a dense correspondence model, and multivariate statistics. We compared the palatal surfaces before neonatal cheiloplasty (mean age, 4 days) and before palatoplasty (mean age, 10 months). The palatal form variability of 10-month-old children was considerably reduced during the observed period thanks to their undisturbed growth, that is, the palate underwent the same growth changes following neonatal cheiloplasty. A detailed colour-coded map identified the most marked growth at the anterior and posterior ends of both segments. The maxilla of cUCLP patients after neonatal cheiloplasty had a growth tendency similar to noncleft controls (unlike LOP). Both methodological approaches showed that early neonatal cheiloplasty in cUCLP patients did not prevent forward growth of the upper jaw segments and did not reduce either the length or width of the maxilla during the first 10 months of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of lip repair on maxillofacial morphology in patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qinghua; Chen, Zhengxi; Yang, Yang; Chen, Zhenqi

    2014-11-01

    Objective : To evaluate the effects of lip repair on maxillofacial development of patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Design : Retrospective. Patients : A total of 75 patients were recruited, including 38 surgical patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and 37 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate who had lip but not palate repair. As controls, 38 patients with no cleft were selected. All subjects were divided according to two growth stages: before the pubertal peak (GS1) and after the pubertal peak (GS2). Interventions : Lateral cephalograms of all subjects were obtained. Main Outcome Measures : Cephalograms were analyzed and compared in the study and control groups. Results : The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate in both GS1 and GS2 demonstrated an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth with retroclined maxillary incisors. The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate showed a shorter length of maxilla, a more clockwise-rotated mandible, and retroclined maxillary incisors. Conclusions : There was an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth but retroclined maxillary incisors in patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate who had received lip repair only, indicating that lip repair may not have a negative impact on the maxillofacial development and influences only the inclination of the maxillary incisors. The shorter anterior-posterior maxillary length and larger gonial angle in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate compared with those in patients with unilateral cleft lip and alveolus suggest that these variations in maxillary and mandibular growth may be a consequence of the cleft itself.

  16. Longitudinal treatment of cleft lip and palate in developing countries: dentistry as part of a multidisciplinary endeavor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cameron C Y; Jagtap, Rasika R; Deshpande, Gaurav S

    2014-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate affects roughly 1 in 600 children and predisposes patients to a lifetime of functional and esthetic discrepancies. Disparities in access as well as quality of care exist worldwide, with many children in developing countries unable to receive treatment. In the late 20th century, humanitarian medical missions emerged as a means of delivering surgical expertise to patients in resource-limited settings. These early missions took on a patient-centered approach focused solely on cleft repair, with little emphasis on treating the dental abnormalities that arose after the initial surgery. However, modern cleft care is characterized by a multidisciplinary, team-based approach with significant dental involvement. Recent cleft lip and palate endeavors have shifted from a mission-based approach to a developmental approach facilitating growth of an independent care center. This strategy focuses on creating an institution with expanded access to dental services, thus facilitating the long-term treatment inherent in modern cleft care. One clinic in a developing country that has experienced successful transitioning from a mission site to an independent craniofacial clinic is Operation Smile's Cleft Comprehensive Care Clinic in Guwahati, India. This article will summarize the rationale and planning of the clinic, underscore the team-based approach required in longitudinal treatment of cleft lip and palate, and demonstrate how treatment methodology may differ in resource-limited settings by outlining the therapeutic considerations of each provider in the Guwahati Clinic.

  17. Number of Surgical Procedures for Patients With Cleft lip and Palate From Birth to 21 Years Old at a Single Children's Hospital.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Joyce K; Sethi, Harleen; Schönbrunner, Anna; Proudfoot, James; Jones, Marilyn; Gosman, Amanda

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric patients with cleft lip and palate undergo numerous surgeries throughout their childhood and early adulthood to correct the aesthetic and functional stigmata of their diagnoses. This study identifies patient and clinical factors that contribute to the number of surgeries and anesthesia events children undergo for their cleft repair. Retrospective chart review was performed using the genetic and dysmorphology database at Rady Children's Hospital San Diego. All patients with cleft lip or cleft palate diagnosis who underwent surgery at Rady Children's Hospital San Diego between 1988 and 2014 were included. A sample size of 71 patients was analyzed. Poisson regression was used to determine if there is a relationship between each variable of interest and the number of procedures. For our sample of 71 patients, the average number of surgical procedures was 8.6 (SD, 4.4). The average number of anesthesia events was 6.7 (SD, 3.3). Across and within diagnosis, race and sex were not statistically significant factors in patients' number of surgeries. Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) and unilateral cleft lip and palate had, on average, 10 and 9.4 procedures, respectively. This is in contrast to patients with unilateral cleft lip and isolated cleft palate who had, on average, 5.3 and 5.9 procedures, respectively. This difference was significant (P value = 0.01). Patients were also compared based on continuity of care. Patients who had their cleft surgeries by multiple plastic surgeons affiliated with our children's hospital had significantly more surgeries (P = 0.01). A surgical outlier subset of 17 patients (24%) was identified who had more than 10 surgeries. These patients also had, on average, 11.3 (unilateral cleft lip and palate) and 11.8 (bilateral cleft lip and palate) anesthesia events; this is in contrast to the nonoutliers who had, on average, 4.1 to 8 anesthesia events. This retrospective review identifies patient and clinical factors

  18. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  19. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  20. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of the Nasopharyngeal Airway in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Subjects.

    PubMed

    Al-Fahdawi, Mahmood Abd; Farid, Mary Medhat; El-Fotouh, Mona Abou; El-Kassaby, Marwa Abdelwahab

    2017-03-01

      To assess the nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth in previously repaired nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate versus bilateral cleft lip and palate patients compared with noncleft controls using cone-beam computed tomography with the ultimate goal of finding whether cleft lip and palate patients are more liable to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction.   A retrospective analysis comparing bilateral cleft lip and palate, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and control subjects. Significance at P ≤ .05.   Cleft Care Center and the outpatient clinic that are both affiliated with our faculty.   Cone-beam computed tomography data were selected of 58 individuals aged 9 to 12 years: 14 with bilateral cleft lip and palate and 20 with unilateral cleft lip and palate as well as 24 age- and gender-matched noncleft controls.   Volume, depth, and cross-sectional area of nasopharyngeal airway were measured.   Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger nasopharyngeal airway volume than controls and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P < .001). Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger cross-sectional area than those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P < .001) and insignificant cross-sectional area compared with controls (P > .05). Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger depth than controls and those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P < .001). Patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate showed insignificant nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth compared with controls (P > .05).   Unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients did not show significantly less volume, cross-sectional area, or depth of nasopharyngeal airway than controls. From the results of this study we conclude that unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the studied age and stage of repaired clefts are not

  1. Presurgical management of unilateral cleft lip and palate in a neonate: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Avhad, Rajendra; Sar, Ranjukta; Tembhurne, Jyoti

    2014-09-01

    A cleft lip and palate consists of fissures of the upper lip and/or palate, and is the most commonly seen orofacial anomaly that involves the middle third of the face. Early treatment of patients with a cleft lip and palate is important because of esthetic, functional, and psychological concerns. Nasoalveolar molding provides excellent results when started immediately after birth. This clinical report describes the presurgical management of an infant with a complete unilateral cleft of the soft palate, hard palate, alveolar ridge, and lip. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence at birth of cleft lip with or without cleft palate: data from the International Perinatal Database of Typical Oral Clefts (IPDTOC).

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    As part of a collaborative project on the epidemiology of craniofacial anomalies, funded by the National Institutes for Dental and Craniofacial Research and channeled through the Human Genetics Programme of the World Health Organization, the International Perinatal Database of Typical Orofacial Clefts (IPDTOC) was established in 2003. IPDTOC is collecting case-by-case information on cleft lip with or without cleft palate and on cleft palate alone from birth defects registries contributing to at least one of three collaborative organizations: European Surveillance Systems of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) in Europe, National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) in the United States, and International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR) worldwide. Analysis of the collected information is performed centrally at the ICBDSR Centre in Rome, Italy, to maximize the comparability of results. The present paper, the first of a series, reports data on the prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate from 54 registries in 30 countries over at least 1 complete year during the period 2000 to 2005. Thus, the denominator comprises more than 7.5 million births. A total of 7704 cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (7141 livebirths, 237 stillbirths, 301 terminations of pregnancy, and 25 with pregnancy outcome unknown) were available. The overall prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was 9.92 per 10,000. The prevalence of cleft lip was 3.28 per 10,000, and that of cleft lip and palate was 6.64 per 10,000. There were 5918 cases (76.8%) that were isolated, 1224 (15.9%) had malformations in other systems, and 562 (7.3%) occurred as part of recognized syndromes. Cases with greater dysmorphological severity of cleft lip with or without cleft palate were more likely to include malformations of other systems.

  3. Transforming growth factor-alpha and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate or cleft palate only in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Roselinda Abdul; Ahmad, Azlina; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Mokhtar, Khairani Idah; Lah, Nik Ahmad Shah Nik; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Samsudin, Ab Rani

    2008-11-01

    To determine the frequency of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) Taq1 polymorphism in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and cleft palate only (CP) in Kelantan, Malaysia. The study was conducted at the Combined Cleft Clinic and at the Human Genome Centre in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia in Kelantan, Malaysia. We examined the C2/Taq1 variant of the TGFalpha gene in 46 patients with nonsyndromic CL+/-P or CP only and in 33 controls. The TGFalpha genotype frequencies in patients were compared with those in controls using the chi-square or Fisher exact test. DNA samples were obtained from peripheral blood. No association was found between TGFalphaTaq1 polymorphism and CL+/-P or CP in this case-control study. In addition, no homozygosity for the rare allele C2 was noted in CL+/-P, CP, or the controls. No evidence of TGFalphaTaq1 polymorphism was observed in association with CL+/-P and CP in this study.

  4. [Analysis of quality of life of 115 parents with cleft lip and/or palate children].

    PubMed

    Yanyan, Zhang; Caixia, Gong; Hongyan, Wu; Ying, Chen; Xiaolin, Zhang; Yuye, Liang; Pin, Ha; Bing, Shi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the quality of life of cleft lip and/or palate children's parents and discuss the factors to provide the oretical basis for improving the quality of life of these parents and promoting the healthy growth of children with cleft lip and/or palate. A total of 115 parents whose children had cleft lip and/or palate surgery treatment were selected as the experiment group, and another 198 parents (with healthy children having a similar age with those in the experiment group) as the control group. The experiment group was divided into three subgroups according to different types of cleft lip and/or palate: cleft Lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), cleft lip and palate (CLP). The experiment group and the control group were both divided into four subgroups according to age: 0-1, 1-3, 3-6 years old, and more than 6 years old. The experiment group and the control group were both divided into three subgroups according to education: junior middle school and the following, high school and technical secondary school, junior college degree or above. The GQOLI-74 scale was selected to assess the experiment group and the control group. SPSS 16.0 software was used to analyze data. 1) The experiment group had no significant difference with the control group in terms of the overall score and the scores of various children ages. 2) The scores of every item had no significant difference in CL, CP, CLP subgroup (P > 0.05). 3) The quality of life scores and scores of psychological function dimension and social function dimension of parents with 3-6 years old patients were obviously lower than those of parents with more than 6 years old patients (P<0.05). The scores of social function dimension of parents with 0-1, 1-3, 3-6 years old patients were obviously lower than those of parents with more than 6 years old patients (P < 0.05). The other items had no significant difference. 4) The scores of material life dimension and social function dimension of parents with junior college

  5. Association between maternal smoking, gender, and cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Daniella Reis Barbosa; Coletta, Ricardo D; Oliveira, Eduardo A; Swerts, Mário Sérgio Oliveira; Rodrigues, Laíse A Mendes; Oliveira, Maria Christina; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face. To assess the relationship between maternal smoking, gender and CL/P. This is an epidemiological cross-sectional study. We interviewed 1519 mothers divided into two groups: mothers of children with CL/P (n=843) and mothers of children without CL/P (n=676). All mothers were classified as smoker or non-smoker subjects during the first trimester of pregnancy. To determine an association among maternal smoking, gender, and CL/P, odds ratios were calculated and the adjustment was made by a logistic regression model. An association between maternal smoking and the presence of cleft was observed. There was also a strong association between male gender and the presence of cleft (OR=3.51; 95% CI 2.83-4.37). By binary logistic regression analysis, it was demonstrated that both variables were independently associated with clefts. In a multivariate analysis, male gender and maternal smoking had a 2.5- and a 1.5-time greater chance of having a cleft, respectively. Our findings are consistent with a positive association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and CL/P in male gender. The results support the importance of smoking prevention and introduction of cessation programs among women with childbearing potential. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  7. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  8. The FGF and FGFR Gene Family and Risk of Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Tianxiao; Wu, Tao; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Ruczinski, Ingo; Schwender, Holger; Liang, Kung Yee; Murray, Tanda; Fallin, M Daniele; Redett, Richard J; Raymond, Gerald V; Jin, Sheng-Chih; Chou, Yah-Huei Wu; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel S; Cheah, Felicia S H; Jee, Sun Ha; Jabs, Ethylin W; Scott, Alan F; Beaty, Terri H

    2013-01-01

    Background : Isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate is a common human congenital malformation with a complex and heterogeneous etiology. Genes coding for fibroblast growth factors and their receptors (FGF/FGFR genes) are excellent candidate genes. Methods : We tested single-nucleotide polymorphic markers in 10 FGF/FGFR genes (including FGFBP1, FGF2, FGF10, FGF18, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGF19, FGF4, FGF3, and FGF9) for genotypic effects, interactions with one another, and with common maternal environmental exposures in 221 Asian and 76 Maryland case-parent trios ascertained through a child with isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Results : Both FGFR1 and FGF19 yielded evidence of linkage and association in the transmission disequilibrium test, confirming previous evidence. Haplotypes of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FGFR1 were nominally significant among Asian trios. Estimated odds ratios for individual single-nucleotide polymorphic markers and haplotypes of multiple markers in FGF19 ranged from 1.31 to 1.87. We also found suggestive evidence of maternal genotypic effects for markers in FGF2 and FGF10 among Asian trios. Tests for gene-environment (G × E) interaction between markers in FGFR2 and maternal smoking or multivitamin supplementation yielded significant evidence of G × E interaction separately. Tests of gene-gene (G × G) interaction using Cordell's method yielded significant evidence between single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FGF9 and FGF18, which was confirmed in an independent sample of trios from an international consortium. Conclusion : Our results suggest several genes in the FGF/FGFR family may influence risk for isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate through distinct biological mechanisms.

  9. Development of Information System for Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate undergoing Operation.

    PubMed

    Augsornwan, Darawan; Pattangtanang, Pantamanas; Surakunprapha, Palakorn

    2015-08-01

    Srinagarind Hospital has 150-200 patients with cleft lip and palate each year. When patients are admitted to hospital for surgery patients and family feel they are in a crisis of life, they feel fear anxiety and need to know about how to take care of wound, they worry if patient will feel pain, how to feed patients and many things about patients. Information is very important for patients/family to prevent complications and help their decision process, decrease parents stress and encourage better co-operation. To develop information system for patients with cleft lip-palate undergoing operation. This is an action research divided into 3 phases. Phase 1 Situation review: in this phase we interview, nursing care observation, and review nursing documents about the information giving. Phase 2 Develop information system: focus groups, for discussion about what nurses can do to develop the system to give information to patients/parents. Phase 3 evaluation: by interviewing 61 parents using the structure questionnaire. 100 percent of patients/parents received information but some items were not received. Patients/parents satisfaction was 94.9 percent, no complications. The information system development provides optimal care for patients and family with cleft lip and palate, but needs to improve some techniques or tools to give more information and evaluate further the nursing outcome after.

  10. A novel computer system for the evaluation of nasolabial morphology, symmetry and aesthetics after cleft lip and palate treatment. Part 2: Comparative anthropometric analysis of patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Pietruski, Piotr; Majak, Marcin; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Skiba, Adam; Antoszewski, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to use a novel system, 'Analyse It Doc' (A.I.D.) for a complex anthropometric analysis of the nasolabial region in patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and in healthy individuals. A set of standardized facial photographs in frontal, lateral and submental view have been taken in 50 non-cleft controls (mean age 20.6 years) and 42 patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft and palate (mean age 19.57 years). Then, based on linear, angular and area measurements taken from the digital photographs with the aid of the A.I.D. system, a photogrammetric analysis of intergroup differences in nasolabial morphology and symmetry was conducted. Patients with cleft lip and palate differed from the controls in terms of more than half of analysed angular measurements and proportion indices derived from linear and area measurements of the nasolabial region. The findings presented herein imply that despite primary surgical repair, patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate still show some degree of nasolabial dysmorphology. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that the novel computer system is suitable for a reliable, simple and time-efficient anthropometric analysis in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Herpes simplex 1 stomatitis after cleft palate repair: a case report and guidelines for management.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Maristella S; Tracy, Lauren; Wells, James H

    2015-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) primary infection and reactivation has been associated with the inflammation and transient decrease in immunocompetence after surgery and local trauma. In addition, HSV infection is known to impair wound healing, increase risk of scarring, and impede connective tissue graft transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of HSV infection complicating cleft palate repair presented in literature. In this report, we present a case of primary HSV infection occurring in a healthy 26-month-old patient after repair of the secondary cleft palate with mucoperichondrial flaps and V-Y pushback. The patient developed high fever on postoperative day 1, which was followed by perioral vesicular lesions and multiple intraoral ulcerations involving the lips, palate, and posterior pharynx. Unknown to the surgeons, the patient was exposed to HSV before surgery by a sibling with orolabial HSV infection. The infective cause was ascertained via polymerase chain reaction for HSV-1 DNA, and the infection was treated with topical and intravenous acyclovir for 1 week. The patient recovered well with adequate flap healing, good aesthetic outcome, and no complications on 1-month follow-up. This report underscores the importance of prompt recognition of herpetic infections in the patient with craniofacial surgery and reviews the association and complications of HSV infection in surgical healing. Early identification with prompt antiviral therapy and meticulous wound care are essential to ameliorate the scarring and delayed wound healing associated with HSV infection.

  12. Differential microRNA expression in cultured palatal fibroblasts from infants with cleft palate and controls.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Christian; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Abghari, Shaghayegh; Bloemen, Marjon; Aschrafi, Armaz; Carels, Carine E L; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2017-05-09

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in animal models of palatogenesis has been shown, but only limited research has been carried out in humans. To date, no miRNA expression study on tissues or cells from cleft palate patients has been published. We compared miRNA expression in palatal fibroblasts from cleft palate patients and age-matched controls. Cultured palatal fibroblasts from 10 non-syndromic cleft lip and palate patients (nsCLP; mean age: 18 ± 2 months), 5 non-syndromic cleft palate only patients (nsCPO; mean age: 17 ± 2 months), and 10 controls (mean age: 24 ± 5 months) were analysed with next-generation small RNA sequencing. All subjects are from Western European descent. Sequence reads were bioinformatically processed and the differentially expressed miRNAs were technically validated using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Using RNA sequencing, three miRNAs (hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-18a-5p, and hsa-miR-92a-3p) were up-regulated and six (hsa-miR-29c-5p, hsa-miR-549a, hsa-miR-3182, hsa-miR-181a-5p, hsa-miR-451a, and hsa-miR-92b-5p) were down-regulated in nsCPO fibroblasts. One miRNA (hsa-miR-505-3p) was down-regulated in nsCLP fibroblasts. Of these, hsa-miR-505-3p, hsa-miR-92a, hsa-miR-181a, and hsa-miR-451a were also differentially expressed using RT-PCR with a higher fold change than in RNAseq. The small sample size may limit the value of the data. In addition, interpretation of the data is complicated by the fact that biopsy samples are taken after birth, while the origin of the cleft lies in the embryonic period. This, together with possible effects of the culture medium, implies that only cell-autonomous genetic and epigenetic differences might be detected. For the first time, we have shown that several miRNAs appear to be dysregulated in palatal fibroblasts from patients with nsCLP and nsCPO. Furthermore, large-scale genomic and expression studies are needed to validate these findings.

  13. Patterns of orofacial clefting in the facial morphology of bats: a possible naturally occurring model of cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Orr, David J A; Teeling, Emma C; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Finarelli, John A

    2016-11-01

    A normal feature of the facial anatomy of many species of bat is the presence of bony discontinuities or clefts, which bear a remarkable similarity to orofacial clefts that occur in humans as a congenital pathology. These clefts occur in two forms: a midline cleft between the two premaxillae (analogous to the rare midline craniofacial clefts in humans) and bilateral paramedian clefts between the premaxilla and the maxillae (analogous to the typical cleft lip and palate in humans). Here, we describe the distribution of orofacial clefting across major bat clades, exploring the relationship of the different patterns of clefting to feeding mode, development of the vomeronasal organ, development of the nasolacrimal duct and mode of emission of the echolocation call in different bat groups. We also present the results of detailed radiographic and soft tissue dissections of representative examples of the two types of cleft. The midline cleft has arisen independently multiple times in bat phylogeny, whereas the paramedian cleft has arisen once and is a synapomorphy uniting the Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae. In all cases examined, the bony cleft is filled in by a robust fibrous membrane, continuous with the periosteum of the margins of the cleft. In the paramedian clefts, this membrane splits to enclose the premaxilla but forms a loose fold laterally between the premaxilla and maxilla, allowing the premaxilla and nose-leaf to pivot dorsoventrally in the sagittal plane under the action of facial muscles attached to the nasal cartilages. It is possible that this is a specific adaptation for echolocation and/or aerial insectivory. Given the shared embryological location of orofacial clefts in bats and humans, it is likely that aspects of the developmental control networks that produce cleft lip and palate in humans may also be implicated in the formation of these clefts as a normal feature in some bats. A better understanding of craniofacial development in bats with and

  14. Descriptive epidemiology of cleft lip and cleft palate in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jane C; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Bower, Carol; Turner, Robin M; Roberts, Christine L; Nassar, Natasha

    2013-02-01

    The reported birth prevalence of orofacial clefts (OFCs) varies considerably. This study describes the epidemiology of OFCs in an Australian population. We studied infants diagnosed with cleft lip, with or without cleft palate (CL±P), and cleft palate only (CPO) since 1980 and reported to the population based Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies. We calculated prevalence rates by sex, Aboriginal status, geographic location, and socio-economic status. Associations between clefts and folate availability, pregnancy characteristics, pregnancy outcomes, other congenital anomalies, and age at diagnosis were also investigated. From 1980 to 2009, 917 infants with CL±P (12.05 per 10,000) and from 1980 to 2004, 621 infants with CPO (10.12 per 10,000) were registered. Prevalence rates for CL±P and CPO were 1.9 and 1.3 times higher, respectively, for Aboriginal Australians. Additional anomalies were reported for 31% of infants with CL±P and for 61% with CPO; chromosomal anomalies and other specific diagnoses accounted for 46% and 66%, respectively, of those with CL±P and CPO with additional anomalies. Almost all (99.7%) children with CL±P were diagnosed before 1 year of age, but 12% of CPO diagnoses were made after 1 year of age; 94% of these diagnoses were of submucous clefts and bifid uvula. These data provide a picture of the prevalence of OFCs in WA since 1980, and provide a useful reference for OFC data in Australia and internationally. The quality and completeness of the WARDA data are high, reflected in high prevalence rates, and proportions of clefts occurring with other anomalies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Limited Chances of Speech Improvement After Late Cleft Palate Repair.

    PubMed

    Schönmeyr, Björn; Wendby, Lisa; Sharma, Mitali; Raud-Westberg, Liisi; Restrepo, Carolina; Campbell, Alex

    2015-06-01

    Late primary palatal repair is a common phenomenon, and many patients across the world will be operated on at a far later age than is suggested for normal speech development. Nevertheless, little is known about the speech outcomes after these procedures and conflicting results exist among the few studies performed. In this study, blinded preoperative and postoperative speech recordings from 31 patients operated on at Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center in Assam, India, older than 7 years were evaluated. Six non-Indian speech and language pathologists evaluated hypernasal resonance and articulation, and 4 local laymen evaluated the speech intelligibility/acceptability of the samples. In 25 of 31 cases, the evaluators could not detect any speech improvement in the postoperative recordings. A clear trend of postoperative improvement was only found in 6 of the 31 patients. Among these 6 patients, lesser clefts were overrepresented. Our findings together with previous studies suggest that late palate repairs have the potential to improve speech, but the probability for improvement and degree of improvement is low, especially in older adolescents and adults with complete clefts.

  16. The effect of tongue appliance on the nasomaxillary complex in growing cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Jamilian, A; Showkatbakhsh, R; Boushehry, M B

    2006-09-01

    Midfacial deficiency is a common feature of cleft lip and palate patients due to scar tissue of the lip and palate closure procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the physiological force of the tongue to move the maxilla in forward position. This research has been done experimentally by, before and after treatment following up in private practice. Ten patients (6 female, 4 male) with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate were selected. All of them had Cl III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency due to scar tissue of lip and palate surgery. Their age ranged from 7.6 to 9.8 years. All the patients were delivered tongue appliance to transfer the force of the tongue to maxillary complex. The mean observation time was 13+/-2 months to achieve positive overjet. Pre- and post-lateral cephalograms were compared to evaluate the skeletal changes with paired t-test. The results showed that after the application of tongue appliance, normal sagittal maxillomandibular relationship was achieved. SN-ANS angle was increased 1.9+/-1.8 - P < 0.03. This study showed that the tongue appliance could transfer considerable force during rest and swallowing period to the maxilla. This method might be considered to improve the deficient maxilla by means of growth modification and redirect concept.

  17. Pre-speech in children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only: phonetic analysis related to morphologic and functional factors.

    PubMed

    Lohmander-Agerskov, A; Söderpalm, E; Friede, H; Persson, E C; Lilja, J

    1994-07-01

    Pre-speech in 35 children with clefts of the lip and palate or palate only were analyzed for place and manner of articulation. Transcriptions were made from tape recorded babbling sequences. Two children without clefts were used as reference. All of the children with clefts were treated according to a regimen of early surgical repair of the velum cleft and delayed closure of the cleft in the hard palate. The frequency of selected phonetic features was calculated. Correlations between phonetic/perceptual and functional and morphological factors were tested. Supraglottal articulation dominated among all the children indicating a sufficient velopharyngeal mechanism. The results also showed correlations between cleft type and place of articulation. Anteriorly placed sounds (i.e., bilabial, dental, and alveolar sounds) occurred frequently among the children with cleft palate only and in the noncleft children. In children with cleft lip and palate, posteriorly placed articulations predominated. It was postulated that early intervention may have a positive effect on articulatory development.

  18. Imputation of orofacial clefting data identifies novel risk loci and sheds light on the genetic background of cleft lip ± cleft palate and cleft palate only

    PubMed Central

    Böhmer, Anne C.; Bowes, John; Nikolić, Miloš; Ishorst, Nina; Wyatt, Niki; Hammond, Nigel L.; Gölz, Lina; Thieme, Frederic; Barth, Sandra; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Spielmann, Malte; Aldhorae, Khalid; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Dixon, Michael J.; Knapp, Michael; Mangold, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (nsCL/P) is among the most common human birth defects with multifactorial etiology. Here, we present results from a genome-wide imputation study of nsCL/P in which, after adding replication cohort data, four novel risk loci for nsCL/P are identified (at chromosomal regions 2p21, 14q22, 15q24 and 19p13). On a systematic level, we show that the association signals within this high-density dataset are enriched in functionally-relevant genomic regions that are active in both human neural crest cells (hNCC) and mouse embryonic craniofacial tissue. This enrichment is also detectable in hNCC regions primed for later activity. Using GCTA analyses, we suggest that 30% of the estimated variance in risk for nsCL/P in the European population can be attributed to common variants, with 25.5% contributed to by the 24 risk loci known to date. For each of these, we identify credible SNPs using a Bayesian refinement approach, with two loci harbouring only one probable causal variant. Finally, we demonstrate that there is no polygenic component of nsCL/P detectable that is shared with nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO). Our data suggest that, while common variants are strongly contributing to risk for nsCL/P, they do not seem to be involved in nsCPO which might be more often caused by rare deleterious variants. Our study generates novel insights into both nsCL/P and nsCPO etiology and provides a systematic framework for research into craniofacial development and malformation. PMID:28087736

  19. Camptodactyly, cleft palate, and club foot (the Gordon syndrome). A report of a large pedigree.

    PubMed Central

    Halal, F; Fraser, F C

    1979-01-01

    A second family is described in which camptodactyly, club foot, and cleft palate (the Gordon syndrome) is transmitted in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. Penetrance appears to be more reduced in females than in males, and cleft palate is the least frequently manifested trait. Images PMID:458832

  20. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  1. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Pamplona, Maria Carmen; Calderon, Juan F.; Shaheen, Kenneth; Chaiyasate, Konkgrit; Rontal, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management. PMID:26273595

  2. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  3. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  4. Surgical and prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous adult cleft palate patients by dental implants.

    PubMed

    Güven, Orhan; Gürbüz, Ayhan; Baltali, Evre; Yilmaz, Burak; Hatipoğlu, Murat

    2010-09-01

    Adult patients who did not receive proper treatment for cleft palate are challenging for clinicians in terms of prosthetic rehabilitation. Moreover, during the late stages of adulthood when patients become edentulous, prosthetic reconstruction becomes even more challenging. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of 2 edentulous geriatric patients with unrepaired cleft palate by placement of dental implants after closure of the oronasal communications.

  5. Psychosocial Aspects of Cleft Lip and Palate: Implications for Parental Education. Research Report 138.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalland, Mirjam

    This study focused on the psychosocial aspects of cleft lip and/or palate on maternal emotional reactions and the family, with emphasis on the effect on the maternal-infant bond. Interviews were conducted with 40 mothers of 1-year-old infants with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenological…

  6. A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harvey R.; Ferrand, Carole T.

    1987-01-01

    Respirometric quotients (RQ), the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained from the productions of oral and nasal airflow of 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. Cleft palate speakers without their appliances exhibited the lowest RQ values. (Author/DB)

  7. A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harvey R.; Ferrand, Carole T.

    1987-01-01

    Respirometric quotients (RQ), the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained from the productions of oral and nasal airflow of 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. Cleft palate speakers without their appliances exhibited the lowest RQ values. (Author/DB)

  8. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  9. Effects of variation of the timing of palatal repair on nasality of speech in complete cleft lip and palate children.

    PubMed

    Nandlal, B; Tewari, A; Utreja, A K; Chari, P S; Raghunathan, N

    1999-12-01

    Nasality is related to factors like velopharyngeal closure and acoustic factors pertaining to cavities. The present investigation is a retrospective study aimed at evaluating the effects of variation in the timing of palatal repair on nasality during speech development in complete cleft lip and palate cases. It has been observed that the delay in palatal repair is associated with increase in nasality. Also, from the operated complete cleft lip and palate cases, it has been observed that the early and medium repair groups had almost similar effects on nasality of speech. (if they were operated before 36 months of age).

  10. [Results of a questionnaire on the treatment of cleft lip and palate in Spain].

    PubMed

    González Landa, G; Sánchez-Ruiz, I; Pérez González, V; López Cedrún, J L

    1999-07-01

    To present the results of a questionnaire done to evaluate the status of the multidisciplinary team treatment of cleft lip and palate in Spain, directed to know the experience and organization of each center. A questionnaire was sent to 34 hospitals asking about the following: existence of multidisciplinary team, number of primary surgical cleft operation in 1997, specialty of the primary surgeon/s, the presence in the hospital staff of: ENT, speech therapist, orthodontist, maxillofacial surgeon; if evaluation of the velopharyngeal function is done, if orthodontist meets with other members of the team, where the speech therapy is performed, how the financial burden of these treatments are covered and if there is a parent group. Nineteen centers (55.8%) have responded. Only seven centers admit to have a multidisciplinary team, primary surgery is done by pediatric, plastic and maxillofacial surgeons, 36% of the surgeons operate less then 10 cases/year, the absence of a speech therapist and orthodontist in staff was 42% and 84% respectively, instrumental diagnosis of VPI is not performed in 60% of teams, scanty and not uniform cost coverage of these treatments, only 12% of centers admit to have a parent group. Deficiencies of organization and staff are present in many centers, there is not a team culture. Centralization of primary surgery is needed. The need of a Spanish Cleft Palate Association is pointed. Eurocleft treatment guidelines are presented.

  11. Latham's appliance for presurgical repositioning of the protruded premaxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Bitter, K

    1992-04-01

    Dislocation of the maxillary segments in cleft lip and palate still is a challenge to the surgeon and the orthodontist. The premaxillary protrusion in bilateral cleft lip and palate, complicates the treatment severely. Latham's appliance, inserted on average at 2-months-of-age, relocates the segments over 3-4 weeks. Removal of the appliance is immediately followed by functional surgery. The first operation comprises: (1) intra-alveolar veloplasty; (2) closure of the alveolar cleft with the help of a gingivo-periosteal-plasty; (3) lip adhesion and (4) insertion of ear tubes. This operating schedule establishes the functional matrix as early as possible. Midfacial growth as well as language and speech development are provided with the necessary preconditions as far as we understand this complex situation. Five cases, being representative of 41 cases, are outlined in detail. The longest follow up period is 3 years; no growth disturbance of the maxilla has been detected to date. Definitive lip and columella surgery is facilitated.

  12. The evolution of human genetic studies of cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs)--primarily cleft lip and cleft palate--are among the most common birth defects in all populations worldwide, and have notable population, ethnicity, and gender differences in birth prevalence. Interest in these birth defects goes back centuries, as does formal scientific interest; scientists often used OFCs as examples or evidence during paradigm shifts in human genetics, and have also used virtually every new method of human genetic analysis to deepen our understanding of OFC. This review traces the evolution of human genetic investigations of OFC, highlights the specific insights gained about OFC through the years, and culminates in a review of recent key OFC genetic findings resulting from the powerful tools of the genomics era. Notably, OFC represents a major success for genome-wide approaches, and the field is poised for further breakthroughs in the near future.

  13. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  14. p63 and IRF6: brothers in arms against cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2010-05-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate, which can also occur together as cleft lip and palate, are frequent and debilitating congenital malformations, with complex geneses that have both genetic and environmental factors implicated. Mutations in the genes encoding the p53 homolog p63 and interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) are major causes of cleft lip and cleft palate, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this have not been clear. However, in this issue of the JCI, Thomason et al. and Moretti et al. independently show that p63 and IRF6 operate within a regulatory loop to coordinate epithelial proliferation and differentiation during normal palate development. Disruption of this loop as a result of mutations in p63 or IRF6 causes congenital clefting.

  15. [Investigation of children with congenital cleft lip and palate by Eysenck personality questionnaire(Junior)

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Z; Hu, J F

    1998-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To approach the personality of the children suffering from congenital cleft lip and palate. METHODS: The subject were 50 children (aged 7 to 17) with congenital cleft lip and palate,and 50 normal children as control.Both groups were investigated by Eysenck personality questionnaire EPQ(Junior). RESULTS: According to the general quantitative table of EPQ(Junior),the abnormal cases in cleft group were significantly more than those in control(P<0.005),and also were the abnormal cases in the single quantitative or in the multiple quantitative tables of EPQ(Junior)(P<0.005) respectively. CONCLUSION: The poor personality in children with cleft lip and palate is correlated to the cleft condition.Therefore it is necessary to pay attention to the prevention of poor personality while the cleft lip and palate is treated.

  16. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P.

  17. In vitro manipulation of cleft palate connective tissue: setting the bases of a proposed new treatment.

    PubMed

    Resel, Eva; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; González, Ignacio; Trinidad, Eva; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Alonso-Bañuelos, Carmen; González-Meli, Beatriz; Lagarón, Emilio; Murillo, Jorge; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; López, María; Martínez-Alvarez, Concepción

    2007-03-01

    Palatoplasty has the undesired side effect of impaired mid-facial growth. To avoid this problem, we propose an alternative to palatoplasty. We hypothesize that if BMP-2 is injected together with a carrier into the periosteum of the cleft palate borders, border volume will increase and connective tissue cells will be activated to produce extra bone. Once these borders supported by bone reach the midline, extraction of their covering epithelia with trypsin will permit adhesion of the underlying tissues. We investigated in vitro the ability of cleft palate connective tissue cells to produce extra bone in the presence of BMP-2 and the possibility of using trypsin to remove the epithelium covering the cleft palate borders without impairing the underlying tissues' ability to adhere. We used the cleft palate presented by tgf-beta(3) null mice and small fragments of human cleft palate mucoperiosteum as models. Immunolabeling BMP-2-treated or untreated cultures with TUNEL and anti-osteocalcin or PCNA antibodies was performed. The epithelium of the cleft palate borders was removed with a trypsin solution, and the de-epithelialized tissues were cultured in apposition. BMP-2 induces differentiation toward bone on cleft palate connective tissue cells without producing cell death or proliferation. Trypsin removal of the cleft palate margins' epithelium does not impair the underlying tissues' adhesion. It is possible to generate extra bone at the cleft palate margins and to chemically eliminate their covering epithelia without damaging the underlying tissues, which allows further investigation in vivo of this new approach for cleft palate closure.

  18. Dental age in children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Huyskens, Rinske W F; Katsaros, Christos; Van 't Hof, Martin A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M

    2006-09-01

    To assess dental age in children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and to compare this with a noncleft control group. Two-group, mixed-longitudinal cohort study. Cleft group from an academic center for cleft lip and palate treatment. Noncleft control group from the same population. Participants included 70 Caucasian children with a full complement of teeth and a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (45 boys and 25 girls) from the Cleft Palate Craniofacial Center at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The control group (90 boys and 91 girls) was taken from the Nijmegen Growth Study. Dental age was assessed on orthopantomograms. In the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, linear interpolation in individual age curves was applied to obtain the dental age at 5, 9.5, and 14 years of age. For these ages, a comparison was made with the noncleft control group. Boys and girls with a unilateral cleft lip and palate showed a significant delay in dental age, as compared with their noncleft peers at all three ages. This delay was more pronounced in boys than in girls. The gender effect was significant at chronological ages 5 and 14 years. Children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate have a delay in dental age, compared with noncleft children.

  19. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Mandibular Asymmetry in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Beladi, Amir Saied; Khojastepour, Leila

    2016-07-21

      The purpose of the present study was to compare mandibular vertical asymmetry in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate and subjects with normal occlusion.   Cone beam computed tomography scans of three groups consisting of 20 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 20 patients affected by bilateral cleft lip and palate, and a control group of 20 subjects with normal occlusion were analyzed for this study. Condylar, ramal, and condylar plus ramal asymmetry indices were measured for all subjects using the method of Habets et al. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to determine any significant differences between the groups for all indices at the 95% level of confidence.   There were no significant differences regarding sex for all mandibular asymmetry indices in all three groups. All Asymmetry indices (condylar, ramal, and condylar plus ramal asymmetry) were significantly higher in the unilateral cleft group compared with the other two groups.   Cone beam computed tomography images showed that patients with cleft lip and palate suffered from mandibular asymmetry. Subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate had a more asymmetric mandible compared with the bilateral cleft lip and palate and control groups. Therefore, the mandible appears to be the leading factor in facial asymmetry in subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  20. Comprehensive Orthodontic Treatment of Adult Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable. PMID:25544903

  1. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment of adult patient with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable.

  2. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. OBJECTIVES: To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. METHODS: A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. RESULTS: On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. CONCLUSIONS: The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory

  3. Tissue engineering in cleft palate and other congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Panetta, Nicholas J; Gupta, Deepak M; Slater, Bethany J; Kwan, Matthew D; Liu, Karen J; Longaker, Michael T

    2008-05-01

    Contributions from multidisciplinary investigations have focused attention on the potential of tissue engineering to yield novel therapeutics. Congenital malformations, including cleft palate, craniosynostosis, and craniofacial skeletal hypoplasias represent excellent targets for the implementation of tissue engineering applications secondary to the technically challenging nature and inherent inadequacies of current reconstructive interventions. Apropos to the search for answers to these clinical conundrums, studies have focused on elucidating the molecular signals driving the biologic activity of the aforementioned maladies. These investigations have highlighted multiple signaling pathways, including Wnt, fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, and bone morphogenetic proteins, that have been found to play critical roles in guided tissue development. Furthermore, a comprehensive knowledge of these pathways will be of utmost importance to the optimization of future cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The scope of this review encompasses a discussion of the molecular biology involved in the development of cleft palate and craniosynostosis. In addition, we include a discussion of craniofacial distraction osteogenesis and how its applied forces influence cell signaling to guide endogenous bone regeneration. Finally, this review discusses the future role of cell-based tissue engineering in the treatment of congenital malformations.

  4. Orbicularis oris muscle defects as an expanded phenotypic feature in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Weinberg, Seth M; Rogers, Carolyn R; Brandon, Carla A; Cooper, Margaret E; Bardi, Kathleen M; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Resick, Judith M; Bowen, A'Delbert; Mooney, Mark P; de Salamanca, Javier Enríquez; González, Beatriz; Maher, Brion S; Martin, Rick A; Marazita, Mary L

    2007-06-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip+/-cleft palate is a complex disease with a wide phenotypic spectrum; occult defects of the superior orbicularis oris muscle may represent the mildest subclinical form of the lip portion of the phenotype. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography to compare the frequency of discontinuities in the OO muscle in 525 unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip+/-cleft palate versus 257 unaffected controls. OO muscle discontinuities were observed in 54 (10.3%) of the non-cleft relatives, compared to 15 (5.8%) of the controls-a statistically significant increase (P=0.04). Male relatives had a significantly higher rate of discontinuities than male controls (12.0% vs. 3.2%; P=0.01); female relatives also had a higher rate of discontinuities than female controls, but the increase was not statistically significant (8.9% vs. 7.4%; P=0.56). These data confirm the hypothesis that subepithelial OO muscle defects are a mild manifestation of the cleft lip phenotype. Identification of subepithelial OO muscle defects may be important in a clinical setting, as a means of providing more accurate recurrence risk estimates to relatives in cleft families. Furthermore, the expansion of the cleft lip+/-cleft palate phenotypic spectrum should improve the power of genetic studies. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Developing a visual rating chart for the esthetic outcome of unilateral cleft lip and palate repair

    PubMed Central

    Adeola, A. Olusanya; Oladimeji, A. Akadiri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aesthetic impairment is a major concern for the cleft lip/palate patient. Thus, auditing of postsurgical esthetic outcome needs to be further explored as till date no universally accepted protocol exists. The study objective was to propose a new visual rating chart (VRC) for the aesthetic outcome of cleft lip and palate (CLP) surgery. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective review of 200 repaired clefts, the common esthetic deficiencies were identified, categorized and ranked in the order of severity. A chart of the illustrative diagram with textual description of the defects was produced and used as a basis for rating outcome by two groups of raters (familiar raters and recruited raters). Intra- and inter-raters reliability was estimated using Cohen's kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Comparison between mean group coefficient was achieved with Kendall's correlation coefficient of concordance. Results: The intra- and inter-rater reliability for familiar raters was found to be strong with kappa values range of 0.80–0.87 (P < 0.001). Similarly, inter-raters’ reliability by recruited judges was very strong using ICC at both single (0.768) and average measures (0.982). Conclusion: The VRC is a reliable tool for assessing the esthetic outcome of CLP repairs. PMID:26389035

  6. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  7. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  8. The Facial Growth Pattern and the Amount of Palatal Bone Deficiency Relative to Cleft Size Should Be Considered in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to determine the best surgical/orthodontic treatment plan for the complete bilateral and unilateral cleft lip and palate patient to achieve all treatment goals of facial aesthetics, speech, dental function, and psychosocial development. Methods: Review of 40 years of serial complete bilateral cleft lip and palate and complete unilateral cleft lip and palate dental casts and photographs from birth to adolescence, with serial cephs starting at 4 years. This was part of a multicenter international 3-dimensional palatal growth study of serial dental casts of patients who developed good speech, occlusion, and facial growth. Results: Nasoalveolar molding and gingivoperiosteoplasty were introduced without proven longitudinal benefits. The procedure bodily retruded the premaxilla, which “telescoped” backward causing synostosis at the premaxillary vomerine suture. The resulting midfacial recessiveness with an anterior dental crossbite can only be corrected by midfacial protraction or a Le Fort I surgery. Conclusions: Staged orthodontic/surgical treatment limiting premaxillary retraction forces to lip adhesion or forces that cause only premaxillary ventroflexion produce the best results. The palatal cleft should be closed between 18 and 24 months when the ratio of the cleft to the palatal size medial to the alveolar ridge is at least 10%. The protruding premaxilla should only be ventroflexed but never bodily retruded. The facial growth pattern and degree of palatal bone deficiency are the main items to be considered in treatment planning. PMID:27579230

  9. Parent and child ratings of satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Flemish pre-pubescent boys and girls with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Van Lierde, K M; Dhaeseleer, E; Luyten, A; Van De Woestijne, K; Vermeersch, H; Roche, N

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this controlled study is to determine satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Flemish pre-pubescent children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Forty-three subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 43 age and gender matched controls participated in this study. The Cleft Evaluation Profile was used to assess the perceived satisfaction for individual features related to cleft care. Both the cleft palate subjects and their parents were satisfied with the speech and facial appearance. The Pearson χ(2) test revealed significant difference between the cleft palate and the control group regarding hearing, nasal aesthetics and function, and the appearance of the lip. An in depth analysis of well specified speech characteristics revealed that children with clefts and their parents significantly more often reported the presence of an articulation, voice and resonance disorder and experienced /s/ /r/ /t/ and /d/ as the most difficult consonants. To what extent the incorporation of specific motor oriented oral speech techniques regarding the realisation of specific consonants, attention to vocal and ear care, and the recommendation of secondary velopharyngeal surgery, with the incorporation of primary correction of the cleft nose deformity simultaneously with primary lip closure, will aid these patients are future research subjects. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rehabilitation of a One-day-Old Neonate with Cleft Lip and Palate using Palatal Obturator: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Pathak, Ashish; Bhatia, Baldev; Gupta, Sailesh; Kumar Gautam, Keshav

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Feeding a neonate with a complete cleft lip and palate is difficult pursuit due to communication between oral cavity and nasal cavity. A multidisciplinary approach is required to manage the complex problems involved in case of such neonates and their families. Present case is of a 1-day-old neonate having complete bilateral cleft lip and palate for which palatal obturator was constructed. A stepwise simple, easy and uncomplicated procedure for making accurate impressions, maxillary cast and fabrication of palatal obturator in infants with cleft lip and palate has been presented. The objective to present this case report is to emphasize the fact that how these palatal obturators /plates help in feeding, speech/language development, presurgical orthopedics and prevent other associated otorhinolaryngeal problems. How to cite this article: Bansal R, Pathak AK, Bhatia B, Gupta S, Gautam KK. Rehabilitation of a One-day Old Neonate with Cleft Lip and Palate using Palatal Obturator: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):145-147. PMID:25206156

  11. Frontonasal and fibrous dysplasia in a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Albright, Steven B; Hollier, Larry H; Buchanan, Edward P

    2013-07-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia is a rare entity. It has characteristic physical deformities: hypertelorism, broad nasal root, median facial cleft of the upper lip or palate, clefting of the nasal alae, poorly formed nasal tip, cranium bifidum occultum, and a widow's peak hairline. Fibrous dysplasia is a benign bone tumor in which normal bone is replaced by fibrous, poorly formed osseus tissues. We present a patient with frontonasal dysplasia who desired correction of her hypertelorism. Incidentally, fibrous dysplasia was found in her left orbit complicating surgical correction. In addition, the patient has velopharyngeal insufficiency and a class III malocclusion. The interplay of all these craniofacial defects makes the sequencing and timing of surgery important in this unique patient.

  12. Maiden morsel - feeding in cleft lip and palate infants

    PubMed Central

    Devi, E. Sree; Sai Sankar, A. J.; Manoj Kumar, M. G.; Sujatha, B.

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are the most common craniofacial anomalies that have an incidence of 0.28 to 3.74 per 1000 live births globally. Due to the great advancements in the field of medical science, these anomalies can today be corrected. However, it cannot be ignored that the parents of these patients may face psychological stress due to the cleft defects in the baby. Also, these conditions may cause financial difficulties to the parents and cause anxiety to the mother about the proper feeding of their infant. Feeding problems can range from excessive air intake to failure to thrive. As the management of such cases is lengthy and includes a multi-disciplinary team approach, it is the role of the Pediatrician/Pedodontist to educate the mother about the proper feeding techniques. In this article, we have reviewed and highlighted the various traditional and advanced devices and techniques which help in the successful management of these individuals. PMID:24478964

  13. Use of hyperdry amniotic membrane in operations for cleft palate: a study in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Makoto; Okabe, Motonori; Tomihara, Kei; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nikaido, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    The growth of maxillary bone and the development of dentition are often impaired in patients who have had pushback operations for repair of a cleft palate. There has been considerable discussion about the most suitable technique or material used in such repairs to resolve the problem. Hyperdry amniotic membrane, a new preservable material derived from human amnion, has recently been introduced in several procedures. We have evaluated its use during pushback surgery in animal studies to try to correct the inhibition of growth and development of the maxilla. Mucosal defects were created in 3-week-old rats, and then covered with hyperdry amniotic membrane or not. Healing was assessed by histological and morphological examination at 1 week and 7 weeks postoperatively. In the group treated with hyperdry amniotic membrane, submucosal tissue was reconstructed successfully during the early postoperative period. Lateral palatal growth was not inhibited as much, and medial inclination of the teeth was less, after a period of growth using this material. The results suggest that hyperdry amniotic membrane is a suitable new dressing material for use in the treatment of cleft palate. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A preliminary study of facial growth and morphology in unoperated male unilateral cleft lip and palate subjects over 13 years of age.

    PubMed

    Mars, M; Houston, W J

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surgery on facial growth and morphology in Sri Lankan males with unilateral cleft lip and palate who were over 13 years of age at the time of study with cephalometry and dental study models. Three separate subgroups were analyzed: those who had totally unrepaired cleft lip and palate, those who received lip repair in infancy but not palatal repair, and those who had lip and palate repair in infancy. Twenty-three healthy noncleft Sri Lankan males over 13 years formed a control group from the same racial background. The results show that subjects who had no surgery had a potential for normal maxillary growth. Subjects who have had lip repair in early infancy show relatively normal maxillary growth, but maxillary hypoplasia is common when the palate has also been repaired early.

  15. Bilateral asymmetry in Chinese families with cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Cooper, Margaret E; Liu, You-E; Hu, Dan-Ning; Melnick, Michael; Weinberg, Seth M; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-03-01

    To determine if Chinese individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) display more bilateral asymmetry than do their unaffected relatives. A case-control study of 313 individuals with CL/P from Shanghai, China, with 201 unaffected relatives as controls. Size-adjusted asymmetry scores were defined by data on middle-finger length, palm length, palpebral fissure width, and ear length. Case-control comparisons used a multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The ear-length measure showed a significant increase in fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in individuals with CL/P compared with their unaffected relatives, which was most pronounced in the female cleft lip and palate subgroup (p = .04). No other measures showed any increase in FA. Evidence was found for increased FA, as measured by overall ear length, in Chinese individuals with nonsyndromic CL/P, compared with their unaffected family members. The use of bilateral measurements other than dermatoglyphics may prove to be a valuable means of assessing overall developmental stability in individuals with developmental malformations and in their families.

  16. The Role of the Velopharyngeal Sphincter in the Speech of Patients with Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate Using Perceptual Methods

    PubMed Central

    Georgievska-Jancheska, Tatjana; Gjorgova, Juliana; Popovska, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The velopharyngeal sphincter (VPS) plays the main role in speech formation. The cleft palate, due to the damage of the soft palate, leads to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal sphincter thus causing speech disorder. AIM: To establish a link between the nasal air escape and the perceptual symptoms in the speech of patients with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate using auditory-visual perceptual procedures for determining the influence the velopharyngeal dysfunction has on speech. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with speech disorders, out of which 10 have cleft palate or cleft lip and palate (experimental group), participated in the perceptual assessment by means of Czermak mirror fogging test for assessing the nasal air escape and Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale (PWSS) for assessing the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. RESULTS: The respondents with a considerable nasal air escape have a higher velopharyngeal inability, that is, probably incompetent nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. There is a strong correlation between the nasal air escape and the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter (the coefficient of linear correlation r = 0.9756). The calculated p-value is p = 0.000002. CONCLUSION: The perceptual speech symptoms and the nasal air escape provide unique insight into the state and role the velopharyngeal sphincter has in speech. PMID:28028412

  17. Speech and language development in toddlers with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Priester, G H; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S M

    2008-06-01

    The effect of early palate closure on speech and language development in children with cleft palate. Comparative study. University Medical Center Groningen, Cleft Palate Team (The Netherlands). Forty-three toddlers with cleft palate and thirty-two toddlers without cleft palate were analyzed with standardized tests for language comprehension and language production. Moreover articulation and hyper nasality were examined by trained speech therapists. For language comprehension, language production and articulation there were no significant differences between the children with and without cleft lip and/or palate. This is despite the high percentage of conductive hearing loss (55%) in children with clefts. Significant difference was found for hyper nasality (mean: 35% vs. 0%, p=0.001). In both groups articulation problems raise to a higher percentage than language production problems (63-20%; 24-4%). Early surgical treatment is effective for a part of the communicative development, i.e. language development and articulation. Besides conductive hearing loss hyper nasality remains a serious problem in 30-50% of the children with cleft palate. Therefore, speech therapy and pharyngoplasty also are part of the treatment procedure. Because of the high amount articulation problems in all children, standards for articulation development are perhaps too strict. Future research should be carried out after normal variations in articulation development.

  18. [Integrated treatment of cleft lip and palate. Organization of a treatment team].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ruiz, I; González Landa, G; Pérez González, V; Díez Rodríguez, R; López-Cedrún, J L; Miró Viar, J; García Miñaur, S; de Celis Vara, R; Sánchez Fernández, L

    1999-01-01

    Collect the team experience in the treatment of children with cleft lip and palate, indicating the evolution of the team composition, advantages and improvement aspects, trying to transmit the need of team treatment. The Bilbao cleft palate team was created in 1983, since then a cleft palate clinic, a parents group and a unit of velopharyngeal function has been developed. At present the team is composed by: pediatric reconstructor surgeon, speech therapist, orthodontist, dentist, pediatrician, ENT, maxillofacial surgeon, dismorphologyst, geneticist, nursing. One of the achievements has been the data unification, obtaining speech cephalometrics, photographic dental casts and video images with prospective view. At this time 403 cleft lip and palate children have been intervened, being essential the transdisciplinar team approach between surgeon, speech therapist and orthodontist. The importance of the team coordinator is pointed. The results of an audit of the two stage cleft palate closure in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate have obligated us to vary our surgical policy. The unresolved aspects are the lack of multidisciplinary team recognition at official level and the non existence of orthodontist in staff, without cost coverage of this treatment by public health system. In our experience the team treatment of cleft lip and palate has resulted in improvement of the clinic results, treatment protocols and training.

  19. The Effectiveness of Psychosocial Intervention for Individuals With Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    PubMed

    Norman, Alyson; Persson, Martin; Stock, Nicola; Rumsey, Nichola; Sandy, Jonathan; Waylen, Andrea; Edwards, Zoe; Hammond, Vanessa; Partridge, Lucy; Ness, Andy

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of different psychological interventions for children and adults with cleft lip and/or palate and their parents. We searched six databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE to June 2013 and checked bibliographies. We included research that evaluated any psychological intervention in studies in which at least 90% of the participants had cleft lip and/or palate or were parents of those with cleft lip and/or palate. Studies containing less than 90% were excluded unless they reported results separately for those with cleft lip and/or palate, or raw data were available upon request from the authors. Inclusion assessment, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were carried out independently by two reviewers. Seven studies were identified as inclusions, with only two studies being included in the full data analysis (one of which failed to meet the full inclusion criteria). The five remaining studies were included only in a narrative synthesis because data were available for people or parents of those with cleft lip and/or palate only. This highlights a distinct dearth of research into psychological intervention within the field of cleft lip and/or palate. The review found no evidence to support any specific intervention. Key uncertainties need to be identified and addressed. Adequately powered, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials are needed to provide a secure evidence base for psychological intervention techniques in participants with cleft lip and/or palate and their parents.

  20. A glucocorticoid receptor in fetal mouse: its relationship to cleft palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hackney, J F

    1980-02-01

    Fetal mouse tissue was investigated for a glucocorticoid binding receptor which might be responsible for cleft palate formation. Fetal mouse heads contain a soluble component which binds the glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide in vitro with high affinity. This binding component is present in small finite amounts. Other glucocorticoids compete with triamcinolone acetonide for the binding site in a manner consistent with their potency ranking as cleft palate teratogens. Several mineralocorticoids and progestins also compete when administered in vitro but not when administered in vivo. Triamcinolone acetonide binding was determined in three mouse strains, A/J, C3H, and C57BL, which are listed in decreasing order of cleft palate susceptibility to cortisone. No positive correlation was found between cortisone cleft palate susceptibility and either triamcinolone acetonide binding affinity or binding amount in fetuses from these strains. Cleft palate dose response curves for triamcinolone acetonide were determined in these strains, but they were not parallel to each other as they were for cortisone. This suggests that triamcinolone acetonide may cause cleft palate by different mechanisms in these strains. Thus, fetal mouse tissue contains an apparent glucocorticoid receptors, but its relationship to cleft palate formation in mice is not clear.

  1. An acoustic study of the temporal characteristics of nasalization in children with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunghee; Sim, Hyunsub; Zhi, Minje; Kuehn, David P

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the oral and nasal cavity acoustic energies to determine whether temporal patterns of nasalization differentiate children with and without cleft palate and the extent to which vowel context contributes to these temporal differences. Nasal onset interval, nasal offset interval, and total nasalization duration measures were obtained from acoustic waveforms, spectrograms, and energy contours acquired using the Computerized Speech Lab (Kay Elemetrics, Lincoln Park, NJ). In addition to absolute temporal values, proportional durations of nasalization were measured to obtain information regarding the relative duration of nasalization. Fifteen children with cleft palate exhibiting mild hypernasality and 15 children without cleft palate participated in the study. Children in both groups were between 4 and 7 years of age. Each of the three absolute measures was significantly different between the two groups of subjects and within the three vowel contexts. Children with cleft palate showed longer temporal characteristics than children without cleft palate in all three absolute measures. The three temporal variables of the high vowel contexts were generally longer than those of low vowel contexts. Regarding proportional measures, nasal offset interval ratio, and total nasalization ratio showed significant differences between the two groups. Nasalization, as reflected by acoustic signals, showed different timing characteristics between children with cleft palate and without cleft palate and across vowel contexts. This suggests that the duration of nasalization reflecting temporal patterns of the oral-nasal acoustic impedance may have an influence on the perception of hypernasality.

  2. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  3. Prevalence, pattern and perceptions of cleft lip and cleft palate among children born in two hospitals in Kisoro District, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is one of the most common congenital anomalies that affect the oro-facial region. The aim of the study was to determine the period prevalence, pattern and perceptions of cleft lip and cleft palate in children born between 2005 and 2010 in two hospitals in Kisoro District, Uganda. Methods The study involved a retrospective review of medical records of mothers who delivered live babies between January 2005 and December 2010 in Kisoro Hospital and St. Francis Hospital, Mutolere in Kisoro District. Key informant interviews of mothers (n = 20) of the children with cleft lip and/or clip palate and selected medical staff (n = 24) of the two hospitals were carried out. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Over the 6 year period, 25,985 mothers delivered live babies in Kisoro Hospital (n = 13,199) and St. Francis Hospital, Mutolere (n = 12,786) with 20 babies having oro-facial clefts. The overall period prevalence of the clefts was 0.77/1,000 live births. Sixty percent (n = 12) of children had combined cleft lip and palate and the same proportion had clefts on the left side of the face. More boys were affected than girls: 13 versus 7. About 45% of mothers were hurt on realizing that they had delivered a child with an oro-facial cleft. Forty percent of mothers indicated that a child with oro-facial cleft was regarded as an outcast. About 91.7% (n = 22) of the medical staff reported that these children were not accepted in their communities. Surgical intervention and psychosocial support were the management modalities advocated for by most respondents. Conclusion/recommendations The period prevalence of combined cleft lip and palate in two hospitals in Kisoro District was comparable to some findings elsewhere. Cleft lip and cleft palate are a medical and psychosocial problem in Kisoro District that calls for sensitization and counseling of the families and communities of the affected children

  4. Influence of timing of delayed hard palate closure on articulation skills in 3-year-old Danish children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Boers, Maria; Schöps, Antje; Kisling-Møller, Mia; Nielsen, Joan Bogh; Jørgensen, Line Dahl; Andersen, Mikael; Bolund, Stig; Andersen, Helene Søgaard

    2017-07-25

    Differing results regarding articulation skills in young children with cleft palate (CP) have been reported and often interpreted as a consequence of different surgical protocols. To assess the influence of different timing of hard palate closure in a two-stage procedure on articulation skills in 3-year-olds born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Secondary aims were to compare results with peers without CP, and to investigate if there are gender differences in articulation skills. Furthermore, burden of treatment was to be estimated in terms of secondary surgery, hearing and speech therapy. A randomized controlled trial (RCT). Early hard palate closure (EHPC) at 12 months versus late hard palate closure (LHPC) at 36 months in a two-stage procedure was tested in a cohort of 126 Danish-speaking children born with non-syndromic UCLP. All participants had the lip and soft palate closed around 4 months of age. Audio and video recordings of a naming test were available from 113 children (32 girls and 81 boys) and were transcribed phonetically. Recordings were obtained prior to hard palate closure in the LHPC group. The main outcome measures were percentage consonants correct adjusted (PCC-A) and consonant errors from blinded assessments. Results from 36 Danish-speaking children without CP obtained previously by Willadsen in 2012 were used for comparison. Children with EHPC produced significantly more target consonants correctly (83%) than children with LHPC (48%; p < .001). In addition, children with LHPC produced significantly more active cleft speech characteristics than children with EHPC (p < .001). Boys achieved significantly lower PCC-A scores than girls (p = .04) and produced significantly more consonant errors than girls (p = .02). No significant differences were found between groups regarding burden of treatment. The control group performed significantly better than the EHPC and LHPC groups on all compared variables. © 2017 Royal College of Speech

  5. [Closure of recurrent cleft palate fistulas with plasma rich in growth factors].

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Jorge Glicerio; Jiménez-Barragán, Karina

    2011-01-01

    Fistulas represent a significant challenge in the treatment of cleft palate. The best outcome of a palatoplasty is obtained with a competent velopharyngeal sphincter and a palate without fistulas. The recurrence of primary cleft palate fistula is reported as high as up to 76%, and to nearly 100% in recurrent fistulas. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) is an autologous blood product with biologically active substances that enhance tissue repair mechanisms such as chemotaxis, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. Its use in cleft palate fistulas has not been reported. Our objective was to evaluate closure of recurrent cleft palate fistulas using PRGF mixed with autologous bone graft. An experimental, prospective, longitudinal study was carried out from April 2008 to July 2010 on 11 recurrent cleft palate fistulas that were closed with local mucoperiosteal flaps and placement of autologous bone graft mixed with PRGF. Complete closure of palate fistulas was achieved in 90.9% (follow-up of 6-24 months), decreasing the reported incidence for the recurrence by other authors with other techniques. The use of PRGF mixed with autologous bone graft seems to be an effective, safe and low-cost technique for the closure of recurrent cleft palate fistulas. However, we consider its study must be extended. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of variation in the timing of palatal repair on sagittal craniofacial morphology in complete cleft lip and palate children.

    PubMed

    Nandlal; Utreja, A; Tewari, A; Chari, P S

    2000-12-01

    The complete cleft lip and palate children, ranging from 6-14 years of age were studied to evaluate the effect of variation in the timing of palatal repair on craniofacial morphology and compared to the noncleft children. It was observed that all the groups early (8 to < or = 24 months), medium (> 24 to < or = 36 months) and late repair (> 36 to < or = 78 months) had significantly larger cranial base, retruded maxillomandibular relations, skeletodental and incisal relationships compared to the noncleft children. However, intercomparison among the cleft groups showed insignificant difference amongst them suggesting that the timing of palatal repairs does not effect the anterioposterior (sagittal) relationship.

  7. Automatic initial and final segmentation in cleft palate speech of Mandarin speakers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Yin, Heng; Zhang, Junpeng; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The speech unit segmentation is an important pre-processing step in the analysis of cleft palate speech. In Mandarin, one syllable is composed of two parts: initial and final. In cleft palate speech, the resonance disorders occur at the finals and the voiced initials, while the articulation disorders occur at the unvoiced initials. Thus, the initials and finals are the minimum speech units, which could reflect the characteristics of cleft palate speech disorders. In this work, an automatic initial/final segmentation method is proposed. It is an important preprocessing step in cleft palate speech signal processing. The tested cleft palate speech utterances are collected from the Cleft Palate Speech Treatment Center in the Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, which has the largest cleft palate patients in China. The cleft palate speech data includes 824 speech segments, and the control samples contain 228 speech segments. The syllables are extracted from the speech utterances firstly. The proposed syllable extraction method avoids the training stage, and achieves a good performance for both voiced and unvoiced speech. Then, the syllables are classified into with “quasi-unvoiced” or with “quasi-voiced” initials. Respective initial/final segmentation methods are proposed to these two types of syllables. Moreover, a two-step segmentation method is proposed. The rough locations of syllable and initial/final boundaries are refined in the second segmentation step, in order to improve the robustness of segmentation accuracy. The experiments show that the initial/final segmentation accuracies for syllables with quasi-unvoiced initials are higher than quasi-voiced initials. For the cleft palate speech, the mean time error is 4.4ms for syllables with quasi-unvoiced initials, and 25.7ms for syllables with quasi-voiced initials, and the correct segmentation accuracy P30 for all the syllables is 91.69%. For the control samples, P30 for all the syllables is 91

  8. Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on the Susceptibility to Contraction-Induced Injury of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally-Clefted Goat Palates

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Erik P.; Cederna, Paul S.; McClellan, William T.; Caterson, Stephanie A.; Panter, Kip E.; Yu, Deborah; Buchman, Steven R.; Larkin, Lisa M.; Faulkner, John A.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Objective Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of levator veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resistant type 1 fibers. As an initial step to determining the validity of this theory, we tested the hypothesis that, in most cases, repair induces the transformation to type 1 fibers, thus diminishing susceptibility to injury. Interventions Single permeabilized levator veli palatini muscle fibers were obtained from normal palates and nonrepaired congenitally-clefted palates of young (2 months old) and adult (14 to 15 months old) goats and from repaired palates of adult goats (8 months old). Repair was done at 2 months of age using a modified von Langenbeck technique. Main Outcome Measures Fiber type was determined by contractile properties and susceptibility to injury was assessed by force deficit, the decrease in maximum force following a lengthening contraction protocol expressed as a percentage of initial force. Results For normal palates and cleft palates of young goats, the majority of the fibers were type 2 with force deficits of ~40%. Following repair, 80% of the fibers were type 1 with force deficits of 20% ± 2%; these deficits were 45% of those for nonrepaired cleft palates of adult goats (p < .0001). Conclusion The decrease in the percentage of type 2 fibers and susceptibility to injury may be important for the development of a functional levator veli palatini muscle postrepair. PMID:18333646

  9. Maxillary sinus volumes of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Erdur, Omer; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmıs

    2015-10-01

    Studies about maxillary sinuses of cleft lip-palate patients have increased since sinusitis is commonly observed in these patients. It is evident that maxillary sinus will be morphologically affected in these patients. And anatomic differences may be a cause or at least a contributor of sinusitis. The aim of this study was to compare maxillary sinus volumes of the non-syndromic patients with unilateral cleft lip-palate and control group by using Cone-Beam computed tomography. Tomography scans of 44 unilateral cleft lip-palate patients (18 right and 26 left) with age and gender matched 45 control patients were evaluated for the study. The images used in the study were part of the diagnostic records collected due to dental treatment needs. All tomographs were obtained in supine position by using Cone-Beam computed tomography (NewTom 5G, QR, Verona, Italy). The patient-specific Hounsfield values were set to include the largest amount of voxels in the sinuses volume calculation individually. All data were measured in mm(3). There was no statistically difference between the gender and age distributions of the groups. No statistically significant difference was found on the cleft and non-cleft side, the right and left side of the unilateral cleft lip-palate patients and the control group (P>0.05). For the inter group comparison, mean maxillary sinus volumes volume of unilateral cleft lip-palate patients (9894.55±4171.44mm(3)) was statistically smaller than the control group (11,977.90±4484.93mm(3)) (P<0.05). Maxillary sinus volumes were effected negatively in unilateral cleft lip-palate patients when compared with the healthy control group. No difference was found on the cleft, non-cleft side and the right-left side of the unilateral cleft lip-palate patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Craniometric and velopharyngeal assessment of infants with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jamie L; Kuehn, David P; Sutton, Bradley P; Goldwasser, Michael S; Jerez, Alex D

    2011-03-01

    The current study was designed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information of the velopharyngeal mechanism and craniometric dimensions in infants born with a normal mechanism and in infants with an unrepaired cleft palate. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained from the medical charts of 4 infants (2 with cleft lip and palate and 2 without) between the ages of 8 and 9 months. Craniometric measures and levator veli palatini muscle morphology were analyzed using visualization modeling software. Both raw measures and measures normalized by head circumference were examined. Patients 1 and 2 demonstrated normal velopharyngeal anatomy and a similar distance between levator muscle origins (38.9-40.7 mm), sagittal angles of origin (56-57 degrees), and levator muscle bundle lengths (28.4-30.7 mm). Patients with an unrepaired cleft palate displayed smaller oblique coronal angles of origins (58-62 degrees) compared with patients without cleft palate (62-67 degrees). Patients without cleft palate showed a steeper muscle (56-57 degrees) compared with patients without cleft palate (66-67 degrees). The basion-sella-nasion angle, hard palate length, and hard palate width measurements are related systematically to head circumference in this patient group. Results from the current study are in agreement with previous studies demonstrating variations across patients with cleft palate particularly in the muscle bundle lengths, distance between muscle origins, velar thickness, and velar length. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine how levator muscle and craniometric dimensions vary between those with and without cleft palate. A larger sample size is necessary to provide statistical analysis.

  11. Follow-Up Association Studies of Chromosome Region 9q and Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Govil, Manika; Fonseca, Renata F.; McHenry, Toby; Granjeiro, José M.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Marazita, Mary L.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip/palate comprises a large fraction of all human birth defects, and is notable for its significant lifelong morbidity and complex etiology. Several studies have shown that genetic factors appear to play a significant role in the etiology of cleft lip/palate. Human chromosomal region 9q21 has been suggested in previous reports to contain putative cleft loci. Moreover, a specific region (9q22.3-34.1) was suggested to present a ∼45% probability of harboring a cleft susceptibility gene. Fine mapping of fifty SNPs across the 9q22.3-34.11 region was performed to test for association with cleft lip/palate in families from United States, Spain, Turkey, Guatemala, and China. We performed family-based analysis and found evidence of association of cleft lip/palate with STOM (rs306796) in Guatemalan families (P=0.004) and in all multiplex families pooled together (P=0.002). This same SNP also showed borderline association in the US families (P=0.04). Under a nominal value of 0.05, other SNPs also showed association with cleft lip/palate and cleft subgroups. SNPs in STOM and PTCH genes and nearby FOXE1 were further associated with cleft phenotypes in Guatemalan and Chinese families. Gene prioritization analysis revealed PTCH and STOM ranking among the top fourteen candidates for cleft lip/palate among 339 genes present in the region. Our results support the hypothesis that the 9q22.32-34.1 region harbors cleft susceptibility genes. Additional studies with other populations should focus on these loci to further investigate the participation of these genes in human clefting. PMID:20583170

  12. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Mexico: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Castro, Emmanuel; Acosta-Alfaro, Luis F; Guadron-Llanos, Alma M; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Murillo-Llanes, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate, the most common developmental deformity, is seen worldwide and the etiology involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the maternal risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate. Materials and Methods: We conducted a case control study at the Women’s Hospital in Culiacan, Mexico. Medical records were analyzed, including patients who delivered babies with and without cleft lip and cleft palate from January 2010 to December 2015. Multiple variables were analyzed, including gestational age, weight at birth, the use of folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy, smoking, alcohol abuse, the use of recreational drugs, history of sexually transmitted infections, marital status, socioeconomic status, education, and nutritional status. Results: We found that the maternal risk factors with the strongest association for the development of cleft lip and cleft palate were the following: patients who were not taking folic acid during pregnancy [OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.32-8.09], P=0.00; patients who were not taking vitamin supplementation during pregnancy [OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.19-7.27], P=0.02; smoking during pregnancy [OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.23-3.41], P=0.01; and alcohol abuse during pregnancy [OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.17-3.08], P=0.03. Conclusions: The main risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate in a Mexican population at the Women’s hospital in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico were smoking, alcohol abuse, and patients not taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy. PMID:28819616

  13. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Mexico: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Castro, Emmanuel; Acosta-Alfaro, Luis F; Guadron-Llanos, Alma M; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Murillo-Llanes, Joel

    2017-07-01

    Cleft lip and palate, the most common developmental deformity, is seen worldwide and the etiology involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the maternal risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate. We conducted a case control study at the Women's Hospital in Culiacan, Mexico. Medical records were analyzed, including patients who delivered babies with and without cleft lip and cleft palate from January 2010 to December 2015. Multiple variables were analyzed, including gestational age, weight at birth, the use of folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy, smoking, alcohol abuse, the use of recreational drugs, history of sexually transmitted infections, marital status, socioeconomic status, education, and nutritional status. We found that the maternal risk factors with the strongest association for the development of cleft lip and cleft palate were the following: patients who were not taking folic acid during pregnancy [OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.32-8.09], P=0.00; patients who were not taking vitamin supplementation during pregnancy [OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.19-7.27], P=0.02; smoking during pregnancy [OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.23-3.41], P=0.01; and alcohol abuse during pregnancy [OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.17-3.08], P=0.03. The main risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate in a Mexican population at the Women's hospital in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico were smoking, alcohol abuse, and patients not taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy.

  14. Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: New BCL3 information

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, C.; Hecht, J.T.; Gasser, D.

    1996-09-01

    We did not previously provide LOD scores for linkage assuming heterogeneity, as suggested by Ott for the linkage analysis of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and BCL3, ApoC2, and D19S178 in the paper by Stein et al. The results from analysis using the HOMOG program, allowing for heterogeneity under the reduced penetrance model, gave a maximum LOD score of 1.85 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.03 for D19S178, and 1.72 for multipoint analysis in the interval. For the affecteds-only model, the values are 1.96 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.01 for D19S178, and 1.44 for the multipoint analysis. 8 refs.

  15. Repair of bilateral clefts of lip, alveolus and palate Part 1: A refined method for the lip-adhesion in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Klaus

    2001-02-01

    The protruding premaxilla represents the most severe problem in the surgical closure of a bilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate (BCLP). In principle there are two methods to overcome this obstacle: (1) preliminary lip adhesion and (2) presurgical repositioning with intraoral devices. According to the various degrees of premaxillary protrusion, sometimes adhesion alone is sufficient, if the surgical technique is unlikely to break down. In this paper a refined adhesion method is presented, withstanding traction to the wound margins and concomitantly enables lip and nose repairs in a single second operation. For patients with severe premaxillary protrusion, presurgical use of a Latham appliance achieves conditions for safe lip adhesion as above. Both treatment methods are outlined. Copyright 2001 European Association for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery.

  16. Vomer flap for hard palate repair is related to favorable maxillary growth in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Fang; Lee, Ying-Hsin; Wang, Ruby; Huang, Chiung-Shing; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Lo, Lun-Jou; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2014-05-01

    Vomer flap repair is assumed to improve maxillary growth because of reduced scarring in growth-sensitive areas of the palate. Our aim was to evaluate whether facial growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate was significantly affected by the technique of hard palate repair (vomer flap versus two-flap). For this retrospective longitudinal study, we analyzed 334 cephalometric radiographs from 95 patients with nonsyndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate who underwent hard palate repair by two different techniques (vomer flap versus two-flap). Clinical notes were reviewed to record treatment histories. Cephalometry was used to determine facial morphology and growth rate. The associations among facial morphology at age 20, facial growth rate, and technique of hard palate repair were assessed using generalized estimating equation analysis. The hard palate repair technique significantly influenced protrusion of the maxilla (SNA: β = -3.5°, 95 % CI = -5.2-1.7; p = 0.001) and the anteroposterior jaw relation (ANB: β = -4.2°, 95 % CI = -6.4-1.9; p = 0.001; Wits: β = -5.7 mm, 95 % CI = -9.6-1.2; p = 0.01) at age 20, and their growth rates (SNA p = 0.001, ANB p < 0.01, and Wits p = 0.02). The results suggest that in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, vomer flap repair has a smaller adverse effect than two-flap on growth of the maxilla. This effect on maxillary growth is on the anteroposterior development of the alveolar maxilla and is progressive with age. We now perform hard palate closure with vomer flap followed by soft palate closure using Furlow palatoplasty. These findings may improve treatment outcome by modifying the treatment protocol for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  17. Supporting the drive to thrive in cleft lip and palate infant- a case report.

    PubMed

    S, Thabitha Rani; M, Manjula; N, Sreelakshmi; E, Rajendra Reddy; A, Rajesh

    2013-12-01

    In infants with cleft lip and palate, failure to thrive (FTT) condition has largely been attributed to early feeding difficulties. Presurgical Nasoalveolar Molding (PNAM) forms an integral part of treatment modality for cleft infants in such conditions, by providing a myriad of benefits.It balances several aspects of treatment such as growth, aesthetics and function in cleft infants and also provides psychological reassurance to the parents. This clinical report describes the presurgical management of an infant with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate who was in failure to thrive condition.

  18. Abrupt laryngeal engagement during stop plosive-vowel transitions in children with repaired cleft palate and adequate velopharyngeal closure: aerodynamic and sound pressure level evidence.

    PubMed

    Zajac, David J; Milholland, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether children with repaired cleft palate and adequate velopharyngeal closure exhibit abrupt laryngeal engagement during stop plosive-vowel transitions as compared with children without cleft palate. A prospective group design was used with convenience sampling of patients at a university craniofacial center. PARTICIPANTS were 25 children (15 boys, 10 girls) with repaired cleft palate (mean age = 10.9 years, standard deviation = 1.5 years) and 20 children (10 boys, 10 girls) without cleft palate (mean age = 10.8 years, standard deviation = 1.8 years). All children with cleft palate had adequate velopharyngeal closure as determined by aerodynamic testing. (1) Peak oral airflow was determined during the release of /t/ in the word "two" during a counting task. (2) An index of laryngeal engagement defined as the ratio of the maximum oral airflow declination to peak oral airflow was calculated during the release of /t/. (3) Sound pressure level was determined during the vowel of the word "two." Children with cleft palate exhibited significantly more negative laryngeal engagement ratios (i.e., more abrupt adduction) (P = .002) and greater sound pressure level (P = .049) than controls. There was a significant negative relationship between laryngeal engagement and sound pressure level for all children (r = -.428, P = .003). Children with repaired cleft palate and adequate velopharyngeal function appear to use a strategy of abrupt laryngeal adduction during stop plosive-vowel transitions. This strategy-perhaps learned even prior to palate surgery-may help to achieve either adequate sound pressure level and/or velopharyngeal closure.

  19. Single-layer Closure with Tongue Flap for Palatal Fistula in Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Abdulla K.; Alwabari, Mufeed Saeed; Almugarrab, Fatimah Jawad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tongue flap is a good option to close a complicated palatal fistula in cleft patients. Most surgeons advocate a double-layer closure to decrease the recurrence rates. In this study, we have reported our experience with a modified single-layer closure with tongue flap in cleft patients. Method: All cases done by a single surgeon using this modified technique in a period of 10 years were retrospectively reviewed. A thorough description of this technique is also provided in the study. Results: Only 5 cases were operated on using this technique. The success rate of all these cases was 100%, with no recurrence of fistula and few complications. Conclusions: This technique provides a way to avoid nasal layer closure in cases where nasal layer is difficult or impossible to close. It also limits the need for a second flap for nasal layer closure. PMID:27622120

  20. The role of pediatric dentistry in multidisciplinary cleft palate teams at advanced pediatric dental residency programs.

    PubMed

    Jaju, Rishita; Tate, Anupama Rao

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the participation of pediatric dentistry in multidisciplinary cleft palate teams (CPTs) at advanced pediatric dental residency programs. A survey was sent to the directors of advanced pediatric dentistry programs across the United States. Of the 60 (90%) surveys returned, 18% of the programs were university-based, 40% hospital-based, and 42% combined programs. Overall, 92% of the programs reported pediatric dentistry's participation in CPTs. Orthodontics, plastic surgery, oral surgery, otolaryngology, and speech therapy, are represented on at least 75% of the CPTs. Nursing and psychology are represented in less than 50% of the CPTs. A higher percentage of combined programs reported providing interceptive orthodontics, while more hospital-based programs reported providing presurgical infant orthopedic appliances (PIOAs). Of the 47% of the programs that reported use of POIA, 64% reported using removable appliances. Seventy-five percent of the programs reported that there has been no change, 22% reported an increase, and 3% reported a decrease in the CPT participation level in the post 5 years. This study highlights the role of pediatric dentistry as a part of cleft palate team. This role extends from preventive and restorative to infant orthopedics.

  1. Analysis for speech and esthetics in sixty consecutive patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Shiraganvi, Mahantesh S; Kumar, N; Desai, A; Kiran, TUR; Gopalkrishnan, K

    2012-01-01

    Background A double-blind retrospective study was carried out at our oral and maxillofacial surgery department to assess speech and esthetics of primary cheiloplasty in patients operated for unilateral complete cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Materials and Methods Total sample size was 60. All were operated for unilateral complete cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Age range was between 1 and 21 years. Results of surgeries performed by two surgeons were assessed. The speech of all these patients was judged by a single speech therapist who was unaware of the operating surgeon. All patients were assessed for articulatory errors, namely, omission, distortion, substitution, addition and intelligibility. Sixty-eight words in local language (Kannada) were selected by the speech pathologist. All patients were subdivided into three age groups: ≤5 years, 6-10 years and ≥11 years. The cheiloplasty was assessed using VLS (V: vermilion, L: lip, S: scar) scale for vermilion, lip and scar patterns. Results and Conclusion Patients undergoing palatoplasty in ≤1 year showed good articulation between the age of 5 and 10 years. Articulation and intelligibility was maximum in patients ≥11 years. Patients at this age try various compensatory mechanisms to overcome communication disabilities. Based on the VLS scale, scarring was the least in all patients. Vermilion and lip patterns showed satisfactory results in most of the patients. PMID:25756010

  2. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  3. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p < 0.0001); children who had isolated cleft lip with or without alveolus and isolated cleft palate were not statistically different from unaffected children. Patients with unilateral cleft lip with cleft palate were found to be more severely affected than bilateral cases. Nasal obstruction was observed in early childhood, although severity worsened in adolescence. This population-based study reports a high prevalence of nasal obstructive symptoms in children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate based on type and severity of the cleft. The authors encourage cleft teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  4. [Progress in studies on the genetic risk factors for nonsyndromic cleft lip or palate in China].

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Q

    2017-04-09

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common congenital defects of oral and maxillofacial region in human beings. The etiology of this malformation is complex, with both genetic and environmental causal factors are involved. To provide a better understanding in the genetic etiology of cleft lip or palate, the author summarized recent years studies based on Chinese population. Those researches included validation of some candidate genes for cleft lip or palate, using genome wide association analysis which included six independent cohorts from China to elucidate the genetic architecture of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Chinese population and finally found a new susceptibility locus. This locus was on the 16p13.3 (rs8049367) between CREBBP and ADCY9. It has been mentioned common methods of genetic analysis involved in the researches on cleft lip or palate in this paper. Furthermore, we try to discuss new methods to illustrate the etiology of cleft lip and palate that could provide more inspiration on future researches.

  5. 20 years of cleft lip and palate missions

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Kreusch, Thomas; Marsh, Jeff L.; Schopper, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Volunteer missions for cleft lip and palate (CLP) care in Indonesia (1991-1992), India (1994-2003), Bhutan (2005-2010), and Kenya (2011), took place always at the same Hospital in each country. Altogether over a thousand patients were operated using a conservative protocol: Safety first - no experiments. Five months and 5 kg were the basic rules. For the native doctors, training help for self-help was priority. In the announcements, patients with CLP were primarily addressed. Burns, contractions, tumors, and trauma-cases were the second priority. Fresh trauma was done in night shifts with the local surgeons in order not to interfere. Besides facial esthetics speech was the number one issue, following priorities fell into place. Cultural aspects played a certain role in the different countries and continents. PMID:25593861

  6. 20 years of cleft lip and palate missions.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, J Thomas; Kreusch, Thomas; Marsh, Jeff L; Schopper, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Volunteer missions for cleft lip and palate (CLP) care in Indonesia (1991-1992), India (1994-2003), Bhutan (2005-2010), and Kenya (2011), took place always at the same Hospital in each country. Altogether over a thousand patients were operated using a conservative protocol: Safety first - no experiments. Five months and 5 kg were the basic rules. For the native doctors, training help for self-help was priority. In the announcements, patients with CLP were primarily addressed. Burns, contractions, tumors, and trauma-cases were the second priority. Fresh trauma was done in night shifts with the local surgeons in order not to interfere. Besides facial esthetics speech was the number one issue, following priorities fell into place. Cultural aspects played a certain role in the different countries and continents.

  7. Candidate Genes for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate Detected by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hoebel, A K; Drichel, D; van de Vorst, M; Böhmer, A C; Sivalingam, S; Ishorst, N; Klamt, J; Gölz, L; Alblas, M; Maaser, A; Keppler, K; Zink, A M; Dixon, M J; Dixon, J; Hemprich, A; Kruse, T; Graf, I; Dunsche, A; Schmidt, G; Daratsianos, N; Nowak, S; Aldhorae, K A; Nöthen, M M; Knapp, M; Thiele, H; Gilissen, C; Reutter, H; Hoischen, A; Mangold, E; Ludwig, K U

    2017-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) is a facial malformation that has a livebirth prevalence of 1 in 2,500. Research suggests that the etiology of nsCPO is multifactorial, with a clear genetic component. To date, genome-wide association studies have identified only 1 conclusive common variant for nsCPO, that is, a missense variant in the gene grainyhead-like-3 ( GRHL3). Thus, the underlying genetic causes of nsCPO remain largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying rare variants that might contribute to nsCPO risk, via whole-exome sequencing (WES), in multiply affected Central European nsCPO pedigrees. WES was performed in 2 affected first-degree relatives from each family. Variants shared between both individuals were analyzed for their potential deleterious nature and a low frequency in the general population. Genes carrying promising variants were annotated for 1) reported associations with facial development, 2) multiple occurrence of variants, and 3) expression in mouse embryonic palatal shelves. This strategy resulted in the identification of a set of 26 candidate genes that were resequenced in 132 independent nsCPO cases and 623 independent controls of 2 different ethnicities, using molecular inversion probes. No rare loss-of-function mutation was identified in either WES or resequencing step. However, we identified 2 or more missense variants predicted to be deleterious in each of 3 genes ( ACACB, PTPRS, MIB1) in individuals from independent families. In addition, the analyses identified a novel variant in GRHL3 in 1 patient and a variant in CREBBP in 2 siblings. Both genes underlie different syndromic forms of CPO. A plausible hypothesis is that the apparently nonsyndromic clefts in these 3 patients might represent hypomorphic forms of the respective syndromes. In summary, the present study identified rare variants that might contribute to nsCPO risk and suggests candidate genes for further investigation.

  8. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-03-23

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not.

  9. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not. PMID:25394591

  10. Biomechanical response of the maxillofacial skeleton to transpalatal orthopedic force in a unilateral palatal cleft.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pawan; Zhao, Linping; Patel, Pravin

    2011-05-01

    To assess the skeletal and dental effects of rapid maxillary expansion in a patient with unilateral cleft deformity of secondary palate and alveolus using the finite element method. A patient-specific composite skull model was developed from a patient computed tomographic scan and a surface scan of the patient's maxillary cast using MIMICS imaging analysis software. For volumetric meshing and the finite element analysis, Abaqus (6.7) was used. The typical wedge-shaped opening that occurs after RME, seen in non-cleft patients, is not seen in cleft patients. A clockwise rotation of the maxilla as a result of maxillary expansion was evident. The areas of maximum stress were the intact primary palate region, inferior orbital foramen of the non-cleft and the cleft sides, and the zygomatic buttress of the cleft side. During expansion, the intact primary palate showed high stress and acted as a region of major resistance, followed by the zygomatic buttress on the cleft side. Clinicians should consider a need for customization of expansion therapy for cleft patients depending on the patient's age, the type of cleft present (primary or secondary palate), and the desired area of expansion (anterior or posterior).

  11. Nasoalveolar Molding Therapy for the Treatment of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Improves Nasal Symmetry and Maxillary Alveolar Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Escolano, María Gloria; Martínez-Plaza, Adoración; Fernández-Valadés, Ricardo; Cortés-Sánchez, Rosario; Muñoz-Miguelsanz, María Angeles; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Perez-Ureña, María Bélen; Matar-Satuf, Kamel; España-López, Antonio José

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the esthetic and morphologic outcomes before surgery using nasoalveolar molding (NAM) therapy in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. A prospective analysis was performed. The study was carried out in the Congenital Malformations Craniofacial and Cleft Lip and Palate Unit, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Andalusian Health Service, Granada (Spain). Twenty consecutively enrolled infants ranging in age from 7 to 30 days with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate treated from 2008 to 2012. All patients were treated with NAM appliances to align the alveolar segments and reduce severity of the nasal deformity. The extraoral nasal measurements were performed on casts and nasal photographs. The measurements consisted of bialar width (BAW), columellar deviation (CD), cleft nostril height (CNH), cleft nostril width (CNW), non-CNH, non-CNW, and the deviation of the columella to the horizontal line represented by bilateral pupil line (BIA). The authors have made the measurements following Barilla method. Also 2 intraoral measurements were taken. Following NAM the extraoral records showed a statistically significant decrease in CD (P < 0.0001), CNW (P < 0.0001), and BAW (P < 0.001). Furthermore, statistically significant increases in CNH (P < 0.05) and BIA (P < 0.0001) were observed.Following Barilla measurements, the authors have found a high percentage of symmetry in all the nasal measurements after the NAM therapy.Intraoral results showed a statistically significant decrease in the gap between the greater and lesser alveolar segments and a statistically significant increase in maxillary arch width. Nasoalveolar molding improves nasal symmetry and achieves an improvement of all maxillary alveolar dimensions, increasing alveolar rim width, reducing the size of alveolar cleft gap, and improving shape of the maxillary dental arch. As a consequence of reducing the alveolar and nasal deformities before surgery

  12. Mice with an anterior cleft of the palate survive neonatal lethality.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuping; Wei, Na; Yu, Xueyan; Jiang, Yiping; Fei, Jian; Chen, YiPing

    2008-05-01

    Many genes are known to function in a region-specific manner in the developing secondary palate. We have previously shown that Shox2-deficient embryos die at mid-gestation stage and develop an anterior clefting phenotype. Here, we show that mice carrying a conditional inactivation of Shox2 in the palatal mesenchyme survive the embryonic and neonatal lethality, but develop a wasting syndrome. Phenotypic analyses indicate a delayed closure of the secondary palate at the anterior end, leading to a failed fusion of the primary and secondary palates. Consistent with a role proposed for Shox2 in skeletogenesis, Shox2 inactivation causes a significantly reduced bone formation in the hard palate, probably due to a down-regulation of Runx2 and Osterix. We conclude that the secondary palatal shelves are capable of fusion with each other, but fail to fuse with the primary palate in a developmentally delayed manner. Mice carrying an anterior cleft can survive neonatal lethality.

  13. Mice With an Anterior Cleft of the Palate Survive Neonatal Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuping; Wei, Na; Yu, Xueyan; Jiang, Yiping; Fei, Jian; Chen, YiPing

    2009-01-01

    Many genes are known to function in a region-specific manner in the developing secondary palate. We have previously shown that Shox2-deficient embryos die at mid-gestation stage and develop an anterior clefting phenotype. Here, we show that mice carrying a conditional inactivation of Shox2 in the palatal mesenchyme survive the embryonic and neonatal lethality, but develop a wasting syndrome. Phenotypic analyses indicate a delayed closure of the secondary palate at the anterior end, leading to a failed fusion of the primary and secondary palates. Consistent with a role proposed for Shox2 in skeletogenesis, Shox2 inactivation causes a significantly reduced bone formation in the hard palate, probably due to a down-regulation of Runx2 and Osterix. We conclude that the secondary palatal shelves are capable of fusion with each other, but fail to fuse with the primary palate in a developmentally delayed manner. Mice carrying an anterior cleft can survive neonatal lethality. PMID:18393307

  14. Nasolabial appearance after two palatoplasty types in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Brudnicki, A; Bronkhorst, E M; Nada, R; Dudkiewicz, Z; Kaminek, M; Katsaros, C; Fudalej, P S

    2014-05-01

    Facial appearance is important for normal psychosocial development in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP). There is conflicting evidence on how deficient maxillary growth may affect nasolabial esthetics. We retrospectively investigated nasolabial appearance in two groups, the Langenback (35 children; mean age 11.1 years; range: 7.9-13.6) and Vomerplasty (58 children; mean age 10.8 years; range: 7.8-14), who received unilateral CLP surgery by the same surgeon. The hard palate repair technique differed between the two groups. In the Langenback group, palatal bone on the non-cleft side only was left denuded, inducing scar formation and inhibiting maxillary growth. In the Vomerplasty group, a vomerplasty with tight closure of the soft tissues on the palate was applied. Thirteen lay judges rated nasolabial esthetics on photographs using a modified Asher-McDade's index. Nasolabial esthetics in both groups was comparable (p > 0.1 for each nasolabial component). Inferior view was judged as the least esthetic component and demonstrated mean scores 3.18 (SD = 0.63) and 3.13 (SD = 0.47) in the Langenback and Vomerplasty groups, respectively. Mean scores for other components were from 2.52 (SD = 0.63) to 2.81 (SD = 0.62). Regression analysis showed that vomerplasty is related with slight improvement in the nasal profile only (coefficient B = -0.287; p = 0.043; R(2 ) = 0.096). This study demonstrates that the use of vomerplasty instead of the Langenbeck technique is weakly associated with the nasolabial appearance among pre-adolescent patients with UCLP. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Impaired FGF signaling contributes to cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Riley, Bridget M; Mansilla, M Adela; Ma, Jinghong; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Maher, Brion S; Raffensperger, Lisa M; Russo, Erilynn T; Vieira, Alexandre R; Dodé, Catherine; Mohammadi, Moosa; Marazita, Mary L; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2007-03-13

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (NS CLP) is a complex birth defect resulting from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Several members of the FGF and FGFR families are expressed during craniofacial development and can rarely harbor mutations that result in human clefting syndromes. We hypothesized that disruptions in this pathway might also contribute to NS CLP. We sequenced the coding regions and performed association testing on 12 genes (FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, FGF2, FGF3, FGF4, FGF7, FGF8, FGF9, FGF10, FGF18, and NUDT6) and used protein structure analyses to predict the function of amino acid variants. Seven likely disease-causing mutations were identified, including: one nonsense mutation (R609X) in FGFR1, a de novo missense mutation (D73H) in FGF8, and other missense variants in FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3. Structural analysis of FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGF8 variants suggests that these mutations would impair the function of the proteins, albeit through different mechanisms. Genotyping of SNPs in the genes found associations between NS CLP and SNPs in FGF3, FGF7, FGF10, FGF18, and FGFR1. The data suggest that the FGF signaling pathway may contribute to as much as 3-5% of NS CLP and will be a consideration in the clinical management of CLP.

  16. Impaired FGF signaling contributes to cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Bridget M.; Mansilla, M. Adela; Ma, Jinghong; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Maher, Brion S.; Raffensperger, Lisa M.; Russo, Erilynn T.; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Dodé, Catherine; Mohammadi, Moosa; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (NS CLP) is a complex birth defect resulting from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Several members of the FGF and FGFR families are expressed during craniofacial development and can rarely harbor mutations that result in human clefting syndromes. We hypothesized that disruptions in this pathway might also contribute to NS CLP. We sequenced the coding regions and performed association testing on 12 genes (FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, FGF2, FGF3, FGF4, FGF7, FGF8, FGF9, FGF10, FGF18, and NUDT6) and used protein structure analyses to predict the function of amino acid variants. Seven likely disease-causing mutations were identified, including: one nonsense mutation (R609X) in FGFR1, a de novo missense mutation (D73H) in FGF8, and other missense variants in FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3. Structural analysis of FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGF8 variants suggests that these mutations would impair the function of the proteins, albeit through different mechanisms. Genotyping of SNPs in the genes found associations between NS CLP and SNPs in FGF3, FGF7, FGF10, FGF18, and FGFR1. The data suggest that the FGF signaling pathway may contribute to as much as 3–5% of NS CLP and will be a consideration in the clinical management of CLP. PMID:17360555

  17. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  18. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  19. Congenital heart anomalies in patients with clefts of the lip and/or palate.

    PubMed

    Wyse, R K; Mars, M; al-Mahdawi, S; Russell-Eggitt, I M; Blake, K D

    1990-07-01

    The nature and severity of congenital heart disease in 78 patients who presented with clefts of the lip and/or palate is reported. The prevalence of bilateral cleft lip and palate in patients with heart lesions was much higher than in cleft patients with normal hearts. Cardiac defects were predominantly conotruncal. Tetralogy of Fallot was present in 24 percent of patients; the prevalence of transposition, atrioventricular septal defect, and truncus arteriosus was also disproportionately high. Patients with conotruncal defects had a greater prevalence of either unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Most patients with congenital heart disease and clefting had additional abnormalities. Anomalies of other systems were found to be present in 87 percent of patients.

  20. Evaluation of 22q11.2 deletion in Cleft Palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Prabodha, L. B. Lahiru; Dias, Dayanath Kumara; Nanayakkara, B. Ganananda; de Silva, Deepthi C.; Chandrasekharan, N. Vishvanath; Ileyperuma, Isurani

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cleft palate is the commonest multifactorial epigenetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.43-2.45 per 1000. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical features and identify the 22q11.2 deletion in patients with cleft palate in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Cleft patients attending a Teaching Hospital in Sri Lanka were recruited for this study. The relevant data were obtained from review of case notes, interviews, and examination of patients according to a standard evaluation sheet. Quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to identify the 22q11.2 deletion. A gel documentation system (Bio-Doc) was used to quantify the PCR product following electrophoresis on 0.8% agarose gel. Results and Conclusion: There were 162 cleft palate patients of whom 59% were females. A total of 92 cleft palate subjects (56.2%) had other associated clinical features. Dysmorphic features (25.27%) and developmental delays (25.27%) were the commonest medical problems encountered. The cleft was limited to the soft palate in 125 patients, while in 25 patients it involved both the hard and the soft palate. There were seven subjects with bifid uvula and five subjects with submucous cleft palate. None of the patients had 22q11.2 deletion in this study population. A multicentered large population-based study is needed to confirm the results of this study and to develop guidelines on the appropriate use of 22q11.2 deletion testing, which are valid for cleft palate patients in Sri Lanka. PMID:23483617

  1. Impressions in cleft lip and palate--a novel two stage technique.

    PubMed

    Pani, Sharat Chandra; Hedge, Amitha M

    2008-01-01

    Though the field of presurgical orthopedics for the management of children with cleft Lip and Palate (CLAP) has made great advances over the past few decades, little is found in literature regarding the imressions required to fabricate these appliances. The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel two stage technique utilizing greenstick compound and addition silicone impression material to provide a safe, economical and accurate method for recording impressions in children with cleft lip and palate.

  2. [Principles of treatment of total unilateral cleft lip and palate. Suggested protocol].

    PubMed

    Simon, E; Duroure, F; Coing, C; Sellal, S; Chassagne, J F; Stricker, M

    2004-09-01

    Complete uni-lateral cleft palates resulting from failed union between internal and external nasal buds cause an imbalance of both superficial and deep nasal structures. After summarizing the principles that should guide the care of these anomalies, the authors present their therapeutic procedure, in which orthopaedic and surgical treatments are intimately associated. They conclude their presentation by emphasizing the difficulty of predicting the definitive result because of the extreme diversity of the sequellae that always accompany the treatment of cleft palates.

  3. Tympanogram findings in patients with cleft palates aged six months to seven years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanti, A.; Widiarni, D.; Alviandi, W.; Tamin, S.; Mansyur, M.

    2017-08-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital craniofacial deformities. Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a middle ear disease having a prevalence of almost 90% in patients with cleft palates. Tympanometry is a fast, safe, non-invasive, and easy tool for diagnosing middle ear disease qualitatively and quantitatively. Studies have been conducted using tympanometry to detect middle ear conditions in patients with cleft palates, but no research has studied tympanogram findings in patients with cleft palates in Indonesia. The aim of this study is to determine the tympanogram findings in Indonesian children aged six months to seven years with cleft palates. This is a cross-sectional study of 30 patients (17 males and 13 females) with Veau classification of palatal clefts aged six months to seven years (median 26.5 months) who underwent tympanometry examinations using a 226 Hztympanometer. Tympanograms were classified using the Jerger/Liden classification. Examinations of 58 ears found that type B tympanograms occurred most frequently (70.7%). The quantitative values of tympanometry analyzed included SAA (0.1-0.2 cm3), TPP value (-197.2-(-146.8 daPa)), Vec value (0.5-0.6 cm3), and gradient value (0.03-0.07 cm3). Using the Fisher test, a significant relationship was found between age and type of tympanogram (p = 0.0039) with the risk of type B and C tympanograms in infants (6-60 months) as high as 4.8 times that of children without cleft palates. The type B tympanogram was most frequently seen in patients with cleft palates aged six months to seven years old with the quantitative values of tympanometry lower than the normal values. Therefore, there was a significant difference in the type of tympanogram seen with age.

  4. Two-stage palate repair with delayed hard palate closure is related to favorable maxillary growth in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Fang; Yang, I-Ying; Wang, Ruby; Yun, Claudia; Huang, Chiung-Shing

    2010-05-01

    Two-stage palate repair with delayed hard palate closure is generally advocated because it allows the best possible postoperative maxillary growth. Nevertheless, in the literature, it has been questioned whether maxillary growth is better following use of this protocol. The authors therefore aimed to investigate whether stage of palate repair, one-stage versus two-stage, had a significant effect on facial growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Seventy-two patients with nonsyndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate operated on by two different protocols for palate repair, one-stage versus two-stage with delayed hard palate closure, and their 223 cephalometric radiographs were available in the retrospective longitudinal study. Clinical notes were reviewed to record treatment histories. Cephalometry was used to determine facial morphology and growth rate. Generalized estimating equations analysis was performed to assess the relationship between (1) facial morphology at age 20 and (2) facial growth rate, and the stage of palate repair. Stage of palate repair had a significant effect on the length and protrusion of the maxilla and the anteroposterior jaw relation at age 20, but not on their growth rates. The data suggest that in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, two-stage palate repair has a smaller adverse effect than one-stage palate repair on the growth of the maxilla. This stage effect is on the anteroposterior development of the maxilla and is attributable to the development being undisturbed before closure of the hard palate (i.e., hard palate repair timing specific).

  5. Mutations in PHF8 are associated with X linked mental retardation and cleft lip/cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, F; Holbert, S; Ronce, N; Faravelli, F; Lenzner, S; Schwartz, C; Lespinasse, J; Van Esch, H; Lacombe, D; Goizet, C; Phan-Dinh, T; van Bokhoven, H; Fryns, J; Chelly, J; Ropers, H; Moraine, C; Hamel, B; Briault, S

    2005-01-01

    Truncating mutations were found in the PHF8 gene (encoding the PHD finger protein 8) in two unrelated families with X linked mental retardation (XLMR) associated with cleft lip/palate (MIM 300263). Expression studies showed that this gene is ubiquitously transcribed, with strong expression of the mouse orthologue Phf8 in embryonic and adult brain structures. The coded PHF8 protein harbours two functional domains, a PHD finger and a JmjC (Jumonji-like C terminus) domain, implicating it in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling. The association of XLMR and cleft lip/palate in these patients with mutations in PHF8 suggests an important function of PHF8 in midline formation and in the development of cognitive abilities, and links this gene to XLMR associated with cleft lip/palate. Further studies will explore the specific mechanisms whereby PHF8 alterations lead to mental retardation and midline defects. PMID:16199551

  6. Mutations in PHF8 are associated with X linked mental retardation and cleft lip/cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Laumonnier, F; Holbert, S; Ronce, N; Faravelli, F; Lenzner, S; Schwartz, C E; Lespinasse, J; Van Esch, H; Lacombe, D; Goizet, C; Phan-Dinh Tuy, F; van Bokhoven, H; Fryns, J-P; Chelly, J; Ropers, H-H; Moraine, C; Hamel, B C J; Briault, S

    2005-10-01

    Truncating mutations were found in the PHF8 gene (encoding the PHD finger protein 8) in two unrelated families with X linked mental retardation (XLMR) associated with cleft lip/palate (MIM 300263). Expression studies showed that this gene is ubiquitously transcribed, with strong expression of the mouse orthologue Phf8 in embryonic and adult brain structures. The coded PHF8 protein harbours two functional domains, a PHD finger and a JmjC (Jumonji-like C terminus) domain, implicating it in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling. The association of XLMR and cleft lip/palate in these patients with mutations in PHF8 suggests an important function of PHF8 in midline formation and in the development of cognitive abilities, and links this gene to XLMR associated with cleft lip/palate. Further studies will explore the specific mechanisms whereby PHF8 alterations lead to mental retardation and midline defects.

  7. Effect of cleft lip palate repair on craniofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Zuber Ahamed; Shivalinga, BM; Ravi, S; Munawwar, Syeda Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare craniofacial growth among operated and unoperated unilateral cleft lip and palate non-syndromic subjects. Materials and Methods: A sample of 180 subjects of Indian origin was selected. Of them, 90 were operated, and 90 were unoperated complete unilateral cleft lip and palate individuals. The subjects were divided into three age groups of 3–5, 8–10, and 20–25 years comprised of 30 patients in each group. The following measurements were evaluated: Angle and length of the cranial base; maxillary spatial positioning and length; mandibular spatial positioning; morphology and length; maxillomandibular relationship. Comparative analysis of the means between the groups was performed with Student's t-test at the significance levels of 5%. The ANOVA test has been performed to test the effect of time. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measurements that represented the angle and length of the cranial base of unoperated and the operated patients (P>0.05). There was statistically significant decrease (P˂0.05) in the maxillary length (Co-A; 69.00 mm in 3–5 years, 68.33 mm in 8–10 years, and 67.17 mm in 20–25 years age group), and SNA angle (74.83° in 3–5 years, 74.17 ° in 8–10 years and 73.17 ° in 20–25 years age group) in operated group. No significant difference noticed on cephalometric values of the mandible, except Ar-Go-Me angle (P˂0.05), which showed vertical growth pattern in unoperated patients (132.50 ° in 3–5 years, 132.00 ° I 8–10 years and 138.33 ° in 20–25 years age group). Conclusion: Lip and palate repair has a significant influence on the maxilla and resulting in retarded growth of maxilla, which causes midface deficiency beyond acceptable sagittal limits. The Gonial angle showed vertical growth pattern in unoperated patients, but the cranial base angle and length of unoperated and the operated patients were similar. PMID:26229945

  8. Spelling Processes of Children With Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen Shi Mei; Young, Selena Ee-Li; Liow, Susan Jane Rickard; Purcell, Alison Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective :  To compare the cognitive-linguistic processes underlying spelling performance of children with cleft lip and/or palate with those of typically developing children. Design :  An assessment battery including tests of hearing, articulation, verbal short-term and working memory, and phonological awareness, as well as word and nonword spelling, was administered to both groups. Participants :  A total of 15 children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate were case-matched by age and sex to 15 typically developing children. The children were aged between 6 and 8 years and were bilingual, with English the dominant language. Results :  Wilcoxon signed-rank tests revealed that the performance of children with cleft lip and/or palate was significantly poorer on phoneme deletion and nonword spelling (P < .05) compared with typically developing children. Spearman correlation analyses revealed different relationships between the cognitive-linguistic and spelling measures for the cleft lip and/or palate and typically developing groups. Conclusions :  Children with cleft lip and/or palate underachieve in phonological awareness and spelling skills. To facilitate early intervention for literacy problems, speech-language pathologists should routinely assess the cognitive-linguistic processing of children with cleft lip and/or palate, especially phonological awareness, as part of their case management protocols.

  9. Alteration of maxillary and mandibular growth of adult patients with unoperated isolated cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunqiang; Wu, Yeke; Gu, Yifei; Yang, Qijian; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of cleft palate itself on the growth of maxilla and mandible. Fifty-two adult female patients with unoperated isolated cleft palate and 52 adult female individuals with normal occlusion were included in our study. Computer software was used for lateral cephalometry measurement. Manual measurement was performed for dental cast measurements, and sample t test analysis was applied to analyze the differences between the 2 groups using SPSS 17.0. The sella-nasion-subspinale point angle, subspinale-nasion-supramentale point angle, and maxillary arch length of the cleft group were significantly smaller than those of the control group (P < 0.01). Both maxillary and mandibular posterior dental arch widths of the cleft group were significantly larger compared with the control group (P < 0.01), whereas the sella-nasion-supramentale point angle, mandible arch length, palate height, and palate shelf inclination did not differ between the 2 groups. The measurements did not differ between the submucosal cleft and the overt cleft patients. Cleft palate itself has adverse effects on the maxilla growth with shorter maxillary arch length and wider posterior dental arch width.

  10. Dental anomalies associated with cleft lip and palate in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, V; Anttonen, V; Ylikontiola, L P; Koskinen, S; Pesonen, P; Sándor, G K

    2015-12-01

    Despite the reported occurrence of dental anomalies of cleft lip and palate, little is known about their prevalence in children from Northern Finland with cleft lip and palate. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies among patients with different types of clefts in Northern Finland. Design and Statistics: patient records of 139 subjects aged three years and older (with clefts treated in Oulu University Hospital, Finland during the period 1996-2010 (total n. 183) were analysed for dental anomalies including the number of teeth, morphological and developmental anomalies and their association with the cleft type. The analyses were carried out using Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Differences between the groups were considered statistically significant at p values < 0.05. More than half of the patients had clefts of the hard palate, 18% of the lip and palate, and 13% of the lip. At least one dental anomaly was detected in 47% of the study population. Almost one in three (26.6%) subjects had at least one anomaly and 17.9% had two or three anomalies. The most common type of anomaly in permanent teeth were missing teeth followed by supernumerary teeth. Supernumerary teeth were significantly more apparent when the lip was involved in the cleft compared with palatal clefts. Missing teeth were less prevalent among those 5 years or younger. The prevalence of different anomalies was significantly associated with the cleft type in both age groups. Dental anomalies are more prevalent among cleft children than in the general population in Finland. The most prevalent anomalies associated with cleft were missing and supernumerary teeth.

  11. Citation Characteristics of Research Articles under the Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal

    2015-08-01

    Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University, has cooperated with the Medical Association of Thailand in publishing the special five issues of JMT (Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand) during the years 2010-2014 in order to promote research activities and working network of related fields in cleft lip-cleft palate and craniofacial deformities. This study aimed to examine the features of 106 research articles in terms of authors and disciplines, and analyze the citations considering sources, country and years after publication. The scope of study also included citations in the form of journal, which was presented as journal ranking compared with impact factors and Bradford's Law on journal citation. The results of study will be useful in developing multidisciplinary research activities of the center and especially assist in the acquisition of academic journals for essential sources of reference.

  12. GFA Taq I polymorphism and cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) risk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijia; Ma, Lian

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) Taq I polymorphism has been indicated to be correlated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) susceptibility, but study results are still debatable. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. We conducted a comprehensive search of Embase, Ovid, Web of Science, the Cochrane database, PubMed, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM-disc, 1979-2014), the database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979-2014) and the full paper database of Chinese Science and Technology of Chongqing (VIP, 1989-2014) to identify suitable studies. There were 18 studies suitable for this meta-analysis, involving a total of 3135 cases and 3575 controls. Significantly increased CL/P risk was observed (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.17-1.89; P = 0.001). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, there was evidence in the Caucasian population for an association between this polymorphism and CL/P risk (OR = 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was found between this his polymorphism and CL/P risk in African and Hispanic populations. According to a specific CL/P type, increased clip lip and palate risk and clip palate risk were found (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.10-1.73; P = 0.005; OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.01-1.66; P = 0.042). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis found that the TGFA Taq I polymorphism may be associated with CL/P susceptibility. PMID:26064247

  13. Four-dimensional changes of nasolabial positions in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Li, Jingtao; Zhao, Shufan; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Yan; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the accurate three-dimensional positions and positional changes of the lip and nose in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Sixty-three patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and 96 patients with isolated cleft palate were retrospectively enrolled. Facial casts of all subjects taken immediately before and after cheiloplasty and before palatoplasty were used. Three-dimensional values of 12 landmarks were measured by electronic caliper and parallel milling machine. Independent-samples t test was used in analyzing positional differences between UCLP and control, and 2-way analysis of variance was selected in analyzing positional changes among UCLP groups. The threshold of significance was set at 0.05. Superiorly dislocated christa philtri (Cph) (P < 0.001), subalae (Sa) (P < 0.001), and nostril tip (Nt) (P < 0.001) were partially corrected and still dislocated (P < 0.05, P < 0.001, P < 0.001) immediately after operation, but Cph (P = 0.322) and Cph' (P = 0.081) developed caudally to normal about 10 months after primary surgery. In sagittal dimension, lip and nose, especially Cph' (P < 0.001), Sa' (P < 0.001), and Nt' (P < 0.001) on the cleft side, dislocated dorsally before operation. Immediately after operation, Sa' (P = 0.456) and Nt' (P = 0.067) were normal in sagittal projection, but Cph' was corrected partially and still insufficient (P < 0.001). Unfortunately, sagittal projections of all nasolabial structures, Cph (P < 0.001), Sa' (P < 0.001), Nt (P < 0.001), Cph' (P < 0.001), Sa' (P < 0.05), and Nt' (P < 0.001), decreased significantly and were insufficient after operation. In vertical dimension, nasolabial displacements were corrected partially by primary surgery, and catching-up growth happened since then. Insufficient sagittal projections of the lip and nose were corrected successfully by lip repair, but lip repair itself had adverse effects on nasolabial sagittal growth.

  14. Evaluation of the intercanine distance in newborns with cleft lip and palate using 3D digital casts

    PubMed Central

    MELLO, Bianca Zeponi Fernandes; FERNANDES, Viviane Mendes; CARRARA, Cleide Felício Carvalho; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this present study was to compare, by means of 3D digital casts, the anterior transverse dimension of the dental arch of newborns with and without cleft lip and palate. Material and Methods The sample was composed of ninety-four children aged from 3 to 9 months divided into three study groups: Group I - children without craniofacial deformities (control group); Group II - children with unilateral cleft lip and palate; Group III - children with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Impressions were executed before lip and palate repair in patients with clefts. Dental casts were digitized using a 3D scanner linked to a computer. Measurements of the intercanine distance were measured on the digital casts. Intergroup comparisons were performed using ANOVA (p<0.05). Results The results showed a mean of 36.5 mm for unilateral cleft lip and palate group, 34.8 mm for bilateral cleft lip and palate group and 27.52 mm for the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between the control group and both groups of patients with cleft lip and palate. There was no statistically significant difference between complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate groups. Conclusions Patients with complete cleft lip and palate were born with an increased anterior dimension of the maxillary dental arch compared to non cleft patients. PMID:24212990

  15. Speech Correction for Children with Cleft Lip and Palate by Networking of Community-Based Care.

    PubMed

    Hanchanlert, Yotsak; Pramakhatay, Worawat; Pradubwong, Suteera; Prathanee, Benjamas

    2015-08-01

    Prevalence of cleft lip and palate (CLP) is high in Northeast Thailand. Most children with CLP face many problems, particularly compensatory articulation disorders (CAD) beyond surgery while speech services and the number of speech and language pathologists (SLPs) are limited. To determine the effectiveness of networking of Khon Kaen University (KKU) Community-Based Speech Therapy Model: Kosumphisai Hospital, Kosumphisai District and Maha Sarakham Hospital, Mueang District, Maha Sarakham Province for reduction of the number of articulations errors for children with CLP. Eleven children with CLP were recruited in 3 1-year projects of KKU Community-Based Speech Therapy Model. Articulation tests were formally assessed by qualified language pathologists (SLPs) for baseline and post treatment outcomes. Teachings on services for speech assistants (SAs) were conducted by SLPs. Assigned speech correction (SC) was performed by SAs at home and at local hospitals. Caregivers also gave SC at home 3-4 days a week. Networking of Community-Based Speech Therapy Model signficantly reduced the number of articulation errors for children with CLP in both word and sentence levels (mean difference = 6.91, 95% confidence interval = 4.15-9.67; mean difference = 5.36, 95% confidence interval = 2.99-7.73, respectively). Networking by Kosumphisai and Maha Sarakham of KKU Community-Based Speech Therapy Model was a valid and efficient method for providing speech services for children with cleft palate and could be extended to any area in Thailand and other developing countries, where have similar contexts.

  16. Sphincterplasty for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency in the Child Without a Cleft-Palate: Etiologies and Speech Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Golinko, Michael S; Mason, Kazlin; Nett, Katie; Riski, John E; Williams, Joseph K

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to report on speech outcomes following surgery for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) on a broad spectrum of patients without a cleft palate. Inclusion criteria included patients without a cleft palate operated on by a single surgeon (JKW) over a 10-year period and postoperative speech evaluation within 1 year. All patients underwent a sphincter pharyngoplasty. The main outcome measures were perceptual speech assessment using a 6-point scale (1 = none or normal, 6 = severe); velopharyngeal function (VPF) (1 = adequate, 2 = marginal, 3 =  dequate); and quantitative nasalance score. Forty children (mean age 7.5 y) were included. Eight unique conditions were identified; the most common was 22q deletion syndromes (27.5%). All patients had a deep nasopharynx, mean nasopharyngeal depth >0.67. Two novel cases are presented in each child with mosaic Trisomy 14 and ring chromosome 18 abnormality. Of all patients, 87.5% improved their postoperative hypernasality score. Preoperatively, all patients had either marginal or inadequate VPF (2 or 3). Postoperatively, 90% of patients (n = 36) achieved adequate velar function, the remainder did not improve at the first postoperative evaluation. Intelligibility and audible nasal emissions improved in between 57% and 65% of patients. Articulation proficiency was the only perceptual rating not to improve initially, but then did so on the most recent postoperative speech evaluation. This study demonstrates successful speech outcomes in a diverse group of patients. It also increases awareness of noncleft VPI amenable to surgical correction.

  17. Speech therapy for errors secondary to cleft palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Ann W

    2011-05-01

    Individuals with a history of cleft lip/palate or velopharyngeal dysfunction may demonstrate any combination of speech sound errors, hypernasality, and nasal emission. Speech sound distortion can also occur due to other structural anomalies, including malocclusion. Whenever there are structural anomalies, speech can be affected by obligatory distortions or compensatory errors. Obligatory distortions (including hypernasality due to velopharyngeal insufficiency) are caused by abnormal structure and not by abnormal function. Therefore, surgery or other forms of physical management are needed for correction. In contrast, speech therapy is indicated for compensatory articulation productions where articulation placement is changed in response to the abnormal structure. Speech therapy is much more effective if it is done after normalization of the structure. When speech therapy is appropriate, the techniques involve methods to change articulation placement using standard articulation therapy principles. Oral-motor exercises, including the use of blowing and sucking, are never indicated to improve velopharyngeal function. The purpose of this article is to provide information regarding when speech therapy is appropriate for individuals with a history of cleft palate or other structural anomalies and when physical management is needed. In addition, some specific therapy techniques are offered for the elimination of common compensatory articulation productions. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  18. Indications on suitable scaffold as carrier of stem cells in the alveoloplasty of cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, C; Fontana, P; Porta, F; Majorana, A; Pazzaglia, U E; Sapelli, P L

    2006-08-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone is used to close the residual alveolar bone defect in cleft palate patients during late mixed dentition. Surgery involves physical and anaesthesiologic risks, long-time hospitalization, high costs and not always good results (15% failure rate). Alternatives to iliac crest bone grafting are going to be evaluated: synthetic, xenograft and allograft matrices combined with platelet-rich plasma or recombined bone morphogenic proteins for osteoinductivity are commercially available. These alternatives have not yet been determined to be equivalent to the previous treatment. A new field of research is represented by stem cells, which have been also used to regenerate ischaemic cardiac tissue after heart attack, to treat hypophosphatasia and osteoporosis. Our aim was to use osteoblasts from stem cells to close the residual palate cleft in association with a suitable carrier. Stem cells are expanded in the Aastrom bioreactor, differentiated into osteoblasts and positioned in the bone defect by means of a Spongostan scaffold. This scaffold has the best characteristics as commercial availability, low cost, good manageability, absence of allergic reactions or other side effects on patient, biocompatibility, imbibition, radiotransparency, reabsorbability and osteoinductivity. Previous studies encourage Spongostan scaffold application.

  19. Facial soft-tissue morphology of adolescent patients with nonsyndromic bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Nadia; Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Kianifar, Hamidreza; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically evaluate the facial soft-tissue characteristics of adolescent patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) and to compare them with a noncleft control group. Lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained from 56 adolescents with nonsyndromic BCLP (29 boys and 27 girls) were analyzed and compared with 67 control subjects (29 boys and 38 girls) who were matched for sex, age, and ethnicity. All patients had been operated on before the age of 2 years for the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate. None had received any orthopedic or orthodontic treatment. Independent-samples t test revealed that patients with BCLP significantly differed from the control group by having a flatter facial profile, thinner and more retruded nasal base, flatter nasal tip (in males), and reduced upper-lip length. Furthermore, thicker lower-lip pit, shallower mentolabial sulcus, and increased inclination angles of the upper and lower lips relative to the horizontal plane were observed in female patients compared with the normal group. The findings of the current study suggested that adolescent patients with BCLP showed several facial soft-tissue deformities when compared with normal individuals with the same age, sex, and ethnic origin. This study provides objective measures that could lead to better treatment planning and prediction of the need for corrective surgeries in patients with BCLP.

  20. [Dynamic expression of wnt and fibroblast growth factor ligands in cleft palate induced by retinoic acid].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Cong, Wei; Wang, Ru; Xiao, Jing

    2011-02-01

    To screen the wnt and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) ligands involved in palatogenesis and cleft palate, and to study the dynamic expression of them in the different stages of palatal development and cleft palate formation. Mouse model of retinoic acid (RA)-induced cleft palate was set up. At embryo day (ED) 14.5, the palatal tissues of RA-treated group and wild type were collected and prepared for gene-chip analysis. According to the gene-chip results, wnt3, wnt8a, fgf9 and fgf10 were selected and their expression level was detected at ED13.5-15.5 by using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). (1) Gene-chip analysis showed that in RA-induced cleft palate group wnt8a and fgf9 were down-regulated, wnt3 and fgf10 were up-regulated in conversely. (2)During the different stage of the control group palatogenesis, intense expression of wnt3, wnt8a, fgf9 and fgf10 were detected with a continuous dynamic pattern. (3)Compared with the control group, the expression level of wnt3, wnt8a, fgf9 and fgf10 in RA-induced cleft palate showed significant difference, respectively (P < 0.05). wnt and FGF signaling molecules participate in the palatogenesis, and RA pathway may interact with wnt and FGF signaling pathway.

  1. Verbal Competence in Narrative Retelling in 5-Year-Olds with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Lohmander, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research regarding expressive language performance in children born with cleft palate is sparse. The relationship between articulation/phonology and expressive language skills also needs to be further explored. Aims: To investigate verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-old children born with unilateral cleft lip and palate…

  2. Verbal Competence in Narrative Retelling in 5-Year-Olds with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Lohmander, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research regarding expressive language performance in children born with cleft palate is sparse. The relationship between articulation/phonology and expressive language skills also needs to be further explored. Aims: To investigate verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-old children born with unilateral cleft lip and palate…

  3. The Slav-cleft: A three-center study of the outcome of treatment of cleft lip and palate. Part 1: Craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Wanda; Klimova, Irena; Brudnicki, Andrzej; Polackova, Petra; Kroupova, Daniela; Dubovska, Ivana; Rachwalski, Martin; Fudalej, Piotr Stanislaw

    2016-11-01

    Results of a comparison of the outcomes of treatment of cleft lip and palate can be affected by growth characteristics of populations from which subjects with the clefts are derived. Moreover, conventional cephalometric techniques used in cleft studies for analysis of facial morphology provide only a partial description of shape and are confounded by biases regarding the reference structures. In this retrospective comparison, craniofacial morphology of preadolescent patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate treated in Warsaw (n = 35, age = 10.6 years, SD = 1.2), Prague (n = 38, age = 11.6 years, SD = 1.4), and Bratislava (n = 26, age = 10.5 years, SD = 1.6) were evaluated on cephalograms with the cephalometric method used in the Eurocleft study and geometric morphometrics. We found that patients treated in Warsaw showed slightly more favorable outcomes than in Prague and Bratislava. The differences were related primarily to the position of maxillary alveolar process, cranial base, mandibular angle, and soft tissues. Although no association between a component of treatment protocol and the outcome was found, it is possible that organizational factors such as participation of high-volume, experienced surgeons contributed to these results. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Postoperative evaluation of the folded pharyngeal flap operation for cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimasu, Hidemi; Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Negishi, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Velopharyngeal function is very important for patients with cleft palate to acquire good speech. For patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency, prosthetic speech appliances and speech therapy are applied first, and then pharyngeal flap surgery to improve velopharyngeal function is performed in our hospital. The folded pharyngeal flap operation was first reported by Isshiki and Morimoto in 1975. We usually use a modification of the original method. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to introduce our method of the folded pharyngeal flap operation and report the results. Materials and Methods: The folded pharyngeal flap operation was performed for 110 patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency from 1982 to 2010. Of these, the 97 whose postoperative speech function was evaluated are reported. The cases included 61 males and 36 females, ranging in age from 7 to 50 years. The time from surgery to speech assessment ranged from 5 months to 6 years. In order to evaluate preoperative velopharyngeal function, assessment of speech by a trained speech pathologist, nasopharyngoscopy, and cephalometric radiography with contrast media were performed before surgery, and then the appropriate surgery was selected and performed. Postoperative velopharyngeal function was assessed by a trained speech pathologist. Results: Of the 97 patients who underwent the folded pharyngeal flap operation, 85 (87.6%) showed velopharyngeal competence, 8 (8.2%) showed marginal velopharyngeal incompetence, and only 2 (2.1%) showed velopharyngeal incompetence; in 2 cases (2.1%), hyponasality was present. Approximately 95% of patients showed improved velopharyngeal function. Conclusions: The folded pharyngeal flap operation based on appropriate preoperative assessment has been shown to be an effective method for the treatment of cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. PMID:26389036

  5. [Quality of life and its influential factors of children and adolescents with congenital cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng; Liu, Zong-xiang; Wang, Peng-lai; Liu, Chao

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the quality of life of children undergoing clef lip or and palate repair as well as the influential factors of the quality of life, and provide theoretical foundation for future studies such as psychological interventions. Totally 164 children and young adolescent patients with cleft lip and palate undergoing maxillofacial surgery and orthodontic treatment in Xuzhou Stomatology Hospital were selected as experimental group, and 102 normal children and young adolescents were selected as control group. Both groups were investigated by general information questionnaire and child and adolescents' quality of life scale (CAQOL). The results were analyzed and the influential factors on quality of life were evaluated by multivariate regression analysis with SPSS 19.0 software package. The overall CAQOL scores and most of the subscale scores (teacher-student relationship, peer relationships, parent-child relationship, self-awareness, physical discomfort, negative emotions, attitude about homework, access to transportation from home, extra curricular activities, self-esteem) in the experimental group were significantly lower compared with the control group (P<0.05). Single factor analysis of the quality of life showed that there was no significant difference between gender distribution; on the contrary, residential areas, parents' level of education, the main caregivers, family income and types of the disease had significant difference (P<0.05). Multiple linear regression equation showed that mother's education level of patients, cleft lip and palate category, family income, the main caregivers and residential areas were the important influential factors on children' quality of life. Among them, the type of disease was the most important influential factor (beta=0.260), followed by mother's education level (beta=0.215). The quality of life of children with cleft lip/palate is poor. Patients' scores of CAQOL are closely related with mothers' education level

  6. Candidate pathway based analysis for cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Xiao; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this research was to identify potential biological pathways associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and to explore the potential biological mechanisms underlying these associated pathways on risk of NSCL/P. This project was based on the dataset of a previously published genome-wide association (GWA) study on NSCL/P (Beaty et al. 2010). Case-parent trios used here originated from an international consortium (The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium, GENEVA) formed in 2007. A total of 5,742 individuals from 1,908 CL/P case-parents trios (1,591 complete trios and 317 incomplete trios where one parent was missing) were collected and genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad array. Candidate pathways were selected using a list of 356 genes that may be related to oral clefts. In total, 42 candidate pathways, which included 1,564 genes and 40,208 SNPs were tested. Using a pathway-based analysis approach proposed by Wang et al (2007), we conducted a permutation-based test to assess the statistical significance of the nominal p-values of 42 candidate pathways. The analysis revealed several pathways yielding nominally significant p-values. However, controlling for the family wise error rate, none of these pathways could retain statistical significance. Nominal p-values of these pathways were concentrated at the lower tail of the distribution, with more than expected low p-values. A permutation based test for examining this type of distribution pattern yielded an overall p-value of 0.029. Thus, while this pathway-based analysis did not yield a clear significant result for any particular pathway, we conclude that one or more of the genes and pathways considered here likely do play a role in oral clefting.

  7. What are the occlusal outcomes for unilateral cleft lip and palate patients? A national project in the UK.

    PubMed

    Deacon, S; Bessant, P; Russell, J I; Hathorn, I

    2007-10-27

    This national project assessed the orthodontic outcome for unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients in the UK. Six consecutively treated fixed appliance cases where orthognathic surgery was not undertaken were assessed using the peer assessment rating (PAR) index on orthodontic study models. These cases were submitted by NHS consultant orthodontists undertaking treatment on patients with cleft lip and/or palate. UK NHS consultant-led hospital service. The mean reduction in PAR score was 69% + or - 22. The mean start PAR score was 41 + or - 11. The mean end of treatment PAR was 12 + or - 9. The proportion of cases where the score was worse or no different was 7.5%. The mean percentage PAR reduction compares well with other national projects looking at outcome from patients treated in the hospital service. The mean PAR reduction could be used as a benchmark for outcome in UCLP orthodontic treatments in future audit projects and the annual consultant appraisal process.

  8. Speech Production in 3-Year-Old Internationally Adopted Children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, AnnaKarin; Schölin, Johnna; Mark, Hans; Jönsson, Radi; Persson, Christina

    Background: In the last decade, a large number of children with cleft lip and palate have been adopted to Sweden. A majority of the children were born in China and they usually arrive in Sweden with an unoperated palate. There is currently a lack of knowledge regarding speech and articulation development in this group of children, who also have to…

  9. The Etiology of Cleft Palate Formation in BMP7-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouskoura, Thaleia; Kozlova, Anastasiia; Alexiou, Maria; Blumer, Susanne; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Graf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Palatogenesis is a complex process implying growth, elevation and fusion of the two lateral palatal shelves during embryogenesis. This process is tightly controlled by genetic and mechanistic cues that also coordinate the growth of other orofacial structures. Failure at any of these steps can result in cleft palate, which is a frequent craniofacial malformation in humans. To understand the etiology of cleft palate linked to the BMP signaling pathway, we studied palatogenesis in Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. Bmp7 expression was found in several orofacial structures including the edges of the palatal shelves prior and during their fusion. Bmp7 deletion resulted in a general alteration of oral cavity morphology, unpaired palatal shelf elevation, delayed shelf approximation, and subsequent lack of fusion. Cell proliferation and expression of specific genes involved in palatogenesis were not altered in Bmp7-deficient embryos. Conditional ablation of Bmp7 with Keratin14-Cre or Wnt1-Cre revealed that neither epithelial nor neural crest-specific loss of Bmp7 alone could recapitulate the cleft palate phenotype. Palatal shelves from mutant embryos were able to fuse when cultured in vitro as isolated shelves in proximity, but not when cultured as whole upper jaw explants. Thus, deformations in the oral cavity of Bmp7-deficient embryos such as the shorter and wider mandible were not solely responsible for cleft palate formation. These findings indicate a requirement for Bmp7 for the coordination of both developmental and mechanistic aspects of palatogenesis. PMID:23516636

  10. Clinical and genetic study on 356 Brazilian patients with a distinct phenotype of cleft lip and palate without alveolar ridge involvement.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Camila Wenceslau; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine; Richieri-Costa, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Oral clefts include cleft lip (CL), cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP) and cleft palate (CP), with wide variations in clinical presentation and degree of severity. We described a sample of individuals with CL and CP without alveolar arch involvement (CL + CP) to verify if the characteristics of this group are distinct from those with CL with or without CP (CL/P) described in literature. The sample was composed of 356 patients with CL + CP, registered at HRCA-USP, Bauru-SP-Brazil. The following characteristics were investigated: sex ratio, parental age at the time of conception, parental consanguinity, familial recurrence, laterality of the cleft and associated anomalies. A subgroup of 30 individuals with microforms of CL and CP were taken from the sample and compared with the remaining cases. Statistical differences were found between this CL + CP sample and the literature data for groups with CL/P regarding laterality, sex ratio, consanguinity, familial recurrence, and the presence of associated anomalies. The microform sample showed a statistical difference in paternal age. In most evaluated aspects, this sample presents similar characteristics to the consulted literature data for CL/P; as do the group of microform cleft cases when compared with the remaining CL + CP sample in this study. Microforms of cleft can represent a target group for investigation into the embryogenetic mechanisms of oral clefts and their phenotypic variability. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosing subtle palatal anomalies: Validation of video-analysis and assessment protocol for diagnosing occult submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Ryan; Weinberg, Seth M; Marazita, Mary L; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-09-01

    Submucous cleft palate (SMCP) classically involves bifid uvula, zona pellucida, and notched hard palate. However, patients may present with more subtle anatomic abnormalities. The ability to detect these abnormalities is important for surgeons managing velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) or considering adenoidectomy. Validate an assessment protocol for diagnosis of occult submucous cleft palate (OSMCP) and identify physical examination features present in patients with OSMCP in the relaxed and activated palate positions. Study participants included patients referred to a pediatric VPD clinic with concern for hypernasality or SMCP. Using an appropriately encrypted iPod touch, transoral video was obtained for each patient with the palate in the relaxed and activated positions. The videos were reviewed by two otolaryngologists in normal speed and slow-motion, as needed, and a questionnaire was completed by each reviewer pertaining to the anatomy and function of the palate. 47 patients, with an average age of 4.6 years, were included in the study over a one-year period. Four videos were unusable due to incomplete view of the palate. The most common palatal abnormality noted was OSMCP, diagnosed by each reviewer in 26/43 and 30/43 patients respectively. Using the assessment protocol, agreement on palatal diagnosis was 83.7% (kappa = 0.68), indicating substantial agreement, with the most prevalent anatomic features being vaulted palate elevation (96%) and visible notching of hard palate (75%). The diagnosis of subtle palatal anomalies is difficult and can be subjective. Using the proposed video-analysis method and assessment protocol may improve reliability of diagnosis of OSMCP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Changes in valvular movements of the velopharyngeal sphincter after speech therapy in children with cleft palate. A videonasopharyngoscopic and videofluoroscopic study of multiple incidence].

    PubMed

    Ysunza-Rivera, A; Pamplona-Ferreira, M C; Toledo-Cortina, E

    1991-07-01

    Thirty-one patients with surgically repaired cleft palate who had velopharyngeal deficiency and compensatory articulatory defects in comparison to hyperrhinophony were studied. All patients were submitted to a videonasopharyngescopic and videofluoroscopic study of multiple incidence before and after speech therapy in order to correct the compensatory articulation. The movement proportions of the pharyngeal velum structures increased significantly after the correction of the compensatory articulation. Even moreso, the size of the pharyngeal velum defect decreased significantly. The results of this study support the postulate which recommends that the articulatory abnormalities associated to hyperrhinophony should be corrected before surgery for pharyngeal velum insufficiency secondary to the closure of the cleft palate.

  13. Cleft lip and palate due to deficiency of mesencephalic neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    van Limborgh, J; Lieuw Kie Song, S H; Been, W

    1983-07-01

    The mesencephalic crest was partially eliminated in chick embryos by means of tangential microlaser. The heads of the surviving embryos were serially sectioned and microscopically studied. A deficiency of mesenshyme in the anlage of the maxillary process was observed in 4 of the 42 embryos sacrificed after 24 hours, on the side of irradiation. Among the 99 surviving embryos sacrificed at the ages of 7 or 12 days, 26 showed a unilateral cleft lip, a wide palatal cleft or a combination of these anomalies. It is concluded that cleft lip and palate can result from insufficient growth of the mesenchyme in the maxillary process caused by partial deficiency of mesencephalic neural crest cells.

  14. Management of the Amniotic Band Syndrome with Cleft Palate: Literature Review and Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Ortega, Carolina; Flores-Velázquez, Joselín; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Noyola-Frías, Miguel Ángel; Santos-Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Amniotic Band Syndrome (ABS) is a group of congenital malformations that includes the majority of typical constriction rings and limb and digital amputations, together with major craniofacial, thoracic, and abdominal malformations. The syndrome is caused by early rupture of the amniotic sac. Some of the main oral manifestations include micrognathia, hyperdontia, and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, which is present in 14.6% of patients with this syndrome. The purpose of this report was to describe the clinical characteristics and the oral treatment provided to a 6-month-old male patient affected with ABS with cleft lip and palate. PMID:28246561

  15. A similarity function to evaluate the orthodontic condition in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Posadas, M R; Vega-Alvarado, L; Toni, B

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is the modeling of a similarity function adapted to the medical environment using the logical-combinatorial approach of pattern recognition theory, and its application to compare the orthodontic conditions of patients with cleft-primary palate and/or cleft-secondary palate congenital malformations. The variables in domains with no a priori algebraic or topological structure are objects whose similarity or difference is evaluated by comparison criteria functions. The range of these functions is an ordered set normalized into the unit interval, and they are designed to allow differentiation and non-uniform treatment of the object-variables. The analogy between objects is formalized as a similarity function that stresses the relations among the comparison criteria and evaluates the partial descriptions (partial similarity/difference) or total descriptions (total similarity/difference) of the objects. For the orthodontic problem we defined a set of 12 variables featuring the unilateral/bilateral fissures, the conditions of maxilla, premaxilla, mandible and patient's bite. The comparison criteria (logical for malocclusion, fuzzy for maxillary collapse unilateral/anteroposterior and for overbite, and Boolean for protrusive/retrusive premaxilla conditions) were assigned a relevance factor based on the orthodontist accumulated knowledge and experience. The modeling of the similarity function and its effectiveness in comparing orthodontic conditions in patients are illustrated by the study of four clinical cases with different clefts. The results through similarity are close to the expected ones. Moreover evaluated at different moments it allows to assess the effect of treatment in a single patient, hence providing valuable auxiliary criteria for medical decision making as to the patient's rehabilitation. We include the potential extension of the methodology to other medical disciplines such as speech therapy and reconstructive surgery.

  16. Bone graft healing in alveolar osteoplasty in patients with unilateral lip, alveolar process, and palate clefts.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Dariusz; Wójcicki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Secondary osteoplasty by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting is the most common procedure used in the reconstruction of the continuity of the maxillary alveolar process. The aim of the study was to analyze retrospectively the effect of certain factors on the course of the bone graft healing process in patients with unilateral complete clefts of the lip, alveolar process, and palate. The investigations involved 62 children aged 8 to 14 years (mean age, 11 years) with unilateral complete cleft of the lip, alveolar process, and palate operated on at the Clinic of Plastic Surgery in Polanica Zdrój from November 2007 to April 2009. All the procedures consisted in the reconstruction of the maxillary alveolar process by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting from the iliac bone. The analysis was performed on the basis of computed tomography scans presenting maxillary alveolar processes in the horizontal cross-sectional planes performed on the second or third postoperative day and after 6 months. They were used as the basis for the measurement of the volume and density (condensation) of the bone graft, the surface of its adhesion to the maxillary alveolar bone, and the volume and density of the healed bone. The following correlation coefficients were determined: between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the volume of the healed bone, between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the density of the healed bone, and between the density of the graft and the volume of the healed bone. Increasing the surface of the graft adhesion to the bone ridges of the alveolar cleft contributes to increased volume of the healed bone and slows down the increase in its density (on 6-month follow-up). Crushing of the bone graft increases its resorption and reduces volume of the healed bone.

  17. Shox2-deficient mice exhibit a rare type of incomplete clefting of the secondary palate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Alappat, Sylvia; Song, Yiqiang; Yan, Mingquan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Guozhong; Jiang, Yiping; Zhang, Zunyi; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing

    2005-10-01

    The short stature homeobox gene SHOX is associated with idiopathic short stature in humans, as seen in Turner syndrome and Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, while little is known about its close relative SHOX2. We report the restricted expression of Shox2 in the anterior domain of the secondary palate in mice and humans. Shox2-/- mice develop an incomplete cleft that is confined to the anterior region of the palate, an extremely rare type of clefting in humans. The Shox2-/- palatal shelves initiate, grow and elevate normally, but the anterior region fails to contact and fuse at the midline, owing to altered cell proliferation and apoptosis, leading to incomplete clefting within the presumptive hard palate. Accompanied with these cellular alterations is an ectopic expression of Fgf10 and Fgfr2c in the anterior palatal mesenchyme of the mutants. Tissue recombination and bead implantation experiments revealed that signals from the anterior palatal epithelium are responsible for the restricted mesenchymal Shox2 expression. BMP activity is necessary but not sufficient for the induction of palatal Shox2 expression. Our results demonstrate an intrinsic requirement for Shox2 in palatogenesis, and support the idea that palatogenesis is differentially regulated along the anteroposterior axis. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that fusion of the posterior palate can occur independently of fusion in the anterior palate.

  18. Clear double layer Bioplast feeding plate for neonates with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, R Burcu Nur; Mutlu, Meltem; Germec-Cakan, Derya

    2015-01-01

    An infant with cleft palate was referred to cleft clinic of the Orthodontic Department. The mother was concerned to feed the child because of the escape of milk from the nose. Intraoral examination revealed a large palatal cleft extending from hard to soft palate involving uvula. The impression was taken and dental cast obtained. A 3 mm soft and afterward a 1 mm hard Bioplast plate was pressed using Biostar device (Scheu-Dental Gmbh, Iserlohn, Germany) on the model. Finally, a hole was prepared on the anterior part to put a thread through it. The infant tolerated the plate immediately and encounters no difficulties during feeding. The inlaying soft Bioplast plates eliminate the risk of tissue irritation, whereas the covering hard Bioplast plate supplies endurance. The fabrication of the clear Bioplast feeding plate is easy and less time-consuming compared with acrylic plates and may be recommended in crowded and overloaded cleft centers.

  19. Clear double layer Bioplast feeding plate for neonates with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, R. Burcu Nur; Mutlu, Meltem; Germec-Cakan, Derya

    2015-01-01

    An infant with cleft palate was referred to cleft clinic of the Orthodontic Department. The mother was concerned to feed the child because of the escape of milk from the nose. Intraoral examination revealed a large palatal cleft extending from hard to soft palate involving uvula. The impression was taken and dental cast obtained. A 3 mm soft and afterward a 1 mm hard Bioplast plate was pressed using Biostar device (Scheu-Dental Gmbh, Iserlohn, Germany) on the model. Finally, a hole was prepared on the anterior part to put a thread through it. The infant tolerated the plate immediately and encounters no difficulties during feeding. The inlaying soft Bioplast plates eliminate the risk of tissue irritation, whereas the covering hard Bioplast plate supplies endurance. The fabrication of the clear Bioplast feeding plate is easy and less time-consuming compared with acrylic plates and may be recommended in crowded and overloaded cleft centers. PMID:26929704

  20. Should We Give Routine Postoperative Intravenous Fluids After Cleft Surgery?

    PubMed

    Onyekwelu, O; Seaward, J; Beale, V

    2015-06-29

      In 2012, the James Lind Alliance, together with the Craniofacial Society of Great Britain and Ireland and the Cleft Lip and Palate Association, set priorities for unanswered questions in cleft management. One of these priorities included postoperative fluid management. The authors' postoperative regimen does not include intravenous fluids unless the child fails to achieve adequate oral intake by the first evening postoperatively. This audit evaluated whether this is appropriate and safe practice.   All patients undergoing cleft-related surgery by a single surgeon in a single center during August 2011 to August 2012 were included. Patient age, weight, and surgery type were recorded together with fluid requirement, length of stay, and any returns to theater or readmissions.   Of the 79 patients included, none required readmission or return to theater, and the mean length of stay was 1.72 days. Nineteen patients (24%) required intravenous fluids, but these tended to be the older children in the group (P value .034). In the youngest patients undergoing primary lip repair, only 1 of 20 required intravenous fluids.   This study demonstrates that, especially in the younger patients, omitting intravenous fluids as a postoperative routine is associated with a shorter length of stay without an increased complication rate. The authors advocate early postoperative feeding and the return to physiological fluid balance.

  1. Should We Give Routine Postoperative Intravenous Fluids After Cleft Surgery?

    PubMed

    Onyekwelu, O; Seaward, J; Beale, V

    2016-03-01

    In 2012, the James Lind Alliance, together with the Craniofacial Society of Great Britain and Ireland and the Cleft Lip and Palate Association, set priorities for unanswered questions in cleft management. One of these priorities included postoperative fluid management. The authors' postoperative regimen does not include intravenous fluids unless the child fails to achieve adequate oral intake by the first evening postoperatively. This audit evaluated whether this is appropriate and safe practice. All patients undergoing cleft-related surgery by a single surgeon in a single center during August 2011 to August 2012 were included. Patient age, weight, and surgery type were recorded together with fluid requirement, length of stay, and any returns to theater or readmissions. Of the 79 patients included, none required readmission or return to theater, and the mean length of stay was 1.72 days. Nineteen patients (24%) required intravenous fluids, but these tended to be the older children in the group (P value .034). In the youngest patients undergoing primary lip repair, only 1 of 20 required intravenous fluids. This study demonstrates that, especially in the younger patients, omitting intravenous fluids as a postoperative routine is associated with a shorter length of stay without an increased complication rate. The authors advocate early postoperative feeding and the return to physiological fluid balance.

  2. Prevalence of Oral Habits in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Barsi, Paula Caroline; Ribeiro da Silva, Thaieny; Costa, Beatriz; da Silva Dalben, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of oral habits in children with clefts aged three to six years, compared to a control group of children without clefts in the same age range, and compared the oral habits between children with clefts with and without palatal fistulae. The sample was composed of 110 children aged 3 to 6 years with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and 110 children without alterations. The prevalence of oral habits and the correlation between habits and presence of fistulae (for children with clefts) were analyzed by questionnaires applied to the children caretakers. The cleft influenced the prevalence of oral habits, with lower prevalence of pacifier sucking for children with cleft lip and palate and higher prevalence for all other habits, with significant association (P < 0.05). There was no significant association between oral habits and presence of fistulae (P > 0.05). The lower prevalence of pacifier sucking and higher prevalence of other oral habits agreed with the postoperative counseling to remove the pacifier sucking habit when the child is submitted to palatoplasty, possibly representing a substitution of habits. There was no causal relationship between habits and presence of palatal fistulae. PMID:23533744

  3. Verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-olds with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Lohmander, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Research regarding expressive language performance in children born with cleft palate is sparse. The relationship between articulation/phonology and expressive language skills also needs to be further explored. To investigate verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-old children born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and its possible relationship with articulation/phonology at 3 and 5 years of age. A total of 49 children, 29 with UCLP treated according to three different procedures for primary palatal surgery and a comparison group of 20 children (COMP), were included. Longitudinally recorded audio files were used for analysis. At ages 3 and 5, the children were presented with a single-word test of word naming and at age 5 also the Bus Story Test (BST). The BST was assessed according to a test manual. The single-word test was phonetically transcribed and the percentage of consonants correct adjusted for age (PCC-A) was calculated. Differences regarding the BST results within the UCLP group were analysed. The results were compared with the results of the COMP group, and also with norm values. In addition, the relationship between the results of the BST and the PCC-A scores at ages 3 and 5 years was analysed. No significant group differences or correlations were found. However, 65.5% of the children in the UCLP group had an information score below 1 standard deviation from the norm value compared with 30% in the COMP group. A larger proportion of children in the UCLP group than in the COMP group displayed problems with retelling but the differences between the two groups were not significant. There was no association between the BST results in the children with UCLP and previous or present articulatory/phonological competence. Since group size was small in both groups, the findings need to be verified in a larger study. © 2014 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  4. Reaction to the birth of a child with cleft lip or cleft palate in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mzezewa, S; Muchemwa, F C

    2010-07-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is often a distressful abnormality for both mother and child. In our setting, CLP is generally associated with witchcraft or ancestral spirits. The mother is often accused of infidelity during pregnancy. We wanted to determine the feelings of parents and the wider public towards CLP babies, to establish what parents believed were the causes of CLP and to establish the postpartum marital status. One hundred and twenty-four parents were prospectively included in the study. They were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. One hundred and fifteen mothers and four fathers said they loved their babies. Thirty-eight parents attributed CLP to witchcraft. Nineteen percent of the mothers were divorced. The responses to our questionnaire show that although CLP babies are loved by their parents, the condition is associated with stigma and superstition.

  5. Occlusal Disorders among Patients with Total Clefts of Lip, Alveolar Bone, and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska-Stolarz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Clefts are common birth defects. They are accompanied by various malformations, including disturbances in facial look as well as skeletal disorders that include malocclusions, most frequently crossbites and class III anomalies. The aim of the study was to present the commonest malocclusions in patients with total cleft of the lip, alveolar bone and palate (n = 154) and compare the results to the healthy on-cleft patients (n = 151). Normal occlusion, characteristic for I angle class, was observed in 50% of the control group and 30% of the examined. In the examined patients with clefts, most frequently crossbite and open bite on the cleft side was observed. In patients with clefts, only 2 out of 154 patients presented isolated dental anomalies. In healthy individuals the commonest occlusal disorder was distal occlusion and dental anomalies. The commonest malocclusions among patients with clefts are crossbites and class III malocclusions. PMID:24982898

  6. Cleft lip and Palate: A 30-year Epidemiologic Study in North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kianifar, Hamidreza; Hasanzadeh, Nadia; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Ezzati, Atefeh; Kianifar, Homa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are among the most common congenital anomalies worldwide. This study was conducted in order to explore the incidence and related factors of cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) among live births in Mashhad, North-Eastern Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, records of 28,519 infants born between March 1982 and March 2011 at three major hospitals in Mashhad were screened for oral clefts. Clinical and demographic factors relating to diagnosed cases, including birth date, gender, birth weight, maternal age, number of pregnancies, type and side of cleft and presence of other congenital anomalies were recorded for analysis. Results: The overall incidence of CL/P was 1.9 per 1,000 live births. Cleft lip associated with cleft palate (CLP) was the most prevalent type of cleft (50%), followed by isolated cleft lip (35.2%) and isolated cleft palate (14.8%). A total of 92.6% of oral clefts were bilateral and 5.5% were located on the right side. In addition, clefts were found to be more common in male than female births (male/female ratio=2.3). The rate of associated congenital anomalies in CL/P newborns was 37%. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of oral clefts across three decades of study; except for CLP which was significantly more prevalent between 2002–2011 (P=0.027). There were no significant differences with regard to season of birth, associated anomalies or maternal age of affected newborns in the three time periods of the study. Furthermore, maternal age and number of pregnancies were not significantly different among the three types of cleft (P=0.43 and P=0.91, respectively). Although the mean birth weight of patients affected with isolated cleft palate was considerably lower than that of the other two types of cleft, the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates a frequency of CL/P close to the findings in East Asian countries and higher than

  7. Comparison of Intercanine and Intermolar Width Between Cleft Lip Palate and Normal Class I Occlusion Group.

    PubMed

    Wahaj, Aiyesha; Ahmed, Imtiaz

    2015-11-01

    To determine the mean difference of arch dimensions (both intercanine and intermolar width) between cleft lip palate and normal class I occlusion group. Cross-sectional analytic study. Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, [Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS)], Karachi, from March 2012 to April 2013. Group 1 consisted of 32 subjects with complete repaired, non-syndromic unilateral and bilateral cleft lip palate. Group 2 consisted of 32 subjects with normal facial morphology and class I occlusion. Exclusion criteria were cleft lip palate subjects with systemic diseases, any arch expansion procedure, incomplete repaired palate, open fistulas, developmental or acquired craniofacial muscular deformities, autoimmune conditions, syndromes, endocrine abnormalities, neurological problems, or previous history of orthodontic treatment and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, history of trauma, impacted or missing teeth, periodontally involved teeth, subdivision molar classification, skeletal base II and III with molar class I. The transverse width (intercanine and intermolar width) of dental casts was measured with the help of digital caliper. The intercanine width was measured between cusp tips of the canine while the intermolar width distance was measured between mesiobuccal cusp tips of first molars, and buccal grooves of the mandibular first molars in both cleft lip palate and normal class I occlusion group, respectively. There were 64 subjects with mean 14.7 ±6.8 years in the cleft palate and 14.7 ±6.3 years in the normal group. There was statistically significant differences found between intercanine and intermolar width in maxillary arch (p < 0.001). In mandibular arch, only intercanine width has showed significant difference (p < 0.001) between cleft and normal occlusion class I group. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine width was found to be significantly reduced in cleft lip palate group (both unilateral

  8. The impact of speech material on speech judgement in children with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Svensson, Henry; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    The chosen method of speech assessment, including type of speech material, may affect speech judgement in children with cleft palate. To assess the effect of different speech materials on speech judgement in 5-year-old children born with or without cleft palate, as well as the reliability of materials by means of intra- and inter-transcriber agreement of consonant transcriptions. Altogether 40 children were studied, 20 born with cleft palate, 20 without. The children were audio recorded at 5 years of age. Speech materials used were: single-word naming, sentence repetition (both developed for cleft palate speech assessment), retelling of a narrative and conversational speech. The samples were phonetically transcribed and inter- and intra-transcriber agreement was calculated. Percentage correct consonants (PCC), percentage correct places (PCP), percentage correct manners (PCM), and percentage active cleft speech characteristics (CSC) were assessed. In addition, an analysis of phonological simplification processes (PSP) was performed. The PCC and CSC results were significantly more accurate in word naming than in all other speech materials in the children with cleft palate, who also achieved more accurate PCP results in word naming than in sentence repetition and conversational speech. Regarding PCM and PSP, performance was significantly more accurate in word naming than in conversational speech. Children without cleft palate did better, irrespective of the speech material. The medians of intra- and inter-transcriber agreement were good in both groups and all speech materials. The closest agreement in the cleft palate group was seen in word naming and the weakest in the retelling task. The results indicate that word naming is the most reliable speech material when the purpose is to assess the best speech performance of a child with cleft palate. If the purpose is to assess connected speech, sentence repetition is a reliable and also valid speech material, with good

  9. Effect of cleft palate repair on the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenitally-clefted goat palates.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~ 15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of levator veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resi...

  10. Two-stage palatoplasty, is it still a valuable treatment protocol for patients with a cleft of lip, alveolus, and palate?

    PubMed

    Gundlach, Karsten K H; Bardach, Janusz; Filippow, Daniel; Stahl-de Castrillon, Franka; Lenz, Jan-Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Speech development is of utmost importance and requires early closure of a palatal cleft. On the other hand, it is well known that all types and timings of surgical repair of facial clefts are detrimental to maxillary growth. Nevertheless, these days one is more and more confronted with a world-wide tendency in favour of the one-in-all operation to close clefts of the lip, alveolus, and palate. Therefore, a three-centre study was performed for testing - once more - the value of two-stage palatoplasty as a means to reduce the detrimental effects of surgery on palatal growth and at the same time to also enable early speech development. Plaster casts from 85 patients have been re-evaluated. All of them had a complete unilateral cleft of lip, alveolus, and palate. They had been treated according to the old therapy protocols followed in either one of the three different cleft centres many years ago, namely in Hamburg, (Western) Germany, Iowa City, IO, USA, and Rostock, (in those days still Eastern) Germany. The impressions had been taken already in 1987 from patients being either 8 years (36 pts.) or 16 years of age (49 pts.). Three different treatment protocols had been followed for these patients in those centres in those days: The main difference was that in centres A and B the palates were closed in two stages whilst in centre C palatoplasty was performed in just one operation. The most interesting results regarding the palatal growth were that: 1. In centre C (one-stage palatoplasty) the patients had more constricted palates. 2. In centre A (two-stage palatoplasty) the patients had least often an anterior cross-bite. It appears that it was possible to show once more that closing the palate in one stage at age 1 year or less is interfering most with maxillary growth. This study leads us to conclude that two-stage palatoplasty is still a valuable treatment protocol for patients with a complete unilateral cleft of lip, alveolus, and palate, especially as apparently

  11. Development of speech services for people with cleft palate in Thailand: lack of professionals.

    PubMed

    Prathanee, Benjamas

    2012-11-01

    Cleft lip/palate is one of the most common birth defects and has a high incidence in Thailand. Most children with cleft still have social stigma from speech and language defects after surgical treatment. Speech and language therapies are required at an early age and require long-term care until teenager or adult. Unfortunately, there are insufficient speech services for cleft because of a lack of qualified speech and language pathologists in Thailand. Development consisted of two remedy modalities of bottom-up and top-down models, Community-Based Speech Therapy Model for people with Cleft Lip Cleft Palate including networking and standard assessments of both subjective and objective measurements. That might be the best and most suitable way to solve problems of lacking speech services in Thailand or developing countries which have similar contexts.

  12. Nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate: No evidence of linkage to HLA or factor 13A

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, J.T.; Yaping Wang; Connor, B.; Daiger, S.P. ); Blanton, S.H. Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville )

    1993-06-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) is a common craniofacial anomaly, the etiology of which is not known. Population studies have shown that a large proportion of cases occur sporadically. Recently, segregation analyses applied to CLP families have demonstrated that an autosomal dominant/codominant gene(s) may cause clefting in cases. Associations of autosomal dominant CLP and nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP) with HLA and F13A genes on chromosome 6p have been suggested previously. Linkage to these two areas on chromosome 6p were tested in 12 autosomal dominant families with CLP. With a LOD score of [minus]2 or less for exclusion, no evidence of linkage was found to four chromosome 6p markers. Multipoint analysis showed no evidence of a clefting locus in this region spanning 54 cM on chromosome 6p in these CLP families. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Changing perspectives in cleft lip and palate: from acrylic to allele.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T; Senders, Craig W; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2008-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate deformities are the most common congenital abnormalities of the head and neck. Advancements in the various multidisciplinary fields involved in cleft management have substantially improved functional and aesthetic outcomes. The legitimacy of such controversial topics as gingivoperiosteoplasty, primary rhinoplasty, and presurgical nasoalveolar molding is heavily contested. Bone morphogenetic protein and other recombinant growth factors may play important roles in future cleft care. As the candidate alleles that contribute to cleft lip and palate are further elucidated, the complex interplay of environmental influence and genetic predisposition is emphasized. Translational research from fields such as fetal wound healing, tissue engineering, and gene therapy may have clinical applications as cleft care continues to evolve.

  14. Adult patients with treated complete cleft lip and palate. Methodological and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marcusson, A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present thesis was to investigate the quality of life, satisfaction with treatment, prevalence of temporomandibular disorders, psychosocial distress, and occlusal stability in a treated group of adults with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP). Sixty-eight adults (44 men and 24 women) with a mean age of 24.2 years (range 19.5-29.2) with treated CLP were compared with a gender- and age-matched group with no clefts. The CLP subjects were born between 1968 and 1977 and had undergone standardised plastic surgery at the Department of Plastic Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. Logopaedic, phoniatric, otological, and orthodontic examinations and treatment had been provided locally, supervised by the Cleft Plate Team. The subjects answered a multidimensional, self-report, standardised questionnaire regarding psychological and somatic conditions. The subjects underwent a clinical TMD examination and an evaluation of the occlusion. The reliability of the multidimensional questionnaire was analysed for the CLP group by a test-retest study within a 2-3 week interval and most questions showed an overall good reliability. A panel of professionals judged the outcome of the surgical treatment on colour slides of the CLP subjects. The dental plaster casts of 39 subjects born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were analysed (mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3) and compared with the dental plaster casts taken at mean age of 19.1 years (range 16.0-20.6). The overall level of quality of life was rather high in both groups. The CLP group rated some detached aspects, such as life meaning, family life, and private economy, significantly lower than did the group without clefts. Overall aspects such as well-being and social life were affected by having a treated cleft but not the more practical and tangible aspects of their daily living. There was an overall high level of satisfaction with all the different part of the body in both groups

  15. Treatment outcome after neonatal cleft lip repair in 5-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Košková, Olga; Vokurková, Jitka; Vokurka, Jan; Bryšova, Alena; Šenovský, Pavel; Čefelínová, Julie; Lukášová, Darina; Dorociaková, Petra; Abelovský, Juraj

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess speech outcomes and dental arch relationship of 5-year-old Czech patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who have undergone neonatal cleft lip repair and one-stage palatal closure. Twenty-three patients with UCLP, born between 2009 and 2010, were included in the study. Three universal speech parameters (hypernasality, articulation and speech intelligibility) have been devised for speech recordings evaluation. Outcomes of dental arch relationship were evaluated by applying the GOSLON Yardstick and subsequently compared with the GOSLON outcome of other cleft centers. Moderate hypernasality was present in most cases, the mean value for articulation and speech intelligibility was 2.07 and 1.93, respectively. The Kappa values for inter-examiner agreement for all the three speech outcomes ranged from 0.786 to 0.808. Sixty-three percent of patients were scored GOSLON 1 and 2, 26% GOSLON 3, and 10% GOSLON 4. GOSLON mean score was 2.35. Interrater agreement was very good, represented by kappa value of 0.867. The treatment protocol, involving neonatal cleft lip repair and one-stage palatal repair performed up to the first year of UCLP patient's life, has shown good speech outcomes and produced very good treatment results in regard to maxillary growth, comparable with other cleft centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Shanghai, China: Evidence for an autosomal major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Marazita, M.L. ); Hu, Dan-Ning; Liu, You-E. ); Spence, A. ); Melnick, M. )

    1992-09-01

    Orientals are at higher risk for cleft lip with our without cleft palate (CL[+-] P) than Caucasians or blacks. The authors collected demographic and family data to study factors contributing to the etiology of CL[+-]P in Shanghai. The birth incidence of nonsyndromic CL[+-]P (SHanghai 1980-87) was 1.11/1,000, with a male/female ratio of 1.42. Almost 2,000 nonsyndromic CL[+-]P probands were ascertained from individuals operated on during the years 1956-83 at surgical hospitals in Shanghai. Detailed family histories and medical examinations were obtained for the probands and all available family members. Genetic analysis of the probands' families were performed under the mixed model with major locus (ML) and multifactorial (MFT) components. The hypothesis of no familial transmission and of MFT alone could be rejected. Of the ML models, the autosomal recessive was significantly most likely and was assumed for testing three complex hypothesis: (1) ML and sporadics; (2) ML and MFT; (3) ML, MFT, and sporadics. None of the complex models were more likely than the ML alone model. In conclusion, the best-fitting, most parsimonious model for CL[+-]P in Shanghai was that of an autosomal recessive major locus. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Contraction-Induced Injury to Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Normal and Congenitally-Clefted Goat Palates

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Erik P.; Cederna, Paul S.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Panter, Kip E.; Yu, Deborah; Buchman, Steven R.; Larkin, Lisa M.; Faulkner, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Levator veli palatini muscles from normal palates of adult humans and goats are predominantly slow oxidative (type 1) fibers. However, 85% of levator veli palatini fibers from cleft palates of adult goats are physiologically fast (type 2). This fiber composition difference between cleft and normal palates may have implications in palatal function. For limb muscles, type 2 muscle fibers are more susceptible to lengthening contraction-induced injury than are type 1 fibers. We tested the hypothesis that, compared with single permeabilized levator veli palatini muscle fibers from normal palates of adult goats, those from cleft palates are more susceptible to lengthening contraction-induced injury. Interventions Congenital cleft palates were the result of chemically-induced decreased movement of the fetal head and tongue causing obstruction of palatal closure. Each muscle fiber was maximally activated and lengthened. Outcome Measures Fiber type was determined by contractile properties and gel electrophoresis. Susceptibility to injury was assessed by measuring the decrease in maximum force following the lengthening contraction, expressed as a percentage of the initial force. Results Compared with fibers from normal palates that were all type 1 and had force deficits of 23 ± 1%, fibers from cleft palates were all type 2 and sustained twofold greater deficits, 40 ± 1% (p = .001). Conclusion Levator veli palatini muscles from cleft palates of goats contain predominantly type 2 fibers that are highly susceptible to lengthening contraction-induced injury. This finding may have implications regarding palatal function and the incidence of velopharyngeal incompetence. PMID:17328650

  18. Social motivation in individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Ellen; Koscik, Timothy R; Conrad, Amy L; Moser, David J; Nopoulos, Peg

    2013-01-01

    Social isolation is common among individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate (ICLP), but the available data on why this may be are mixed. We present a novel theory relating to reduced social motivation in ICLP, called the social abulia hypothesis. Based on this hypothesis, we predicted that reduced social motivation would lead to reduced responsiveness to negative social feedback, in terms of both explicit responses and noncontrolled, psychophysiological responses. Twenty males with ICLP and 20 normal comparison males between 13 and 25 years old participated in the study. Social motivation was examined by measuring participants' response to negative social feedback (social exclusion). Additionally, psychophysiological reactivity to positive and negative social stimuli was measured. In order to rule out other potential contributors to social isolation, we tested basic social perception, emotion recognition, and social anxiety. In line with the social abulia hypothesis, we show that negative social feedback had less of an effect on males with ICLP than on healthy male peers, which was evident in explicit responses and noncontrolled, psychophysiological responses to negative social feedback. Our results could not be attributed to problems in social perception, a lack of understanding facial expressions, or increased social anxiety, as groups did not differ on these constructs. This study suggests that current views on social isolation in ICLP may need to be reconsidered to include the possibility that isolation in this population may be the direct result of reduced social motivation.

  19. Factors affecting speech in patients with isolated cleft palate. A methodic, clinical and instrumental study.

    PubMed

    Haapanen, M L

    1992-01-01

    The present study deals with various factors affecting speech, particularly its resonance, in patients with isolated cleft palate. For that purpose a method to evaluate hypernasality was developed. The degree of hypernasality was assessed in terms of hypernasality indexes by means of a modified cul-de-sac hypernasality test. The phonetic content of the test words was chosen so as not to bias the evaluations by compensatory articulations. The reliability and validity of four variations of hypernasality indexes were examined. All these four indexes proved reliable, valid and feasible for evaluating hypernasality. The hypernasality indexes were compared with nasalance scores derived from the Model 6200 Nasometer (The Nasometer 1987, Fletcher et al. 1989). Reference nasalance scores for normal Finnish speech were measured. The mean percent nasalance and the standard deviation were 13 and 8, respectively. In addition to the present hypernasality test modification, more traditional descriptive speech analysis was used in some studies. The effect of the age at primary palatal repair on speech was examined in three year old children with isolated cleft palate. The effect on speech of two techniques for primary palatal repair - a Veau-Wardill-Kilner V to Y push back procedure and the Cronin modification - were compared in young adults with isolated cleft palate. The effect on speech of two techniques for a secondary velopharyngeal flap - a Sanvenero-Rosselli and modified Honig flap - were compared in patients with various ages and cleft types. One third had cleft lip and palate or submucous cleft palate. The rest had isolated cleft palate. The quality of speech was significantly dependent on the age at primary palatal repair. The children, whose palatal repair was performed at the average age of 22 months demonstrated, significantly more frequently, hypernasality and misarticulations related to velopharyngeal insufficiency than the children operated upon earlier. The

  20. Parent-Reported Family Functioning Among Children With Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Crerand, Canice E.; Rosenberg, Janine; Magee, Leanne; Stein, Margot B.; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Broder, Hillary L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine family functioning related to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics in youth with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). Design Cross-sectional, multisite investigation. Setting Six U.S. cleft centers. Patients/Participants A diverse sample of 1200 children with CL/P and their parents. Main Outcome Measure Parents completed the Family Environment Scale (FES), which assesses three domains of family functioning: cohesion (or closeness), expressiveness (open expression of feelings), and conflict. Demographic and clinical characteristics were also assessed including race, ethnicity, type of insurance, and surgical recommendations. Results The FES scores for families seeking team evaluations for their youth with CL/P (mean age = 11.6 years) fall within the average range compared with normative samples. Families receiving surgical recommendations for their youth also had FES scores in the average range, yet families of children recommended for functional surgery reported greater cohesion, expressiveness, and less conflict compared with those recommended for aesthetic surgery (P < .05). For cohesion and expressiveness, significant main effects for race (P = .012, P < .0001, respectively) and ethnicity (P =.004, P < .0001, respectively) were found but not for their interaction. No significant differences were found on the conflict domain. Families with private insurance reported significantly greater cohesion (P < .001) and expressiveness (P < .001) than did families with public insurance. Conclusions Family functioning across domains was in the average range. However, observed differences by race, ethnicity, type of insurance, and surgical recommendation may warrant consideration in clinical management for patients and families. PMID:25405543

  1. Genome-wide meta-analyses of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate identify six new risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kerstin U; Mangold, Elisabeth; Herms, Stefan; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Paul, Anna; Becker, Jessica; Herberz, Ruth; AlChawa, Taofik; Nasser, Entessar; Böhmer, Anne C; Mattheisen, Manuel; Alblas, Margrieta A; Barth, Sandra; Kluck, Nadine; Lauster, Carola; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf H; Hemprich, Alexander; Pötzsch, Simone; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Daratsianos, Nikolaos; Kreusch, Thomas; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scott, Alan F; Beaty, Terri H; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Wienker, Thomas F; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P; Rubini, Michele; Mossey, Peter A; Hoffmann, Per; Lange, Christoph; Cichon, Sven; Propping, Peter; Knapp, Michael; Nöthen, Markus M

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted the first meta-analyses for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) using data from the two largest genome-wide association studies published to date. We confirmed associations with all previously identified loci and identified six additional susceptibility regions (1p36, 2p21, 3p11.1, 8q21.3, 13q31.1 and 15q22). Analysis of phenotypic variability identified the first specific genetic risk factor for NSCLP (nonsyndromic cleft lip plus palate) (rs8001641; PNSCLP = 6.51 × 10−11; homozygote relative risk = 2.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.84–3.16). PMID:22863734

  2. Prevalence of cleft lip and/or palate in children from Lodz between years 1981-2010.

    PubMed

    Antoszewski, Bogusław; Fijałkowska, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital malformations constitute a serious problem of both medical and social nature. Cleft lip and/or palate represent the most common congenital anomaly of the face that is why it is essential to know the real frequency of the described phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to determine the frequency of cleft lip and/or palate and the types of malformations that occurred in Lodz city between the years 1981-2010. Our clinic has been carrying on the studies concerning the incidence of cleft lip and/or palate since 1981. The Polish Registry of Congenital Malformations has been operating in Poland since 1 April 1997. The team has managed to obtain data, from the Registry, concerning the total number of all live born infants and the number of children with cleft lip and/or palate, who were born in Lodz, between 1998 and 2010. In years 1981-2010, 319 children, in 210 952 live born infants, were born with cleft lip and/or palate in Lodz. The isolated cleft palate was observed more frequently in girls and the unilateral cleft of lip and palate in boys. In all three decades palate clefts are more common whereas bilateral lip, alveolus and palate clefts are more infrequent. A small tendency to decrease in actual cleft lip and/or palate frequency among children, in the period of 30 years, is observed in Lodz. Over the years it has still been observed that the isolated cleft palate is the most common type of defect. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  3. Treatment of 4-5 year old patients with cleft lip and cleft palate in Tawanchai Center: prevalence and type of associated malformations.

    PubMed

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Pongpagatip, Sumalee; Pathumwiwatana, Pornpen; Kiatchoosakun, Pakaphan; Panamonta, Manat; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2014-10-01

    Patients with cleft lip/palate may have other associated malformations but the reported prevalence and type of associated malformations varied between different studies. To report the prevalence and the type of associated malformations in Northeastern Thai patients with cleft lip/palate. A retrospective study of 123 cleft lip/palate patients aged 4-5 years was carried out at the Tawanchai Cleft Center, Khon Kaen University during the periodfrom October to December 2011. Data were collected by reviewing the patients medical records. Seventeen (14%) of the 123patients had associated malformations. Four (21%) of the 19patients with cleft palate, eleven (15%) of the 74 patients with clefts lip and palate, and two (7%) of the 30 patients with cleft lip had associated malformations. The organ systems affected by associated malformations were cardiovascular system (41%), craniofacial anomaly (23%), skeletal system (12%), urogenital system (12%) and central nervous systemn (12%). Atrial septal defect and tetralogy ofFallot were most common associated cardiovascular malformation found. The high prevalence of associated malformationsfound in patients with cleft lip/palate emphasizes the needfor a thorough screening of associated malformations and congenital heart disease ofall cleft lip/palatepatients.

  4. Conventional prosthodontic management of partial edentulism with a resilient attachment-retained overdenture in a patient with a cleft lip and palate: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Varun; Brecht, Lawrence E

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in surgery and orthodontics have resulted in improvements in the management of patients with a cleft lip or palate. Early surgical intervention and bone-grafting procedures have frequently been used to ensure closure of the cleft and continuity of the alveolar bone. However, a need for the prosthodontic management of patients with a cleft palate still exists. Most frequently, the indication is to restore the edentulous spaces located anteriorly in the vicinity of the residual cleft defect. In addition to improving the esthetic outcome, prosthodontic management also is required to restore function, especially occlusion and speech. This clinical report illustrates the management of an adult patient with a unilateral cleft of the lip and palate who required prosthodontic rehabilitation after surgery. The patient had previously undergone multiple surgeries and did not want to consider implant therapy as a treatment option. Thus, the patient was managed with fixed and removable prosthodontics with a maxillary overdenture prosthesis retained by microextracoronal resilient attachments, which were laser welded onto crowns on abutment teeth to obtain a functionally and esthetically acceptable result.

  5. Secondary correction of nasal deformities in cleft lip and palate patients: surgical technique and outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vass, Gabor; Mohos, Gabor; Bere, Zsofia; Ivan, Laszlo; Varga, Janos; Piffko, Jozsef; Rovo, Laszlo

    2016-12-01

    Nasal deformity associated with cleft lip and palate is a highly challenging reconstructive problem in rhinoplasty. In the literature, several operative solutions and evaluation methods have been described, however these do not offer a standard procedure for the surgeon. Our aim was to standardize our surgical technique-as much as the uniqueness of each case allowed it-based on the most frequent deformities we had faced; and to evaluate our results via a postoperative patient satisfaction questionnaire. Between 2012 and 2014 12 consecutive patients with combined cleft lip and palate deformities underwent secondary nasal and septal correction surgery with the same method by the same surgeon. The indications of surgery were, on one hand, difficult nasal breathing and altered nasal function (tendency for chronic rhinosinusitis) and on the other hand the aesthetic look of the nose. No exclusion criteria were stated. In our follow-up study we evaluated our results by using a modified Rhinoplasty Outcome Evaluation (ROE) questionnaire: patients answered the same four questions pre- and postoperatively. Data were statistically analyzed by t-test. Based on the questionnaire, all patients experienced improvement of nasal breathing function, improved appearance of the nose and less stigmatization from the society. According to the t-test, all scores of the four questions improved significantly in the postoperative 4-6 months, compared with the preoperative scores. In our opinion with our standardized surgical steps satisfactory aesthetic and functional results can be achieved. We think the modified ROE questionnaire is an adequate and simple method for the evaluation of our surgical results.

  6. Islandized mucoperiosteal flaps: A versatile technique for closure of a wide palatal cleft

    PubMed Central

    Aboul-Wafa, Ahmed Mabrouk

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of surgical methods have been described to repair wide cleft palate; they are all challenging to perform and yield consistently good results. The islandized mucoperiosteal flap, the technique described in the present article, is very versatile because it can close palatal defects of any size without undue tension. Moreover, it provides adequate length and mobility of the soft palate with improved speech and feeding functions without fistula formation. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2011, 36 patients with wide cleft palate were operated on using islandized mucoperiosteal flaps. This technique involves dissection of the neurovascular bundle from the mucoperiosteal flaps for approximately 1 cm and dissecting the muscle from the posterior edge of the hard palate with intravelar veloplasty. The flaps subsequently become freely mobile in all directions. It can move medially to close palatal defects of any size without tension. In addition, posterior or backward mobilization lengthens the soft palate and renders it freely mobile. RESULTS: All repairs were successful, with no complications and no patients requiring secondary procedures. All patients regained normal feeding function three weeks postoperatively. All patients showed normal nasal resonance of speech except for two (three and five years of age) who experienced abnormal resonance in the form of open nasality that required regular speech therapy for six months. There was significant improvement and no secondary procedures were required for either. CONCLUSIONS: A technical modification for closure of wide palatal clefts is introduced. The islandized mucoperiosteal flap, which is a very versatile technique, can close cleft palates of any width without tension, lengthens the soft palate and renders it freely mobile for proper speech functions. Using this technique, good speech and feeding function with no complications were achieved. PMID:23997584

  7. Comparative study of nasoalveolar molding methods: nasal elevator plus DynaCleft® versus NAM-Grayson in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Luis; Ford, Alison; Gutiérrez, Carolina; Tastets, María Eugenia; García, Jacqueline

    2013-09-01

    Objective : To compare nasoalveolar molding (NAM) effect employing a nasal elevator plus DynaCleft® and NAM-Grayson system in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Method : Prospective study in two groups. Group A included 20 consecutive patients treated with DynaCleft® and a nasal elevator before lip surgery. Group B included 20 patients treated with NAM-Grayson system. Maxillary casts and standard view photographs were done before and after treatment. Columella deviation angle, soft tissue distance of the cleft, intercommisural distance, and nostril height and width were traced and measured on the printed photos; a ratio was obtained and compared before and after treatment. Cleft width, anterior width, and anteroposterior distances were measured on the maxillary cast. Results : Group A began treatment at an average age of 14.3 days and group B at an average age of 16.9 days; no complications were observed. For group A, the initial average alveolar cleft within the cast was 10.7 mm, and after treatment it was 6.6 mm. For group B, pretreatment width was 11.2 mm, and after treatment it was 5.9 mm. No differences were found on the anterior and posterior width, and A-P distance of both groups. The initial mean columellar angle in group A was 38.1°, and after treatment it was 61.5°; for group B the initial mean columellar angle was 33.6°, and after treatment it was 59.5°. Results of Mann-Whitney U and Student's t tests showed no differences (P > .05). Width and height dimensions of the nostril showed minor differences. Conclusions : Both methods significantly reduced the cleft width and improved the nasal asymmetry. Our findings show that both methods produced similar results.

  8. Reduction of procarbazine-induced cleft palates by prenatal folic acid supplementation in rats.

    PubMed

    Malek, Fathi A; Möritz, Klaus-Uwe; Fanghänel, Jochen; Bienengräber, Volker

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of prenatal folic acid supplementation on procarbazine (PCZ)-induced intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR), cleft palates, and microgenia. Three groups of gravid rats were treated with 200 mg/kg body weight (BW) PCZ on day 13.5 of gestation (GD13.5). Two groups of them were additionally supplemented with 1 and 2.5 mg/kg folic acid, respectively, from GD13.5 through GD16.5. On GD19.5, all fetuses were delivered by caesarian sections and sexed subsequently. Numbers of live and dead fetuses as well as resorptions were counted. Data on fetal BW, crown-rump length, tail length, placental weight, and diameter were collected. Fetal heads were histologically scrutinized for the occurrence of cleft palates and microgenia. Folic acid at 2.5 mg/kg diminished PCZ-induced IUGR. In male fetuses, both folic acid doses significantly reduced the incidence of cleft palates and microgenia, while in females, only the high folic acid dose was capable of lowering the occurrence frequency of cleft palates. We conclude that folic acid supplementation at the used doses confers a substantial protection against PCZ-induced IUGR and incidence of cleft palates and microgenia. However, these effects are gender-related and dose-dependent.

  9. The identification of children with cleft palate and sleep disordered breathing using a referral system.

    PubMed

    MacLean, J E; Fitzsimons, D; Hayward, P; Waters, K A; Fitzgerald, D A

    2008-03-01

    Cleft palate is associated with an increased risk of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) but the magnitude of this risk and specific risk factors are unclear. A better understanding of these components of risk will aid the early identification of SDB in this group of children. To describe the clinical characteristics and results of sleep studies undertaken in a cohort of children with cleft palate. Clinical features will be examined to determine potential associations with SDB in this group. A retrospective chart review was undertaken to ascertain sleep study results and clinical data for all children with cleft palate. Clinical features of interest included age, gender, syndrome diagnosis, cleft classification, and surgical status. A total of 99 sleep studies were available from 62 children. The sample included a select group of children with cleft palate with features predictive of a high risk of SDB. Baseline sleep study results were consistent with SDB for 87% of children and 28% (15 of 54) of these children demonstrated severe SDB. Uni-variate analysis showed that age, syndrome, and surgical status had significant association with the severity of SDB. On multi-variate analysis only surgical status maintained this association, such that pre-palatoplasty/pharyngoplasty was associated with more severe SDB. Follow-up studies were completed in one-third of the cohort. Children with cleft palate appear to have a significant risk of SDB. A prospective study of a population of children with cleft palate is needed to further define the characteristics of this risk and important risk factors. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Cleft lip and palate treatment of 530 children over a decade in a single centre.

    PubMed

    Vlastos, I M; Koudoumnakis, E; Houlakis, M; Nasika, M; Griva, M; Stylogianni, E

    2009-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the process of care and the outcomes of cleft lip and palate operations carried by a multidisciplinary team at a centre of craniofacial anomalies with a high patients' volume. A retrospective review of all cleft lips and/or palates cases treated in the centre from 1995 to 2007 was performed. Direct and long term complication rates, clinical, audiologic, speech intelligibility and dental arch assessments were analyzed. A total of 530 children have been operated this period in the centre (64 isolated cleft lip closures). A detailed presentation of the outcomes is performed in relation to the various types of cleft lip and palates. The majority of parents (70%) reported very good or excellent results 2-5 years after the lip closure with the Millard technique, although those with bilateral clefts were significantly less satisfied (P<0.002). Forty-two percent of children with cleft palate and otitis media with effusion were self-improved 2-8 months after palate reconstruction and 83.3% of children treated with the two flaps palatoplasty technique had a rather high or very high intelligibility score. Muscles' retropositioning had a significant effect on intelligibility (P=0.04). Children with cleft lips and palates have a variety of conditions and functional limitations even after the surgical correction of their problem that need to be evaluated and treated by several specialists. The treatment protocol utilized by the multidisciplinary team of our centre is efficient with a relative low percentage of complications and unfavorable results.

  11. A randomized controlled trial comparing two techniques for unilateral cleft lip and palate: Growth and speech outcomes during mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Praveen; Murthy, Jyotsna; Ulaghanathan, Navitha; Savitha, V H

    2015-07-01

    To study the growth and speech outcomes in children who were operated on for unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) by a single surgeon using two different treatment protocols. A total of 200 consecutive patients with nonsyndromic UCLP were randomly allocated to two different treatment protocols. Of the 200 patients, 179 completed the protocol. However, only 85 patients presented for follow-up during the mixed dentition period (7-10 years of age). The following treatment protocol was followed. Protocol 1 consisted of the vomer flap (VF), whereby patients underwent primary lip nose repair and vomer flap for hard palate single-layer closure, followed by soft palate repair 6 months later; Protocol 2 consisted of the two-flap technique (TF), whereby the cleft palate (CP) was repaired by two-flap technique after primary lip and nose repair. GOSLON Yardstick scores for dental arch relation, and speech outcomes based on universal reporting parameters, were noted. A total of 40 patients in the VF group and 45 in the TF group completed the treatment protocols. The GOSLON scores showed marginally better outcomes in the VF group compared to the TF group. Statistically significant differences were found only in two speech parameters, with better outcomes in the TF group. Our results showed marginally better growth outcome in the VF group compared to the TF group. However, the speech outcomes were better in the TF group. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of lip closure on early maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Pascal; Metzger, Marc; Frucht, Sibylle; Schupp, Wipke; Hempel, Mareike; Otten, Jörg-Elard

    2013-01-01

    Debate continues about the cause of midfacial growth disturbance in patients with facial clefts. To evaluate the functional effect of surgical closure of the lip before palatal closure according to the technique by Delaire on early maxillary growth in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Twenty-two patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were studied using plaster casts obtained at the time of cheilorhinoplasty and 6 months later before palatal closure. The interrupted lateral muscles were anatomically repositioned using the surgical technique by Delaire. No patients had received preoperative orthodontic treatment or a passive palatal plate. Cast analyses were performed using a digital caliper. Landmark positioning was performed 3 times by 2 different examiners to define intraobserver and interobserver differences. The final maxilla dimensions were recorded as the distances between the mean landmark positions. Using the t test, dimensions obtained before palatal closure were compared with dimensions obtained before lip closure. The method allowed good reproducibility. Functional closure of the lip significantly narrowed the transverse anterior cleft areas by -2.36 mm (P < .05). Sagittal variables were increased by 1.68 mm on the nonaffected side and by 1.48 mm on the affected side (P < .05 for both). Functional closure according to the technique by Delaire narrows the transverse dimensions of the maxilla, while simultaneously preserving initial sagittal growth. 4.

  13. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Materials and Methods: Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. Results: In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies. PMID:26981462

  14. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Ylikontiola, Leena P; Sándor, George K; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies.

  15. Assessment of complete unilateral cleft lip and palate treatment outcome using EUROCRAN index and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Anas Imran; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2017-09-01

    Assessment of treatment outcome is the only non-invasive approach to identify the effects of cleft lip and palate repair and modify management accordingly. Here the aim is to assess the outcome of complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP) patients using EUROCRAN index and to check whether there are any factors associated with the treatment outcome. It is a retrospective cross sectional study. Dental models were collected from archives of two cleft referral centers in Pakistan. Five blinded examiners scored 101 models twice at two week interval. The primary outcome was mean EUROCRAN scores based on dental arch relationships and palatal surface morphology. A mean(SD) score of 2.72 (0.76) and 2.20 (0.73) was determined based on dental arch relationships and palatal surface morphology, respectively. According to the final logistic regression model, modified Millard technique (cheiloplasty) and Veau-Wardill-Kilners' method (palatoplasty) had higher odds of producing unfavorable treatment outcome. Present study determined a fair and a fair to poor treatment outcome based on dental arch relationships and palatal surface morphology, respectively. Our study suggests a significant association between treatment outcome and primary surgical techniques for lip and palate. These findings could warrant a modification of management protocols to ensure improvement in future cleft outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Timing of hard palate closure and dental arch relationships in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients: a mixed-longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Noverraz, A E; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Mars, M; van't Hof, M A

    1993-07-01

    In a mixed longitudinal study, dental arch relationships of 88 consecutive UCLP patients treated at the Nijmegen Cleft Palate Centre were evaluated using the Goslon Yardstick. On the basis of timing of hard palate closure, the patients were divided into four groups. Mean age of hard palate closure the patients were divided into four groups. Mean age of hard palate closure in group A (n = 18) was 1.5 years, in group B (n = 26) 4.6 years and in group C (n = 18) 9.4 years. In group D (n = 26, no patient older than 10 years) the hard palate was still open. Four stages of dental development were distinguished; deciduous dentition, early mixed dentition, late mixed dentition and permanent dentition. Reproducibility of scoring with the Goslon Yardstick was good for all stages of dental development. No differences in dental arch relationships were found between the four groups. In 86% of the cases, the dental arch relationships of UCLP patients treated in Nijmegen were acceptable. Pharyngeal flap surgery had minor unfavorable effects on dental arch relationships.

  17. Histone acetylation is involved in TCDD-induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xingang; Qiu, Lin; Pu, Yalan; Liu, Cuiping; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Chen; Pu, Wei; Fu, Yuexian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present was to evaluate the effects of DNA methylation and histone acetylation on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlo-rodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced cleft palate in fetal mice. Pregnant mice