Science.gov

Sample records for cleveland clinic experience

  1. The Cleveland Clinic's magnet experience.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Peggy A; Lewicki, Linda J; Modic, Mary Beth; Schaab, Debbie; Rump, Colleen; Bixler, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    The awarding of Magnet Status by the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program of the American Nursing Credentialing Center is acknowledged as the achievement of Excellence in Nursing. In this article, The Cleveland Clinic shares insights from its experience in becoming the 72nd Magnet hospital. Questions to ponder when conducting a readiness assessment before embarking on the Magnet journey, techniques to engage the staff in the application process, and writing and organizing tips are shared.

  2. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Hess, Caryl A; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report, detail an expanded health care leadership development programme called the Cleveland Clinic Academy (CCA). CCA consists of a broad suite of offerings, including cohort-based learning and 'a la carte' half- or full-day courses addressing specific competencies to manage and to lead. Academy attendance is optional and is available to all physicians, nurses, and administrators with the requisite experience. Course selection is guided by competency matrices which map leadership competencies to specific courses. As of December 2012, a total of 285 course sessions have been offered to 6,050 attendees with uniformly high ratings of course quality and impact. During the past 10 years, Cleveland Clinic's leadership and management curriculum has successfully created a pipeline of health care leaders to fill executive positions, search committees, board openings, and various other organizational leadership positions. Health care leadership can be taught and learned.

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Single Brainstem Metastases: The Cleveland Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Chao, Samuel T.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the imaging and clinical outcomes of patients with single brainstem metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from patients with single brainstem metastases treated with SRS. Locoregional control and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Between 1997 and 2007, 43 patients with single brainstem metastases were treated with SRS. The median age at treatment was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance status was 80, and the median follow-up was 5.3 months. The median dose was 15 Gy (range, 9.6-24), and the median conformality and heterogeneity index was 1.7 and 1.9, respectively. The median survival was 5.8 months from the procedure date. Of the 33 patient with post-treatment imaging available, a complete radiographic response was achieved in 2 (4.7%), a partial response in 8 (18.6%), and stable disease in 23 (53.5%). The 1-year actuarial rate of local control, distant brain control, and overall survival was 85%, 38.3%, and 31.5%, respectively. Of the 43 patients, 8 (19%) died within 2 months of undergoing SRS, and 15 (36%) died within 3 months. On multivariate analysis, greater performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, p = .004), score index for radiosurgery (HR, 0.7; p = .004), graded prognostic assessment score (HR, 0.48; p = .003), and smaller tumor volume (HR, 1.23, p = .002) were associated with improved survival. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SRS is a safe and effective local therapy for patients with brainstem metastases.

  4. Cleveland Clinic Next Generation Neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Mark

    2009-09-30

    This was an award to purchase equipment for state-of-the-art MRI radiofrequency coils. There was no personnel effort or construction as a part of this project. This report details the final status of the approved budget items for this project. All approved budget items were successfully delivered and installed. The equipment provided to Cleveland Clinic under this project will allow Cleveland Clinic researchers to build imaging equipment with improved capability to investigate brain disorders.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  6. Radio-frequency tracking of respiratory equipment: rationale and early experience at the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K; Roberts, Vincent; Matt, David; Chom, Leslie; Sasidhar, Madhu; Chatburn, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    When respiratory therapists (RTs) seek respiratory care equipment, finding it quickly is desirable, both to expedite patient care and to avert RTs wasting time. To optimize RTs' ability to quickly locate ventilators, we developed and implemented a radio-frequency identification (RFID) tagging system called eTrak. The Clinical Engineering and Information Technology groups at Cleveland Clinic collaboratively developed a Wi-Fi-based RFID program that used active RFID tags. Altogether, 218 ventilators, 82 noninvasive ventilators, and various non-respiratory equipment were tagged, beginning in March 2010. We calculated the difference in time required to locate equipment before versus after implementation. The eTrak system had a mean 145 log-ons per week over the first year of use, and was associated with a decreased time required for RTs to locate ventilators: median 18 min (range 1-45 min) versus 3 min (range 1-6 min) (P < .001). Surveys of RTs regarding whether equipment was hard to find before versus after implementing eTrak showed a non-significant trend toward improvement. An RFID tracking system for respiratory equipment shortened the time to locate ventilators and non-significantly improved RT satisfaction with finding equipment. RFID tagging of equipment warrants further investigation.

  7. Developing leadership competencies among medical trainees: five-year experience at the Cleveland Clinic with a chief residents' training course.

    PubMed

    Farver, Carol F; Smalling, Susan; Stoller, James K

    2016-10-01

    Challenges in healthcare demand great leadership. In response, leadership training programs have been developed within academic medical centers, business schools, and healthcare organizations; however, we are unaware of any well-developed programs for physicians-in-training. To address this gap, we developed a two-day leadership development course for chief residents (CRs) at the Cleveland Clinic, framed around the concept of emotional intelligence. This paper describes our five-year experience with the CRs leadership program. Since inception, 105 CRs took the course; 81 (77%) completed before-and-after evaluations. Participants indicated that they had relatively little prior knowledge of the concepts that were presented and that the workshop greatly enhanced their familiarity with leadership competencies. Qualitative analysis of open-ended responses indicated that attendees valued the training, especially in conflict resolution and teamwork, and indicated specific action plans for applying these skills. Furthermore, the workshop spurred some participants to express plans to learn more about leadership competencies. This study extends prior experience in offering an emotional intelligence-based leadership workshop for CRs. Though the program is novel, further research is needed to more fully understand the impact of leadership training for CRs and for the institutions and patients they serve. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders in lung transplant patients: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, P; Rybicki, L; Smith, M D; Abrahams, N A; Tubbs, R R; Pettay, J; Farver, C F; Hsi, E D

    2002-06-01

    PTLD is a well-recognized complication of organ transplantation. Large series of heart, renal, and liver transplants have been examined for the incidence and behavior of PTLD. However, reports of the incidence and characteristics of PTLDs in lung transplant (LTx) patients are few. We report our experience with PTLDs in a large series of LTx recipients at a single institution and compare them to other solid organ transplant recipient PTLDs seen at our institution. Twenty-eight patients were found to have PTLD, of whom 8 were lung transplant recipients. We evaluated nine PTLD specimens from these 8 patients for their histology, immunophenotype (CD20, CD3, EBV-LMP1), EBER status by in situ hybridization, and clinical features. The incidence of PTLD was 3.3% (8/244 patients). The time to development of PTLD, after transplant, was short (median time, 7 mo). All were of B-cell lineage. Overall, EBV was demonstrated in 77.7% (7 of 9 specimens) of PTLDs. All specimens tested for clonality were found to be monoclonal. Five patients died, with a median time to death of only 4.6 months. PTLDs in LTx patients are EBV-associated B-cell, predominantly monoclonal lymphoid lesions similar to other solid organ transplant PTLDs. Compared with other solid organ transplant recipients with PTLD at our institution, PTLDs in LTx patients have a propensity to involve the transplanted organ (P =.001, Fisher's exact test), occur earlier after transplant (P =.003, Wilcoxon test), and have a shorter survival (P =.002, log rank test). Reasons for this may include the relatively higher level of immunosuppression required in these patients and limited options in decreasing it. Although the incidence is low, careful early monitoring of lung transplantation patients is warranted because of the poor prognosis of patients developing this complication.

  9. The Cleveland Clinic Experience with Supraclavicular and Popliteal Ambulatory Nerve Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Gharabawy, Ramez; Eid, Gamal; Mendoza, Maria; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Ali Sakr Esa, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNB) are commonly used for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Our study aimed at describing our experience with ambulatory peripheral nerve catheters. After Institutional Review Board approval, records for all patients discharged with supraclavicular or popliteal catheters between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A licensed practitioner provided verbal and written instructions to the patients prior to discharge. Daily follow-up phone calls were conducted. Patients either removed their catheters at home with real-time simultaneous telephone guidance by a member of the Acute Pain Service or had them removed by the surgeon during a regular office visit. The primary outcome of this analysis was the incidence of complications, categorized as pharmacologic, infectious, or other. The secondary outcome measure was the average daily pain score. Our study included a total of 1059 patients with ambulatory catheters (769 supraclavicular, 290 popliteal). The median infusion duration was 5 days for both groups. Forty-two possible complications were identified: 13 infectious, 23 pharmacologic, and 6 labeled as other. Two patients had retained catheters, 2 had catheter leakage, and 2 had shortness of breath. Our study showed that prolonged use of ambulatory catheters for a median period of 5 days did not lead to an increased incidence of complications. PMID:25535627

  10. The Cleveland Clinic experience with supraclavicular and popliteal ambulatory nerve catheters.

    PubMed

    Gharabawy, Ramez; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Farag, Ehab; Cummings, Kenneth; Eid, Gamal; Mendoza, Maria; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Rosenquist, Richard; Ali Sakr Esa, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNB) are commonly used for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Our study aimed at describing our experience with ambulatory peripheral nerve catheters. After Institutional Review Board approval, records for all patients discharged with supraclavicular or popliteal catheters between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A licensed practitioner provided verbal and written instructions to the patients prior to discharge. Daily follow-up phone calls were conducted. Patients either removed their catheters at home with real-time simultaneous telephone guidance by a member of the Acute Pain Service or had them removed by the surgeon during a regular office visit. The primary outcome of this analysis was the incidence of complications, categorized as pharmacologic, infectious, or other. The secondary outcome measure was the average daily pain score. Our study included a total of 1059 patients with ambulatory catheters (769 supraclavicular, 290 popliteal). The median infusion duration was 5 days for both groups. Forty-two possible complications were identified: 13 infectious, 23 pharmacologic, and 6 labeled as other. Two patients had retained catheters, 2 had catheter leakage, and 2 had shortness of breath. Our study showed that prolonged use of ambulatory catheters for a median period of 5 days did not lead to an increased incidence of complications.

  11. Regional referral system for patients with acute mechanical support: experience at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V; Chang, Albert S Y; Navia, Jose L; Banbury, Michael K; Buda, Tiffany; Hoercher, Kathy; Starling, Randall C; Taylor, David O; Smedira, Nicholas G

    2006-01-01

    Regional referral networks ("hub and spoke") have been created to facilitate the transfer of patients on mechanical circulatory support. Although individual centers report good success, overall outcomes have remained poor. We investigated whether preoperative variables influenced survival and could be used to help select patients best served by referral. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients transferred to our institution supported on cardiac assist devices. Between January 1995 and September 2003, 39 patients were received in transfer for continued care after the implantation of a cardiac assist device. Eighty-five percent of patients had the ABIOMED BVS 5000 implanted. The most common indication was postcardiotomy shock. Sixty-four percent of patients were not candidates for heart transplantation due to medical or social contraindications. The 30-day mortality of this group was 62%. Survivors had less comorbidity and were less likely to have complex surgeries, neurologic impairment, and multisystem organ failure when presenting to our center. Devices were weaned in 30% of cases. Only six patients (15%) were successfully transplanted, and five of these patients have done well at follow-up. Based on our experience, we believe that cardiogenic shock patients benefit from a regional referral system if they have not had complex cardiac surgical procedures or developed multisystem organ failure. Furthermore, there is a survival advantage when using long-term devices because this allows possible recovery or transplantation.

  12. Cardiac transplantation at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.

    PubMed

    Hoercher, K; McCarthy, P; Young, J B

    1999-01-01

    The past 15 years has seen a significant evolution of heart transplant patient selection criteria, definition of suitable donors, immunosuppressive strategies, infection prophylaxis and treatment, and post-transplant patient surveillance. Primarily important has been broadening of the donor suitability definition and an evolution toward transplanting more ill and hemodynamically unstable patients. Despite "pushing the envelope" with both patient and donor selection and with transplanted patients generally being more ill, we believe our outcomes at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation are exemplary. The one- and 3-year survival rates for 265 heart transplants performed during 1996-1998 were 88% and 81%, respectively. Key to the success of our program has been close interdisciplinary working relationships and respect, broad and expert consultative support services, a desire to investigate clinical challenges, and dedication to excellence. Of additional importance is the realization that no matter how difficult we believe our difficulties are, we realize that those of our patients are vastly greater.

  13. Contemporary art in medicine: the Cleveland Clinic art collection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Fine art is good medicine. It comforts, elevates the spirit, and affirms life and hope. Art in the healthcare setting, combined with outstanding care and service, creates an environment that encourages healing and supports the work of medical professionals. As one of the world’s great medical centers, Cleveland Clinic has always included the arts in its healing environment. The four founders and subsequent leadership encouraged artistic and musical expression by employees. Distinguished artworks have long hung on the walls. In 1983, an Aesthetics Committee was officially formed at Cleveland Clinic to address issues of art and design in Cleveland Clinic facilities. PMID:24282686

  14. Heart Pump Design for Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Through a Lewis CommTech Program project with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the NASA Lewis Research Center is playing a key role in the design and development of a permanently implantable, artificial heart pump assist device. Known as the Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS), this device will take on the pumping role of the damaged left ventricle of the heart. The key part of the IVAS is a nonpulsatile (continuous flow) artificial heart pump with centrifugal impeller blades, driven by an electric motor. Lewis is part of an industry and academia team, led by the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), that is working with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation to make IVAS a reality. This device has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives each year, since 80 percent of heart attack victims suffer irreversible damage to the left ventricle, the part of the heart that does most of the pumping. Impeller blade design codes and flow-modeling analytical codes will be used in the project. These codes were developed at Lewis for the aerospace industry but will be applicable to the IVAS design project. The analytical codes, which currently simulate the flow through the compressor and pump systems, will be used to simulate the flow within the blood pump in the artificial heart assist device. The Interdisciplinary Technology Office heads up Lewis' efforts in the IVAS project. With the aid of numerical modeling, the blood pump will address many design issues, including some fluid-dynamic design considerations that are unique to the properties of blood. Some of the issues that will be addressed in the design process include hemolysis, deposition, recirculation, pump efficiency, rotor thrust balance, and bearing lubrication. Optimum pumping system performance will be achieved by modeling all the interactions between the pump components. The interactions can be multidisciplinary and, therefore, are influenced not only by the fluid dynamics of adjacent components but also by

  15. Joining the team: ethics consultation at the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Agich, George J

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, I describe the development of ethics consultation services and their operation at the Cleveland Clinic; my own educational experiences and background and how I came to see the importance of setting and collaboration for successfully doing clinical ethics; the unique culture of the Cleveland Clinic and its influence on the ethics consultation services provided there; and, finally, the place of personal commitments and values on the conduct of ethics consultations. I stress the point that although philosophers (and perhaps other bioethicists without health professions training) are socialized and educated to do solitary work, successfully conducting ethics consultations requires relatively high levels of collaboration and cooperation that have not been sufficiently discussed. Although this paper is more a description than an analysis of the influence of institutional setting on ethics consultation, I would claim that attention to setting, either as the local scene of the consultation or the institutional and social framework, deserves more attention by bioethicists intent on understanding ethics consultation.

  16. The Cleveland Clinic: a distinctive model of American medicine.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2014-04-01

    The Cleveland Clinic is a large healthcare system based in Cleveland, Ohio (USA) with an extensive American (throughout Northeast Ohio; Weston, Florida; and Las Vegas, Nevada) and global presence (in Abu Dhabi, UAE; and with training alumni in >70 countries). Cleveland Clinic was founded in 1921 as a distinctive medical model with a tripartite mission of "better care of the sick, investigation of their problems, and more teaching of those who serve" which has been vibrantly maintained. Distinctive aspects of the Clinic include its being a closed staff, salaried, group practice which is physician-led and which features 1-year faculty appointments and a vigorous annual review process for all physicians and leaders. Regarding its tripartite mission, the Clinic has demonstrated longstanding clinical excellence, e.g., with consistent ranking as first in cardiovascular care in U.S. News and World Report and top-10 rankings in at least 12 other specialties. A longstanding tradition of research has contributed landmark discoveries, including performance of the first coronary revascularization procedure, the first intra-coronary angiogram, the world's third face transplant, ongoing development of a breast cancer vaccine, etc. Regarding education, the Clinic serves many educational audiences excellently through its Education Institute. These audiences include medical students, graduate medical trainees, faculty physicians, nurses, and allied health providers (both within the Cleveland Clinic and from other institutions worldwide), and patients. The Education Institute also includes the Cleveland Clinic Academy, which offers training in leadership competencies to physicians, nurses, and healthcare administrators both within the Cleveland Clinic and to visitors from abroad (through the Executive Visitors Program and the Samson Global Leadership Academy for Healthcare Executives). The latter program is an intensive 2-week residential leadership development course for emerging

  17. Cleveland Clinic television series enhances branding in active market.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    "Medical Miracles" premiered April 26. It is an information-packed series of programs showcasing The Cleveland Clinic's advanced medical practices. The Cleveland Clinic teamed with local NBC-affiliate, WKYC to develop half-hour shows on topics including neuro-sciences, orthopedics, eye, heart, pediatrics and cancer. As of this writing, three of the half-hour shows already have aired. They will resume in September, October and November, following a summer break. The collaboration is a healthy prospect all the way around. For Cleveland Clinic, it provides highly credible visibility in a competitive marketplace. And, according to WKYC president and general manager, Brooke Spectorsky, " Medical news and information is a high priority among our viewers."

  18. Definitive radiotherapy for early (T1-T2) Glottic Squamous cell carcinoma: a 20 year Cleveland clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report our 20 yr experience of definitive radiotherapy for early glottic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and materials Radiation records of 141 patients were retrospectively evaluated for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Cox proportional hazard models were used to perform univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA). Cause specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were plotted using cumulative incidence and Kaplan-Meir curves, respectively. Results Of the 91% patients that presented with impaired voice, 73% noted significant improvement. Chronic laryngeal edema and dysphagia were noted in 18% and 7%, respectively. The five year LC was 94% (T1a), 83% (T1b), 87% (T2a), 65% (T2b); the ten year LC was 89% (T1a), 83% (T1b), 87% (T2a), and 53% (T2b). The cumulative incidence of death due to larynx cancer at 10 yrs was 5.5%, respectively. On MVA, T-stage, heavy alcohol consumption during treatment, and used of weighted fields were predictive for poor outcome (p < 0.05). The five year CSS and OS was 95.9% and 76.8%, respectively. Conclusions Definitive radiotherapy provides excellent LC and CSS for early glottis carcinoma, with excellent voice preservation and minimal long term toxicity. Alternative management strategies should be pursued for T2b glottis carcinomas. PMID:23164282

  19. How Cleveland Clinic used TDABC to improve value.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher J; Hopkins, Mike; Kimmel, Benjamin M; Koberna, Stephanie; Montie, Carrie A

    2014-06-01

    Cleveland Clinic partnered with Harvard Business School to conduct a pilot project to explore the differences between time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) and relative value unit costing. The goal was to determine whether TDABC could improve the accuracy of cost information and identify value-improvement opportunities for two types of heart-value procedures. Using TDABC, leaders gained a detailed look into process steps that could be consolidated, reduced, or performed with a lower cost mix of personnel.

  20. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  1. Progress in Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart development.

    PubMed

    Harasaki, H; Fukamachi, K; Massiello, A; Chen, J F; Himley, S C; Fukumura, F; Muramoto, K; Niu, S; Wika, K; Davies, C R

    1994-01-01

    A totally implantable, Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart (TAH) uses electrohydraulic energy conversion and an automatic left master-alternate mode control scheme, with a filling sensitivity of 1.0 l/min/mmHg and a maximum output of 9.5 l/min. The TAHs were tested in 12 calves for 1-120 days with normal major organ and blood cell function. Post-operative suppression of platelet aggregation recovered by the second post-operative week. The gelatin-coated pump surface generally was clean without any anticoagulants and free from infection. Embolism, which occurred in two cases, was caused by complications attributable to fungal infection in a Dacron graft and by thrombus formed around a jugular vein catheter. A system with a hybridized microcircuit controller in the interventricular space has been tested successfully in the three most recent cases, with a peak device surface temperature elevation of 6.5 degrees C. Heat effects were confined to the tissues immediately adjacent to the hottest spots. The carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy housing and 60 ml butyl rubber compliance chamber showed good tissue compatibility with a thin, fibrous tissue capsule. The transcutaneous energy transmission system and the internal battery functioned well as designed in the most recent animal implant.

  2. Flow Analysis of the Cleveland Clinic Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Golding, Leonard A. R.; Smith, William A.; Horvath, David; Medvedev, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    An implantable ventricular assist rotordynamic blood pump is being developed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in cooperation with the NASA Lewis Research Center. At the nominal design condition, the pump provides blood flow at the rate of 5 liters per minute at a pressure rise of 100 mm of mercury and a rotative speed of 3000 RPM. Bench testing of the centrifugal pump in a water/glycerin mixture has provided flow and pressure data at several rotative speeds. A one-dimensional empirical based pump flow analysis computer code developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used in the design process to simulate the flow in the primary centrifugal pump stage. The computer model was used to size key impeller and volute geometric parameters that influence pressure rise and flow. Input requirements to the computer model include a simple representation of the pump geometry. The model estimates the flow conditions at the design and at off-design operating conditions at the impeller leading and trailing edges and the volute inlet and exit. The output from the computer model is compared to flow and pressure data obtained from bench testing.

  3. Reflective Writing in the Competency-Based Curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments. PMID:21364819

  4. Leadership and organization development in health-care: lessons from the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Margaret M; O'Neil, Deborah A; FitzSimons, Kathleen; Bailin, Philip L; Stoller, James K

    2011-01-01

    Leaders in health-care today are faced with a wide array of complex issues. This chapter describes an innovative physician leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic intended to enhance the leadership capacities of individuals and the organization. Propositions regarding the program's impact on organizational innovation, organizational commitment, social capital, and the human element of physician practice are offered for future examination.

  5. The Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart. In vivo hemodynamic performance in calves and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, P M; Fukamachi, K; Fukumura, F; Muramoto, K; Golding, L A; Harasaki, H

    1994-09-01

    In vitro function of the Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus electrohydraulic total artificial heart met National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute hemodynamic guidelines for such devices. In a series of in vivo experiments, we implanted the total artificial heart in eight calves (mean weight 87 kg), one for a short-term experiment and seven for long-term experiments. The mean blood flow during support was 7.7 +/- 1.6 L/min with left atrial pressure 13 +/- 6 mm Hg, right atrial pressure 13 +/- 4 mm Hg, and aortic pressure 97 +/- 9 mm hg. Maximum pump flow (9.6 L/min) occurred after 4 days of support as a result of the high resting cardiac output of the animals. A 10% to 15% right pump stroke-volume limit effectively balanced atrial pressures, and afterload insensitivity was confirmed by the in vivo studies. Calves tolerated treadmill exercise studies well, with an average duration of 22 minutes and an average top speed of 2.1 mph. The experiments were terminated after 1 day to 120 days of support (mean 32 days). Most experiments were terminated as a result of correctable mechanical problems. In a separate study of six adult human patients undergoing orthotopic cardiac transplantation, five showed an excellent fit for the Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart. Further studies using chest roentgenograms, chest measurements, and transesophageal echocardiography should help predict fit of the total artificial heart in potential candidates. Initial candidates for a "vented-electric" version of the Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart are patients for whom univentricular (left ventricular assist device) support is not appropriate, but who require mechanical support as a bridge to cardiac transplantation.

  6. Harlan Cleveland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishimoto, Warren

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Harlan Cleveland, political scientist, diplomat, public executive, author of dozens of articles and books, and eighth president of the University of Hawai'i. Harlan Cleveland was born in 1918 in New York City. He was the son of Stanley Matthews Cleveland and Marian Phelps Van Buren Cleveland. Cleveland…

  7. Continuing development of the Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Rintoul, T C; Butler, K C; Thomas, D C; Carriker, J W; Maher, T R; Kiraly, R J; Massiello, A; Himley, S C; Chen, J F; Fukamachi, K

    1993-01-01

    A completely implanted total artificial heart (TAH) is under development by Nimbus, Inc., and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF). Key features of the system include an electrohydraulic energy converter, an automatic control system that produces a Frank-Starling response, and dual ventricles composed of graphite-epoxy and titanium with gelatin blood contacting surfaces. The system is controlled by a single substrate, hybridized microcircuit (the hybrid). Fabrication of the TAH control hybrid has recently been completed and testing begun. Its design emphasizes simplicity, reliability, and efficiency. Particular attention was given to optimizing thermal management. Externally controlled TAH systems have been used in eight in vivo experiments of up to 120 days' duration. In the last two of these experiments, a variable volume device was also implanted with excellent results. In vivo use of the system has demonstrated the Frank-Starling pump response, but the systems quickly reach maximum output with the bovine animal models. Human fitting studies, including adult patients undergoing heart transplantation, demonstrated satisfactory fit of the pump within the pericardium without compression of the vascular structures or chest wall. Measurements of chest circumference, plain chest films, and transesophageal echocardiograms should provide reliable predictions of pump fit in the majority of patients.

  8. Innovation the Cleveland Clinic Way: Powering Transformation by Putting Ideas to Work.

    PubMed

    Brown, David

    2016-07-01

    Innovation the Cleveland Clinic Way: Powering Transformation by Putting Ideas to Work, a 10 chapter book with three appendices, provides health practitioners a way to plan, develop, and implement their ideas in health care settings to transform the delivery of health and human services programs. The book provides health professionals with suggestions to improve programs and services within the health care delivery system. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine: an innovative approach to medical education and the training of physician investigators.

    PubMed

    Fishleder, Andrew J; Henson, Lindsey C; Hull, Alan L

    2007-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) is an innovative, five-year medical education track within Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Case) with a focused mission to attract and educate a limited number of highly qualified persons who seek to become physician investigators. CCLCM curriculum governance, faculty appointments and promotions, and admissions committees are integrated with respective Case committees. The CCLCM curriculum is based on faculty-defined professional attributes that graduates are expected to develop. These attributes were used to create curricular and assessment principles that guided the development of an integrated basic science, clinical science, and research curriculum, conducted in an active learning environment. An organ-system approach is used to solidify an understanding of basic science discipline threads in the context of relevant clinical problems presented in PBL and case-based discussion formats. Clinical skills are introduced in the first year as part of the two-year longitudinal experience with a family practice or internal medicine physician. The research program provides all students with opportunities to learn and experience basic and translational research and clinical research before selecting a research topic for their 12- to 15-month master-level thesis project. All Case students participate in required and elective clinical curriculum after the second year, but CCLCM students return to the Cleveland Clinic on selected Friday afternoons for program-specific research and professionalism-learning activities. A unique portfolio-based assessment system is used to assess student achievements in nine competency areas, seven of which reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies.

  10. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

    PubMed Central

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs. PMID:26563960

  11. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician-scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  12. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician-scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  13. Sensorless Suction Recognition in the Self-Regulating Cleveland Clinic Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, David; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry; Golding, Leonard; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart passively regulates itself in regard to the relative performance of systemic and pulmonary pumps. The system incorporates real-time monitoring to detect any indication of incipient left or right suction as input for automatic controller response. To recognize suction, the external controller compares the waveforms of modulating speed input and power feedback. Deviations in periodic waveforms indicate sudden changes to flow impedance, which are characteristic of suction events as the pump speed is modulating. Incipient suction is indicated within three seconds of being detected in the power wave form, allowing timely controller response before mean flow is affected. This article describes the results obtained from subjecting the system to severe hemodynamic manipulation during an acute study in a calf. PMID:26102177

  14. The Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart. Design and in vitro function.

    PubMed

    Massiello, A; Kiraly, R; Butler, K; Himley, S; Chen, J F; McCarthy, P M

    1994-09-01

    We describe the design and in vitro testing of the Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus electrohydraulic permanent total artificial heart as it nears completion of development. The total artificial heart uses an electric motor and hydraulic actuator to drive two diaphragm-type blood pumps. The interventricular space contains the pump control electronics and is vented to an air-filled compliance chamber. Pericardial tissue valves and biolized blood-contacting surfaces potentially eliminate the need for anticoagulation. In vitro studies on a mock circulatory circuit demonstrated preload-sensitive control of pump output over the operating range of the blood pump: 70 to 160 beats/min and 5 to 9.6 L/min at right and left atrial pressures of 1.0 to 7.0 mm Hg and 5.0 to 12.0 mm Hg, respectively. The pump output was found to be insensitive to afterload over a range of 15 to 40 mm Hg mean pulmonary artery pressure and 60 to 130 mm Hg mean systemic pressure. The left master alternate control mode balanced the ventricular outputs during simulated bronchial artery shunting of up to 20% of cardiac output. A 10% to 15% right-pump, stroke-volume limiter balanced ventricular outputs during maximum output of 9.6 L/min. In response to a sustained increase in systemic venous return, the pump increased output by 2 L/min (29%) in 35 seconds. Thus the Cleveland Clinic-Nimbus total artificial heart meets the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute hemodynamic performance goals for devices being developed for permanent heart replacement. The biolized blood-contacting surfaces should decrease the risk of thromboembolism associated with circulatory assist devices.

  15. The portfolio approach to competency-based assessment at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dannefer, Elaine F; Henson, Lindsey C

    2007-05-01

    Despite the rapid expansion of interest in competency-based assessment, few descriptions of assessment systems specifically designed for a competency-based curriculum have been reported. The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a portfolio approach to a comprehensive, competency-based assessment system that is fully integrated with the curriculum to foster an educational environment focused on learning. The educational design goal of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University was to create an integrated educational program-curriculum and instructional methods, student assessment processes, and learning environment-to prepare medical students for success in careers as physician investigators. The first class in the five-year program matriculated in 2004. To graduate, a student must demonstrate mastery of nine competencies: research, medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, clinical skills, clinical reasoning, health care systems, personal development, and reflective practice. The portfolio provides a tool for collecting and managing multiple types of assessment evidence from multiple contexts and sources within the curriculum to document competence and promote reflective practice skills. This article describes how the portfolio was developed to provide both formative and summative assessment of student achievement in relation to the program's nine competencies.

  16. Human Fitting Studies of Cleveland Clinic Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    PubMed Central

    Karimov, Jamshid H.; Steffen, Robert J.; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Cruz, Vincent; Golding, Leonard A.R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Moazami, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of mechanical circulatory support devices is challenging, especially in patients with a small chest cavity. We evaluated how well the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) fit the anatomy of patients about to receive a heart transplant. A mock pump model of the CFTAH was rapid-prototyped using biocompatible materials. The model was brought to the operative table, and the direction, length, and angulation of the inflow/outflow ports and outflow conduits were evaluated after the recipient's ventricles had been resected. Thoracic cavity measurements were based on preoperative computed tomographic data. The CFTAH fit well in all five patients (height, 170 ± 9 cm; weight, 75 ± 24 kg). Body surface area was 1.9 ± 0.3 m2 (range, 1.6-2.1 m2). The required inflow and outflow port orientation of both the left and right housings appeared consistent with the current version of the CFTAH implanted in calves. The left outflow conduit remained straight, but the right outflow direction necessitated a 73 ± 22 degree angulation to prevent potential kinking when crossing over the connected left outflow. These data support the fact that our design achieves the proper anatomical relationship of the CFTAH to a patient's native vessels. PMID:25806613

  17. Cleveland Clinic intelligent mouthguard: a new technology to accurately measure head impact in athletes and soldiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Adam; Samorezov, Sergey

    2013-05-01

    Nearly 2 million Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) occur in the U.S. each year, with societal costs approaching $60 billion. Including mild TBI and concussion, TBI's are prevalent in soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan as well as in domestic athletes. Long-term risks of single and cumulative head impact dosage may present in the form of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, suicide, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Quantifying head impact dosage and understanding associated risk factors for the development of long-term sequelae is critical toward developing guidelines for TBI exposure and post-exposure management. The current knowledge gap between head impact exposure and clinical outcomes limits the understanding of underlying TBI mechanisms, including effective treatment protocols and prevention methods for soldiers and athletes. In order to begin addressing this knowledge gap, Cleveland Clinic is developing the "Intelligent Mouthguard" head impact dosimeter. Current testing indicates the Intelligent Mouthguard can quantify linear acceleration with 3% error and angular acceleration with 17% error during impacts ranging from 10g to 174g and 850rad/s2 to 10000rad/s2, respectively. Correlation was high (R2 > 0.99, R2 = 0.98, respectively). Near-term development will be geared towards quantifying head impact dosages in vitro, longitudinally in athletes and to test new sensors for possible improved accuracy and reduced bias. Long-term, the IMG may be useful to soldiers to be paired with neurocognitive clinical data quantifying resultant TBI functional deficits.

  18. Cleveland Clinic experience with interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulchaker, James C.; Ng, Christopher S.; Palone, David; Angie, Michelle; Kursh, Elroy D.

    2000-05-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has long been considered the gold standard therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The problems associated with the TURP, which have been extensively described, include significant bleeding, TUR syndrome, incontinence, stricture, bladder neck contracture, and sexual dysfunction. The desire for simpler, less morbid alternative therapies to TURP has led to an eruption of research and development in the last decade. This is fueled by the continued research for more economical alternatives in our current high cost health care system.

  19. Mitigating preventable chronic disease: Progress report of the Cleveland Clinic's Lifestyle 180 program

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor lifestyle choices are key in development and progression of preventable chronic diseases. The purpose of the study was to design and test a program to mitigate the physical and fiscal consequences of chronic diseases. Methods Here we report the outcomes for 429 participants with one or more chronic conditions, including obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus, many of whom had failed traditional disease management programs, who enrolled into a comprehensive lifestyle intervention. The Lifestyle 180 program integrates nutrition, physical activity and stress management interventions and was conducted at the Wellness Institute of the Cleveland Clinic, United States. An intensive 6 week immersion course, with 8 hours of group instruction per week, was followed by 3 follow-up, 4 hour-long sessions over the course of 6 months. Results Changes in biometric (weight, height, waist circumference, resting heart rate and blood pressure) and laboratory variables (fasting lipid panel, blood glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, ultra sensitive C-reactive protein) at 6 months were compared with baseline (pre-post analysis). At week 30, biometric and laboratory data were available for 244 (57%) and 299 (70%) participants, respectively. These had a mean ± SD reduction in weight (6.8 ± 6.9 kg, P < 0.001), waist circumference (6.1 ± 7.3 cm, P < 0.001), glucose (4.5 ± 29.6 mg/dL or 0.25 ± 1.64 mmol/L, P = 0.009), triglycerides (26.4 ± 58.5 mg/dL or 0.30 ± 0.66 mmol/L, P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) (7.9 ± 25.1 mg/dL or 0.2 ± 0.65 mmol/L, P < 0.001), hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) (0.20 ± 0.64%, P = 0.001), insulin (3.8 ± 11 microU/ml or 26.6 ± 76.4 ρmol, P < 0.001) and ultra sensitive C-reactive protein (US - CRP) (0.9 ± 4.8 mg/dL or 7.3 ± 40.2 nmol/L, P = 0.012), an increase in mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (3.7 ± 8.4 mg/dL or 0.1 ± 0.22, P < 0.001), and decreased use of medications. Conclusion

  20. Area contingency plan: Cleveland. (COTP Cleveland)

    SciTech Connect

    1993-06-30

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Cleveland Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Cleveland Coastal Zone.

  1. Reducing Unplanned Medical Oncology Readmissions by Improving Outpatient Care Transitions: A Process Improvement Project at the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Montero, Alberto J; Stevenson, James; Guthrie, Amy E; Best, Carolyn; Goodman, Lindsey Martin; Shrotriya, Shiva; Azzouqa, Abdel-Ghani; Parala, Armida; Lagman, Ruth; Bolwell, Brian J; Kalaycio, Matt E; Khorana, Alok A

    2016-05-01

    Reducing 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions is a national policy priority. We examined the impact of a quality improvement project focused on reducing oncology readmissions among patients with cancer who were admitted to palliative and general medical oncology services at the Cleveland Clinic. Baseline rates of readmissions were gathered during the period from January 2013 to April 2014. A quality improvement project designed to improve outpatient care transitions was initiated during the period leading to April 1, 2014, including: (1) provider education, (2) postdischarge nursing phone calls within 48 hours, and (3) postdischarge provider follow-up appointments within 5 business days. Nursing callback components included symptom management, education, medication review/compliance, and follow-up appointment reminder. During the baseline period, there were 2,638 admissions and 722 unplanned 30-day readmissions for an overall readmission rate of 27.4%. Callbacks and 5-day follow-up appointment monitoring revealed a mean monthly compliance of 72% and 78%, respectively, improving over time during the study period. Readmission rates declined by 4.5% to 22.9% (P < .01; relative risk reduction, 18%) during the study period. The mean direct cost of one readmission was $10,884, suggesting an annualized cost savings of $1.04 million with the observed reduction in unplanned readmissions. Modest readmission reductions can be achieved through better systematic transitions to outpatient care (including follow-up calls and early provider visits), thereby leading to a reduction in use of inpatient resources. These data suggest that efforts focused on improving outpatient care transition were effective in reducing unplanned oncology readmissions. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Solar Heating Experiment on the Grover Cleveland School, Boston, Massachusetts. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co., Philadelphia, PA. Space Div.

    General Electric Company was one of four contractors who received a contract in early January 1974 to design, build, and install a solar heating experiment in a public school. The overall objective of this program was to obtain data that would assist in evaluating the applicability of solar heating systems in large metropolitan areas. This data…

  3. Cleveland Initiative for Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    The Cleveland Initiative for Education (CIE) is a plan designed by the Greater Cleveland (Ohio) Roundtable, the city's key assembly of civic and corporate leaders, and the Cleveland Public Schools. Its goal is to improve the quality of education, increase the number of high school graduates, and improve graduates' post-secondary opportunities…

  4. Dr. Millie Cleveland: chiropractic achiever.

    PubMed

    Nash, J

    1998-06-01

    Dr. Mildred Genoa Allison-Cleveland, affectionately known as "Dr. Millie," was an important part of life at Cleveland Chiropractic College for over thirty years, serving first as a clerical assistant, then instructor, administrative assistant, and trusted right hand of her husband, Dr. Carl Cleveland, Jr. Yet Mildred Cleveland, like many other women who have helped the profession grow and survive over the years, has never been the subject of an article in print. In this paper, the author will strive to outline Dr. Mildred Cleveland's accomplishments, as well as to give the reader as clear a picture as possible of the woman who was the wife of one chiropractic pioneer and mother of another.

  5. 77 FR 33312 - Safety Zone; Marine Week Cleveland, Lake Erie, Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Marine Week Cleveland, Lake Erie, Cleveland... temporary safety zone on Lake Erie and Cleveland Harbor at Burke Lakefront Airport, Cleveland, Ohio. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Erie and Cleveland Harbor near...

  6. Short-term in vivo performance of the Cleveland clinic PediPump left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Fumoto, Hideyuki; Shiose, Akira; Flick, Christine R; Noble, Lawrence D; Dudzinski, David T; Casas, Fernando; Takaseya, Tohru; Arakawa, Yoko; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Smith, William A; Duncan, Brian W

    2014-05-01

    The PediPump was implanted in six healthy lambs (mean 25.6 ± 1.4 kg) between the left ventricular apex and the descending aorta to evaluate in vivo performance for up to 30 days. Anticoagulation was achieved by continuous heparin infusion. Three animals were euthanized prematurely, two because of respiratory dysfunction and one because of deteriorating pump performance resulting from thrombus formation inside the pump. Three lambs were electively sacrificed 30 days after implantation; all had stable hemodynamics and minimal hemolysis, as indicated by low plasma free hemoglobin (2.5 ± 3.1 mg/dL). Mean 30-day pump flow was 1.8 ± 0.1 L/min at a pump speed of 12 200 ± 400 rpm. Neither activated clotting time nor activated partial thromboplastin time followed the changes in heparin dose. At necropsy, depositions were observed at the front (n = 1) and rear rotor axial positioning stops (n = 4); improved polishing techniques on the stationary stop surfaces and the addition of a hard-carbon, thin-film coating on the rotating stop of the pumps used for the last two experiments addressed the deposition seen earlier. In conclusion, the PediPump showed excellent hydraulic performance and minimal hemolysis during support for up to 30 days. Depositions observed at the axial positioning stops in earlier experiments were addressed by design and material refinements. We continue to focus on developing effective anticoagulation management in the lamb model as well as on further evaluating and demonstrating pump biocompatibility.

  7. Cleveland Clinic Rehabilitation Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    demonstrated that FMS is effective for improving cough , bladder function, gastric emptying and colonic transits in SCI/D. This proposal consists of four...population (study 4), and for improving cough in patients with multiple sclerosis (study 3). The following paragraphs provide brief synopsis of these

  8. Cleveland Clinic Rehabilitation Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    humans we have successfully demonstrated that FMS is effective for improving cough , bladder function, gastric emptying and colonic transits in SCI/D...improving constipation in general population (study 4), and for improving cough in patients with multiple sclerosis (study 3). The following paragraphs

  9. 7. Photocopy of c 1837 map of Cleveland Harbor with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of c 1837 map of Cleveland Harbor with two plans for additonal harbor. This is the first map to show the Cleveland Breakwater. Original in the Corps' files, Buffalo District. - Cleveland Breakwater at Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. 78 FR 16910 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, Ohio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... at: http://www.faa.gov/airports airtraffic/airports/environmental/airport noise/ part 150/states... International Airport, Cleveland, Ohio AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... approved the Cleveland- Hopkins International Airport noise compatibility program. Twelve...

  11. Reexamining educational philosophy: the issue of professional responsibility, "Cleveland First".

    PubMed

    Wotman, Stephen; Lalumandier, James; Canion, Seth; Zakariasen, Kristin

    2003-04-01

    This paper proposes a shift of emphasis in the dental curriculum from measures to protect and improve the oral health of individuals to measures to protect and improve the oral health of the community or society. This shift represents a fundamental change in educational philosophy of the dental school. To illustrate this shift in emphasis, this paper describes a demonstration project to test the feasibility of this approach involving all seventy first-year students in the Case Western Reserve University School of Dentistry in a four-week experience placing dental sealants in erupting molars of second and sixth graders in fifty schools of the Cleveland City School System. In future years, the program is expected to reach all second and sixth graders in the Cleveland School System. The experience is a required integral component of the curriculum, involving every student in the class, and is designed to make a demonstrable difference in oral health in the City of Cleveland. The experience is reinforced with course material on professional responsibility. The school is developing additional intensive experiences for second-, third-, and fourth-year classes involving smoking prevention for adolescents, oral health maintenance for nursing home residents, and dental care delivery in the inner city. The initial year of the program has had effects on students' responses to other elements of the first-year curriculum that go beyond the experience of placing sealants in children's teeth. The focused efforts of dental students every year are expected to have a measurable effect on the disparities in oral health found in the City of Cleveland as well as a measurable effect on dental students' and dentists' attitudes concerning professional responsibility.

  12. Bisphosphonates: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert E

    2004-01-01

    Bone is a preferred site of metastasis for many solid tumors, and the complications associated with bone metastases can result in significant skeletal morbidity including severe bone pain, pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM). Bisphosphonates are the current standard of care for preventing skeletal complications associated with bone metastases. Clinical trials investigating the benefit of bisphosphonate therapy have used a composite end point defined as a skeletal-related event (SRE) or bone event, which typically includes pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, radiation or surgery to bone, and HCM. Bisphosphonates have been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of these events in patients with bone metastases. Zoledronic acid (Zometa; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.; East Hanover, NJ), pamidronate (Aredia; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.), clodronate (Bonefos; Anthra Pharmaceuticals; Princeton, NJ), and ibandronate (Bondronat; Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.; Nutley, NJ) all have demonstrated efficacy superior to that of placebo in patients with breast cancer. Zoledronic acid is the only bisphosphonate that has been compared directly with pamidronate, and it was shown by multiple event analysis to be significantly more effective at reducing the risk of an SRE. In patients with prostate cancer, clodronate, etidronate (Didronel; Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Cincinnati, OH), and pamidronate have demonstrated transient palliation of bone pain. However, zoledronic acid is the only bisphosphonate to demonstrate both significant and sustained pain reduction and a significantly lower incidence and longer time to onset of SREs compared with placebo. Zoledronic acid is also the only bisphosphonate to demonstrate efficacy in patients with bone metastases from a variety of other solid tumors, including lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma. In conclusion, bisphosphonates effectively reduce skeletal complications in

  13. Clinical experience with bemiparin.

    PubMed

    Abad Rico, José Ignacio; Lozano Sánchez, Francisco S; Rocha, Eduardo

    2010-12-14

    therapy, while bleeding complications over 3 months of therapy were similarly low. In a European study, acute treatment of DVT with bemiparin for one week followed by 12 weeks' secondary prevention with bemiparin (i.e. bemiparin/bemiparin) was associated with a cost saving of &U20AC;908 per patient compared with UFH/warfarin. Similarly, bemiparin/warfarin produced a cost saving of &U20AC;769 compared with UFH/warfarin. The savings were predominantly the result of reduced hospital stays during acute treatment with bemiparin. Bemiparin was also associated with increased quality-adjusted life expectancy. Observational studies in routine clinical practice demonstrated that outpatient treatment of acute VTE was as effective as inpatient treatment, but with lower costs, and bemiparin was as effective as vitamin K antagonists over 3 months for secondary prevention, with VTE recurrence rates of 0% and 0.3% over 3 months in separate studies. Bemiparin is thus an effective, well tolerated agent for thromboprophylaxis in surgery, and for the acute and long-term treatment of established VTE, having advantages over UFH and particular benefits as a result of initiating therapy postoperatively.

  14. Cases from the Cleveland Clinic Foundation: What's Knowledge Got to Do with It? Ethics, Epistemology, and Intractable Conflicts in the Medical Setting.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Bryan; Ford, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    This article utilizes the case of Ms H. to examine the contrasting ways that surrogate decision makers move from simply hearing information about the patient to actually knowing and understanding the patient's medical condition. The focus of the case is on a family's request to actually see the patient's wounds instead of being told about the wounds, and the role of clinical ethicists in facilitating this request. We argue that clinical ethicists have an important role to play in the work of converting information into knowledge and that this can serve as a valuable way forward in the midst of seemingly intractable conflicts in the medical setting.

  15. 2. COPY OF MAP DATED 121073, OF THE CLEVELAND DISTRICT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. COPY OF MAP DATED 12-10-73, OF THE CLEVELAND DISTRICT STEEL PLANT, REPUBLIC STEEL CORPORATION. MAP COURTESY REPUBLIC STEEL. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. CONTEXT VIEW SHOWING CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL ALONG HISTORIC RAIL BED. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW SHOWING CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL ALONG HISTORIC RAIL BED. LOOKING NORTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. CONTEXT VIEW FROM SOUTHERNMOST HULETT, SHOWING UNLOADER AND CLEVELAND BULK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW FROM SOUTHERN-MOST HULETT, SHOWING UNLOADER AND CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS IN ASSOCIATION. LOOKING SOUTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. 10. Shaker Rapid Transit Tracks on Cleveland city streets, East ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Shaker Rapid Transit Tracks on Cleveland city streets, East Side, prior to opening of sub-grade tracks into Terminal Tower project, 1927. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. On writing from clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Scharff, J S

    2000-01-01

    Papers that present the life of the analytic session offer material through which analysts can together study analytic process and therapeutic action and arrive at consensus on how to improve psychoanalytic theory and practice. But some analysts have been deterred from publishing clinical material of that kind because of concerns about preserving confidentiality, protecting the therapeutic relationship, reporting accurately, being scrutinized, worrying about losing their colleagues' support, and not feeling authorized to present their views. Here conscious, preconscious, and unconscious constraints against writing and publishing are explored, and an example is given of successful self-analysis of a writing inhibition. The debate over the ethics of writing is reviewed and an argument made that detailed clinical description is useful in advancing analytic understanding. Finally, a clinical example shows how the analysand usefully analyzes the experience of reading what the analyst has written, and how the analyst's self-analysis may be promoted in resonance with the analysand's experience.

  20. Practical guide for implementing hybrid PET/MR clinical service: lessons learned from our experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nainesh; Friedman, Kent P.; Shah, Shetal N.; Chandarana, Hersh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging, until recently, have been performed on separate PET and MR systems with varying temporal delay between the two acquisitions. The interpretation of these two separately acquired studies requires cognitive fusion by radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians or dedicated and challenging post-processing. Recent advances in hardware and software with introduction of hybrid PET/MR systems have made it possible to acquire the PET and MR images simultaneously or near simultaneously. This review article serves as a road-map for clinical implementation of hybrid PET/MR systems and briefly discusses hardware systems, the personnel needs, safety and quality issues, and reimbursement topics based on experience at NYU Langone Medical Center and Cleveland Clinic. PMID:25985966

  1. 77 FR 31067 - Cleveland Commercial Railroad Company, LLC-Continuance in Control Exemption-Cleveland Harbor Belt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    .... FD 35623] Cleveland Commercial Railroad Company, LLC--Continuance in Control Exemption--Cleveland Harbor Belt Railroad Cleveland Commercial Railroad Company, LLC (CCR), a Class III rail carrier, has... Harbor Belt Railroad (CHB), upon CHB's becoming a Class III rail carrier. CCR has established CHB as...

  2. Characteristics of Effective Clinical Teachers in Simulated Clinical Experiences Compared to Traditional Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieh-Bliss, Selina

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence in the literature measuring effective clinical teacher characteristics in traditional experiences, little is known of effective characteristics expected from clinical teachers during simulated clinical experiences. This study examined which clinical teaching behaviors and characteristics are perceived by nursing students'…

  3. Characteristics of Effective Clinical Teachers in Simulated Clinical Experiences Compared to Traditional Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieh-Bliss, Selina

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence in the literature measuring effective clinical teacher characteristics in traditional experiences, little is known of effective characteristics expected from clinical teachers during simulated clinical experiences. This study examined which clinical teaching behaviors and characteristics are perceived by nursing students'…

  4. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  5. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  6. Clinical experiences with dental implants.

    PubMed

    Henry, P J

    1999-06-01

    The clinical utilization of dental implants has accelerated in recent years, and new applications continue to emerge. Concomitantly, alternative implant systems have introduced conceptually different approaches to treatment using altered protocols. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the background issues pertinent to the long-term success, survival, safety, and effectiveness of these devices. The requirements for clinical acceptance of implants are controlled initially by regulatory bodies; however, the dentist eventually must make a decision on which type of implant should be used in clinical practice. This clinical decision-making process should involve the strategy of using an evidence-based approach to ensure quality of care and reduction of liability for negligent care. This is particularly the case when treatment is undertaken in identified high-risk categories. While short- to medium-term data have been accumulated on the success rates of several implant systems, it is apparent that long-term data comparing and contrasting the various advantages and disadvantages of different systems do not exist, and adequate criteria applicable to the collective clinical experience need to be defined. Expanding areas of application are dependent on continuous improvements in implant hardware, surgical protocol development, and rationalized osteopromotive and site installation augmentation technology. Many treatment endeavors are still largely at the pilot study level of development, and long-term prospective clinical trials on large numbers of patients are required to document results adequately and to elucidate the most likely productive areas for future investigation.

  7. High-level resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Cleveland, Ohio.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, K S; Sanders, C C; Washington, J A

    1991-01-01

    Two isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae possessing both TEM-1 and SHV-2 beta-lactamases were isolated from patients at the Cleveland Clinic in 1988. The beta-lactamases were discriminated and identified by using substrate hydrolysis data and an isoelectric focusing procedure in which the gel was overlaid with beta-lactamase inhibitors. Images PMID:1854155

  8. Much Ado about Nothing: The Minimal Competitive Effects of the Cleveland Voucher Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.; McGuinn, Patrick

    This paper examines how the introduction of the Cleveland, Ohio, voucher experiment in 1995 affected the administration and leadership of the city's public schools. The paper focuses on the nature of political and bureaucratic responses to competition and describes the short-term consequences of competition and how such consequences might…

  9. Experimenting with clinical networks: the Australasian experience.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Frances C; Morris, Andrew D; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Australian states have embraced clinical networking as a mechanism for managing, organising and improving the quality of care. Using these individualised state approaches to clinical networks, in this paper the authors aim to examine this Australasian "experimentation" and present lessons for other health systems. The paper draws on current knowledge from the literature on clinical networks. The 2010 Inaugural Australasian Clinical Networks Conference also serves as a primary resource, as well as the authors' extensive discussions with policy-makers, managers and clinicians in Australasian systems. Key themes from the literature include: network type (mandated or natural, and hybrids); network purpose; the importance of network objectives; drivers of network success and barriers; the need for consumer engagement; and the difficulty of evaluating network effectiveness. Policy challenges include the establishment of networks for some specialty areas and not others; how to develop common standards across networks; and the need for performance metrics to assess network impact on patient outcomes. Australian networks report difficulties with achieving greater involvement of rural clinicians and indigenous populations, and with private sector clinical engagement. There are challenges too with implementation, at service level, of models of care and recommendations. Clinical networks are becoming a fundamental vehicle for clinical improvement and change across complex organisational and professional boundaries. How to nurture and sustain effective clinical networks is of import to every health system and the authors invite stakeholders in health systems to network and share their empirical research on clinical networks to assist with distinguishing the evidence from the rhetoric.

  10. Brownfields City of Cleveland: Deconstruction Lessons Learned Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical memorandum presents an overview of Cleveland’s current deconstruction initiative goals and lessons learned (in the Cleveland area) and potential strategies for addressing lessons learned.

  11. 13. Photocopy of a photograph (original negative in the Cleveland ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of a photograph (original negative in the Cleveland Picture Collection, Cleveland Public Library)--1909 ROCKY RIVER BRIDGE UNDER CONSTRUCTION, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING FORMER HIGH-LEVEL BRIDGE IN BACKGROUND - Rocky River Bridge, Spanning Beaver Dam River, Rocky River, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. Program Development Trends and Issues: The Cleveland Leadership Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisci, Pat Eva; Tutela, Alfred D.

    This paper focuses on public school program development to correct the effects of segregation. It suggests concrete measures and plans for the Cleveland Leadership Academy, which is designed to enhance instruction and access. Cleveland City School District's Remedial Order is a court-approved blueprint for desegregation that mandated management…

  13. The Cleveland City Normal School, 1874-1936.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Melinda; Dye, Charles M.

    The Cleveland (Ohio) Board of Education opened the Cleveland City Normal School in the fall of 1874 to provide a teacher corps for the public schools that was prepared to meet the unique needs of the rapidly growing metropolitan area. Increased Ohio teacher certification requirements prompted the school board and Western Reserve University to…

  14. The City Normal Schools of Cleveland and Akron, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Melinda J.

    The public school systems of 19th century Cleveland and Akron, Ohio, desiring a qualified and ready corps of teachers to staff their respective school systems, established normal schools to train their own staff. Increased Ohio certification requirements prompted Western Reserve University and the Cleveland school board as well as the Municipal…

  15. 11. Photocopy of original in CPL, CPC of first Cleveland ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of original in CPL, CPC of first Cleveland water works engine house at Kentucky Street and Lakefront. Photo c 1856, 1857. Photo taken from the south; the building housed two cornish steam engines. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. Segregation Levels in Cleveland Public Schools and the Cleveland Voucher Program. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Examining the widespread claims that private schools have high segregation levels and vouchers will lead to greater segregation, this study finds that both assertions are empirically unsupportable. Private schools participating in Cleveland's voucher program are much less segregated than Cleveland's public schools. This means that students using…

  17. Clinical exposures during internal medicine acting internship: profiling student and team experiences.

    PubMed

    Smith, Todd I; LoPresti, Charles M

    2014-07-01

    The clinical learning model in medical education is driven by knowledge acquisition through direct patient-care experiences. Despite the emphasis on experiential learning, the ability of educators to quantify the clinical exposures of learners is limited. To utilize Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic medical record information through a data warehouse to quantify clinical exposures during an inpatient internal medicine rotation. We queried the VA clinical data warehouse for the patients encountered by each learner completing an acting internship rotation at the Cleveland VA Medical Center from July 2008 to November 2011. We then used discharge summary information to identify team exposures-patients seen by the learner's inpatient team who were not primarily assigned to the learner. Based on the learner and team exposures, we complied lists of past medical problems, medications prescribed, laboratory tests that resulted, radiology evaluated, and primary discharge diagnoses. Primary learner and team-based clinical exposures were evaluated for a total of 128 acting internship students. The percentage of learners who had a primary exposure to a medication/lab value/imaging result/diagnosis was calculated. The percentage of learners with at least 1 primary or team-based exposure to an item was also calculated. The most common exposures in each category are presented. Analysis of the clinical exposures during an inpatient rotation can augment the ability of educators to understand learners' experiences. These types of analyses could provide information to improve learner experience, implement novel curricula, and address educational gaps in clinical rotations. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Cleveland electric employs efficient wastewater treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the wastewater treatment systems developed by Cleveland Electric for the efficient, reliable treatment of coal pile runoff. The process employed uses a step-wise rather than the single stage neutralization technique for pH adjustment. Also, solid/liquid separation is accomplished in compact high-rate clarifiers and thickeners. Lime is added as a slurry rather than the more conventional dry feed, assuring rapid dissemination of lime in the reaction tank. The systems have met or exceeded all requirements and produced an effluent with a pH in the range of 6 to 9 and total suspended solids in the range of 20 mg per liter. The design of a coal pile runoff treatment system is described in depth.

  19. Designing a Curriculum for Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, John E.; Erb, Dorothy J.; Randles, Halle Schoener; Fults, Nanette; Webb, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort among five teacher preparation programs to create a conceptual tool designed to put clinical experiences at the center of our programs. The authors refer to the resulting product as a clinical curriculum. The clinical curriculum describes a developmental sequence of clinical…

  20. Designing a Curriculum for Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, John E.; Erb, Dorothy J.; Randles, Halle Schoener; Fults, Nanette; Webb, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort among five teacher preparation programs to create a conceptual tool designed to put clinical experiences at the center of our programs. The authors refer to the resulting product as a clinical curriculum. The clinical curriculum describes a developmental sequence of clinical…

  1. RadNet Air Data From Cleveland, OH

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Cleveland, OH from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  2. Cleveland Youths Leave Their Mark in the Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riedel, Barb L.

    1975-01-01

    Forty young men between the ages of 13 and 17 worked on an innovative program that involved rebuilding a walking trail and preventing erosion of picnic area facilities at Euclid Creek Park in Cleveland, Ohio. (RC)

  3. Cleveland Youths Leave Their Mark in the Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riedel, Barb L.

    1975-01-01

    Forty young men between the ages of 13 and 17 worked on an innovative program that involved rebuilding a walking trail and preventing erosion of picnic area facilities at Euclid Creek Park in Cleveland, Ohio. (RC)

  4. Clinical experience with CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Garry, John L.; Wilson, Lynn A.; Johnson, C. Daniel

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC) in 1995, many advances in computer equipment and software have become available. Despite these advances, the promise of colon cancer prevention has not been realized. A colorectal screening tool that performs at a high level, is acceptable to patients, and can be performed safely and at low cost holds promise of saving lives in the future. Our institution has performed over two hundred seventy five clinical CTC examinations. These scans, which each entail a supine and a prone acquisition, only differ from our research protocol in the necessity of an expeditious interpretation. Patients arrive for their CTC examination early in the morning following a period of fasting and bowel preparation. If a CTC examination has a positive finding, the patient is scheduled for colonoscopic polypectomy that same morning. To facilitate this, the patients are required to continue fasting until the CTC examination has been interpreted. It is therefore necessary to process the CTC examination very quickly to minimize patient discomfort. A positive CTC result occurred in fifteen percent of examinations. Among these positive results, the specificity has been in excess of ninety five percent. Additionally, life threatening extra-colonic lesions were discovered in two percent of the screened population.

  5. New clinical experience with tramadol.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A

    1994-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of tramadol has been recently reassessed as part of a new clinical development programme to support an application for registration in the USA. This article reviews the results of single dose and short term studies of oral tramadol 50, 75, 100 and 150 mg in various acute pain conditions. In a double-blind single dose study conducted in 161 patients with severe pain following caesarean section, tramadol 75 and 150 mg and the combination of paracetamol 650 mg with dextropropoxyphene napsylate 100 mg were shown to be effective and statistically superior to placebo. The results from this and 17 other similar studies in patients with pain after surgery (n = 1594) or dental extraction (n = 1859) including other comparators were included in a pooled analysis. Tramadol 100 mg was the optimal single dose for acute pain and tramadol 50 mg showed similar analgesic efficacy to codeine 60 mg. Multiple dose short term studies (n = 520) with tramadol 50, 75 and 100 mg demonstrated a statistically significant and dose-dependent reduction in the consumption of either ibuprofen or morphine as escape medication. New pharmacokinetic data show that steady-state plasma tramadol concentrations reached after oral administration of 50 mg doses every 6 hours are similar to those obtained after administration of a 100 mg single oral dose (250 micrograms/L). This rationale is supported by the results of long term studies in which the average daily dose of tramadol was approximately 250 mg.

  6. Electromagnetic Induction Survey of the Mississippi River in Cleveland, Mississippi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Storm Damage Reduction Program under the Remote Sensing and Monitoring focus area. BACKGROUND: An electromagnetic (EM) induction survey was... Electromagnetic Induction Survey of the Mississippi River in Cleveland, Mississippi By Joseph B. Dunbar and Maureen K. Corcoran Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electromagnetic Induction Survey of the Mississippi River in Cleveland

  7. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice.

  8. The lived experience of clinical educators.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, D S

    1996-04-01

    This phenomenological study was undertaken to discover the everyday meanings which clinical educators of pre-registration Bachelor of Nursing students attached to their experiences as clinical educators. The researcher employed a qualitative design using audiotaped in-depth interviews with four registered nurses employed as clinical educators in four different schools of nursing in Victoria, Australia. Using hermeneutics, thematic analysis revealed five themes of meaning central to the lived experiences of clinical educators. They are:(a) being human, (b) having standards, (c) developing own teaching style, (d) learn as you go, and (e) not belonging. The first three themes are described in the literature on clinical education, however, the latter two are unique to this research. The results of this study indicate there is need for extensive preparation and on-going support of clinical educators. The researcher, who is respectful of the enormity of the task which educators face in preparing students for practice, speculates whether clinical educators are the vanguards of student learning in the clinical field. It is evident that the participants of this study did not possess many of the role requirements of clinical educators identified in the literature. Further studies are needed which explore the link between student learning and clinical educator support.

  9. Shared-learning experience during a clinical pharmacy practice experience.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Syahiera Farhana; Awaisu, Ahmed

    2011-05-10

    To implement a shared learning approach through fourth-year students' mentorship of third-year students and to assess the perceptions of the mentored students on the value of their shared learning experience. We introduced the shared learning experience in clinical pharmacy and pharmacotherapeutic practice experiences involving 87 third-year and 51 fourth-year students. Both student groups undertook the practice experiences together, with third-year students working in smaller groups mentored by fourth-year students. A majority of the students (> 75%) believed that they learned to work as a team during their practice experiences and that the shared learning approach provided an opportunity to practice their communication skills. Similarly, most respondents (> 70%) agreed that the new approach would help them become effective members of the healthcare team and would facilitate their professional relationships in future practice. Almost two-thirds of the students believed that the shared learning enhanced their ability to understand clinical problems. However, about 31% of the pharmacy students felt that they could have learned clinical problem-solving skills equally well working only with peers from their own student group. The pharmacy students in the current study generally believed that the shared-learning approach enhanced their ability to understand clinical problems and improved their communication and teamwork skills. Both groups of students were positive that they had acquired some skills through the shared-learning approach.

  10. Influence of left ventricular function on survival and mode of death after implantable defibrillator therapy (Cleveland Clinic Foundation and Montefiore Medical Center experience).

    PubMed

    Kim, S G; Maloney, J D; Pinski, S L; Choue, C W; Ferrick, K J; Roth, J A; Gross, J; Brodman, R; Furman, S; Fisher, J D

    1993-12-01

    To determine the influence of left ventricular (LV) function on survival and mode of death in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), sudden death, surgical mortality, total arrhythmia-related death, total cardiac death and total death were retrospectively evaluated in 377 consecutive patients. The outcomes were also compared between patients with an LV ejection fraction > or = 30% (214 patients, group 1) and < 30% (148 patients, group 2). Surgical mortality was 3.9% (1.8% in group 1, 7% in group 2). During the follow-up of 25 +/- 20 months, actuarial survival rates of all patients at 3 years were 96% for sudden deaths, 81% for total cardiac deaths and 74% for total mortality. When the 2 groups were compared, survival rates of groups 1 and 2 at 3 years, respectively, were 99 and 90% for sudden death (p < 0.05), 97 and 84% for sudden death and surgical mortality (p < 0.01), 94 and 80% for the total arrhythmia-related death (p < 0.001), 88 and 68% for total cardiac death (p < 0.0001), and 81 and 62% for total mortality (p < 0.002). In group 2, 73% of total cardiac deaths within 1 year were causally related to the arrhythmia. Thus, in patients with an ICD, sudden death rates were very low. However, total cardiac death and total death rates were relatively higher. The outcomes of patients with an ICD were strongly influenced by the degree of LV dysfunction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  12. Implementing a Clinical Experience for Student Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Rod

    Clinical experiences offered to students preparing to become athletic trainers at East Carolina University (North Carolina) are diverse and multiple. The program acquaints students with actual medical practices in sports medicine by allowing them to observe experienced trainers and doctors at work as well as providing opportunities for practical…

  13. Implementing a Clinical Experience for Student Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Rod

    Clinical experiences offered to students preparing to become athletic trainers at East Carolina University (North Carolina) are diverse and multiple. The program acquaints students with actual medical practices in sports medicine by allowing them to observe experienced trainers and doctors at work as well as providing opportunities for practical…

  14. Physiotherapy clinical educators' perceptions and experiences of clinical prediction rules.

    PubMed

    Knox, Grahame M; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Rivett, Darren A

    2015-12-01

    Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are widely used in medicine, but their application to physiotherapy practice is more recent and less widespread, and their implementation in physiotherapy clinical education has not been investigated. This study aimed to determine the experiences and perceptions of physiotherapy clinical educators regarding CPRs, and whether they are teaching CPRs to students on clinical placement. Cross-sectional observational survey using a modified Dillman method. Clinical educators (n=211, response rate 81%) supervising physiotherapy students from 10 universities across 5 states and territories in Australia. Half (48%) of respondents had never heard of CPRs, and a further 25% had never used CPRs. Only 27% reported using CPRs, and of these half (51%) were rarely if ever teaching CPRs to students in the clinical setting. However most respondents (81%) believed CPRs assisted in the development of clinical reasoning skills and few (9%) were opposed to teaching CPRs to students. Users of CPRs were more likely to be male (p<0.001), have post-professional qualifications (p=0.020), work in private practice (p<0.001), and work in the area of musculoskeletal physiotherapy (p<0.001) compared with non-users. The CPRs most commonly known, used and taught were the Ottawa Ankle Rule, the Ottawa Knee Rule, and Wells' Rule for Deep Vein Thrombosis. Students are unlikely to be learning about CPRs on clinical placement, as few clinical educators use them. Clinical educators will require training in CPRs and assistance in teaching them if students are to better learn about implementing CPRs in physiotherapy clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 47632 - Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations, Cleveland Office, Including Workers Whose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations, Cleveland Office..., applicable to workers of Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations, Cleveland Office, Independence... that some workers separated from employment at the Independence, Ohio location of Thomson Reuters Legal...

  16. 31. Photocopy of drawing L974 in Utilities Engineering Department, Cleveland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of drawing L-974 in Utilities Engineering Department, Cleveland, dated 1927, showing experimental dechlorinating plant, Baldwin Filtration Plant. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. Clinical experiences of students with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Morris, David; Turnbull, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a study exploring the clinical experiences of student nurses with dyslexia and its potential influence on their practice. Widened access to university education has meant an increase in the number of students with dyslexia. A limited number of studies have explored the academic experiences of dyslexic student nurses. However, nursing students in the United Kingdom spend 50% of their programme in practice settings, and there are no studies detailing their clinical experiences. This qualitative exploratory study involved tape-recorded interviews with a convenience sample of 18 nursing students with a formal dyslexia diagnosis. Data were collected in 2003-2004 and were analysed using thematic analysis. Participants described a number of personalized approaches to managing their difficulties in practice. Whilst many of these may be useful to non-dyslexic students, descriptions of, for example, avoiding answering the telephone, were inappropriate. Some participants contended with discrimination and ridicule, often choosing not to disclose their disability. Less acute clinical environments appeared to provide more satisfying working experience, and this factor may be influential in shaping future career options. Participants valued more time and an undisturbed place to complete clinical documentation. Heightened self-awareness promoted patient safety as the major concern for study participants. Positive aspects of dyslexia were never raised or acknowledged by participants. The clinical setting provides a challenging environment for nursing students with dyslexia, who find personalized ways to manage their disability. A dyslexia diagnosis continues to carry a stigma that may result in non-disclosure, with implications for the level of support available. Greater awareness of the practice-specific needs of such students is required to ensure appropriate support and public safety.

  18. Planning a study abroad clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Dolores J

    2010-05-01

    Not only is globalization expanding areas of human activity, it is also influencing the variety of educational offerings in universities. Therefore, globalization must be considered by nurse educators as they reevaluate ways of preparing nursing students to meet the health care needs of populations they currently serve and will care for in the future. Study abroad programs have been encouraged to be part of the college experience in the United States for more than 30 years; however, these programs have been relatively lacking in nursing education. Most of the study abroad programs described in the nursing literature are research-based or first-person accounts of an experience and provide little information about planning a study abroad program. This article describes a study abroad learning experience for senior nursing students and discusses the issues such as student selection, student safety, and available clinical experiences that need to be considered before undertaking such an endeavor.

  19. Ethnic Heritage and Language Schools in Greater Cleveland: A Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatie, Bruce A.

    The two-part document provides background information on ethnic heritage and language schools (EHALS) in the United States as well as results of a survey and a directory of these schools in Cleveland, Ohio. Part I contains a rationale for community language schools, traces their evolution from the colonial period to the present, and summarizes the…

  20. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  1. Selected Ethnic Communities of Cleveland: A Socio-Economic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonutti, Karl; Prpic, George

    The origins, socioeconomic growth, and present status of four Cleveland, Ohio, ethnic neighborhoods are analyzed in this report in order to determine their viability as inner city communities. The communities studied include (1) a "white ethnic island," the Slovenian/Croatian neighborhood on the East Side; (2) an area of "dying…

  2. 76 FR 66250 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Communications... CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting....

  3. Grover Cleveland School, Boston, Massachusetts. Refurbishment and Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co., Philadelphia, PA.

    The solar heating system is a retrofit installation on the roof of the Grover Cleveland Middle School in Boston. The system includes 4,600 square feet of flat plate collectors, a 2,000 gallon solar energy storage tank, plus the required structural steel, piping, insulation, pumps, heat exchangers, and controls to heat the air supplied by two…

  4. Grover Cleveland School, Boston, Massachusetts. Refurbishment and Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co., Philadelphia, PA.

    The solar heating system is a retrofit installation on the roof of the Grover Cleveland Middle School in Boston. The system includes 4,600 square feet of flat plate collectors, a 2,000 gallon solar energy storage tank, plus the required structural steel, piping, insulation, pumps, heat exchangers, and controls to heat the air supplied by two…

  5. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  6. Closed-loop neurostimulation: the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Sun, Felice T; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-07-01

    Neurostimulation is now an established therapy for the treatment of movement disorders, pain, and epilepsy. While most neurostimulation systems available today provide stimulation in an open-loop manner (i.e., therapy is delivered according to preprogrammed settings and is unaffected by changes in the patient's clinical symptoms or in the underlying disease), closed-loop neurostimulation systems, which modulate or adapt therapy in response to physiological changes, may provide more effective and efficient therapy. At present, few such systems exist owing to the complexities of designing and implementing implantable closed-loop systems. This review focuses on the clinical experience of four implantable closed-loop neurostimulation systems: positional-adaptive spinal cord stimulation for treatment of pain, responsive cortical stimulation for treatment of epilepsy, closed-loop vagus nerve stimulation for treatment of epilepsy, and concurrent sensing and stimulation for treatment of Parkinson disease. The history that led to the development of the closed-loop systems, the sensing, detection, and stimulation technology that closes the loop, and the clinical experiences are presented.

  7. Preliminary clinical experience in cardiology with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Marelli, C

    2000-08-17

    Sonazoid (formerly NC100100) is a new ultrasound contrast agent for intravenous injection developed by Nycomed-Amersham. It consists of perfluorocarbon microbubbles that are stabilized with a surfactant and are within a well-defined size range (median diameter approximately 3 microm). Due to the low diffusibility and blood solubility of the gas, the controlled size distribution of the microbubbles, and the flexibility of the shell, Sonazoid is a free-flowing tracer capable of crossing the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. It is stable enough for the duration of the ultrasound examination and provides echo enhancement useful for clinical requirements. The preliminary clinical experience in cardiology indications, including its use in reducing the frequency of inadequate echocardiographic studies in patients with suboptimal echocardiograms, and its use as a myocardial perfusion agent in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia is briefly discussed.

  8. Balancing clinical experience in outpatient residency training.

    PubMed

    Stahl, James E; Balasubramanian, Hari Jagannathan; Gao, Xiaoling; Overko, Steven; Fosburgh, Blair

    2014-05-01

    To receive adequate training experience, resident panels in teaching clinics must have a sufficiently diverse patient case-mix. However, case-mix can differ from one resident panel to another, resulting in inconsistent training. Encounter data from primary care residency clinics at Massachusetts General Hospital from July 2008 to May 2010 (64 residents and ~3800 patients) were used to characterize patients by gender, age, major disease category (both acute and chronic, e.g., Cardio Acute, Cardio Chronic, etc., for a total of 44 disease categories), and number of disease categories. Imbalance across resident panels was characterized by the standard deviation for disease category, patient panel size, and annual visit frequency. To balance case-mix in resident panels, patient reassignment algorithms were proposed. First, patients were sorted by complexity; then patients were allocated sequentially to the panel with the least overall complexity. Patient reassignment across resident panels was considered under 3 scenarios: 1) within preceptor, 2) within a group of preceptors, and 3) across the entire practice annually. were compared with case-mix (pre-July 2012) and post-July 2012. Results. All 3 reassignment algorithms produced significant reductions in standard deviation of either number of disease categories or diagnoses across residents when compared with baseline (pre-July 2012) and actual July 2012 reassignment. Reassignment across the clinic and group provided the best and second best scenarios, respectively, although both came at the cost of initially reduced patient-preceptor continuity. Systematically reallocating patient panels in teaching clinics potentially can improve the consistency and breadth of the educational experience. The method in principle can be extended to any target of health care system reform where there is patient or clinician turnover.

  9. [Anxiety and sleep in experiment and clinic].

    PubMed

    Verbitsky, E V

    2017-01-01

    High anxiety is a genetically determined personal trait. It is produced by limbic system and other cerebral structures involved in maintenance of wakefulness and development of sleep. Analysis of experiments on the animals and clinic observations showed that animals and individuals with high personal anxiety have a high risk of anxiety disorders. Inhibition of GABA-benzodiazepine system which is typical for high anxiety dramatically influences sleep duration and sleep quality. Phenazepamum due to its anxiolytic properties deactivates the excitation focus in the brain, jugulates anxiety and normalize sleep.

  10. [Rationale for using nabumetone and clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Roth, S H

    2000-01-01

    Nabumetone's position as one of the most commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the world today is based upon over a decade of clinical experience. The popularity of this drug lies in both its unique pharmacokinetic profile and special safety features in pharmacodynamic terms. This nonacidic prodrug with an active 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA) metabolite has COX-2 preferential features and is also devoid of enterohepatic recirculation. It is felt that these characteristics have provided the basis for its unique long term tolerability, documented in various at-risk osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis populations. The excellent tolerability of nabumetone and its 24-hour half-life, which provides the advantages of a once-daily dosage regimen, make it uniquely suitable for long term anti-inflammatory therapy in arthritis. The tolerability profile of nabumetone has also demonstrated clear cost-effectiveness advantages, as confirmed by comparative and epidemiological studies. Selective COX-2 NSAIDs are likely to prove more expensive because of the increasing costs and demands of clinical research prior to FDA approval. These higher costs may limit and influence patient access, depending on the healthcare delivery system, and many years of experience will be required to document the putative tolerability advantages of these newer COX-2 inhibitor agents. In the meantime, it is comforting that nabumetone has established such an advantageous tolerability profile together with acknowledged efficacy.

  11. Natural orifice surgery: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Santiago; Cullen, John P; Talamini, Mark A; Mintz, Yoav; Ferreres, Alberto; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan; Bosia, Julie; Savides, Thomas; Easter, David W; Savu, Michelle K; Ramamoorthy, Sonia L; Whitcomb, Emily; Agarwal, Sanjay; Lukacz, Emily; Dominguez, Guillermo; Ferraina, Pedro

    2009-07-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has moved quickly from preclinical investigation to clinical implementation. However, several major technical problems limit clinical NOTES including safe access, retraction and dissection of the gallbladder, and clipping of key structures. This study aimed to identify challenges and develop solutions for NOTES during the initial clinical experience. Under an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol, patients consented to a natural orifice operation for removal of either the gallbladder or the appendix via either the vagina or the stomach using a single umbilical trocar for safety and assistance. Nine transvaginal cholecystectomies, one transgastric appendectomy, and one transvaginal appendectomy have been completed to date. All but one patient were discharged on postoperative day 1 as per protocol. No complications occurred. The limited initial evidence from this study demonstrates that NOTES is feasible and safe. The addition of an umbilical trocar is a bridge allowing safe performance of NOTES procedures until better instruments become available. The addition of a flexible long grasper through the vagina and a flexible operating platform through the stomach has enabled the performance of NOTES in a safe and easily reproducible manner. The use of a uterine manipulator has facilitated visualization of the cul de sac in women with a uterus to allow for safe transvaginal access.

  12. [Clinical experience with 53 consecutive heart transplants].

    PubMed

    Villavicencio, Mauricio; Rossel, Víctor; Larrea, Ricardo; Peralta, Juan Pablo; Larraín, Ernesto; Sung Lim, Jong; Rojo, Pamela; Gajardo, Francesca; Donoso, Erika; Hurtado, Margarita

    2013-12-01

    Heart transplantation is the therapy of choice for advance heart failure. Our group developed two transplant programs at Instituto Nacional del Tórax and Clínica Dávila. We report our clinical experience based on distinctive clinical policies. Fifty-three consecutive patients were transplanted between November 2008 and April 2013, representing 51% of all Chilean cases. Distinctive clinical policies include intensive donor management, generic immunosuppression and VAD (ventricular assist devices) insertion. Ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy were the main indications (23 (43%) each), age 48 ± 13 years and 48 (91%) were male. Transplant listing Status: IA 14 (26%) (VAD or 2 inotropes), IB 14 (26%) (1 inotrope) and II25 (47%) (no inotrope). Mean waiting time 70 ± 83 days. Twelve (24%) were transplanted during VAD support (median support: 36 days). orthotopic bicaval transplant with ischemia time: 175 ± 54 min. Operative mortality: 3 (6%), all due to right ventricular failure. Re-exploration for bleeding 2 (4%), stroke 3 (6%), mediastinitis 0 (0%), pneumonia 4 (8%), and transient dialysis 6 (11%). Mean follow-up was 21 ± 14 months. Three-year survival was 86 ± 6%. One patient died of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and the other died suddenly (non-compliance). Freedom from rejection requiring specific therapy was 80 ± 7% at 3 years of follow-up. Four hundred eighty four endomyocardial biopsies were done: 11 (2.3%) had 2R rejection. All survivors are in NYHA (New York Heart Association) functional class I and all but one have normal biventricular function. Mid-term results are similar to those reported by the registry of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. This experience has a higher proportion of VAD support than previous national series. Rejection rates are low in spite of generic immunosuppression.

  13. Undergraduate clinical orthodontic experience: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Oliver, R; Hingston, E

    2006-08-01

    Undergraduate clinical orthodontic experience may be expressed in a variety of ways. The most common way (used, inter alia, in the DentEd school visits) is by number of curriculum hours. Other ways include the number of patients seen, or number of procedures carried out. Whilst any of these methods may allow comparison between cohorts of students within a school or between schools, none of them are suitable to determine how much experience is 'satisfactory', nor do they indicate what the student should know, understand, or be able to do, to be considered 'satisfactory', and hence fit to graduate. This situation may be addressed by the use of competences and/or learning outcomes, and in 2004 the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) adopted a document that contained one major competence and five supporting competences in orthodontics. This paper considers the shortcomings of conventional methods of recording orthodontic experience in relation to the acquisition of these competences, and some ways in which staff and students may assess competence.

  14. Reduction of Inappropriate Prophylactic Pegylated Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use for Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Who Receive Chemotherapy: An ASCO Quality Training Program Project of the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lindsey Martin; Moeller, Machelle B; Azzouqa, Abdel-Ghani; Guthrie, Amy E; Dalby, Carole K; Earl, Marc A; Cheng, Connie; Pennell, Nathan A; Shapiro, Marc; Velcheti, Vamsidhar; Stevenson, James P

    2016-01-01

    savings. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Cleveland Harbor, Ohio. Section 3. Study. Termination Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    or improvement of the quality of certain natural and cultural resources and ecological systems; c. Mitigation or prevention of shore damages due to...1) Interruption of alongshore moving sediment by the trapping effect of the Cleveland Harbor breakwater system, thereby depriving downdrift shores of...from human activities, causing no significant impacts. No known cultural resources would be adversely affected under this plan. c. Alternative IIB

  16. A Curriculum Model for an Integrated Senior Year Clinical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wukasch, Ruth N.; Blue, Carolyn L.; Overbay, Jane

    2000-01-01

    A flexible clinical experience for nursing seniors integrates pediatrics, public health, and nursing leadership. Experiences in hospital units, schools, nurse-directed clinics, and home visits expose students to a wide range of settings and issues. (SK)

  17. Overview of investigations into pulmonary hemorrhage among infants in Cleveland, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, D G; Yike, I; Sorenson, W G; Miller, M J; Etzel, R A

    1999-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage was diagnosed in 37 infants in the Cleveland, Ohio, area between 1993 and 1998. This rare disorder has been related to 12 deaths, including 7 originally thought to be sudden infant death syndrome. Thirty of the infants were African American, all of whom lived in a limited geographic area of eastern metropolitan Cleveland, an area of older housing stock. An investigation led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found an association with household exposure to a toxigenic mold, Stachybotrys chartarum, and other fungi. The rapidly growing lungs of young infants appear to be especially vulnerable to the toxins made by toxigenic molds. Environmental tobacco smoke was frequently present in the infants' homes and may be a trigger precipitating the acute bleeding. Stachybotrys, although not thought to be a common mold, is known to have a wide geographic distribution. An additional 101 cases of acute, idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage have been reported in infants in the United States over the past 5 years. In this overview, the investigations are summarized, the clinical profile is described, the toxicity of S. chartarum is discussed, and pathophysiologic concepts are presented.

  18. Clinical experience with ureteral metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Al Aown, Abdulrahman; Iason, Kyriazis; Panagiotis, Kallidonis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N.

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral metal stents (MSs) present a minimally invasive tool to preserve the drainage of renal pelvis whenever ureteral patency is at risk to be obstructed due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. Clinical experience with these stents demonstrates that they impose a promising alternative treatment option in ureteral pathologies that are difficult to be treated via common polymeric stents. Current application of MSs in the treatment of both benign and malignant ureteral obstruction reveals quite promising results. Nevertheless, the ideal MS that would provide uncomplicated long-term effectiveness is still lucking and current MS usage is facing several adverse effects between which stent obstruction, encrustation, infection, migration, and patient discomfort. Ongoing attempts to create more inert stent with sophisticated novel designs are expected to improve current MS efficiency. MSs will play a major role in the future as a routine management of a variety of ureteral pathologies. PMID:21369375

  19. Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star at the National Air Races in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1946-08-21

    A Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star jet aircraft on the tarmac at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) NACA Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. The Air Force aircraft was participating in the 1946 National Air Races over Labor Day weekend. The air races were held at the Cleveland Municipal Airport seven times between 1929 and 1939. The events included long distance, sprint, and circuit competitions, as well as aeronautical displays, demonstrations, and celebrities. The air races were suspended indefinitely in 1940 for a variety of reasons, including the start of World War II in Europe. The nature of the National Air Races changed dramatically when the event resumed in 1946. The introduction of jet aircraft, primarily the Lockheed P-80 seen here, required an entire separate division for each event. Since military pilots were the only ones with any jet aircraft experience, only they could participate in those divisions. In addition, the performance and quantity of commercially manufactured piston aircraft had increased dramatically during the war. By 1946, the custom-built racing aircraft that made the pre-war races so interesting were no longer present. The P-80 was the first US-designed and US-manufactured jet aircraft. Early models were tested during the war in NACA Lewis’ Altitude Wind Tunnel. A modified P-80 set the world’s speed record at the 1947 air races by achieving 620 miles per hour.

  20. Liposomal amphotericin B: clinical experience and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Winter J; Drew, Richard H; Perfect, John R

    2005-04-01

    While amphotericin B deoxycholate (Fungizone, Apothecon Pharmaceuticals) has been considered by many to be the gold standard for the treatment for numerous invasive fungal infections for over 45 years, toxicities associated with its use often necessitate treatment modification or discontinuation. Lipid-based formulations, including liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome, Fujisawa Healthcare, Inc.), were developed to decrease many of these toxicities while retaining broad antifungal spectrum and potency of amphotericin B. In clinical trials, liposomal amphotericin B has demonstrated efficacy comparable to that of amphotericin B deoxycholate while reducing the incidence of treatment-related nephrotoxicity, electrolyte-wasting, and infusion-related reactions. In addition, recent clinical trials have also compared liposomal amphotericin B with other antifungal classes. Acquisition costs of liposomal amphotericin B are substantially higher than those of amphotericin B deoxycholate and other antifungals. While pharmacoeconomic analyses consider outcomes and other treatment-related costs, they have yet to clearly demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of liposomal amphotericin B when compared with amphotericin B deoxycholate or other antifungal agents. This review will focus primarily on recent liposomal amphotericin B experience and attempt to put its use into perspective considering other available antifungal agents.

  1. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  2. Nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer: the Cleveland Clinic protocol.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mona; Davis, Mellar; LeGrand, Susan; Walsh, Declan; Lagman, Ruth

    2013-03-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common and distressing symptoms in advanced cancer. Both are multifactorial and cause significant morbidity, nutritional failure, and reduced quality of life. Assessment includes a detailed history, physical examination and investigations for reversible causes. Assessment and management will be influenced by performance status, prognosis, and goals of care. Several drug classes are effective with some having the added benefit of multiple routes of administration. It is our institution's practice to recommend metoclopramide as the first drug with haloperidol as an alternative antiemetic. Dexamethasone should be used for patients with central nervous system metastases or bowel obstruction. If your patient is near death, empiric metoclopramide, haloperidol or chlorpromazine is used without further investigation. For patients with a better prognosis, we exclude reversible causes and use the same first-line antiemetics, metoclopramide and haloperidol. For those who do not respond to first-line single antiemetics, olanzapine is second line and ondansetron is third. Rarely do we use combination therapy or cannabinoids. Olanzapine as a single agent has a distinct advantage over antiemetic combinations. It improves compliance, reduces drug interactions and has several routes of administration. Antiemetics, anticholinergics, octreotide and dexamethasone are used in combination to treat bowel obstruction. In opiod-na'ive patients, we prefer haloperidol, glycopyrrolate and an opioid as the first-line treatment and add or substitute octreotide and dexamethasone in those who do not respond. Non-pharmacologic interventions (mechanical stents and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes) are used when nausea is refractory to medical management or for home-going management to relieve symptoms, reduce drug costs and rehospitalization.

  3. Neuroimaging of Brain Injuries and Disorders at Cleveland Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c...5 of 12 We established minimum performance criteria and minimum motion limits for fMRI, rs-fMRI and DTI as described in Lowe et al. (2008) for...Stephen Rao Mark Lowe Ken Sakaie Stephen Jones Michael Parsons Erik Beall Michael Phillips Jian Lin Christine Reece Alex Bura Juliet Schulz

  4. Neuromimaging of Brain Injuries and Disorders at Cleveland Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    to final analysis. Functional ROIs derived from the finger tapping task were drawn on the primary motor cortices of the left and right hemispheres...non-blast groups by ANOVA. Results of this preliminary analysis of fcMRI data indicate that functional connectivity to left primary motor cortex...unique effect on functional connectivity patterns that can be distinguished from non-blast TBI. Conclusion Our preliminary group analysis

  5. Neuromimaging of Brain Injuries and Disorders at Cleveland Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Functional MRI is an imaging method that detects increases in cerebral blood volume, flow, and oxygenation that occur locally in response to...The LFBF measure of functional connectivity within the brain is proving to be a powerful and sensitive measure of pathology in a number of patient...populations that have previously been difficult to study with other imaging methods. We have recently demonstrated that LFBF measured functional

  6. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  7. Compounds in airborne particulates - Salts and hydrocarbons. [at Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Antoine, A. C.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the aliphatics as a group, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, and carbon in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1-year period during 1971 and 1972. Analytical methods used included gas chromatography, colorimetry, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, and the analytical methods are evaluated. The data are discussed relative to other studies and source origins. High concentrations downwind of coke ovens for 3,4 benzopyrene are discussed. Hydrocarbon correlation studies indicated no significant relations among compounds studied.

  8. Compounds in airborne particulates - Salts and hydrocarbons. [at Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Antoine, A. C.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the aliphatics as a group, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, and carbon in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1-year period during 1971 and 1972. Analytical methods used included gas chromatography, colorimetry, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, and the analytical methods are evaluated. The data are discussed relative to other studies and source origins. High concentrations downwind of coke ovens for 3,4 benzopyrene are discussed. Hydrocarbon correlation studies indicated no significant relations among compounds studied.

  9. Baseball caps of the Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians in the flight deck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-25

    STS073-E-5135 (26 Oct. 1995) --- Baseball caps from the two 1995 World Series representative franchises float near the cabin windows of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Columbia, with the Earth in the background. The American League champion Cleveland Indians and their National League counterpart Atlanta Braves were engaged in a scheduled best-of-seven World Series throughout the first portion of the scheduled 16-day mission in space. Off-duty crewmembers came out of a rest period to set up the scene in tribute to the October classic. The crew will continue working in shifts around the clock on a diverse assortment of United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) experiments located in the science module. Fields of study include fluid physics, materials science, biotechnology, combustion science and commercial space processing technologies. The frame was exposed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  10. Service Learning in Community Development: Partnering with East Cleveland. Briefly Stated. Number 10-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David G.; Chupp, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    Residents of East Cleveland are fighting to improve the quality of public education and access to vocational opportunities. "White flight" (Frey, 1979, p. 425), economic disinvestment, and ineffective political leadership have led to the disadvantages faced by East Cleveland (Kathi & Cooper, 2005). Nearly 1,200 vacant structures…

  11. 76 FR 5840 - The Basic Aluminum Castings Co., Cleveland, OH; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration The Basic Aluminum Castings Co., Cleveland, OH; Notice of Revised... Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of The Basic Aluminum Castings Co., Cleveland, Ohio... are engaged in employment related to the production of aluminum die castings. New information revealed...

  12. 33 CFR 207.570 - Harbors of Huron, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Ohio; use, administration...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harbors of Huron, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Ohio; use, administration, and navigation. 207.570 Section 207.570... REGULATIONS § 207.570 Harbors of Huron, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Ohio;...

  13. 33 CFR 207.570 - Harbors of Huron, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Ohio; use, administration...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Harbors of Huron, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Ohio; use, administration, and navigation. 207.570 Section 207.570... REGULATIONS § 207.570 Harbors of Huron, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Ohio;...

  14. 77 FR 3500 - Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... Cleveland, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Tjfc... wages reported under a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name TJFC Distribution...: All workers of Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc., including workers whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages...

  15. 75 FR 9925 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: The Cleveland Museum of Natural History...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... History, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in... intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History... The Cleveland Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C),...

  16. 78 FR 52424 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dayton, TN, Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cleveland, TN, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ..., Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cleveland, TN, and Revocation of Class E Airspace; Bradley Memorial Hospital... Bradley Memorial Hospital is added to the Cleveland, TN, airspace description and removed from both the Dayton, TN, regulatory text as well as its listing as Bradley Memorial Hospital, Cleveland, TN,...

  17. [Enalapril-clinical experience in Bulgaria].

    PubMed

    Taseva, T

    2000-01-01

    The authors present the results of clinical trail about treatment of arterial hypertension with ENAP (Enalapril) fo KRKA in centers of Bulgaria. Enalapril is ACE-inhibitor usually administered orally once daily, decreases blood pressure by lowering peripheral vascular resistance without increasing heart rate or output. In this clinical trail are given results about blood pressure, heart rate and biochemical indexes. The most frequent adverse events--headache, dizziness, orthostatic effects, abdominal pain e.t.s. occurring in less than 10%. More important side effects like dry persistent cough occurring in 8.6%. The results of clinical trail define high efficacy and good tolerability of ENAP in the treatment of arterial hypertension.

  18. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,…

  19. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,…

  20. Ultrafast networks (ATM): first clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Duerinckx, A J; Valentino, D J; Hayrapetian, A; Hagan, G; Grant, E G

    1996-06-01

    Ultrafast networks using asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology can provide the bandwidth and throughput that may be sufficient to satisfy the medical imaging community. Several trials are underway to assess the effect of ATM network capabilities on the clinical practice of radiology, by providing immediate interactive radiology consultations between subspecialists and general radiologists at affiliated academic institutions. The hardware to build such networks is now commercially available and its cost is decreasing steadily, but the monthly charges for ATM bandwidth use are still high. Nevertheless, given the tremendous increase in communication capability and data transfer rates possible with ATM networks, cost alone should not be the determining factor for selecting this technology. The ATM concept in general is first reviewed, followed by a description of early clinical ATM network installation in four medical environments worldwide. These medical clusters include: the UCLA affiliated hospitals (UCLA Medical Center, West LA VAMC and Olive-View UCLA Medical Center), the UCSF affiliated hospitals, Duke University Hospitals and a cluster of medical centers in Berlin which have all been connected via ATM networks. The use of ATM technology in these realistic clinical environments is discussed and evaluated for its potential impact on patient care and clinical teaching within radiology departments. From this preliminary study it is concluded that image communications over a regional PACS using an ATM network can allow interactive consultations between different subspecialist and general radiologists or other specialized radiologists spread over different medical centers.

  1. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langone, Luis; Vanetta, Marcos; Vazquez, Marcelo; Rotger, Viviana; Olivera, Juan Manuel

    2007-11-01

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología of the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic.

  2. [Clinical experience with a new microfilled composite].

    PubMed

    Grandini, R; Pagavino, G; Nardi, P

    1990-02-01

    The authors have investigated a new material for esthetic restoration for front teeth. It is a microfilled heterogene composite (Helio Progress) with spheridal prepolymer. The clinical trials were realized in cavities III, IV an V, in anomal y teeth and resin ceramic (with a pretreatment with silane). The results after 18 months have demonstrated the better characteristics of this material in relation with foreknown ones.

  3. The clinical experience of acute cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Yen, D; Tsai, J; Wang, L M; Kao, W F; Hu, S C; Lee, C H; Deng, J F

    1995-09-01

    The authors reviewed the clinical manifestations, complications, and the prognosis affected by Lilly Cyanide Antidote in 21 victims of acute cyanide poisoning over a 10-year period. The clinical signs and symptoms in cyanide poisoning are variable. Among 21 cases, loss of consciousness (15), metabolic acidosis (14), and cardiopulmonary failure (9) were the three leading manifestations of cyanide intoxication. Anoxic encephalopathy (6) was not uncommon in the severely intoxicated victims. Diabetes insipidus (1) or clinical signs and symptoms mimicking diabetes insipidus (3) may be an ominous sign to encephalopathy victims. The major cause of fatal cyanide poisoning is the intentional ingestion of cyanide compounds as part of a suicide attempt. Decrease of arteriovenous difference of O2 partial pressure may be a clue for the suspicion of cyanide intoxication. Although the authors cannot show a statistically significant difference (P = .47) for the Lilly cyanide antidote kit in terms of improving the survival rate for victims of cyanide poisoning, the antidote kit was always mandatory in our study in the cases of severely intoxicated victims who survived. Early diagnosis, prompt, intensive therapy with antidote, and supportive care are still the golden rules for the treatment of acute cyanide poisoning, whether in the ED or on the scene.

  4. Surreptitious surgery on Long Island Sound: The oral cancer surgeries of President Grover Cleveland.

    PubMed

    Maloney, William

    2010-01-01

    Grover Cleveland rose from being the mayor of Buffalo to the governor of New York to the president of the United States. At the start of Cleveland's second term as president, the nation was involved in a severe financial crisis, the extent of which was not known by the general public. President Cleveland was to make a strong appeal to Congress in the coming months to repeal the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890. He thought this would set the nation on the road to fiscal recovery. However, his vice president, Adlai Stevenson, strongly opposed repeal of the Sherman Act. Prior to scheduling his appearance before Congress, President Cleveland noticed a rough spot on his palate. A biopsy confirmed that it was cancer, and it was determined that surgery was needed. Cleveland and his advisors thought the nation would be thrown into a panic if the President's health did not remain a secret. A surgical team, which included a dentist, performed the surgery in secrecy while traveling aboard a yacht. A prosthetic obturator was fabricated by a New York prosthodontist to close the surgical defect. Cleveland recovered well, made a forceful speech before Congress, had the Sherman Act repealed and lived without a recurrence of his oral cancer for the rest of his life. The public remained unaware, for the most part, of the gravity of President Cleveland's health for decades.

  5. Calculation of irrotational wind pattern with application to Cleveland topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1972-01-01

    Small perturbation theory is applied to compute the deflection of the wind blowing across land that has an irregular topography. As an illustration, the method is applied first to the flow around a single hill of Gaussian profile. Then calculations are made for the irregular topography on the east side of Cleveland where the elevation changes by several hundred feet. It was found that the topography produced small wind deflections that would not be of practical importance in air pollution dispersion studies. The calculations were for a neutrally stable atmosphere. Although they are not investigated here, other factors such as thermal stratification of the atmosphere, diurnal variations, and convection currents resulting from the proximity of Lake Erie and the city heat island effect are expected to be more significant than the influence of topography.

  6. Modeling Code Is Helping Cleveland Develop New Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Master Builders, Inc., is a 350-person company in Cleveland, Ohio, that develops and markets specialty chemicals for the construction industry. Developing new products involves creating many potential samples and running numerous tests to characterize the samples' performance. Company engineers enlisted NASA's help to replace cumbersome physical testing with computer modeling of the samples' behavior. Since the NASA Lewis Research Center's Structures Division develops mathematical models and associated computation tools to analyze the deformation and failure of composite materials, its researchers began a two-phase effort to modify Lewis' Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) software for Master Builders' use. Phase I has been completed, and Master Builders is pleased with the results. The company is now working to begin implementation of Phase II.

  7. Dabigatran: Experience in standard clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Otero, J; de la Fuente-Aguado, J; Arias-Castaño, J C; González-González, L; Puerta-Louro, R; Araújo-Fernández, S

    2015-10-01

    Dabigatran is an anticoagulant drug and a direct thrombin inhibitor and has been approved for the prevention of ischaemic stroke secondary to nonvalvularauricular auricular fibrillation. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of dabigatran in clinical practice for preventing cerebral ischaemic events associated with nonvalvularauricular auricular fibrillation, as well as its tolerance and safety profile. A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted, which included all patients who started anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran between November 2011 and September 2012. Follow-up was performed from the start of treatment until June 2013. The incidence of ischaemic events of cerebral, cardiac and peripheral origin was recorded, as was the onset of adverse effects and haemorrhagic complications, whose location and severity were determined. We analysed 316 patients, with a mean age of 76.46±8.37 years, of whom 53.5% were men. Two patients (0.55/100 patient-years) presented ischaemic stroke (including one amaurosis fugax). Eight (2.18/100 patient-years) patients had an adverse ischaemic event, whose origin was cardiac in 5 (1.36/100 patient-years) cases and peripheral in 3 (0.81/100 patient-years). Forty (10.91/100 patient-years) patients had a haemorrhagic complication: 32 minor (8.73/100 patient-years) and 8 major (2.18/100 patient-years) haemorrhages. Dabigatran is effective in standard clinical practice in preventing stroke and has a safety profile similar to that reported in the clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  9. Experimental and clinical experience with distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J

    1994-11-01

    G.A. Ilizarov's clinical insights and experimental biology have developed into what is known today as distraction osteogenesis. Initially used for the treatment of fractures and nonunions, his methods have proven successful for limb lengthening and bone transportation. A brief history of the development of distraction osteogenesis, definition of terms, methods, and monitoring techniques are described. The primary mechanism, intramembranous ossification, is direct bone formation in uniform gradients of mineralization from a central fibrous interzone. New bone is produced from the local host surfaces and quickly remodels to the equivalent macro and microstructure. Blood supply at the focus of distraction, dependency on a latency period, different rates, and rhythms of distraction are all tested and discussed. Data from experimental tibial lengthening in more than 125 animals (dogs, rabbits, and rats) show that distraction osteogenesis provides unlimited new bone formation that remodels at daily rates ranging from 200 to 400 microns. In over 100 clinical cases, patients ranging in age from 18 months to 49 years have regenerated bone at an average rate of 213 microns in adults and 385 microns in children. Approximately 10% of these cases required supplemental bone grafts. The article proposes that distraction osteogenesis might be successfully applied in craniofacial surgery.

  10. Clinical experience with Angiojet: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, A M; Xhepa, G; Piffaretti, G; Bacuzzi, A; Tozzi, M; Carbone, M; Barile, A; Squillaci, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Carrafiello, G

    2015-12-01

    The development of various sophisticated mechanical thrombectomy devices and the amassed experience of physicians in minimal invasive therapy produced a paradigm shift in vascular access management toward percutaneous declotting procedures, using pharmaceutical thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon thrombectomy, and a combination of the above techniques. In this setting, in the last years, AngioJet™ (Possis, Minneapolis, MN, USA) rheolytic thrombectomy (RT) showed an increasing use in emergency and election patients. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in different fields of applications.

  11. Ruth Rose Ashworth-Cleveland: a pioneer's journey as seen through personal letters.

    PubMed

    Nash, J

    1999-06-01

    Ruth Rose Ashworth-Cleveland accomplished a great deal during her eighty years of life. It is generally known that she was one of the founders of Cleveland Chiropractic College. However, she was also an accomplished public speaker and active in several chiropractic organizations for much of her adult life. Not much is known of her life after she left Cleveland Chiropractic College in the early 1940s. It is the author's hope in writing this to give the reader a greater awareness of her accomplishments, and of her as a person.

  12. [Somatostatin and the digestive system. Clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2013-09-29

    The effect of somatostatin on the gastrointestinal tract is complex; it inhibits the release of gastrointestinal hormones, the exocrine function of the stomach, pancreas and bile, decreases motility and influences absorption as well. Based on these diverse effects there was an increased expectation towards the success of somatostatin therapy in various gastrointestinal disorders. The preconditions for somatostatin treatment was created by the development of long acting somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide). During the last twenty-five years large trials clarified the role of somatostatin analogues in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases. This study summarizes shortly these results. Somatostatin analogue treatment could be effective in various pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, however, this therapeutic modality became a part of the clinical routine only in neuroendocrine tumours and adjuvant treatment of oesophageal variceal bleeding and pancreatic fistulas.

  13. Clinical experience with peripheral excimer laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visona, Adriana; Cecchetti, Walter; Liessi, Guido; Miserocchi, Luigi; Bonanome, Andrea; Lusiani, Luigi; Mayellaro, Valeria; Pagnan, Antonio

    1993-06-01

    We used an excimer laser system (xenon-chloride at the wavelength of 308 nm) to treat totally occluded peripheral vessels in 71 patients. Energy was delivered through a multifiber catheter, which combines 12 (7F) or 18 (9F) fibers (260 (mu) diameter each), concentrically arranged. Balloon dilatation was associated to complete the procedure in 84% of the cases. The immediate success rate was 97%. The cumulative patency rate was 49% at one year. The major problems with this system were that the stiff multifiber tips caused dissections, and spasm; dead space/active space ratio of the catheter was unfavorable, allowing mechanical `dottering;' the maximum lumen obtained was considered inadequate. After this three year period, the goal of our clinical laser program is to develop a stand alone laser technique by employing a multifiber catheter which combines 130 - 150 fibers 100 (mu) diameter each, and features a quartz coated distal tip.

  14. Clinical evaluation of terconazole. European experience.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H A

    1989-08-01

    Terconazole is a new topical antifungal agent that differs structurally and functionally from the imidazoles. European clinical trials were conducted to determine (1) the lowest effective dose for a given treatment period, (2) which formulation should be tested further, and (3) how terconazole compares with other topical antifungal agents in terms of safety and efficacy. The results of dose-response studies demonstrated that 80- and 240-mg suppositories and 0.4% cream were the most effective formulations. Data from multicenter studies of pregnant and nonpregnant women in Belgium and Luxembourg indicate that the efficacy of terconazole cream is superior to that of miconazole nitrate cream and clotrimazole cream. Terconazole cream is also more effective than clotrimazole cream in terms of lower relapse rates.

  15. Clinical evaluation of terconazole. United states experience.

    PubMed

    Thomason, J L

    1989-08-01

    Terconazole is the first of a new class of antifungal agents, the triazoles. The results of numerous European studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of this agent in both cream and suppository form in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Recently, results of short- and long-term analyses in the United States confirmed the efficacy and safety of 0.4% terconazole cream and 80-mg terconazole suppositories. In short-term evaluations (eight to ten days after therapy), 0.4% terconazole cream was as effective as 2.0% miconazole nitrate cream and significantly superior microbiologically in one study. The clinical cure rates with terconazole cream ranged from 87.3% to 95.5% and the microbiologic cure rates, from 76.9% to 91.1%. Thirty- to 35-day microbiologic relapse rates with terconazole cream ranged from 10.4% to 22.2%. In the short-term evaluations of vaginal suppositories the cure rates of 80-mg terconazole suppositories for three days were comparable to those of 100-mg miconazole nitrate suppositories for seven days. The clinical cure rates with 80-mg terconazole suppositories ranged from 90.0% to 92.2% and the microbiologic cure rates, from 80.4% to 85.0%. The 30- to 35-day microbiologic relapse rates of the 80-mg terconazole suppositories ranged from 20.0% to 28.1%. Terconazole cream and suppositories demonstrated an excellent safety profile in all the studies; no life-threatening side effects occurred with any of the regimens. The frequency of common side effects was similar with terconazole and miconazole nitrate formulations.

  16. Clinical guideline on adenotonsillectomy: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Bellussi, Luisa M; Marchisio, Paola; Materia, Enrico; Passàli, Francesco M

    2011-01-01

    Five years after publishing the document on 'The clinical and organizational appropriateness of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy' in 2003, a multidisciplinary group of experts came together again to update this document and to publish a guideline with grading of evidences and recommendations. Major revisions of the previous document were addressed to: (1) the diagnosis and indications for adenotonsillectomy in presence of OSAS in children, (2) the analysis of advantages of new surgical techniques in terms of effectiveness, costs or the risk of postsurgery bleeding and recurrences, and (3) the efficacy of perioperative management in reducing the incidence and duration of post-operative events. In fact, in the last years, a relevant number of evidence became available on the above-mentioned items making the need for a continuing updating of guidelines tangible. As a premise to the guideline, it is stressed how the previous document impact was prominent: the decrease of total number of tonsillectomy in Italy was evident and accompanied by a decrease of variations in the regional rates. Besides the document contributed to strengthen the multidisciplinary collaboration, especially between pediatricians and otorhinolaryngologists, and to divulge the Evidence-Based Medicine culture. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Terazosin, doxazosin, and prazosin: current clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Akduman, B; Crawford, E D

    2001-12-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction are common in aging men. Nearly 25% of men >40 years of age have LUTS. Medical therapy with alpha-blockade is the most common method of medical therapy for benign prostatic obstruction. Multiple methods of minimally invasive surgical therapies have been introduced in the last decade. These methods include balloon dilatation, temporary and permanent urethral stents, various laser techniques, microwave thermotherapy, transurethral needle ablation, electrovaporization, and high-intensity focused ultrasound. alpha-Receptor blockers to reduce the sympathetic tone of the prostate are considered as first-line therapy to relieve the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Selective alpha(1)-receptor blockers relax prostatic smooth muscle, relieve bladder outlet obstruction, and enhance urine flow with fewer side effects. In addition, it was determined that treating patients with alpha-blockers increases prostatic apoptosis. Pharmacokinetic activity, mode of action, clinical efficacy, and side effects of the selective alpha(1)-receptor blockers terazosin, doxazosin, and prazosin are reviewed.

  18. Cartap hydrochloride poisoning: A clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Boorugu, Hari K.; Chrispal, Anugrah

    2012-01-01

    Cartap hydrochloride, a nereistoxin analog, is a commonly used low toxicity insecticide. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with alleged history of ingestion of Cartap hydrochloride as an act of deliberate self-harm. The patient was managed conservatively. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Cartap hydrochloride suicidal poisoning. Cartap toxicity has been considered to be minimal, but a number of animal models have shown significant neuromuscular toxicity resulting in respiratory failure. It is hypothesized that the primary effect of Cartap hydrochloride is through inhibition of the [3H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a dose-dependent manner and promotion of extracellular Ca2+ influx and induction of internal Ca2+ release. This results in tonic diaphragmatic contraction rather than paralysis. This is the basis of the clinical presentation of acute Cartap poisoning as well as the treatment with chelators namely British Anti Lewisite and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate. PMID:22557838

  19. Cartap hydrochloride poisoning: A clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Boorugu, Hari K; Chrispal, Anugrah

    2012-01-01

    Cartap hydrochloride, a nereistoxin analog, is a commonly used low toxicity insecticide. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with alleged history of ingestion of Cartap hydrochloride as an act of deliberate self-harm. The patient was managed conservatively. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Cartap hydrochloride suicidal poisoning. Cartap toxicity has been considered to be minimal, but a number of animal models have shown significant neuromuscular toxicity resulting in respiratory failure. It is hypothesized that the primary effect of Cartap hydrochloride is through inhibition of the [(3)H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca(2+) release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a dose-dependent manner and promotion of extracellular Ca(2+) influx and induction of internal Ca(2+) release. This results in tonic diaphragmatic contraction rather than paralysis. This is the basis of the clinical presentation of acute Cartap poisoning as well as the treatment with chelators namely British Anti Lewisite and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate.

  20. Immunoscintigraphic localization of inflammatory lesions: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Seybold, K; Locher, J T; Coosemans, C; Andres, R Y; Schubiger, P A; Bläuenstein, P

    1988-01-01

    This clinical study was based on the experimental results reported in the two preceding papers, showing that the highly selective affinity of the 123I-anti-CEA monoclonal antibody 47 (123I-Mabgc) for human granulocytes makes this compound suitable for the immunoscintigraphic detection of inflammatory lesions. Forty five patients with suspected infections have been studied after infusion of 4 mCi (148 MBq) 123I-Mabgc corresponding to 120 micrograms labeled protein. No adverse reactions have been seen. Because of the high number of labeled cells, the quality of the images was excellent. SPECT was performed in 15 cases in order to define the extent of the lesion. Infectious foci were usually seen 3-5 h postinjection, but the unimpaired function of the granulocytes guarantees diagnostically relevant examinations over a much longer period of time. Scans were read as being negative if no pathological accumulation of activity was detected after 24 h. The new scanning method is technically easy to perform and provides distinct advantages over other techniques necessitating in vitro labeling of the white blood cells. Therefore, recommended indications are acute infections of unknown origin or extent, especially recurrent episodes of osteomyelitis and infections of joint prostheses.

  1. Clinical experience in appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Caglar K.; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dibekoglu, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse the incidence of appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms in appendectomy specimens and establish the epidemiological and histopathological features, treatment, and clinical course. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2013, 975 patients who underwent appendectomy in Ankara Oncology Education and Research Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results Neuroendocrine neoplasm was detected in the nine of 975 (0.9%) patients. Neuroendocrine neoplasms were diagnosed in eight patients by appendectomy, which was performed because of the prediagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in one patient by the suspicious mass detection during surgical procedures that were done in the appendix for a different reason. Eight of the patients’ tumours were in the tip of the appendix, and one of the patients’ tumours was at the base of appendix. Tumour size in 77.8% of patients was equal or less than 1 cm, in 22.2% patients it was 1–2 cm. There was tumour invasion in the muscularis propria layer in four patients, in the serosa layer in three patients, and in the deep mesoappendix in two patients. Patients were followed for a median of 78 months. In the follow-up of patients who were operated because of colon cancer, metachronous colon tumour evolved. This patient died due to progressive disease. Other patients are still disease-free. Conclusions The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasm is often incidentally done after appendectomy. Tumour size is important in determining the extent of disease and in the selection of the surgical method during operation. PMID:26793027

  2. [Clinical experience of automated double filtration plasmapheresis].

    PubMed

    Lee, C T; Chuang, F R; Hsu, K T; Lam, K K; Liao, S C; Liu, C C; Chen, J B; Jang, S W; Chien, Y S; Pan, H H

    1996-12-01

    Double filtration plasmapheresis, one kind of fractionation plasmapheresis, was developed from membrane type plasmapheresis to remove only the pathogen and return the normal protein back to the patient. We started our automated double filtration plasmapheresis since December 1993. There were 13 patients who received one hundred treatments totally during one year period. And they are myasthenia gravis (8 patients); acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (1 patient), multiple myeloma (1 patient); acquired factor VIII inhibitor (1 patient); autoimmune hemolytic anemia (1 patient); systemic lupus erythematous (1 patient). Technically double filtration plasmapheresis is easy to perform and time-saving. It also makes necessity of replacement fluid less frequent. Incidence of complication is rare, and this includes hypotension 2%, palpitation 1%, headache 1%, hemolysis 4%, air emboli 1%, high secondary pressure 2%, and no motality during our treatment. Clinical response is documented in cases of myasthenia gravis; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acquired factor VIII inhibitor in our study. In conclusion, double filtration plasmapheresis is a time-saving, convenient, and safe therapeutic modality with rare complication. Because its effectiveness on limited kinds of diseases and costs relatively high price, thus plasmapheresis should be used in selected cases and treat aggressively if indicated.

  3. Tinnitus: clinical experience of the psychosomatic connection

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Massimo; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Terlizzi, Samira; Melcore, Claudia; Panico, Roberta; Romano, Graziella Francesca; Valeriani, Guiseppe; Macrì, Francesco; Altissimi, Giancarlo; Mazzei, Filippo; Testugini, Valeria; Latini, Luca; Delle Chiaie, Roberto; Biondi, Massimo; Cianfrone, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Background The connection between psychopathology and tinnitus is complex and not adequately studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between tinnitus and psychiatric comorbidities from different points of view: categorical, dimensional, temperamental, and perceived stress level. Methods Two hundred and thirty-nine patients affected by tinnitus were recruited between January and October 2012. Patients underwent a preliminary battery of tests including the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Symptom Check List (SCL90-R), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and Stress-Related Vulnerability Scale (VRS), and eventually a full psychiatric evaluation. Results One hundred and fourteen patients (48% of the total sample) presented psychiatric comorbidity. Among these, a higher prevalence of depression, somatization, obsession, and anxiety was found. More than 41% of patients affected by decompensated tinnitus reported a family history of psychiatric disorders. Significant positive correlations between the psychopathological screening tools (SCL90-R and VRS) and THI were found. Patients affected by comorbid psychiatric disorder showed specific temperamental and characterial predispositions. Conclusion Psychiatric comorbidity in subjects affected by tinnitus is frequent. Stress can be considered as a factor leading to damage and dysfunction of the auditory apparatus. The vulnerability to neurotic disorders and the lack of coping capabilities can play a critical role in the clinical history of patients affected by severe tinnitus. PMID:24550676

  4. Differences in clinical experiences of ADN and BSN students.

    PubMed

    Oermann, M H

    1998-05-01

    Prior research has suggested that clinical experience for nursing students is stressful. Concern about making an error and harming the patient, limited knowledge and skills for practice, and difficulties in interacting with the teacher and others in the clinical setting are some of the stressors reported by students. Few studies have compared these stresses and the clinical experiences in general between students in associate degree (ADN) and baccalaureate (BSN) nursing programs. The purposes of this research were to compare the clinical experiences of ADN and BSN students at different levels in the programs and describe these experiences from the students' perspectives. As such, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 415 students in ADN and BSN programs in the Midwest. The ADN students reported significantly higher stress in clinical practice than BSN students (t = 2.16, p < .05). The stress experienced by ADN and BSN students in clinical practice increased as they progressed through the programs. The semester prior to graduation was the most stressful time in terms of clinical practice for both ADN and BSN students. The instructor was the predominant stressor reported by students in ADN programs across all levels of the curriculum. Among BSN students, the most prevalent stresses were coping with demands associated with patient care and the clinical teacher. The findings highlight the important role of the clinical faculty in both types of nursing programs.

  5. Review article: clinical experience with Prometheus.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Kinan; Manns, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    Prometheus is a new extracorporeal liver support device which facilitates the combined removal of both albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins based upon the method of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA). The pilot trial included 11 patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure and concomitant renal failure. Prometheus therapy was found to be safe except for a reversible decrease of blood pressure. In three patients, clotting of the secondary system occurred. Prometheus treatment significantly improved blood levels of protein-bound (conjugated bilirubin, bile acids, ammonia) and water-soluble (creatinine, urea) substances. Thus, Prometheus might be a new therapeutic option in patients with severe hepatorenal syndrome. Furthermore, there is some preliminary experience with Prometheus in the treatment of refractory cholestatic pruritus and in successful bridging to liver transplantation. In order to compare extraction capacities of Prometheus and the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS), five patients were crossover-treated with both systems. Prometheus resulted in significantly higher reduction ratios of bilirubin, ammonia and urea. Another study closely monitored whether the device causes an unselective removal. Neither important cytokines nor coagulation factors were found to be removed. In conclusion, Prometheus seems to be a new therapeutic option in artificial liver support. A significant improvement of the biochemical milieu was already observed after two treatments. The potential to remove protein-bound and water-soluble substances has been shown without signs of a significant unselective removal.

  6. Clinical experience with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Moschos, M; Droutsas, D; Boussalis, P; Tsioulias, G

    In this paper 385 cases treated with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive during the years 1980-1995 are studied. The indications, outcomes and complications of cyanoacrylate adhesive are investigated and the results are analysed. It is encouraging that except for three cases of ocular hypotony and two cases of microbial infection no other complications occurred. Even in desperate cases with corneal perforation greater than 3 mm and ocular infection, enucleation was avoided. The early use of a bandage contact lens, inserted just after the glue application and the coverage with topical antibiotics switched every 15 days until the removal of the glue, may explain the small incidence of infection. Our experience from the use of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive in cases with corneal perforation greater than 3 mm is very encouraging. In these cases a running 10.0 nylon suture was used to create a reticulum over the space of the corneal perforation upon which the glue was applied. The use of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive offers to the clinician a safe technique for healing corneal wounds that avoids tectonic penetrating keratoplasty with its associated complications.

  7. The good clinical nursing educator and the baccalaureate nursing clinical experience: attributes and praxis.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karla J; Stenvig, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Clinical education accounts for a significant portion of baccalaureate nursing (BSN) education. This study examined recent BSN program graduates' views about clinical nursing educator attributes that enhance the ability of the graduates to provide safe, effective patient care. In this descriptive study, 6 participants were interviewed using grounded theory techniques. The study framework blended the elements of cognitive field theory, the humanistic philosophy of teaching and learning, the gestalt theory of learning, and Hergenhahn's behavioral change model. Participants identified three attributes of a good clinical nursing educator: knowledge, interpersonal presentation, and teaching strategies. Analysis revealed that educator attributes and phases of the clinical experience process together form the foundation for clinical experience praxis. Educators can improve the clinical education experience by developing teaching strategies and evaluation tools that build on the positive attributes and phases of the clinical experience identified in this study.

  8. Green Residential Demolitions: Case Study of Vacant Land Reuse in Storm Water Management in Cleveland

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demolition process impacts how vacant land might be reused for storm water management. For five residential demolition sites (Cleveland, Ohio), an enhanced green demolition process was observed in 2012, and soil physical and hydrologic characteristics were measured predemolit...

  9. Green Residential Demolitions: Case Study of Vacant Land Reuse in Storm Water Management in Cleveland

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demolition process impacts how vacant land might be reused for storm water management. For five residential demolition sites (Cleveland, Ohio), an enhanced green demolition process was observed in 2012, and soil physical and hydrologic characteristics were measured predemolit...

  10. Periodic Inspections of Cleveland Harbor East Breakwater, Ohio, and Burns Harbor North Breakwater, Indiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Hales, CHL. Points-of-contact at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District (CELRB) for Cleveland Harbor are Shanon A. Chader and...Cleveland Harbor is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, 96 miles east of Toledo, OH, and 176 miles west of Buffalo , NY (Figure 1). The Harbor is... African engineer for East London Harbor on the southern coast of Africa, witnessed a storm remove over half of the Harbor breakwater’s solid armor

  11. Clinical mentoring of nurse practitioners: the doctors' experience.

    PubMed

    Barton, Thomas David

    The clinical development of nurse practitioners (NPs) has historically been dependent on mentorship from medical practitioners, yet their experience of this mentorship is generally unexplored. NPs have an ambiguous relationship with medicine as they have been dependent on medical mentorship to develop clinical skills, and they substitute into roles traditionally associated with medical practice. Consequently, NPs challenge professional boundaries and present particular concerns to their medical mentors. Practitioner ethnography examined the experiences of medical mentors, nurse practitioner students and academic staff during a clinical degree programme. This paper reports specifically on the medical mentors, focusing primarily on their professional authority relationship with their students and on their experience of imparting and sharing clinical knowledge. These experiences fell into three perspective stages, the provisional perspective, transitional perspective, and final perspective. Medical mentors were instrumental to the advanced clinical role of the student NP. This resulted in a conflicting experience of promoting a clinical role that challenged traditional medical authority. The effect of this was a cautious re-negotiation of professional boundaries. In future NP students (and their academic teachers) need to acknowledge this if they are to mutually gain the most from their relationship with their medical mentors.

  12. Educational Preparation and Experiences in the Clinical Setting: Entry-Level Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Context: The clinical job setting: (Outpatient/Ambulatory/Rehabilitation Clinic) should no longer be referred to as a nontraditional setting as it employs the greatest percentage of certified members. Understanding the experiences, knowledge, and skills necessary to be successful in the clinical setting as entry-level certified athletic trainers…

  13. Subjective experiences in psychotic disorders: diagnostic value and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Peralta, V; Cuesta, M J

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence and clinical correlates of abnormal subjective experiences across functional psychotic disorders. Patients were recruited from consecutive admissions with the following diagnoses; schizophrenia (n = 40), schizophreniform disorder (n = 40), schizoaffective disorder (n = 21), mood disorder (n = 18), brief reactive psychosis (n = 15), and atypical psychosis (n = 16). Subjective experiences were assessed using the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ), and the clinical status was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS) and the Manual for the Assessment and Documentation of Psychopathology (AMDP). Neither the FCQ total score nor individual subjective experiences displayed significant differences across diagnoses. When the clinical predictors of subjective experiences were studied by multiple regression analyses, a different pattern resulted for individual psychotic disorders. In schizophrenic patients, subjective experiences were predicted by female gender, euphoria, lack of insight, greater illness severity, and more positive symptoms. The only predictors of subjective experiences in the schizophreniform disorder group were the negative symptoms. Within the affective disorders group, subjective experiences had no clinical predictors.

  14. A tale of two rain gardens: Barriers and bridges to adaptive management of urban stormwater in Cleveland, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Brian C; Shuster, William D; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Furio, Brooke; Albro, Sandra L; Gardiner, Mary; Spring, MaLisa; Green, Olivia Odom

    2016-12-01

    Green infrastructure installations such as rain gardens and bioswales are increasingly regarded as viable tools to mitigate stormwater runoff at the parcel level. The use of adaptive management to implement and monitor green infrastructure projects as experimental attempts to manage stormwater has not been adequately explored as a way to optimize green infrastructure performance or increase social and political acceptance. Efforts to improve stormwater management through green infrastructure suffer from the complexity of overlapping jurisdictional boundaries, as well as interacting social and political forces that dictate the flow, consumption, conservation and disposal of urban wastewater flows. Within this urban milieu, adaptive management-rigorous experimentation applied as policy-can inform new wastewater management techniques such as the implementation of green infrastructure projects. In this article, we present a narrative of scientists and practitioners working together to apply an adaptive management approach to green infrastructure implementation for stormwater management in Cleveland, Ohio. In Cleveland, contextual legal requirements and environmental factors created an opportunity for government researchers, stormwater managers and community organizers to engage in the development of two distinct sets of rain gardens, each borne of unique social, economic and environmental processes. In this article we analyze social and political barriers to applying adaptive management as a framework for implementing green infrastructure experiments as policy. We conclude with a series of lessons learned and a reflection on the prospects for adaptive management to facilitate green infrastructure implementation for improved stormwater management.

  15. Clinical Needs Finding: Developing the Virtual Experience, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as “virtual” clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but for increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  16. Clinicians' experiences with the fragile X clinical and research consortium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jessica A; Hagerman, Randi J; Miller, Robert M; Craft, Lisa T; Finucane, Brenda; Tartaglia, Nicole; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Sherman, Stephanie L; Kidd, Sharon A; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess the attitudes and experiences of clinicians involved in a consortium of clinics serving people with fragile X-associated disorders to gauge satisfaction with the consortium and its efforts to improve quality of life for patients and the community. An internet survey was sent to 26 fragile X (FX) clinic directors participating in the Fragile X Clinical and Research Consortium (FXCRC). Respondents were asked to complete 19 questions on consortium performance and outcomes relevant for their own clinic. The response rate was 84% (22/26), with two surveys providing incomplete data. Assistance with clinic establishment, opportunities for research collaborations, and access to colleagues and information were highly valued. Approximately 76% of clinicians reported improvements in patient care and 60% reported an increase in patient services. There was a 57% increase in participation in a FX-related clinical trial among clinics since joining the FXCRC (24% vs. 81%). Overall, respondents reported primarily positive experiences from participation in the FXCRC. Common suggestions for improvement included additional financial support and increased utilization of collected patient data for research purposes. Additionally, a Clinic Services Checklist was administered annually to examine changes in services offered over time. There were several important changes regarding the provision of services by clinics, often with multiple clinics changing with respect to a service. In conclusion, the FXCRC has led to the establishment and sustainment of fragile X clinics in the U.S., fostered cooperation among fragile X clinicians, and provided clinics with a platform to share recommendations and best practices to maximize quality of life for their patients and the overall fragile X community. The results from the survey and checklist also provide suggestions to strengthen the FXCRC and enhance future collaborations among FXCRC members. © 2016

  17. Stage 2 Report for Reformulation Phase I General Design Memorandum, Cleveland Harbor, Ohio. Volume I. Main Report. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Cleveland Harbor,Ohio Stage 2 Report for Reformul- Final...from the city of Cleveland and inland portions of the State of Ohio and adjacent States. During the 10-year period 1969 to 1978, an average of about...Forcast - Commodity movements of iron ore, lime- stone, sand and gravel, and salt at Cleveland Harbor for the 10-year period 1969 to 1978 were analyzed

  18. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic.

    PubMed

    Saba, Thomas G; Hershenson, Marc B; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A; Mullan, Patricia B; Owens, Sonal T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics.

  19. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Thomas G.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; Mullan, Patricia B.; Owens, Sonal T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics. PMID:26547081

  20. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic.

    PubMed

    Saba, Thomas G; Hershenson, Marc B; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A; Mullan, Patricia B; Owens, Sonal T

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics.

  1. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting.

  2. Our clinical experience in low-energy laser medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bruckner, Ion I.; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Moldovan, Corneliu I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Ionescu, Elena

    1996-05-01

    In clinical research the efficiency of low-energy laser (LEL) therapy remains controversial. We present here some of the most important results of our clinical experience in this field. We summarize our opinions about the LEL effects in rheumatic diseases, in chronic pelvic inflammatory disorders, in the treatment of some dermatological disorders, and in the recovery of the distal forearm nerve from traumatic lesion after surgical suture. We conclude that these results may be important evidence for the real clinical efficiency of the LEL.

  3. Some experience in an area health authority child health clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, R S

    1979-01-01

    Three years' experience as a doctor taking two clinics a week in an area health authority child health clinic was reviewed. A wide range of clinical conditions was seen, including: problems associated with feeding in breast- and bottle-fed infants; minor developmental abnormalities (mental, behavioural, and physical); surgical and orthopaedic conditions requiring treatment; medical conditions, mainly respiratory and alimentary infections, skin conditions, and problems of over-treatment for minor ailments; and minor genetic abnormalities. Mothers asked for advice on a wide range of topics, risks and benefits of immunisation being the most common. The clinic doctor needs a wide experience in paediatrics to deal with such problems. It is suggested that all lecturers in child health and paediatric and senior registrars should take one clinic a week for six months, and all medical students should attend some clinics as part of their paediatric training. Health visitors have an important role in helping the clinic doctor, but their training should be more realistic and appropriate facilities should be provided to keep them up to date in their work. PMID:86374

  4. Experiences from an interprofessional student-assisted chronic disease clinic.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Kerrie-Anne; Brownie, Sharon; Davies, Lauren; Thomas, Janelle; Miller, Mary-Ellen; Tyack, Zephanie

    2014-11-01

    Faced with significant health and workforce challenges in the region, the Central Queensland Health Service District (CQHSD) commenced a student-assisted clinical service. The Capricornia Allied Health Partnership (CAHP) is an interprofessional clinical placement program in which pre-entry students from exercise physiology, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, podiatry and social work are embedded in a collaborative chronic disease service delivery model. The model coordinates multiple student clinical placements to: address service delivery gaps for previously underserved people with chronic disease in need of early intervention and management; provide an attractive clinical placement opportunity for students that will potentially lead to future recruitment success, and demonstrate leadership in developing future health workforce trainees to attain appropriate levels of interprofessional capacity. The CAHP clinic commenced student placements and client services in February 2010. This report provides early evaluative information regarding student experiences included self-reported changes in practice.

  5. Dental Students' Clinical Expectations and Experiences Treating Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Perusini, Darsi J; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Sigal, Michael J; Dempster, Laura J

    2016-03-01

    Persons with disabilities (PWDs) have a disproportionate level of dental disease relative to the general population. Access to care is a cause along with dentists' willingness to treat PWDs. The aim of this study was to investigate the expectations and experiences of dental students in providing treatment to these patients in a hospital-based dental clinic for PWDs. Senior dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto (n=92) were surveyed prior to (Phase I) and at the end of (Phase II) mandatory clinical rotations at the Mount Sinai Hospital's Dentistry Clinic for Persons with Special Needs. Response rates were 88% for Phase I and 58% for Phase II. Before the rotations, 70% of the respondents reported little or no experience with PWDs, and 46% said they did not feel comfortable providing basic dental treatment to PWDs. However, in Phase II, significantly more students reported being comfortable than in Phase I (p=0.001). Overall, the majority of respondents (Phase I 95%; Phase II 98%) indicated they would at least attempt to provide basic dental care to PWDs after graduation. The majority also identified the opportunity to provide care and interact with PWDs as the most enjoyable aspect of their experience at the clinic. They reported that the experience helped reduce their concerns about treating PWDs including being more realistic about the time required and ideal quality of the treatment they could provide. These results suggest that their experience in the clinic significantly increased students' comfort in treating PWDs. The respondents expressed a willingness to treat PWDs once graduated and generally identified their experience as being more positive than their expectations.

  6. Physiotherapy students' perceptions and experiences of clinical prediction rules.

    PubMed

    Knox, Grahame M; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Stanton, Tasha R; Kelly, David H; Vicenzino, Bill; Wand, Benedict M; Rivett, Darren A

    2017-09-01

    Clinical reasoning can be difficult to teach to pre-professional physiotherapy students due to their lack of clinical experience. It may be that tools such as clinical prediction rules (CPRs) could aid the process, but there has been little investigation into their use in physiotherapy clinical education. This study aimed to determine the perceptions and experiences of physiotherapy students regarding CPRs, and whether they are learning about CPRs on clinical placement. Cross-sectional survey using a paper-based questionnaire. Final year pre-professional physiotherapy students (n=371, response rate 77%) from five universities across five states of Australia. Sixty percent of respondents had not heard of CPRs, and a further 19% had not clinically used CPRs. Only 21% reported using CPRs, and of these nearly three-quarters were rarely, if ever, learning about CPRs in the clinical setting. However most of those who used CPRs (78%) believed CPRs assisted in the development of clinical reasoning skills and none (0%) was opposed to the teaching of CPRs to students. The CPRs most commonly recognised and used by students were those for determining the need for an X-ray following injuries to the ankle and foot (67%), and for identifying deep venous thrombosis (63%). The large majority of students in this sample knew little, if anything, about CPRs and few had learned about, experienced or practiced them on clinical placement. However, students who were aware of CPRs found them helpful for their clinical reasoning and were in favour of learning more about them. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Designing Nursing Simulation Clinical Experiences to Promote Critical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Bev; Koroll, Donna; Price, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) learning opportunities in nursing education has received increased attention in the literature. This article describes the design of a systematic framework used to promote critical inquiry and provide meaningful simulation clinical experiences for second year nursing students. Critical inquiry, as defined…

  8. Enhancing the clinical practicum experience through journal writing.

    PubMed

    Patton, J G; Woods, S J; Agarenzo, T; Brubaker, C; Metcalf, T; Sherrer, L

    1997-05-01

    Although journaling is commonplace, its usefulness or effectiveness has been rarely supported by empirical data or examples. The purpose of this article is to highlight integration of classroom and clinical learning, decision-making skills and level of skill acquisition in the Senior Practicum experiences through student journal entry exemplars. Critical thinking, observation and description, and empathy and release of feelings will be discussed.

  9. Time Keeps on Ticking: The Experience of Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions by Ridley and Shaw-Ridley (EJ832451) and Lichtenberg (EJ832452) to the authors' meta-analysis on the effects of experience on judgment accuracy add positively to what is hoped will become an ever more focused discourse on this most basic question: How can mental health clinical decision making be improved? In this rejoinder, the…

  10. A solo hospital librarian's experience in clinical informatics.

    PubMed

    Miles, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    This column reviews some of a solo librarian's experiences that led to involvement with the hospital Clinical Informatics Team. This included work on the electronic health record (EHR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system, development of order sets, and participation in the Physician Technology Committee.

  11. Teachers' Clinical Experiences and Attitudes toward Technology Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paganelli, Andrea Lynch

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multisite case study is to examine participants' attitudes toward technology, types of technology available for participant use, and the extent to which technology is used by preservice and mentor teachers during clinical experiences. Research supports the benefit of improved attitudes toward technology integration…

  12. Enrichment of the Educational Psychology Curriculum through Clinical Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaker, Paul; Ullrich, Walter

    An educational psychology curriculum for preservice teachers that attempts to overcome some of the shortcomings of most such curricula while providing clinical experience is described. The curriculum is based on three major propositions: (1) preservice teachers must acquire psychologically informed inquiry skills and a general understanding of…

  13. Time Keeps on Ticking: The Experience of Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions by Ridley and Shaw-Ridley (EJ832451) and Lichtenberg (EJ832452) to the authors' meta-analysis on the effects of experience on judgment accuracy add positively to what is hoped will become an ever more focused discourse on this most basic question: How can mental health clinical decision making be improved? In this rejoinder, the…

  14. Providing premedical students with quality clinical and research experience

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James; Anderson, Maggie; Stankevitz, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate premedical students face a prodigious decision as they work to determine whether to pursue a profession in medicine. Experience in clinical medicine and research is essential to inform students what it might be like to be a physician. Undergraduates, however, face a number of obstacles to obtaining the kind of quality clinical and research experience needed to best inform them on this decision. Growing regulations designed to protect patient confidentiality, though undeniably important, pose a barrier to students seeking patient contact. Traditional passive physician shadowing often does not provide ample opportunities for one-on-one patient interaction or problem solving. Finally, research opportunities available to students typically are not associated with clinical work and therefore do not provide an experiential model of how empirical evidence informs medical practice. This report provides a description of the University of Wisconsin Tobacco Science Scholars Program, a pilot program designed to grapple with some of these barriers. The program provides supervision for students so that they might fulfill institutional requirements required for patient contact, provides an active model of clinical patient interaction and problem solving, and provides access to research that is integrated into the student’s clinical experience so the student might better understand the nature of research-based evidence in medicine. Program details and limitations are discussed. PMID:24734413

  15. [Hospital clinical experience: meanings for Family Health resident nurses].

    PubMed

    Landim, Simone Alves; Batista, Nildo Alves; da Silva, Gilberto Tadeu Reis

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research in phenomenological design aimed at understanding the meaning of hospital clinical experience in the nurse's training in a Multiprofessional Family Health Residency. The study was developed in a teaching institution. Data collection was based on interviews and had as study population eight resident nurses. I investigated the residents' experience according to their speeches, by making the following guiding question: "Talk about your hospital experience, how does it show itself in your training as a resident"? One open category emerged from the subject' description: Causing to approach the hospital experience and the Primary Health Care. Among the meanings attributed to the hospital experience, there is the need and relevance as an integrant part of the curriculum vitae of the Multiprofessional Family Health Residency for the nurses.

  16. Nursing students' experiences with incivility in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Yastik, Joanne

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students as targets of incivility in clinical settings, to describe their perceptions of specific uncivil and favorable behaviors by nurses, and to examine how nursing students think schools of nursing should address incivility in clinical settings. Four focus groups were conducted comprising 21 prelicensure nursing students. Data were collected with semi-structured interviews. Uncivil behaviors fell into three themes: exclusionary, hostile or rude, and dismissive. Positive experiences occurred when students felt included by the staff nurses in patient care. Schools of nursing should prepare students through discussion. Our research suggests that incivility occurs in clinical education. Further research on a larger scale is needed to provide qualitative and generalizable findings. All health care team members, including students, should be educated about the organization's code of conduct.

  17. [One-stop outpatient cardiology clinics: 10 years' experience].

    PubMed

    Falces, Carlos; Sadurní, Josep; Monell, Joan; Andrea, Rut; Ylla, Miquel; Moleiro, Angels; Cantillo, Jordi

    2008-05-01

    A one-stop outpatient cardiology clinic was set up at the Vic General Hospital in Spain in 1996. The aims were to provide patients with a rapid response, and to ensure that, on the same day, they saw a specialist and were referred for any relevant investigations required, primarily echocardiography, exercise testing, and Holter monitoring. We report experience from 10 years of follow-up, involving 19,515 consultations. The mean waiting time for a consultation was 3 days. We analyzed the reasons for the consultations, the investigations carried out, and the reductions in follow-up visits and hospital admissions. Primary care physicians' level of satisfaction was increased by this approach. The one-stop clinic proved feasible in clinical practice and proved robust during the follow-up period. This clinical model was beneficial for patients, was highly acceptable to primary care physicians, reduced the need for patients to contact the hospital, and, possibly, reduced hospital admissions.

  18. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    PubMed

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other.

  19. Challenging clinical learning environments: experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Linda; McDonald, Jane; Gillespie, Mary; Brown, Helen; Miles, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Clinical learning is an essential component of becoming a nurse. However at times, students report experiencing challenging clinical learning environments (CCLE), raising questions regarding the nature of a challenging clinical learning environment, its impact on students' learning and how students might respond within a CCLE. Using an Interpretive Descriptive study design, researchers held focus groups with 54 students from two Canadian sites, who self-identified as having experienced a CCLE. Students defined a CCLE as affected by relationships in the clinical area and by the context of their learning experiences. CCLE decreased students' learning opportunities and impacted on them as persons. As students determined which relationships were challenging, they tapped other resources and they used strategies to rebuilt, reframe, redirect and/or retreat relative to the specific challenge. Relationships also acted as buffers to unsupportive practice cultures. Implications for practice and research are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Student nurses experience of learning in the clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Tsangari, Haritini; Saarikoski, Mikko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2010-05-01

    The clinical learning environment is a complex social entity that influences student learning outcomes in the clinical setting. Exploration of this environment gives insight into the educational functioning of the clinical areas and allows nurse teachers to enhance students' opportunities for learning. Since Cyprus is undergoing major reforms in nursing education, building on the experience and knowledge gained, this study aims to explore the present clinical situation and how this would impact on nursing education moves to the university. As nursing education would take on a different approach, it is assumed the learning approach would also be different, and so utilization of the clinical environment would also be improved. Six hundred and forty five students participated in the study. Data were collected by means of the clinical learning environment and supervision instrument. A statistically significant correlation was found between the sub-dimensions "premises of nursing care" and "premises of learning" indicating that students are relating learning environment with the quality of nursing care and patient relationships. The ward atmosphere and the leadership style of the manager were rated as less important factors for learning. The majority of students experienced a group supervision model, but the more satisfied students were those with a "personal mentor" that was considered as the most successful mentor relationship. The findings suggest more thorough examination and understanding of the characteristics of the clinical environment that are conductive to learning. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cultural sensitivity or professional acculturation in early clinical experience?

    PubMed

    Whitford, David L; Hubail, Amal Redha

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to explore the early clinical experience of medical students following the adaptation of an Early Patient Contact curriculum from a European culture in Ireland to an Arab culture in Bahrain. Medical students in Bahrain took part in an Early Patient Contact module modelled on a similar module from a partner medical school in Ireland. We used a qualitative approach employing thematic analysis of 54 student reflective logbooks. Particular attention was placed on reflections of cultural influences of experience in the course. Medical students undergoing this module received reported documented benefits of early clinical experience. However, students in Bahrain were exposed to cultural norms of the local Arab society including gender values, visiting the homes of strangers, language barriers and generous hospitality that led to additional challenges and learning for the medical students in acculturating to norms of the medical profession. Modules intended for curriculum adaptation between two cultures would be best served by a group of "core" learning outcomes with "secondary" outcomes culturally appropriate to each site. Within the context of the Arab culture, early clinical experience has the added benefit of allowing students to learn about both local and professional cultural norms, thereby facilitating integration of these two cultures.

  2. Interprofessional student experiences on the HAVEN free clinic leadership board.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elizabeth Anne; Swartz, Martha K

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the experiences of students serving on the leadership board of HAVEN - the student-run free clinic of the Yale University health professional schools. Open-ended responses were collected from 18 of the 28 members of the 2011-2012 leadership board through an online survey. Students reported an overall positive experience participating on the board and valued the opportunity to be part of a committed community creating change. The majority of students reported that their time as a board member had improved their attitude towards interprofessional collaboration (78%) and had also fostered their leadership skills (67%). Around two thirds (67%) reported that their experience had positively impacted their future career plans, either reinforcing their desire to work with underserved populations or encouraging them to pursue leadership roles. Based on these data, it is suggested that the HAVEN Free Clinic offers a useful opportunity for students to experience the demands of clinical care leadership while working together in an interprofessional context.

  3. A curriculum model for an integrated senior year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Wukasch, R N; Blue, C L; Overbay, J

    2000-01-01

    Transformations in the delivery of health care from hospital to community have brought about many changes in nursing practice. These, in turn, have necessitated alterations in the education of nursing students, the curricula, and clinical experiences. Confident that nursing is an independent practice, exclusive of the health care setting, our faculty decided to direct our teaching efforts to reflect changes in health care delivery. We restructured our baccalaureate nursing program's senior level clinical education experience to prepare students to meet the needs of the clients we serve--the community--and the demands of professional nursing education. In doing so, we have supported Ryan's definition of community, which includes "all settings where consumers seek health care" (1, p. 140). In response to the recommendation by the pew health professions commission for new models of content integration "between education and the highly managed and integrated systems of care" (2, p. 51), a decision was made to merge three senior level clinical courses--pediatrics, public health, and nursing leadership and management--into one integrated experience. This process required an examination of collective values and beliefs with respect to course content and learning experiences. The challenge was to examine "sacred cows" and eliminate redundancies and replication of learning activities.

  4. Experience of 2 dental clinics registered to ISO 9002.

    PubMed

    Casas, Michael J; Kenny, David J; Johnston, Douglas H

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the 3-year experience of managing 2 hospital-based dental clinics registered to ISO 9002:1994; it also examines the revision of previous quality management standards in 2 separate institutions to prepare for registration under the new ISO 9001:2000 standard. Daily equipment and process checks, combined with internal audits, were the backbone of the quality system at both locations. Corrective and protective actions had been underused, because of the partial duplication produced by 2 different institutionally mandated risk management and incident reporting systems. ISO 9002 registration provided both dental clinics with responsive quality systems, emphasizing patient satisfaction and providing measurable continuous quality improvement.

  5. Pediatricians' Experience with Clinical Ethics Consultation: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Wynne; Womer, James; Nathanson, Pamela; Kersun, Leslie; Hester, D Micah; Walsh, Corbett; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-10-01

    To conduct a national survey of pediatricians' access to and experience with clinical ethics consultation. We surveyed a randomly selected sample of 3687 physician members of the American Academy of Pediatrics. We asked about their experiences with ethics consultation, the helpfulness of and barriers to consultation, and ethics education. Using a discrete choice experiment with maximum difference scaling, we evaluated which traits of ethics consultants were most valuable. Of the total sample of 3687 physicians, 659 (18%) responded to the survey. One-third of the respondents had no experience with clinical ethics consultation, and 16% reported no access to consultation. General pediatricians were less likely to have access. The vast majority (90%) who had experience with consultation had found it helpful. Those with fewer years in practice were more likely to have training in ethics. The most frequently reported issues leading to consultation concerned end-of-life care and conflicts with patients/families or among the team. Intensive care unit physicians were more likely to have requested consultation. Mediation skills and ethics knowledge were the most highly valued consultant characteristics, and representing the official position of the hospital was the least-valued characteristic. There is variability in pediatricians' access to ethics consultation. Most respondents reported that consultation had been helpful in the past. Determining ethically appropriate end-of-life care and mediation of disagreements are common reasons that pediatricians request consultation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Seven years experience with a computerized diabetes clinic database.

    PubMed

    Flack, J R

    1995-01-01

    With the emergence of information technology applications in medicine, a computerized medical record system that could be used to : (1) maintain patients' clinical records over time, (2) communicate with referring practitioners, and (3) form the basis of a potential research database of information, was sought. In 1987, we developed such a clinical database to register patients attending our busy Diabetes Clinic, now seeing in excess of 300 new referrals and, on average, 3,000 clinic visits per year. Baseline demographic data, clinical history, and examination and investigation results are recorded. We also record diabetes therapy and other medication dosage and changes, monitor follow-up, assess health outcome information (such as stroke or amputation), and generate results, summaries, and reports to referring practitioners and other health professionals. We now have almost seven years of experience using the system. Initially established on a single PC with paper-based data collection and subsequent data entry (running as a DOS application), it is now established on a PC Local Area Network [LAN] with terminals in the clinic consultation rooms enabling direct data entry and allowing patients to view their results in graphic form on screen. From its inception, the Diabetes Clinic Database System has maintained patient demographic and clinical data (which facilitates efficient clinic management) with patient clinic lists and adhesive address labels generated from appropriate menus. Batch mode processing produces daily work sheets which facilitate the running of clinics as well as ad hoc, daily, and weekly reports for all patients (as required). This expedites correspondence with referring doctors. A quality assurance report to the clinic doctor highlights missing clinical information which must be obtained in order to ensure data completeness. The initial system was relatively inefficient in that it required data entry following patient consultation and provided no

  7. Air quality aerometric data for the city of Cleveland from 1967 to 1970 for sulphur dioxide, suspended particulates, and nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Burr, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is assisting the City of Cleveland, Ohio, in its effort to monitor its air pollution. This report describes the Cleveland program of the past 4 years and the supportive Lewis program currently being developed. The data accumulated by Cleveland over the past 4 years are presented together with some preliminary statistical analyses indicating in a semiquantitive manner the degree of air pollution existing within the boundaries of Cleveland.

  8. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  9. Water resources of Clark, Cleveland, and Dallas Counties, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plebuch, Raymond O.; Hines, Marion S.

    1969-01-01

    Clark, Cleveland, and Dallas counties constitute an area of 2,151 square miles in south-central Arkansas. The area is in two physiographic provinces--the Ouachita Mountains of the Ouachita province of the Interior Highlands, and the West Gulf Coastal Plain of the Coastal Plain province. The area is drained by the Ouachita, Saline, and Little Missouri Rivers and their tributaries. Although some of the streams in the project area can furnish dependable water supplies without storage, the amount of water available for use can be increased by the construction of reservoirs. The average surface-water yield in the area is about 1.4 cubic feet per second per square mile, or a total of about 3,000 cubic feet per second. Generally, the water quality is good; but water from some of the streams, particularly from the smaller tributaries, may require treatment for excessive iron content and high color. Ground-water yields in the project area vary considerably. The consolidated rocks in the Interior Highlands generally yield less than 10 gallons per minute to wells, precluding the development of large municipal or industrial groundwater supplies in that area. Of the 17 geologic units present in the Coastal Plain part of the project area, 12 yield water but in varying amounts. Among the formations of Cretaceous age, the Tokio yields good-quality water in the outcrop, but the quality deteriorates downdip; the Brownstown Marl yields small amounts of water for domestic purposes, mainly in the outcrop area ; the Ozan Formation yields a highly mineralized water that is generally unsuitable for most purposes; the Nacatoch Sand yields as much as 100 gallons per minute of good-quality water in and near the outcrop, but the water becomes very salty and corrosive at distances ranging from 2 miles downdip from the outcrop in northern Clark County to 17 miles downdip in the southern part of the county. The formations of Tertiary age offer the best possibilities for ground water

  10. The experience of care at nurse-led rheumatology clinics.

    PubMed

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Samuelson, Karin; Hagell, Peter; Svensson, Björn; Fridlund, Bengt; Hesselgard, Karin

    2012-12-01

    To describe how people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience the care provided by Swedish nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics. Eighteen adult people with a diagnosis of RA who had had at least three documented contact sessions with a nurse-led clinic were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Care was expressed in three categories: social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures. A social environment including a warm encounter, a familial atmosphere and pleasant premises was desired and contributed to a positive experience of care. The nurses' professional approach was experienced as empathy, knowledge and skill, as well as support. The care was described as person centred and competent, as it was based on the individual's unique experience of his/her disease and needs. The nurses' specialist knowledge of rheumatology and rheumatology care was highly valued. The offered care represented added value for the participants, instilling security, trust, hope and confidence. It was perceived as facilitating daily life and creating positive emotions. The nurse-led clinics were reported to be easily accessible and provided continuity of the care. These features were presented as fundamental guarantees for health care safety. The experiences emphasized the need for a holistic approach to care. In this process, the organization of care and the role and skills of the nurse should be focused on the individual's needs and perspectives. The social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures are particularly relevant for optimal care at nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Experience of nursing students with dyslexia on clinical placement.

    PubMed

    McPheat, Christopher

    2014-06-17

    A review of the literature was conducted to explore the experience of nursing students with dyslexia while on clinical placement. Three main themes emerged, including risk to patient safety, disclosure of dyslexia and support for nursing students. The literature review highlights the lack of dyslexia awareness and understanding in the research and at the trusts at which nursing students are placed, and calls for further research in this area.

  12. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources.

  13. West Virginians in Their Own State and in Cleveland, Ohio. Summary and Conclusions of a Comparative Social Study. West Virginia University, Appalachian Center Information Report 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Photiadis, John D.

    Nonmigrants, returned migrants, migrants living in Cleveland ghettos, and migrants living in Cleveland suburbs were studied in order to: (1) examine social and sociopsychological characteristics of West Virginians living in their own state and in Cleveland and (2) test the hypothesis that in order to satisfy societal expectations in terms of…

  14. Meteorological characteristics associated with PM 2.5 air pollution in Cleveland, Ohio, during the 2009-2010 Cleveland Multiple Air Pollutants Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, Adam N.; MacDonald, Clinton P.; Gilliam, Robert C.; Knoderer, Charley A.; Roberts, Paul T.

    2011-12-01

    Cleveland, Akron, and Lorain, Ohio, exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particles with a diameter less than 2.5 microns (PM 2.5). The 2009-2010 Cleveland Multiple Air Pollutants Study (CMAPS) and analyses were conducted to characterize the sources and processes that contribute to high PM 2.5 concentrations in the Cleveland area. The results are being used in high-resolution mesoscale chemical and meteorological modeling to protect public health. This paper summarizes the meteorological measurements collected during CMAPS and describes how three-dimensional meteorological processes influence surface PM 2.5 concentrations. Mixing heights were higher, boundary layer winds were stronger, flow was southerly, and ventilation was greater on most episode days compared to non-episode days. While greater ventilation typically results in lower PM 2.5 concentrations, in this case the greater ventilation coincided with the transport of regional pollution by southerly winds. Stagnation, or limited transport of air parcels, occurred on the remaining episode days and was associated with limited vertical mixing and light winds. These stagnation/limited dispersion events were associated with a weak lake breeze during the summer and slow-moving, large-scale high-pressure systems with weak surface pressure gradients, resulting in light winds during the winter.

  15. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them.

  16. What Is Happening to a Lebanese Dialect in Cleveland, Ohio: Language Attrition in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Nazih Y.

    1988-01-01

    A study of the changes in the language behavior of an American-Lebanese community in Cleveland, Ohio, considering the community's background, its current status, environmental interactions, and linguistic behavior. Findings indicate a reduced ability to be quick and easy, reduced ability to be expressive, and linguistic insecurity. (CB)

  17. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    In 1985-86, Project CAUSA completed a three-year funding cycle at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, New York. The project provided 132 newly arrived students from Italy and several Spanish-speaking countries with instruction in English as a second language (ESL), native language arts, and content areas. Basic goals were to help students…

  18. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  19. Chemical Composition and Source Apportionment of Size Fractionated Particulate Matter in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cleveland airshed comprises a complex mixture of industrial source emissions that contribute to periods of non-attainment for fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) and are associated with increased adverse health outcomes in the exposed population. Specific PM sources responsible...

  20. Passive Sampling to Capture the Spatial Variability of Coarse Particles by Composition in Cleveland, OH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers deployed at 25 sites for three week-long intervals were used to characterize spatial variability in the mass and composition of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Cleveland, OH in summer 2008. The size and composition of individual particles deter...

  1. Chemical Composition and Source Apportionment of Size Fractionated Particulate Matter in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cleveland airshed comprises a complex mixture of industrial source emissions that contribute to periods of non-attainment for fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) and are associated with increased adverse health outcomes in the exposed population. Specific PM sources responsible...

  2. 75 FR 15739 - Lockheed Martin: Cleveland, OH; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Lockheed Martin: Cleveland, OH; Notice of Termination of Investigation... a petition filed on January 14, 2010 by a company official on behalf of workers of Lockheed...

  3. 77 FR 16800 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, AR, and Cleveland, MS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, AR, and Cleveland, MS AGENCY: Federal... Commission requests comment on a petition filed by Delta Radio Network, LLC, proposing to amend the Table of..., Delta Radio Network, LLC, 9408 Grand Gate Street, Las Vegas, NV 89143-1397. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  4. 78 FR 27306 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi AGENCY... Delta Radio Network, LLC, substitutes FM Channel 224A for 289A at Dermott, Arkansas, and substitutes FM... CFR part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant...

  5. 40 CFR 81.22 - Greater Metropolitan Cleveland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.22 Section 81.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.22 Greater Metropolitan Cleveland Intrastate Air Quality...

  6. Household Mobility, Housing Traits, Public Goods, and School Quality in Cleveland's Metropolitan Statistical Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margulis, Harry L.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluates how selective housing traits, local government expenditures, and school district qualities influence household mobility in the Cleveland metropolitan statistical area. Overall results show that housing traits do not extensively differ among suburban municipalities, and they do not substantially affect household mobilities. However,…

  7. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    In 1985-86, Project CAUSA completed a three-year funding cycle at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, New York. The project provided 132 newly arrived students from Italy and several Spanish-speaking countries with instruction in English as a second language (ESL), native language arts, and content areas. Basic goals were to help students…

  8. Preliminary Design of a Computerized Information System for Teacher Education Centers in Greater Cleveland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, David E.

    This report describes an information system designed to aid individuals within the Greated Cleveland Teacher Education Centers. Three components of the system are specified: information gathering or input, a data bank, and reports. Following an overview of the teacher education centers and information system, the primary design of the information…

  9. Grassroots Journalism in the City: Cleveland's Neighborhood Newspapers. Monograph No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffres, Leo W.; And Others

    The first section of this monograph on community newspapers describes the patterns and trends of "grassroots journalism" in the Cleveland, Ohio, area. Based on interviews with 37 newspaper editors, the following topics are covered: origins and history, goals, organization and structure, method of production, advertising, content,…

  10. From Slovenian to American: Immigrants in Cleveland's Public and Parochial Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gombach, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    In a Cleveland that was one of the most foreign of the country's cities, the Slovenian community struggled with the problem of maintaining its cultural ties while still adopting enough American customs to enable it to take advantage of the opportunities in a democratic, industrialized city. This article attempts to clarify some of the problems of…

  11. Passive Sampling to Capture the Spatial Variability of Coarse Particles by Composition in Cleveland, OH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers deployed at 25 sites for three week-long intervals were used to characterize spatial variability in the mass and composition of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Cleveland, OH in summer 2008. The size and composition of individual particles deter...

  12. 75 FR 49528 - Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations Cleveland Office Including Workers Whose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations Cleveland Office... Assistance on June 22, 2010, applicable to workers of Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations... unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name West Publishing Corporation, a Thomson Reuters Business...

  13. 75 FR 14459 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland... 1867, the Western Reserve Historical Society was founded. Starting in 1894, book numbers were...

  14. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.903 Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH. (a) Location. The waters of...

  15. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.903 Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH. (a) Location. The waters of...

  16. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.903 Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH. (a) Location. The waters of...

  17. A Review of Three Alternative Schools in Greater Cleveland: Promising Practices and Feasibility Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Elyse; And Others

    The intent of the evaluation studies reported here was two-fold: (1) to determine the promising practices of three alternative schools in Greater Cleveland, and (2) to determine which of those practices identified as promising would be feasible for incorporation into the public schools. Each substudy includes an overview, a description of the…

  18. 78 FR 30863 - Foreign-Trade Zone 40-Cleveland, Ohio; Application for Reorganization and Expansion Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 40--Cleveland, Ohio; Application for Reorganization and Expansion Under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ...

  19. Tight Site. John F. Kennedy Recreational Center, Cleveland, Ohio; P/A Building Cost Analysis 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Describes the John F. Kennedy Recreation Center, Cleveland, Ohio, which combines the recreational and athletic requirements of three distinct clients on a confined parcel of land. This building cost analysis is the second in a series. (See EA 503 949). Other related articles are EA 503 950-951, EA 504 571-572, and EA 504 578. (Author/MF)

  20. Analysis of Reference Service at the Cleveland Law Library, April-September 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlowski, Ken

    This study initiated service request sheets, evaluated reference services provided by the staff of the Cleveland Law Library (Cuyahoga County, Ohio) for the time period April-September, 1995. Five thousand and fifty-two questions were included in the study, of which 2,949 were of the type in which reference service was provided. The other 2,103…

  1. From Slovenian to American: Immigrants in Cleveland's Public and Parochial Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gombach, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    In a Cleveland that was one of the most foreign of the country's cities, the Slovenian community struggled with the problem of maintaining its cultural ties while still adopting enough American customs to enable it to take advantage of the opportunities in a democratic, industrialized city. This article attempts to clarify some of the problems of…

  2. Western dwarf mistletoe infects understory Jeffrey pine seedlings on Cleveland National Forest, California

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Scharpf; Detlev Vogler

    1986-01-01

    Many young, understory Jeffrey pines (Pinus jeffreyi Grev. & Balf.) were found to be infected by western dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium campylopodum Engelm.) on Laguna Mountain, Cleveland National Forest, in southern California. Under heavily infected overstory, about three-fourths of the young pines (about 15 years old on the...

  3. Sculpted landscapes: art & place in Cleveland's Cultural Gardens, 1916-2006.

    PubMed

    Tebeau, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the world's first peace garden, the Cleveland Cultural Gardens embody the history of twentieth-century America and reveal the complex interrelations between art and place. This essay uses the Cleveland Cultural Gardens as a lens through which to explore how art and place have intersected over time. It explores how communities have negotiated questions of national, ethnic, and American identity and embedded those identities into the vernacular landscape. It considers how the particulars of place were embedded into a public garden and asks whether it is possible for public art to transcend its place—both in terms of geography and history. In some sense, the Gardens have transcended their place, but in others respects, their fortunes were bound inextricably to that place, to the economic, demographic, and cultural contours that shaped and reshaped Northern Ohio. As works of art, the Cleveland Cultural Gardens both have reflected the history of Cleveland and American industrial cities during the 20th century and revealed something of the dynamics that underscored the changing character of public art and gardens in American cities.

  4. Content Knowledge of the Internet Among Public Reference Librarians at the Cleveland Heights Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Matthew J.

    The Internet is becoming an increasingly important medium of electronic information dissemination, and thus an increasingly important library reference tool. This study examines the Internet skills of a sample group of 15 public reference librarians in the Adult Services Department at the Cleveland Heights Public Library. The Internet skills that…

  5. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  6. 78 FR 14475 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cleveland, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Cleveland Regional...; Airspace Docket No. 12-ASO-47) and be submitted in triplicate to the Docket Management System (see... request a copy of Advisory circular No. 11-2A, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking distribution System,...

  7. 33 CFR 162.160 - Vermilion, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, and Conneaut Harbors, Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vermilion, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, and Conneaut Harbors, Ohio. 162.160 Section 162.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters..., Ohio. (a) In Vermilion Harbor, no vessel may exceed 6 miles per hour. (b) In Lorain,...

  8. 33 CFR 162.160 - Vermilion, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, and Conneaut Harbors, Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vermilion, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, and Conneaut Harbors, Ohio. 162.160 Section 162.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters..., Ohio. (a) In Vermilion Harbor, no vessel may exceed 6 miles per hour. (b) In Lorain,...

  9. Analysis of Reading Discrepancies for 1986-1987: Cleveland City School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafirau, S. James

    Fifth in a series of studies examining reading discrepancies in Cleveland, Ohio public schools, this report analyzed the spring 1986-1987 reading data so that accurate and usable information and recommendations would be available to decision-makers for related planning, curriculum design, and implementation functions of the district. Students in…

  10. Artifacts Bring Grover Cleveland's Presidency to Life in the First Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macken, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The author's school is located in Caldwell, New Jersey, which has the honor of being the birthplace of President Grover Cleveland. She wanted her students to connect that legacy to their study of the presidency. She knew that first graders are kinesthetic learners who love stories. She decided to combine excellent children's literature with…

  11. Application of optimal design methodologies in clinical pharmacology experiments.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Aarons, Leon

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics data are often analysed by mixed-effects modelling techniques (also known as population analysis), which has become a standard tool in the pharmaceutical industries for drug development. The last 10 years has witnessed considerable interest in the application of experimental design theories to population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic experiments. Design of population pharmacokinetic experiments involves selection and a careful balance of a number of design factors. Optimal design theory uses prior information about the model and parameter estimates to optimize a function of the Fisher information matrix to obtain the best combination of the design factors. This paper provides a review of the different approaches that have been described in the literature for optimal design of population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic experiments. It describes options that are available and highlights some of the issues that could be of concern as regards practical application. It also discusses areas of application of optimal design theories in clinical pharmacology experiments. It is expected that as the awareness about the benefits of this approach increases, more people will embrace it and ultimately will lead to more efficient population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic experiments and can also help to reduce both cost and time during drug development.

  12. [Leadership Experience of Clinical Nurses: Applying Focus Group Interviews].

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung Sook; Eo, Yong Sook; Lee, Mi Aie

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand and describe the leadership experience of clinical nurses. During 2014, data were collected using focus group interviews. Three focus group interviews were held with a total of 20 clinical nurses participating. All interviews were recorded as they were spoken and transcribed and data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Fifteen categories emerged from the five main themes. 1) Thoughts on the leadership category: to lead others, to cope with problem situations adequately and to serve as a shield against difficulties. 2) Situations requiring leadership: situation that requires correct judgement, coping and situations that need coordination and cooperation. 3-1) Leadership behaviors: other-oriented approach and self-oriented approach. 3-2) Leadership behavior consequences: relevant compensation and unfair termination. 4-1) Facilitators of leadership: confidence and passion for nursing and external support and resources. 4-2) Barriers to leadership: non-supportive organization culture and deficiency in own leadership competencies. 5) Strategies of leadership development: strengthen leadership through self-development and organizational leadership development. In conclusion, the results indicate that it is necessary to enhance clinical nurses' leadership role in healthcare. Enhancement can be achieved through leadership programs focused on enlarging leadership experience, constant self-development, leadership training, and development of leadership competencies suited to the nursing environment.

  13. Exploring nursing students' experience of peer learning in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students' experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students' experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job.

  14. Clinical experience of medical students in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Malik, Alam Sher; Seng, Quah Ban

    2003-07-01

    This paper compares the clinical experience in acute conditions of the undergraduate students of a medical school from a developing country (Malaysia) with those from a developed country (UK). This study was conducted at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). Through questionnaire survey enquiry was made about 27 acute medical conditions (i.e. conditions related to internal medicine, paediatrics, and psychiatry), 15 acute surgical conditions (i.e. conditions related to general surgery, orthopaedics, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, gynaecology and obstetrics), 15 surgical operations and 26 practical procedures. The results obtained were compared with published data from the UK. Acute medical conditions were seen by higher number of the USM students but with less frequency than the British students. The USM students saw practical procedures more frequently than the British students did, but almost an equal number performed these procedures independently. The British students attended surgical operations more frequently than the USM students did. Given the limitations of comparison (epidemiological, cultural and geographical differences, conventional curriculum (in the British medical schools) vs. problem based learning curriculum (in the Malaysian medical school)) the overall clinical experience of the medical students in the USM and the UK was comparable. The USM students had more opportunities to observe cases and procedures but "hands on" experience was similar to that of the British students.

  15. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  16. 'Net Generation' medical students: technological experiences of pre-clinical and clinical students.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gregor; Gray, Kathleen; Tse, Justin

    2008-02-01

    While institutions have been keen to integrate information and communication technologies into medical education, little is known about the technological experiences of the current cohort of so-called 'Net Generation' students. This study investigated the technological experiences of medical students and determined whether there were differences between pre-clinical and clinical students. In 2006, 207 pre-clinical and 161 clinical students studying medicine at a major Australian university were surveyed. The questionnaire asked students about their access to, use of and skills with an array of technologies and technology-based tools. The results show that access to mobile phones, memory sticks, desktop computers, and broadband Internet connections was high while technologies such as PDAs were used in very low numbers. A factor analysis of students' use of 39 technology-based tools revealed nine clear activity types, including the 'standard' use of computers and mobile-phones, and the use of the Internet as a pastime activity, for podcasting and for accessing services. A comparison of pre-clinical and clinical students revealed a number of significant differences in terms of the frequency and skill with which these students use distinct technology-based tools. The findings inform current technology-based teaching and learning activities and shed light on potential areas of educational technology development.

  17. Clinical education experiences: perceptions of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Elisha, Sass; Rutledge, Dana N

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and attitudes of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) related to clinical instruction. This descriptive study used a cross-sectional survey method with a regionally stratified randomly selected sample of SRNA members from the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists data bank. A total of 2,673 SRNAs were invited by email to respond to an online, 54-item questionnaire; 696 SRNAs participated. Verbal abuse was reported by almost 70% of SRNA participants, but fewer experienced sexual harassment (13%), physical abuse (14%), or racial discrimination (72%). However, SRNAs reported that their Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) preceptors most often served as positive role models. These SRNAs found CRNA preceptors, unique cases, reading, and clinical lectures more helpful to their clinical learning compared with grand rounds, surgeons, and anesthesiology residents. The SRNAs' perceptions of the ideal behavioral characteristics for CRNA preceptors included calmness during stressful events, use of nonthreatening communication, clear communication, and encouraging independent decision making. The educational process for nurse anesthetists is continually evolving and improving. Study findings offer insights that may assist in improvements in the clinical component of SRNA education.

  18. Investigator experiences with financial conflicts of interest in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Paula A; Sekeres, Melanie; Hoey, John; Lexchin, Joel; Ferris, Lorraine E; Moher, David; Wu, Wei; Kalkar, Sunila R; Van Laethem, Marleen; Gruneir, Andrea; Gold, Jennifer; Maskalyk, James; Streiner, David L; Taback, Nathan; Chan, An-Wen

    2011-01-12

    Financial conflicts of interest (fCOI) can introduce actions that bias clinical trial results and reduce their objectivity. We obtained information from investigators about adherence to practices that minimize the introduction of such bias in their clinical trials experience. Email survey of clinical trial investigators from Canadian sites to learn about adherence to practices that help maintain research independence across all stages of trial preparation, conduct, and dissemination. The main outcome was the proportion of investigators that reported full adherence to preferred trial practices for all of their trials conducted from 2001-2006, stratified by funding source. 844 investigators responded (76%) and 732 (66%) provided useful information. Full adherence to preferred clinical trial practices was highest for institutional review of signed contracts and budgets (82% and 75% of investigators respectively). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for the other two practices in the trial preparation stage (avoidance of confidentiality clauses, 12%; trial registration after 2005, 39%). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for 7 practices in the trial conduct (35% to 43%) and dissemination (53% to 64%) stages, particularly in industry funded trials. 269 investigators personally experienced (n = 85) or witnessed (n = 236) a fCOI; over 70% of these situations related to industry trials. Full adherence to practices designed to promote the objectivity of research varied across trial stages and was low overall, particularly for industry funded trials.

  19. Investigator experiences with financial conflicts of interest in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Financial conflicts of interest (fCOI) can introduce actions that bias clinical trial results and reduce their objectivity. We obtained information from investigators about adherence to practices that minimize the introduction of such bias in their clinical trials experience. Methods Email survey of clinical trial investigators from Canadian sites to learn about adherence to practices that help maintain research independence across all stages of trial preparation, conduct, and dissemination. The main outcome was the proportion of investigators that reported full adherence to preferred trial practices for all of their trials conducted from 2001-2006, stratified by funding source. Results 844 investigators responded (76%) and 732 (66%) provided useful information. Full adherence to preferred clinical trial practices was highest for institutional review of signed contracts and budgets (82% and 75% of investigators respectively). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for the other two practices in the trial preparation stage (avoidance of confidentiality clauses, 12%; trial registration after 2005, 39%). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for 7 practices in the trial conduct (35% to 43%) and dissemination (53% to 64%) stages, particularly in industry funded trials. 269 investigators personally experienced (n = 85) or witnessed (n = 236) a fCOI; over 70% of these situations related to industry trials. Conclusion Full adherence to practices designed to promote the objectivity of research varied across trial stages and was low overall, particularly for industry funded trials. PMID:21226951

  20. One clinic's experience with carbon fiber orthoses in neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Mnatsakanian, Ani; Kissel, John T; Terry, Philip; King, Wendy M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize our experience with off-the-shelf anterior shell carbon fiber ankle-foot orthoses (CFAFOs) prescribed to adult neuromuscular patients in an outpatient clinic. We studied ambulatory patients who were seen in Muscular Dystrophy Association or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clinics between 2011 and 2014 and prescribed anterior shell CFAFOs. Charts were reviewed with attention to diagnosis, satisfaction with use, and reasons for acceptance or rejection. We included individuals who were currently using AFOs and those being prescribed AFOs for the first time. We were especially interested in reasons for acceptance or rejection of the orthosis. Two hundred eighty-three charts were reviewed. Of these, 109 of 123 (89%) patients were satisfied or extremely satisfied with the anterior shell CFAFOs, including 38 who had previously used other styles. Anterior shell CFAFOs should be considered for most neuromuscular patients with distal leg weakness. Muscle Nerve 55: 202-205, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Preliminary clinical experience with a new fluted humeral nail.

    PubMed

    Garnavos, C; Lunn, P G

    1994-05-01

    The early clinical results of humeral nailing using a fluted intramedullary nail with a locking screw are reported. The True-Flex nail has been designed with a proximal cancellous screw to prevent 'back-tracking' and with flutes to give rotational control. The design features have proved to be successful in the authors' brief clinical experience in 12 patients with complicated fractures, non-unions or pathological lesions. Eight of the 10 fractures healed uneventfully, one by delayed union; one had to be revised because of loosening due to use of a nail which was too narrow. There were no serious complications. Return of function in the arm was good. This humeral nail may be suitable for fixation of some complicated and difficult fractures and lesions of the humeral shaft.

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Libby Creek (Lower Cleveland) Stabilization Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-07-29

    This project is follow-up to stream stabilization activities on Libby Creek that were initiated on the Upper Cleveland reach of Libby Creek 2 years ago. BPA now proposes to fund FWP to complete channel stabilization activities on the Lower Cleveland reach of Libby Creek, reduce sediment sources, convert overwidened portions of the stream into self-maintaining channel types, use natural stream stabilization techniques, and improve wildlife migratory corridors. This lower reach is about one river mile below the upper Cleveland Reach and the proposed activities are very similar to those conducted before. The current work would be constructed in two additional phases. The first phase of the Lower Cleveland project would be completed in the fall of 2004 (9/1/04--12/31/04), to include the upper 3,100 feet. The second phase will be constructed in the fall of 2005 (9/1/05--12/31/05), to include stabilizing the remaining 6,200 feet of stream. The Cleveland reaches are a spawning and rearing tributary for resident redband trout, and resident and fluvial bull trout migrating from the Kootenai River. The planned work at the two remaining phases calls for shaping cut banks; installing root wads and tree revetments; installing channel grade control structures; planting native vegetation; and installing cross vanes constructed from rock and trees to control channel gradient. In the past, this reach of Libby Creek has been degraded by past management practices, including road building, hydraulic and dredge mining, and riparian logging. This past activity has resulted in accelerated bank erosion along a number of meander bends, resulting in channel degradation and poor fish habitat. Currently the stream channel is over-widened and shallow having limited pool habitat. The current stream channel is over-widened and shallow, having limited pool habitat.

  3. Experience of isolated sleep paralysis in clinical practice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohaeri, J U

    1992-06-01

    The supernatural fears associated with the experience of isolated sleep paralysis in the culture of developing countries is sometimes associated with the evolution of somatic symptoms of psychological origin in patients predisposed to neurotic illness. Patients rarely spontaneously volunteer these fears and doctors pay them scant attention. Illustrative case histories that demonstrate the dynamics of the clinical presentation, as well as the treatment approach, are highlighted. It is hoped that doctors in general medical practice and in psychological medicine in developing countries where belief in supernatural causation of illness is rife will consider these factors in order to provide more effective treatment.

  4. Thalidomide in type-2 lepra reaction--a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, V H; Patki, A H; Mehta, J M

    1990-01-01

    A clinical experience of using thalidomide in type-2 lepra reaction (ENL) in 90 male patients--57 with lepromatous leprosy (LL) and 33 with borderline lepromatous leprosy (BL)--is described. All the patients responded well although some took a longer time to improve. No major side effects were observed except for giddiness in 10 and gastrointestinal upsets in 7 patients. Thalidomide thus appears to be a very effective drug in the treatment of severe type-2 lepra reaction and apart from its historically well-documented embryopathic effects, does not seem to have any other serious side effects in the patients under study.

  5. [The clinical experience with MARS and Prometheus procedures].

    PubMed

    Hydzik, Piotr; Gawlikowski, Tomasz; Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Sułlek, Monika

    2007-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis, that extracorporeal removal of endo- and egzogenic substances should be beneficial to the clinical course of the patient in liver failure or poisoned, treatment systems were evaluatedbased on the two concepts: (1) blood dialysis against albumin dialysate--Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS), Single Pass Albumin Dialysis (SPAD), Continuous Veno-Venous Haemodiafiltration (CWHDF); (2) selective albumin filtration and adsorption combined with haemodialysis--Fractioned Plasma Separation and Adsorption-Prometheus. We present our own experiences with MARS and Prometheus procedures between 2003-2006 years.

  6. Integrative clinical experience: an innovative program to prepare for internship.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joslyn W; Thompson, Britta M; Garcia, Aimee D

    2007-01-01

    Interns experience tremendous challenges on the transition from student to new physician. There is limited literature describing curriculum that enhances medical students' preparation for internship. To prepare graduating medical students at our institution for the new responsibilities and stressors that they will face as interns, an elective course, Integrative Clinical Experience, was implemented. Over a 2-week period, participating medical students rotate through 1 to 3-hr modules that cover four major domains: managing acutely ill patients, teaching, communicating, and coping with stressors. Participants evaluated the course qualitatively and quantitatively through verbal and written feedback. Students found the course useful and educationally valuable. They also had a statistically significant increase in perceived preparedness for internship upon completion of the course. A 2-week, concentrated course is a feasible and effective method for raising students' perceived preparedness for internship.

  7. Pediatric residents' experiences of a clinical rotation in Adolescent Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although Adolescent Medicine is a pediatric subspecialty, it addresses many issues that differ from other aspects of pediatrics clinical training. The aim of this study was to explore the general experiences of pediatric residents during their rotations in Adolescent Medicine. Methods Qualitative methods were applied. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with pediatric residents who had completed a rotation in Adolescent Medicine. Emergent themes were identified. Results Three key themes emerged: gaining exposure, taking on a professional role, and achieving self-awareness. Subcategories were also identified. There was particular emphasis on the multidisciplinary team and the biopsychosocial approach to adolescent health care. Conclusions The experiences in Adolescent Medicine reflected residents' learning, notably gains in the "non-expert" as well as "medical expert" physician competencies. Future studies should explore how the interprofessional nature of an Adolescent Medicine team and the patient populations themselves contribute to this learning. PMID:21122143

  8. Aggregate/community-centered undergraduate community health nursing clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Flick, L H; Reese, C; Harris, A

    1996-02-01

    Debate continues about the appropriateness of clinical experiences targeting aggregates in undergraduate community health nursing education. This paper describes a practical model to teach, through experience, the concepts of aggregate/community-centered practice at the baccalaureate level. As a voluntary alternative to the usual community assessment paper, groups of students worked in partnership with community groups to define health needs and to address one need. Sequential student groups focused the assessment and implemented a plan. The required time for each project varied. One project is described to illustrate the model. While independent community-centered practice is not expected of the B.S.N. graduate, the model described here develops comprehension of the concepts and process of such practice.

  9. Pediatric residents' experiences of a clinical rotation in Adolescent Medicine.

    PubMed

    Albuhairan, Fadia; Leslie, Karen; Goldberg, Eudice

    2010-12-01

    Although Adolescent Medicine is a pediatric subspecialty, it addresses many issues that differ from other aspects of pediatrics clinical training. The aim of this study was to explore the general experiences of pediatric residents during their rotations in Adolescent Medicine. Qualitative methods were applied. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with pediatric residents who had completed a rotation in Adolescent Medicine. Emergent themes were identified. Three key themes emerged: gaining exposure, taking on a professional role, and achieving self-awareness. Subcategories were also identified. There was particular emphasis on the multidisciplinary team and the biopsychosocial approach to adolescent health care. The experiences in Adolescent Medicine reflected residents' learning, notably gains in the "non-expert" as well as "medical expert" physician competencies. Future studies should explore how the interprofessional nature of an Adolescent Medicine team and the patient populations themselves contribute to this learning.

  10. Clinical trial participants' experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-03-24

    To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in 'missing' or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an intervention is a subjective experience, it seems important to create a

  11. Clinical trial participants’ experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. Setting The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. Participants The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. Outcomes We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Results Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Conclusions Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in ‘missing’ or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an

  12. Physician experiences with clinical pharmacists in primary care teams.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Gerardo; Lonowski, Sarah; Fu, Jeffrey; Chon, Janet S; Whitmire, Natalie; Vasquez, Carolina; Skootsky, Samuel A; Bell, Douglas S; Maranon, Richard; Mangione, Carol M

    2017-08-12

    Improving medication management is an important component of comprehensive care coordination for health systems. The Managing Your Medication for Education and Daily Support (MyMeds) medication management program at the University of California Los Angeles addresses medication management issues by embedding trained clinical pharmacists in primary care practice teams. The aim of this work was to examine and explore physician opinions about the clinical pharmacist program and identify common themes among physician experiences as well as barriers to integration of clinical pharmacists into primary care practice teams. We conducted a mixed quantitative-qualitative methods study consisting of a cross-sectional physician survey (n = 69) as well as semistructured one-on-one physician interviews (n = 13). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize survey responses, and standard qualitative content-analysis methods were used to identify major themes from the interviews. The survey response rate was 61%; 13 interviews were conducted. Ninety percent of survey respondents agreed or strongly agreed that having the pharmacist in the office makes management of the patient's medication more efficient, 93% agreed or strongly agreed that pharmacist recommendations are clinically helpful, 71% agreed or strongly agreed that having access to a pharmacist has increased their knowledge about medications they prescribe, and 75% agreed or strongly agreed that having a pharmacist as part of the primary care team has made their job easier. Qualitative interviews corroborated survey findings, and physicians highlighted the value of the clinical pharmacist's communication, team care and expanded roles, and medication management. Primary care physicians valued the integrated pharmacy program highly, particularly its features of strong communication, expanded roles, and medication management. Pharmacists were viewed as integral members of the health care team. Copyright © 2017 American

  13. Aerodynamic size distribution of suspended particulate matter in the ambient air in the city of Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The City of Cleveland Division of Air Pollution Control and NASA jointly investigated the chemical and physical characteristics of the suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, and as part of the program, measurements of the particle size distribution of ambient air samples at five urban locations during August and September 1972 were made using high-volume cascade impactions. The distributions were evaluated for lognormality, and the mass median diameters were compared between locations and as a function of resultant wind direction. Junge-type distributions were consistent with dirty continental aerosols. About two-thirds of the suspended particulate matter observed in Cleveland is less than 7 microns in diameter.

  14. Trichomycosis (Trichobacteriosis): Clinical and Microbiological Experience with 56 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Váquez-González, Denisse; Fierro, Leonel; Araiza, Javier; Ponce, Rosa María

    2013-01-01

    Background: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic bacterial infection of the axillary hairs caused by Corynebacterium sp. Objective: to bring a series of cases of trichomycosis, its clinical and microbiological experience. Materials and Methods: This report consists in a linear and observational retrospective study of 15 years of cases of trichomycosis confirmed clinically and microbiologically. Results: Fifty six confirmed cases of trichomycosis were included in this report. The majority were men 53/56 (94.6%), mean age was 32.5 years. The most commonly affected area was the axilla (92%), trichomycosis flava was the principal variant 55/56 (98.2%) and signs and symptoms associated were hyperhidrosis (87.5%), hairs’ texture change (57.1%) and odor (35.7%). Bacterial concretions were observed in all cases, and the predominant causative agent in 89.3% of all cases was Corynebacterium sp. Thirty patients were included in therapeutic portion of the study, and 28 (93.3%) of them experienced a clinical and microbiological cure. Conclusion: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic, superficial infection, which primarily affects axillary hairs. PMID:23960390

  15. Light-emitting Diodes: A Brief Review and Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Opel, Daniel R; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A; Desai, Shraddha; Swan, James

    2015-06-01

    In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors' clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters.

  16. Molding of the regenerate in mandibular distraction: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joseph G; Hopper, Richard A; Hollier, Larry H; Peltomaki, Timo; Katzen, Timothy; Grayson, Barry H

    2003-10-01

    Initial clinical experience with distraction osteogenesis has demonstrated the risk of developing postdistraction malocclusion that requires secondary orthodontic correction. In addition, optimal mandibular form is not always achieved. Both animal studies and preliminary clinical investigations have suggested that the regenerate can be successfully "molded" during active mandibular distraction. The authors have applied this concept clinically to obtain a more desirable occlusal relationship in a group of mandibular distraction patients. Eleven patients are described in whom angulation of the distraction device or intermaxillary/interdental elastics were employed to mold the regenerate. Two representative case studies are provided to illustrate the principles. When using elastic traction to close an anterior open bite, care must be taken that extrusion of individual teeth is minimized by distributing the force over the entire dental arch, especially the basilar portions of the jaws. The authors demonstrate that molding of the regenerate can be successfully accomplished not only during device activation but also early in the consolidation period. The outer limit of the time window in which molding is effective remains to be defined.

  17. Initial clinical experience with the Baylor-Nikkiso centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, S; Naito, K; Matsuura, M; Kawahito, K; Shimono, T; Makinouchi, K; Tasai, K; Ohara, Y; Damm, G; Glueck, J

    1995-07-01

    Recently, a newly developed centrifugal pump, the Baylor-Nikkiso pump, was approved for clinical use in the United States. This pump is the most compact centrifugal pump with a priming volume of only 25 ml. Although it is small, this pump can provide a flow of 4 L/min against a total pressure head of 300 mm Hg at 3,000 rpm. In vitro and in vivo validation of the Baylor-Nikkiso pump has proved that this pump could effectively reduce blood trauma even under high total head pressure. In addition, 48-h durability tests with biventricular bypass using calves verified the reliability of shaft sealing and antithrombogenicity. Clinical trials of the Baylor-Nikkiso pumps have been initiated in our department. This pump provides flows of 60-70 ml/kg/min with stable hemodynamic conditions. No leakage of thrombus formation was observed. The results of the initial clinical experience of the Baylor-Nikkiso pump suggest that it is suitable for cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

  18. Doctors' experience with handheld computers in clinical practice: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Schweikhart, Sharon B; Medow, Mitchell A

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine doctors' perspectives about their experiences with handheld computers in clinical practice. Design Qualitative study of eight focus groups consisting of doctors with diverse training and practice patterns. Setting Six practice settings across the United States and two additional focus group sessions held at a national meeting of general internists. Participants 54 doctors who did or did not use handheld computers. Results Doctors who used handheld computers in clinical practice seemed generally satisfied with them and reported diverse patterns of use. Users perceived that the devices helped them increase productivity and improve patient care. Barriers to use concerned the device itself and personal and perceptual constraints, with perceptual factors such as comfort with technology, preference for paper, and the impression that the devices are not easy to use somewhat difficult to overcome. Participants suggested that organisations can help promote handheld computers by providing advice on purchase, usage, training, and user support. Participants expressed concern about reliability and security of the device but were particularly concerned about dependency on the device and over-reliance as a substitute for clinical thinking. Conclusions Doctors expect handheld computers to become more useful, and most seem interested in leveraging (getting the most value from) their use. Key opportunities with handheld computers included their use as a stepping stone to build doctors' comfort with other information technology and ehealth initiatives and providing point of care support that helps improve patient care. PMID:15142920

  19. Dental Student Hand Hygiene Decreased With Increased Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Yaembut, Nanmanas; Ampornaramveth, Ruchanee S; Pisarnturakit, Pagaporn P; Subbalekha, Keskanya

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness, related knowledge, attitudes, and practices of hand hygiene (HH) among dental students with different levels of clinical experience. This was a cross-sectional analytical study. Bacterial samples on the participants' hands were obtained using a swab technique before and after handwashing, for oral surgical procedures. After culturing, the colony-forming units were counted. Self-reported questionnaires reflecting the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to HH were completed by the participants. This study was performed in a primary oral health care institution, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok, Thailand). Bacterial samples and self-reported questionnaires were collected in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Bacterial culture was performed in the Department of Microbiology. The 120 participants comprised first, second, third-year clinical training students (CTs), and postgraduate dental students (PGs) (32, 34, 30, and 24 participants, respectively). More than 99% of the bacteria were eliminated from the participants' hands after handwashing. Significantly higher numbers of bacteria were recovered from the hands of the PGs compared with those of the CTs, and the hands of the third-year CTs compared with those of the first-year CTs (p < 0.001), after HH. The first-year CTs had the highest attitude scores, whereas the PGs had the lowest practice scores. The knowledge scores were similar in all groups. HH effectiveness, attitudes, and practices of dental students decreased as students gained more clinical experience, whereas knowledge did not. Our results suggest that HH instruction should be given throughout the duration of dental students' education. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary

  1. The Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience: building communication skills in the clinical reasoning context.

    PubMed

    Konopasek, Lyuba; Kelly, Kevin V; Bylund, Carma L; Wenderoth, Suzanne; Storey-Johnson, Carol

    2014-07-01

    Students are rarely taught communication skills in the context of clinical reasoning training. The purpose of this project was to combine the teaching of communication skills using SPs with clinical reasoning exercises in a Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience (GOSCE) to study feasibility of the approach, the effect on learners' self-efficacy and attitude toward learning communication skills, and the effect of providing multiple sources of immediate, collaborative feedback. GOSCE sessions were piloted in Pediatrics and Medicine clerkships with students assessing their own performance and receiving formative feedback on communication skills from peers, standardized patients (SPs), and faculty. The sessions were evaluated using a retrospective pre/post-training questionnaire rating changes in self-efficacy and attitudes, and the value of the feedback. Results indicate a positive impact on attitudes toward learning communication skills and self-efficacy regarding communication in the clinical setting. Also, learners considered feedback by peers, SPs, and faculty valuable in each GOSCE. The GOSCE is an efficient and learner-centered method to attend to multiple goals of teaching communication skills, clinical reasoning, self-assessment, and giving feedback in a formative setting. The GOSCE is a low-resource, feasible strategy for experiential learning in communication skills and clinical reasoning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Concept-Based Learning in Clinical Experiences: Bringing Theory to Clinical Education for Deep Learning.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ann

    2016-07-01

    Concept-based learning is used increasingly in nursing education to support the organization, transfer, and retention of knowledge. Concept-based learning activities (CBLAs) have been used in clinical education to explore key aspects of the patient situation and principles of nursing care, without responsibility for total patient care. The nature of best practices in teaching and the resultant learning are not well understood. The purpose of this multiple-case study research was to explore and describe concept-based learning in the context of clinical education in inpatient settings. Four clinical groups (each a case) were observed while they used CBLAs in the clinical setting. Major findings include that concept-based learning fosters deep learning, connection of theory with practice, and clinical judgment. Strategies used to support learning, major teaching-learning foci, and preconditions for concept-based teaching and learning will be described. Concept-based learning is promising to support integration of theory with practice and clinical judgment through application experiences with patients. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(7):365-371.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Managing medical images and clinical information: InCor's experience.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Sergio S; Rebelo, Marina S; Moreno, Ramon A; Santos, Marcelo; Bertozzo, Nivaldo; Motta, Gustavo H M B; Pires, Fabio A; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Patients usually get medical assistance in several clinics and hospitals during their lifetime, archiving vital information in a dispersed way. Clearly, a proper patient care should take into account that information in order to check for incompatibilities, avoid unnecessary exams, and get relevant clinical history. The Heart Institute (InCor) of São Paulo, Brazil, has been committed to the goal of integrating all exams and clinical information within the institution and other hospitals. Since InCor is one of the six institutes of the University of São Paulo Medical School and each institute has its own information system, exchanging information among the institutes is also a very important aspect that has been considered. In the last few years, a system for transmission, archiving, retrieval, processing, and visualization of medical images integrated with a hospital information system has been successfully created and constitutes the InCor's electronic patient record (EPR). This work describes the experience in the effort to develop a functional and comprehensive EPR, which includes laboratory exams, images (static, dynamic, and three dimensional), clinical reports, documents, and even real-time vital signals. A security policy based on a contextual role-based access control model was implemented to regulate user's access to EPR. Currently, more than 10 TB of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images have been stored using the proposed architecture and the EPR stores daily more than 11 GB of integrated data. The proposed storage subsystem allows 6 months of visibility for rapid retrieval and more than two years for automatic retrieval using a jukebox. This paper addresses also a prototype for the integration of distributed and heterogeneous EPR.

  4. [Clinical data I. Clinical experience with tenofovir in combination with nonnucleoside analogue transcriptase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Bernardino de la Serna, J I; Mora Rillo, M; Arribas López, J R

    2008-06-01

    Highly active antirretroviral therapy has transformed the prognosis of patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The efficacy of these drugs has shifted the clinicians; attention to other therapeutic aspects like QD regimens, fixed dose combinations and clinical safety. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate(TDF) is a nucleoside monophosphate (nucleotide) analogue that inhibits reverse trascriptase enzyme. It's administered in a q.d. regimen and it's recommended by most of the clinical guidelines as a start regimen in combination with two other drugs. Currently more than 5 years of clinical experience is accumulated and confirmed that a combination of tenofovir and a nonnucleoside analogue transcriptase inhibitor is a comfortable, safe, highly effective and low pill burden regimen.

  5. Impact of clinical experience on quantification of clinical signs at physical examination.

    PubMed

    Drager, L F; Abe, J M; Martins, M A; Lotufo, P A; Benseñor, I J M

    2003-09-01

    Although physical examination is a fundamental component of medical decision making, relatively few studies have evaluated how physicians quantify clinical signs and whether different methods of assessment have different effects on clinical practice. To evaluate a possible impact of clinical experience when attending physicians, medical residents and medical students quantify qualitative signs of physical examination in a teaching hospital. Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 244 randomly selected physicians and medical students completed a reliable and consistent eight-item questionnaire. To compare how they quantified clinical signs of cyanosis, anaemia, jaundice, oedema and dehydration, why they used the method(s) they described, and whether the method used could affect diagnosis, further testing or patient management. A chi-square test was used to calculate differences between the groups. Whilst the majority of those surveyed tended to use a four-level evaluation for these clinical signs, attending staff physicians were more likely to employ two-level evaluations than were residents or medical students. For all five signs, attending physicians' use of dichotomous evaluations was significantly higher than that of residents or medical students: anaemia (P = 0.004), cyanosis (P < 0.001), oedema (P = 0.005), dehydration (P < 0.001) and jaundice (P = 0.002). Although medical students and residents are routinely taught to use a four-level evaluation for these clinical signs, many of those surveyed tend to abandon this experience for a dichotomous approach. Given that the clinicians in this survey tended not to change their initial approach to a patient based on the intensity of this semi-quantitative method, increased emphasis on teaching dichotomous approach evaluations in medical school should be encouraged.

  6. General Practitioners' responses to global climate change - lessons from clinical experience and the clinical method.

    PubMed

    Blashki, Grant; Abelsohn, Alan; Woollard, Robert; Arya, Neil; Parkes, Margot W; Kendal, Paul; Bell, Erica; Bell, R Warren

    2012-08-08

    Climate change is a global public health problem that will require complex thinking if meaningful and effective solutions are to be achieved. In this conceptual paper we argue that GPs have much to bring to the issue of climate change from their wide-ranging clinical experience and from the principles underpinning their clinical methods. This experience and thinking calls forth particular contributions GPs can and should make to debate and action. We contend that the privileged experience and GP way of thinking can make valuable contributions when applied to climate change solutions. These include a lifetime of experience, reflection and epistemological application to first doing no harm, managing uncertainty, the ability to make necessary decisions while possessing incomplete information, an appreciation of complex adaptive systems, maintenance of homeostasis, vigilance for unintended consequences, and an appreciation of the importance of transdisciplinarity and interprofessionalism. General practitioners have a long history of public health advocacy and in the case of climate change may bring a way of approaching complex human problems that could be applied to the dilemmas of climate change.

  7. 75 FR 4063 - Adequacy Status of the Cleveland/Akron, Ohio Submitted Annual Fine Particulate Matter Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Demonstration for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... in transportation conformity determinations. Ohio submitted the Cleveland/Akron area budgets with the... from the submitted PM 2.5 attainment demonstration plan for future transportation...

  8. From IDs to Ice Cream to "I, Claudius": Security Is in the Cards at Cleveland Hill Union Free School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passmore, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of plastic identity badges with photographs and barcodes issued to all administrators, teachers, staff members, and students in grades 6-12 at the Cleveland Hill Union Free School District in Cheektowaga, New York. (PKP)

  9. From IDs to Ice Cream to "I, Claudius": Security Is in the Cards at Cleveland Hill Union Free School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passmore, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of plastic identity badges with photographs and barcodes issued to all administrators, teachers, staff members, and students in grades 6-12 at the Cleveland Hill Union Free School District in Cheektowaga, New York. (PKP)

  10. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  11. Implementing security in computer based patient records clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Iversen, K R; Heimly, V; Lundgren, T I

    1995-01-01

    In Norway, organizational changes in hospitals and a stronger focus on patient safety have changed the way of organizing and managing paper based patient records. Hospital-wide patient records tend to replace department based records. Since not only clinicians, but also other non-medical staff have access to the paper records, they also have easy access to all the information which is available on a specific patient; such a system has obvious 'side effects' on privacy and security. Computer based patient records (CPRs) can provide the solution to this apparent paradox if the complex aspects of security, privacy, effectiveness, and user friendliness are focused on jointly from the outset in designing such systems. Clinical experiences in Norway show that it is possible to design patient record systems that provide a very useful tool for clinicians and other health care personnel (HCP) while fully complying with comprehensive security and privacy requirements.

  12. Prescribing exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation: a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S; Ribeiro, F; Maltais, F; Saey, D

    2014-01-01

    Built around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary, evidence-based, comprehensive approach to working with the patient as a whole and not just the pulmonary component of the disease. Integrated into the individualized treatment, this intervention aims to reduce symptoms, optimize functional status, increase participation in daily life, and reduce health care costs through stabilizing or reversing systemic manifestations of the disease. Although there are many other components that should be considered to manage the impairment and symptom burden, supervised exercise training is considered the cornerstone of effective pulmonary rehabilitation. This paper addresses our clinical experience at Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec to assess and manage exercise training in line with the current recommendations and guidelines surrounding PR.

  13. Experiences of establishing an academic early phase clinical trials unit.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah R; Sherratt, Debbie; Booth, Gill; Brown, Julia; Collinson, Fiona; Gregory, Walter; Flanagan, Louise

    2017-08-01

    Early phase trials are essential in drug development, determining appropriate dose levels and assessing preliminary activity. These trials are undertaken by industry and academia, with increasing collaborations between the two. There is pressure to perform these trials quickly, safely, and robustly. However, there are inherent differences between developing and managing early phase, compared to late phase, drug trials. This article describes an approach to establishing an academically led early phase trial portfolio, highlighting lessons learned and sharing experiences. In 2009, the University of Leeds Clinical Trials Research Unit became the Clinical Trials Coordinating Office for Myeloma UK's phase I and II trials. We embarked on a transition from working extensively in phase III to early phase trials development and conduct. This involved evaluating and revising our well-established standard operating procedures, visiting other academic early phase units, and developing essential new documentation and processes. A core team of trial and data managers and statisticians was established to facilitate expertise and knowledge retention. A detailed training plan was implemented focussing on essential standard practices for early phase. These included pharmacovigilance, recruitment, trial design and set-up, data and site monitoring, and oversight committees. Training in statistical methods for early phase trials was incorporated. Initial scoping of early phase trial management and conduct was essential in establishing this early phase portfolio. Many of the processes developed were successful. However, regular review and evaluation were implemented to enable changes and ensure efficiencies. It is recommended that others embarking on this venture build on the experiences described in this article.

  14. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed.

  15. Management of pituitary apoplexy: clinical experience with 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Lubina, A; Olchovsky, D; Berezin, M; Ram, Z; Hadani, M; Shimon, I

    2005-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare major clinical event with neurological, neuro-ophthalmological, cardiovascular and hormonal consequences, resulting from an acute infarction of pituitary adenoma. We report our experience with a series of 40 patients presenting with pituitary apoplexy. Forty patients (27 males, 13 females; mean age, 51.2 yr) were admitted to our medical center between years 1985-2002 with acute presentation of pituitary apoplexy. Visual field defects occurred in 61% and ocular paresis in 40% of subjects. Sixty-three percent of adenomas were nonfunctional, and prolactinomas comprised 31%. Thirty-four patients underwent transsphenoidal pituitary decompression. Visual fields and ophthalmoplegia improved in 81% and 71%, respectively. During follow-up (4.5+/-5.4 yr), 79% of patients developed hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, central hypothyroidism appeared in 54% and hypocortisolism--in 40% of patients. Permanent diabetes insipidus was diagnosed in 8%. Serial sellar MRI showed disappearance of pituitary tumor in 63% of operated subjects. Six patients (3 with PRL-secreting and 3 nonfunctional adenomas) were treated medically (corticosteroids, dopamine agonists), two patients (out of three) with visual deficits improved, and tumor shrinkage was noted in four. We present a large series of patients with pituitary apoplexy. Most subjects were operated, but six were treated conservatively. Almost all patients improved clinically, including those who were not operated, but hormonal deficiencies are very common.

  16. The initial Trinidad experience with Cine MRI in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C N; Maharaj, P; Bodapati, S; John, R; Rahaman, R; Henry, R; Brann, S

    2002-03-01

    We describe the initial Trinidad experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Cine MRI as a diagnostic tool in clinical cardiology. Six patients from the following categories were referred for Cine MRI evaluation: congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, aortic diseases, cardiomyopathy and intracardiac mass. All patients underwent echocardiography. MRI and Cine MRI were performed on all patients using a Siemens Magnetom 1.0 Tesla MR system at MRI Trinidad and Tobago Ltd. Selected patients underwent Angiography and/or computed tomography (CT) scanning. Clinical data and images of the six patients evaluated are described. MRI and Cine MRI provided excellent anatomical and functional details of the heart and aorta in five patients with dissection of the aorta, aneurysm of the ascending aorta, suspected left ventricular apical thrombus, infiltrative cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Technical difficulty was experienced with one patient who had a congenital defect (common atrium). In this study, Cine MRI provided excellent images in all but one patient. This new noninvasive technique enhanced diagnostic capabilities and facilitated management in patients with certain cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Dabigatran in Secondary Stroke Prevention: Clinical Experience with 106 Patients

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe-Mimbrera, Alicia; Cánovas, Araceli Alonso; Guillán, Marta; Matute, Consuelo; Cruz, Antonio; Vera, Rocío; Masjuan, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Our aim was to analyze our clinical experience with dabigatran etexilate in secondary stroke prevention. Methods. We retrospectively included patients starting dabigatran etexilate for secondary stroke prevention from March 2010 to December 2012. Efficacy and safety variables were registered. Results. 106 patients were included, median follow-up of 12 months (range 1–31). Fifty-six females (52.8%), mean age 76.4 (range 50–95, SD 9.8), median CHADS2 4 (range 2–6), CHA2DS2-VASc 5 (range 2–9), and HAS-BLED 2 (range 1–5). Indication for dabigatran etexilate was ischemic stroke in 101 patients and acute cerebral hemorrhage (CH) due to warfarin in 5 (4.7%). Dabigatran etexilate 110 mg bid was prescribed in 71 cases (67%) and 150 mg bid was prescribed in the remaining. Seventeen patients (16%) suffered 20 complications during follow-up. Ischemic complications (10) were 6 transient ischemic attacks (TIA), 3 ischemic strokes, and 1 acute coronary syndrome. Hemorrhagic complications (10) were CH (1), gastrointestinal bleeding (6), mild hematuria (2), and mild metrorrhagia (1), leading to dabigatran etexilate discontinuation in 3 patients. Patients with previous CH remained uneventful. Three patients died (pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and acute cholecystitis) and 9 were lost during follow-up. Conclusions. Dabigatran etexilate was safe and effective in secondary stroke prevention in clinical practice, including a small number of patients with previous history of CH. PMID:25133166

  18. Clinical experience of surgically treating giant neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baoguo; Xu, Minghuo; Song, Huifeng; Gao, Quanwen

    2017-02-01

    The surgical treatment for giant neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) requires comprehensive measures. Presently, there is no systematic description of surgical treatment. Because of its high level of risk, we want to share our clinical experience. From 2011 to 2014, patients (n = 8, 5 female and 3 male patients, aging from 31 to 45 years-old) were included in the study. The tumours were located on the trunk (n = 5) or face (n = 3). In addition to routine examination, blood storage was also prepared. Preoperative consultation from related departments was critical at first. Related artery embolisation was also carried out. In the operation, we checked thromboelastography, based on which reasonable blood component transfusion was implemented. Autologous blood transfusion was also ready. An instrument of copper needle or ring ligation was used to reduce haemorrhage before the surgery. Protruding or drooping portions of the tumours were excised. A pressurised bandage was applied when the surgery was completed. After the surgery, besides the routine monitoring of vital signs, re-haemorrhage should be detected in time. Then, we should decide whether blood transfusion or surgery was required again. Expanders were implanted in one female patient with facial injuries before removing the tumour. Then, expanded flaps were applied to repair the secondary wound. According to the above clinical route, after an average of 1-year follow-up, no patients died, and other unforeseen events did not occur. Wounds healed well in all patients. The tumor was excised as much as possible. No facial nerve paralysis occurred in the facial sites. Expanded flaps necrosis WAS not encountered. It is essential to design the educational clinical route for treating NF-1 when a giant protruding tumour is advised to be excised, which can minimise the risk of surgery and assure us of the maximum range of resection. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML.

  20. Clinical experience of spontaneous pneumomediastinum: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Hyun Woo; Moon, Youngkyu; Kim, Young Du; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Jae Kil

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a benign disease with a variety degree of severity but definite treatment modality is not clearly identified with its rarity. The purpose of this study was to review our experience and discuss the management of SPM according to the severity of disease. Methods From March 1996 to December 2012, total 64 patients were enrolled and classified as mild, moderate and severe groups and subsequent clinical courses were analyzed retrospectively. Results Fifty-one were males and 13 were females (M:F =3.9:1) with a mean age of 18 years old (range: 10-30 years old). Thirty-six patients were in mild, 22 in moderate and 6 in severe group. Chief complaints were chest pain (50 cases; 78.1%), neck pain (35 cases; 54.7%), dyspnea (18 cases; 28.1%), odynophagia (9 cases; 14.1%) and precipitating factors were coughing in 12 cases, feeding problems in 9 cases, and vomiting in 7 cases; however, 34 patients (53.1%) had no precipitating signs. All patients received oxygen therapy (100%), prophylactic antibiotics in 57 patients (89.1%), and pain medications in 47 patients (73.4%). The mean hospital stay was 4.6 days (range: 1-10 days). There was an increased linear trend according to time to visit (P=0.023) but clinical course demonstrated no significant trend between groups. Conclusions These data demonstrated that there was no difference in symptom, clinical course and SPM was adequately treated with conservative management regardless of the degree of severity of SPM. PMID:26623105

  1. Clinical experience with heat sterilization for reprocessing dialyzers.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A M; Frinak, S; Godmere, R O; Levin, N W

    1992-01-01

    Use of heat sterilization for dialysis reprocessing offers significant advantages over chemical germicides. Polysulfone dialyzers (Fresenius 60M or 80M) can be sterilized by heating to 105 degrees C for 20 hr, thus permitting clinical trials of this method. One hundred eighty patients received 9,000 treatments. Pyrogenic reactions, sepsis, and subjective symptoms have not occurred. In vitro clearances (Qb 500 ml/min, Qd 800 ml/min) at baseline and after 2-8 uses did not differ (340 +/- 29 vs. 352 +/- 4 ml/min, respectively). KoA determined in vivo did not decrease (baseline 709 +/- 131 vs. 7th use 632 +/- 50 ml/min). Kt/V for urea was not different in 18 patients treated with heat sterilized dialyzers over 6 months when compared with a baseline period with formaldehyde sterilized dialyzers (1.37 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.32 +/- 0.11 at similar time and blood flows). Mean use number was 7.4 (dialyzers limited to 11 uses). Of discarded dialyzers, 44% failed a bedside integrity test (blood side pressurized at > 400 mmHg for 1 min), 36% failed automated fiber bundle or pressure holding tests, 8% had a blood leak, and 12% reached 11 uses. Clinical blood leaks occur in < 0.5% of treatments. Heat sterilization is a safe and effective method of dialysis reprocessing, but quality control of the process is essential. Based on initial clinical experience, heat sterilization of dialyzers for reuse is a promising alternative to chemical disinfection.

  2. Initial European clinical experience with pulsatile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Agati, Salvatore; Mignosa, Carmelo; Ciccarello, Giuseppe; Salvo, Dario; Undar, Akif

    2006-04-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for post-cardiotomy heart failure in neonates and infants still carries high mortality and morbidity rates. In this study we present the first European clinical experience with the Medos DeltaStream DP1, a new pulsatile flow pump, in neonates and infants. The DP1 is an extracorporeal rotary blood pump. The pump features a diagonal flow impeller, and can be used for both continuous and pulsatile output. Special characteristics include its small priming volume of approximately 30 ml and a high pumping capacity. A temperature sensor and speed sensors are integrated into the pump. The pump has a delivery rate of up to 8 liters/min and a speed range of 100 to 10,000 rpm. Two patients being assisted with the pulsatile pump system were successfully weaned after 36 and 53 hours, respectively. Based on our limited experience with 2 patients, we believe that pulsatile DP1 device is a reasonable alternative to current conventional non-pulsatile systems.

  3. Students' experiences of learning manual clinical skills through simulation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Eva; Silén, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Håkan

    2013-03-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and thoughts about their learning through simulation skills training. The study was designed for an educational setting at a clinical skills centre. Ten third-year undergraduate nursing students performed urethral catheterisation, using the virtual reality simulator UrecathVision™, which has haptic properties. The students practised in pairs. Each session was videotaped and the video was used to stimulate recall in subsequent interviews. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis from interviews resulted in three themes: what the students learn, how the students learn, and the simulator's contribution to the students' learning. Students learned manual skills, how to perform the procedure, and professional behaviour. They learned by preparing, watching, practising and reflecting. The simulator contributed by providing opportunities for students to prepare for the skills training, to see anatomical structures, to feel resistance, and to become aware of their own performance ability. The findings show that the students related the task to previous experiences, used sensory information, tested themselves and practised techniques in a hands-on fashion, and reflected in and on action. The simulator was seen as a facilitator to learning the manual skills. The study design, with students working in pairs combined with video recording, was found to enhance opportunities for reflection.

  4. Learning Clinical Procedures Through Internet Digital Objects: Experience of Undergraduate Students Across Clinical Faculties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tse Yan; Wong, Kin; Tse, Christine Shuk Kwan; Chan, Ying Yee

    2015-01-01

    Background Various digital learning objects (DLOs) are available via the World Wide Web, showing the flow of clinical procedures. It is unclear to what extent these freely accessible Internet DLOs facilitate or hamper students’ acquisition of clinical competence. Objective This study aimed to understand the experience of undergraduate students across clinical disciplines—medicine, dentistry, and nursing—in using openly accessible Internet DLOs, and to investigate the role of Internet DLOs in facilitating their clinical learning. Methods Mid-year and final-year groups were selected from each undergraduate clinical degree program of the University of Hong Kong—Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS), Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS), and Bachelor of Nursing (BNurs). All students were invited to complete a questionnaire on their personal and educational backgrounds, and their experiences and views on using Internet DLOs in learning clinical procedures. The questionnaire design was informed by the findings of six focus groups. Results Among 439 respondents, 97.5% (428/439) learned a variety of clinical procedures through Internet DLOs. Most nursing students (107/122, 87.7%) learned preventive measures through Internet DLOs, with a lower percentage of medical students (99/215, 46.0%) and dental students (43/96, 45%) having learned them this way (both P<.001). Three-quarters (341/439, 77.7%) of students accessed DLOs through public search engines, whereas 93.2% (409/439) accessed them by watching YouTube videos. Students often shared DLOs with classmates (277/435, 63.7%), but rarely discussed them with teachers (54/436, 12.4%). The accuracy, usefulness, and importance of Internet DLOs were rated as 6.85 (SD 1.48), 7.27 (SD 1.53), and 7.13 (SD 1.72), respectively, out of a high score of 10. Conclusions Self-exploration of DLOs in the unrestricted Internet environment is extremely common among current e-generation learners and was regarded by students

  5. Environmental impact statement for National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The probable environmental impact and adverse effects of the Lewis Research Center are assessed. The Cleveland and Plum Brook facilities are briefly described. It is felt that the absence of harmful environmental impact from the Cleveland site is apparent, and the monitoring at the Plum Brook reactor facility shows the effectiveness of effluent controls. The probable adverse effects are considered for air, water, and noise pollution, and radioactive and hazardous waste storage and disposal; it is concluded that all emissions are maintained below Federal, and local standards. There are no appropriate alternatives to the operation of the Center, and no improvement in environmental quality would result from relocation. The relationship between local short-term productivity is briefly discussed. No adverse comment has been received from public agencies or private organizations or individuals.

  6. The Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: "we have evolved".

    PubMed

    Walsh, Colleen C; Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A; Trapl, Erika S; Borawski, Elaine A

    2015-06-04

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city's food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context.

  7. Advantageous GOES IR results for ash mapping at high latitudes: Cleveland eruptions 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Rose, William I.; Schneider, D.J.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Watson, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    The February 2001 eruption of Cleveland Volcano, Alaska allowed for comparisons of volcanic ash detection using two-band thermal infrared (10-12 ??m) remote sensing from MODIS, AVHRR, and GOES 10. Results show that high latitude GOES volcanic cloud sensing the range of about 50 to 65??N is significantly enhanced. For the Cleveland volcanic clouds the MODIS and AVHRR data have zenith angles 6-65 degrees and the GOES has zenith angles that are around 70 degrees. The enhancements are explained by distortion in the satellite view of the cloud's lateral extent because the satellite zenith angles result in a "side-looking" aspect and longer path lengths through the volcanic cloud. The shape of the cloud with respect to the GOES look angle also influences the results. The MODIS and AVHRR data give consistent retrievals of the ash cloud evolution over time and are good corrections for the GOES data. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Questioning Skills Demonstrated by Approved Clinical Instructors During Clinical Field Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Mary G

    2008-01-01

    Context: The current trend in athletic training clinical education places greater emphasis on the quality of interactions occurring between Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) and athletic training students (ATSs). Among other attributes, the ability of ACIs to facilitate and direct quality clinical learning experiences may be influenced by the skill with which the ACI is able to use selected teaching strategies. Objective: To gain insight into ACIs' use of questioning as a specific teaching strategy during the clinical education experiences of undergraduate ATSs. Design: Qualitative case study design involving initial and stimulated-recall interviews, prolonged field observations, and audio recording of ACI-ATS interactions. Setting: The primary athletic training facility at one athletic training education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: The 8 ACI participants included 3 full-time athletic training education program faculty members and 5 graduate-level assistants. The 24 ATS participants included 1 senior, 17 juniors, and 6 sophomores. Data Collection and Analysis: Transcribed data collected from 8 initial interviews, 23 field observations, 23 audio-recorded ACI-ATS interactions and 54 stimulated-recall interviews were analyzed through microscopic, open, and axial coding, as well as coding for process. The cognition level of questions posed by ACIs was analyzed according to Sellappah and colleagues' Question Classification Framework. Results: The ACI participants posed 712 questions during the 23 observation periods. Of the total questions, 70.37% were classified as low-level cognitive questions and 17.00% as high-level cognitive questions. The remaining 12.64% were classified as other. Conclusions: Although all ACIs used questioning during clinical instruction, 2 distinct questioning patterns were identified: strategic questioning and nonstrategic questioning. The way ACIs

  9. Combination Therapy for Acne Scarring: Personal Experience and Clinical Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Kroepfl, Lucija; Emer, Jason J

    2016-11-01

    Acne is one of the most prevalent skin conditions seen by dermatologists. The cosmetic sequelae of severe acne, including scarring and pigmentation, have a profound psychological impact on those in icted. Topical (eg, retinoids, antibiotics, dapsone, hydroxyacids) and oral treatments (eg, antibiotics and/or spironolactone) are often bene cial to control acne or in the instance of oral isotretinoin use, rid the acne permanently; however, these treatments have very little affect on the ultimate cosmetic outcome of the acne scarring and skin texture that results. Given the variety of scar types that can form and the variability of responses seen in various skin types and textures, treatment options are vast without appropriate guidelines for pathways that dictate best timing, combinations, and options in given clinical scenarios. Current treatment options include solo or combina- tions of energy-based (eg, laser, radiofrequency), chemical-based (eg, peels, TCA cross), surgical-based options (eg, subcision, punch excision), microneedling, and llers and/or fat injections. Most recently, fractional radiofrequency-based treatments have been used to improve acne scarring with less reported downtime as compared to lasers or chemical peels and the ability to treat darker or sensitive skin types with less risk of scarring or hyperpigmentation. In severe cystic ares, scarring treatments are often postposed till the acne is under control and in many instances this can limit the dermatologists ability to affect future cosmetic treatments. Based on personal experience of various clinical scenarios in a busy laser practice that treats a signi cant number of patients with acne scarring, fractional radiofrequency is an excellent choice for treating all forms of acne scars with minimal risk to patients, even those on concurrent treatments such as isotretinoin. Additionally, fractional radiofrequency can be used in combination with all other treatment options to speed the time to

  10. The Meta-Analysis of Clinical Judgment Project: Effects of Experience on Judgment Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.; Anderson, Linda A.; Cook, Robert S.; Nichols, Cassandra N.; Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Walker, Blain S.; Cohen, Genna R.; Rush, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and educational experience is one of the most commonly studied variables in clinical judgment research. Contrary to clinicians' perceptions, clinical judgment researchers have generally concluded that accuracy does not improve with increased education, training, or clinical experience. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized…

  11. Elemental composition of suspended particulates as functions of space and time in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to the analysis of a very large elemental concentration data set. The particular data considered was generated by instrumental neutron activation and emission spectroscopy analyses of over 750 24-hour ambient air particulate samples collected at 16 sites in Cleveland, Ohio, during the 15 months from August 1971 thru October 1972. Examples are presented that show the use of multiple approaches to interpreting the data, including pairwise correlation statistics, selective data plotting and cluster analysis.

  12. Cleveland Harbor, Cuyahoga County, Ohio Confined Disposal Facility Project (Site 10B-15 Year)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    costly. Site acquisition ( real estate ) and preparation would also be required. Site capacities are usually a problem. Additionally, there are local...industries (27%), other (20%), retail trade (18%), and finance, insurance, and real estate (7%). 3.39 In 1985, personal income (per capita) in the...finance insurance, and real estate ; and service industries. Continued moderate growth of income is anticipated. 3.41 As indicated previously, Cleveland

  13. Ford Cleveland: Inside-out Analysis Identifies Energy Cost Savings Opportunities at Metal Casting Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-01

    The Ford Cleveland Casting Plant used results from its plant-wide energy efficiency assessment to identify 16 energy- and cost-saving projects. These projects addressed combustion, compressed air, water, steam, motor drive, and lighting systems. When implemented, the projects should save a total of $3.28 million per year. In addition, two long-term projects were identified that together would represent another $9.5 million in cost savings.

  14. Exploring masculinity and marginalization of male undergraduate nursing students' experience of belonging during clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Monique G; Kellett, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive recruitment strategies used in Canadian undergraduate nursing programs have enjoyed only moderate success, given that male students represent a small percentage of the student population. To determine whether there were gender differences in their sense of belonging, undergraduate nursing students (n = 462) in southern Alberta were surveyed using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire. No significant gender differences were found on two of the subscales. However, male students demonstrated significantly lower scores on the efficacy subscale (p = 0.02). This finding suggests that some men experience feelings of marginalization and discrimination. Nurse educators and students are encouraged to explore their worldviews related to gendered performances and teaching practices that create bias. Practice environments are encouraged to deinstitutionalize policies and procedures that accentuate femininities of care. Finally, men entering into the nursing profession are encouraged to reflect on how their gender performance may facilitate or detract from their feelings of belonging. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Airborne Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Cleveland, OH and Chicago, IL

    PubMed Central

    Persoon, Carolyn; Peters, Thomas M.; Kumar, Naresh; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2009-01-01

    Passive samplers were deployed across Cleveland, OH and Chicago, IL to evaluate the spatial variability of airborne PCBs in urban areas. We measured ∑PCB concentrations, the sum of 151 congeners or congener groups quantified using tandem mass spectrometry, spatial distributions, and congener profiles in two urban areas in the Great Lakes region. Mean ∑PCB concentrations were significantly different between Cleveland (1.73±1.16 ng m−3) and Chicago (1.13 ± 0.58 ng m−3) during the August 2008 sampling period. Mean congener profiles were compared with commercial Aroclor mixtures and found to be similar to Aroclor 1242 in Cleveland and similar to a mixture of 1242 and 1254 in Chicago. We observed large spatial variation in concentrations and weak or no significant autocorrelation between sites in both cities. ‘Hot spots’ of high ∑PCB concentrations were identified in both urban areas and the congener profile at these locations were most strongly correlated to that of PCB Aroclor mixtures. Congener profiles showed important differences including the enrichment of dioxin-like congeners in Chicago. PMID:20384374

  16. Primary Brachial Plexus Tumors: Clinical Experiences of 143 Cases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaotian; Yang, Jianyun; Chen, Lin; Yu, Cong; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    Primary brachial plexus tumors are extremely rare and the treatment is challengeable. Our aim is to share the experiences in the treatment of primary brachial plexus tumors. A retrospective analysis of 143 patients with primary brachial plexus tumors was made in our department from January 2001 to December 2012. The clinical presentation of the patients, the characteristics and pathological results of the tumors and the prognosis were described. Seventy-eight males and sixty-five female were enrolled. The mean age was 48.17 years old. A palpable mass was the most common clinical presentation occurred in 129 patients. The trunks of the brachial plexus were the locations where the tumors originated with high possibility, with 68 cases. Benign tumors were composed of 119 schwannomas and 12 neurofibromas, while malignant tumors were composed of 8 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 2 malignant granular cell tumors, 1 synovial sarcoma and 1 peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Appropriate surgical method, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were used according to the condition during operation, preoperative examinations and pathological result. The survival rate was 50.00% with a 3-year follow-up. Local recurrence happened in 7 patients. Five patients presented Metastasis. Appropriate surgical method is the key for the treatment of different brachial plexus tumors. Surgery has a great effect on the treatment of benign tumors. For malignant tumors, adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy should be used according to the pathological result. The general prognosis for malignant brachial plexus tumors is less than ideal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical and laboratory experience of chorionic villous sampling in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oloyede, O A; Olaide, A; Onyinye, N

    2014-01-01

    Chorionic villous sampling is a first trimester invasive diagnosis procedure that was introduced in Nigeria < 2 decades ago. The objective of the following study is to review experience with chorionic villous sampling in relation to clinical and laboratory procedures, including general characteristics of women, indications and outcome, complications, laboratory analysis and learning curve. Descriptive study of chorionic villous samplings between 2005 and 2012. Clinical and laboratory data were extracted from records. The women had trans-abdominal or trans-cervical procedure after counseling. Deoxyribonucleic acid extraction was by boiling method and molecular diagnosis by restriction fragment length polymorphism or quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction. Analyzed data were presented using simple frequency tables. A total of 426 women were analyzed. The major indications were Sickle cell anemia (97.2%), gender determination (1.9%) and aneuploidy (0.7%) respectively. Most procedures (71.2%) were done between 11 +0 and 13 +6 weeks by trans-abdominal approach (88.7%). Overall success at the first sampling was 98.8%. Error in laboratory diagnosis recorded in 3 (0.7%) pregnancies, while 5 (1.2%) were reanalyzed due to maternal decidua/inadequate fetal sample (0.7%) or failure of amplification (0.5%) respectively. Primary sex ratio was 5 (XY): 3 (XX). Down syndrome was the most common aneuploidy diagnosed with a detection rate of 66.7%. Learning curve was evident from reducing the incidence of abortion, number of aspirations and increasing success at the first attempt and villi yield. The present study shows acceptance and utilization of chorionic villus sampling and also demonstrates its safety and reliability.

  18. Clinical experience of baclofen in alcohol dependence: A chart review

    PubMed Central

    Rozatkar, Abhijit R.; Kapoor, Abhishek; Sidana, Ajeet; Chavan, Bir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Craving is recognized as a formidable barrier in the management of patients with alcohol dependence. Among pharmacological agents that have been used in experimental studies for reduction in craving, baclofen appears to have a significant advantage over other agents. Methodology: The study is retrospective chart review of patients (n = 113) who have been treated with baclofen for alcohol dependence in a tertiary hospital of North India. Baseline assessments included sociodemography, motivation, quantity-frequency of alcohol use, and other alcohol-related clinical parameters. Weekly assessments, for a period of 4 weeks, were extracted from records which included dose of baclofen, craving intensity, and alcohol consumption. Results: The study sample was predominantly male, mean age of 41.49 (±9.75) years, most having a family history of substance use (70.97%), and many reporting binge use pattern in last year (49.46%). Baseline assessment revealed 48.7% of the sample was in precontemplation phase for alcohol use and 70% reported severe and persistent craving. This persistent craving was reported by only 15% of the sample by the end of 4 weeks treatment with baclofen (20–40 mg/day). Thirty-four percent of patients reported continued problematic use of alcohol by the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion: Our clinical experience suggests that baclofen reduces craving and alcohol consumption including in those with poor motivation. The drug causes few side effects and does not add to the intoxication effect of alcohol. Considering that baclofen is safe in those with liver cirrhosis and reduces withdrawal symptoms due to alcohol, a controlled trial comparing it with standard treatment is required. PMID:28163402

  19. Centralization of a regional clinical microbiology service: The Calgary experience.

    PubMed

    Church, D L; Hall, P

    1999-11-01

    Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA) and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL). Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs) are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service.

  20. Centralization of a regional clinical microbiology service: The Calgary experience

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre L; Hall, Paula

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA) and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL). Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs) are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service. PMID:22346397

  1. Initial Clinical Experience with Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sara C.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Albert, Michael; Conant, Emily F.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE and OBJECTIVES Contrast-enhanced digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are 2 imaging techniques that attempt to increase malignant breast lesion conspicuity. The combination of these into a single technique, contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DBT), could potentially integrate the strengths of both. The objectives of this study were to assess the clinical feasibility of CE-DBT as an adjunct to digital mammography, and to correlate lesion enhancement characteristics and morphology obtained with CE-DBT to digital mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR). MATERIALS and METHODS CE-DBT (GE Senographe 2000D, Milwaukee, WI) was performed as a pilot study in an ongoing NCI-funded grant (P01 CA85484) studying multimodality breast imaging. 13 patients with ACR BI-RADS category 4 or 5 breast lesions underwent imaging with digital mammography, ultrasound, MR, and CE-DBT. CE-DBT was performed at 45-49 kVp with a rhodium target and a 0.27 mm copper (Alfa Aesar, Ward Hill, MA) filter. Pre- and post-injection DBT image sets were acquired in the MLO projection with slight compression. Each image set consists of 9 images acquired over a 50° arc and was obtained with a mean glandular x-ray dose comparable to two conventional mammographic views. Between the pre- and post-contrast DBT image sets, a single bolus of iodinated contrast agent (1 ml/kg at 2 ml/s; Omnipaque-300, Amersham Health Inc., Princeton, NJ) was administered. Images were reconstructed using filtered-backprojection in 1 mm increments, and transmitted to a clinical PACS workstation. RESULTS Initial experience suggests that CE-DBT provides morphologic and vascular characteristics of breast lesions qualitatively concordant with that of digital mammography and MR. CONCLUSION As an adjunct to digital mammography, CE-DBT may be a potential alternative tool for breast lesion morphologic and vascular characterization. PMID:17236995

  2. Childhood lead exposure and uptake in teeth in the Cleveland area during the era of leaded gasoline.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Norman; Zhang, Zhong-Fa; Sun, Jiayang; Ketterer, Michael E; Lalumandier, James A; Shulze, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    Childhood uptake of lead from exposure to atmospheric leaded gasoline in the United States has been studied using mainly blood lead levels. Since reliable blood lead techniques were used only after the peak use of leaded gasoline, the prior exposure history is unclear. The well-documented decline in blood lead levels after the mid-1970s could represent the continuation of a historic steady decline in exposure from many sources. Alternatively, the post-1970s decline might represent the declining phase of a unimodal rise and fall corresponding closely to usage of leaded gasoline. To assess these possibilities, lead concentration and 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were measured in the enamel of permanent molar teeth formed between 1936 and 1993 in mainly African-American donors who grew up in the Cleveland area. Tooth enamel preserves the lead concentration and isotope ratio that prevails during tooth formation. Historical trends in enamel lead concentration were significantly correlated with surrogates of atmospheric lead exposure: lead in sediments of two dated Lake Erie cores, and lead consumed in gasoline. About two-thirds of the total lead uptake into enamel in this period was attributable to leaded gasoline, and the remainder to other sources (e.g. paint). Enamel 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were similar to those of one lake sediment. Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlation in neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, and including lake sediment data, accounted for 53% of the variation in enamel lead levels. Enamel lead concentration was highly correlated with reported African-American childhood blood levels. The extrapolated peak level of 48microg/dL (range 40 to 63) is associated with clinical and behavioral impairments, which may have implications for adults who were children during the peak gasoline lead exposure. In sum, leaded gasoline emission was the predominant source of lead exposure of African-American Cleveland children during the latter

  3. Clinical Experiences with the Scapular Fascial Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Ho; Chang, Yong Joon; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of reconstruction is to provide coverage of exposed vital structures with well-vascularized tissue for optimal restoration of form and function. Here, we present our clinical experience with the use of the scapular fascial free flap to correct facial asymmetry and to reconstruct soft tissue defects of the extremities. Methods We used a scapular fascial free flap in 12 cases for soft tissue coverage of the extremities or facial soft tissue augmentation. Results The flaps ranged in size from 3×12 to 13×23 cm. No cases of total loss of the flap occurred. Partial loss of the flap occurred in 1 patient, who was treated with a turnover flap using the adjacent scapular fascial flap and a skin graft. Partial loss of the skin graft occurred in 4 patients due to infection or hematoma beneath the graft, and these patients underwent another skin graft. Four cases of seroma at the donor site occurred, and these cases were treated with conservative management or capsulectomy and quilting sutures. Conclusions The scapular fascial free flap has many advantages, including a durable surface for restoration of form and contours, a large size with a constant pedicle, adequate surface for tendon gliding, and minimal donor-site scarring. We conclude that despite the occurrence of a small number of complications, the scapular fascial free flap should be considered to be a viable option for soft tissue coverage of the extremities and facial soft tissue augmentation. PMID:27689051

  4. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  5. Health promotion initiatives: An experience of a Well Women's Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dudeja, Puja; Singh, Amarjeet; Jindal, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Army Medical Corps provides comprehensive health care services to troops and their dependents. This approach is in consonance with the concept of Health Promoting Hospitals (HPH) initiative introduced by WHO in 1986. However, the concept is still at an infancy stage in civil health care system in India. This article describes the experiences and advantages of establishing a Well Women's Clinic (WWC) in a station of North India. Methods A system analysis approach was followed for analyzing input, process and output of the WWC during 2007–2009. Inputs included manpower and material i.e public health expert, non medical attendant and a nursing officer charts, poster, models, Television with Compact Disc (CD) player and CDs etc. Health promotion activities were conducted in the form of lectures, demonstrations, workshops, training, screening of movies, quiz, essay writing and declamation contests etc. Results Overall 385 lectures, 12 competitions, 07 training capsules were conducted. Coverage of target population was 92%. First aid training workshop trained 300 women. Six percent of the counseled women opted for tubectomy. Twelve new cases of diabetes and four new cases of hypertension were detected through screening. Seventy-two women were referred for dental treatment after a dental screening camp. Conclusion Establishment of WWC using HPH approach was quite cost effective. PMID:24623950

  6. The Use of Harmonic Scalpels in Thyroidectomies: Clinical Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Basoglu, Mahmut; Ozturk, Gurkan; Atamanalp, S. Selcuk; Aydinli, Bulent; Yildirgan, M. Ilhan; Oren, Durkaya

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Many studies have been conducted to investigate the efficacy of harmonic scalpels in thyroidectomies. Here, we present our clinical experiences with the instrument. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at the General Surgery Department of the Ataturk University School of Medicine between January 2005 and July 2008. It was a prospective, randomized, controlled study. Patients with benign nodular goiter (BNG) were included in the study and randomly divided into three groups. The first group consisted of 47 patients, the second group consisted of 57 patients, and the third group consisted of 41 patients. Patients in the first group underwent the classical thyroidectomy. Those in the second group had only the superior thyroid arteries and veins ligated (with silk or polyglactin), while the other vascular structures were divided using a harmonic scalpel. In the third group, all arteries and veins of the thyroid gland were divided using a harmonic scalpel. In each group, mean operation time, amount of bleeding, amount of postoperative drainage, and other postoperative complications were recorded. Results: Operation time was significantly lower for patients in the third group. The degree of bleeding and postoperative drainage was lower in the second and third groups with respect to the first group. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of the development of transient hypocalcemia or voice impairment. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of harmonic scalpels for a thyroidectomy is safe, shortens operative time, and decreases intraoperative bleeding. PMID:25610032

  7. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  8. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were…

  9. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were…

  10. Productive efficiency of rural health clinics: the Midwest experience.

    PubMed

    Sinay, T

    2001-01-01

    This article identifies the characteristics of efficient and inefficient rural clinics in the Midwest, using 1994 Medicare cost reports. Rural health clinics are compared on the basis of productive efficiency by estimating a nonparametric frontier. Six inputs and five output categories were employed to estimate an efficient frontier. The results show that an efficient clinic, on average, employs approximately 1.5 more physicians than an inefficient clinic and incurs capital expenses more than twice those of the inefficient clinic. Future rural clinics are expected to be larger, employing more capital and labor to take advantage of scale economies. However, given the steady (or decreasing) population of rural communities, the expansion of relatively small rural clinics could involve forming rural health care systems and/or networks in close proximity to create synergies from scale economies, staff recruitment, easier access to capital, shared information systems, improved mobility of physicians among several clinics and savings from management costs.

  11. Guidelines for Clinical Experiences in Health Occupations Education. Information Series: Report No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J., Ed.; Johnson, Lois H., Ed.

    This manual is intended to assist health occupations education (HOE) teachers in planning clinical experiences for their students. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the purpose, philosophy, and legal aspects of clinical experiences in HOE; the HOE clinical structure (teacher qualifications, the role of the…

  12. The Effects of an Institutional Clinical Experience on Pharmacy Student Professional Status Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCook, William M.; Speranza, Kenneth A., Sr.

    1978-01-01

    Senior pharmacy students' perceptions prior to and after clinical experience were examined as they rated the occupations of BS pharmacist, PharmD pharmacist, physician, and nurse in one of three teaching hospitals in which the clinical course was conducted. The clinical experience did not significantly change students' previous perceptions. (LBH)

  13. Cultural awareness: Enhancing clinical experiences in rural Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaundel

    2013-01-01

    Students often work with clients from a cultural group different than their own. This is especially true for students completing clinical practica in Appalachia, where there is a culture unique to that geographic area. To prepare for this unique setting, common cultural scenarios experienced in the clinical setting must be addressed to help provide culturally appropriate patient care while developing required clinical competencies. Although applicable to most nursing students, the author discusses culturally specific approaches to clinical care of clients from Appalachia, specifically applied to nurse practitioner students, preceptors, and clinical faculty.

  14. LEWY BODY DEMENTIA: THE CAREGIVER EXPERIENCE OF CLINICAL CARE

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, James E.; Duda, John E.; Kaufer, Daniel I.; Lippa, Carol F.; Taylor, Angela; Zarit, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lewy body dementia (LBD) is the second most common cause of dementia, however, little is known about how the clinical diagnosis of LBD is obtained in the community or the caregiver experience while seeking the diagnosis. METHODS The Lewy Body Dementia Association (www.LBDA.org) conducted a web-based survey of 962 caregivers over a 6-month period. RESULTS The mean age of respondents was 55.9y; 88% were female and 64% had daily contact with patients. The mean age of LBD patients was 75.4y; 62% were male and 46% lived with a caregiver. The most common presentation of symptoms as reported by LBD caregivers was cognitive (48%), motor (39%) or both (13%). The first diagnoses given to the patients were Parkinson disease or other movement disorder (39%), Alzheimer disease or other cognitive disorder (36%), or mental illness (24%). Fifty percent of patients saw >3 doctors for more than 10 visits over the course of 1 year before an LBD diagnosis was established. Neurologists diagnosed most cases (62%), while primary care-providers diagnosed only 6% of cases. No differences were found between the presentation of disease and the number of physicians, number of office visits, length of time to establish diagnosis, or type of doctor who finally made an LBD diagnosis. Caregivers viewed physicians as knowledgeable about disease manifestations and treatment options, but not about disease course/prognosis and available community resources and referrals. CONCLUSIONS These data highlight a need for increasing physician awareness and knowledge of LBD, which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and treatment. Community resources such as the Lewy Body Dementia Association may serve this end, while also providing practical information and support for caregivers. PMID:20434939

  15. Clinical Experience With A Portable 3-D Reconstruction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holshouser, Barbara A.; Christiansen, Edwin L.; Thompson, Joseph R.; Reynolds, R. Anthony; Goldwasser, Samuel M.

    1988-06-01

    Clinical experience with a computer program for reconstructing and visualizing three-dimensional (3-D) structures is reported. Applications to the study of soft-tissue and skeletal structures, such as the temporomandibular joint and craniofacial anatomy, using computed tomography (CT) data are described. Several features specific to the computer algorithm are demonstrated and evaluated. These include: (1) manipulation of density windows to selectively visualize bone or soft tissue structures; (2) the efficacy of gradient shading algorithms in revealing fine surface detail; and (3) the rapid generation of cut-away views revealing details of internal structures. Also demonstrated is the importance of high resolution data as input to the 3-D program. The implementation of the program (VoxelView-32) described here, is on a MASSCOMP computer running UNIX. Data were collected with General Electric or Siemens CT scanners and transferred to the MASSCOMP for off-line 3-D recon-struction, via magnetic tape or Ethernet. An interactive graphics facility on the MASSCOMP allows viewing of 2-D slices, subregioning, and selection of lower and upper density thresholds for segmentation. The software then enters a pre-processing phase during which a volume representation of the segmented object (soft tissue or bone) is automatically created. This is followed by a rendering phase during which multiple views of the segmented object are automatically generated. The pre-processing phase typically takes 4 to 8 minutes (although very large datasets may require as much as 30 minutes) and the rendering phase typically takes 1 to 2 minutes for each 3-D view. Volume representation and rendering techniques are used at all stages of the processing, and gradient shading is used for enhanced surface detail.

  16. Initial clinical experience using a novel laparoscopy assistant.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Raineesh; Martínez, Arturo Minor; Lorias Espinoza, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    This article presents the first clinical and experimental experiences of the PMASS (Postural Mechatronic Assistance Solo Surgery) from a prospective study carried on on thirteen laparoscopic procedures. Also, their advantages and disadvantages are identified. The PMASS is a system with three articulations; two articulations are passive and one is active; this handles the optic in real time, reducing the latency time by spatial relocation. The surgeons assisted themselves visually in 13 surgical procedures, having direct and intuitive control in real time of the laparoscopic vision field using the PMASS. The surgical and delay time was documented for each surgery. The surgical procedures were: Laparoscopic appendicectomy, ovarian cystectomy and laparoscopic sterilization. In all procedures, surgeons were able to auto-navigate in real time and there was no visual tremor while using the system. The global average times taken to perform the self-assisted surgery with the PMASS for the laparoscopic appendicectomies were 45 ± 4.5 minutes, ovarian cystectomies 49 ± 3.5 minutes and for the laparoscopic sterilization 22 ± 2 minutes. The approximate set-up time of PMASS was one minute, and removal almost a minute (the time required by the surgeon to remove the harness after completing the surgery). The laparoscope itself disengages from the PMASS in a couple of seconds approximately. There were no transoperative or postoperative complications during the procedures. Thirteen laparoscopic procedures were performed, the design of the mechatronic assistance allowed the surgeon to self-assist visually in real time and in an autonomous way in the solo-surgery mode, without compromising the surgical performance and the morbidity. Additionally, the latency times are also reduced by space relocation and coupling of the telescope.

  17. [Clinical experience of 302 cases with brain abscess].

    PubMed

    Cui, X P; Cai, X W; Zhang, Z; Gao, N N; Liu, P R; Li, J; Yang, S Y; Zhang, J N; Yang, X Y

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnosis and treatment experience of brain abscesses and improve prognosis. Methods: The data of 302 patients of brain abscess at Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from 1980 to 2014 was analyzed retrospectively. There were 215 male and 87 female patients aged from 11 to 82 years with mean age of (30±8) years. The patients was divided into 1980-2001 group and 2002-2014 group according to different diagnosis and the treatment methods. The therapy methods include operation and conservative treatment. There were 196 cases received operation, including 95 cases of excision, 89 cases of ventriculopuncture, 12 cases of excision after ventriculopuncture, 106 cases received drug conservative therapy. Two groups of information including clinical manifestation, abscess location, therapeutic effect and prognosis were compared by χ(2) test. Results: Compared to 1980-2001 group, adjacent infection incidence declined(χ(2)=8.000, P=0.005). The ratio of single abscess declined and multiple abscess increased(χ(2)=11.060, P=0.001), the infection proportion of frontal lobe and temporal lobe decreased(χ(2)=9.080, P=0.003; χ(2)=15.440, P=0.000). The ratio of headache and vomit and papilledema declined significantly(χ(2)=23.290, P=0.000; χ(2)=21.020, P=0.000; χ(2)=2.290, P=0.001). Total mortality of 302 patients were 23 cases and 5 cases of 1980-2001 group and 2002-2014 group (10.4% vs. 6.3%, χ(2)=1.180, P=0.277). However, there were statistical difference in postoperative mortality between both groups (14.4% vs. 4.0%, χ(2) =3.880, P=0.049). Conclusion: With the application of antibiotics and the development of neurosurgical techniques, the prognosis of brain abscess has been improved.

  18. The Lived-Experience of Novice Nurse's Actualizing Clinical Reasoning in Academic Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinker, Mary Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this existential-phenomenological study was to address the first-person perspective of what it is like to experience clinical reasoning during a simulation. It was not known how a novice nurse would describe the experience of actualizing clinical reasoning during the academic simulation experience. In order to maintain the…

  19. The Lived-Experience of Novice Nurse's Actualizing Clinical Reasoning in Academic Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinker, Mary Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this existential-phenomenological study was to address the first-person perspective of what it is like to experience clinical reasoning during a simulation. It was not known how a novice nurse would describe the experience of actualizing clinical reasoning during the academic simulation experience. In order to maintain the…

  20. An eight-year clinic experience with clozapine use in a Parkinson's disease clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Hack, Nawaz; Fayad, Sarah M; Monari, Erin H; Akbar, Umer; Hardwick, Angela; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Malaty, Irene A; Romrell, Janet; Shukla, Aparna A Wagle; McFarland, Nikolaus; Ward, Herbert E; Okun, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    To examine our eight year clinic-based experience in a Parkinson's disease expert clinical care center using clozapine as a treatment for refractory psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD). The study was a retrospective chart review which covered eight years of clozapine registry use. Statistical T-tests, chi-square, correlations and regression analysis were used to analyze treatment response for potential associations of age, disease duration, and Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) score, and degree of response to clozapine therapy. There were 36 participants included in the analysis (32 PD, 4 parkinsonism-plus). The characteristics included 30.6% female, age 45-87 years (mean 68.3±10.15), disease duration of 17-240 months (mean 108.14±51.13) and H&Y score of 2 to 4 (mean 2.51±0.51). The overall retention rate on clozapine was 41% and the most common reasons for discontinuation were frequent blood testing (28%), nursing home (NH) placement (11%) and leucopenia (8%). Responses to clozapine across the cohort were: complete (33%), partial (33%), absent (16%), and unknown (16%). Age (r = -0.36, p<0.01) and H&Y score (r = -0.41, p<0.01) were shown to be related to response to clozapine therapy, but disease duration was not an associated factor (r = 0.21, p>0.05). This single-center experience highlights the challenges associated with clozapine therapy in PD psychosis. Frequent blood testing remains a significant barrier for clozapine, even in patients with therapeutic benefit. Surprisingly, all patients admitted to a NH discontinued clozapine due to logistical issues of administration and monitoring within that setting. Consideration of the barriers to clozapine therapy will be important to its use and to its continued success in an outpatient setting.

  1. Predicting medical school and internship success: does the quality of the research and clinical experience matter?

    PubMed

    Paolino, Nathalie D; Artino, Anthony R; Saguil, Aaron; Dong, Ting; Durning, Steven J; DeZee, Kent J

    2015-04-01

    This article explores specific aspects of self-reported clinical and research experience and their relationship to performance in medical training. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted at the Uniformed Services University. The American Medical College Application Service application was used to discern students' self-reported clinical and research experience. Two authors applied a classification scheme for clinical and research experience to the self-reported experiences. Study outcomes included medical school grade point average (GPA), U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores, and intern expertise and professionalism scores. A linear regression analysis was conducted for each outcome while controlling for prematriculation GPA. Data were retrieved on 1,020 matriculants. There were several statistically significant but small differences across outcomes when comparing the various categories of clinical experience with no clinical experience. The technician-level experience group had a decrease of 0.1 in cumulative GPA in comparison to students without self-reported clinical experience (p = 0.004). This group also performed 5 points lower on the USMLE Step 2 than students who did not report clinical experience (p = 0.013). The various levels of self-reported research experience were unrelated to success in medical school and graduate medical education. These findings indicate that self-reported technician-level clinical experience is related to a small reduction in typically reported outcomes in medical school. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Experience with a rural telepsychiatry clinic for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ermer, D J

    1999-02-01

    Access to child and adolescent psychiatric services in many rural areas is limited by lack of physicians and long travel times. A child and adolescent telepsychiatry clinic that is part of the University of Kansas Medical Center's telemedicine program addresses this problem by linking the medical center with a county mental health center in rural Pittsburg, Kansas. The clinic receives ten to 18 visits a week and has been able to serve severely disturbed children and children in crisis. The quality of clinical interactions in the telepsychiatry clinic appears comparable to that in face-to-face meetings.

  3. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience.

  4. Vinflunine in the treatment of advanced urothelial cancer: clinical evidence and experience

    PubMed Central

    Gerullis, Holger; Wawroschek, Friedhelm; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Ecke, Thorsten Holger

    2016-01-01

    Vinflunine (VFL) has been approved in Europe for second-line treatment of metastatic and advanced urothelial cancer after failure of platin-containing therapy. Since approval, the drug has been investigated in few clinical trials. Most of the currently available reports describe experiences with VFL in a daily clinical setting. This review gives a short overview on clinical experiences and clinical trials involving VFL since the approval of this drug in 2009. PMID:28042310

  5. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  6. Table Clinics: A Valuable Learning Experience for Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Jimmie H.

    Table clinics, or short oral presentations on techniques related to some phase of research, diagnosis, or treatment, can be used to enrich allied health education. To present a table clinic, students must choose a topic which lends itself to a 5- to 7-minute presentation and which imparts knowledge that participants can take back to their…

  7. Progressive Skill Development and Progressive Clinical Experience Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    This editorial describes the swinging pendulum of the role of clinical supervision in relation to the clinical skill development of students in athletic training programs. In the past, students working as interns were essentially assistant athletic trainers with little direct supervision, which resulted in decisions being made with less than…

  8. Elemental composition of airborne particulates and source identification - An extensive one year survey. [in Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 60 chemical elements in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1 year period during 1971 and 1972 (45 to 50 sampling days). Analytical methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analytical methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data are discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  9. Elemental composition of airborne particulates and source identification - An extensive one year survey. [in Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 60 chemical elements in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1 year period during 1971 and 1972 (45 to 50 sampling days). Analytical methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analytical methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data are discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  10. A study of dental students' clinical knowledge acquisition and experiences in conscious sedation.

    PubMed

    Scally, K J; Wilson, K E; Girdler, N M

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate final year dental students' knowledge acquisition and experiences during their intravenous sedation (IVS) clinical attachment within the sedation department at Newcastle School of Dental Sciences (NSDS). Students attending IVS clinical attachments in the period September 2012 - April 2013 completed a novel clinical knowledge test at the beginning and end of their one week attachment; a feedback questionnaire was also completed. A total of 70 students attended the attachment. Clinical knowledge tests were completed by 71.4% (n = 50) of students. The average test result improved from 75.1% in the pre-attachment test to 92.1% in the post-attachment test. Feedback questionnaires were returned by 65.7% (n = 46) of students. All students attained clinical experience of administering sedation and treating sedated patients. 'Teaching and Clinical Support' was rated highest, with 97.8% (n = 45) rating it as excellent. Students commented that hands-on clinical experience and clinical teaching were the most valuable parts of the attachment. Patients failing to attend appointments were considered the least useful part of the attachment. This pilot study provides an insight into undergraduate clinical sedation, which is often under reported in the literature. The clinical experience gained at NSDS exceeds GDC recommendations for undergraduate sedation. The clinical knowledge test results suggest that clinical knowledge may be better retained after direct clinical experience.

  11. Experience with the "fixateur interne": initial clinical results.

    PubMed

    Bednar, D A

    1992-03-01

    Impressive clinical reports have come from several major spinal research centers regarding the results of using the AO spinal internal fixator, a recently released pedicle screw rod system. A retrospective review of the first 2 years of clinical results from a diverse group of orthopedic surgeons using this device at a Canadian University center may provide some insight into potential clinical outcomes in general use. These results contrast with the outcome data provided to date, which have been presented by expert academic spinal surgeons. The results suggest that there may be room for considering limited release of this device, perhaps with the requirement for special certification in its application.

  12. How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can…

  13. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic: The Keele experience.

    PubMed

    Katali, Hamza Mahamadu; Parry-Smith, William Rhys; Eliot, Rees L; O'Mahony, Fidelma

    2016-01-01

    Much discussion in the literature centres on how best to teach medical students the intricacies of gynaecological assessment and the subsequent formulation of a management plan. At Keele University skills are initially developed in a simulated setting and then transferred to the workplace where students continue to develop their skills. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic has been developed and comprises of 2-3 students and a tutor. All 38 students rotating through the department between January and June 2013 were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire to evaluate this clinic and 36 (95%) of them responded. Respondents felt significantly more comfortable taking a gynaecology history, ensuring privacy during examination and formulating a management plan post-clinic (all p < 0.001), with female students feeling significantly more comfortable than their male counterparts (p = 0.04). The use of this clinic shows great promise to help students learn an unfamiliar and challenging skill.

  14. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Wilson, Katheryne E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. © RSNA, 2016 PMID:27429141

  15. Factors associated with higher clinical skills experience of medical students on a family medicine preceptorship.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barcey T; Merchant, Mary L

    2005-05-01

    Educators should document students' clinical skills experience and whether curriculum and other course changes impact this experience. We wanted to determine the factors associated with students' clinical skills experience during their third-year family medicine preceptorship. We conducted an observational study of 1,419 third-year students at the University of Iowa taking a required family medicine preceptorship during 9 academic years: 1994-1995 to 2002-2003. Students rated their level of experience with 57 clinical skills on a 5-point scale. Student ratings were summed to obtain scores for total clinical skills (n=57), procedural skills (n=22), and female-specific skills (n=9). Students who completed their preceptorship in rural areas (as opposed to urban areas or in a residency), prior to the implementation of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services regulations, prior to integration with ambulatory internal medicine and community-based primary care, or who rotated during the second half of the academic year reported a higher mean level of experience with clinical skills in univariate and multivariate analyses. Both years of experience as a preceptor and total number of previous students taught were positively associated with students' total clinical skills scores. In addition, several preceptor teaching qualities were significantly and positively associated with overall skills experience: opportunity for clinical procedures, delegation of appropriate responsibility, and preceptor conveyed expectations clearly. Use of a consistent clinical skills checklist allowed us to document important effects of curriculum, legislation, and preceptor teaching qualities on the students' clinical skills experience.

  16. Clinical experience with molindone hydrochloride in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Peper, M

    1985-08-01

    Elderly patients (N = 28) with a variety of psychiatric disorders were treated with molindone in an 8-week open clinical trial. Many patients had concomitant medical illnesses, and many were on other medications in addition to molindone. Molindone appeared to be safe, clinically effective, and well-tolerated. The most common adverse effects were extrapyramidal side effects, but the occurrence of these symptoms was relatively low.

  17. Using discrete choice experiments to go beyond clinical outcomes when evaluating clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mandy; Major, Kirsten; Skåtun, Diane

    2005-08-01

    This study builds on the results of a randomized controlled trial concerned with examining the effect of reducing waiting times on the health status of patients referred for non-urgent rheumatology opinion. No difference in clinical outcomes was found between a 'fast-track' and 'ordinary' appointment system. This suggests that rationing by waiting times is not detrimental to health. However, such an approach ignores the value patients attach to reducing waiting time. To estimate the monetary value of reducing waiting time, as well as changes in duration of appointment and the introduction of a pain management service, in the provision of rheumatology services. Discrete choice experiment (DCE). The main outpatient clinic of the rheumatology service for the Lothian and Borders region. 262 patients who had received a specialist rheumatology opinion--73 had received fast-track treatment, 65 standard care and 124 were non-trial patients. A response rate of 71% was achieved. Patients valued a 9-week reduction in waiting time at 131 pounds sterling. However, the introduction of a pain management service was valued at 209 pounds sterling. Thus, the latter is of more value to respondents. Evidence was also found of the internal consistency and theoretical validity of the DCE approach. The reduction of waiting times is a central plank of NHS policy. Whilst a reduction in waiting time is of value, a pain management service is of more benefit than a 9-week reduction in waiting time. DCE were shown to be a potentially useful technique for valuing different aspects of health care interventions.

  18. [Topics in clinical thanatology. Autopathothanatobiographies, -diaries, -epistulographies in comparison with Angloamerican clinical thanatologic experiences].

    PubMed

    Jacob, H

    1990-12-01

    Extensive results of thanatologic sciences since the first decades of 20. century and multivarious practical knowledge in clinical thanatology are discussed--relating to the central problem of understanding different forms of "realisation of death". Possibilities of thanatologic information, forms of dialogue, communicative engagement and self-attitude in care-situations are critically conferred--this even in regard to mourning, grief and sorrow of the bereaved. The confrontation of thanatologic data in short-time illness until death to autopathothanatobiographic insights in long-time illness until death seems comparable in respect to relations between present clinical findings and anamnestic data. Awareness of approaching death seems not seldom due to "presentiment", averbal-communicative "preinformation" or impressions in face to progressive illness without successful therapy. Not only this is to think over in treatment and care, but also some new thanatologic experiences of the last years--for instance in respect to the question of timing, various circumstances and possible forms of informations and clearing up. Apart from individual forms of "living until death" there are certain pithy types in awareness, feeling, thinking, exposition or attitude. Some autobiographic, diaristic or epi-stulographic dates to long-time illness until death are characterized by striking limited possibilities of self-description and verbalization in situations of vital-existential distress. Silent suffering can be caused by loss of possibility in verbalization. Autothanatobiographic insights and experiences in thanatologic praxis in long-time illness until death lead to more differentiated insights than short-time illness until death--especially in respect of changing and contrary courses. Insight "evidences" of life continuities in the face of danger of death, changes in awareness of time, intensifications in intensities of perception, of feelings of the own life and changes in

  19. LEAP. The Educational Effects of LEAP and Enhanced Services in Cleveland. Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program for Teenage Parents on Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, David; And Others

    This report presents new findings on the effectiveness of Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program in Cleveland as well as initial results from the Cleveland Student Parent Demonstration, a special project undertaken as part of the LEAP evaluation. LEAP is a statewide initiative that uses financial incentives and penalties to promote…

  20. Statistical summary of air quality data for metropolitian Cleveland, Ohio, 1967 - 1972: Total suspended particulates, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Neustadter, H. E.; Fordyce, J. S.; Burr, J. C., Jr.; Cornett, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Air-quality data for metropolitan Cleveland, Ohio, from 1967 through 1972 were collated and statistically analyzed. Total suspended particulates (TSP) departed from lognormal distribution in 1972. Nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, departed significantly from lognormal distributions in 1972. In Cleveland the Ohio standards were not met. However, the data indicate a general improvement in air quality. Unusually high precipitation (43% above the average in 1972) may be responsible in lowering these values from the 1971 levels. The mean values of TSP, NO2, and SO2 are 104, 191, and 83 microgram/cu m respectively.

  1. Clinical experience with CD64-directed immunotherapy. An overview.

    PubMed

    Curnow, R T

    1997-01-01

    The class I IgG receptor (Fc gamma RI or CD64 receptor), which is present on key cytotoxic effector cells, has been shown to initiate the destruction of tumor cells in vitro and has been hypothesized to play a role in the destruction of antibody-coated cells such as platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP). This overview summarizes the clinical experience with CD64-directed immunotherapy in cancer patients with the bispecific antibodies MDX-447 [humanized Fab anti-CD64 x humanized Fab anti-(epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR)] and MDX-H210 (humanized Fab anti-DC64 x Fab anti-HER2/neu), and with the anti-CD64 monoclonal antibody (mAB) MDX-33 (H22) in the modulation of monocyte CD64 in vivo. In an ongoing phase I/II open-label trial with progressive dose escalation (1-15 mg/m2), patients with treatment refractory EGFR-positive cancers (renal cell carcinoma (RCC), head and neck, bladder, ovarian, prostate cancer and skin cancer) are treated weekly with intravenous MDX-447, with and without granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). MDX-447 has been found to be immunologically active at all doses, binding to circulating monocytes and neutrophils (when given with G-CSF), causing monocytopenia and stimulating increases in circulating plasma cytokines. MDX-447 is well tolerated, the primary toxicities being fever, chills, blood pressure lability, and pain/ myalgias. Of 36 patients evaluable for response, 9 have experienced stable disease of 3-6 month's duration. The optimal dose and the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) have yet to be defined; dose escalation continues to define better the dose, toxicity, and the potential therapeutic role of this bispecific antibody. Three MDX-H210 phase II trials are currently in progress, all using the intravenous dose of 15 mg/m2 given with granulocyte/macrophage (GM-CSF). These consist of one trial each in the treatment of RCC patients, patients with prostate cancer, and colorectal cancer patients, all of whom have

  2. Preclinical and clinical experience with a viscoelastic total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Ross, Raymond S.; Jollenbeck, Boris A.; Zimmers, Kari B.; Defibaugh, Neal D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe the mechanical durability and the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR). The human intervertebral disc is a complex, viscoelastic structure, permitting and constraining motion in 3 axes, thus providing stability. The ideal disc replacement should be viscoelastic and deformable in all directions, and it should restore disc height and angle. Methods Mechanical testing was conducted to validate the durability of the VTDR, and a clinical study was conducted to evaluate safety and performance. Fifty patients with single-level, symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease at L4-5 or L5-S1 were enrolled in a clinical trial at 3 European sites. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically for 2 years by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), a visual analog scale (VAS), and independent radiographic analyses. Results The VTDR showed a fatigue life in excess of 50 million cycles (50-year equivalent) and a physiologically appropriate level of stiffness, motion, geometry, and viscoelasticity. We enrolled 28 men and 22 women in the clinical study, with a mean age of 40 years. Independent quantitative radiographic assessment indicated that the VTDR restored and maintained disc height and lordosis while providing physiologic motion. Mean ODI scores decreased from 48% preoperatively to 23% at 2 years’ follow-up. Mean VAS low-back pain scores decreased from 7.1 cm to 2.9 cm. Median scores indicated that half of the patient population had ODI scores below 10% and VAS low-back pain scores below 0.95 cm at 2 years. Conclusions The VTDR has excellent durability and performs clinically and radiographically as intended for the treatment of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease. Clinical Relevance The VTDR is intended to restore healthy anatomic properties and stability characteristics to the spinal segment. This study is the first to evaluate a VTDR in a 50-patient

  3. The ethics of nursing student international clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Levi, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the motivations for offering international nursing student experiences and the reasons students choose to participate. Students should prepare by learning cultural humility rather than cultural competency, and they should be oriented to the ethical responsibility implicit in caring for those in developing countries. Programs that provide these experiences need to be developed with an eye to sustainability so the lives of those receiving care will be enriched after the students go home.

  4. On the occurrence of Prototaxites in the Cleveland black shale of Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Chitaley, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The 9 {times} 5 cm permineralized specimen of Prototaxites Dawson from the Upper Devonian Age of the Cleveland Shale exposed at the intersection of Interstate Route 71 and West 130th Street, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, is grayish-black and pyritized with an appearance of a petrified wood. Cellulose acetate peels and ground sections have been prepared for study, along its longitudinal and transverse surfaces. SEM photographs are also made. The specimen preserves only the medullary region without an outer rind. The medulla consists mainly of densely crowded, thick-walled, two-layered tubes running mostly lengthwise, parallel to the longitudinal axis of the specimen. They may also be oblique and horizontal. Many tubes are septate and branched and many disintegrated. Rings of growth and medullary rays are absent but scattered darker spots enclosing a collection of tubes in a disintegrated structureless mass, are present. The interesting structural details of the tube wall as observed for the first time in SEM coupled with other various characteristics are compared with the known species of Prototaxites Dawson for identification of the Cleveland specimen.

  5. Pebble treatment and use at Cleveland-Cliffs` autogenous milling operations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, B.R.; McIvor, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Subsidiaries of Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. operate seven iron mining operations worldwide. Of these seven operations, four North American facilities employ autogenous milling. Two of these autogenous milling circuits are in northern Michigan, the Tilden and Empire Mines, one is in northern Minnesota, Hibbing Taconite, and the fourth is the Wabush Mine in Labrador. The original autogenous milling circuit developed by Cleveland-Cliffs was at the Empire Mine. Extensive laboratory, pilot plant and full-scale testing was conducted prior to commissioning this first iron ore autogenous circuit in 1963. Since the original circuits were installed at the four mines, modifications have been made based on pilot plant and full-scale plant tests that have resulted in significant improvements in primary mill throughputs. The following is a discussion of the autogenous milling circuits at Empire, Tilden and Hibtac and the changes to the circuits related to pebble treatment and use that have been and are scheduled to be made to increase feed rates and/or improve efficiency.

  6. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  7. Sporotrichosis in childhood: clinical and therapeutic experience in 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Saúl, Amado; Paredes-Solis, Vanessa; Fierro, Leonel; Rosales, Alejandra; Palacios, Carolina; Araiza, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Sporotrichosis in an uncommon mycoses in childhood and is generally associated with injuries received as a consequence of farm work. We undertook a retrospective study of sporotrichosis in children and adolescents seen over a 10-year period, focusing on their clinical, epidemiologic, and mycologic features as well as treatment. We included 25 children with a mean age of 9.3 years. Most of those affected were schoolchildren (84%) from rural areas. The main clinical variety of sporotrichosis seen was the lymphocutaneous form (64%), followed by the fixed cutaneous form (36%), and one instance of the disseminated cutaneous form. Most lesions were located on the upper limbs (40%) and the face (36%). Sporothrix schenckii was isolated in all patients and 24 of 25 had a positive sporotrichin skin test. Nineteen patients were treated and cured clinically and mycologically with potassium iodide, three were cured with itraconazole and one with heat therapy.

  8. Dental Students' Clinical Experience Across Three Successive Curricula at One U.S. Dental School.

    PubMed

    White, Joel M; Jenson, Larry E; Gansky, Stuart A; Walsh, Cameron J; Accurso, Brent T; Vaderhobli, Ram M; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Walji, Muhammad F; Cheng, Jing

    2017-04-01

    As dental schools continue to seek the most effective ways to provide clinical education for students, it is important to track the effects innovations have on students' clinical experience to allow for quantitative comparisons of various curricula. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of three successive clinical curricula on students' experience at one U.S. dental school. The three were a discipline-based curriculum (DBC), a comprehensive care curriculum (CCC), and a procedural requirement curriculum plus externships (PRCE). Students' clinic experience data from 1992 to 2013 were analyzed for total experience and in five discipline areas. Clinic experience metrics analyzed were patient visits (PVs), relative value units (RVUs), and equivalent amounts (EQAs). A minimum experience threshold (MET) and a high experience threshold (HET) were set at one standard deviation above and below the mean for the DBC years. Students below the MET were designated as low achievers; students above the HET were designated as high achievers. The results showed significant differences among the three curricula in almost all areas of comparison: total PVs, total EQAs, total RVUs, RVUs by discipline, and number of high and low achievers in total clinical experience and by discipline. The comprehensive care approach to clinical education did not negatively impact students' clinical experience and in many cases enhanced it. The addition of externships also enhanced student total clinical experience although more study is needed to determine their effectiveness. The insights provided by this study suggest that the methodology used including the metrics of PVs, EQAs, and RVUs may be helpful for other dental schools in assessing students' clinical experience.

  9. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyung Min; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Cho, Byung Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center. Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered. Results The sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47%) males and 10 (53%) females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years). Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients. Conclusions KTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management. PMID:26430625

  10. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hyung Min; Chung, Ho Yun; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Cho, Byung Chae

    2015-09-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center. We conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered. The sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47%) males and 10 (53%) females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years). Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients. KTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management.

  11. Evaluating Perceptions of Culminating Clinical Education Experiences of Senior Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Patricia A.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The perceptions of athletic training students (ATSs) regarding their clinical education experiences are not fully understood. It is important to investigate ATS perceptions of clinical education to allow athletic training educators to provide educational experiences that will maximize learning. Objective: To determine what ATSs value…

  12. Evaluating Perceptions of Culminating Clinical Education Experiences of Senior Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Patricia A.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The perceptions of athletic training students (ATSs) regarding their clinical education experiences are not fully understood. It is important to investigate ATS perceptions of clinical education to allow athletic training educators to provide educational experiences that will maximize learning. Objective: To determine what ATSs value…

  13. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  14. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been employed…

  15. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  16. Clinical experience with recombinant molecules for allergy vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Oliver; Niederberger, Verena; Horak, Friedrich; Fiebig, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Numerous allergens have been cloned and produced by the use of recombinant DNA technology. In several cases recombinant variants with reduced IgE-reactivity have also been developed as candidates for allergen specific immunotherapy. Only very few of these proteins have as yet been tested in the clinic, and the major focus has been on birch and grass pollen, two of the most common causes of IgE-mediated allergic disease. This article serves to justify the rational for using recombinant products and reviews the progress that has been made to date with their clinical assessment.

  17. Necrotizing Craniocervical Soft Tissue Infections: Clinical Experience and Personal Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Riccardo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Dallan, Iacopo

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing cervical soft tissue infections (NCSTIs) are devastating uncommon clinical entities that are often life threatening. We report two patients suffering from NCSTI and treated at our institution. Diagnosis of NCSTI has been confirmed histologically and surgically. Both patients were managed with very aggressive treatment (medical and surgical) and survived with minimal morbidity. Early diagnosis and aggressive, multimodality treatment can reduce mortality and morbidity rates. Thoracic and mediastinal involvement requires appropriate management. A strong clinical suspicion remains one of the most important aspects of the management of such shattering conditions. PMID:23304596

  18. Review of clinical and laboratory experiences with molindone hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Claghorn, J L

    1985-08-01

    The literature concerning the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, receptor physiology, and clinical use of molindone is reviewed. Unanswered questions about the drug are addressed. Although molindone is reputed to have a short half-life (1.5 hours), clinical observations report a prolonged effect from a once-daily dose. Early in treatment, some patients show intolerance due to akathisia or extrapyramidal symptoms. This may be withdrawal dyskinesia due to discontinuation of another drug or an early adverse effect of molindone. Different effects on dopamine receptors have been described, but the significance of these properties for the development of tardive dyskinesia remains unclear.

  19. Contact allergy to colophony. Chemical identifications of allergens, sensitization experiments and clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, A T

    1988-01-01

    Colophony (rosin) is a widespread material which is obtained from species of the family Pinaceae. It has a complex chemical composition, which differs depending mainly on the recovery process. The global production is about one million tons a year and the largest single consumption is in the sizing of paper and paper board. Rosin is a common cause of contact allergy and is included in the standard tray for patch testing at dermatological clinics. Unmodified gum rosin is the material mainly used in the routine series. It is desirable to test with identified allergens in order to make the testing and diagnosis more reliable and establish a strategy for prevention. The principal aims of the present study were to compare the allergenicity of rosin of different origins, to isolate and identify some of the allergens in unmodified gum rosin, and to attempt to diminish the allergenic potential of rosin preparations. Tall oil rosin and different types of gum rosin were tested in guinea pigs and in man. The test reactivity corresponded well when comparing gum rosin from different sources, while tall oil rosin showed a lower reactivity. However, testing with more than one rosin preparation in the routine series detected additional cases. A clear dose-response relationship was obtained by patch testing with gum rosin, implying that a concentration of 10% in petrolatum is well worth considering for routine testing. Unmodified Portuguese gum rosin was fractionated by chromatographic methods. Isolated fractions and components were tested for eliciting activity in guinea pigs sensitive to gum rosin. Pure compounds were also tested in patients with known allergy to gum rosin. The structures of the isolated allergens were elucidated using spectroscopic methods. Abietic acid, the classical colophony allergen, was found not to be allergenic, while oxidation products of abietic acid and dehydroabietic acid were identified as allergens. The isolated allergens showed a pattern of cross

  20. The Relationship Between Levels of Fidelity in Simulation, Traditional Clinical Experiences and Objectives.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of baccalaureate nursing students' (BSN) perceived learning effectiveness using the Clinical Learning Environments Comparison Survey of different levels of fidelity simulation and traditional clinical experiences. A convenience sample of 103 first semester BSN enrolled in a fundamental/assessment clinical course and 155 fifth semester BSN enrolled in a leadership clinical course participated in this study. A descriptive correlational design was used for this cross-sectional study to evaluate students' perceptions after a simulation experience and the completion of the traditional clinical experiences. The subscales measured were communication, nursing leadership, and teaching-learning dyad. No statistical differences were noted based on the learning objectives. The communication subscale showed a tendency toward preference for traditional clinical experiences in meeting students perceived learning for communication. For student perceived learning effectiveness, faculty should determine the appropriate level of fidelity in simulation based on the learning objectives.

  1. Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway: the Hong Kong experience.

    PubMed

    Lau, T W; Leung, F; Siu, D; Wong, G; Luk, K D K

    2010-12-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is one of the commonest fractures in orthopaedic trauma. There is a trend of further increase in its incidence in the coming decades. Besides the development of techniques and implants to overcome the difficulties in fixation of osteoporosis bone, the general management of the hip fracture is also very challenging in terms of the preparation of the generally poorer pre-morbid state and complicate social problems associated with this group of patients. In order to cope with the increasing demand, our hospital started a geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway in 2007. The aim of this pathway is to provide better care for this group of patients through multidisciplinary approach. From year 2007 to 2009, we had managed 964 hip fracture patients. After the implementation of the pathway, the pre-operative and the total length of stay in acute hospital were shortened by over 5 days. Other clinical outcomes including surgical site infection, 30 days mortality and also incidence of pressure sore improved when compared to the data before the pathway. The rate of surgical site infection was 0.98%, and the 30 days mortality was 1.67% in 2009. The active participation of physiotherapists, occupational therapists as well as medical social workers also helped to formulate the discharge plan as early as the patient is admitted. In conclusion, a well-planned and executed clinical pathway for hip fracture can improve the clinical outcomes of the geriatric hip fractures.

  2. The Clinical/Practicum Experience in Professional Preparation: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Edwin George; Walker, Keith; Wimmer, Randy

    2008-01-01

    The authors synthesize preliminary findings from an interdisciplinary study of the practicum/clinical phase of undergraduate pre-service education in the professions. Early data analysis identified similarities and differences across disciplines in terms of: (a) the terminology describing each practicum program, (b) the programs' key…

  3. Suicide Loss Survivors' Experiences with Therapy: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Rebecca; Cerel, Julie; McGann, Vanessa; Maple, Myfanwy

    2016-07-01

    Over two-thirds of suicide loss survivors, those who have lost a loved one to suicide, seek individual therapy following their loss. However, nothing is known about what survivors find helpful about therapy or how therapy impacts their grief. An online survey was conducted June 2012-March 2013 with a convenience sample of 197 survivors primarily from the USA and Australia to develop a better understanding of treatment seeking loss survivors and their experiences in therapy. Questions explored the experience of the suicide death, the therapy received after the loss, and insights about improving therapy for loss survivors. Participants were generally positive about their therapy experiences. However, respondents endorsed symptoms of PTSD, though many did not report a formal diagnosis from a provider, suggesting a discrepancy that could lead to inadequate treatment of symptoms. The findings provide an understanding of treatment seeking loss survivors, along with implications for therapists treating this population.

  4. Clinical microbiology quality assurance program: a Taiwan experience.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W C; Wu, J L; Luh, K T

    1995-05-01

    Quality assurance programs have been established during the last two decades in developed countries to promote high quality performance in clinical laboratories. In Taiwan, such a program for clinical microbiology laboratories has been in place since July 1987. It has been supported by the Department of Health, Executive Yuan, R.O.C. and was set up by the authors. The manpower status, facilities and equipment, and performance of clinical laboratories were investigated during the first year and standards of laboratory quality were recommended. Since then, under a continuing education program, we have conducted seminars, symposia, workshops, short-courses or panel discussions approximately 4 times a year. There have been about 150 participants per session and they have come from local hospitals (primary care hospitals), regional hospitals (secondary care hospitals) and medical centers (tertiary care hospitals). Proficiency test specimens or external unknown specimens were sent to all the laboratories twice a year and approximately 3 specimens were used each time for the evaluation of each laboratory's diagnostic capability and quality of service. Results indicated that there were tremendous improvements in the quality of laboratory performance. At the same time, several laboratory manuals describing the methods of quality control of clinical specimens, test procedures, media and reagents, personnel management and a compilation of reports etc. were published as guidelines of basic requirements for each level of the laboratories. For local hospital laboratories in remote areas, several regional hospitals or medical centers with high quality laboratories were selected to serve as back-ups. Our evaluation has shown that the performance and quality of service provided by most clinical microbiology laboratories in Taiwan have now reached nearly the level of those found in the so-called "developed countries".

  5. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences with novel somatostatin ligands: advantages, disadvantages and new prospects.

    PubMed

    Hofland, L J; van der Hoek, J; Feelders, R; van der Lely, A J; de Herder, W; Lamberts, S W J

    2005-01-01

    Since the cloning and characterization of the five human somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes, our understanding of the expression and functional role of the five SSTR subtypes in human (neuro-)endocrine tumors has increased significantly. The majority of human (neuro-)endocrine tumors express multiple SSTR. GH-secreting pituitary adenomas preferentially express SSTR2 and SSTR5, prolactinomas SSTR1 and SSTR5, and corticotroph adenomas express SSTR2 (low number) and predominantly SSTR5s. In addition, gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors frequently express multiple SSTR as well, with SSTR2 being expressed at the highest level. Treatment with the current generation of octapeptide somatostatin-analogs, e.g. octreotide and lanreotide, normalizes circulating GH- and IGF-I levels in approximately 60-70% of acromegalic patients, thereby remaining about one-third of patients uncontrolled. In patients with GEP neuroendocrine tumors, both somatostatin-analogs effectively suppress the production of bioactive peptides and hormones by the tumor cells, resulting in an important improvement of the related clinical symptomatology. However, a considerable proportion of patients experience an escape from treatment within months to several years. Altogether, the current generation of somatostatin analogs are effective medical tools in the treatment of acromegalic patients and of patients with neuroendocrine GEP tumors, but there is certainly a need for novel somatostatin analogs. In recent years, a significant number of novel somatostatin-ligands has been developed. These ligands include SSTR selective-, bi-specific, universal, as well as chimeric dopamine (DA)-somatostatin ligands. In vitro studies using human pituitary adenoma cells demonstrate a more profound inhibition of GH, PRL and ACTH secretion by somatostatin-analogs targeting both SSTR2s and SSTR5s, compared with SSTR2-preferential somatostatin-analogs. This likely reflects the SSTR subtype expression pattern

  6. PACS archive upgrade and data migration: clinical experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Documet, Luis; Sarti, Dennis A.; Huang, H. K.; Donnelly, John

    2002-05-01

    Saint John's Health Center PACS data volumes have increased dramatically since the hospital became filmless in April of 1999. This is due in part of continuous image accumulation, and the integration of a new multi-slice detector CT scanner into PACS. The original PACS archive would not be able to handle the distribution and archiving load and capacity in the near future. Furthermore, there is no secondary copy backup of all the archived PACS image data for disaster recovery purposes. The purpose of this paper is to present a clinical and technical process template to upgrade and expand the PACS archive, migrate existing PACs image data to the new archive, and provide a back-up and disaster recovery function not currently available. Discussion of the technical and clinical pitfalls and challenges involved in this process will be presented as well. The server hardware configuration was upgraded and a secondary backup implemented for disaster recovery. The upgrade includes new software versions, database reconfiguration, and installation of a new tape jukebox to replace the current MOD jukebox. Upon completion, all PACS image data from the original MOD jukebox was migrated to the new tape jukebox and verified. The migration was performed during clinical operation continuously in the background. Once the data migration was completed the MOD jukebox was removed. All newly acquired PACS exams are now archived to the new tape jukebox. All PACs image data residing on the original MOD jukebox have been successfully migrated into the new archive. In addition, a secondary backup of all PACS image data has been implemented for disaster recovery and has been verified using disaster scenario testing. No PACS image data was lost during the entire process and there was very little clinical impact during the entire upgrade and data migration. Some of the pitfalls and challenges during this upgrade process included hardware reconfiguration for the original archive server, clinical

  7. Co-Learning: Maximizing Learning in Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merk, Hillary; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Carroll, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and teacher educators have given increased attention to co-teaching during the student teaching experience. Co-teaching facilitates an apprenticeship arrangement that encourages modeling of classroom practice for the candidate and a chance to implement directly what is being learned by the apprentice. The co-teaching model can be…

  8. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  9. "Playing" at Leadership: Clinical Experiences for Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Ladd, Patricia R.

    1990-01-01

    The required educational administration internship at Eastern Illinois University is a rigorous program designed to promote professional development through structures integrating play or a playful attitude into its work-related elements. These structures allow interns opportunities to initiate and think clearly, experience solidarity in work…

  10. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  11. Medical students' emotional development in early clinical experience: a model.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes, students wrote daily about their most impressive experiences, explicitly reporting what they felt, thought, and did. In a subsequent interview, they discussed those experiences in greater detail. Following a grounded theory approach, we conducted a constant comparative analysis, collecting and then interpreting data, and allowing the interpretation to inform subsequent data collection. Impressive experiences set up tensions, which gave rise to strong emotions. We identified four 'axes' along which tensions were experienced: 'idealism versus reality', 'critical distance versus adaptation', 'involvement versus detachment' and 'feeling versus displaying'. We found many factors, which influenced how respondents relieved those tensions. Their personal attributes and social relationships both inside and outside the medical community were important ones. Respondents' positions along the different dimensions, as determined by the balance between attributes and tensions, shaped their learning outcomes. Medical students' emotional development occurs through active participation in medical practice and having impressive experiences within relationships with patients and others on wards. Tensions along four dimensions give rise to strong emotions. Gaining insight into the many conditions that influence students' learning about emotions might support educators and supervisors in fostering medical students' emotional and professional development.

  12. Three years of clinical experiences on excimer laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viligiardi, Riccardo; Galiberti, Sandra; Pini, Roberto; Salimbeni, Renzo

    1992-08-01

    Our experience on excimer laser angioplasty in peripheral arteries is reported. During three years 34 patients were treated with improved techniques, following the evolution of the laser and of the delivery systems. Encouraging results in the laser stand alone technique allowed us to reduce the association with balloon dilatation to a limited number of cases.

  13. Welfare Reform in Cleveland: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Thomas; Coulton, Claudia; London, Andrew; Polit, Denise; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Scott, Ellen; Verma, Nandita

    A study assessed Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) implementation and effects in Cuyahoga County between 1992-2000. It used field research, surveys and interviews of current and former welfare recipients, state and county welfare and employment records, and indicators of social and economic trends. Findings indicated Cuyahoga County…

  14. [Clinical experience of usage of neurostimulator in regionar anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, M I; Kolobaeva, E G

    2006-09-01

    The elaboration of more reliable and simple methods of transmitted and plexus anestesias has provided a wide clinical usage of regionar anestesia (RA) during the operations on extremities. The creation of devices to identificate (locate) nerval bearer and plexes was also an important factor for increasing quantity of RA. For such identification we use the portable "Innervator 232" neurostimulator manufactured by "Fisher & Paykel Ltd.", New Zealand. Successful conduction of transmitted and plexus anesthesia depends a lot on anesthesiologist's knowledge of anatomy-topography location of nerval bearer and plexes, precise fulfillment of anesthesia, manual capabilities of physician and obtaining a paresthesia or muscular contraction during the identification of nerval bearer with the help of neurostimulator. RA is secure, effective, and provides less risk for a patient. With neurostimulation the amount of successful anesthesias increases up to 98%. The neurostimulator is easy to use, clinically effective in emergency and planned surgeries for identification of nerval bearer and plexes.

  15. Constructing maternal-child learning experiences using clinical simulations.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Pamela R; Bambini, Deborah; Hensel, Desiree; Moorman, Megan; Washburn, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Clinical simulations are gaining more attention in the field of maternal-child health and allow nursing programs and service organizations to assess competency of students and staff in key patient safety situations. Nursing and midwifery programs, orientations, and yearly reaccreditation modules commonly include simulation on postpartum hemorrhage, placenta abruption, shoulder distocia, and other high-risk, low-incidence emergency events. This article describes the use of simulations by educators and managers as teaching or professional development strategies.

  16. Clinical Aspects of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: Experiences in Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Hyun Taek; Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho; Cho, Byung Moon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare condition for which few clinical reviews have been conducted in Korea. Our aim was to investigate, risk factors, clinical presentations/courses, and outcomes of 22 patients treated for CVT at two centers. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted, selecting 22 patients diagnosed with and treated for CVT at two patient care centers over a 10-year period (January 1, 2004 to August 31, 2015). Patient data, pathogenetic concerns (laboratory findings), risk factors, locations, symptoms, treatments, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Results Mean patient age at diagnosis was 54.41 ± 16.19. Patients most often presented with headache (40%), followed by seizure (27%) and altered mental status (18%). Focal motor deficits (5%), visual symptoms (5%), and dysarthria (5%) were less common. Important predisposing factors in CVT included prothrombotic conditions (35%), infections (14%), hyperthyroidism (18%), trauma (14%), and malignancy (4%). By location, 9 patients (40%) experienced thrombosis of superior sagittal sinus predominantly, with involvement of transverse sinus in 20 (90%), sigmoid sinus in 12 (40%), and the deep venous system in 5 (23%). Treatment generally consisted of anticoagulants (63%) or antiplatelet (23%) drugs, but surgical decompression was considered if warranted (14%). Medical therapy in CVT yields good functional outcomes. Conclusion Mean age of patients with CVT in our study exceeded that reported in Europe or in America and had difference in risk factors. Functional outcomes are good with use of antithrombotic medication, whether or not hemorrhagic infarction is evident. PMID:27847760

  17. Targeted therapies for lung cancer: clinical experience and novel agents.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jill E; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E; Heymach, John V; Minna, John D

    2011-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography-based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene "addictions" as important therapeutic targets. Perhaps the most significant advance in the treatment of this challenging disease is the introduction of molecularly targeted therapies, a term that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The development of effective targeted therapeutics requires knowledge of the genes and pathways involved and how they relate to the biologic behavior of lung cancer. Drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor are now U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy and show dramatic efficacy when their use is coupled with a clear understanding of clinical data, mechanism, patient selection, drug interactions, and toxicities. Integrating genome-wide tumor analysis with drug- and targeted agent-responsive phenotypes will provide a wealth of new possibilities for lung cancer-targeted therapeutics. Ongoing research efforts in these areas as well as a discussion of emerging targeted agents being evaluated in clinical trials are the subjects of this review.

  18. Clinical experience of integrative cancer immunotherapy with GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Mette, Martin; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2013-07-01

    Immunotherapy has become an attractive new strategy in the treatment of cancer. The laboratory and clinical study of cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing. However, in the clinical setting, the results of cancer immunotherapy are mixed. We therefore contend that cancer immunotherapy should be customized to each patient individually based on their immune status and propose an integrative immunotherapy approach with second-generation group-specific component macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)-containing human serum. The standard protocol of our integrative cancer immunotherapy is as follows: i) 0.5 ml GcMAF-containing human serum is administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously once or twice per week for the duration of cancer therapy until all cancer cells are eradicated; ii) hyper T/natural killer (NK) cell therapy is given once per week for six weeks; iii) high-dose vitamin C is administered intravenously twice per week; iv) alpha lipoic acid (600 mg) is administered orally daily; v) vitamin D3 (5,000-10,000 IU) is administered orally daily. By March 2013, Saisei Mirai have treated over 345 patients with GcMAF. Among them we here present the cases of three patients for whom our integrative immunotherapy was remarkably effective. The results of our integrative immunotherapy seem hopeful. We also plan to conduct a comparative clinical study.>

  19. Clinical experience with trimegestone as a new progestin in HRT.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Gary; Spielmann, Daniele; Pickar, James; Constantine, Ginger

    2003-11-01

    Trimegestone (TMG) is a novel, 19-norpregnane progestin, which demonstrates endometrial selectivity with a reduced progestin-related side effect profile when compared to several other currently marketed progestins. TMG has been studied in combination with 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2) and conjugated equine estrogens (CEE). TMG-containing HRT agents were effective in relieving vasomotor symptoms and providing protection from endometrial hyperplasia with < or =1% hyperplasia. In clinical trials with sequential regimens, TMG provided predictable withdrawal bleeding associated with a low incidence of irregular and prolonged bleeding. Clinical studies of continuous combined regimens of estrogen/TMG combinations demonstrated high levels of amenorrhea. Both 17beta-E2 and CEE/TMG combinations have shown improved bone mineral density and quality-of-life assessments. Both continuous combined and sequential regimens of 17beta-E2/TMG and CEE/TMG have a favorable clinical profile. TMG provides an important new option for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms and the prevention of osteoporosis.

  20. Laboratory and clinical experience with neodymium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1991, we have undertaken extensive laboratory and clinical studies of the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser for surgical treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Side-firing optical fibers which emit a divergent, relatively low energy density Nd:YAG laser beam produce coagulation necrosis of obstructing periurethral prostate tissue, followed by gradual dissolution and slough in the urinary stream. Laser-tissue interactions and Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for prostatectomy have been studied in canine and human prostate model systems, enhancing clinical application. Ongoing studies examine comparative Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for various beam configurations produced by available side-firing optical fibers and continue to refine operative technique. We have documented clinical outcomes of Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy in 230 consecutive patients treated with the UrolaseTM side-firing optical fiber. Nd:YAG laser coagulation the prostate produces a remarkably low acute morbidity profile, with no significant bleeding or fluid absorption. No postoperative incontinence has been produced. Serial assessments of voiding outcomes over more than 3 years of followup show objective and symptomatic improvement following Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy which is comparable to older but more morbid electrosurgical approaches. Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy is a safe, efficacious, durable and cost-effective treatment for BPH.

  1. Association Between Medicare Summary Star Ratings for Patient Experience and Clinical Outcomes in US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Stephen; Gaughan, John P; Bosire, Joshua; Mazzarelli, Anthony J

    2016-03-01

    In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released new summary star ratings for US hospitals based on patient experience. We aimed to test the association between CMS patient experience star ratings and clinical outcomes. We analyzed risk-adjusted data for more than 3000 US hospitals from CMS Hospital Compare using linear regression. We found that better patient experience was associated with favorable clinical outcomes. Specifically, a higher number of stars for patient experience had a statistically significant association with lower rates of many in-hospital complications. A higher patient experience star rating also had a statistically significant association with lower rates of unplanned readmissions to the hospital within 30 days. Better patient experience according to the CMS star ratings is associated with favorable clinical outcomes. These results support the inclusion of patient experience data in the framework of how hospitals are paid for services.

  2. Does self-reported clinical experience predict performance in medical school and internship?

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; Gilliland, William R; Waechter, Donna M; Cruess, David; Calloway, Margaret; Durning, Steven J

    2012-02-01

    Medical school admissions committees attempt to select the most qualified applicants. In addition to traditional performance measures, committees often look favourably upon applicants who report previous clinical experience. This study aimed to determine if self-reported clinical experience is a valid indicator of future performance in medical school and internship. We collected data for seven year groups (1993-1999; n = 1112) and operationalised trainee performance in terms of five outcomes: cumulative medical school grade point average (GPA); US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and 2 scores, and scores on a validated programme director's evaluation measuring intern expertise and professionalism. We then conducted a series of analyses of covariance to compare outcomes in applicants who self-reported previous clinical experience with outcomes in those who did not. In these analyses, the independent variable was self-reported clinical experience (yes/no), the covariate was undergraduate GPA, and the dependent variables were the five performance outcomes. In four of five analyses, we found no differences in the performance of the two groups (clinical experience versus no clinical experience). However, on the cumulative medical school GPA outcome, applicants who reported previous clinical experience had statistically significantly lower cumulative GPAs upon graduation than those who did not report such experience (F(1,940) = 9.35, p = 0.002, partial η(2) = 0.01 [small effect size]). Our results suggest that applicants who self-report previous clinical experience may not be better candidates. In fact, on some measures of performance, these applicants may actually perform worse than those who report no clinical experience. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  3. Gay men's experiences of surrogacy clinics in India.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Damien W; Due, Clemence; Power, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    While growing numbers of Australian gay men are entering into 'offshore' surrogacy arrangements in order to become parents, little empirical research has been conducted with this population. This article reports on a qualitative analysis of interviews with 12 gay men who had entered into surrogacy arrangements in India. The findings outline both positive and negative experiences in terms of support pre-conception, during the birth and post-birth. Changes to legislation in India mean that gay men can no longer access surrogacy services there, but it is important to understand the experiences of men who had previously accessed those services. The article concludes by highlighting aspects of the data that demonstrate the particular experiences of gay men who undertake offshore surrogacy arrangements, especially with regard to their need for support and involvement in all aspects of the process. A more thoroughly developed network of care may help to facilitate such support and this may further increase the positive outcomes reported by gay men who form families through surrogacy arrangements. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. School Vouchers: Publicly Funded Programs in Cleveland and Milwaukee. Report to the Honorable Judd Gregg, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    This report provides information on Cleveland's and Milwaukee's publicly funded school voucher programs, using previous research and reviews of state laws, school district and voucher program records, state budgets, voucher-related reports and articles, and site visits and interviews. Researchers examined eligibility criteria; public and voucher…

  5. Investigating the impact of local urban sources on total atmospheric mercury wet deposition in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Event-based precipitation samples were collected at a downtown industrial and a predominantly upwind rural location in the Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan area from July 2009 through December 2010 to investigate the potential local total mercury (Hg) wet deposition enhancement in a ...

  6. Investigating the impact of local urban sources on total atmospheric mercury wet deposition in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Event-based precipitation samples were collected at a downtown industrial and a predominantly upwind rural location in the Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan area from July 2009 through December 2010 to investigate the potential local total mercury (Hg) wet deposition enhancement in a ...

  7. THE NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT: PARTNERSHIP FOR SUCCESS COASTAL ZONE SYMPOSIUM, CLEVELAND, OH JULY 15-19, 2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partnering for Success (Abstract). Presented at Coastal Zone 01: Hands Across the Water - Linking Land, Lake, and Sea, 15-19 July 2001, Cleveland, OH. 1 p. (ERL,GB R843).

    The National Coastal Assessment (Coastal 2000) is a coastal monitoring survey that responds to the ne...

  8. 78 FR 16826 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Cleveland-Akron-Lorain and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Cleveland...-hour ozone maintenance air quality State Implementation Plans (SIPs) under the Clean Air Act to replace... Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the SIP revision requests to EPA...

  9. Marching toward Justice: Lessons Learned from the Shaw High School Mighty Cardinals Marching Band in East Cleveland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luminais, Misty; Williams, Rhonda Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Shaw High School marching band has emerged as a collective site of individual and group pride and empowerment in the stories gathered through the community-based "Voicing & Action Project", which the Social Justice Institute debuted in East Cleveland. At first glance, a high school marching band might not have much in common with…

  10. Unraveling Neighborhood Change Using Two-Wave Panel Analysis: A Case Study of Cleveland in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Shanta; Coulton, Claudia

    1994-01-01

    Provides analysis of neighborhood change in Cleveland (Ohio) in 1980s using two-wave panel design and causal modeling. Reports that relationship of poverty rate to housing values and rate of births to unmarried mothers is reciprocal, implying cycle of social and economic decline of neighborhood. Other findings are reported that suggest declining…

  11. Marching toward Justice: Lessons Learned from the Shaw High School Mighty Cardinals Marching Band in East Cleveland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luminais, Misty; Williams, Rhonda Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Shaw High School marching band has emerged as a collective site of individual and group pride and empowerment in the stories gathered through the community-based "Voicing & Action Project", which the Social Justice Institute debuted in East Cleveland. At first glance, a high school marching band might not have much in common with…

  12. "Somewhere between a Network and a Secret Society": The Cleveland Conference and Elite Policymaking in American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Lynne M.

    The Cleveland Conference, which dates from 1915, is an annual gathering of leading figures in university schools of education, government, state and city school superintendents, foundations, policy institutes, and education commissions. Growing from its original 4 members to the present 100 limit, and broadening its membership to include a few…

  13. Development of a Quality Care Plan to Reduce Otolaryngologic Readmissions: Early Lessons from the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Karthik; Revenaugh, Peter; Benninger, Michael; Burkey, Brian; Sindwani, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Hospital readmissions are an important focus of national quality and cost containment efforts. With increased emphasis on the impact of unplanned readmissions, it is critical to evaluate factors contributing to readmission rates and optimize strategies aimed at reducing these rates. The objectives of this study were to discuss quality interventions implemented at our institution and to evaluate their impact on reducing readmissions. Case series with chart review. Academic tertiary care medical center. Medical records of patients who were admitted to an otolaryngology inpatient service and readmitted within 30 days of discharge between January 2010 and December 2012 were reviewed. A quality care plan (QCP) was developed, and various interventions were implemented during this time to affect these rates. There were 769, 816, and 798 admissions during the years 2010, 2011, and 2012, respectively. The number of readmissions during this time were 50 (6.5%), 51 (6.3%), and 28 (3.5%), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in case mix index, demographics, and subsequent length of stay for those patients requiring readmission. The reduction in number of readmissions in 2012, after the institution of our QCP, was statistically significant (P < .05). Readmission within 30 days in a large otolaryngology practice can be multifactorial. To reduce rates of readmission, it is essential to understand the diagnoses, postoperative complications, and comorbidities contributing to readmission. Implementation of a QCP composed of comprehensive discharge planning and close postdischarge follow-up can lead to a reduction in readmissions. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  14. Data Sharing and the Development of the Cleveland Clinic Statistical Education Dataset Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Examples are highly sought by both students and teachers. This is particularly true as many statistical instructors aim to engage their students and increase active participation. While simulated datasets are functional, they lack real perspective and the intricacies of actual data. In order to obtain real datasets, the principal investigator of a…

  15. Data Sharing and the Development of the Cleveland Clinic Statistical Education Dataset Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Examples are highly sought by both students and teachers. This is particularly true as many statistical instructors aim to engage their students and increase active participation. While simulated datasets are functional, they lack real perspective and the intricacies of actual data. In order to obtain real datasets, the principal investigator of a…

  16. The correspondence and collaboration of Harvey Cushing and Irvine Page: Lessons from the Cleveland Clinic Archives.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Kalil G; Lubelski, Daniel; Lautzenheiser, Frederick; Mroz, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Harvey Cushing is well-known as a pioneer of brain surgery and is considered the father of modern neurosurgery. However, Cushing's interests and contributions extend beyond neurosurgery. Through his determined interdisciplinary collaboration in medicine and biomedical research, Cushing was able to contribute to numerous fields including bacteriology, anesthesiology, and endocrinology. With regards to the latter, Cushing corresponds with Irvine Page, well-known for isolating serotonin, discovering the renin-angiotensin system, and postulating of the mosaic theory of hypertension. In a correspondence spanning 3 years, from January 1933 to April 1936, Cushing and Page collaborated to discover a substance responsible for hypertension. In this historical article, the authors review the letters to highlight the collaborative efforts between leaders in disparate fields driven by the scientific curiosity. As national research agencies are focusing their funds toward collaborative and interdisciplinary research, it is interesting to note the historical communication among the scientific leaders that led to discoveries in the respective fields.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  18. Clinical spectrum of hypopituitarism in India: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gundgurthi, Abhay; Garg, M. K.; Bhardwaj, Reena; Brar, Karninder S.; Kharb, Sandeep; Pandit, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: There is paucity of information regarding clinical profile of hypopituitarism from India. We report the clinical profile of hypopituitarism from a tertiary center in North India. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in patients attending our endocrine center between January 2010 and December 2011. All new patients were studied prospectively and those registered before January 2010 retrospectively. Relevant clinical, hormonal, and imaging data were collected. Dynamic testing for pituitary functions was carried out as necessary. Hormonal deficiencies were defined as per prevailing recommendations. Results: This study included 113 subjects. The mean age was 38.6 ± 17.8 years (range, 4 – 76 years). There were 78 (69%) males and 35 females (31%). There were 22 subjects aged ≤18 years (childhood and adolescence) and 91 adults (>18 years). Visual disturbances were the most common presenting complaint (33%), though headache was the most common symptom (81%). Fifteen percent presented with pituitary apoplexy. Tumors comprised of 84% of cases. Hypogonadism (97%) was the most common abnormality seen followed by hypothyroidism (83.2%), hypoadrenalism (79.6%), growth hormone deficiency (88.1% of the 42 patients tested), and diabetes insipidus (13.3%). Panhypopituitarism was seen in 104 (92%) patients. There were no cases of hypopituitarism secondary to traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, central nervous system infections, or cranial irradiation to extrasellar tumors. Conclusion: The most common cause of hypopituitarism at tertiary care center is pituitary tumors and the commonest presenting complaint is visual symptoms. Panhypopituitarism is present in 92% cases. PMID:23087868

  19. [Experiences from a stress clinic. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Bech, Per; Eller, Nanna H

    2007-01-08

    The aim of the study was to develop a multi-disciplinary stress management program for employees with long-term stress. In a two-year period, 66 people active in the labour market were referred to the stress clinic at an occupational medicine clinic. All but 10 went through the program for four months and were further evaluated after one year regarding employment, symptoms and salivary cortisol. The program consisted of 1) an evaluation of symptoms of depression and stress, 2) stress management consultations, 3) introduction to relaxation techniques and physical exercise and 4) in some cases contact to the work place for adjustments or referral to psychiatric evaluation. Physiological measures such as maximal oxygen uptake, blood pressure, cholesterol, HDL, TSH, HbA1C, fasting glucose and fibrinogen were carried out at baseline and after four months. Salivary cortisol was measured at baseline, after four months and one year. As a control group 24 people with similar symptoms referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine were used. A significantly larger number of people in the study group (82%) than in the control group (42%) were employed after one year. There was no difference between the two groups regarding the prevalence of stress symptoms during the follow-up period, even though the prevalence decreased significantly. However, the prevalence of depression was significantly lower after one year in the study group (4%) compared to the control group (40%). Maximum oxygen uptake increased and fibrinogen decreased significantly in four months. The rise in salivary cortisol from awakening until 30 minutes later increased significantly during one year and correlated with symptoms of depression.

  20. Clinical experience with generic levetiracetam in people with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chaluvadi, Siresha; Chiang, Sharon; Tran, Larry; Goldsmith, Corey E.; Friedman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose To describe the clinical outcomes of a compulsory switch from branded to generic levetiracetam (LEV) among people with epilepsy (PWE) in an outpatient setting. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of 760 unduplicated consecutive adult patients attending a tertiary care epilepsy clinic at Ben Taub General Hospital. On November 1, 2008 hospital policy required all patients receiving branded LEV to be automatically switched to generic LEV. We calculated the proportion of patients switching back to branded LEV and reasons for the switch back. Key Findings Of the 260 patients (34%) being prescribed LEV (generic and brand name) during the study period, 105 (42.9%) were switched back to brand name LEV by their treating physicians. Reasons for switch back included increase in seizure frequency (19.6% vs. 1.6%; p < 0.0001) and adverse effects (AEs) (3.3%). AEs included headache, fatigue, and aggression. Patient age was associated with switchback when controlling for gender, epilepsy classification, and treatment characteristics [relative risk (RR) 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.09–2.84; p < 0.05)]. An increase in seizure frequency subsequent to generic substitution was associated with polytherapy compared to monotherapy (3.225; 1.512–6.880; p < 0.05). Significance A significant proportion of patients in our cohort on generic LEV required switch back to the branded drug. Careful monitoring is imperative because a compulsory switch from branded to generic LEV may lead to poor clinical outcomes, with risk of AEs and increased seizure frequency. PMID:21426334

  1. Clinical Experience of Laser Angioplasty for the Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masato; Tsuji, Yoshihiko

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, lasers are being utilized in cardiovascular surgery. Since the 1980's we have investigated angioplasty using an Argon laser for patients with obstructive arterial diseases. This technique aims to open the obstructive arterial lumen. Based on the excellent results of experimental studies, the technique has been clinically applied. Laser angioplasty was carried out in 84 patients with stenotic or obstructive lesions occluding more than 75% of peripheral and coronary arteries angiographically. They consisted of 74 cases with intermittent claudication and 10 cases with angina pectoris. Laser angioplasty for the peripheral arterial disease was performed under local anesthesia in the inguinal region under angioscopic guidance. On the other hand, laser coronary angioplasty was simultaneously undertaken at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting for a patient with multiple coronary stenoses. The initial success rate by laser angioplasty for the peripheral artery was 91% in the stenotic lesions and 71% in the obstructive lesions. The cumulative patency rate was 94% in the stenotic lesions and 83% in the occlusive lesions. A follow-up study of 66 months was carried out for patients with clinical success, excluding the cases where an angiogram showed occlusion within 1 week after laser angioplasty. Consequently, excellent long-term results could be clinically obtained. Based on the satisfactory results in the peripheral artery, coronary laser angioplasty was employed in 10 patients with angina pectoris. There were no complications by laser. Thus, the feasibility of laser application was apparently confirmed and laser angioplasty might be recommended for patients with atherosclerotic changes, especially for small arteries. PMID:18493376

  2. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: clinical experience with 124 patients.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Martinez-Guerra, G; Altamirano-Alvarez, E; Martinez-Avalos, A; Cardenas-Cardoz, R; Ayon-Cardenas, A; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Lopez-Corella, E

    1988-08-01

    We cared for 124 pediatric patients with a histologic diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (histiocytosis X) over a period of 14 years. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings were analyzed. The most frequent manifestations were bone lesions, lymph node involvement, and skin infiltration. Liver disease was noted in 50% of patients and lung disease in 23%; hematologic changes were also frequent. Dysfunction and involvement of these three organ systems, plus age of onset, distinguished the group of patients with the highest mortality. All patients with generalized disease or organ dysfunction were treated with systemic chemotherapy. The actuarial survival curve at 10 years was 63%.

  3. Clinical Experiences of Uncommon Motor Neuron Disease: Hirayama Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Hee; Choi, Dae Seob; Lee, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease, juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper limb, is a rare disease predominantly affecting the anterior horn cells of the cervical spinal cord in young men. This cervical myelopathy is associated with neck flexion. It should be suspected in young male patients with a chronic history of weakness and atrophy involving the upper extremities followed by clinical stability in few years. Herein, we report 2 cases of Hirayama disease on emphasis of diagnostic approach and describe the pathognomonic findings at flexion magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27800001

  4. Client Accounts of Corrective Experiences in Psychotherapy: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Angus, Lynne; Constantino, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    The Patient Perceptions of Corrective Experiences in Individual Therapy (PPCEIT; Constantino, Angus, Friedlander, Messer, & Moertl, 2011) posttreatment interview guide was developed to provide clinical researchers with an effective mode of inquiry to identify and further explore clients' firsthand accounts of corrective and transformative therapy experiences and their determinants. Not only do findings from the analysis of client corrective experience (CE) accounts help identify what and how CEs happen in or as a result of psychotherapy, but the measure itself may also provide therapists with an effective tool to further enhance clients' awareness, understanding, and integration of transformative change experiences. Accordingly, we discuss in this afterword to the series the implications for clinical practice arising from (a) the thematic analysis of client CE accounts, drawn from a range of clinical samples and international research programs and (b) the clinical effect of completing the PPCEIT posttreatment interview inquiry. We also identify directions for future clinical training and research. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [The experience with Dalkon shield in UCLA family planning clinic].

    PubMed

    Wang, A C

    1974-07-01

    The UCLA family planning clinic studied a series of 1263 IUD insertions to evaluate effectiveness and continuation rates. There were 2 groups of patients: Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) patients and UCLA students and their spouses. Some differences were found between the 2 groups but they were not considered statistically significant. 82% of IUDs inserted in HEW patients were for multiparous woman while 95% of the UCLA patients were nulliparous. Careful pelvic examinations were done and paracervical block was used for each insertion. Early inserts were with the Lippes loop, later ones with the Dalkon shield. Pain after insertion was treated with sedatives. Patients were instructed to return at 2 months, 10 months, and yearly thereafter. The IUDs were not found to be as effective as oral contraceptives. With the small Dalkon shield there were 4 accidental pregnancies per 100 woman years of use. The clinic switched to the standard size shield for nulliparous women and had fewer pregnancies. The multiparous group had 1.9 pregnancies per 100 woman years, the UCLA group had 3.2 pregnancies, the HEW group 1.9. The medical removal rate was 9.8 in the HEW group, 6.8 in the UCLA group. Lippes loop wearers had a lower pregnancy rate (.7), higher expulsion rate (2.5) and higher medical removal rate (10.2). The Dalkon shield had a higher continuation rate and a lower expulsion rate.

  6. PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer: evidence, experience and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tarra; Matulonis, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) are considered one of the most active and exciting new therapies for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The anticancer activity of PARP inhibitors is based on the DNA repair vulnerability of many ovarian cancer cells, and multiple mechanisms of action of PARP inhibitors have been identified. As single agents, PARP inhibitors have demonstrated their greatest activity in ovarian cancer cells that harbor mutations in BRCA genes. Additionally, recent phase III studies have shown that single-agent PARP inhibitor activity extends beyond BRCA-related cancers and can benefit patients with ovarian cancers that do not have known BRCA mutations, especially when clinical characteristics such as platinum sensitivity and high-grade serous histology are present. PARP inhibitors have also been combined with chemotherapy, however, overlapping myelosuppression observed with PARP inhibitor and chemotherapy combinations has hampered development of these combinations. Contrariwise, PARP inhibitor and biologic agent combinations, specifically antiangiogenic agents, appear well tolerated and show promising activity in both BRCA mutated (BRCAm) and BRCA wild-type (BRCAwt) cancers. Currently, multiple clinical trials are underway examining the antitumor activity of PARP inhibitor combination therapy. PMID:28491146

  7. Caring touch--patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

    PubMed

    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  8. Clinical trials of live oral rotavirus vaccines: the Finnish experience.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T

    1993-01-01

    Live oral candidate rotavirus vaccines of bovine (RIT 4237) or rhesus (RRV-1) origin and reassortants of RRV-1 expressing human serotype 1 (DxRRV) or serotype 2 (DS1xRRV) VP7 protein were evaluated for clinical efficacy in young children in successive trials from 1983 to 1989. In each study, the vaccinations were given before a rotavirus epidemic season and the follow-up of vaccinees covered two rotavirus epidemic seasons lasting up to 2-3 years of age. Serotype 1 rotavirus was predominant in each season. Protection rates against all rotavirus-associated diarrhoea ranged from 0 to 67% but were higher, up to 100%, against more severe rotavirus disease. All tested vaccines also showed efficacy for diarrhoea not apparently associated with rotavirus; therefore the clinical benefit of the vaccinations was greater than could be deduced from efficacy rates for rotavirus-associated diarrhoea alone. Each of the candidate vaccines could significantly reduce severe diarrhoea in Finnish children in the first 2 to 3 years of life. For optimal efficacy, the vaccines should be administered in the autumn before the regular epidemic season of rotavirus.

  9. Clinical experience of esophageal perforation occurring with endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Inoue, H; Ikeda, H; Grace R Santi, E; Yoshida, A; Onimaru, M; Kudo, S

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal perforation occurring during or after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a rare, but serious complication. However, reports of its characteristics, including endoscopic imaging and management, have not been fully detailed. To analyze and report the clinical presentation and management of esophageal perforations occurred during or after EMR/ESD. Four hundred seventy-two esophageal neoplasms in 368 patients were treated (171 EMR; ESD 306) at Northern Yokohama Hospital from 2003 to 2012. Esophageal perforation occurred in a total of seven (1.9%) patients, all of whom were male and had undergone ESD. The etiology of perforation was: three (42.9%) intraoperative; three (42.9%) balloon dilatation for stricture prevention; one (14.2%) due to food bolus impaction. All cases were managed non-operatively based on the comprehensive assessment of clinical severity, extent of the injury, and the time interval from perforation to treatment onset. Conservative management included (i) bed rest and continuous monitoring to determine the need for operative intervention; (ii) fasting and intravenous fluid infusion/ tube feeding; and (iii) intravenous antibiotics. All defects closed spontaneously, save one case where closure was achieved by endoscopic clipping. Surgery was not required. Conservative management for esophageal perforation during advanced endoscopic resection is may be possible when there is no delay in diagnosis or treatment. Decision-making should be governed purely by multidisciplinary discussion.

  10. Patient experience of source isolation: lessons for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Ruth Linda; Shaban, Ramon; Moyle, Wendy

    2011-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is now the leading antimicrobial-resistant organism of concern to clinicians worldwide. Preventing and controlling the increase and spread of MRSA within the health-care environment is therefore an important function of the infection control team. The prevention and control of MRSA requires strict use of both Standard and Additional Precautions, which include good hand hygiene practices, judicious antimicrobial prescribing, and source isolation. While few would dispute the need for these precautions for preventing the spread of MRSA and other infections, their use may result in adverse physical and psychological effects for the patient. In an age of quality and safety of health care, ensuring infection control practice such as source isolation and contact precautions adhere to fundamental human rights is paramount. This paper presents a review of the literature on the patient experience of source isolation for MRSA or other infectious diseases. The review yielded five major interconnected themes: (1) psychological effects of isolation; (2) coping with isolation; (3) social isolation; (4) communication and information provision; and (5) physical environment and quality of care. It found that the experience of isolation by patients has both negative and positive elements. Isolation may result in detrimental psychological effects including anxiety, stress and depression, but may also result in the patient receiving less or substandard care. However, patients may also benefit from the quietness and privacy of single rooms. Nurses and other healthcare workers must look for ways to improve the experience of isolation and contact precautions of patients in source isolation. Opportunities exist in particular in improving the environment and the patient's self-control of the situation and in providing adequate information.

  11. Atraumatic suction tip for microneurosurgery--clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mariak, Z; Lyson, T

    2007-12-01

    Our two-year experience with a new atraumatic tip for the neurosurgical suction tube is described. During microneurosurgical procedures the tip reduces injury to fragile vital brain structures and protects them from being aspirated into the suction tube. The perforated membrane of the appended suction tip does not impede evacuation of blood in any situation and can be easily cleaned off without demounting. The device can be immediately attached to the tube and disconnected. The neurosurgeon need not concentrate on its use, in contrast to those systems with active suction pressure control. The atraumatic suction tip is available in several sizes to fit different callibers of suction tubes.

  12. Childhood victimisation and developmental expression of non-clinical delusional ideation and hallucinatory experiences: victimisation and non-clinical psychotic experiences.

    PubMed

    Lataster, Tineke; van Os, Jim; Drukker, Marjan; Henquet, Cécile; Feron, Frans; Gunther, Nicole; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2006-06-01

    Victimisation in childhood may be associated with adult psychosis. The current study examined this association in the crucial developmental period of early adolescence and investigated whether (1) unwanted sexual experiences, and (2) being bullied, were associated with non-clinical delusional ideation and hallucinatory experiences in a general population sample of 14 year olds. Data were derived from standard health screenings of the Youth Health Care Divisions of the Municipal Health Services in Maastricht, the Netherlands. A self-report questionnaire was filled out by a total of 1290 adolescents to assess non-clinical psychotic experiences, as well as experiences of being bullied and sexual trauma. Non-clinical psychotic experiences were strongly and independently associated with both bullying (OR=2.9, 95% CI 1.8-4.8) and sexual trauma (OR=4.8, 95% CI 2.3-10.1). The results suggest that reported associations between childhood victimisation and adult psychosis can be understood in a developmental framework of onset of at-risk mental states in early adolescence. In addition, the data suggest that the traumatic experience of being bullied may also feed the cognitive and biological mechanisms underlying formation of psychotic ideation.

  13. Clinical Experiences Are Not Predictive of Outcomes on the NATABOC Examination

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; Comfort, Ronald E.; Perrin, David H.; Gieck, Joe H.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of the National Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) clinical experience requirements and individual student characteristics to predict candidate outcomes on the NATABOC certification examination. Design and Setting: For all subjects, we gathered survey information and examination scores. The survey information included age, sex, route to certification, previous athletic training and allied health experience, and clinical education experiences. Subjects: A total of 269 subjects, 22.25% of all first-time candidates for the June and November 1993 NATABOC examinations, were included in this study. Measurements: Data were analyzed for standard descriptive statistics and parametric linear regression and correlational relationships. Results: Total clinical hours, high-risk sport experiences, and previous athletic training experience were not predictive of examination outcomes. Although our results indicated a relationship between previous allied health experience and both outcome on the written section of the examination and age and outcome on the oral/practical section, these characteristics also were not predictive of examination outcomes. Conclusions: Gaining clinical experience hours in excess of 400 hours beyond the 800-or 1500-hour requirement may yield no greater benefit for an entry-level professional than less time. The quality, rather than the quantity, of clinical experiences should be evaluated. More emphasis should be placed on the achievement of an entry level of clinical competency, rather than on total hour collection. Also, because high-risk sport experiences did not predict outcomes on the NATABOC examination, the emphasis of clinical education should be on students' receiving a more structured clinical experience, in which they are progressively required to assume greater responsibilities integrating both cognitive and psychomotor skills, while working under the supervision of a certified

  14. A Comparison of a Traditional Clinical Experience to a Precepted Clinical Experience for Baccalaureate-Seeking Nursing Students in Their Second Semester

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Kristin; Schumann, Renae; Dune, Linda; Kohne, David

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty has contributed greatly to the nursing workforce shortage, with many schools turning away qualified applicants because there are not enough faculty to teach. Despite the faculty shortage, schools are required to admit more students to alleviate the nursing shortage. Clinical groups in which preceptors are responsible for student learning extend faculty resources. Purpose. To determine the effectiveness of an alternative clinical experience (preceptorship). Methods. quasi-experimental, randomized, longitudinal design. Students were randomized to either the traditional or precepted clinical group. The clinical experience was a total of 12 weeks. Groups were compared according to several variables including second semester exam scores, HESI scores, and quality and timeliness of clinical paperwork. Sample. Over a two-year period, seventy-one undergraduate nursing students in the second semester medical-surgical nursing course participated. 36 were randomized to the experimental group. The preceptors were baccalaureate-prepared nurses who have been practicing for at least one year. Setting. Two hospitals located in the Texas Medical Center. Statistical Analysis. Descriptive statistics and independent t-test. Results. There was no difference between the groups on the variables of interest. Conclusion. Students in the precepted clinical group perform as well as those in a traditional clinical group. PMID:22577535

  15. Clinical experience with a computerized record and verify system.

    PubMed

    Podmaniczky, K C; Mohan, R; Kutcher, G J; Kestler, C; Vikram, B

    1985-08-01

    To improve the quality of patient care by detecting and preventing many types of treatment mistakes, we have implemented a computerized system for recording and verifying external beam radiation treatments on our therapy machines. It inhibits the radiation beam if treatment machine settings do not agree with prescribed values to within maximum permissible deviations (tolerances). The tolerances are determined from experience and adjusted when necessary to make the system more effective and less susceptible to "false alarms." The system uses a common data base for all treatment machines. As a result, it permits statistical analysis and generation of reports based on data encompassing the entire patient population as well as verification of treatments of patients transferred from one machine to another. Reports of verification failures reveal patterns of mistakes. Knowing these, attempts can be made to reduce the frequency of verification failures. "Significant" mistakes that were prevented are extracted by treatment planning personnel from these reports. Analysis of data indicates a rate of approximately 150 "significant" mistakes detected and prevented per machine per year, representing 1.0% of all fields treated. We present and discuss our experiences with the system and with the frequency, patterns, and significance of verification failures. We selected a few of the patients for whose treatments significant set-up mistakes were made, and were detected and prevented by the Record and Verify System. We include discussions of the overall effect these mistakes would have had on dose distribution had they not been prevented.

  16. Assessing research participants' perceptions of their clinical research experiences.

    PubMed

    Kost, Rhonda G; Lee, Laura M; Yessis, Jennifer; Coller, Barry S; Henderson, David K

    2011-12-01

    Participants' perceptions of their research experiences provide valuable measures of ethical treatment, yet no validated instruments exist to measure these experiences. We conducted focus groups of research participants and professionals as the initial step in developing a validated instrument. Research participants enrolled in 12 focus groups, consisting of: (1) individuals with disorders undergoing interventions; (2) in natural history studies; or (3) healthy volunteers. Research professionals participated in six separate groups of: (1) institutional review board members, ethicists, and Research Subject Advocates; (2) research nurses/coordinators; or (3) investigators. Focus groups used standard methodologies. Eighty-five participants and 29 professionals enrolled at eight academic centers. Altruism and personal relevance of the research were commonly identified motivators; financial compensation was less commonly mentioned. Participants were satisfied with informed consent processes but disappointed if not provided test results, or study outcomes. Positive relationships with research teams were valued highly. Research professionals were concerned about risks, undue influence, and informed consent. Participants join studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. They value staff relationships, health gains, new knowledge, and compensation, and expect professionalism and good organization. On the basis of these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention, and satisfaction. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rock-eval pyrolysis and vitrinite reflectance trends in the Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, eastern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rimmer, S.M.; Cantrell, D.J.; Gooding, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Within eastern Kentucky, organic petrographic and geochemical data indicate a southeastwards increase in maturation of the Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale (Devonian-Mississippian). Reflectance levels of dispersed organic material in the Cleveland Shale increase from 0.5% in the outcrop belt in central Kentucky, to slightly over 1.0% in Pike County, eastern Kentucky. A decrease in fluorescence intensity of liptinitic components, such as Tasmanites, accompanies this reflectance increase, as does a shift in fluorescence color of the alginite towards the red. In the highest rank areas, fluorescence is almost absent. Groundmass fluorescence is observed also, and follows trends similar to those shown by the alginite. Kerogen in the Cleveland Shale is primarily Type II, as indicated by petrographic observations and Rock-Eval data. Total organic carbon contents of this shale decrease from over 12% in the outcrop belt, to less than 2% in the eastern-most part of the study area. Source rock potential ranges from good to very good, with the highest potentials occurring in the outcrop belt. Tmax values for this unit increase from under 430??C in the outcrop belt to over 450??C in the southeast, confirming the increase in maturation trends indicated by vitrinite reflectance data. Both petrographic and geochemical maturation parameters place the Cleveland Shale of eastern Kentucky within the oil window. Comparison with maturation data for Pennsylvanian-age coals upsection suggests that maturation indices are retarded, or suppressed, in the Devonian shales. The level of maturation indicated for the Cleveland may be problematical considering that the Ohio Shale is a major gas-producer in this area. ?? 1993.

  18. What do medical students learn from early clinical experiences (ECE)?

    PubMed

    Lie, Désirée; Boker, John; Gutierrez, David; Prislin, Michael

    2006-08-01

    What are the common learning themes perceived by medical students during ECE with varying practice settings and patient profiles? Retrospective qualitative and quantitative analyses of structured descriptive reports completed by one class (n = 92) for 895 observed patient encounters identified common learning themes. Identified themes were examined by practice setting and patient characteristics. Student response rates were 85 to 94% across settings. Fifty-five percent of ECE were in outpatient settings. Chief complaints were predominantly medical (67%); only 20% represented psychosocial and 8% preventive care, respectively (5% were ambiguous). The five most common learning themes (out of 13 themes coded) were communication (>50%), procedures/time management, cross-cultural issues, feeling useful as a student, and presenting medical problems. Cross-cultural issues were addressed mainly in community settings. Negative learning occurred only rarely (<3%). Student observations from ECE can be used by course managers to design effective early clinical exposures to address specific course learning objectives.

  19. [Malaria in Turkey and 14 years of clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Celikbaş, Aysel Kocagül; Ergönül, Onder; Baykam, Nurcan; Eren, Sebnem; Güven, Tümer; Dokuzoğuz, Başak

    2006-07-01

    In this retrospective study, the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of 105 adult malaria patients, who had been hospitalized between the period of 1992 and 2006 were evaluated. Nineteen percent of the patients were female, and the mean age was 28 +/- 10 years. Fifty percent of the patients acquired the infection in Southeastern Anatolia, while they were on military duty. The most common complaints were rigor (93%), fever (90%), sweating (90%), headache (76%), nausea (45%), and fatigue (38%). The most common physical examination findings were splenomegaly (86%) and hepatomegaly (62%). Anemia was detected in 23%, leukopenia in 47%, thrombocytopenia in 73%, two fold increase in ALT or AST enzyme levels in 32% of the patients. Plasmodium vivax was detected in 101 (96%) patients, whereas P. falciparum was detected in 4 patients (4%). Although the number of malaria cases in Turkey is declining in recent years, the febrile patients with a history of travel to the endemic regions should raise the suspicion of malaria.

  20. Fat emulsion for intravenous administration: clinical experience with intralipid 10%.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L M; Hardie, B S; Hidalgo, J

    1976-01-01

    A 10% soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid 10%), used extensively in Europe for intravenous alimentation, has now been clinically evaluated in the United States. Controlled studies have shown that the soybean oil emulsion can be substituted for glucose to supply one-third to two-thirds of the total calories, and can be administered peripherally without significant vein irritation. Essential fatty acid deficiencies, frequently encountered in patients dependent on parenteral alimentation with fat-free solutions, are prevented and corrected by use of this preparation. Data on long-term tolerance to Intralipid 10% infusions are presented for 292 patients treated for more than 6,000 patient days. The soybean oil emulsion was usually well tolerated. Side effects were reported in two of 133 adults and 12 of 159 pediatric patients. PMID:820291

  1. Early Clinical Experience With Argon Ion Laser Endarterectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugene, John; Baribeau, Yvon; Ott, Richard A.; McColgan, Stephen J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes our progress in the development of argon ion laser endarterectomy for arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nine patients underwent 10 vascular reconstructions for claudication (6), rest pain (1), and gangrene (2). There was 1 aortoiliac endarterectomy, 6 superficial femoral artery endarterectomies, 1 profunda femoris endarterectomy and 2 popliteal endarterectomies. The reconstructions were 6 cm to 60 cm in length. The operations were performed using low power argon ion laser radiation, 1.0 W. All patients experienced symptomatic relief and had palpable pulses postoperatively. There were no perforations and there were no injuries to surrounding tissues from laser radiation. Surgical complications occurred and these were technical problems that should be eliminated from the operation with further developments. The early clinical results show that laser endarterectomy can be performed for peripheral vascular reconstruction using low power argon ion laser radiation.

  2. Clinical events in mad honey poisoning: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Mehmet; Bostan, Habib; Kaya, Ali Osman; Bilir, Ozlem; Satiroglu, Omer; Kazdal, Hizir; Karadag, Zakir; Bozkurt, Engin

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the clinical findings of patients who admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning. Thirty-three patients were included in this study. Three patients were female (9%) and the others male (91%). Median age of patients was 52 (42-68). The most frequently observed findings were sinus bradycardia (91%), nausea-vomiting (81.8%), and dizziness (78.8%). Average heart rate was 55.35 +/- 6.72 beats/min. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 77.86 +/- 16.64 mmHg and 46.42 +/- 12.30 mmHg, respectively. Mad honey poisoning is an important problem that is life-threatening in the Black Sea region of Turkey.

  3. Clinical experiences with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Anna; Várallyay, Péter; Osztie, Eva; Papp, Erzsébet; Sólyom, András; Finta, Lehel; Varga, Dániel; Barcs, Gábor; Holló, András; Kamondi, Anita

    2012-11-30

    The clinical picture, electroencephalographic, imaging and cerebrospinal fluid parameters as well as the molecular background of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been well explored. The diagnostic criteria, offering clinicians a fair chance to identify these patients in vivo, have recently been updated. However, the diagnosis is still a challenge in everyday neurological routine. We report on three of our Creutzfeldt-Jakob patients for calling attention to the classical and the recently defined features of the disease. We conclude that based on the rapidly progressing neuropsychiatric syndrome Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may be suspected; follow-up EEG may reveal the typical (pseudo)-periodic pattern with progressive deterioration of the background activity. In addition, diffusion-weighted brain MRI imaging (DWI) has high diagnostic value. Detection of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid supports the in vivo diagnosis.

  4. [Clinical experiences with a gestodene containing oral contraceptive (femoden)].

    PubMed

    Gimes, G; Valent, S

    1998-09-01

    In order to reduce the side-effects (blood-lipid alterations, androgen effects etc.) new gestogens were introduced, while the ethinyl-estradiol component of the pill was unchanged. Authors report about clinical trial on monophasic oral contraceptive containing 0.030 mg ethinyl-estradiol and 0.075 mg gestodene. In a follow up of 92 women, in 1740 cycles no pregnancy and no cardivascular or thromboembolic complication was observed. The frequency of bleeding disorders was below 10% already in the first cycle. The quantity of withdrawal bleeding, as well the frequency of breakthrough bleeding and spotting decreased during the treatment. Significant alteration in body weight or blood pressure did not occur. Femoden containing third generation gestogen has an excellent cycle control and good patient compliance.

  5. [Experience in thyroglossal duct pathology: clinical case series].

    PubMed

    Cieri, Patricio; Udaquiola, Julia E; Calello, Santiago E; Libero, Daniel H

    2016-10-01

    The thyroglossal duct cyst pathology represents the second cause of bening cervical anomalies in childhood. Diagnosis is mainly clinical. Sistrunk (1920) proposed a surgical technique that is still considered the gold standard for definitive treatment of this condition. A retrospective study was made including patients who underwent surgery for thyroglossal duct cyst pathology in our department between June 2008 and August 2015. In this period, we performed 54 procedures in 45 patients (39 primary cases). Median age was 4.7 years; 14/39 patients (31.1%) had pre-operative infection. All patients were studied with neck ultrasound. A Sistrunk's procedure was performed in all cases. The global recurrence rate was 17.8% (8/45).

  6. Complications of Zygomatic Implants: Our Clinical Experience with 4 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tzerbos, Fotios; Theologie-Lygidakis, Nadia; Fakitsas, Dimitrios; Fakitsas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Zygomatic implants have been used for rehabilitation of the edentulous atrophic maxilla as an alternative to bone grafting for almost two decades resulting in satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, the patients with edentulous atrophic maxilla treated using this technique may present serious complications that could put the prosthetic restoration at risk. Four cases are reported in this paper, one case with a cutaneous fistula in the left zygomatic-orbital area caused by aseptic necrosis at the apical part of the implant, which was treated with the surgical removal of this part, a second case with loss of the right zygomatic implant due to failure of osseointegration and two cases of periimplantitis that resulted in partial and complete removal of the implant, respectively. All patients who had complications were treated without compromising the restoration which remained functional after appropriately modified treatment. PMID:27847399

  7. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data.

  8. Selecting clinical diagnoses: logical strategies informed by experience.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Donald Edward; Campos, Daniel G

    2016-08-01

    This article describes reasoning strategies used by clinicians in different diagnostic circumstances and how these modes of inquiry may allow further insight into the evaluation and treatment of patients. Specifically, it aims to make explicit the implicit logical considerations that guide a variety of strategies in the diagnostic process, as exemplified in specific clinical cases. It focuses, in particular, in strategies that clinicians use to move from a large set of possible diagnoses initially suggested by abductive inferences - the process of hypothesis generation that creates a diagnostic space - to a narrower set or even to a single 'best' diagnosis, where the criteria to determine what is 'best' may differ according to different strategies. Experienced clinicians should have a diversified kit of strategies - for example, Bayesian probability or inference to a lovely explanation - to select from among previously generated hypotheses, rather than rely on any one approach every time. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Clinical manifestations and outcomes of pulmonary aspergillosis: experience from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nousheen; Irfan, Muhammad; Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Jabeen, Kauser; Awan, Safia; Khan, Javaid A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary aspergillosis has variable course of illness, severity and outcomes depending on underlying conditions. There is limited data available on the clinical manifestations and outcome of pulmonary aspergillosis from Pakistan. Methods To determine the clinical manifestations and outcome of pulmonary aspergillosis in a tertiary care hospital a retrospective study was conducted from 2004 to 2014 in patients admitted with pulmonary aspergillosis at the Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. Results Of the 280 cases with provisional diagnosis of aspergillosis 69 met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 45±15.7 years, 48 (69.6%) were men and 21 (30.4%) had diabetes mellitus (DM). The average length of hospital stay (LOS) was 10.61±9.08 days. Aspergillus fumigatus was the most common (42.0%), followed by Aspergillus flavus (28.9%). More than one-third of patients previously had tuberculosis (TB) (39.13%). The commonest pulmonary manifestation was chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) 47 (68.1%) followed by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) 12 (17.4%) and subacute invasive aspergillosis (SAIA) 8 (11.6%). Surgical excision was performed in 28 patients (40.57%). Intensive care unit admission was required for 18 patients (26.08%). Case fatality rate was 14/69 (20.3%). DM, mean LOS and hypoxic respiratory failure were identified as independent risk factors of mortality on multivariate analysis. Conclusion A. fumigatus was the most frequent species found especially in patients with prior TB. CPA was the commonest pulmonary manifestation seen as post TB sequel. Diabetes, hypoxic respiratory failure and increased LOS were independent predictors of poor outcomes. Overall patients had good outcome with CPA compared with SAIA and IPA. PMID:28074136

  10. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  11. Clinical experience with the Bicarbon heart valve prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Yoshio; Saito, Tsutomu; Konishi, Hiroaki; Oki, Shin-ichi; Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Sakano, Yasuhito; Morita, Hideki; Aizawa, Kei

    2007-01-01

    Bacground We have previously reported mid-term results of a study, which ended in January 2000, on the Bicarbon valve. The study concluded that the valve showed excellent clinical results, associated with a low incidence of valve-related complications. In the present study, the same patients were prospectively followed for an additional 5 years. Methods Forty-four patients had aortic valve replacement (AVR), 48 had mitral valve replacement (MVR), and 13 had both aortic and mitral valve replacement (DVR). The mean age of the 105 patients was 61.2 ± 11.3 years. The mean follow-up was 6.1 ± 1.9 years with a cumulative follow-up of 616 patient-years. Results There were 5 early deaths (4.7%: 4 in the AVR group and 1 in the MVR group) and 21 late deaths (3.4%/patient-year: 5 valve related deaths and 16 valve unrelated deaths). Survival at 8 years was 75.2 ± 7.0% in the AVR group, 76.6 ± 6.2% in the MVR group, and 55.4 ± 16.1% in the DVR group. The linearized incidence of thrombo-embolic complications, hemorrhagic complications, and paravalvular leaks in all patients was 0.65 ± 1.48%, 0.81 ± 1.69%, and 0.16 ± 0.54%/patient-year respectively. No other complications were observed. Conclusion The Bicarbon prosthetic heart valve has shown excellent long-term clinical results, associated with a low incidence of valve-related complications. PMID:17254363

  12. Clinical experience with the Bicarbon heart valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Yoshio; Saito, Tsutomu; Konishi, Hiroaki; Oki, Shin-Ichi; Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Sakano, Yasuhito; Morita, Hideki; Aizawa, Kei

    2007-01-25

    We have previously reported mid-term results of a study, which ended in January 2000, on the Bicarbon valve. The study concluded that the valve showed excellent clinical results, associated with a low incidence of valve-related complications. In the present study, the same patients were prospectively followed for an additional 5 years. Forty-four patients had aortic valve replacement (AVR), 48 had mitral valve replacement (MVR), and 13 had both aortic and mitral valve replacement (DVR). The mean age of the 105 patients was 61.2 +/- 11.3 years. The mean follow-up was 6.1 +/- 1.9 years with a cumulative follow-up of 616 patient-years. There were 5 early deaths (4.7%: 4 in the AVR group and 1 in the MVR group) and 21 late deaths (3.4%/patient-year: 5 valve related deaths and 16 valve unrelated deaths). Survival at 8 years was 75.2 +/- 7.0% in the AVR group, 76.6 +/- 6.2% in the MVR group, and 55.4 +/- 16.1% in the DVR group. The linearized incidence of thrombo-embolic complications, hemorrhagic complications, and paravalvular leaks in all patients was 0.65 +/- 1.48%, 0.81 +/- 1.69%, and 0.16 +/- 0.54%/patient-year respectively. No other complications were observed. The Bicarbon prosthetic heart valve has shown excellent long-term clinical results, associated with a low incidence of valve-related complications.

  13. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  14. Perspectives on the use of green infrastructure for stormwater management in Cleveland and Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Melissa; Koburger, Althea; Dolowitz, David P; Medearis, Dale; Nickel, Darla; Shuster, William

    2013-06-01

    Green infrastructure is a general term referring to the management of landscapes in ways that generate human and ecosystem benefits. Many municipalities have begun to utilize green infrastructure in efforts to meet stormwater management goals. This study examines challenges to integrating gray and green infrastructure for stormwater management, informed by interviews with practitioners in Cleveland, OH and Milwaukee WI. Green infrastructure in these cities is utilized under conditions of extreme fiscal austerity and its use presents opportunities to connect stormwater management with urban revitalization and economic recovery while planning for the effects of negative- or zero-population growth. In this context, specific challenges in capturing the multiple benefits of green infrastructure exist because the projects required to meet federally mandated stormwater management targets and the needs of urban redevelopment frequently differ in scale and location.

  15. Education at the Dittrick Museum of Medical History, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Edmonson, James M

    2009-01-01

    The Dittrick Museum of Medical History pursues an educational mission as being part of a major research university. While the Dittrick dates to 1899 as a historical committee of the Cleveland Medical Library Association, it first affiliated with Case Western Reserve University in 1966, and became a department of the College of Arts and Sciences of CWRU in 1998. The Dittrick maintains a museum exhibition gallery that is open to the public free of charge, and museum staff provide guided tours on appointment. Much of the teaching and instruction at the Dittrick is conducted by university professors; their classes meet in the museum and use museum resources in the form of artifacts, images, archives, and rare books. Class projects using Dittrick collections may take the form of research papers, exhibitions, and online presentations. Dittrick staff assist in these classes and are available to help researchers use museum resources.

  16. Perspectives on the Use of Green Infrastructure for Stormwater Management in Cleveland and Milwaukee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, Melissa; Koburger, Althea; Dolowitz, David P.; Medearis, Dale; Nickel, Darla; Shuster, William

    2013-06-01

    Green infrastructure is a general term referring to the management of landscapes in ways that generate human and ecosystem benefits. Many municipalities have begun to utilize green infrastructure in efforts to meet stormwater management goals. This study examines challenges to integrating gray and green infrastructure for stormwater management, informed by interviews with practitioners in Cleveland, OH and Milwaukee WI. Green infrastructure in these cities is utilized under conditions of extreme fiscal austerity and its use presents opportunities to connect stormwater management with urban revitalization and economic recovery while planning for the effects of negative- or zero-population growth. In this context, specific challenges in capturing the multiple benefits of green infrastructure exist because the projects required to meet federally mandated stormwater management targets and the needs of urban redevelopment frequently differ in scale and location.

  17. EXPERIENCE WITH CORTISONE AND ACTH IN A PRIVATE CLINIC

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Marcus A.; Saier, Milton; Keddie, Frances; Tanner, Ralph; Snell, A. M.

    1951-01-01

    Cortisone and ACTH are valuable agents for treating a large variety of diseases. In appropriate situations they may save life. It may be possible to prevent loss of vision in eye disease or permanent damage to important viscera in generalized disease. With ready access to these agents through the pharmacist, it is important to know that cortisone and ACTH can be used in office practice provided patients are selected carefully and followed frequently and closely. Strict observation of criteria for selection of patients limited the size of the series of patients reported upon, but by the same token the incidence of complications from therapy was exceptionally small. Every physician who elects to employ these potent hormones must become familiar with their physiological effects and with the various methods of exhibiting them. Some of these effects are noted in this paper, but the experiences reviewed here provide an incomplete picture of the wide application of cortisone and ACTH. PMID:14848715

  18. Variable clinical presentations of secondary delusional infestation: an experience of six cases from a psychodermatology clinic.

    PubMed

    Altunay, Ilknur K; Ates, Bilge; Mercan, Sibel; Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Kayaoglu, Semra

    2012-01-01

    Delusional Infestation (DI) is a relatively rare condition with a fixed belief of being infested with living organisms, despite a lack of medical evidence of such infestation. Although it seems to be a psychiatric disease, patients commonly are admitted to dermatology clinics because of skin findings. Psychiatrists can underestimate its prevalance, whereas dermatologists can miss the diagnosis. It should be managed as a psychodermatological disease. Our aim in the study was to evaluate six patients with different clinical presentations of DI and to emphasize some clinical features. All patients were internalized in the psychodermatology clinic for this study. Medical history and clinical data from dermatologic and psychiatric examinations were noted; Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-Plus) and laboratory investigations including blood and urine analyses, microscopic analysis of so-called pathogens, and skin biopsy if needed, were performed. The diagnosis was made based on detailed history, dermatologic and psychiatric examinations, and laboratory investigations. All patients had symptoms of itching, burning, or crawling sensations dermatologically and thus were admitted to dermatology clinic. They were all considered secondary DI to another medical condition or to psychiatric illness. Vitamin B12 deficiency, diabetes, and hypothyroidism were the underlying medical conditions. Related psychiatric illnesses were trichotillomania and schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, shared pychotic disorder, and brief psychotic disorder. Two patients had delusions of inanimate materials; four patients had partial and complete remissions; and two patients have dropped out. Each patient had different clinical characteristics creating diagnostic challenges. All complaints were related to the infestation of the skin. The presence of different psychiatric comorbidities is remarkable. It seems that both psychiatrists and dermatologists can face diagnostic and

  19. Defecography by digital radiography: experience in clinical practice*

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Amanda Nogueira de Sá; Sala, Marco Aurélio Sousa; Bruno, Rodrigo Ciotola; Xavier, José Alberto Cunha; Indiani, João Mauricio Canavezi; Martin, Marcelo Fontalvo; Bruno, Paulo Maurício Chagas; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to profile patients who undergo defecography, by age and gender, as well as to describe the main imaging and diagnostic findings in this population. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, descriptive study of 39 patients, conducted between January 2012 and February 2014. The patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, and diagnosis. They were stratified by age, and continuous variables are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. All possible quantitative defecography variables were evaluated, including rectal evacuation, perineal descent, and measures of the anal canal. Results The majority (95%) of the patients were female. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 82 years (mean age, 52 ± 13 years): 10 patients were under 40 years of age; 18 were between 40 and 60 years of age; and 11 were over 60 years of age. All 39 of the patients evaluated had abnormal radiological findings. The most prevalent diagnoses were rectocele (in 77%) and enterocele (in 38%). Less prevalent diagnoses were vaginal prolapse, uterine prolapse, and Meckel's diverticulum (in 2%, for all). Conclusion Although defecography is performed more often in women, both genders can benefit from the test. Defecography can be performed in order to detect complex disorders such as uterine and rectal prolapse, as well as to detect basic clinical conditions such as rectocele or enterocele. PMID:28100932

  20. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in brain diseases: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Schoknecht, Karl; Shalev, Hadar

    2012-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier, a unique feature of the cerebral vasculature, is gaining attention as a feature in common neurologic disorders including stroke, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Although acute blood-brain barrier dysfunction can induce cerebral edema, seizures, or neuropsychiatric symptoms, epileptogenesis and cognitive decline are among the chronic effects. The mechanisms underlying blood-brain barrier dysfunction are diverse and may range from physical endothelial damage in traumatic brain injury to degradation of extracellular matrix proteins via matrix metalloproteinases as part of an inflammatory response. Clinically, blood-brain barrier dysfunction is often detected using contrast-enhanced imaging. However, these techniques do not give any insights into the underlying mechanism. Elucidating the specific pathways of blood-brain barrier dysfunction at different time points and in different brain diseases using novel imaging techniques promises a more accurate blood-brain barrier terminology as well as new treatment options and personalized treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome.

  2. Clinical experience of ketogenic diet on children with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mak, S C; Chi, C S; Wan, C J

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen children with refractory epilepsy received a ketogenic diet (medium chain triglyceride oil diet) as an alternative therapy since September 1997. Their seizure patterns included (1) generalized tonic-clonic seizures, (2) myoclonic seizures, (3) generalized tonic + atonic seizures, (4) complex partial seizures, (5) generalized clonic + atonic + myoclonic seizures, (6) head nodding + myoclonic + gelastic seizures, and (7) generalized tonic-clonic + myoclonic + atonic seizures. Major concerns emphasized on the efficacy and side effects of the diet. Clinical observation one month after the diet revealed that 53.8% of the patients had a > 75% reduction in seizure frequency and 76.9% of the patients had a > 50% reduction in seizure frequency. Six patients had some degrees of improvement in cognitive function and/ or school performances. The most common side effects were body weight loss (n = 6) and diarrhea (n = 5). Others included bad temper (n = 1), abdominal cramps (n = 2), nausea (n = 2), bad body smell (n = 1), and renal stones (n = 1). Even after discontinuation of the diet, 61.5% of patients still had a > 50% reduction in seizure frequency. We concluded that the ketogenic diet deserves a trial in children with refractory epilepsy.

  3. “The invisible”: Participant's experiences in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Nadimpally, Sarojini; Bhagianadh, Divya

    2017-01-01

    Background: The paper discussing the perspectives of clinical trial participants about the various aspects of CTs is based on the primary research conducted by Sama in 2012-13. Methodology: In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 CT participants from the states of New Delhi, Gujarat, Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh. In addition to CT participants, other key informants including investigators, representatives of Contract Research Organizations (CROs), sponsor, Ethics Committee (EC) members etc. were also interviewed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the CT sector. Findings and Discussion: The paper describes the perspectives of participants on the relevant aspects of recruitment into CTs, reasons for participation in CTs, informed consent, adverse events and compensation. The role played by the push and pull factors in recruitment, the information asymmetry, the power imbalance between the health-care provider and seeker, the role of sociocultural factors, etc., are explored in the paper. Combined with the insights from other stakeholders, the study gives an understanding about the chasm between regulations and realities in the Indian CT sector. Further, the paper briefly explores the recent changes and amendments in the laws governing the CT sector that is aimed at improving the conduct of CTs and uphold the rights of participants. Conclusion: Participants are the most important stakeholders in a CT setting. It is imperative that their voices are heard and their rights upheld for the ethical conduct of CTs. PMID:28194331

  4. Clinical Experience with Insulin Glargine in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Emily; Dain, Marie-Paule; Rodionova, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) demonstrated the importance of optimal glycemic control achieved through intensive insulin therapy in reducing the microvascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. However, the DCCT, which was conducted prior to the availability of insulin analogs, also reported a significant increase in severe hypoglycemia with intensive versus conventional therapy. Insulin analogs were developed to aid patients in achieving better diabetes control by providing insulins with optimized pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. Insulin glargine was the first long-acting insulin analog with a 24-h duration of action, offering once-daily injection, and has now been in clinical use for over 10 years. The authors performed a systematic search of EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science (Science Citation Index) to determine the efficacy of insulin glargine in type 1 diabetes in basal–bolus insulin regimens. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that glycemic control with insulin glargine is at least comparable to that with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin in adults and in children and adolescents, and with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults. However, these same trials show a significantly lower risk for hypoglycemia with insulin glargine compared with NPH insulin in adults. PMID:20969435

  5. Clinical experience with Nikkiso centrifugal pumps for extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Onoda, K; Kondo, C; Mizumoto, T; Kusagawa, H; Katayama, Y; Hayashi, T; Komada, T; Hirano, R; Miyamura, T; Tanaka, J

    1994-09-01

    A comparative study of a newly developed impeller-type centrifugal pump, Nikkiso HMS-15, was made to assess the effects on hemolysis, platelet function, and renal function for extracorporeal circulation (ECC) during open heart surgery. The Bio-pump (cone-type, Medtronic) and the roller pump were used as controls. The increase of serum hemoglobin level in the Nikkiso pump was significantly lower than that in the other pumps. The decrease of platelet counts was recognized after the initiation of ECC in the three pumps whereas the levels of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin in the Nikkiso pump group increased by far less than in the other two groups. Moreover, renal function was better maintained in the Nikkiso pump group; in particular, a significantly higher urine output was recorded during ECC and for 1 h after the termination of ECC. The results of our clinical studies suggest that the Nikkiso centrifugal pump is suitable for ECC during open heart surgery.

  6. Clinical experience with insulin glargine in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satish; Moser, Emily; Dain, Marie-Paule; Rodionova, Anastasia

    2010-11-01

    The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) demonstrated the importance of optimal glycemic control achieved through intensive insulin therapy in reducing the microvascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. However, the DCCT, which was conducted prior to the availability of insulin analogs, also reported a significant increase in severe hypoglycemia with intensive versus conventional therapy. Insulin analogs were developed to aid patients in achieving better diabetes control by providing insulins with optimized pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. Insulin glargine was the first long-acting insulin analog with a 24-h duration of action, offering once-daily injection, and has now been in clinical use for over 10 years. The authors performed a systematic search of EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science (Science Citation Index) to determine the efficacy of insulin glargine in type 1 diabetes in basal-bolus insulin regimens. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that glycemic control with insulin glargine is at least comparable to that with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin in adults and in children and adolescents, and with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults. However, these same trials show a significantly lower risk for hypoglycemia with insulin glargine compared with NPH insulin in adults.

  7. Accessory parotid gland tumours: 24 years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lukšić, I; Suton, P; Rogić, M; Dokuzović, S

    2012-12-01

    The accessory parotid gland (APG) is salivary tissue anterior to and anatomically separate from the parotid gland. APG is a common anatomical variation, but APG tumours are extremely rare. The authors report 6 patients with APG tumours emphasizing the diagnosis, clinical features, indications and rationales for different treatment approaches. Patients with primary tumours of the parotid gland or APG tumours who underwent surgical treatment were included. APG tumours comprised 1.23% of overall parotid tumours (6/488) and had a malignancy rate of 33.3% (2/6). There were three male and three female patients with a mean age of 39 years (range 14-70 years). 5 of 6 parotidectomies entailed superficial lobectomy, while one was a total parotidectomy with composite resection of masseter muscle. Concomitant selective lymphadenectomy was carried out in 3 of 6 patients. At 5 years disease-free survival was 83.3%. Mean follow-up was 161 months (range 14-253 months). Although nonsalivary diagnoses frequently occur in the buccal area, APG tumours should be considered in every differential diagnosis in patients presenting with a mid-cheek mass. From oncosurgical, cosmetic and functional standpoints, treatment by facelift parotidectomy or 'S-incision' with concomitant superficial lobectomy is the recommended surgical approach; high-grade malignancies require total parotidectomy with regional lymphadenectomy. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction: clinical experience and personal considerations.

    PubMed

    Nacci, A; Fattori, B; Ursino, F; Rocchi, V; Matteucci, F; Citi, C; Bruschini, L; Rognini, F; La Vela, R; Dallan, I

    2007-10-01

    Paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction is a nosographic entity that remains to be fully elucidated as far as concerns criteria required for diagnosis and underlying aetiopathogenesis. The disorder manifests with repeated episodes of acute dyspnoea associated with a series of symptoms that may include hoarseness, globus, chest pain and "shortness of breath". A retrospective analysis of cases with acute dyspnoea referred to our Department between June 2004 and June 2005 revealed 3 patients with paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction. In 2 of these 3 cases, concomitant psychiatric morbidity was observed and the third also presented gastro-oesophageal reflux. In one patient, the episodes of dyspnoea were triggered by inspiration of irritating substances. Diagnosis of the condition requires a high level of suspicion, which is confirmed by a laryngoscopic investigation that demonstrates hyperadduction of the true vocal cords and a reduction of at least 50% in the breathing space. From a therapeutic point of view, patients with paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction require, in our opinion, a multidisciplinary approach; in fact, only a team comprising otorhinolaryngologists, phoniatricians, pulmonologists, neurologists, allergologists, psychotherapists and speech therapists is capable of defining the appropriate treatment according to the clinical and psychological characteristics of each individual patient. Our results with speech therapy, focused on respiratory and speech retraining, are reported.

  9. Initial Clinical Experience Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, David J.; Kessel, David O. Nicholson, Anthony A.; Patel, Jai V.; McPherson, Simon J.; Shaw, David R.

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a self-expanding nitinol wire mesh vascular embolization device derived from the Amplatz septal occluder. We assessed the results of vascular embolization obtained using the AVP. Methods. A retrospective review was carried out of 23 consecutive cases of vascular embolization using the AVP in a variety of different clinical settings. The AVP was chosen to have a diameter approximately 30-50% greater than the target vessel. The device was delivered via an appropriately sized guide catheter and was released when satisfactorily positioned. Additional embolic agents were used in some cases. Results. All target vessels were successfully occluded with no device malpositioning or malfunction. In 14 (61%) patients the AVP was the sole embolic material. In the remaining patients additional agents were used, particularly in preoperative embolization of highly vascular renal tumors. The AVP does not cause instantaneous thrombosis and in high-flow situations thrombosis typically takes up to 15 min. Conclusion. The AVP is a safe, effective embolization device that provides a useful adjunct to the therapeutic armamentarium. It is particularly suited to the treatment of short high-flow vessels where coil migration and catheter dislodgment might occur. In the majority of cases no additional embolic agents are necessary but it may take up to 15 min for complete thrombosis to occur.

  10. Clinical experience with the Sorin Monolyth Oxygenator at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, C; Dragan, R

    1999-01-01

    High altitude combined with low barometric pressure can present unique challenges during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), not only for the perfusionist, but also for the oxygenator. Manufacturers of cardiopulmonary devices have responded to the requests from the perfusion community with a variety of oxygenators which balance low priming volumes and low pressure drops against high gas transfer. This paper will feature the first author's clinical studies using the Sorin Monolyth Oxygenator in a selected group of patients at an altitude of approximately 5200 feet and an average barometric pressure of 634 mmHg (sea levels is 760 mmHg). A review of the 47 charts on patients requiring CPB and who met the selection criteria was performed retrospectively. To qualify for this study, the patient needed to weigh more than 91 kg. The data reviewed included type of surgery, age, weight, bypass time, crossclamp time, pump flows (l/min/m2), hematocrits pre- and post-CPB, and pressure drop across the membrane. The PaO2, PaCO2, FiO2 and sweep gas flow at hypothermia and normothermia were recorded. Data concerning oxygen transfer were obtained from the manufacturer's report to the Food and Drug Administration. All patients had adequate blood gases while on CPB. We feel that the design of the Sorin Monolyth Oxygenator met our criteria for an oxygenator: low priming volume, low pressure drop, and sufficient gas transfer to provide safe oxygenation of all patients at high altitude.

  11. A Medical Student-Run Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic: One Institution's Experience.

    PubMed

    Murzl, Cassandra A; Durns, Tyler A; Mowrey, Lorin T; Tubbs, Andrew S; Boeve, Sally A

    2017-07-13

    This report examines the experience of one institution's development of the first student-run psychiatry clinic that serves both adult and pediatric populations. The clinic is held weekly with pre-clinical and clinical medical student volunteers under the supervision of board-certified adult and child psychiatrists. The development and evolution of the clinic over time are evaluated with particular attention to obstacles overcome. Medical student volunteers were surveyed retrospectively to evaluate their experience with patients with psychiatric illness, skill development, and interest in psychiatry. Since January 2016, the clinic has scheduled 90 patients, 32% of which were pediatric patients. Ninety-six medical students have volunteered, with roughly equal parts from all four medical school classes. Respondents to the experience survey showed marked improvement in their comfort working with patients with mental illness. Additionally, 40% "strongly agreed" or "agreed" that their experience influenced their interest in pursuing psychiatry as a career. This report describes a student-run psychiatry clinic with a dual mission of education and service, and the challenges associated with these sometimes competing goals. This clinic serves a vital need within our community and may be an example of the role that student-run clinics can have in fostering interdisciplinary care, psychiatric recruitment, and training for medical students.

  12. Experiences with array-based sequence capture; toward clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Almomani, Rowida; van der Heijden, Jaap; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Lai, Yuching; Bakker, Egbert; van Galen, Michiel; Breuning, Martijn H; den Dunnen, Johan T

    2011-01-01

    Although sequencing of a human genome gradually becomes an option, zooming in on the region of interest remains attractive and cost saving. We performed array-based sequence capture using 385K Roche NimbleGen, Inc. arrays to zoom in on the protein-coding and immediate intron-flanking sequences of 112 genes, potentially involved in mental retardation and congenital malformation. Captured material was sequenced using Illumina technology. A data analysis pipeline was built that detects sequence variants, positions them in relation to the gene, checks for presence in databases (eg, db single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)) and predicts the potential consequences at the level of RNA splicing and protein translation. In the samples analyzed, all known variants were reliably detected, including pathogenic variants from control cases and SNPs derived from array experiments. Although overall coverage varied considerably, it was reproducible per region and facilitated the detection of large deletions and duplications (copy number variations), including a partial deletion in the B3GALTL gene from a patient sample. For ultimate diagnostic application, overall results need to be improved. Future arrays should contain probes from both DNA strands, and to obtain a more even coverage, one could add fewer probes from densely and more probes from sparsely covered regions. PMID:21102627

  13. Clinical experience treating Paecilomyces lilacinus keratitis in four patients

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yu; Sugita, Minoru; Yamakawa, Ryoji; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2012-01-01

    Background Paecilomyces lilacinus is a saprobic fungus that occasionally causes keratitis in infected patients. Voriconazole, a triazole antifungal agent, is often administered to treat P. lilacinus keratitis, because it is resistant to many antifungal agents. However, some patients may not require voriconazole. Here, we report our experience of treating this infection and compare outcomes between patients treated with or without voriconazole. Subjects We retrospectively reviewed four cases of infectious keratitis caused by P. lilacinus and compared treatment course and outcomes among the four cases. Observations P. lilacinus was isolated from corneal cultures in all four cases. Three cases developed corneal perforation and underwent keratoplasty. Voriconazole was given in two cases with severe and refractory infection. Both required long-term treatment despite the effectiveness of voriconazole. They also had a medical history of diabetes and corticosteroid therapy. In two cases that were not treated with voriconazole, the eye conditions improved with a short treatment period (2–3 weeks). Neither of these cases had a medical history of diabetes, nor had they used corticosteroids. Conclusion Although voriconazole is the most useful antifungal agent for treating P. lilacinus keratitis, this infection can be resolved by other treatments. Voriconazole should be offered to patients with diabetes and/or prior corticosteroid use. PMID:22791978

  14. Clinical review: The Israeli experience: conventional terrorism and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Aschkenasy-Steuer, Gabriella; Shamir, Micha; Rivkind, Avraham; Mosheiff, Rami; Shushan, Yigal; Rosenthal, Guy; Mintz, Yoav; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Weiss, Yoram G

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years there have been 93 multiple-casualty terrorist attacks in Israel, 33 of them in Jerusalem. The Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is the only Level I trauma center in Jerusalem and has therefore gained important experience in caring for critically injured patients. To do so we have developed a highly flexible operational system for managing the general intensive care unit (GICU). The focus of this review will be on the organizational steps needed to provide operational flexibility, emphasizing the importance of forward deployment of intensive care unit personnel to the trauma bay and emergency room and the existence of a chain of command to limit chaos. A retrospective review of the hospital's response to multiple-casualty terror incidents occurring between 1 October 2000 and 1 September 2004 was performed. Information was assembled from the medical center's trauma registry and from GICU patient admission and discharge records. Patients are described with regard to the severity and type of injury. The organizational work within intensive care is described. Finally, specific issues related to the diagnosis and management of lung, brain, orthopedic and abdominal injuries, caused by bomb blast events associated with shrapnel, are described. This review emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in caring for these patients. PMID:16277738

  15. Particle beam therapy (hadrontherapy): basis for interest and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Orecchia, R; Zurlo, A; Loasses, A; Krengli, M; Tosi, G; Zurrida, S; Zucali, P; Veronesi, U

    1998-03-01

    The particle or hadron beams deployed in radiotherapy (protons, neutrons and helium, carbon, oxygen and neon ions) have physical and radiobiological characteristics which differ from those of conventional radiotherapy beams (photons) and which offer a number of theoretical advantages over conventional radiotherapy. After briefly describing the properties of hadron beams in comparison to photons, this review discusses the indications for hadrontherapy and analyses accumulated experience on the use of this modality to treat mainly neoplastic lesions, as published by the relatively few hadrontherapy centres operating around the world. The analysis indicates that for selected patients and tumours (particularly uveal melanomas and base of skull/spinal chordomas and chondrosarcomas), hadrontherapy produces greater disease-free survival. The advantages of hadrontherapy are most promisingly realised when used in conjunction with modern patient positioning, radiation delivery and focusing techniques (e.g. on-line imaging, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy) developed to improve the efficacy of photon therapy. Although the construction and running costs of hadrontherapy units are considerably greater than those of conventional facilities, a comprehensive analysis that considers all the costs, particularly those resulting from the failure of less effective conventional radiotherapy, might indicate that hadrontherapy could be cost effective. In conclusion, the growing interest in this form of treatment seems to be fully justified by the results obtained to date, although more efficacy and dosing studies are required.

  16. Clinical experience with ultrasound guided angioplasty for vascular access

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong; Lee, Yu-Ji; Kim, Sung-Rok

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of ultrasound guided percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (UG-PTA), which use ultrasound as an imaging modality, is an evolving strategy. But, in Korea, this method is rarely used. We report our experiences with UG-PTA with respect to technical success rates and complication rates compared to conventional PTA (C-PTA), performed between 2010 and 2015 at Samsung Changwon Hospital, Korea. Methods In our series, 53 cases of UG-PTA and 90 cases of C-PTA were reviewed, respectively. Cases of central vein stenosis, cephalic arch stenosis, arterial stenosis and thrombosis were excluded. However, cases of juxta-anastomotic stenosis and outflow vein stenosis were included. Results Technical success was achieved in 96.2% (51 of 53) of cases in the UG-PTA group and in 93.3% (84 of 90) of cases in the C-PTA group, respectively (P = 0.710). Technical failure was experienced in a total 8 cases (UG-PTA group: 2/53, 3.8%; C-PTA group: 6/90, 6.7%). No differences were observed in complications. Conclusion Duplex ultrasound-guided angioplasty for dialysis access in the outpatient setting is feasible, safe, and effective for peripheral venous stenotic lesions. It offers many advantages over conventional angiographic procedures, and, in the future, it has great potential to play a significant role in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:28393000

  17. Incorporating community-based clinical experiences into a maternal-women's health nursing course.

    PubMed

    Aurilio, Louise A; O'Dell, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    Many barriers to increasing enrollment in nursing programs currently exist. One barrier is increased competition for clinical site placement from competing nursing and multidisciplinary programs. A critical component of nursing educational programs is providing clinical experiences that reinforce didactic learning. Incorporating women's health in a maternity course required clinical experiences to reflect this content. Faculty incorporated new strategies to help students integrate relevant theoretical concepts of maternity and women's health nursing by placing students in more community sites. Although labor and delivery and mother-baby units are located in the hospital, a wealth of community experiences for maternal and women's health nursing students exists. This article discusses strategies implemented by faculty at Youngstown State University to meet these challenges and promote appropriate clinical learning experiences for student nurses enrolled in a maternal-women's health nursing course. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. [Tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) in obstetrics and gynecology--first clinical experience in Bulgaria].

    PubMed

    Markov, D

    2008-01-01

    We present our first experience with a new form of 3D data image processing named tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) and discuss its technique and clinical implications in obstetrics and gynecology.

  19. Abdominal Tuberculosis with an Acute Abdomen: Our Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Ramprasad; Bhattacharya, Ujjwal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity in India. Abdominal Tuberculosis is a great mimicker and is difficult to diagnose. This prospective observational study is based on those patients who were diagnosed to be suffering from Abdominal Tuberculosis only after they presented with an acute abdomen. This study aims to document the nature of different types of acute presentation in Abdominal Tuberculosis according to involved sites and surgical pathology. The study also discusses the indications and extent of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Seventy new cases of Abdominal Tuberculosis (out of 718 cases of acute abdomen) were diagnosed and treated over a period of three years in the surgical ward of Calcutta National Medical College. Macroscopic appearance of abdominal tissues during surgery suggested the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology and tissue culture. All patients were subsequently treated with a full course of antitubercular drugs (ATD). Results: The clinical presentations of acute abdomen included acute intestinal obstruction, perforative peritonitis and acute appendicitis etc. Terminal ileum and ileocaecal region were predominantly involved. The most common pathology was intestinal stricture with or without perforation. Most of the patients (approx 78.5%) required emergency surgery as a therapeutic intervention. A two-stage procedure was preferred in peritonitis and sepsis. Most of the remaining patients (12.8%) required surgery after initial conservative treatment for the first few days. Undiagnosed Abdominal Tuberculosis represents a notable percentage (10%) of patients who present with an acute abdomen as a surgical emergency. Conclusion: Abdominal Tuberculosis is very difficult to diagnose and diagnosis is often delayed till an acute abdomen is presented with. Almost all patients needed surgical intervention. Irrespective of surgery, all patients of abdominal tuberculosis require a

  20. Clinical experience of thyroid carcinoma: a study of 178 cases

    PubMed Central

    Devrim, Cetinkaya Dölek; Pelin, Tutuncuoglu A.; Ahmet, Gorgel; Ozgur, Nιflιoglu M.; Mustafa, Harman; Mithat, Bahceci

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignancy of endocrine organs. The prognosis varies. Factors such as age, sex, size of the tumor, stage of disease, presence of extrathyroidal spread, and completeness of resection have been found to significantly influence prognosis. We aimed to evaluate clinical features of our patients with thyroid carcinoma, prospectively. Material and methods We evaluated total 178 patients treated between 2010 and 2011 at the Department of Endocrinology, İzmir Atatürk Training Hospital, retrospectively. Data on patients, tumors, and therapeutic approaches were collected. All results are shown as mean ± standard deviation (SD). P values were based on two-sided tests with a cutoff for statistical significance of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval. Results There were no differences between female and male patients according to histopathological subtypes, demographic data and prognostic findings of thyroid cancer. The assessment of tumor size and other prognostic factors revealed that there was a correlation between tumor size and capsular and/or vascular invasion. In the postoperative evaluation we detected a correlation between metastases and vascular invasion and/or capsular invasion but there was no significant relation between focus (solitary/multifocal) and metastases. Conclusion There was no significant difference in terms of gender and age (< 45 years of age and ≥ 45 years of age) among the patient groups (low risk/intermediate risk/high risk). By multiple regression analysis among metastasis and prognostic factors it was observed that vascular invasion and thyroglobulin levels affect development of metastases. PMID:23788883

  1. [Our clinical experience in the treatment of snakebites].

    PubMed

    Ertem, Kadir; Esenkaya, Irfan; Kaygusuz, M Akif; Turan, Caner

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the results of medical and surgical treatment for venomous snakebites and reviewed current principles of first aid and therapy for affected patients. Fourteen venomous snakebite victims (8 males, 6 females; mean age 22 years; range 7 to 75 years) were enrolled in the study. Six patients received medical treatment alone, while eight patients required both medical and surgical treatments. Injury was in the upper and lower extremities in nine and five patients, respectively. Fasciotomy was performed in seven patients due to ensuing compartment syndrome, which was manifest with extreme swelling in the affected extremity and severe pain on passive stretching of the muscles at the site of the lesion. Fasciotomy site was primarily closed in three patients, whereas four patients required debridement and skin grafting. One patient, who developed necrosis due to an excessively tight tourniquet at the time of first aid, underwent amputation of the third finger at the level of the middle phalanx. The mean follow-up was 11.5 months (range 3 to 30 months). Following fasciotomy, a long incision line remained in all the patients and a marked scar tissue due to skin grafting, which were associated with flexion contracture deformities in two elbows (35 and 105 degrees). Hemopericardium detected in one patient was dealt with by medical treatment. The mean length of hospital stay was 11.3 days for medically treated patients, and 18.2 days following surgical treatment. No incidence of late serum disease or mortality was encountered. Management of snakebite victims include an appropriate first aid and treatment at the hospital; identification of compartment syndrome through clinical means and measurements should lead to an indication for fasciotomy.

  2. Adult Intussusception: Clinical Experience from a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Ozogul, Bunyami; Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Ozturk, Gurkan; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Yıldırgan, Mehmet İlhan; Aköz, Ayhan; Aydinli, Bulent

    2015-12-01

    Though frequently observed in children, intussusception is a rare state in adults. The treatment of intussusception in adults is different. In this trial, we have presented intussusception cases in adults that were treated and followed up in our department. The records of 31 adult intussusception cases surgically treated in our department between January 1993 and July 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. Among the 31 adult cases of intussusception that were treated during a period of 19 years, 10 were men, and 21 were women. The mean age was determined as 39.7 ± 5.3. The presentation symptom was abdominal pain in all the patients. Failure to pass gas or feces was observed in 23 patients (74.2 %); nausea and vomiting, in 22 patients (70.9 %); hematochezia, in 16 patients (51.6 %); and weight loss, in 3 patients (9.6 %). The mean duration of symptoms was 4.8 days. Abdominal tenderness was found in all the patients. Muscular defense and rebound tenderness were determined in 13 patients (41.9 %). Findings of intussusception were found in 80.9 % of patients examined by abdominal ultrasonography and in 63.1 % of cases examined by computerized tomography. Resection of the intussuscepted bowel segment was performed in 87 % of the patients. In conclusion, intussusception in adults is a rare clinical entity. Intussusception should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with spasmodic abdominal pain, especially in cases with intestinal obstruction. The recommended surgical method is en bloc resection of the intussuscepted segment in cases suspected to carry a risk of malignancy.

  3. Clinical experiences with cannabinoids in spasticity management in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorente Fernández, L; Monte Boquet, E; Pérez-Miralles, F; Gil Gómez, I; Escutia Roig, M; Boscá Blasco, I; Poveda Andrés, J L; Casanova-Estruch, B

    2014-06-01

    Spasticity is a common symptom among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of the combination of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in clinical practice for the treatment of spasticity in MS. Retrospective observational study with patients treated with inhaled THC/CBD between April 2008 and March 2012. Descriptive patient and treatment variables were collected. Therapeutic response was evaluated based on the doctor's analysis and overall impression. Of the 56 patients who started treatment with THC/CBD, 6 were excluded because of missing data. We evaluated 50 patients (42% male) with a median age 47.8 years (25.6-76.8); 38% were diagnosed with primary progressive MS, 44% with secondary progressive MS, and 18% with relapsing-remitting MS. The reason for prescribing the drug was spasticity (44%), pain (10%), or both (46%). Treatment was discontinued in 16 patients because of ineffectiveness (7 patients), withdrawal (4), and adverse effects (5). The median exposure time in patients whose treatment was discontinued was 30 days vs 174 days in those whose treatment continued at the end of the study. THC/CBD was effective in 80% of patients at a median dose of 5 (2-10) inhalations/day. The adverse event profile consisted of dizziness (11 patients), somnolence (6), muscle weakness (7), oral discomfort (2), diarrhoea (3), dry mouth (2), blurred vision (2), agitation (1), nausea (1), and paranoid ideation (1). THC/CBD appears to be a good alternative to standard treatment as it improves refractory spasticity in MS and has an acceptable toxicity profile. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical experience with ceramics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oonishi, H; Wakitani, S; Murata, N; Saito, M; Imoto, K; Kim, S; Matsuura, M

    2000-10-01

    As part of a search for better articulation in total hip prostheses, the decrease in the thickness of the socket in different total hip prostheses was measured in vivo. The wear rates of (1) RCH 1000 (molecular weight, 10(6)) socket gamma-irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with a crude COP (stainless steel containing 20% cobalt and 0.01% phosphorous) metal femoral head; (2) RCH 1000 socket nonirradiated articulating with a crude COP femoral head; (3) RCH 1000 socket irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with an alumina femoral head; (4) ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (molecular weight, 5-6 x 10(6)) socket articulating with an alumina femoral head; and (5) ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a stainless steel femoral head (T-28) were 0.06, 0.30, 0.06, 0.1 and 0.25 mm/year, respectively, in the authors' clinical cases. Alumina femoral heads were effective in decreasing wear of the polyethylene socket. However, the wear rates of gamma-irradiated sockets articulating with alumina and with metal femoral heads wear very low and were not different from each other. Regarding the relationship between wear rate and the thickness of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a 28 mm alumina femoral head, on radiographs, average wear rates of socket thicknesses of 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 mm were 0.14, 0.15, 0.12, 0.06, and 0.08 mm/year, respectively. On measuring retrieved prostheses, average wear rates of 7, 8, 9 and 11 mm thickness sockets were 0.2, 0.19, 0.14, and 0.1 mm/year, respectively. The wear of sockets has been proven to be minimal in alumina femoral heads articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene sockets thicker than 10 mm.

  5. Emergence of Linezolid-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus after Prolonged Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Cleveland, Ohio ▿

    PubMed Central

    Endimiani, Andrea; Blackford, Martha; Dasenbrook, Elliot C.; Reed, Michael D.; Bajaksouszian, Saralee; Hujer, Andrea M.; Rudin, Susan D.; Hujer, Kristine M.; Perreten, Vincent; Rice, Louis B.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael W.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Linezolid (LZD)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LRSA) isolates were monitored from 2000 to 2009 in Cleveland, OH. LRSA first emerged in 2004 only in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with 11 LRSA-infected CF patients being identified by 2009. LRSA was isolated from 8 of 77 CF patients with S. aureus respiratory tract infection treated with LZD from 2000 to 2006. Analysis of clinical data showed that the 8 CF patients with LRSA received more LZD courses (18.8 versus 5.9; P = 0.001) for a longer duration (546.5 versus 211.9 days; P < 0.001) and had extended periods of exposure to LZD (83.1 versus 30.1 days/year; P < 0.001) than the 69 with LZD-susceptible isolates. Five LRSA isolates included in the clinical analysis (2000 to 2006) and three collected in 2009 were available for molecular studies. Genotyping by repetitive extrapalindromic PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that seven of these eight LRSA strains from unique patients were genetically similar. By multilocus sequence typing, all LRSA isolates were included in clonal complex 5 (seven of sequence type 5 [ST5] and one of ST1788, a new single-locus variant of ST5). However, seven different variants were identified by spa typing. According to the Escherichia coli numbering system, seven LRSA isolates contained a G2576T mutation (G2603T, S. aureus numbering) in one to four of the five copies of domain V of the 23S rRNA genes. One strain also contained a mutation (C2461T, E. coli numbering) not previously reported. Two strains, including one without domain V mutations, possessed single amino acid substitutions (Gly152Asp or Gly139Arg) in the ribosomal protein L3 of the peptidyltransferase center, substitutions not previously reported in clinical isolates. Emergence of LRSA is a serious concern for CF patients who undergo prolonged courses of LZD therapy. PMID:21263048

  6. Improving patient experience in a multi-disciplinary clinic: clinical efficiency and patient satisfaction of 400 patients attending the Manchester Hypodontia Clinic.

    PubMed

    Tams, C; Ashley, M

    2013-03-01

    To assess the efficiency of the Manchester Hypodontia Clinic (MHC) in improving patient experience and satisfaction. In January 2010, the University Dental Hospital of Manchester applied a more modern approach to the design of a treatment planning clinic for patients with hypodontia. This brought together all the necessary dental specialties in one multidisciplinary clinic. A questionnaire study of patients attending the MHC between January 2010 and March 2012 was used to monitor each patient's journey through the clinic. 400 patients attended the MHC between January 2010 and March 2012. Patient satisfaction was assessed before and after attending the clinic via questionnaires in an attempt to understand more about patient expectations and satisfaction with the structure and management of the clinic. Ninety-nine percent of patients received a clear explanation of why they had been invited to attend the clinic and 98% felt that they had been directly involved in their treatment planning and were fully informed of the decisions made regarding their future treatment. Almost all patients (99%) felt that attending the MHC had been worthwhile. Nearly a third of patients rated their experience as good and over two-thirds of patients (69%) rated their experience as excellent. The results prove that by designing the service around the patients' needs it is possible to run an efficient clinic and achieve high levels of patient satisfaction.

  7. The electromagnetic bio-field: clinical experiments and interferences

    PubMed Central

    Burnei, G; Hodorogea, D; Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, Ş; Drăghici, I; Dan, D; Vlad, C; Drăghici, L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important factors is the technical and scientifically rapid development that is continually modifying the world we live in and polluting it with electromagnetic radiations. A functional and structural influence of magnetic and electromagnetic field on living organisms is presented in the literature by many performed experiments. Material and methods: The notion of bio-field represents the electromagnetic field generated by the bio-structures, not only in their normal physiological activities but also in their pathological states. There is a tight interdependency between the bio-field and the bio-structure, which respects the primary notion of an electromagnetic field given by the Maxwell-Faraday laws, in which, the electromagnetic phenomena are simplified to the field variations. These variations can be expressed in a coherent differential equation system that bounds the field vectors to different space points at different time moments. Results: The living organisms cannot contain electrostatic and magneto-static fields due to the intense activity of the bio-structures. The biochemical reactions that have high rhythms and speeds always impose the electrodynamics character of the biologic field that also corresponds to the stability of the protein molecule that can be explained only through a dynamic way. The existent energy is not considered an exciting agent, and it does not lead to any effects. Conclusions: The parameters of these elementary bio-fields cannot yet be fully known due to technical reasons. The biological structures are very complex ones and undergo continuous dynamical activity. That is why the calculus model should be related to the constant dynamics, nowadays being very difficult to express. PMID:22802878

  8. The electromagnetic bio-field: clinical experiments and interferences.

    PubMed

    Burnei, G; Hodorogea, D; Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, Ş; Drăghici, I; Dan, D; Vlad, C; Drăghici, L

    2012-06-12

    One of the most important factors is the technical and scientifically rapid development that is continually modifying the world we live in and polluting it with electromagnetic radiations. A functional and structural influence of magnetic and electromagnetic field on living organisms is presented in the literature by many performed experiments. The notion of bio-field represents the electromagnetic field generated by the bio-structures, not only in their normal physiological activities but also in their pathological states. There is a tight interdependency between the bio-field and the bio-structure, which respects the primary notion of an electromagnetic field given by the Maxwell-Faraday laws, in which, the electromagnetic phenomena are simplified to the field variations. These variations can be expressed in a coherent differential equation system that bounds the field vectors to different space points at different time moments. The living organisms cannot contain electrostatic and magneto-static fields due to the intense activity of the bio-structures. The biochemical reactions that have high rhythms and speeds always impose the electrodynamics character of the biologic field that also corresponds to the stability of the protein molecule that can be explained only through a dynamic way. The existent energy is not considered an exciting agent, and it does not lead to any effects. The parameters of these elementary bio-fields cannot yet be fully known due to technical reasons. The biological structures are very complex ones and undergo continuous dynamical activity. That is why the calculus model should be related to the constant dynamics, nowadays being very difficult to express.

  9. Expertise in Clinical Psychology. The Effects of University Training and Practical Experience on Expertise in Clinical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Sabine; Spada, Hans; Caspar, Franz; Burri, Salome

    2013-01-01

    How do university training and subsequent practical experience affect expertise in clinical psychology? To answer this question we developed methods to assess psychological knowledge and the competence to diagnose, construct case conceptualizations, and plan psychotherapeutic treatment: a knowledge test and short case studies in a first study, and a complex, dynamically evolving case study in the second study. In our cross-sectional studies, psychology students, trainees in a certified postgraduate psychotherapist curriculum, and behavior therapists with more than 10 years of experience were tested (100 in total: 20 each of novice, intermediate, and advanced university students, postgraduate trainees, and therapists). Clinical knowledge and competence increased up to the level of trainees but unexpectedly decreased at the level of experienced therapists. We discuss the results against the background of expertise research and the training of clinical psychologists (in Germany). Important factors for the continuing professional development of psychotherapists are proposed. PMID:23543213

  10. A discussion of nursing students' experiences of culture shock during an international clinical placement and the clinical facilitators' role.

    PubMed

    Maginnis, Cathy; Anderson, Judith

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the meaning and experience of culture shock for nursing students undertaking an international clinical placement (ICP) and the role of the clinical facilitator. Oberg's four stages of adapting to culture shock were aligned to anecdotal conversations with nursing students on an ICP. All four stages were identified in anecdotal conversations with the students. Support by the accompanying clinical facilitator is pivotalin overcoming culture shock and maximising the learning experience. It is essential that students are prepared for the change in cultural norms and are supported by the academic staff to work through the processes required to adapt to culture shock. Planning and preparation prior to departure is essential to assist with managing culture shock with an emphasis on the inclusion of cultural norms and beliefs. The role of the facilitator is crucial to guide and support the students through the culture shock process.

  11. Psychiatric Consultation in Community Clinics: A Decade of Experience in the Community Clinics in Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    Avny, Ohad; Teitelbaum, Tatiana; Simon, Moshe; Michnick, Tatiana; Siman-Tov, Maya

    2016-01-01

    A consultation model between primary care physicians and psychiatrists that has been in operation for 12 years in the Jerusalem district of the Clalit Health Services in Israel is evaluated. In this model psychiatrists provide consultations twice a month at the primary care clinic. All patients are referred by their family physicians. Communication between the psychiatric consultant and the referring physician is carried out by telephone, correspondence and staff meetings. Evaluation of the psychiatric care consultation model in which a psychiatrist consults at the primary care clinic. A questionnaire-based survey distributed to 17 primary care physicians in primary care clinics in Jerusalem in which a psychiatric consultant is present. Almost all of the doctors (93%) responded that the consultation model was superior to the existing model of referral to a secondary psychiatric clinic alone and reduced the workload in caring for the referred patients. The quality of psychiatric care was correlated with the depression prevalence among patients referred for consultation at their clinic (r=0.530, p=0.035). In addition, correlation was demonstrated between primary care physicians impression of alleviation of care of patients and their impression of extent of the patients' cooperation with the consulting psychiatrist (r=0.679, p = 0.015) Conclusions: Very limited conclusions may be drawn from this questionnaire distributed to primary care physicians who were asked to assess psychiatric consultation in their clinic. Our conclusion could be influenced by the design and the actual distribution of the questionnaires by the consulting psychiatrist. Nevertheless answers to the questionnaire might imply that the consultation model of care between a psychiatric consultant and the primary care physician, where the patient's primary care physician takes a leading role in his psychiatric care, is perceived by family physicians as a good alternative to referral to a psychiatric

  12. Development of an International Clinical Education Extracurricular Experience Through a Collaborative Partnership.

    PubMed

    Mandich, MaryBeth; Erickson, Mia; Nardella, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Participating in global health care through international clinical education may enhance the development of cultural competence and professionalism. Many logistical issues need to be resolved in the development of international clinical education experiences that meet program requirements. The purpose of this case report is to describe how a university developed such an experience for students by partnering with Amizade Global Service-Learning (Amizade), an organization that facilitates global learning experiences. Medical, nursing, and pharmacy students were already participating in a 4-week international health-related service learning rotation through Amizade. The preexisting relationship and contractual agreement with the university provided the necessary legal framework. Amizade staff assisted in finding a physical therapist qualified and willing to host a student. The academic coordinator for clinical education at the university and Amizade liaisons determined living arrangements, schedule, clinical settings, and patient population. The selected student had expressed interest and had met all clinical education placement requirements. The academic coordinator for clinical education had ongoing electronic communications with all parties. The student demonstrated predicted attributes of cultural competence and professionalism; through the partnership with Amizade, the student was exposed to several unique interprofessional experiences. The steps used by the university faculty in developing this interprofessional, international clinical education experience through a collaborative partnership may provide guidance for other institutions.

  13. [Application of portfolio in teaching dermatology clinic: an experience in teaching of medicine].

    PubMed

    de Cabalier, M E; Chalub, D M

    2009-01-01

    We present a learning experience conducted in the Chair of Dermatology Clinic of the Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of Cordoba in the context of curriculum change. For comprehension,present a theoretical framework and practical from the conceptualization of the "portfolio" teaching and its role teaching and learning paradigms sustained constructivist medical education. The portfolio Teach-ing is not a collection of papers, but a coherent set of experiences led thoughtful learning between teachers and students. This resource allows to account for the "qualitative achievements" of students from their work produced, sorted and evaluated in a carefully planned sequence of experiences and case Dermatology Clinic. To introduce the teaching portfolio, the planned new student grouping shapes and a sequence of learning experiences for the construction of this resource, namely: "The development of theoretical material iconographic resources and working guidelines for students. "The clinical reasoning on a case or laboratory experience-Clinical case Discussion and bibliography. -The development of records to from observation of patients. "The study of clinical cases: diagnosis and evolution of clinical cases. Interconsultations-Registration and referrals. "The magazine room and sharing experiences. In each of these, production, tutorial feedback Team teaching and assessment tasks allowed assessment approach to learning and improving he achievements of the students to the approval of the subject.

  14. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of…

  15. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  16. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  17. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of…

  18. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  19. Experiences of Student Speech-Language Pathology Clinicians in the Initial Clinical Practicum: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech-language pathology literature is limited in describing the clinical practicum process from the student perspective. Much of the supervision literature in this field focuses on quantitative research and/or the point of view of the supervisor. Understanding the student experience serves to enhance the quality of clinical supervision. Of…

  20. Diagnostic games: from adequate formalization of clinical experience to structure discovery.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Michael A; Kasparova, Eva I

    2008-01-01

    A method of obtaining well-founded and reproducible results in clinical decision making is presented. It is based on "diagnostic games", a procedure of elicitation and formalization of experts' knowledge and experience. The use of this procedure allows formulating decision rules in the terms of an adequate language, that are both unambiguous and clinically clear.