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Sample records for clinical cerebrovascular anatomy

  1. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  2. Clinical anatomy of the hand.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Canoso, Juan J; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Kalish, Robert A

    This article reviews the underlying anatomy of trigger finger and thumb (fibrous digital pulleys, sesamoid bones), flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain's syndrome, Dupuytren's contracture, some hand deformities in rheumatoid arthritis, the carpal tunnel syndrome and the ulnar nerve compression at Guyon's canal. Some important syndromes and structures have not been included but such are the nature of these seminars. Rather than being complete, we aim at creating a system in which clinical cases are used to highlight the pertinent anatomy and, in the most important part of the seminar, these pertinent items are demonstrated by cross examination of participants and teachers. Self learning is critical for generating interest and expanding knowledge of clinical anatomy. Just look at your own hand in various positions, move it, feel it, feel also your forearms while you move the fingers, do this repeatedly and inquisitively and after a few tries you will have developed not only a taste, but also a lifelong interest in clinical anatomy.

  3. Chromosomes and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Robert James McKinlay

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome abnormalities may cast light on the nature of mechanisms whereby normal anatomy evolves, and abnormal anatomy arises. Correlating genotype to phenotype is an exercise in which the geneticist and the anatomist can collaborate. The increasing power of the new genetic methodologies is enabling an increasing precision in the delineation of chromosome imbalances, even to the nucleotide level; but the classical skills of careful observation and recording remain as crucial as they always have been. Clin. Anat. 29:540-546, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cerebrovascular risk factors and clinical classification of strokes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Fernandez, Paola; Licata, Giuseppe

    2004-08-01

    Cerebrovascular risk represents a progressive and evolving concept owing to the particular distribution of risk factors in patients with ischemic stroke and in light of the newest stroke subtype classifications that account for pathophysiological, instrumental, and clinical criteria. Age represents the strongest nonmodifiable risk factor associated with ischemic stroke, while hypertension constitutes the most important modifiable cerebrovascular risk factor, confirmed by a host of epidemiological data and by more recent intervention trials of primary (HOT, Syst-Eur, LIFE) and secondary (PROGRESS) prevention of stroke in hypertensive patients. To be sure, a curious relationship exists between stroke and diabetes. Although the Framingham Study, The Honolulu Heart Program, and a series of Finnish studies reported a linear relationship between improved glucose metabolism and cerebral ischemia, the clinical and prognostic profile of diabetic patients with ischemic stroke remains to be fully understood. Our group, on the basis of TOAST classification--a diagnostic classification of ischemic stroke developed in 1993 that distinguishes five different clinical subtypes of ischemic stroke: large-artery atherosclerosis (LAAS), cardioembolic infarct (CEI), lacunar infarct (LAC), stroke of other determined origin (ODE), and stroke of undetermined origin (UDE), and now extensively used in clinical and scientific context--analysed the prevalence of cerebrovascular risk factors and the distribution of TOAST subtypes in more 300 patients with acute ischemic stroke in two consecutives studies that reported the significant association between diabetes and the lacunar subtype and a better clinical outcome for diabetic patients, most likely related to the higher prevalence of the lacunar subtype. Well-confirmed are the roles of cigarette smoking, atrial fibrillation, and asymptomatic carotid stenosis as cerebrovascular risk factors. Particularly interesting seems to be the function of

  5. Fischer-344 rats are unsuitable for the MCAO filament model due to their cerebrovascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Michael S; Vatankhah, Bijan; Fehm, Nando P; Schuierer, Gerhard; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Horn, Markus; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2006-09-30

    Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in Fischer-344 rats results in a small variance of infarct size. However, complications are frequent especially in aged Fisher-344 rats undergoing endovascular suture occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Analyzing our experiences with 165 Wistar, 13 Sprague-Dawley and 10 F-344 rats, we compared the incidence of impossible thread advancement and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was applied to study the course of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in Fischer and Wistar rats. Finally, we performed a structured review of the literature from 1991 to 2005 evaluating reports on Fischer rats subjected to intraluminal filament MCAO. Complications like fruitless filament advancement or subarachnoid hemorrhage were found to be significantly more frequent in Fischer rats than in other strains. MRA revealed significantly more pronounced kinking of the ICA in F-344 than in Wistar rats. In seven publications available on filament MCAO in F-344 rats, complication rates of 50-100% were reported, corroborating our data. Surgical difficulties accompanied by high complication rates due to their cerebrovascular anatomy make Fischer rats unsuitable for filament MCAO. If the use of Fischer rats for studies on focal cerebral ischemia is indicated, other ischemia models than intraluminal suture occlusion should be chosen.

  6. Pathobiology of human cerebrovascular malformations: basic mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gault, Judith; Sarin, Hemant; Awadallah, Nabil A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A

    2004-07-01

    Cerebrovascular malformations affect more than 3% of the population, exposing them to a lifetime risk of hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) exhibit an immature vessel wall, a brittle hemorrhagic tendency, and epileptogenesis, whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) lack capillary beds and manifest apoplectic bleeding under high-flow conditions. There are also more benign venous anomalies, capillary malformations, and lesions with mixed and transitional features. Advances have been made toward understanding the natural history, radiological and pathological correlates, and clinical management. Yet, mechanisms of lesion genesis and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown, and the clinical behavior in individual patients is highly unpredictable. Lesion pathogenesis likely involves abnormal assembly or maintenance of blood vessels, resulting in dysmorphic vessel phenotypes. Familial CCM disease is in part caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal-related protein that is likely integral to interendothelial cell connectivity and maturation of the vascular wall. Rare familial forms of AVM disease have been correlated with two different transforming growth factor-beta receptor components, possibly causing disturbance in signaling during vascular assembly. Relevance of these mechanisms to the more common and otherwise identical sporadic CCM and AVM lesions is being explored. In this report, basic mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how they possibly relate to the common cerebrovascular malformation lesions are reviewed. Novel concepts are discussed related to the cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates in CCM and AVM as well as to how this knowledge can be applied to predict, explain, and possibly modify clinical disease manifestations.

  7. Clinical and angiographic comparison of asymptomatic occlusive cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, P B; Caplan, L R; Langenberg, P; Hier, D B; Pessin, M; Patel, D; Taber, J

    1988-06-01

    We compared clinical and arteriographic features in 106 patients with symptomatic unilateral carotid territory occlusive disease to determine the frequency and distribution of occlusive arterial lesions in asymptomatic vessels. Among black patients who were predominantly from Chicago, young, and female, there were fewer transient ischemic attacks and myocardial infarcts, less claudication, and more asymptomatic lesions of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery stem, and the middle cerebral artery stem. Among white patients predominantly from New England, elderly, and male, there was more frequent and severe occlusive asymptomatic disease at extracranial carotid and vertebral artery sites. Knowledge of the distribution of asymptomatic lesions will help guide evaluation and treatment strategies for patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease.

  8. Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class,…

  9. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  10. Clinical anatomy of the subserous layer: An amalgamation of gross and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-05-01

    The 1998 edition of Terminologia Anatomica introduced some currently used clinical anatomical terms for the pelvic connective tissue or subserous layer. These innovations persuaded the present author to consider a format in which the clinical anatomical terms could be reconciled with those of gross anatomy and incorporated into a single anatomical glossary without contradiction or ambiguity. Specific studies on the subserous layer were undertaken on 79 Japanese women who had undergone surgery for uterine cervical cancer, and on 26 female cadavers that were dissected, 17 being formalin-fixed and 9 fresh. The results were as follows: (a) the subserous layer could be segmentalized by surgical dissection in the perpendicular, horizontal and sagittal planes; (b) the segmentalized subserous layer corresponded to 12 cubes, or ligaments, of minimal dimension that enabled the pelvic organs to be extirpated; (c) each ligament had a three-dimensional (3D) structure comprising craniocaudal, mediolateral, and dorsoventral directions vis-á-vis the pelvic axis; (d) these 3D-structured ligaments were encoded morphologically in order of decreasing length; and (e) using these codes, all the surgical procedures for 19th century to present-day radical hysterectomy could be expressed symbolically. The establishment of clinical anatomical terms, represented symbolically through coding as demonstrated in this article, could provide common ground for amalgamating clinical anatomy with gross anatomy. Consequently, terms in clinical anatomy and gross anatomy could be reconciled and compiled into a single anatomical glossary.

  11. Guyon Canal: The Evolution of Clinical Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Maroukis, Brianna L.; Ogawa, Takeshi; Rehim, Shady A.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The eponym “Guyon canal” refers to the ulnar tunnel at the wrist that was named after the French surgeon Jean Casimir Félix Guyon who first described this space in 1861. After Guyon’s discovery, clinicians have focused their interest on symptoms caused by compression of structures occupying this canal (later named ulnar tunnel syndrome, or Guyon syndrome). However disagreement and confusion persisted over the correct anatomical boundaries and terminology used to describe the ulnar tunnel. Through anatomical investigation and evolving clinical case studies, the current understanding of the anatomy of the ulnar tunnel was established. This article examines the evolution of the anatomical description of the ulnar tunnel and its relevant clinical associations, and casts light on the life and contributions of Jean Casimir Félix Guyon. PMID:25446410

  12. Perceptions of Anatomy: Critical Components in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Leong, Shou Ling; Kauffman, Gordon L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution in undergraduate medical school curricula has significantly impacted anatomy education. This study investigated the perceived role of clinical anatomy and evaluated perceptions of medical students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge in the clinic. The aim of this study was to develop a framework to enhance anatomical educational…

  13. Clinical Vignettes Improve Performance in Anatomy Practical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikah, December S. K.; Finn, Gabrielle M.; Swamy, Meenakshi; White, Pamela M.; McLachlan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Although medical curricula now adopt an integrated teaching approach, this is not adequately reflected in assessment of anatomy knowledge and skills. In this study, we aimed to explore the impact of the addition of clinical vignette to item stems on students' performance in anatomy practical examinations. In this study, 129 undergraduate medical…

  14. Clinical anatomy as practiced by ancient Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; Hanna, Michael; Alsaiegh, Nada; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2011-05-01

    Egypt is famously known for its Nile and pyramids, yet not many people know that Egypt made possible the origin of the anatomical sciences. Several ancient papyri guide us through the Egyptians' exploration of the human body and how they applied anatomical knowledge to clinical medicine to the best of their knowledge. It is through records, such as the Edwin Smith, Ebers, and Kahun papyri and other literature detailing the work of the Egyptian embalmers, physicians, and Greek anatomists, that we are able to take a glimpse into the evolution of the anatomical sciences from 3000 B.C. to 250 B.C. It is through the Egyptian embalmer that we were able to learn of some of the first interactions with human organs and their detailed observation. The Egyptian physician's knowledge, being transcribed into the Ebers and Edwin Smith papyri, enabled future physicians to seek reference to common ailments for diagnosing and treating a variety of conditions ranging from head injuries to procedures, such as trans-sphenoidal surgery. In Alexandria, Herophilus, and Erasistratus made substantial contributions to the anatomical sciences by beginning the practice of human dissection. For instance, Herophilus described the anatomy of the heart valves along with Erasistratus who demonstrated how blood was prevented from flowing retrograde under normal conditions. Hence, from various records, we are able to unravel how Egypt paved the road for study of the anatomical sciences.

  15. Guidelines for standard photography in gross and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers are supposed to demonstrate the required information clearly. Thus, photographs should be taken with certain techniques in order to obtain high quality and standardization. Camera, lens, lighting, background, and certain photographic techniques are among the factors to achieve precise images. A set of suggested guidelines for accomplishing these standards are given for anatomists.

  16. Teaching of clinical anatomy in rheumatology: a review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Torralba, Karina D; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Evelyn, Christine M; Koolaee, R Michelle; Kalish, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Clinical anatomy may be defined as anatomy that is applied to the care of the patient. It is the foundation of a well-informed physical examination that is so important in rheumatologic practice. Unfortunately, there is both documented and observed evidence of a significant deficiency in the teaching and performance of a competent musculoskeletal examination at multiple levels of medical education including in rheumatology trainees. At the Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston, MA, that took place in November 2014, a Clinical Anatomy Study Group met to share techniques of teaching clinical anatomy to rheumatology fellows, residents, and students. Techniques that were reviewed included traditional anatomic diagrams, hands-on cross-examination, cadaver study, and musculoskeletal ultrasound. The proceedings of the Study Group section are described in this review.

  17. Clinical anatomy of the periocular region.

    PubMed

    Shams, Pari N; Ortiz-Pérez, Santiago; Joshi, Naresh

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this article are twofold: (1) to provide the facial plastic surgeon with a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of periocular anatomy including the brow, midface, and temporal region and (2) to highlight important anatomical relationships that must be appreciated in order to achieve the best possible functional and aesthetic surgical outcomes.

  18. Clinical Anatomy and Anatomical Skills: An Innovative Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hijleh, Marwan F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explains the organization, structure, and assessment of the undergraduate course entitled Clinical Anatomy and Anatomical Skills. The course aims to refocus, vertically integrate, and revise the subject using problem-solving methods plus testing of various clinically relevant skills recorded in a logbook. This report re-emphasizes the importance…

  19. Clinical Anatomy of the Liver: Review of the 19th Meeting of the Japanese Research Society of Clinical Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kokudo, Norihiro; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Akita, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Precise clinical knowledge of liver anatomy is required to safely perform a hepatectomy, for both open and laparoscopic surgery. At the 19th meeting of the Japanese Research Society of Clinical Anatomy (JRSCA), we conducted special symposia on essential issues of liver surgery, such as the history of hepatic segmentation, the glissonean pedicle approach, application of 3-D imaging simulation and fluorescent imaging using indocyanine green solution, a variety of segmentectomies including caudate lobectomy, the associating liver partition and portal vein embolization for stage hepatectomy and harvesting liver grafts for living donor liver transplantation. The present review article provides useful information for liver surgeons and anatomic researchers. PMID:28275581

  20. Routine clinical evaluation of cerebrovascular reserve capacity using carbogen in patients with intracranial stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J.; Dethrage, Lindsey; Faraco, Carlos C.; Jordan, Lori C.; Clemmons, Paul; Singer, Robert; Mocco, J; Shyr, Yu; Desai, Aditi; O’Duffy, Anne; Riebau, Derek; Hermann, Lisa; Connors, John; Kirshner, Howard; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A promising method for identifying hemodynamic impairment that may serve as a biomarker for stroke risk in patients with intracranial (IC) stenosis is cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) mapping using non-invasive MRI. Here, abilities to measure CVR safely in the clinic using hypercarbic hyperoxic (carbogen) gas challenges, which increase oxygen delivery to tissue, are investigated. Methods In sequence with structural and angiographic imaging, blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) carbogen-induced CVR scans were performed in patients with symptomatic IC stenosis (n=92) and control (n=10) volunteers, with a subgroup of patients (n=57) undergoing cerebral blood flow-weighted (CBFw) pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) CVR. Subjects were stratified for four sub-studies: to evaluate relationships between (i) carbogen and hyercarbic normoxic (HN) CVR in healthy tissue (n=10), (ii) carbogen CBF CVR and BOLD CVR in IC stenosis patients (n=57), (iii) carbogen CVR and clinical measures of disease in patients with asymmetric IC atherosclerotic (n=31) and moyamoya (n=29) disease, and (iv) the CVR scan and immediate and longer-term complications (n=92). Results Non-invasive BOLD carbogen-induced CVR values correlate with (i) lobar HN gas stimuli in healthy tissue (R=0.92; P<0.001), (ii) carbogen-induced CBF CVR in IC stenosis patients (R=0.30–0.33; P<0.012), and (iii) angiographic measures of disease severity both in atherosclerotic and moyamoya patients after appropriate processing. No immediate stroke-related complications were reported in response to carbogen administration; longer-term neurological events fell within the range for expected events in this patient population. Conclusions Carbogen-induced CVR elicited no added adverse events and provided a surrogate marker of cerebrovascular reserve consistent with IC vasculopathy. PMID:24938845

  1. The Weak Relationship between Anatomy Competence and Clinical Skills in Junior Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeman, Scarpa; Chandratilake, Madawa

    2012-01-01

    In modern curricula, the early integration of anatomy and clinical skills education at undergraduate level is seen as important. However, the direct relationship between medical students' competence in anatomy, and their clinical proficiency during early undergraduate years, has scarcely been studied. In this study, the marks for anatomy and…

  2. Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy: Design and Implementation of a First-Year Medical School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubert, Lisa M.; Jones, Kenneth; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    Medical students state the need for a clinically oriented anatomy class so to maximize their learning experience. We hypothesize that the first-year medical students, who take the Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy program, will perform better than their peers in their anatomy course, their surgical clerkships and ultimately choose surgical…

  3. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs.

  4. Body painting as a tool in clinical anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, Paul G

    2008-01-01

    The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as the primary method of learning is driving changes to more varied and novel learning and teaching methodologies. The present article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical curriculum. Body painting was introduced into integrated clinical skills teaching sessions which included clinically important aspects of respiratory system, musculoskeletal system, and topics in regional anatomy including head and neck. Nontoxic body paints, easels, a mixture of brush sizes, and anatomical images were supplied. Students were allowed between 20 and 40 min to complete body painting tasks, in which they were encouraged to alternate between painting and acting as a model. Students were encouraged to use life-like rendering and coloration where appropriate. Evaluation of these sessions was performed at the end of the semester as part of a larger evaluation process. The kinesthetic nature and active participation together with the powerful visual images of underlying anatomy appear to contribute to the value of body painting as a teaching exercise. In addition, it may have the added bonus of helping break down apprehension regarding peer-peer examination. Some practical advice on introducing this method of teaching in medical curricula based on the outcomes of the evaluation is given. On the basis of our experience and student feedback, we strongly advocate the use of body painting as an adjunct to surface anatomy and clinical skills teaching classes.

  5. Implementation of clinical references for undergraduates in anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kranz, André; Bechmann, Ingo; Feja, Christine; Kohlhaw, Kay-Rüdiger; Bürkigt, Thomas; Lippross, Lisa; Dietze, Nora; Löffler, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates the implementation of clinical references in undergraduate medical education. For this purpose, images of typical diagnostic, intraoperative and clinical findings were integrated into two different teaching formats and adapted to the learning objectives of the Institute of Anatomy in Leipzig. Paper based questionnaires were used to evaluate the status quo (without clinical images) and the optimal time of implementation, as well as the benefit for the students of human medicine. Three test groups were drawn from two preclinical semesters (2014 and 2015). The first group in 2014 represents the control group, which did not have any image-supported clinical references but only defined learning objectives regarding the five exams in special anatomy. Primary implementation took place in the dissection course (second semester) as automatically running Power Point presentations while secondary implementation was during one of the five clinical seminars within the fourth semester. All groups were asked to evaluate the pros and cons through a self-developed paper-based questionnaire. The analysis was performed employing Microsoft Excel and SPSS. It has been demonstrated that most of the students welcome and appreciate the implementation of appropriate images as a valuable support in understanding clinical references. On the contrary, the dissection course did not seem to be the right time for this implementation. In keeping with previous studies, the important role of anatomy in medical education was outlined. A close collaboration between preclinical and clinical physicians concerning educational matters was presented. Considering these approaches, high-quality and sustainable education can be provided. Better patient care and education of young academics should be the motivation.

  6. A clinically oriented comprehensive pictorial review of canine elbow anatomy.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Gheorghe M; Constantinescu, Ileana A

    2009-02-01

    The clinically oriented canine elbow anatomy in its complexity earned a high importance in surgery especially after multiple imaging modalities have been used in the benefit of diagnosis and treatment of canine elbow disorders. The bony, joint, and muscular structures, the arteries, the veins and the nerves supplying the elbow are described and illustrated in textbooks and atlases in the context of the comparative anatomy. Nevertheless, there is no publication focused on all of these structures described together from the skin to the bones in a systematic and topographic order, nor through cross and/or sagittal and coronal sections. The figures used in this article are original and drawn after dissection, cross, sagittal, and coronal sections of the elbow structures. The sections are correlated to the multiple imaging modalities shown in the next article.

  7. Effectiveness of a Shortened, Clinically Engaged Anatomy Course for Physician Assistant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J.; Rando, William C.; O'Brien, Michael K.; Garino, Alexandria; Stewart, William B.

    2011-01-01

    There is little consensus among programs that train physician assistants (PAs) regarding how much time should be devoted to the study of anatomy, what should be included, or how it should be taught. Similar concerns led us to redesign anatomy for medical students and introduce clinically engaged anatomy, an approach designed in collaboration with…

  8. Midface: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    PubMed

    Cotofana, Sebastian; Schenck, Thilo L; Trevidic, Patrick; Sykes, Jonathan; Massry, Guy G; Liew, Steven; Graivier, Miles; Dayan, Steve; de Maio, Mauricio; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Andrews, J Todd; Remington, B Kent

    2015-11-01

    The clinical approach towards the midface is one of the most important interventions for practitioners when treating age-related changes of the face. Currently a plethora of procedures are used and presented. However, few of these approaches have been validated or passed review board assigned evaluations. Therefore, it is the aim of this work to establish a guideline manual for practitioners for a safe and effective mid-face treatment based on the most current concepts of facial anatomy. The latter is based on the 5-layered structural arrangement and its understanding is the key towards the favoured outcome and for minimizing complications.

  9. Adrenal steroid metabolism in birds: anatomy, physiology, and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal system in birds is anatomically and functionally different from that in mammals. The adrenal gland structure and corticosteroid hormone physiology of birds will be reviewed. The anatomy and physiology sections of this article will be important for better understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and possible treatment of primary or secondary adrenal gland disease. Causes of hyper- and hypoadrenocorticism in birds also will be reviewed. The article will conclude with current indications and complications to the clinical use of glucocorticoids in birds.

  10. Practicing Handoffs Early: Applying a Clinical Framework in the Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Dos Santos, Jason A.; Haidet, Paul M.; Whitcomb, Tiffany L.

    2016-01-01

    The anatomy laboratory provides an ideal environment for the integration of clinical contexts as the willed-donor is often regarded as a student's "first patient." This study evaluated an innovative approach to peer teaching in the anatomy laboratory using a clinical handoff context. The authors introduced the "Situation,…

  11. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  12. Determination of Clinically Relevant Content for a Musculoskeletal Anatomy Curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F.; Loh, Eldon Y.; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M. R.; Woods, Nicole N.

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi…

  13. Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, John Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility in the United Kingdom. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support other activities…

  14. The Case Anatomical Knowledge Index (CAKI): A Novel Method Used to Assess Anatomy Content in Clinical Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banda, Sekelani S.

    2009-01-01

    There are concerns in the literature that the use of case-based teaching of anatomy could be compromising the depth and scope of anatomy learned by students in a problem-based learning curriculum. Poor selection of clinical cases that are used as vehicles for teaching/learning anatomy may be the root problem because some clinical cases do not…

  15. The microarterial anatomy of the dorsalis pedis flap and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Man, D; Acland, R D

    1980-04-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the microanatomic details of the cutaneous branches of the dorsalis pedis artery. The microarterial anatomy of the dorsalis pedis flap area and its clinical implications are described.

  16. Anatomy of the Ophthalmic Artery: A Review concerning Its Modern Surgical and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Michalinos, Adamantios; Zogana, Sofia; Kotsiomitis, Evangelos; Mazarakis, Antonios; Troupis, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy of ophthalmic artery has been thoroughly studied and reviewed in many anatomical and surgical textbooks and papers. Issues of interest are its intracranial and extracranial course, its branches, its importance for vision, and its interaction with various intracranial pathologies. Improvement of our understanding about pathophysiology of certain diseases like aneurysm formation, central retinal artery occlusion, and retinoblastoma and also invention of new therapeutic modalities like superselective catheterization, intra-arterial fibrinolysis, and intra-arterial chemotherapy necessitate a reappraisal of its anatomy from a clinical point of view. The aim of this review is to examine clinical anatomy of ophthalmic artery and correlate it with new diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26635976

  17. Design principles for developing an efficient clinical anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J; Stewart, William B; O'Brien, Michael; Haims, Andrew; Rando, William; Abrahams, James; Dunne, Shane; Wang, Silas; Aden, Marcus

    2006-03-01

    The exponential growth of medical knowledge presents a challenge for the medical school curriculum. Because anatomy is traditionally a long course, it is an attractive target to reduce course hours, yet designing courses that produce students with less understanding of human anatomy is not a viable option. Faced with the challenge of teaching more anatomy with less time, we set out to understand how students employ instructional media to learn anatomy inside and outside of the classroom. We developed a series of pilot programs to explore how students learn anatomy and, in particular, how they combine instructional technology with more traditional classroom and laboratory-based learning. We then integrated what we learned with principles of effective instruction to design a course that makes the most efficient use of students' in-class and out-of-class learning. Overall, we concluded that our new anatomy course needed to focus on transforming how medical students think, reason, and learn. We are currently testing the hypothesis that this novel approach will enhance the ability of students to recall and expand their base of anatomical knowledge throughout their medical school training and beyond.

  18. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Sinus Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  19. Nasal Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Nasal Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  20. The clinical anatomy of the physical examination of the abdomen: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Voin, Vlad; Topale, Nitsa; Iwanaga, Joe; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-02-06

    Physical examination of the abdomen is an essential skill. Knowledge of its clinical anatomy and application is vital for making diagnoses. Misinterpretation of anatomy during examination can have serious consequences. This review addresses understanding of the anatomy, methodology and complications of abdominal physical examination. It includes particular reference to modern technology and investigations. Physical examination is performed for diagnostic purposes. However, the art of physical examination is declining as more and more clinicians rely on newer technology. This can have regrettable consequences: negligence, waste of time and resources, and deterioration of clinical skills. With a sound knowledge of clinical anatomy, and realization of the importance of physical examination of the abdomen, clinician and patients alike can benefit. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical and Radiological Classification of the Jawbone Anatomy in Endosseous Dental Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Marius

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review the classifications suggested for assessment of the jawbone anatomy, to evaluate the diagnostic possibilities of mandibular canal identification and risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, aesthetic considerations in aesthetic zone, as well as to suggest new classification system of the jawbone anatomy in endosseous dental implant treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandible; mandibular canal; alveolar nerve, inferior; anatomy, cross-sectional; dental implants; classification. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to March 2013. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy and oral surgery books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical and human anatomy studies. Results In total 109 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The classifications suggested for assessment of the jawbone anatomy, diagnostic possibilities of mandibular canal identification and risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, aesthetic considerations in aesthetic zone were discussed. New classification system of the jawbone anatomy in endosseous dental implant treatment based on anatomical and radiologic findings and literature review results was suggested. Conclusions The classification system proposed here based on anatomical and radiological jawbone quantity and quality evaluation is a helpful tool for planning of treatment strategy and collaboration among specialists. Further clinical studies should be conducted for new classification validation and reliability evaluation. PMID:24422030

  2. The Bequest Programme at the University of Otago: cadavers donated for clinical anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    McClea, Kathryn

    2008-05-23

    This paper aims to inform the reader about the procedures of, and the need to run, a bequest programme for the teaching of clinical anatomy. It provides an overview of how the programme operates, and why the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology at the University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand) requires cadavers (bodies). It also looks at the acceptance and restrictions of bequests, and the altruistic nature of those who bequeath themselves to the Department.

  3. Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMenamin, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as…

  4. The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy, function and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Willard, F H; Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Schleip, R

    2012-12-01

    In this overview, new and existent material on the organization and composition of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) will be evaluated in respect to its anatomy, innervation biomechanics and clinical relevance. The integration of the passive connective tissues of the TLF and active muscular structures surrounding this structure are discussed, and the relevance of their mutual interactions in relation to low back and pelvic pain reviewed. The TLF is a girdling structure consisting of several aponeurotic and fascial layers that separates the paraspinal muscles from the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall. The superficial lamina of the posterior layer of the TLF (PLF) is dominated by the aponeuroses of the latissimus dorsi and the serratus posterior inferior. The deeper lamina of the PLF forms an encapsulating retinacular sheath around the paraspinal muscles. The middle layer of the TLF (MLF) appears to derive from an intermuscular septum that developmentally separates the epaxial from the hypaxial musculature. This septum forms during the fifth and sixth weeks of gestation. The paraspinal retinacular sheath (PRS) is in a key position to act as a 'hydraulic amplifier', assisting the paraspinal muscles in supporting the lumbosacral spine. This sheath forms a lumbar interfascial triangle (LIFT) with the MLF and PLF. Along the lateral border of the PRS, a raphe forms where the sheath meets the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis. This lateral raphe is a thickened complex of dense connective tissue marked by the presence of the LIFT, and represents the junction of the hypaxial myofascial compartment (the abdominal muscles) with the paraspinal sheath of the epaxial muscles. The lateral raphe is in a position to distribute tension from the surrounding hypaxial and extremity muscles into the layers of the TLF. At the base of the lumbar spine all of the layers of the TLF fuse together into a thick composite that attaches firmly to the posterior superior iliac spine and

  5. The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy, function and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Willard, F H; Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Schleip, R

    2012-01-01

    In this overview, new and existent material on the organization and composition of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) will be evaluated in respect to its anatomy, innervation biomechanics and clinical relevance. The integration of the passive connective tissues of the TLF and active muscular structures surrounding this structure are discussed, and the relevance of their mutual interactions in relation to low back and pelvic pain reviewed. The TLF is a girdling structure consisting of several aponeurotic and fascial layers that separates the paraspinal muscles from the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall. The superficial lamina of the posterior layer of the TLF (PLF) is dominated by the aponeuroses of the latissimus dorsi and the serratus posterior inferior. The deeper lamina of the PLF forms an encapsulating retinacular sheath around the paraspinal muscles. The middle layer of the TLF (MLF) appears to derive from an intermuscular septum that developmentally separates the epaxial from the hypaxial musculature. This septum forms during the fifth and sixth weeks of gestation. The paraspinal retinacular sheath (PRS) is in a key position to act as a ‘hydraulic amplifier’, assisting the paraspinal muscles in supporting the lumbosacral spine. This sheath forms a lumbar interfascial triangle (LIFT) with the MLF and PLF. Along the lateral border of the PRS, a raphe forms where the sheath meets the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis. This lateral raphe is a thickened complex of dense connective tissue marked by the presence of the LIFT, and represents the junction of the hypaxial myofascial compartment (the abdominal muscles) with the paraspinal sheath of the epaxial muscles. The lateral raphe is in a position to distribute tension from the surrounding hypaxial and extremity muscles into the layers of the TLF. At the base of the lumbar spine all of the layers of the TLF fuse together into a thick composite that attaches firmly to the posterior superior iliac spine

  6. [Clinical anatomy of the horse: teeth and dentition].

    PubMed

    Staszyk, C

    2015-01-01

    The routine inspection of the equine oral cavity allows a numerical assessment of the teeth and provides information about positional changes within the dentition. By use of appropriate dental equipment, the occlusal surfaces of all teeth can be inspected and diagnosed. However, neither the teeth nor their occlusal surfaces are constant structures. Instead, equine teeth and, in particular, their occlusal surfaces are subjected to continuous morphological and positional changes due to the effects of aging and the equine-specific high amount of occlusal wear. Therefore, it is mandatory to define anatomical criteria, which allow us to distinguish between anatomical variations and pathological conditions. Moreover, an unambiguous nomenclature with regard to the equine-specific dental anatomy is essential. This article provides a tutorial overview of the equine dental anatomy as well as recent findings in the field of equine dentistry. Special attention is paid to dynamic changes within both individual teeth and dentition.

  7. The Development of Clinical Reasoning Skills: A Major Objective of the Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo E.; Lopez, Santos Guzman

    2008-01-01

    Traditional medical school curricula have made a clear demarcation between the basic biomedical sciences and the clinical years. It is our view that a comprehensive medical education necessarily involves an increased correlation between basic science knowledge and its clinical applications. A basic anatomy course should have two main objectives:…

  8. The Student's Dilemma, Liver Edition: Incorporating the Sonographer's Language into Clinical Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, M. Kennedy; Mirjalili, S. Ali; Moore, Christopher L.; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy students are often confused by multiple names ascribed to the same structure by different clinical disciplines. Increasingly, sonography is being incorporated into clinical anatomical education, but ultrasound textbooks often use names unfamiliar to the anatomist. Confusion is worsened when ultrasound names ascribed to the same structure…

  9. Bridging the gap between basic and clinical sciences: A description of a radiological anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anna; Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz J; Lisiecka, Justyna; Pietrzyk, Łukasz; Czekajlo, Michael; Arancibia, Carlos U; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Torres, Kamil

    2016-05-06

    A wide variety of medical imaging techniques pervade modern medicine, and the changing portability and performance of tools like ultrasound imaging have brought these medical imaging techniques into the everyday practice of many specialties outside of radiology. However, proper interpretation of ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images requires the practitioner to not only hone certain technical skills, but to command an excellent knowledge of sectional anatomy and an understanding of the pathophysiology of the examined areas as well. Yet throughout many medical curricula there is often a large gap between traditional anatomy coursework and clinical training in imaging techniques. The authors present a radiological anatomy course developed to teach sectional anatomy with particular emphasis on ultrasonography and computed tomography, while incorporating elements of medical simulation. To assess students' overall opinions about the course and to examine its impact on their self-perceived improvement in their knowledge of radiological anatomy, anonymous evaluation questionnaires were provided to the students. The questionnaires were prepared using standard survey methods. A five-point Likert scale was applied to evaluate agreement with statements regarding the learning experience. The majority of students considered the course very useful and beneficial in terms of improving three-dimensional and cross-sectional knowledge of anatomy, as well as for developing practical skills in ultrasonography and computed tomography. The authors found that a small-group, hands-on teaching model in radiological anatomy was perceived as useful both by the students and the clinical teachers involved in their clinical education. In addition, the model was introduced using relatively few resources and only two faculty members. Anat Sci Educ 9: 295-303. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Design and development of a new facility for teaching and research in clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Greene, John Richard T

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility in the United Kingdom. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support other activities central to the university mission-namely research and community interaction. The new facilities comprise an engaging learning environment and were designed to support a range of pedagogies appropriate to the needs of healthcare professionals at different stages of their careers. Specific innovations include integrated workstations each comprising of a dissection table, with removable top sections, an overhead operating light, and ceiling-mounted camera. The tables incorporate waterproof touch-screen monitors to display images from the camera, an endoscope or a database of images, videos, and tutorials. The screens work independently so that instructors can run different teaching sessions simultaneously and students can progress at different speeds to suit themselves. Further, database access is provided from within an integrated anatomy and pathology museum and display units dedicated to the correlation of cross-sectional anatomy with medical imaging. A new functional neuroanatomy modeling system, called the BrainTower, has been developed to aid integration of anatomy with physiology and clinical neurology. Many aspects of the new facility are reproduced within a Mobile Teaching Unit, which can be driven to hospitals, colleges, and schools to provide appropriate work-based education and community interaction.

  11. [Clinical, psychological and neurophysiological results of double-blind study on vincamine-cromesilate in patients with cerebro-vascular insufficiency (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mikus, P

    1978-01-01

    In a long-term double-blind cross-over design 26 patients with amnestic syndrome due to cerebro-vascular insufficiency were submitted to vincamine-cromesilate (Vincaryl) and placebo treatment. The efficiency of vincamine was proved by mildly ameliorated psychometric patterns, biochemically by decreased cholesterol level and ophthalmodynamographically by slight increase of pulsation capacity. By means of EMG, ECG and EEG clinic side effects were excluded.

  12. Clinical implications of rhinoceros reproductive tract anatomy and histology.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, N E; Foley, G L; Gill, S; Pope, C E

    2001-03-01

    Reproductive tracts or tissues from five male black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis), two male white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum), two male one-horned Asian rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis), seven female black rhinoceroses, and six female white rhinoceroses from multiple institutions were examined to characterize their anatomy and histology. Some observations and measurements were obtained from in situ tracts of intact animals before or during necropsy. Formalin-fixed tissues were dissected and examined histologically. Retrospective reproductive data from each rhinoceros was obtained from the institutions of origin. Reproductive histology of these species was similar to that of other mammals. Male accessory gland structure varied among species, and the Asian rhinoceros epididymis was more loosely attached and had larger duct diameters than did the epididymides of the African species. Although histology was typically mammalian, rhinoceros reproductive morphology combined characteristics of several different mammals. Defining this unique morphology of rhinoceroses may help in understanding their reproductive physiology and will effect the development of appropriate reproductive techniques.

  13. An interactive method for teaching anatomy of the human eye for medical students in ophthalmology clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Kivell, Tracy L; Doyle, Sara K; Madden, Richard H; Mitchell, Terry L; Sims, Ershela L

    2009-01-01

    Much research has shown the benefits of additional anatomical learning and dissection beyond the first year of medical school human gross anatomy, all the way through postgraduate medical training. We have developed an interactive method for teaching eye and orbit anatomy to medical students in their ophthalmology rotation at Duke University School of Medicine. We provide review lectures on the detailed anatomy of the adult human eye and orbit as well as the developmental anatomy of the eye. These lectures are followed by a demonstration of the anatomy of the orbit using conventional frontal and superior exposures on a prosected human cadaver. The anatomy is projected onto a large LCD screen using a mounted overhead camera. Following a brief lecture on clinically relevant anatomy, each student then dissects a fresh porcine (pig) eye under low magnification using a dissecting microscope. These dissections serve to identify structures extrinsic to the eyeball, including extraocular muscle attachments, small vessels, optic nerve stalk, and fascial sheath of the eyeball (Tenon's fascia). Dissection then shifts to the internal anatomy of the eyeball. The size and anatomy of the porcine eye is comparable with that of the human and the dissection provides students with a valuable hands-on learning opportunity that is otherwise not available in embalmed human cadavers. Students and clinical faculty feedback reveal high levels of satisfaction with the presentation of anatomy and its scheduling early during the ophthalmology clerkship.

  14. Integration of Medical Imaging Including Ultrasound into a New Clinical Anatomy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscova, Michelle; Bryce, Deborah A.; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Young, Noel

    2015-01-01

    In 2008 a new clinical anatomy curriculum with integrated medical imaging component was introduced into the University of Sydney Medical Program. Medical imaging used for teaching the new curriculum included normal radiography, MRI, CT scans, and ultrasound imaging. These techniques were incorporated into teaching over the first two years of the…

  15. VARK Learning Preferences and Mobile Anatomy Software Application Use in Pre-Clinical Chiropractic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Amanda J.; Stomski, Norman J.; Innes, Stanley I.; Armson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists…

  16. Evidence-Based Decision about Test Scoring Rules in Clinical Anatomy Multiple-Choice Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severo, Milton; Gaio, A. Rita; Povo, Ana; Silva-Pereira, Fernanda; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-01-01

    In theory the formula scoring methods increase the reliability of multiple-choice tests in comparison with number-right scoring. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the formula scoring method in clinical anatomy multiple-choice examinations, and to compare it with that from the number-right scoring method, hoping to achieve an…

  17. Interactive Anatomical and Surgical Live Stream Lectures Improve Students' Academic Performance in Applied Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiozawa, Thomas; Butz, Benjamin; Herlan, Stephan; Kramer, Andreas; Hirt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Tuebingen's "Sectio Chirurgica" (TSC) is an innovative, interactive, multimedia, and transdisciplinary teaching method designed to complement dissection courses. The Tuebingen's "Sectio Chirurgica" (TSC) allows clinical anatomy to be taught via interactive live stream surgeries moderated by an anatomist. This method aims to…

  18. VARK learning preferences and mobile anatomy software application use in pre-clinical chiropractic students.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Amanda J; Stomski, Norman J; Innes, Stanley I; Armson, Anthony J

    2016-05-06

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists between preferred learning styles as determined by the validated VARK(©) questionnaire and use of mobile anatomy apps. The majority of the students who completed the VARK questionnaire were multimodal learners with kinesthetic and visual preferences. Sixty-seven percent (73/109) of students owned one or more mobile anatomy apps which were used by 57 students. Most of these students owned one to five apps and spent less than 30 minutes per week using them. Six of the top eight mobile anatomy apps owned and recommended by the students were developed by 3D4Medical. Visual learning preferences were not associated with time spent using mobile anatomy apps (OR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.12-1.40). Similarly, kinesthetic learning preferences (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 0.18-20.2), quadmodal preferences (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.06-9.25), or gender (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.48-4.81) did not affect the time students' spent using mobile anatomy apps. Learning preferences do not appear to influence students' time spent using mobile anatomy apps. Anat Sci Educ 9: 247-254. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. The mandible and its foramen: anatomy, anthropology, embryology and resulting clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lipski, M; Tomaszewska, I M; Lipska, W; Lis, G J; Tomaszewski, K A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to summarise the knowledge about the anatomy, embryology and anthropology of the mandible and the mandibular foramen and also to highlight the most important clinical implications of the current studies regarding anaesthesia performed in the region of the mandible. An electronic journal search was undertaken to identify all the relevant studies published in English. The search included MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and years from 1950 to 2012. The subject search used a combination of controlled vocabulary and free text based on the search strategy for MEDLINE using key words: 'mandible', 'mandibular', 'foramen', 'anatomy', 'embryology', 'anthropology', and 'mental'. The reference lists of all the relevant studies and existing reviews were screened for additional relevant publications. Basing on relevant manuscripts, this short review about the anatomy, embryology and anthropology of the mandible and the mandibular foramen was written.

  20. What anatomy is clinically useful and when should we be teaching it?

    PubMed

    Leveritt, Simon; McKnight, Gerard; Edwards, Kimberley; Pratten, Margaret; Merrick, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Anatomy teaching, once thought of as being the cornerstone of medical education, has undergone much change in the recent years. There is now growing concern for falling standards in medical graduates' anatomical knowledge, coupled with a reduction in teaching time and appropriately qualified teaching staff. With limited contact hours available to teach this important discipline, it is essential to consider what anatomy is taught within the medical curriculum to ensure it is fit for clinical practice. The views of medical students, junior doctors, and consultants were obtained from the University of Nottingham and the Trent Deanery in Nottingham, United Kingdom, to establish what core anatomical knowledge they feel medical students should study and assimilate during preclinical training. All participants felt strongly that medical students should be adept at interpreting modern diagnostic images before entering their clinical placement or specialty. Respondents proposed more teaching emphasis should be placed on specific anatomical areas (including lymphatic drainage and dermatome innervation) and illustrated other areas where less detailed teaching was appropriate. Recommendations from our study highlight a need for greater clinical emphasis in anatomy teaching during preclinical years. To successfully achieve this, it is essential that clinicians become integrally involved in the design and delivery of future medical undergraduate anatomy courses. Anat Sci Educ 9: 468-475. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. [Variants of the clinical course of cerebrovascular diseases in various biogeochemical regions of the Ukrainian Carpathian Mountains].

    PubMed

    Buletsa, B A; Fatula, M I; Fabri, Z I

    1990-01-01

    A total of 417 patients with cerebral circulatory disorders were examined in two biogeochemical regions of the UkrainianCarpathian Mountains. The first one is a region with iodine insufficiency; the second one is a region where the people use table salt in excess. It has been established that iodine insufficiency and excessive iodine concentration in the body of man are risk factors of the development of cerebrovascular disease. Besides, in persons with abnormal iodine metabolism, cerebrovascular diseases run a graver course than in those with normal content in the body of these trace elements.

  2. Meta-Evaluation in Clinical Anatomy: A Practical Application of Item Response Theory in Multiple Choice Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severo, Milton; Tavares, Maria A. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    The nature of anatomy education has changed substantially in recent decades, though the traditional multiple-choice written examination remains the cornerstone of assessing students' knowledge. This study sought to measure the quality of a clinical anatomy multiple-choice final examination using item response theory (IRT) models. One hundred…

  3. An explorative learning approach to teaching clinical anatomy using student generated content.

    PubMed

    Philip, Christo T; Unruh, Kenneth P; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Translating basic sciences into a clinical framework has been approached through the implementation of various teaching techniques aimed at using a patient case scenario to facilitate learning. These techniques present students with a specific patient case and lead the students to discuss physiological processes through analysis of provided data supported by independent learning and research. However, no literature exists that describes a reverse teaching methodology in which students are given disease diagnosis and then asked to construct a patient case. This article discusses an explorative learning approach introduced in the gross anatomy course in which students were asked to use clinical skills and reasoning to create a patient case. The online knowledge-sharing portal utilizing MediaWiki provided a necessary base for students in completing their task. Teams were given 4 weeks to complete their written online project with weekly feedback provided by 3rd year teaching assistants using the Wiki discussion page. A survey was performed to assess competence regarding a patient write up and oral presentation. Skills that the teams acquired through the completion of this project will benefit future patient interactions. This project also emphasized and reinforced the importance of effective communication, leadership, and teamwork. This study shows that a clinical anatomy project that incorporates explorative learning can be an effective way of introducing students to the skills needed for patient write ups and oral presentations. Furthermore this approach to learning allows students to excel during their clinical years and to correlate anatomy to clinical diagnoses.

  4. [The clinical application of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging to acute cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Chu, B C; Miyasaka, K

    1998-09-01

    cytotoxic edema plays an important role in the acute cerebral stroke. In clinical setting of acute cerebral ischemia, diffusion weighted MRI may detect superacute infarction by showing high signal (slower ADC) over the 6 hours following the insult, whereas conventional MRI generally fails to do so. In chronic liquefied cerebral infarction, increased ADC, or attenuated signal are the most frequent findings, suggestive of an elevated diffusion. Therefore, diffusion weighted MRI improves early diagnosis of stroke and help differentiate acute from chronic stroke. One disadvantage of diffusion weighted MRI is motion artifact, which may be reduced by the introduction of a navigator echo to correct for the phase shift caused by the first imaging echo, or by the utility of ultrafast imaging technique, such as echo planar. Another shortcomings is the susceptibility artifact incorporating the diffusion weighted MRI. The eddy current may also result from the strong gradients, producing shiftlike artifact. Such artifacts can be compensated for by appropriate shaping of the current pulses sent into the gradient coils, or by use of shielded gradients. As with rapid progresses in perfusion imaging of ischemia penumbra, misery perfusion and luxury perfusion, new insight into the diffusion weighted MRI will be significant.

  5. Determination of clinically relevant content for a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for physical medicine and rehabilitation residents.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F; Loh, Eldon Y; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M R; Woods, Nicole N

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi method to identify clinically relevant content to incorporate in a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. A two round modified Delphi involving PM&R experts was used to establish the curricular content. The anatomical structures and clinical conditions presented to the expert group were compiled using multiple sources: clinical musculoskeletal anatomy cases from the PM&R residency program at the University of Toronto; consultation with PM&R experts; and textbooks. In each round, experts rated the importance of each curricular item to PM&R residency education using a five-point Likert scale. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was used to determine consensus at the end of each round and agreement scores were used as an outcome measure to determine the content to include in the curriculum. The overall internal consistency in both rounds was 0.99. A total of 37 physiatrists from across Canada participated and the overall response rate over two rounds was 97%. The initial curricular list consisted of 361 items. After the second iteration, the list was reduced by 44%. By using a national consensus method we were able to objectively determine the relevant anatomical structures and clinical musculoskeletal conditions important in daily PM&R practice.

  6. Clinical evaluation of an anatomy-based patient specific quality assurance system.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Pascal; Verlaan, Sarah; Graydon, Shaun; Ahnen, Linda; Klöck, Stephan; Lang, Stephanie

    2014-03-06

    The Delta(4DVH) Anatomy 3D quality assurance (QA) system (ScandiDos), which converts the measured detector dose into the dose distribution in the patient geometry was evaluated. It allows a direct comparison of the calculated 3D dose with the measured back-projected dose. In total, 16 static and 16 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) fields were planned using four different energies. Isocenter dose was measured with a pinpoint chamber in homogeneous phantoms to investigate the dose prediction by the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy algorithm for static fields. Dose distributions of VMAT fields were measured using GAFCHROMIC film. Gravitational gantry errors up to 10° were introduced into all VMAT plans to study the potential of detecting errors. Additionally, 20 clinical treatment plans were verified. For static fields, the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy predicted the isocenter dose accurately, with a deviation to the measured phantom dose of 1.1% ± 0.6%. For VMAT fields the predicted Delta(4DVH) Anatomy dose in the isocenter plane corresponded to the measured dose in the phantom, with an average gamma agreement index (GAI) (3 mm/3%) of 96.9± 0.4%. The Delta(4DVH) Anatomy detected the induced systematic gantry error of 10° with a relative GAI (3 mm/3%) change of 5.8% ± 1.6%. The conventional Delta(4PT) QA system detected a GAI change of 4.2%± 2.0%. The conventional Delta(4PT) GAI (3 mm/3%) was 99.8% ± 0.4% for the clinical treatment plans. The mean body and PTV-GAI (3 mm/5%) for the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy were 96.4% ± 2.0% and 97.7%± 1.8%; however, this dropped to 90.8%± 3.4% and 87.1% ± 4.1% for passing criteria of 3 mm/3%. The anatomy-based patient specific quality assurance system predicts the dose distribution correctly for a homogeneous case. The limiting factor for the error detection is the large variability in the error-free plans. The dose calculation algorithm is inferior to that used in the TPS (Eclipse).

  7. Brain white matter tracts: functional anatomy and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Amy C; Thomas, Adam G; Dineen, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is increasingly available on clinical magnetic resonance scanners and can be acquired in a relatively short time. There has been an explosion of applications in the research field but the use to the practicing radiologist may seem obscure. This paper aims to highlight how diffusion tensor imaging can be used to prompt a dedicated neuroanatomical search for white matter lesions in clinical presentations relating to motor, sensory, language, and visuospatial deficits. The enhanced depiction of white matter tracts in the temporal stem is also highlighted, which is a region of importance in epilepsy surgery planning.

  8. The lateral upper arm flap: anatomy and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Katsaros, J; Schusterman, M; Beppu, M; Banis, J C; Acland, R D

    1984-06-01

    There is a highly dependable free flap donor site of moderate size on the posterolateral aspect of the distal upper arm. The area is supplied by the posterior radial collateral artery, a direct continuation of the profunda brachii. The flap area is supplied by a direct cutaneous nerve. It can be raised on its own, with underlying tendon, with bone, or with fascia only. This article describes our findings in 32 cadaver dissections and in 23 clinical cases.

  9. Teardrop shadow of the pelvis: anatomy and clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, J.W.; Sena, J.M.; Chang, R.

    1982-06-01

    The teardrop shadow of the pelvis is poorly understood and as a result its clinical significance is not appreciated. The structure responsible for this shadow was pinpointed by removing sections from the hemipelvis of an anatomic specimen with an electric saw. This structure is located in the anteroinferior portion of the acetabular fossa at the acetabular notch and consists of cortical and medullary bone contributed primarily from the ischium with a much smaller contribution from the superior pubic ramus. The normal and abnormal appearances of the teardrop shadow of the acetabulum of three patients were demonstrated on both plain radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans.

  10. Cerebrovascular insult hospital cases in the Clinical Hospital Mostar (Bosnia and Herzegovina) from 1999 to 2003--an example of an institutional register.

    PubMed

    Vasilj, Ivan; Cavaljuga, Semra; Petrović, Pavao; Ostojić, Ljerka; Ostojić, Zdenko; Kvesić, Ante; Martinović, Vlatka

    2006-09-01

    The analysis of a cerebro-vascular insult hospitalized cases in the Clinical Hospital Mostar as a retrospective epidemiological study was done in the Clinical Hospital Mostar for the period from 1999 to 2003. The major source of data was medical documentation of this hospital (an institutional register), the only hospital for the treatments of 457,491 inhabitants who gravitate by a health insurance for the treatment in this hospital. The study included a total of 1,555 cerebro-vascular insult cases treated in the Clinical Hospital Mostar Among them 727 (46.8%) were male patients, while 828 (53.2%) cases were female. The majority of the cases were above 50 years of life. Majority of treated female patients were older than 61 (45.6% of all cases), as well as among male patients (31.3%). The least number of cases was under 41 years in both groups (1.2%). Prevalence of risk factors was 2,035 cases (74%). During the same period risk factors research for entire Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (FBiH) was performed on the sample of 2,750 national insurance holders, out of which 852 gravitate for treatment in CB Mostar. Out of them 1.7% was found to suffer of cerebro vascular insult.

  11. Meningioma involving Meckel's cave: transpetrosal surgical anatomy and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Choo, Daniel I; Steward, David L; Pensak, Myles L

    2002-09-01

    Meningiomas originating in Meckel's cave (MC) are uncommon lesions that represent 1% of all intracranial meningiomas. Innovations in skull base surgery have enabled resection of these lesions with less morbidity, but require an intimate knowledge of both lesional pathology and regional microneuroanatomy. To review the surgical and clinical considerations involved in the management of MC meningiomas, we retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent transpetrosal resection of primary MC meningiomas between 1984 and 1998. Of 146 patients who underwent transpetrosal removal of meningiomas, 7 were believed to have tumors originating in MC. All 7 patients presented with trigeminal dysfunction, facial pain, and/or headache. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 5 of the 7 patients. Facial hypoesthesia or anesthesia, paralysis of cranial nerve VI, and ophthalmoplegia were among the postoperative complications encountered. Meningiomas of MC represent treatable lesions whose diagnosis requires prompt imaging of patients with trigeminal dysfunction and symptoms of facial pain and headache.

  12. Anatomy of the retrohepatic tunnel in a Chinese population and its clinical application in liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wang; Zi-hai, Ding; Jie, Zhou; Shi-zhen, Zhong; Jian-hua, Lin; Yi-xiong, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Liver hanging maneuver (LHM) is an important technique in liver surgery. However, applied anatomy of the retrohepatic tunnel for the surgical approach in Chinese population needs further study. In this study, to explore the basic anatomy of retrohepatic tunnel and its clinical application in a Chinese population, a total of 32 formalin-fixed cadavers were dissected, related parameters were measured, and their clinical applications were discussed. The length of the retrohepatic tunnel was (60.6 ± 9.9) mm. The width of the retrohepatic tunnel superior opening was (13.8 ± 3.9) mm. The width of the retrohepatic tunnel inferior opening was (15.2 ± 7.4) mm. The hepatic short vessels were distributed along the middle and lower 1/3 of hepatic inferior vena cava (HIVC), with a slight predominance on its left wall. A few hepatic short vessels were distributed along the upper 1/3 of the HIVC. We concluded: the anatomy of the retrohepatic tunnel provides a basis for use of LHM in liver surgery; more hepatic short vessels from hepatic caudate lobe can be preserved via right approach. The retrohepatic tunnel can be used as a good surgical approach in liver surgery; its application also has important significance in laparoscopic minimally invasive liver surgery. PMID:28322287

  13. The Dorello canal: historical development, controversies in microsurgical anatomy, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kshettry, Varun R; Lee, Joung H; Ammirati, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Interest in studying the anatomy of the abducent nerve arose from early clinical experience with abducent palsy seen in middle ear infection. Primo Dorello, an Italian anatomist working in Rome in the early 1900s, studied the anatomy of the petroclival region to formulate his own explanation of this pathological entity. His work led to his being credited with the discovery of the canal that bears his name, although this structure had been described 50 years previously by Wenzel Leopold Gruber. Renewed interest in the anatomy of this region arose due to advances in surgical approaches to tumors of the petroclival region and the need to explain the abducent palsies seen in trauma, intracranial hypotension, and aneurysms. The advent of the surgical microscope has allowed more detailed anatomical studies, and numerous articles have been published in the last 2 decades. The current article highlights the historical development of the study of the Dorello canal. A review of the anatomical studies of this structure is provided, followed by a brief overview of clinical considerations.

  14. Facial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery.

  15. From college to clinic: reasoning over memorization is key for understanding anatomy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sue Ann; Perrotti, William; Silverthorn, Dee U; Dalley, Arthur F; Rarey, Kyle E

    2002-04-15

    Anatomy and physiology are taught in community colleges, liberal arts colleges, universities, and medical schools. The goals of the students vary, but educators in these diverse settings agree that success hinges on learning concepts rather than memorizing facts. In this article, educators from across the postsecondary educational spectrum expand on several points: (1) There is a problem with student perception that anatomy is endless memorization, whereas the ability to manage information and use reasoning to solve problems are ways that professionals work. This misperception causes students to approach the subject with the wrong attitude. (2) The process of learning to use information is as important as the concepts themselves. Using understanding to explain and make connections is a more useful long-term lesson than is memorization. Anatomy should be presented and learned as a dynamic basis for problem solving and for application in the practice and delivery of quality health care. (3) Integration of form and function must be explicit and universal across all systems. (4) Using only models, images, audiovisuals, or computers cannot lead students to the requisite reasoning that comes from investigative dissection of real tissue. (5) Some undergraduate courses require students to memorize excessive musculoskeletal detail. (6) Learning tissue biology is a particular struggle for medical students who have no background from an undergraduate course. (7) Medical professors and students see benefits when students have taken undergraduate courses in anatomy, histology, and physiology. If medical schools suggest these electives to applicants, medical students might arrive better prepared and, thus, be able to learn clinical correlations more efficiently in the limited allocated time of medical school curricula.

  16. Differential properties of Van der Pol — Duffing mathematical model of cerebrovascular haemodynamics based on clinical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, D. V.; Ufimtseva, I. V.; Cherevko, A. A.; Khe, A. K.; Orlov, K. Yu; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Chupakhin, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper discusses the method of identification (diseased/healthy) human cerebral vessels by using of mathematical model. Human cerebral circulation as a single tuned circuit, which consists of blood flow, elastic vessels and elastic brain gel tissue is under consideration. Non linear Van der Pol-Duffing equation is assumed as mathematical model of cerebrovascular circulation. Hypothesis of vascular pathology existence in some position of blood vessel, based on mathematical model properties for this position is formulated. Good reliability of hypothesis is proved statistically for 7 patients with arterial aneurysms.

  17. The student's dilemma, liver edition: incorporating the sonographer's language into clinical anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kennedy; Mirjalili, S Ali; Moore, Christopher L; Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy students are often confused by multiple names ascribed to the same structure by different clinical disciplines. Increasingly, sonography is being incorporated into clinical anatomical education, but ultrasound textbooks often use names unfamiliar to the anatomist. Confusion is worsened when ultrasound names ascribed to the same structure actually refer to different structures. Consider the sonographic main lobar fissure (MLF). The sonographic MLF is a hyper-echoic landmark used by sonographers of the right upper quadrant. Found in approximately 70% of people, there is little consensus on what the sonographic MLF is anatomically. This structure appears to be related to the main portal fissure (aka principal plane of the liver or principal hepatic fissure), initially described by anatomists and surgeons as in intrahepatic division along the middle hepatic vein which in essence divides the territories of the left and right hepatic arteries and biliary systems. By exploring the relationship between the main portal fissure and the sonographic MLF in cadaveric livers ex vivo, the data suggest the sonographic MLF is actually an extrahepatic structure that parallels the rim of the main portal fissure. The authors recommend that this structure be renamed the "sonographic cystic pedicle," which includes the cystic duct and ensheathing fat and blood vessels. In the context of the redefined underlying anatomy, the absence of the sonographic cystic pedicle due to anatomic variation may serve an important clinical role in predicting complications from difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomies and is deserving of future study.

  18. Teaching clinically relevant dental anatomy in the dental curriculum: description and assessment of an innovative module.

    PubMed

    Obrez, Ales; Briggs, Charlotte; Buckman, James; Goldstein, Loren; Lamb, Courtney; Knight, William G

    2011-06-01

    The primary objective of the preclinical dental anatomy course in the predoctoral dental curriculum is to introduce students to cognitive and psychomotor skills related to the morphology and spatial and functional relationships of human dentition. Traditionally, didactic content for the subject is found in textbooks and course manuals and summarized by the faculty in lectures to the entire class. Psychomotor skills associated with recognition and reproduction of tooth morphology are traditionally learned by examining preserved tooth specimens and their cross-sections, combined with producing two-dimensional line drawings and carving teeth from wax blocks. These activities have little direct clinical application. In most cases, students are passive in the learning process, and assessment of student performance is unilateral and subjective. A recently revised dental anatomy module at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry integrates independent class preparation with active small-group discussion and patient scenario-based wax-up exercises to replace missing tooth structure on manikin teeth. The goal of the revision is to shift emphasis away from decontextualized technical learning toward more active and clinically applicable learning that improves conceptual understanding while contributing to early acquisition of psychomotor skills. This article describes the rationale, components, and advantages of the revised module and presents a pre-post comparison of student learning outcomes for three class cohorts (N=203).

  19. Recent progress in cerebrovascular gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Shimamura, Munehisa; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2005-07-01

    Gene therapy provides a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease such as peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, restenosis after angioplasty, and vascular bypass graft occlusion. Currently, more than 20 clinical studies of gene therapy for cardiovascular disease are in progress. Although cerebrovascular gene therapy has not proceeded to clinical trials, in contrast to cardiovascular gene therapy, there have been several trials in experimental models. Three major potential targets for cerebrovascular gene therapy are vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and restenosis after angioplasty, for which current therapy is often inadequate. In experimental SAH models, strategies using genes encoding a vasodilating protein or decoy oligodeoxynucleotides have been reported to be effective against vasospasm after SAH. In experimental ischemic cerebrovascular disease, gene therapy using growth factors, such as Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), or Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), has been reported to be effective for neuroprotection and angiogenesis. Nevertheless, cerebrovascular gene therapy for clinical human treatment still has some problems, such as transfection efficiency and the safety of vectors. Development of an effective and safe delivery system for a target gene will make human cerebrovascular gene therapy possible.

  20. Cerebrovascular MRI: a review of state-of-the-art approaches, methods and techniques.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Matthew Ethan; Frayne, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrovascular imaging is of great interest in the understanding of neurological disease. MRI is a non-invasive technology that can visualize and provide information on: (i) the structure of major blood vessels; (ii) the blood flow velocity in these vessels; and (iii) the microcirculation, including the assessment of brain perfusion. Although other medical imaging modalities can also interrogate the cerebrovascular system, MR provides a comprehensive assessment, as it can acquire many different structural and functional image contrasts whilst maintaining a high level of patient comfort and acceptance. The extent of examination is limited only by the practicalities of patient tolerance or clinical scheduling limitations. Currently, MRI methods can provide a range of metrics related to the cerebral vasculature, including: (i) major vessel anatomy via time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced imaging; (ii) blood flow velocity via phase contrast imaging; (iii) major vessel anatomy and tissue perfusion via arterial spin labeling and dynamic bolus passage approaches; and (iv) venography via susceptibility-based imaging. When designing an MRI protocol for patients with suspected cerebral vascular abnormalities, it is appropriate to have a complete understanding of when to use each of the available techniques in the 'MR angiography toolkit'. In this review article, we: (i) overview the relevant anatomy, common pathologies and alternative imaging modalities; (ii) describe the physical principles and implementations of the above listed methods; (iii) provide guidance on the selection of acquisition parameters; and (iv) describe the existing and potential applications of MRI to the cerebral vasculature and diseases. The focus of this review is on obtaining an understanding through the application of advanced MRI methodology of both normal and abnormal blood flow in the cerebrovascular arteries, capillaries and veins.

  1. Clinical functional anatomy of the pterygopalatine ganglion, cephalgia and related dysautonomias: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khonsary, Seyed Ali; Ma, Quanfeng; Villablanca, Pablo; Emerson, Josh; Malkasian, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the anatomy of the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), its location in the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) in the skull, and the relationship it has to the Vidian nerve terminal branches and the fifth cranial nerve. An overview of the neuro-anatomical/clinical correlations, a spectrum of pathologies affecting the seventh cranial nerve and some therapies both medical and surgical are noted. The focus is the pterygopalatine region with discussion of the proximal courses of the seventh and fifth cranial nerves and their pathological processes. The ganglion is used as an example of neuro-anatomical model for explaining cluster headaches (CH). Radiological correlation is included to clarify the location of the PPF and its clinical importance. PMID:24349865

  2. [Draft of guidelines for human body dissection for clinical anatomy education and research and commentary].

    PubMed

    Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Ide, Chizuka; Higuchi, Norio; Aiso, Sadakazu; Sakai, Tatsuo; Matsumura, George; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Eiji; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Maki; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Imanishi, Nobuaki

    2011-06-01

    This article analyses the Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research drawn by the Study Group for Future Training Systems of Surgical Skills and Procedures established by the Fiscal Year 2010 research program of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The purpose of the Draft of Guidelines is: First, to lay out the required basic guidelines for human cadaver usage to allow medical and dental faculty to conduct clinical education and research in accordance with existing regulations. Second, the guidelines are expected to give physicians a regulatory framework to carry out cadaver training in accordance with the current legal framework. This article explains the Draft of Guidelines in detail, outlines the future of cadaver training, and describes issues which must still be solved.

  3. [Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research and commentary].

    PubMed

    Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Ide, Chizuka; Higuchi, Norio; Aiso, Sadakazu; Sakai, Tatsuo; Matsumura, George; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Eiji; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Maki; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Imanishi, Nobuaki

    2011-07-01

    This article analyses the Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research drawn by the Study Group for Future Training Systems of Surgical Skills and Procedures established by the Fiscal Year 2010 research program of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The purpose of the Draft of Guidelines is: First, to lay out the required basic guidelines for human cadaver usage to allow medical and dental faculty to conduct clinical education and research in accordance with existing regulations. Second, the guidelines are expected to give physicians a regulatory framework to carry out cadaver training in accordance with the current legal framework. This article explains the Draft of Guidelines in detail, outlines the future of cadaver training, and describes issues which must still be solved.

  4. Clinical Significance of Cerebrovascular Biomarkers and White Matter Tract Integrity in Alzheimer Disease: Clinical correlations With Neurobehavioral Data in Cross-Sectional and After 18 Months Follow-ups.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Kung; Lu, Yan-Ting; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Nai-Ching; Lui, Chun-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Sz-Fan; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrovascular risk factors and white matter (WM) damage lead to worse cognitive performance in Alzheimer dementia (AD). This study investigated WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging in patients with mild to moderate AD and investigated specific fiber tract involvement with respect to predefined cerebrovascular risk factors and neurobehavioral data prediction cross-sectionally and after 18 months. To identify the primary pathoanatomic relationships of risk biomarkers to fiber tract integrity, we predefined 11 major association tracts and calculated tract specific fractional anisotropy (FA) values. Eighty-five patients with AD underwent neurobehavioral assessments including the minimental state examination (MMSE) and 12-item neuropsychiatric inventory twice with a 1.5-year interval to represent major outcome factors. In the cross-sectional data, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, vitamin B12, and homocysteine levels correlated variably with WM FA values. After entering the biomarkers and WM FA into a regression model to predict neurobehavioral outcomes, only fiber tract FA or homocysteine level predicted the MMSE score, and fiber tract FA or age predicted the neuropsychiatric inventory total scores and subdomains of apathy, disinhibition, and aberrant motor behavior. In the follow-up neurobehavioral data, the mean global FA value predicted the MMSE and aberrant motor behavior subdomain, while age predicted the anxiety and elation subdomains. Cerebrovascular risk biomarkers may modify WM microstructural organization, while the association with fiber integrity showed greater clinical significance to the prediction of neurobehavioral outcomes both cross-sectionally and longitudinally.

  5. Topology and hemodynamics of the cortical cerebrovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Sven; Reichold, Johannes; Schneider, Matthias; Székely, Gábor; Weber, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The cerebrovascular system continuously delivers oxygen and energy substrates to the brain, which is one of the organs with the highest basal energy requirement in mammals. Discontinuities in the delivery lead to fatal consequences for the brain tissue. A detailed understanding of the structure of the cerebrovascular system is important for a multitude of (patho-)physiological cerebral processes and many noninvasive functional imaging methods rely on a signal that originates from the vasculature. Furthermore, neurodegenerative diseases often involve the cerebrovascular system and could contribute to neuronal loss. In this review, we focus on the cortical vascular system. In the first part, we present the current knowledge of the vascular anatomy. This is followed by a theory of topology and its application to vascular biology. We then discuss possible interactions between cerebral blood flow and vascular topology, before summarizing the existing body of the literature on quantitative cerebrovascular topology. PMID:22472613

  6. The Anatomy of Learning Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Scheja, Max; Lonka, Kirsti; Josephson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The experience of clinical teachers as well as research results about senior medical students' understanding of basic science concepts has much been debated. To gain a better understanding about how this knowledge-transformation is managed by medical students, this work aims at investigating their ways of setting about learning anatomy.…

  7. The Integrated Clinical Anatomy Program at Alfaisal University: An Innovative Model of Teaching Clinically Applied Functional Anatomy in a Hybrid Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaqinuddin, Ahmed; Ikram, Muhammad Faisal; Zafar, Muhammad; Eldin, Nivin Sharaf; Mazhar, Muhammad Atif; Qazi, Sadia; Shaikh, Aftab Ahmed; Obeidat, Akef; Al-Kattan, Khaled; Ganguly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of specialty. It is essential for physicians to be able to perform a variety of tasks, including performing invasive procedures, examining radiological images, performing a physical examination of a patient, etc. Medical students have to be prepared for such tasks, and we…

  8. Comparisons between the attitudes of medical and dental students toward the clinical importance of gross anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Olowo-Ofayoku, Anthony; Moxham, Bernard John

    2014-10-01

    Marked changes are occurring within both the medical and dental curricula and new ways of teaching the basic sciences have been devised and traditional methods (e.g., dissection for gross anatomy and of bench-based animal preparations for physiology) are increasingly no longer the norm. Although there is much anecdotal evidence that students are not in favor of such changes, there is little evidence for this based on quantitative analyses of students' attitudes. Using Thurstone and Chave attitude analyses, we assessed the attitudes of first year medical and dental students at Cardiff University toward gross anatomy and physiology in terms of their perceived clinical importance. In addition, we investigated the appropriateness ("fitness for purpose") of teaching methodologies used for anatomy and physiology. The hypotheses tested recognized the possibility that medical and dental students differed in their opinions, but that they had a preference to being taught gross anatomy through the use of dissection and had no preference for physiology teaching. It was found that both medical and dental students displayed positive attitudes toward the clinical relevance of gross anatomy and that they preferred to be taught by means of dissection. Although both medical and dental students displayed positives attitudes toward the clinical relevance of physiology, this was greater for the medical students. Both medical and dental students showed a preference for being taught physiology through didactic teaching in small groups but the medical students also appreciated being taught by means of practicals. Overall, this study highlights the expectations that students have for the basic science foundation teaching within their professional training and signals a preference for being taught experientially/practically. Differences were discerned between medical and dental students that might reflect the direct association between systems physiology and pathophysiology and the

  9. Endoscopic endonasal anatomy of superior orbital fissure and orbital apex regions: critical considerations for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dallan, Iacopo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; de Notaris, Matteo; Sellari-Franceschini, Stefano; Lenzi, Riccardo; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The superior orbital fissure is a critical three-dimensional space connecting the middle cranial fossa and the orbit. From an endoscopic viewpoint, only the medial aspect has a clinical significance. It presents a critical relationship with the lateral sellar compartment, the pterygopalatine fossa and the middle cranial fossa. The connective tissue layers and neural and vascular structures of this region are described. The role of Muller's muscle is confirmed, and the utility of the maxillary and optic strut is outlined. Muller's muscle extends for the whole length of the inferior orbital fissure, passes over the maxillary strut and enters the superior orbital fissure, representing a critical surgical landmark. Dividing the tendon between the medial and inferior rectus muscle allows the identification of the main trunk of the oculomotor nerve, and a little laterally, it is usually possible to visualize the first part of the ophthalmic artery. Based on a better knowledge of anatomy, we trust that this area could be readily addressed in clinical situations requiring an extended approach in proximity of the orbital apex.

  10. Novel femoral artery terminology: integrating anatomy and clinical procedures leading to standardized intuitive nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the terminology of the femoral artery and recommended alternative terminology that satisfies both anatomy and clinical arenas.The femoral artery (FA) is often defined as the continuation of the external iliac artery. Specifically, when the external iliac artery reaches directly beneath the inguinal ligament, it becomes the FA. Currently, Terminologia Anatomica (TA) records the profunda femoris or deep femoral as a terminal branch. Clinicians often use superficial femoral artery (SFA) rather than FA and profunda or deep FA. SFA is actually very deep and well protected for most of its journey. On observation, the terminology in current use is not intuitive. The objective of this study was to investigate the terminology associated with the anatomical and clinical anatomical interpretations of the FA and its terminal branches and to suggest a more appropriate terminology that addresses the points of view of the macro anatomist, as well as that of the clinician. Literature search was conducted regarding the nomenclature of the FA and its terminal branches. Dissection of 89 embalmed cadavers (49F, 40M, ages 47-89) was conducted to analyze the morphology of the FA and its branches. Perusal of the literature revealed a difference in terminology between anatomical and clinical textbooks/atlases/journals regarding the FA and its terminal branch. Our dissections suggested that the FA may be better defined vis-à-vis its relationship to the anterior and posterior compartments of the thigh. A difference in terminology exists between the anatomical and clinical arenas. A need for a standardized terminology is necessary because clinicians and their publishers have not adopted TA. This study suggests that the current FA be considered the common FA and the continuation of the FA, the SFA be renamed the anterior FA and the current profunda (the deep FA) be renamed the posterior FA, respectively. The proposed terminology mirrors the lower

  11. Optimizing cerebrovascular surgical and endovascular procedures in children via personalized 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Peter; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Flynn, Katie; Orbach, Darren B; Smith, Edward

    2015-07-31

    OBJECT Despite the availability of multiplanar imaging, understanding relational 3D anatomy for complex cerebrovascular lesions can be difficult. A 3D printed model allows for instantaneous visualization of lesional anatomy from all perspectives, with the added ability to simulate operative approaches with tactile feedback. The authors report their experience with customized 3D printed models of pediatric cerebrovascular lesions as an educational and clinical tool for patients, trainees, and physicians. METHODS Via an "in-house" 3D print service, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) studies of pediatric patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were processed with specialized software, and regions of interest were selected by the surgical/endovascular team. Multiple models for each patient were then printed on a 3D printer, with each construct designed to illustrate different aspects of the specific lesion. Intraoperative validation of model fidelity was performed using perioperative imaging, surgical filming, and post hoc analysis of models with intraoperative photography. RESULTS Four cases involving pediatric patients (ages 0-16 years) were studied for initial proof of principle. Three of the patients had AVMs and one had a vein of Galen malformation (VOGM). The VOGM was embolized successfully and the AVMs were resected without complication. In the AVM cases, intraprocedural imaging and photography were performed and verified millimeter-level fidelity of the models (n = 5, 98% concordance, range 94%-100% with average of < 2 mm variation in the largest AVM [6-cm diameter]). The use of 3D models was associated with a 30-minute reduction in operative time (12%) in 2 cases when they were compared with matched controls as a feasibility study. CONCLUSIONS Patient-specific 3D printed models of pediatric cerebrovascular conditions can be constructed with high fidelity. This proof-of-principle series demonstrates, for the first time

  12. Cerebrovascular Injury in Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    TITLE: Cerebrovascular injury in blast loading PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kenneth L. Monson, PhD...SUBTITLE Cerebrovascular injury in blast loading 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0295 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...and pH control. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Blast brain injury; cerebrovascular injury and dysfunction; shock tube 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  13. Larynx Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Larynx Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1350x1200 View Download Large: 2700x2400 View Download Title: Larynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the larynx; drawing shows ...

  14. Vulva Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Vulva Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x634 ... View Download Large: 3000x2640 View Download Title: Vulva Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the vulva; drawing shows the ...

  15. Hand Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons Anatomy The upper extremity is a term used to ... of the parts together. Learn more about the anatomy of the upper extremity using the links in ...

  16. Pharynx Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pharynx Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pharynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pharynx; drawing shows the ...

  17. Patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Seth L; Plackis, Andreas C; Nuelle, Clayton W

    2014-07-01

    Patellofemoral disorders are common. There is a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from patellofemoral pain and instability to focal cartilage disease and arthritis. Regardless of the specific condition, abnormal anatomy and biomechanics are often the root cause of patellofemoral dysfunction. A thorough understanding of normal patellofemoral anatomy and biomechanics is critical for the treating physician. Recognizing and addressing abnormal anatomy will optimize patellofemoral biomechanics and may ultimately translate into clinical success.

  18. Clinical anatomy and imaging of the cranial nerves and skull base.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ruchira M; Klein, Joshua P

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of patients with cranial neuropathies requires an understanding of brainstem anatomy and nerve pathways. Advances in neuroimaging, particularly high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have enabled visualization of these tiny structures and their related pathology. This review provides an approach toward using imaging in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) and skull base anatomy and pathology. Because brainstem nuclei are inextricably linked to the information contained within CNs, they are briefly mentioned whenever relevant; however, a comprehensive discussion of brainstem syndromes is beyond the scope of this review.

  19. What Anatomy Is Clinically Useful and When Should We Be Teaching It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leveritt, Simon; McKnight, Gerard; Edwards, Kimberley; Pratten, Margaret; Merrick, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy teaching, once thought of as being the cornerstone of medical education, has undergone much change in the recent years. There is now growing concern for falling standards in medical graduates' anatomical knowledge, coupled with a reduction in teaching time and appropriately qualified teaching staff. With limited contact hours available to…

  20. Inferior Phrenic Arteries and Their Branches, Their Anatomy and Possible Clinical Importance: An Experimental Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Gürses, İlke Ali; Gayretli, Özcan; Kale, Ayşin; Öztürk, Adnan; Usta, Ahmet; Şahinoğlu, Kayıhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is a common treatment for patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. If the carcinoma is advanced or the main arterial supply, the hepatic artery, is occluded, extrahepatic collateral arteries may develop. Both, right and left inferior phrenic arteries (RIPA and LIPA) are the most frequent and important among these collaterals. However, the topographic anatomy of these arteries has not been described in detail in anatomy textbooks, atlases and most previous reports. Aims: To investigate the anatomy and branching patterns of RIPA and LIPA on cadavers and compare our results with the literature. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: We bilaterally dissected 24 male and 2 female cadavers aged between 49 and 88 years for this study. Results: The RIPA and LIPA originated as a common trunk in 5 cadavers. The RIPA originated from the abdominal aorta in 13 sides, the renal artery in 2 sides, the coeliac trunk in 1 side and the left gastric artery in 1 side. The LIPA originated from the abdominal aorta in 9 sides and the coeliac trunk in 6 sides. In 6 cadavers, the ascending and posterior branches of the LIPA had different sources of origin. Conclusion: As both the RIPA and LIPA represent the half of all extrahepatic arterial collaterals to hepatocellular carcinomas, their anatomy gains importance not only for anatomists but interventional radiologists as well. PMID:26167344

  1. Pedagogical Tools to Address Clinical Anatomy and Athletic Training Student Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie; Yeargin, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Context: A thorough knowledge of anatomy is needed in four of the six domains of athletic training: prevention, injury/condition recognition, immediate care, and treatment/rehabilitation. Students with a solid foundation can achieve competency in these specific domains. Objective: To provide educators with pedagogical tools to promote a deeper…

  2. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation.

  3. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation. PMID:26825517

  4. The sacroiliac joint: an overview of its anatomy, function and potential clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Masi, A T; Carreiro, J E; Danneels, L; Willard, F H

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the (functional) anatomy and biomechanics of the pelvic girdle and specifically the sacroiliac joints (SIJs). The SIJs are essential for effective load transfer between the spine and legs. The sacrum, pelvis and spine, and the connections to the arms, legs and head, are functionally interrelated through muscular, fascial and ligamentous interconnections. A historical overview is presented on pelvic and especially SIJ research, followed by a general functional anatomical overview of the pelvis. In specific sections, the development and maturation of the SIJ is discussed, and a description of the bony anatomy and sexual morphism of the pelvis and SIJ is debated. The literature on the SIJ ligaments and innervation is discussed, followed by a section on the pathology of the SIJ. Pelvic movement studies are investigated and biomechanical models for SIJ stability analyzed, including examples of insufficient versus excessive sacroiliac force closure. PMID:22994881

  5. The sacroiliac joint: an overview of its anatomy, function and potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Masi, A T; Carreiro, J E; Danneels, L; Willard, F H

    2012-12-01

    This article focuses on the (functional) anatomy and biomechanics of the pelvic girdle and specifically the sacroiliac joints (SIJs). The SIJs are essential for effective load transfer between the spine and legs. The sacrum, pelvis and spine, and the connections to the arms, legs and head, are functionally interrelated through muscular, fascial and ligamentous interconnections. A historical overview is presented on pelvic and especially SIJ research, followed by a general functional anatomical overview of the pelvis. In specific sections, the development and maturation of the SIJ is discussed, and a description of the bony anatomy and sexual morphism of the pelvis and SIJ is debated. The literature on the SIJ ligaments and innervation is discussed, followed by a section on the pathology of the SIJ. Pelvic movement studies are investigated and biomechanical models for SIJ stability analyzed, including examples of insufficient versus excessive sacroiliac force closure.

  6. The anatomy of the sacrococcygeal cornual region and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Woon, Jason T K; Stringer, Mark D

    2014-09-01

    There has been no systematic study of the anatomy of the region between the sacral and coccygeal cornua. Reference texts describe an intercornual ligament connecting these structures. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomy of this region, which may be relevant to unexplained cases of coccygeal pain (coccydynia) and local nerve blocks. The bony anatomy of the sacrococcygeal (SC) cornual region was analyzed in 33 CT scans obtained from supine adults of mostly European origin with no known SC pathology, 7 μCT scans of cadaver SC specimens, and 105 Asian Indian adult skeletons. A further five cadaver SC specimens were examined histologically. SC cornual fusion was seen in 45% of CT/μCT scans (mean age 67 years, 20 males) and in 20% of adult skeletons (78 males); there was no association with age or sex. In the absence of SC fusion, the mean intersacrococcygeal cornual gap was 7.1 ± 2.4 mm; this was bridged by an intercornual ligament composed of parallel vertical collagen fibers reinforced by elastin fibers on its anterior surface. Small nerve branches were observed adjacent to the ventral aspect of the intercornual ligament and, in one case, traversing the ligament. Ipsilateral sacral and coccygeal cornua are therefore normally bridged by an intercornual ligament that is probably innervated. The cornua are fused on one or both sides in 20-45% of adults. These findings may have implications for some cases of coccydynia and for anesthetists performing local nerve blocks.

  7. Educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop on 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M A; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Harfush, L A; Navarro-Zarza, J E; Canoso, J J; Cruz-Domínguez, P; Vargas, A; Hernández-Díaz, C; Chiapas-Gasca, K; Camacho-Galindo, J; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Kalish, R A

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop in 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. First-year rheumatology fellows (N = 17) and a convenience sample of 1st-year orthopedic fellows (N = 14) from Mexico City in the 9th month of training participated in the study. The pre- and the post- workshop tests included the same 20 questions that had to be answered by identification or demonstration of relevant anatomical items. The questions, arranged by anatomical regions, were asked in five dynamic stations. Overall, the 31 participants showed an increase of correct answers, from a median of 6 (range 1 to 12) in the pre-workshop test, to a median of 14 (range 7 to 19) in the post-workshop test. In the pre-workshop test, the correct median answers were 7 (range 2 to 12) in the orthopedic fellows and 5 (range 1 to 10) in the rheumatology fellows (p = 0.297). Corresponding scores in the post-workshop were 15 (range 10 to 19) and 12 (range 7 to 18) (p = 0.026) showing a significant difference favoring the orthopedic group. Our clinical anatomy workshop was efficacious, in the short term, as a teaching instrument for 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. The post-workshop scores, although significantly improved in both groups, particularly in the orthopedic fellows, were still suboptimal. Further refinements of our workshop might yield better results.

  8. Eye Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  9. Tooth anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Lingen MW. Head and neck. In: Kumar ...

  10. Anatomy and physiology of the liver in relation to clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Pierce, L

    1977-06-01

    As nurses assume expanded roles in patient care, skills in history-taking and in performing a physical examination are expected. Of the various diagnostic procedures the history and physical examination are the most direct and expeditious methods of obtaining facts about patients' problems. As represented in this article, detailed knowledge of the liver's anatomy and physiology as well as that of other body systems is prerequisite to these skills. To understand and document the complexity of life disturbances occuring in patients with hepatic problems, integration of social-behavioral and mental health concepts is needed.

  11. Anatomy atlases.

    PubMed

    Rosse, C

    1999-01-01

    Anatomy atlases are unlike other knowledge sources in the health sciences in that they communicate knowledge through annotated images without the support of narrative text. An analysis of the knowledge component represented by images and the history of anatomy atlases suggest some distinctions that should be made between atlas and textbook illustrations. Textbook and atlas should synergistically promote the generation of a mental model of anatomy. The objective of such a model is to support anatomical reasoning and thereby replace memorization of anatomical facts. Criteria are suggested for selecting anatomy texts and atlases that complement one another, and the advantages and disadvantages of hard copy and computer-based anatomy atlases are considered.

  12. The clinical anatomy of the insertion of the rotator cuff tendons.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, M; Keough, N; De Beer, M A

    2017-02-16

    The rotator cuff (RC) insertions according to most anatomical texts are described as being separate from one another. However, clear fusion of the RC tendon fibres exists with prior studies showing this interdigitation forming a common, continuous insertion onto and around the lesser and greater tubercles (LT and GT) of the humerus. Current surgical repair methods (especially arthroscopic techniques) rarely mention or consider these connections during repair and suture anchor implantation. The general principles of RC surgery remain a controversial subject, due to various available techniques, surgeon experience and preference, and the contradicting success rates. This results from old-fashioned knowledge of the anatomy of the RC complex and its functional aspects. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to visualise and define the RC footprint and extension insertions with the aim of enhancing and improving knowledge of the basic anatomy in the hopes that this will be considered during orthopaedic repair. Twenty shoulders (16 cadaveric and 4 fresh) were used in the study. The fresh shoulders were received from the National Tissue Bank, and ethical clearance was obtained (239/2015). Reverse dissection was performed to better visualise the RC unit exposing the interdigitated rotator hood (extension insertions), as well as the complete RC unit (tendons + internal capsule) separated from the scapula and humerus. Once the insertions were exposed and documented, the RC muscle footprint (articular surface area) was measured and recorded, using AutoCAD 2016. No statistical significant difference between left and right (p = 0.424) was noted, but a significant difference between males and females (p = 0.000) was. Collectively, these findings indicate and strengthen evidence towards the notion that the RC muscles/tendons and the internal capsule are one complete and inseparable unit/complex. The fact that the RC unit is more complex in its structure and attachment

  13. [Cerebro-vascular accident during pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Yamasaki, S; Tamaki, N; Fujita, S; Shirakata, S; Matsumoto, S

    1978-10-01

    Cerebro-vascular accident is an uncommon but formidable complication of pregnancy. Faced with these cases, the neurosurgeon and obstetrician might differ in the planning of the treatment, when the interests of mother and child appear to conflict between them. From our clinical data of 5 cases and review of the literatures, the following points should be considered for the management of a cerebro-vascular accident during pregnancy. (1) The possibility of cerebro-vascular accident should be considered in any pregnant patients with neurological symptoms, and full investigation should be done if clini-indicated. (2) Aneurysm and angioma are most often encountered in pregnant patients with a cerebro-vascular accident. (3) Unless labour begins during investigation, a cerebral lesion should be treated before delivery, irrespective of the stage of pregnancy and the method of treatment should be decided primarily on neurosurgical grounds. (4) The time of onset of cerebro-vascular accident may be related to the hemodynamic and hormonal change. It occurs more frequently after the second trimester, when the blood volume and cardiac output reach their peak. (5) Pregnancy per se does not influence the mortality from a cerebro-vascular accident in pregnant patients.

  14. Anatomy of female puberty: The clinical relevance of developmental changes in the reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Caroline Wingo; Abdullatif, Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is the period of biologic transition from childhood to adulthood. The changes that occur at this time are related to the increasing concentrations of sex steroid hormones. In females, most pubertal changes are caused by estrogen stimulation that results from the onset of central puberty. Significant development occurs in the organs of the female reproductive system and results in anatomic changes that characterize reproductive maturity. Adrenal and ovarian androgens also increase during puberty, affecting change that includes the promotion of certain secondary sex characteristics. The ability to recognize normal pubertal anatomy and distinguish between estrogen and androgen effects is important in the ability to diagnose and treat disorders of sex development, precocious puberty, pubertal delay, and menstrual irregularities in children and adolescents. An understanding of this developmental process can also help clinicians identify and treat reproductive pathology in adults and across all female life stages.

  15. Male Aesthetics: A Review of Facial Anatomy and Pertinent Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Farhadian, Joshua A; Bloom, Bradley S; Brauer, Jeremy A

    2015-09-01

    Aesthetics continues to be a rapidly growing field within dermatology. In 2014, Americans spent 5 billion dollars on an estimated 9 million minimally invasive cosmetic procedures. Between 1997 and 2014, the number of aesthetic procedures performed on men increased by 273%. The approach to male aesthetics differs from that of females. Men have a squarer face, a more angled and larger jaw, and equally balanced upper and lower facial proportions. Facial muscle mass, subcutaneous tissue, and blood vessel density are also increased in men relative to women. While many of the same cosmetic procedures are performed in males and females, the approach, assessment, and treatment parameters are often different. Improper technique in a male patient can result in feminizing facial features and patient dissatisfaction. With an increasing number of men seeking aesthetic procedures, it behooves dermatologists to familiarize themselves with male facial anatomy and the practice of cosmetic dermatology in this population.

  16. Psoas Major: a case report and review of its anatomy, biomechanics, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sajko, Sandy; Stuber, Kent

    2009-01-01

    A 25-year-old male professional hockey player with right sided hip pain was diagnosed with myofascopathy of the right psoas major and rectus femoris. The patient maintained a conservative treatment regimen and was prescribed a four week active strengthening program. The program progressed from resisted concentric exercise to eccentric abduction/adduction exercises along with balance training, core stabilizing and endurance exercises in the first two weeks. In the final two weeks the program progressed to include sport specific exercises. At three weeks the patient was able to participate in non-contact practice and was clear for full contact at five weeks. The anatomy, biomechanics, and function of the psoas major muscle are discussed as is its influence on lumbar spine stability. Evidence-based evaluation and management strategies for psoas dysfunction are presented. PMID:20037696

  17. Computed and conventional arthrotomography of the glenohumeral joint: normal anatomy and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, A.L.; Resnick, D.; Mink, J.H.; Berman, J.L.; Cone, R.O. III; Resnik, C.S.; Danzig, L.; Guerra, J. Jr.

    1984-12-01

    The glenohumeral joint was studied in 25 cadavers and 136 patients using computed arthrotomography (CAT) and conventional arthrotomography (AT) to assess shoulder instability. Cadaver shoulders were injected with air or latex, sectioned with a band saw, and normal articular anatomy outlined. CAT was performed in 81 patients and characterized the glenoid labrum as normal, abnormal, or detached. Hill-Sachs defects were seen in 20 out of 29 patients with anterior labral abnormalities, while bicipital tendon abnormalities were evident on CAT in 6. Of 55 patients who had AT, the status of the labrum was clarified in 13 of the 16 patients who had surgery or arthroscopy. Both methods can characterize the labrum; however, CAT is more comprehensive and appears ideal for both detection of Hill-Sachs defects and imaging the bicipital tendon. CAT requires less technical expertise and radiation than AT and is tolerated better by patients in pain.

  18. Decision Making for Borderline Cases in Pass/Fail Clinical Anatomy Courses: The Practical Value of the Standard Error of Measurement and Likelihood Ratio in a Diagnostic Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severo, Milton; Silva-Pereira, Fernanda; Ferreira, Maria Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the standard error of measurement (SEM) can be used as an additional “safety net” to reduce the frequency of false-positive or false-negative student grading classifications. Practical examinations in clinical anatomy are often used as diagnostic tests to admit students to course final examinations. The aim of this…

  19. Non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves traversing the head can be used to detect cerebrovascular autoregulation responses

    PubMed Central

    Oziel, M.; Hjouj, M.; Gonzalez, C. A.; Lavee, J.; Rubinsky, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring changes in non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves as they traverse the brain can detect the effects of stimuli employed in cerebrovascular autoregulation (CVA) tests on the brain, without contact and in real time. CVA is a physiological phenomenon of importance to health, used for diagnosis of a number of diseases of the brain with a vascular component. The technology described here is being developed for use in diagnosis of injuries and diseases of the brain in rural and economically underdeveloped parts of the world. A group of nine subjects participated in this pilot clinical evaluation of the technology. Substantial research remains to be done on correlating the measurements with physiology and anatomy. PMID:26898944

  20. Non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves traversing the head can be used to detect cerebrovascular autoregulation responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, M.; Hjouj, M.; Gonzalez, C. A.; Lavee, J.; Rubinsky, B.

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring changes in non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves as they traverse the brain can detect the effects of stimuli employed in cerebrovascular autoregulation (CVA) tests on the brain, without contact and in real time. CVA is a physiological phenomenon of importance to health, used for diagnosis of a number of diseases of the brain with a vascular component. The technology described here is being developed for use in diagnosis of injuries and diseases of the brain in rural and economically underdeveloped parts of the world. A group of nine subjects participated in this pilot clinical evaluation of the technology. Substantial research remains to be done on correlating the measurements with physiology and anatomy.

  1. Integer anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Doolittle, R.

    1994-11-15

    The title integer anatomy is intended to convey the idea of a systematic method for displaying the prime decomposition of the integers. Just as the biological study of anatomy does not teach us all things about behavior of species neither would we expect to learn everything about the number theory from a study of its anatomy. But, some number-theoretic theorems are illustrated by inspection of integer anatomy, which tend to validate the underlying structure and the form as developed and displayed in this treatise. The first statement to be made in this development is: the way structure of the natural numbers is displayed depends upon the allowed operations.

  2. Fascial bundles of the infraspinatus fascia: anatomy, function, and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Moccia, David; Nackashi, Andrew A; Schilling, Rebecca; Ward, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The infraspinatus fascia is a tough sheet of connective tissue that covers the infraspinatus fossa of the scapula and the muscle within. Muscle fibers originate from the fossa and fascia and then travel laterally to insert on the greater tubercle of the humerus. Frequently the infraspinatus fascia is quickly removed to appreciate the underlying muscle, but the fascia is an interesting and complex structure in its own right. Despite having a characteristic set of fascial bundles, no contemporary anatomy texts or atlases describe the fascia in detail. The infraspinatus fascia was dissected in detail in 11 shoulders, to characterize the fascial bundles and connections that contribute to it. Thereafter, 70 shoulders were dissected to tabulate the variability of the fascial bundles and connections. Six characteristic features of the infraspinatus fascia were noted: a medial band, an inferior-lateral band, and superior-lateral band of fascia, insertion of the posterior deltoid into the infraspinatus fascia, a transverse connection from the posterior deltoid muscle to the infraspinatus fascia, and a retinacular sheet deep to the deltoid and superficial to the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles. Although other structures of the shoulder are more frequently injured, the infraspinatus fascia is involved in compartment syndromes and the fascial bundles of this structure are certain to impact the biomechanical function of the muscles of the posterior shoulder.

  3. Aquaporin-4 and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Heling; Huang, Chuyi; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jing; Gao, Zidan; Yang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are conditions caused by problems with brain vasculature, which have a high morbidity and mortality. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the brain and crucial for the formation and resolution of brain edema. Considering brain edema is an important pathophysiological change after stoke, AQP4 is destined to have close relation with cerebrovascular diseases. However, this relation is not limited to brain edema due to other biological effects elicited by AQP4. Till now, multiple studies have investigated roles of AQP4 in cerebrovascular diseases. This review focuses on expression of AQP4 and the effects of AQP4 on brain edema and neural cells injuries in cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current review, we pay more attention to the studies of recent years directly from cerebrovascular diseases animal models or patients, especially those using AQP4 gene knockout mice. This review also elucidates the potential of AQP4as an excellent therapeutic target. PMID:27529222

  4. Massive presacral bleeding during rectal surgery: From anatomy to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Meng, Rong-Gui; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate control of two different types of massive presacral bleeding according to the anatomy of the presacral venous system. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed in 1628 patients with middle or low rectal carcinoma who were treated surgically in the Department of Colorectal Surgery, Changhai Hospital, Shanghai, China from January 2008 to December 2012. In four of these patients, the presacral venous plexus (n = 2) or basivertebral veins (n = 2) were injured with massive presacral bleeding during mobilization of the rectum. The first two patients with low rectal carcinoma were operated upon by a junior associate professor and the source of bleeding was the presacral venous plexus. The other two patients with recurrent rectal carcinoma were both women and the source of bleeding was the basivertebral veins. RESULTS: Two different techniques were used to control the bleeding. In the first two patients with massive bleeding from the presacral venous plexus, we used suture ligation around the venous plexus in the area with intact presacral fascia that communicated with the site of bleeding (surrounding suture ligation). In the second two patients with massive bleeding from the basivertebral veins, the pelvis was packed with gauze, which resulted in recurrent bleeding as soon as it was removed. Following this, we used electrocautery applied through one epiploic appendix pressed with a long Kelly clamp over the bleeding sacral neural foramen where was felt like a pit Electrocautery adjusted to the highest setting was then applied to the clamp to “weld” closed the bleeding point. Postoperatively, the blood loss was minimal and the drain tube was removed on days 4-7. CONCLUSION: Surrounding suture ligation and epiploic appendices welding are effective techniques for controlling massive presacral bleeding from presacral venous plexus and sacral neural foramen, respectively. PMID:23840150

  5. An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivell, Tracy L.; Doyle, Sara K.; Madden, Richard H.; Mitchell, Terry L.; Sims, Ershela L.

    2009-01-01

    Much research has shown the benefits of additional anatomical learning and dissection beyond the first year of medical school human gross anatomy, all the way through postgraduate medical training. We have developed an interactive method for teaching eye and orbit anatomy to medical students in their ophthalmology rotation at Duke University…

  6. The anatomy of the pubic region revisited: implications for the pathogenesis and clinical management of chronic groin pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Brett A; Barker, Priscilla J; Fahrer, Marius; Schache, Anthony G

    2009-01-01

    Chronic groin pain is a common complaint for athletes participating in sports that involve repetitive sprinting, kicking or twisting movements, such as Australian Rules football, soccer and ice hockey. It is frequently a multifactorial condition that presents a considerable challenge for the treating sports medicine practitioner. To better understand the pathogenesis of chronic groin pain in athletes, a precise anatomical knowledge of the pubic symphysis and surrounding soft tissues is required. Several alternative descriptions of pubic region structures have been proposed. Traditionally, chronic groin pain in athletes has been described in terms of discrete pathology requiring specific intervention. While this clinical reasoning may apply in some cases, a review of anatomical findings indicates the possibility of multiple pathologies coexisting in athletes with chronic groin pain. An appreciation of these alternative descriptions may assist sports medicine practitioners with diagnostic and clinical decision-making processes. The purpose of this literature review is to reappraise the anatomy of the pubic region, considering findings from cadaveric dissection and histology studies, as well as those from diagnostic imaging studies in athletes.

  7. Effect of age and vascular anatomy on blood flow in major cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Du, Xinjian; Pandey, Dilip K; Thulborn, Keith R; Charbel, Fady T

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of volume flow rates in major cerebral vessels can be used to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of cerebrovascular disease. However, both age and vascular anatomy can affect flow rates independent of disease. We prospectively evaluated 325 healthy adult volunteers using phase contrast quantitative magnetic resonance angiography to characterize these effects on cerebral vessel flow rates and establish clinically useful normative reference values. Flows were measured in the major intracranial and extracranial vessels. The cohort ranged from 18 to 84 years old, with 157 (48%) females. All individual vessel flows and total cerebral blood flow (TCBF) declined with age, at 2.6 mL/minute per year for TCBF. Basilar artery (BA) flow was significantly decreased in individuals with one or both fetal posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs). Internal carotid artery flows were significantly higher with a fetal PCA and decreased with a hypoplastic anterior cerebral artery. Indexing vessel flows to TCBF neutralized the age effect, but anatomic variations continued to impact indexed flow in the BA and internal carotid artery. Variability in normative flow ranges were reduced in distal vessels and by examining regional flows. Cerebral vessel flows are affected by age and cerebrovascular anatomy, which has important implications for interpretation of flows in the disease state.

  8. Definition and therapy of chronic cerebro-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Agnoli, A; Denaro, A; Ruggieri, S

    1982-05-01

    Chronic cerebro-vascular disorders could be considered in a broad sense as a large body of knowledge in which three main categories of clinical disturbances have to be be considered: 1) Pathological aging that manifest itself with light short term memory impairment associated with a mild parkinsonian symptomatology or pseudobulbar signs. 2) Senile dementia Alzheimer type and multi infarct dementia. 3) Chronic cerebro-vascular disorders as defined by the Ad Hoc Committee (Paris, 1980). At present the therapy of chronic cerebro-vascular disorders is based on two main groups of drugs and can be divided into: 1) A treatment of prevention or secondary prevention which tends to correct or modify the different risk factors. 2) A treatment that seeks to control and modify the neurological and neuropsychological after effects and the disorders of the higher nervous activities which result from the lesion.

  9. Stroke atlas: a 3D interactive tool correlating cerebrovascular pathology with underlying neuroanatomy and resulting neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-02-01

    Understanding stroke-related pathology with underlying neuroanatomy and resulting neurological deficits is critical in education and clinical practice. Moreover, communicating a stroke situation to a patient/family is difficult because of complicated neuroanatomy and pathology. For this purpose, we created a stroke atlas. The atlas correlates localized cerebrovascular pathology with both the resulting disorder and surrounding neuroanatomy. It also provides 3D display both of labeled pathology and freely composed neuroanatomy. Disorders are described in terms of resulting signs, symptoms and syndromes, and they have been compiled for ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and cerebral aneurysms. Neuroanatomy, subdivided into 2,000 components including 1,300 vessels, contains cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, white matter, deep grey nuclei, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, cranial nerves and tracts. A computer application was developed comprising: 1) anatomy browser with the normal brain atlas (created earlier); 2) simulator of infarcts/hematomas/aneurysms/stenoses; 3) tools to label pathology; 4) cerebrovascular pathology database with lesions and disorders, and resulting signs, symptoms and/or syndromes. The pathology database is populated with 70 lesions compiled from textbooks. The initial view of each pathological site is preset in terms of lesion location, size, surrounding surface and sectional neuroanatomy, and lesion and neuroanatomy labeling. The atlas is useful for medical students, residents, nurses, general practitioners, and stroke clinicians, neuroradiologists and neurologists. It may serve as an aid in patient-doctor communication helping a stroke clinician explain the situation to a patient/family. It also enables a layman to become familiarized with normal brain anatomy and understand what happens in stroke.

  10. Male perineogenital anatomy and clinical applications in genital reconstructions and male-to-female sex reassignment surgery.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Francisco; Mora, María José; Solano, Ana; González, Carlos; Smith-Fernández, Víctor

    2002-04-01

    To determine the possibility of providing alternative surgical techniques for male genital reconstruction and for male-to-female sex reassignment surgery, the authors undertook an anatomic investigation of the perineogenital region in male cadavers. Anatomic dissection was performed on 14 male adult human cadavers (fresh and formalin-preserved) studying the main afferent vessels to the anterior perineal region and their mean internal diameters: deep external pudendal artery (0.60 mm), superficial perineal artery (0.50 mm), and funicular artery (0.37 mm). We established their exact topography, together with vascular anatomic variations, main vascular anastomosis circuits (base of the penis, scrotal septum, and perineal fat and lateral spermatic-scrotal fascia), angiosomes, anatomy of the rectovesical septum cavity, and their "critical" key points of dissection. The authors discuss the clinical possibility of elevation of a "tree" of previously described paragenital-genital flaps including mainly those based on the terminal branches of the internal pudendal vascular system, the erectile tissue pedicled flaps, and finally, flaps of the external pudendal system. The authors indicate the concrete vascularization system for each flap.

  11. An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Christo T.; Unruh, Kenneth P.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Translating basic sciences into a clinical framework has been approached through the implementation of various teaching techniques aimed at using a patient case scenario to facilitate learning. These techniques present students with a specific patient case and lead the students to discuss physiological processes through analysis of provided data…

  12. Anatomy and history of an external quality assessment program for interpretative comments in clinical biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Vasikaran, Samuel D

    2015-05-01

    The provision of clinical interpretation of results, either verbally or in the printed report, may be considered an integral part of clinical biochemistry diagnostic service. Proficiency testing or external quality assessment (EQA) of such activity may be useful in education, training, continuing professional development and ensuring the quality of such service. Details of the Patient Report Comments Program (RPCProgram) developed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) Chemical Pathology Quality Assurance Programs Pty Ltd (QAP) is described in this review. The program is aimed at pathologists, clinical scientists and trainees. Registered participants are provided a report with case details and a set of clinical biochemistry results at monthly intervals and submit an interpretative comment for the report. Comments received are broken up into components that are translated into common key phrases. An expert panel evaluates the key phrases, classifies them according to appropriateness and drafts a suggested comment, a case summary and a rationale, which are included in a summary report returned to participants. There is considerable diversity in the quality of interpretative comments received from participants of the PRCProgram. The primary purpose of EQA of interpretative commenting is educational self-assessment, and they are recognized as a continuing professional development activity. Whilst there is some evidence for the utility of interpretative comments in improving patient outcomes, evidence for the utility of EQA in improving quality of comments is awaited.

  13. New Clinically-Feasible 3-T MRI Protocol to Discriminate Internal Brain Stem Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Michael J.; Chung, Sohae; Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Bruno, Mary T.; Fatterpekar, Girish M.; Shepherd, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Two new 3-T MRI contrast methods, track density imaging and echo modulation curve T2 mapping were combined with simultaneous multislice acquisition to reveal exquisite anatomical detail at 7 canonical levels of the brainstem. Compared to conventional MRI contrasts, many individual brainstem tracts and nuclear groups were directly visualized for the first time at 3-T. This new approach is clinically practical and feasible (total scan time = 20 min) allowing better brainstem anatomical localization and characterization. PMID:26869471

  14. Breast ultrasound tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging for clinical display of anatomy and tumor rendering: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter J.; Duric, Nebojsa; Chandiwala-Mody, Priti; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical display thresholds of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for comparable visualization of breast anatomy and tumor rendering. Materials and Methods The study was compliant with HIPAA, approved by the IRB, and performed after obtaining informed consent. Thirty-six women were imaged with MR and our UST prototype. The UST scan generated reflection, sound speed and attenuation images. The reflection images were fused with the components of sound speed and attenuation images that achieved thresholds to represent parenchyma and/or solid masses using an image arithmetic process. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of MR and UST clinical images were used to identify anatomical similarities, and optimized thresholds for tumor shapes and volumes. Results Thresholding techniques generated UST images comparable to MR for visualizing fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and tumors, of which 25 were cancer and 11 benign. Optimized sound speed thresholds of 1.46±0.1 km/s and 1.52±0.03 km/s were identified to best represent the extent of fibroglandular tissue and solid masses, respectively. An arithmetic combination of attenuation images using the threshold of 0.16±0.04 dB/cm further characterized benign from malignant masses. No significant difference in tumor volume was noted between benign or malignant masses by UST or MR (p>0.1) using these universal thresholds. Conclusion UST demonstrated the ability to image and render breast tissues in a manner comparable to MR. Universal UST threshold values appear feasible for rendering of the size and distribution of benign and malignant tissues without intravenous contrast. PMID:22194502

  15. Arterial blood supply of the infrapatellar fat pad. Anatomy and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D; Deiler, S; Rudert, M

    1995-01-01

    The arterial blood supply to the infrapatellar fat pad (Hoffa's fat pad) was investigated in 12 knee joints of human cadavers. The infrapatellar fat pad is supplied by an anastomotic network which displays some striking topographic features. Its vascular blood supply protects it against necrosis, when either reconstructive operations are carried out or extensive surgical exposures of the knee are done. The blood supply to the center of the fat pad is limited. This is of practical importance for the choice of arthroscopic portals. In addition, arthroscopically verified sources of bleeding are described in 57 patients with hemarthrosis without clinically detectable instability. Rupture of the infrapatellar synovial fold can be a cause of posttraumatic hemarthrosis in rare cases. Arteries irregularly found within the fold contribute to the blood supply of the anterior aspect of the synovial membrane covering the cruciate ligaments.

  16. The normal and variant clinical anatomy of the sensory supply of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Voirol, Jenna R; Vilensky, Joel A

    2014-03-01

    Orbital and retro-orbital pain are relatively common clinical conditions that are associated with such disorders as trigeminal, lacrimal, and ciliary neuralgia, cluster headaches, paroxysmal hemicrania, inflammatory orbital pseudotumor, trochleitis, and herpetic neuralgia ophthalmicus, thus making the nerves supplying the orbit of great clinical importance. Surprisingly, how pain from this region reaches conscious levels is enigmatic. Classically, it has been assumed that pain reaches the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve (V1 ) and travels to the descending spinal trigeminal nucleus. However, exactly where the receptors for orbital pain are located and how impulses reach V1 is speculative. In this project, we reviewed all of the reported connections between the orbital nerves and V1 in order to understand how pain from this region is transmitted to the brain. We found reported neural connections to exist between cranial nerve (CN) V1 and CNs III, IV, and VI within the orbit, as well as direct neural branches to extra-ocular muscles from the nasociliary, frontal, and supraorbital nerves. We also found reported neural connections to exist between the presumed carotid plexus and CN VI and CN V1 , CN VI and CN V1 and V2 , and between CN V1 and CN III, all within the cavernous sinus. Whether or not these connections are sympathetic or sensory or some combination of both connections remains unclear. An understanding of the variability and frequency of these neural connections could lead to safer surgical procedures of the orbit and effective treatments for patients with orbital pain.

  17. The neuropathology and cerebrovascular mechanisms of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Knoefel, Janice; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing in our aging population at an alarming rate. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and complexity of disease neuropathology, dementia classifications remain controversial. Recently, the National Plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease prioritized Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias to include: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementias. While each of these dementing conditions has their unique pathologic signature, one common etiology shared among all these conditions is cerebrovascular dysfunction at some point during the disease process. The goal of this comprehensive review is to summarize the current findings in the field and address the important contributions of cerebrovascular, physiologic, and cellular alterations to cognitive impairment in these human dementias. Specifically, evidence will be presented in support of small-vessel disease as an underlying neuropathologic hallmark of various dementias, while controversial findings will also be highlighted. Finally, the molecular mechanisms shared among all dementia types including hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial bioenergetics, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and blood–brain barrier permeability responsible for disease etiology and progression will be discussed. PMID:26174330

  18. Morphometric analysis of the skull of the Sahel goat breed: basic and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Olopade, James O; Onwuka, Silas K

    2009-01-01

    The work reports morphometric analysis of the skulls of the Sahel breed of goat. The calculated metric data (mean +/- SD) included the condylobasal length, 16.94 +/- 1.39 cm, while the orbital circumference was 11.30 +/- 0.48 cm. The foramen magnum height and width were 1.82 +/- 0.11 cm and 1.85 +/- 0.15 cm respectively while the foramen magnum index was 89.81 +/- 8.71. Animals above one year of age had significantly higher values for orbital length including horizontal and vertical diameters, overall skull length, basal length, and neurocranium height than animals aged one year and below. The cornual process length, maximum orbital circumference and horizontal diameter obtained in this study were higher than those reported for other Nigerian goat breeds in the literature. The data for the distances from the facial tuberosity to the infraorbital canal, from the mental foramen to the lateral extent of the alveolar root of the lower incisor, as well as from the mandibular foramen to the base of the mandible and that from the mental foramen to the caudal border of the mandible, which are important clinically in the estimation of craniofacial measurements that will aid regional anaesthesia, were however similar to those reported earlier for the Red Sokoto and West African Dwarf breeds implying that a uniform craniometric estimation for associated regional nerve blocks can be attempted for these goat breeds.

  19. The anatomy of clinical decision-making in multidisciplinary cancer meetings

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Tayana; Petrides, Konstantinos V.; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Sarkar, Somita; Arora, Sonal; Shah, Sujay; Darzi, Ara; Green, James S. A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the UK, treatment recommendations for patients with cancer are routinely made by multidisciplinary teams in weekly meetings. However, their performance is variable. The aim of this study was to explore the underlying structure of multidisciplinary decision-making process, and examine how it relates to team ability to reach a decision. This is a cross-sectional observational study consisting of 1045 patient reviews across 4 multidisciplinary cancer teams from teaching and community hospitals in London, UK, from 2010 to 2014. Meetings were chaired by surgeons. We used a validated observational instrument (Metric for the Observation of Decision-making in Cancer Multidisciplinary Meetings) consisting of 13 items to assess the decision-making process of each patient discussion. Rated on a 5-point scale, the items measured quality of presented patient information, and contributions to review by individual disciplines. A dichotomous outcome (yes/no) measured team ability to reach a decision. Ratings were submitted to Exploratory Factor Analysis and regression analysis. The exploratory factor analysis produced 4 factors, labeled “Holistic and Clinical inputs” (patient views, psychosocial aspects, patient history, comorbidities, oncologists’, nurses’, and surgeons’ inputs), “Radiology” (radiology results, radiologists’ inputs), “Pathology” (pathology results, pathologists’ inputs), and “Meeting Management” (meeting chairs’ and coordinators’ inputs). A negative cross-loading was observed from surgeons’ input on the fourth factor with a follow-up analysis showing negative correlation (r = −0.19, P < 0.001). In logistic regression, all 4 factors predicted team ability to reach a decision (P < 0.001). Hawthorne effect is the main limitation of the study. The decision-making process in cancer meetings is driven by 4 underlying factors representing the complete patient profile and contributions to case review by all core

  20. Movement disorders in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Movement disorders can occur as primary (idiopathic) or genetic disease, as a manifestation of an underlying neurodegenerative disorder, or secondary to a wide range of neurological or systemic diseases. Cerebrovascular diseases represent up to 22% of secondary movement disorders, and involuntary movements develop after 1-4% of strokes. Post-stroke movement disorders can manifest in parkinsonism or a wide range of hyperkinetic movement disorders including chorea, ballism, athetosis, dystonia, tremor, myoclonus, stereotypies, and akathisia. Some of these disorders occur immediately after acute stroke, whereas others can develop later, and yet others represent delayed-onset progressive movement disorders. These movement disorders have been encountered in patients with ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformations, and dural arteriovenous fistula affecting the basal ganglia, their connections, or both.

  1. Zebrafish models of cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Peterson, Randall T

    2014-04-01

    Perturbations in cerebral blood flow and abnormalities in blood vessel structure are the hallmarks of cerebrovascular disease. While there are many genetic and environmental factors that affect these entities through a heterogeneous group of disease processes, the ultimate final pathologic insult in humans is defined as a stroke, or damage to brain parenchyma. In the case of ischemic stroke, blood fails to reach its target destination whereas in hemorrhagic stroke, extravasation of blood occurs outside of the blood vessel lumen, resulting in direct damage to brain parenchyma. As these acute events can be neurologically devastating, if not fatal, development of novel therapeutics are urgently needed. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an attractive model for the study of cerebrovascular disease because of its morphological and physiological similarity to human cerebral vasculature, its ability to be genetically manipulated, and its fecundity allowing for large-scale, phenotype-based screens.

  2. To Quiz or Not to Quiz: Formative Tests Help Detect Students at Risk of Failing the Clinical Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzi, Alain J.; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Smith, Jennifer; Dionne, Éric; Jalali, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Through a modified team-based learning (TBL) in the anatomy pre-clerkship curriculum, formative evaluations are utilized in the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine to assess and predict students' outcomes on summative examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of formative assessments to predict student's…

  3. Paraganglioma Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... carotid artery. It may also form along nerve pathways in the head and neck and in other parts of the body. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Nervous System Type: Color, Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute Creator: Terese Winslow (Illustrator) AV Number: CDR739011 ...

  4. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The Heart Valves The Heartbeat Vasculature of the Arm Vasculature of the Head Vasculature of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso ...

  5. Architecture of arachnoid trabeculae, pillars, and septa in the subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve: anatomy and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Killer, H E; Laeng, H R; Flammer, J; Groscurth, P

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To describe the anatomy and the arrangement of the arachnoid trabeculae, pillars, and septa in the subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve and to consider their possible clinical relevance for cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and fluid pressure in the subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve. Methods: Postmortem study with a total of 12 optic nerves harvested from nine subjects without ocular disease. All optic nerves used in this study were obtained no later than 7 hours after death, following qualified consent for necropsy. The study was performed with transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: The subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve contains a variety of trabeculae, septa, and stout pillars that are arranged between the arachnoid and the pia layers of the meninges of the nerve. They display a considerable numeric and structural variability depending on their location within the different portions of the optic nerve. In the bulbar segment (ampulla), adjacent to the globe, a dense and highly ramified meshwork of delicate trabeculae is arranged in a reticular fashion. Between the arachnoid trabeculae, interconnecting velum-like processes are observed. In the mid-orbital segment of the orbital portion, the subarachnoid space is subdivided, and can appear even loosely chambered by broad trabeculae and velum-like septa at some locations. In the intracanalicular segment additionally, few stout pillars and single round trabeculae are observed. Conclusion: The subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve is not a homogeneous and anatomically empty chamber filled with cerebrospinal fluid, but it contains a complex system of arachnoid trabeculae and septa that divide the subarachnoid space. The trabeculae, septa, and pillars, as well as their arrangement described in this study, may have a role in the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics between the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve and the chiasmal cistern and may contribute to the

  6. Non-invasive evaluation of culprit lesions by PET imaging: shifting the clinical paradigm away from resultant anatomy toward causative physiology.

    PubMed

    Caobelli, Federico; Bengel, Frank M

    2014-12-01

    Although coronary angiography is the gold standard for assessing coronary artery disease (CAD), there is at best a weak correlation between degree of stenosis and the risk of developing cardiac events. Plaque rupture is the most common type of plaque complication, accounting for about 70% of fatal acute myocardial infarctions or sudden coronary deaths. Recently, the feasibility of (18)F-fluoride PET/CT in the evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions was assessed. Radionuclide techniques allow non-invasive biologic assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. This may help to further shift the clinical paradigm in coronary disease away from anatomy toward causative physiology and biology.

  7. Non-invasive evaluation of culprit lesions by PET imaging: shifting the clinical paradigm away from resultant anatomy toward causative physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bengel, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Although coronary angiography is the gold standard for assessing coronary artery disease (CAD), there is at best a weak correlation between degree of stenosis and the risk of developing cardiac events. Plaque rupture is the most common type of plaque complication, accounting for about 70% of fatal acute myocardial infarctions or sudden coronary deaths. Recently, the feasibility of 18F-fluoride PET/CT in the evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions was assessed. Radionuclide techniques allow non-invasive biologic assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. This may help to further shift the clinical paradigm in coronary disease away from anatomy toward causative physiology and biology. PMID:25610799

  8. Radial access for cerebrovascular procedures: Case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Ansar Z; Sivapatham, Thinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Advantages of radial access over brachial/axillary or femoral access have been well described for several decades and include decreased cost, patient preference, and decreased major access site complications. Despite these advantages, radial access is rarely employed or even considered for neurointerventional procedures. This attitude should be reconsidered given several recent large, randomized, controlled trials from the cardiovascular literature proving that radial access is associated with statistically lower costs, decreased incidence of myocardial infarctions, strokes, and even decreased mortality. Radial access is now considered the standard of care for percutaneous coronary interventions in most US centers. Although radial access has been described for neurovascular procedures in the past, overall experience is limited. The two major challenges are the unique anatomy required to access the cerebral vasculature given very acute angles between the arm and craniocervical vessels and limitations in available technology. Methods We present a simplified approach to radial access for cerebrovascular procedures and provide a concise step-by-step approach for patient selection, ultrasound-guided single-wall access, recommended catheters/wires, and review of patent hemostasis. Additionally, we present a complex cerebrovascular intervention in which standard femoral access was unsuccessful, while radial access was quickly achieved to highlight the importance of familiarity with the radial approach for all neurointerventionalists. Results We have found that the learning curve is not too steep and that the radial access approach can be adopted smoothly for a large percentage of diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologic procedures. Conclusions Radial access should be considered in all patients undergoing a cerebrovascular procedure. PMID:26659807

  9. Parkinson disease and comorbid cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nanhoe-Mahabier, Wandana; de Laat, Karlijn F; Visser, Jasper E; Zijlmans, Jan; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2009-10-01

    Optimal management of chronic diseases not only requires tackling of the primary disease processes, but also necessitates timely recognition and treatment of comorbid conditions. In this article, we illustrate this two-pronged approach for two common age-related disorders: Parkinson disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). We first discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that could provide a link between PD and CVD. Patients with PD have a series of risk factors that could promote development of CVD, but also have several protective factors. We then review the available clinical, radiological and neuropathological evidence to support an association between these two conditions. We conclude by discussing the potential implications for clinical practice, highlighting how comorbid CVD could alter the clinical presentation of PD and reviewing the possibilities for prevention and secondary prophylaxis. Additional research will be needed to fully evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of comorbid CVD in PD. Pending further evidence, we recommend that cerebral neuroimaging should be considered if patients with initially uncomplicated PD develop-either acutely or chronically-prominent and/or treatment-resistant gait impairment, postural instability, depression, cognitive decline, or urinary incontinence. Finding comorbid CVD in such patients could have prognostic implications, and could necessitate treatment to arrest further progression of CVD.

  10. Intracranial Arteries - Anatomy and Collaterals.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S; Caplan, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology are inextricably linked in patients with intracranial atherosclerosis. Knowledge of abnormal or pathological conditions such as intracranial atherosclerosis stems from detailed recognition of the normal pattern of vascular anatomy. The vascular anatomy of the intracranial arteries, both at the level of the vessel wall and as a larger structure or conduit, is a reflection of physiology over time, from in utero stages through adult life. The unique characteristics of arteries at the base of the brain may help our understanding of atherosclerotic lesions that tend to afflict specific arterial segments. Although much of the knowledge regarding intracranial arteries originates from pathology and angiography series over several centuries, evolving noninvasive techniques have rapidly expanded our perspective. As each imaging modality provides a depiction that combines anatomy and flow physiology, it is important to interpret each image with a solid understanding of typical arterial anatomy and corresponding collateral routes. Compensatory collateral perfusion and downstream flow status have recently emerged as pivotal variables in the clinical management of patients with atherosclerosis. Ongoing studies that illustrate the anatomy and pathophysiology of these proximal arterial segments across modalities will help refine our knowledge of the interplay between vascular anatomy and cerebral blood flow. Future studies may help elucidate pivotal arterial factors far beyond the degree of stenosis, examining downstream influences on cerebral perfusion, artery-to-artery thromboembolic potential, amenability to endovascular therapies and stent conformation, and the propensity for restenosis due to biophysical factors.

  11. Eagle syndrome revisited: cerebrovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tsuyoshi; Alexander, Michael; Stokol, Colin; Lyden, Patrick; Braunstein, Glenn; Gewertz, Bruce

    2012-07-01

    Cervical pain caused by the elongation of the styloid process (Eagle syndrome) is well known to otolaryngologists but is rarely considered by vascular surgeons. We report two patients with cerebrovascular symptoms of Eagle syndrome treated in our medical center in the past year. Case 1: an 80-year-old man with acromegaly presented with dizziness and syncope with neck rotation. The patient was noted to have bilateral elongated styloid processes impinging on the internal carotid arteries. After staged resections of the styloid processes through cervical approaches, the symptoms resolved completely. Case 2: a 57-year-old man presented with acute-onset left-sided neck pain radiating to his head immediately after a vigorous neck massage. Hospital course was complicated by a 15-minute transient ischemic attack resulting in aphasia. Angiography revealed bilateral dissections of his internal carotid arteries, with a dissecting aneurysm on the right. Both injuries were immediately adjacent to the bilateral elongated styloid processes. Despite immediate anticoagulation therapy, he experienced aphasia and right hemiparesis associated with an occlusion of his left carotid artery. He underwent emergent catheter thrombectomy and carotid stent placement, with near-complete resolution of his symptoms. Elongated styloid processes characteristic of Eagle syndrome can result in both temporary impingement and permanent injury to the extracranial carotid arteries. Although rare, Eagle syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with cerebrovascular symptoms, especially those induced by positional change.

  12. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus gland; drawing shows ...

  13. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 761x736 ... View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows the ...

  14. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing shows the uterus, myometrium (muscular outer layer ...

  15. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  16. Vascular anatomy: the head, neck, and skull base.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michele H; Thorisson, Hjalti M; Diluna, Michael L

    2009-07-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the vasculature of the head and neck from the thorax to the skull base is critical to the approach to diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular disease. Awareness of the anatomic variations that may be encountered, common and uncommon, is necessary to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to avert therapeutic disasters. Careful anatomic analysis and understanding of collateral pathways and dangerous anastomoses facilitates cross-sectional and angiographic diagnosis and the development of surgical and endovascular treatment strategies.

  17. Notch signaling in cerebrovascular diseases (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiyou; Zhao, Bin; Deng, Yanqing; Shangguan, Shouqin; Zhou, Faming; Zhou, Wenqing; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Yanfeng; Chen, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of numerous fundamental cellular processes. Increasing evidence suggests that Notch signaling is involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, and thus in the progress of cerebrovascular diseases. In addition, Notch signaling in cerebrovascular diseases is associated with apoptosis, angiogenesis and the function of blood-brain barrier. Despite the contradictory results obtained to date as to whether Notch signaling is harmful or beneficial, the regulation of Notch signaling may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27574001

  18. To quiz or not to quiz: Formative tests help detect students at risk of failing the clinical anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Alain J; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Smith, Jennifer; Dionne, Éric; Jalali, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Through a modified team-based learning (TBL) in the anatomy pre-clerkship curriculum, formative evaluations are utilized in the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine to assess and predict students' outcomes on summative examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of formative assessments to predict student's performance on summative examinations, during the first two semesters of medical school. Formative assessments included multiple-choice quizzes (MCQ) for each laboratory session and a practical midterm examination (MIDTERM), while the summative assessment corresponded to the final practical examination (FINAL). A moderate correlation between MCQs and FINAL (r = 0.353 and 0.301, respectively), and strong correlation between MIDTERM and FINAL assessments (r = 0.688 and 0.610, respectively) were found in the first two semesters. The MIDTERM-FINAL correlations were enhanced for students who scored under 61% in the MIDTERM (r = 0.887 and 0.717, respectively). Despite limitations, mostly related to particularities of the used tests, the analysis revealed an efficient method to identify students at risk of failing the FINAL in a TBL-based anatomy program. Future developments include the elaboration of strategies to predict and support those underperforming students.

  19. Cerebrovascular reactivity mapping without gas challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiying; Li, Yang; Pinho, Marco; Park, Denise C; Welch, Babu G; Lu, Hanzhang

    2017-02-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), the ability of cerebral vessels to dilate or constrict, has been shown to provide valuable information in the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of patients with various cerebrovascular conditions. CVR mapping is typically performed using hypercapnic gas inhalation as a vasoactive challenge while collecting BOLD images, but the inherent need of gas inhalation and the associated apparatus setup present a practical obstacle in applying it in routine clinical use. Therefore, we aimed to develop a new method to map CVR using resting-state BOLD data without the need of gas inhalation. This approach exploits the natural variation in respiration and measures its influence on BOLD MRI signal. In this work, we first identified a surrogate of the arterial CO2 fluctuation during spontaneous breathing from the global BOLD signal. Second, we tested the feasibility and reproducibility of the proposed approach to use the above-mentioned surrogate as a regressor to estimate voxel-wise CVR. Third, we validated the "resting-state CVR map" with a conventional CVR map obtained with hypercapnic gas inhalation in healthy volunteers. Finally, we tested the utility of this new approach in detecting abnormal CVR in a group of patients with Moyamoya disease, and again validated the results using the conventional gas inhalation method. Our results showed that global BOLD signal fluctuation in the frequency range of 0.02-0.04Hz contains the most prominent contribution from natural variation in arterial CO2. The CVR map calculated using this signal as a regressor is reproducible across runs (ICC=0.91±0.06), and manifests a strong spatial correlation with results measured with a conventional hypercapnia-based method in healthy subjects (r=0.88, p<0.001). We also found that resting-state CVR was able to identify vasodilatory deficit in patients with steno-occlusive disease, the spatial pattern of which matches that obtained using the conventional gas method (r

  20. Utility of transcranial Doppler ultrasound for the integrative assessment of cerebrovascular function.

    PubMed

    Willie, C K; Colino, F L; Bailey, D M; Tzeng, Y C; Binsted, G; Jones, L W; Haykowsky, M J; Bellapart, J; Ogoh, S; Smith, K J; Smirl, J D; Day, T A; Lucas, S J; Eller, L K; Ainslie, P N

    2011-03-30

    There is considerable utility in the use of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) to assess cerebrovascular function. The brain is unique in its high energy and oxygen demand but limited capacity for energy storage that necessitates an effective means of regional blood delivery. The relative low cost, ease-of-use, non-invasiveness, and excellent temporal resolution of TCD make it an ideal tool for the examination of cerebrovascular function in both research and clinical settings. TCD is an efficient tool to access blood velocities within the cerebral vessels, cerebral autoregulation, cerebrovascular reactivity to CO(2), and neurovascular coupling, in both physiological states and in pathological conditions such as stroke and head trauma. In this review, we provide: (1) an overview of TCD methodology with respect to other techniques; (2) a methodological synopsis of the cerebrovascular exam using TCD; (3) an overview of the physiological mechanisms involved in regulation of the cerebral blood flow; (4) the utility of TCD for assessment of cerebrovascular pathology; and (5) recommendations for the assessment of four critical and complimentary aspects of cerebrovascular function: intra-cranial blood flow velocity, cerebral autoregulation, cerebral reactivity, and neurovascular coupling. The integration of these regulatory mechanisms from an integrated systems perspective is discussed, and future research directions are explored.

  1. Risk of Cerebrovascular Diseases After Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shin-Yan; Cherng, Yih-Giun; Lee, Fei-Peng; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Yu; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Liao, Chien-Chang; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little was known about the beneficial effects of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) on the outcomes after obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of UPPP on reducing risk of cerebrovascular diseases in patients with OSA. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 10,339 patients with new OSA between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009. The incident cerebrovascular disease was identified during the 1-year follow-up period in patients with and without receiving UPPP. The rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cerebrovascular disease associated with receiving UPPP in patients with OSA were calculated in multivariate Poisson regression. The 1-year incidences of cerebrovascular disease for OSA patients with and without UPPP were 1.06% and 5.14%, respectively. Patients with OSA receiving UPPP had lower risk of cerebrovascular disease compared with those without UPPP (RR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.33–0.61). The decreased risk of cerebrovascular disease following UPPP was observed in both sexes and all age groups. In the stratified analysis of medical conditions, the RR of cerebrovascular disease associated with UPPP for patients with 0, 1, ≥ 2 medical conditions were 0.28 (95% CI 0.12–0.68), 0.39 (95% CI 0.21–0.73), and 0.63 (95% CI 0.43–0.93), respectively. Patients with OSA who received UPPP had lower risk of cerebrovascular disease within 1 year after surgery compared with patients not receiving UPPP. Clinical physicians could have more evidence to persuade patients to receive surgical intervention, especially those who have severe OSA symptoms or do not acquire adequate symptom relief under conservative treatments. PMID:26469923

  2. Minimally Invasive Posterior Trans-muscular C1-C2 Screw Fixation Through an Anatomical Corridor to Preserve Occipitocervical Tension Band: Surgical Anatomy and Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Roberto; Berbeo, Miguel E; Villalobos, Luis M; Vergara, Manuel F; Osorio, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The C1-C2 joint is affected by multiple entities that may produce biomechanical instability. Optimal management for atlantoaxial instability has been searched by ways of different surgical techniques with different results, generating discussion between second effects of a particular treatment. Lateral dissections can place the axial neck musculature and ligaments at risk of neural denervations or vascular compromise. Either of these entities may result in significant postoperative atrophy, pain, and instability. Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of spinal disorders allow to our patients less morbid procedures with equal or better results compared to conventional surgery. In the following paper, we review the anatomy of the atlantoaxial joint and propose a minimally invasive trans-muscular C1-C2 fusion technique using C1 lateral-mass screws and C2 pedicular screws. We describe cases with surgical, clinical, and radiographic follow-up.

  3. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  4. [Forbidden anatomy].

    PubMed

    Holck, Per

    2004-12-16

    Since centuries anatomists have used any course of action in order to get hold of material for dissections, and at the same time avoid prosecution for grave robbery, at times the only way to get hold of cadavers. Stealing newly dead people from the churchyards and offering them for sale to anatomical institutions was not uncommon in the 19th century. "Resurrectionists"--as these thieves were called, as they made the dead "alive"--were seen as necessary for the teaching of anatomy in Victorian Britain. In the 1820s a scandal was revealed in Scotland, when it was discovered that some people even committed murder to make money from supplying anatomists with human cadavers. Two men, William Burke and William Hare, became particularly notorious because of their "business" with the celebrated anatomist Robert Knox in Edinburgh.

  5. On the Anatomy of Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Josephson, Anna

    2011-01-01

    In search for the nature of understanding of basic science in a clinical context, eight medical students were interviewed, with a focus on their view of the discipline of anatomy, in their fourth year of study. Interviews were semi-structured and took place just after the students had finished their surgery rotations. Phenomenographic analysis was…

  6. Nail anatomy.

    PubMed

    de Berker, David

    2013-01-01

    The nail unit comprises the nail plate, the surrounding soft tissues, and their vasculature and innervation based upon the distal phalanx. The nail plate is a laminated keratinized structure lying on the nail matrix (15-25%), the nail bed with its distal onychodermal band (75-85%), and the hyponychium at its free edge. The distal part of the matrix, the lunula characterized by its half-moon shape, can be observed in some digits. The nail plate is embedded by the proximal and lateral folds. From the proximal nail fold, the cuticle (also known as the eponychium), adheres to the superficial surface of the proximal nail plate. The nail unit possesses a complex and abundant vascular network to ensure adequate blood supply. Finally, both the periungual soft tissues and the nail folds are innervated. The shapes, structure, and inter-relationships of these tissues are factors in the way nails present with disease and how we understand and manage those diseases. In particular, an understanding of the surgical anatomy is important for those undertaking diagnostic or curative operations on the nail. With this knowledge, the most appropriate surgery can be planned and the patient can be provided with accurate and clear guidance to enable informed consent.

  7. Cerebrovascular disease in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Miners, J Scott

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have more in common than their association with ageing. They share risk factors and overlap neuropathologically. Most patients with AD have Aβ amyloid angiopathy and degenerative changes affecting capillaries, and many have ischaemic parenchymal abnormalities. Structural vascular disease contributes to the ischaemic abnormalities in some patients with AD. However, the stereotyped progression of hypoperfusion in this disease, affecting first the precuneus and cingulate gyrus, then the frontal and temporal cortex and lastly the occipital cortex, suggests that other factors are more important, particularly in early disease. Whilst demand for oxygen and glucose falls in late disease, functional MRI, near infrared spectroscopy to measure the saturation of haemoglobin by oxygen, and biochemical analysis of myelin proteins with differential susceptibility to reduced oxygenation have all shown that the reduction in blood flow in AD is primarily a problem of inadequate blood supply, not reduced metabolic demand. Increasing evidence points to non-structural vascular dysfunction rather than structural abnormalities of vessel walls as the main cause of cerebral hypoperfusion in AD. Several mediators are probably responsible. One that is emerging as a major contributor is the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (EDN1). Whilst there is clearly an additive component to the clinical and pathological effects of hypoperfusion and AD, experimental and clinical observations suggest that the disease processes also interact mechanistically at a cellular level in a manner that exacerbates both. The elucidation of some of the mechanisms responsible for hypoperfusion in AD and for the interactions between CVD and AD has led to the identification of several novel therapeutic approaches that have the potential to ameliorate ischaemic damage and slow the progression of neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and cerebrovascular events: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Brian G; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2012-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has revolutionized the care of high-risk patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. Those considered at high or prohibitive risk of major adverse outcomes with open surgical aortic valve replacement may now be offered an alternative less-invasive therapy. Despite the rapid evolution and clinical application of this new technology, recent studies have raised concerns about adverse cerebrovascular event rates in patients undergoing TAVI. In this review, we explore the current data both in relation to procedure-related silent cerebrovascular ischemic events, as well as clinically apparent stroke. The timing of neurological events and their prognostic implications are also examined. Finally, potential mechanisms of TAVI-related cerebrovascular injury are described, in addition to efforts to minimize their occurrence.

  9. Anal anatomy and normal histology.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priti

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this article is the anatomy and histology of the anal canal, and its clinical relevance to anal cancers. The article also highlights the recent histological and anatomical changes to the traditional terminology of the anal canal. The terminology has been adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, separating the anal region into the anal canal, the perianal region and the skin. This paper describes the gross anatomy of the anal canal, along with its associated blood supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and nerve supply. The new terminology referred to in this article may assist clinicians and health care providers to identify lesions more precisely through naked eye observation and without the need for instrumentation. Knowledge of the regional anatomy of the anus will also assist in management decisions.

  10. [Functional anatomy of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Krainik, A; Feydy, A; Colombani, J M; Hélias, A; Menu, Y

    2003-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a particular regional functional anatomy. The morphological support of cognitive functions can now be depicted using functional imaging. Lesions of the central nervous system may be responsible of specific symptoms based on their location. Current neuroimaging techniques are able to show and locate precisely macroscopic lesions. Therefore, the knowledge of functional anatomy of the central nervous system is useful to link clinical disorders to symptomatic lesions. Using radio-clinical cases, we present the functional neuro-anatomy related to common cognitive impairments.

  11. Anatomy of the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of ...

  12. NIRS-based noninvasive cerebrovascular regulation assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Richmond, I.; Borgos, J.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Alterations to cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been implicated in diverse neurological conditions, including mild traumatic brain injury, microgravity induced intracranial pressure (ICP) increases, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-measured regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) provides an estimate of oxygenation of the interrogated cerebral volume that is useful in identifying trends and changes in oxygen supply to cerebral tissue and has been used to monitor cerebrovascular function during surgery and ventilation. In this study, CO2-inhalation-based hypercapnic breathing challenges were used as a tool to simulate CBF dysregulation, and NIRS was used to monitor the CBF autoregulatory response. A breathing circuit for the selective administration of CO2-compressed air mixtures was designed and used to assess CBF regulatory responses to hypercapnia in 26 healthy young adults using non-invasive methods and real-time sensors. After a 5 or 10 minute baseline period, 1 to 3 hypercapnic challenges of 5 or 10 minutes duration were delivered to each subject while rSO2, partial pressure of end tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and vital signs were continuously monitored. Change in rSO2 measurements from pre- to intrachallenge (ΔrSO2) detected periods of hypercapnic challenges. Subjects were grouped into three exercise factor levels (hr/wk), 1: 0, 2:>0 and <10, and 3:>10. Exercise factor level 3 subjects showed significantly greater ΔrSO2 responses to CO2 challenges than level 2 and 1 subjects. No significant difference in ΔPETCO2 existed between these factor levels. Establishing baseline values of rSO2 in clinical practice may be useful in early detection of CBF changes.

  13. Fetal cerebrovascular circulation: a review of prenatal ultrasound assessment.

    PubMed

    Degani, S

    2008-01-01

    Antenatal intrauterine cerebrovascular events were found to play an important role in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain damage. Changes in placental vascular resistance, cardiac contractibility, vessel compliance, and blood viscosity alter the normal dynamics of fetal cerebral circulation. The circulatory mechanisms described in animal fetuses also operate in the human fetus. The isthmus of the aorta represents a watershed area reflecting the redistribution of blood during increased peripheral resistance and hypoxia. The fetal cerebrovascular system acts locally within the skull and interacts with the other components of fetal circulation to compensate by redistribution of blood in case of shortage in resources. The introduction of various sonographic techniques and the collection of data from the arterial and venous cerebral circulation have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in fetal cerebral hemodynamic events. Anatomical and physiological considerations of cerebral vasculature in health and disease are relevant in the research of variations in fetal brain blood perfusion. Changes in flow characteristics in fetal cerebral vasculature can be used for clinical decisions. However, caution is advised before applying research data into practice. The clinical utility is well established in situations of fetal compromise such as growth restriction and anemia.

  14. Single photon emission computed tomography in cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brass, L.M.; Rattner, Z.

    1991-12-31

    Every year, nearly half a million people in the United States have a stroke. Cerebrovascular disease is the third leading cause of death in the country, and it costs the economy approximately $25 billion annually. SPECT perfusion imaging is a sensitive indicator of stroke. Abnormal patterns of blood flow are recognized either as areas of hypoactivity (focal or diffused) or hyperactivity (hyperemia or luxury perfusion). Lesions are demonstrated earlier by SPECT than by CT or MRI, and the physiologic information from flow imaging is not available from such anatomic studies. Given the significance of stroke and the early sensitivity of SPECT, why do most neurologists not include SPECT in the evaluation of their patients? The authors feel that the answer is that most neurologists do not view SPECT flow imaging as providing additional information beyond the standard clinical and radiologic work-up. This article therefore concentrates on ways in which SPECT imaging can be useful in stroke, identifying the major concerns of clinicians, and demonstrating how some of these concerns can be addressed by SPECT. The goal is to expand the perspective of the nuclear-medicine physician and encourage investigations on urgent clinical problems in the diagnosis and management of patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Additional information may be obtained from several excellent reviews of SPECT imaging in stroke. 73 refs.

  15. FastStats: Cerebrovascular Disease or Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 MB] More data Death rates for cerebrovascular diseases by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age Health, United States, 2015, table 23 [ ... causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin Health, United States, 2015, table 18 [PDF - 9.8 ... Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion National Heart, Lung, and ...

  16. Interprofessional Education in Gross Anatomy: Experience with First-Year Medical and Physical Therapy Students at Mayo Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Steven S.; Yuan, Brandon J.; Lachman, Nirusha; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Krause, David A.; Hollman, John H.; Youdas, James W.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical practice is believed to improve outcomes in health care delivery. Integrating teaching and learning objectives through cross discipline student interaction in basic sciences has the potential to initiate interprofessional collaboration at the early stages of health care education. Student attitudes and…

  17. Superoxide-dependent cerebrovascular effects of homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Slungaard, A; Vercellotti, G M; Iadecola, C

    1998-06-01

    Recent evidence indicates that elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are a risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. However, little is known about cerebrovascular effects of homocysteine. Homocysteine could impair cerebrovascular function by metal-catalyzed production of activated oxygen species. We studied whether homocysteine, in the presence of Cu2+, alters reactivity of cerebral circulation and, if so, whether this effect depends on O-2 generation. In halothane-anesthetized rats the parietal cortex was exposed and superfused with Ringer solution. Cerebrocortical blood flow (CBF) was monitored by a laser-Doppler probe. With Ringer solution superfusion, CBF increased with hypercapnia (+134 +/- 7%; PCO2 = 50-60 mmHg) and topical application of 10 microM ACh (+35 +/- 3%), the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, 500 microM; +66 +/- 6%), or 1 mM papaverine (+100 +/- 6%; n = 5). Superfusion with 40 microM Cu2+ alone did not perturb resting CBF or responses to hypercapnia, ACh, SNAP, or papaverine (P > 0.05, n = 5). However, superfusion of homocysteine-Cu2+ reduced resting CBF (-28 +/- 4%) and attenuated (P < 0.05) responses to hypercapnia (-31 +/- 9%), ACh (-73 +/- 6%), or SNAP (-48 +/- 4%), but not papaverine. The effect was observed only at 1 mM homocysteine. Cerebrovascular effects of homocysteine-Cu2+ were prevented by coadministration of superoxide dismutase (SOD; 1,000 U/ml; n = 5). SOD alone did not affect resting CBF or CBF reactivity (n = 5). The observation that homocysteine-Cu2+ attenuates the response to hypercapnia, ACh, and SNAP, but not the NO-independent vasodilator papaverine, suggests that homocysteine-Cu2+ selectively impairs NO-related cerebrovascular responses. The fact that SOD prevents such impairment indicates that the effect of homocysteine is O-2 dependent. The data support the conclusion that O-2, generated by the reaction of homocysteine with Cu2+, inhibits NO-related cerebrovascular responses by scavenging NO

  18. Impact of fine needle aspiration (FNA) and of the number of punctures on the feline testis: clinical, gross anatomy and histological assessment.

    PubMed

    Gouletsou, Pagona G; Galatos, Apostolos D; Sideri, Aikaterini I; Kostoulas, Polychronis

    2012-07-01

    The safety of testicular fine needle aspiration (FNA) has been proven in dogs but has not been fully established in men, while studies in rats have given contradictory results. Furthermore, the extent of damage inflicted by multiple punctures is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of FNA and of the number of punctures on the feline testis with clinical, gross anatomy and histological examinations. Twenty-seven sexually mature healthy laboratory Domestic Shorthair cats were randomly assigned to two groups: 5 cats in which no FNA was performed (control group), and 22 cats which had their left and right testis punctured with a 26 ga needle towards 3 and 8 directions, respectively (experimental group). Two cats at a time were orchiectomized 5 or 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 7 or 14 days or 1, 2, 3 or 4 mo post-aspiration. The cats of the control group were also orchiectomized. During the first week post-aspiration clinical examination revealed vaginal cavity hematoma (8/44 testes), while the histological findings were focal hemorrhagic areas (20/24 testes), erythrocytes inside the seminiferous tubules' lumen (9/24 testes), and germinal cell degeneration in <1.94% of the seminiferous tubules (15/24 testes). After the first week the histological findings were germinal cell degeneration in <2.14% of the seminiferous tubules (19/20 testes) and enlargement of the lumen of <5.16% of the seminiferous tubules (7/20 testes). The germinal epithelium and interstitium had an overall normal appearance. No significant differences were observed between the left and right testis. The results of the study indicate that testicular FNA should be considered a safe procedure in the cat when up to 8 punctures are performed.

  19. Anatomy Education in Namibia: Balancing Facility Design and Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed…

  20. Surgical anatomy of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve and its clinical significance in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kochilas, Xenophon; Bibas, Athanasios; Xenellis, John; Anagnostopoulou, Sofia

    2008-03-01

    Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) increases the morbidity following a variety of neck procedures and can have catastrophic consequences in people who use their voice professionally. Identification and preservation of the EBSLN are thus important in thyroidectomy, parathyroidectomy, carotid endarterectomy, and anterior cervical spine procedures, where the nerve is at risk. There are large variations in the anatomical course of the EBSLN, which makes the intraoperative identification of the nerve challenging. The topographic relationship of the EBSLN to the superior thyroid artery and the upper pole of the thyroid gland are considered by many authors to be the key point for identifying the nerve during surgery of the neck. The classifications by Cernea et al. ([1992a] Head Neck 14:380-383; [1992b] Am. J. Surg. 164:634-639) and by Kierner et al. ([1998] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 124:301-303), as well as clinically important connections are discussed in detail. Along with sound anatomical knowledge, neuromonitoring is helpful in identifying the EBSLN during neck procedures. The clinical signs of EBSLN injury include hoarseness, decreased voice projection, decreased pitch range, and fatigue after extensive voice use. Videostroboscopy, electromyography, voice analysis, and electroglottography can provide crucial information on the function of the EBSLN following neck surgery.

  1. Knee Joint Dysfunctions That Influence Gait in Cerebrovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Greve, Julia Maria D’Andrea

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is still no consensus among different specialists on the subject of kinematic variation during the hemiparetic gait, including the main changes that take place during the gait cycle and whether the gait velocity changes the patterns of joint mobility. One of the most frequently discussed joints is the knee. OBJECTIVES This study aims to evaluate the variables found in the angular kinematics of knee joint, and to describe the alterations found in the hemiparetic gait resulting from cerebrovascular injury. METHODS This study included 66 adult patients of both genders with a diagnosis of either right or left hemiparesis resulting from ischemic cerebrovascular injury. All the participants underwent three-dimensional gait evaluation, an the angular kinematics of the joint knee were selected for analysis. RESULTS The results were distributed into four groups formed based on the median of the gait speed and the side of hemiparesis. CONCLUSIONS The relevant clinical characteristics included the important mechanisms of loading response in the stance, knee hyperextension in single stance, and reduction of the peak flexion and movement amplitude of the knee in the swing phase. These mechanisms should be taken into account when choosing the best treatment. We believe that the findings presented here may aid in preventing the occurrence of the problems found, and also in identifying the origin of these problems. PMID:18719753

  2. Cerebrovascular Disease in Children: Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Karen J.; deVeber, Gabrielle A.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Roach, E. Steve; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease in children manifests in many forms, all of which have devastating and long-lasting effects. Recent advances in diagnostic imaging have revealed that this condition is much more common in the pediatric population than previously believed, affecting as many as 1 in 1500 neonates and 1 in 3000 children. The underlying mechanisms that cause stroke—ischemic stroke, sinovenous thrombosis, and hemorrhagic stroke—are only beginning to be understood; however, progress has been made toward better understanding the mechanisms of disease, particularly in the fields of genetics, inflammation, and thrombus formation. Furthermore, new imaging techniques, and better understanding of how to use imaging in managing stroke, have enabled practitioners to more quickly and accurately identify cerebrovascular disease type in children, which is key to mitigation of negative outcomes. The 2010 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 39th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe clinical issues surrounding childhood stroke, including diagnosis and acute care; (2) discuss recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of childhood stroke; (3) review current management of and therapies for childhood stroke, including controversial therapies; and (4) establish research directions for investigators. This article summarizes the speakers’ presentations and includes an edited transcript of question-and-answer sessions. PMID:21778188

  3. Dementia with cerebrovascular disease: the benefits of early treatment.

    PubMed

    Schindler, R J

    2005-10-01

    Patients with vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular disease (AD + CVD) have dementia associated with underlying CVD. Although diagnosis of VaD is challenging, VaD is typically characterized by a stepwise progression of dementia that is closely associated with stroke and focal neurological findings, and a symptom profile that often includes executive dysfunction leading to decreased ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). In contrast, AD + CVD patients typically present with progressive deterioration of cognition/memory that may also be influenced by concurrent cerebrovascular events. Early diagnosis and intervention are desirable to prevent further decline due to subsequent vascular events. Management of CVD can limit deterioration of cognitive symptoms in VaD patients, and treatment benefits with cholinesterase inhibitors may be realized as improvement above baseline levels in dementia symptoms. Results from a combined analysis of two 24-week, placebo-controlled clinical trials show that donepezil-treated VaD patients improve in cognition, global function, and performance of IADL. In contrast, AD + CVD patients may continue to decline despite management of CVD, and treatment benefits should be recognized as initial improvements followed by stabilization or slowed decline of dementia symptoms over time. In post-marketing studies, donepezil-treated AD and AD + CVD patients show similar benefits in cognition, global function, and quality of life. The results of these studies support the use of donepezil in treatment of patients with VaD or AD + CVD.

  4. [Cerebro-vascular emergencies: cerebral and meningeal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Philippon, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is the most dramatic, even if not the most frequent among cerebrovascular emergencies. However the improved treatment of arterial hypertension has decreased its frequency. Modern neuroradiological methods have led to an easier diagnosis, but the best choice for treatment (medical or surgical) is still debated. Decision must be based upon different factors, the most important of which are clinical condition volume, and location of haemorrhage. If the general prognosis has been improved by the transfer to specialized Units, wherein such are available, the benefit of surgery, while indispensable in some cases, has yet to be demonstrated by prospective studies. The problem is far different in subarachnoïd haemorrhage due to rupture of a vascular malformation: the necessity of a rapid treatment by surgery or embolization is largely admitted except for those patients in a bad clinical conditions.

  5. Through-knee amputation for a patient with proximal femur focal deficiency and tibial hemimelia: surgical anatomy and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Selvyn; Rashid, Abdul Halim Abd; Das, Srijit; Ibrahim, Sharaf

    2014-03-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare anomaly of unknown etiology. This condition can occur sporadically or may have a familial inheritance. It is characterized by deficiency of the tibia with a relatively intact fibula. The anomaly may be unilateral or bilateral. We report a case of a 2-year-old girl who presented with right lower limb deformity since birth. She was diagnosed with proximal femur focal deficiency with absence of the ipsilateral tibia. She presented with a shorter right lower limb and a deformed foot. She was treated with a through-knee amputation. Anatomical dissection of the amputated limb was carried out to verify the anomalies. The dissection showed that the distal phalanx of the great toe was trifid. The anatomical and clinical significance of this interesting case is discussed.

  6. Andrea Pasta (1706-1782), eclectic scholar of anatomy and clinical medicine, communication and the history of art.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Veneroni, Laura; Patriarca, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Andrea Pasta was an eclectic visionary light years ahead of his time. He made numerous contributions to the field of medicine, some recognized by his contemporaries and others so visionary that they are being applied only in modern times. His contributions spanned the disciplines of psychology, gynaecology, haematology, infectious diseases and the doctor-patient relationship. Well known among his contemporaries, he combined a passion for clinical medicine and a keen interest in history and art with a strict research methodology and an approach to caring for patients as human beings. By studying his life and works, we can better understand the magnitude and significance of his innovative method and its applicability in modern times and also the significance of his many contributions.

  7. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part I: Clinical Perspective, Anatomy and Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Rapid evolution in technology in the recent years has lead to availability of multiple options for cardiac imaging. Availability of multiple options of varying capability, poses a challenge for optimal imaging choice. While new imaging choices are added, some of the established methods find their role re-defined. State of the art imaging practices are limited to few specialist cardiac centres, depriving many radiologists and radiologist in-training of optimal exposure to the field. This presentation is aimed at providing a broad idea about complexity of clinical problem, imaging options and a large library of images of congenital heart disease. Some emphasis is made as to the need of proper balance between performing examination with technical excellence in an ideal situation against the need of the majority of patients who are investigated with less optimal resources. Cases of congenital cardiac disease are presented in an illustrative way, showing imaging appearances in multiple modalities, highlighting specific observations in given instance. PMID:27376034

  8. The clinical surface anatomy anomalies of the palmaris longus muscle in the Black African population of Zimbabwe and a proposed new testing technique.

    PubMed

    Gangata, Hope

    2009-03-01

    The presence of the palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is highly variable. Rates of absence vary from 0.6% in the Korean population to as high as 63.9% in the Turkish population. The tendon of PLM may be absent on one or both forearms, may have duplicated tendons on one forearm or may be laterally shifted to the extent that the tendon of the PLM lies superficial to that of flexor carpi radialis muscle. Among Black American populations, in which there is usually mixed ancestry, rates of absence are 3.5%. Only two studies have been performed on Black African populations: in Republic of Congo and Uganda, and each showed widely differing rates of absence of 3.0% and 14.6%, respectively. In this study, a total of 890 Black Zimbabwean subjects in Harare aged between 8 and 13 years, were examined for clinical surface anatomy anomalies of the tendon of PLM. The results showed that the tendon of the PLM was absent unilaterally in 0.9% of the population, and bilaterally absent in 0.6% with an overall rate of absence of 1.5%. Other variations noted were a laterally shifted PLM in 1.1% of subjects and duplicated tendons on one forearm, which was the least prevalent anomaly, in 0.2% of subjects. The author proposes a new technique to test the tendon of PLM, which combines resisted thumb abduction and resisted wrist flexion. The proposed technique capitalizes on the role of the PLM as an important abductor of the thumb.

  9. Aortic Stiffness, Cerebrovascular Dysfunction, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. Summary Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery. Aortic stiffening thereby impairs a protective mechanism that shields the peripheral microcirculation from excessive pulsatility within downstream target organs. Beyond midlife, aortic stiffness increases rapidly and exposes the cerebral microcirculation to abnormal pulsatile mechanical forces that are associated with microvascular damage and remodeling in the brain. Aortic stiffening and high-flow pulsatility are associated with alterations in the microvasculature of the brain; however, a mechanistic link between aortic stiffness and memory has not been established. We showed that in a community-based sample of older individuals, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities - markers of cerebrovascular remodeling and damage - mediated the relation between higher aortic stiffness and lower performance on memory function tests. These data suggest that microvascular and white matter damage associated with excessive aortic stiffness contribute to impaired memory function with advancing age. Key Messages Increasing evidence suggests that vascular etiologies - including aortic stiffness and microvascular damage - contribute to memory impairment and the pathogenesis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness may delay memory decline among older individuals. PMID:27752478

  10. Livedo reticularis and cerebro-vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, W. P.; Ferguson, I. T.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases are described in which extensive livedo reticularis was associated with premature cerebrovascular disease. The patients presented with transient cerebral ischaemic attacks and gradually developed permanent neurological damage with intellectual impairment. The value of detailed neuropsychological testing to identify bilateral cortical abnormalities is demonstrated. CAT scanning may reveal multifocal cerebral infarction. The nature of this condition is not understood. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7100027

  11. Cervical carotid and circle of willis arterial anatomy of macaque monkeys: a comparative anatomy study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishant; Lee, John J; Perlmutter, Joel S; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2009-07-01

    Macaque monkeys are used in many research applications, including cerebrovascular investigations. However, detailed catalogs of the relevant vascular anatomy are scarce. We present our experience with macaque vessel patterns as determined by digital subtraction angiography of 34 different monkeys. We retrospectively analyzed digital subtraction angiograms obtained during experimental internal carotid artery (ICA) catheterization and subsequent injection of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Results were catalogued according to vascular distribution and variants observed. Macaque monkeys have a bovine aortic arch. The carotid vessels generally bifurcate, but are occasionally observed to divide into three vessels. The external carotid gives rise primarily to two trunks: an occipital branch and a common vessel that subsequently gives off the lingual, facial, and superior thyroid arteries. The internal maxillary artery may be present as a terminal branch of the external carotid or as a branch of the occipital artery. The ICA is similar in course to that of the human. The anterior circle of Willis was intact in all monkeys in our study. Its primary difference from that of the human is the union of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries as a single (azygous) median vessel. Macaque cervical carotid and circle of Willis arterial anatomy differs from humans in a couple of specific patterns. Knowledge of these differences and similarities between human and macaque anatomy is important in developing endovascular macaque models of human diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  12. [Hemodynamic adaptations in proximal cerebrovascular occlusion].

    PubMed

    De Ley, G

    1990-01-01

    In order to gain more insight into the pathophysiology of extracerebral cerebrovascular occlusion, the cerebral hemodynamic behaviour after uni- or bilateral carotid occlusion was investigated. In Wistar rats, acute occlusion of one common carotid artery leads to a moderate bilateral lowering of the resting hemispheric brain blood flow; no interhemispheric perfusion asymmetry is observed. During hypercapnia, however, a manyfold increase of the hemispheric blood flow is seen at the intact side, whereas blood flow increase at the side of the occlusion is suppressed indicating that the cerebrovascular reserve at the side of the occlusion is largely used to preserve resting hemispheric perfusion. During the days (1, 5, 15 and 30) following the occlusion, resting hemispheric blood flow is progressively restored rather rapidly (bilateral normalization on the fifth day) whereas restoration of the cerebrovascular reserve (hemispheric blood flow increase in hypercapnia) proceeds more slowly and a nearly normal hypercapnic response is reached on day thirty. Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) show structural abnormalities of their blood vessels during the development of hypertension, leading to impaired adaptation possibilities of the cerebral vasculature after unilateral common carotid occlusion. This is indicated by the striking comparability of the compensation of hemispheric cerebral blood flow (in normo- and hypercapnia) of SH rats five days after unilateral carotid occlusion with the cerebral hemodynamic status of normotensive animals already seen 24 hours after the same occlusion. Consecutive bilateral common carotid occlusion shows that survival rate increases by increasing the interval between both occlusions. This survival relation is much more unfavorable in SH rats. The parallelism between the restoration of the measured CO2-reactivity of the blood flow in the involved hemisphere after unilateral carotid occlusion and the evolution of survival rate after

  13. Alzheimer disease and cerebrovascular pathology: an update.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, K A

    2002-05-01

    Recent epidemiological and clinico-pathologic data suggest overlaps between Alzheimer disease (AD) and cerebrovascular lesions that may magnify the effect of mild AD pathology and promote progression of cognitive decline or even may precede neuronal damage and dementia. Vascular pathology in the aging brain and in AD includes: 1. cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) with an incidence of 82-98% often associated with ApoE epsilon 2 and causing a) cerebral mass hemorrhages (around 70%, mainly in the frontal and parietal lobes), b) multiple or recurrent microhemorrhages (15%), and c) ischemic (micro-)infarcts or lacunes (around 20%). The frequency of these lesions increases with the severity of CAA and shows no correlation with that of senile amyloid plaques. CAA, significantly more frequent in patients with cerebral hemorrhages or infarcts than in aged controls, is an important risk factor for cerebrovascular lesions in AD. 2. Microvascular changes with decreased density and structural abnormalities causing regional metabolic and blood-brain barrier dysfunctions with ensuing neuronal damage. In large autopsy series of demented aged subjects, around 80% show Alzheimer type pathology, 20-40% with additional, often minor vascular lesions, 7-10% "pure" vascular dementia, and 3-5% "mixed" dementia (combination of AD and vascular encephalopathy). AD cases with additional minor cerebrovascular lesions have significantly more frequent histories of hypertension or infarcts than "pure" AD patients. Vascular lesions in AD include cortical microinfarcts, subcortical lacunes, white matter lesions / leukoencephalopathy, small hemorrhages and corticosubcortical infarcts, while in mixed type dementia multiple larger or hemispheral infarcts are more frequent. Small infarcts in AD patients have no essential impact on global cognitive decline which mainly depends on the severity of Alzheimer pathology, but in early stage of AD they may influence and promote the development of dementia

  14. Anatomy Comic Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  15. Anatomy: Spotlight on Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Beverley; Pather, Nalini; Ihunwo, Amadi O.

    2008-01-01

    Anatomy departments across Africa were surveyed regarding the type of curriculum and method of delivery of their medical courses. While the response rate was low, African anatomy departments appear to be in line with the rest of the world in that many have introduced problem based learning, have hours that are within the range of western medical…

  16. Anatomy comic strips.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective imagination. The comics were drawn on paper and then recreated with digital graphics software. More than 500 comic strips have been drawn and labeled in Korean language, and some of them have been translated into English. All comic strips can be viewed on the Department of Anatomy homepage at the Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea. The comic strips were written and drawn by experienced anatomists, and responses from viewers have generally been favorable. These anatomy comic strips, designed to help students learn the complexities of anatomy in a straightforward and humorous way, are expected to be improved further by the authors and other interested anatomists.

  17. The acute (cerebro)vascular effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Vincent; Endres, Matthias

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, i.e., statins, constitutes a milestone in the prevention of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease. The effects of statins extend far beyond their effects on cholesterol levels: pleiotropic effects include vasoprotective mechanisms, comprising improved endothelial function, increased bioavailability of nitric oxide, immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties, stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques, as well as antioxidant and stem cell-regulating capacities. Large clinical trials have clearly demonstrated that statins reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent experimental and clinical data have demonstrated that in addition to risk reduction, statins may also improve outcome after stroke and myocardial infarction, even when statins were administered after the event. Moreover, abrupt discontinuation of statin therapy after acute cardio- or cerebrovascular events may impair vascular function and increase morbidity and mortality. Beyond stroke, statin treatment also has been shown to provide protective effects in critically ill patients, e.g., after major surgery, sepsis, or in patients at high-vascular risk. However, although large randomized controlled trials are missing, ongoing trials will clarify the impact of acute statin treatment in these conditions. Although evidence is presently limited, acute statin therapy is emerging as a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of the critically ill. Until now, statins were only available as oral drugs. An IV formulation may be warranted for acute treatment of severely ill patients, for example, those who are unable to swallow or scheduled for surgery. Hydrophilic statins would be suitable for an IV formulation and have been safely tested in healthy volunteers.

  18. Student Perspectives of Imaging Anatomy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Jorge Americo Dinis; Barbosa, Joselina Maria Pinto; Ferreira, Maria Amelia Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Radiological imaging is gaining relevance in the acquisition of competencies in clinical anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of medical students on teaching/learning of imaging anatomy as an integrated part of anatomical education. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the perceptions of second-year students…

  19. Student-Directed Fresh Tissue Anatomy Course for Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare providers in all areas and levels of education depend on their knowledge of anatomy for daily practice. As educators, we are challenged with teaching the anatomical sciences in creative, integrated ways and often within a condensed time frame. This article describes the organization of a clinical anatomy course with a peer taught…

  20. A Minimally Invasive Approach to Undergraduate Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogalniceanu, Petrut; Madani, Hardi; Paraskeva, Paraskevas A.; Darzi, Ara

    2008-01-01

    Anatomy is one of the cornerstones of medical education. Unfortunately, sufficient evidence has accumulated to suggest a worldwide decline in the resources and time allocated to its teaching. Integration of anatomy with clinical medicine has been frequently advocated as the solution to this academic crisis. Consequently, new ways of harnessing…

  1. Simultaneous cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses during presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondar, R. L.; Kassam, M. S.; Stein, F.; Dunphy, P. T.; Fortney, S.; Riedesel, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Presyncope, characterized by symptoms and signs indicative of imminent syncope, can be aborted in many situations before loss of consciousness occurs. The plasticity of cerebral autoregulation in healthy humans and its behavior during this syncopal prodrome are unclear, although systemic hemodynamic instability has been suggested as a key factor in the precipitation of syncope. Using lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to simulate central hypovolemia, we previously observed falling mean flow velocities (MFVs) with maintained mean arterial blood pressure (MABP). These findings, and recent reports suggesting increased vascular tone within the cerebral vasculature at presyncope, cannot be explained by the classic static cerebral autoregulation curve; neither can they be totally explained by a recent suggestion of a rightward shift in this curve. METHODS: Four male and five female healthy volunteers were exposed to presyncopal LBNP to evaluate their cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses by use of continuous acquisition of MFV from the right middle cerebral artery with transcranial Doppler sonography, MABP (Finapres), and heart rate (ECG). RESULTS: At presyncope, MFV dropped on average by 27.3 +/- 14% of its baseline value (P < .05), while MABP remained at 2.0 +/- 27% above its baseline level. Estimated cerebrovascular resistance increased during LBNP. The percentage change from baseline to presyncope in MFV and MABP revealed consistent decreases in MFV before MABP. CONCLUSIONS: Increased estimated cerebrovascular resistance, falling MFV, and constant MABP are evidence of an increase in cerebral vascular tone with falling flow, suggesting a downward shift in the cerebral autoregulation curve. Cerebral vessels may have a differential sensitivity to sympathetic drive or more than one type of sympathetic innervation. Future work to induce dynamic changes in MABP during LBNP may help in assessing the plasticity of the cerebral autoregulation

  2. An ontological modeling approach to cerebrovascular disease studies: the NEUROWEB case.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Gianluca; Merico, Daniele; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; De Paoli, Flavio; Ellul, John; Frisoni, Giuseppe; Nagy, Zoltan; van der Lugt, Aad; Vassányi, István; Antoniotti, Marco

    2010-08-01

    The NEUROWEB project supports cerebrovascular researchers' association studies, intended as the search for statistical correlations between a feature (e.g., a genotype) and a phenotype. In this project the phenotype refers to the patients' pathological state, and thus it is formulated on the basis of the clinical data collected during the diagnostic activity. In order to enhance the statistical robustness of the association inquiries, the project involves four European Union clinical institutions. Each institution provides its proprietary repository, storing patients' data. Although all sites comply with common diagnostic guidelines, they also adopt specific protocols, resulting in partially discrepant repository contents. Therefore, in order to effectively exploit NEUROWEB data for association studies, it is necessary to provide a framework for the phenotype formulation, grounded on the clinical repository content which explicitly addresses the inherent integration problem. To that end, we developed an ontological model for cerebrovascular phenotypes, the NEUROWEB Reference Ontology, composed of three layers. The top-layer (Top Phenotypes) is an expert-based cerebrovascular disease taxonomy. The middle-layer deconstructs the Top Phenotypes into more elementary phenotypes (Low Phenotypes) and general-use medical concepts such as anatomical parts and topological concepts. The bottom-layer (Core Data Set, or CDS) comprises the clinical indicators required for cerebrovascular disorder diagnosis. Low Phenotypes are connected to the bottom-layer (CDS) by specifying what combination of CDS values is required for their existence. Finally, CDS elements are mapped to the local repositories of clinical data. The NEUROWEB system exploits the Reference Ontology to query the different repositories and to retrieve patients characterized by a common phenotype.

  3. Skull Base Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base.

  4. Does Spatial Ability Help the Learning of Anatomy in a Biomedical Science Course?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Kevin; Hayes, Jennifer A.; Chiavaroli, Neville

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional appreciation of the human body is the cornerstone of clinical anatomy. Spatial ability has previously been found to be associated with students' ability to learn anatomy and their examination performance. The teaching of anatomy has been the subject of major change over the last two decades with the reduction in time spent…

  5. Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumwalt, Ann C.; Lufler, Rebecca S.; Monteiro, Joseph; Shaffer, Kitt

    2010-01-01

    Active learning exercises were developed to allow advanced medical students to revisit and review anatomy in a clinically meaningful context. In our curriculum, students learn anatomy two to three years before they participate in the radiology clerkship. These educational exercises are designed to review anatomy content while highlighting its…

  6. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughson, Richard Lee; Shoemaker, Joel Kevin; Blaber, Andrew Philip; Arbeille, Philippe; Greaves, Danielle Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS (CCISS) will study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on crew members' heart functions and their blood vessels that supply the brain. Learning more about the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems could lead to specific countermeasures that might better protect future space travelers. This experiment is collaborative with the Canadian Space Agency.

  7. Cerebrovascular Complications of Diabetes: Alpha Glucosidase Inhibitor as Potential Therapy.

    PubMed

    Patel, S S

    2016-02-01

    Increased risk of cerebrovascular accident in diabetes cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors. Epidemiological studies show that postprandial hyperglycemia is strongly associated with cerebrovascular events and cerebrovascular-associated mortality. Postprandial hyperglycemia contributes to vascular damage by several mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, arthrosclerosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hypercoagulability. Hyperglycemia has deleterious effects on the vascular endothelium and leads to the development of cerebrovascular disease. Thus, an important strategy to reduce cerebrovascular risk in patients with diabetes is to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and α-glucosidase inhibitors predominantly reduce postprandial plasma glucose levels. Among all of these, α-glucosidase inhibitors reduces postprandial hyperglycemia by delaying carbohydrate absorption from the intestine and this mechanism provides glycemic control without exacerbating coexisting cerebrovascular risk factors. Good glycemic control is proven to reduce the risk of cardiovascular complications, but equivalent evidence for cerebrovascular risk reduction is lacking. This review examines the evidences that postprandial hyperglycemia plays a major role in vascular damage, along with the complex interplay between hyperglycemia and coexisting risk factors. Furthermore, the mechanism by which α-glucosidase inhibitors may prevent this vascular damage as well as risk of hypoglycemia with α-glucosidase inhibitors are examined. Thus, this review suggests that α-glucosidase inhibitors are useful in reducing the risk of cerebrovascular events in patients with diabetes.

  8. Cerebrovascular disease in Utah, 1968--1971.

    PubMed

    Lyon, J L; Bishop, C T; Nielsen, N S

    1981-01-01

    Utah mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease (ICD numbers 430--438) are 13% below U.S. rates. About 70% of Utahns are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly called Mormons of LDS, which proscribes use of tobacco and alcohol. Other studies on this group have found significantly lower occurrence of many cancers and ischemic heart disease. We tested the hypothesis that Utah's lower cerebrovascular disease (CBVD) mortality was contributed by the LDS population. We classified by religion all CBVD deaths (2,521) (except subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral embolism) occurring in the state in 1968--1971. No significant difference was found between LDS and non-LDS, but both groups had mortality rates below U.S. expectation. Although recent studies have reported smoking to be a risk factor for CBVD, we found no consistent difference between the LDS and non-LDS, even in the younger age groups. The results do not support the hypothesis that tobacco is an important etiologic agent in CBVD mortality.

  9. Factors affecting the determination of cerebrovascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Rosemary E; Fisher, Joseph A; Duffin, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), measures the ability of the cerebrovasculature to respond to vasoactive stimuli such as CO2. CVR is often expressed as the ratio of cerebral blood flow change to CO2 change. We examine several factors affecting this measurement: blood pressure, stimulus pattern, response analysis and subject position. Methods Step and ramp increases in CO2 were implemented in nine subjects, seated and supine. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were determined breath-by-breath. Cerebrovascular conductance (MCAc) was estimated as MCAv/MAP. CVR was calculated from both the relative and absolute measures of MCAc and MCAv responses. Results MAP increased with CO2 in some subjects so that relative CVR calculated from conductance responses were less than those calculated from CVR calculated from velocity responses. CVR measured from step responses were affected by the response dynamics, and were less than those calculated from CVR measured from ramp responses. Subject position did not affect CVR. Conclusions (1) MAP increases with CO2 and acts as a confounding factor for CVR measurement; (2) CVR depends on the stimulus pattern used; (3) CVR did not differ from the sitting versus supine in these experiments; (4) CVR calculated from absolute changes of MCAv was less than that calculated from relative changes. PMID:25328852

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with delusional disorder due to diffuse cerebrovascular disease: a report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Su, K P; Hsu, C Y; Hsieh, S C; Shen, W W

    2001-04-01

    Delusions associated with cerebrovascular diseases have been sporadically reported. Although both psychiatrists and neurologists attempted to link delusions with anatomical locations of the brain lesion, comorbid psychiatric and neurological disorders make the interpretation of delusions difficult. The purpose of the present paper is to report the clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics in patients with delusional disorder due to diffuse cerebrovascular diseases, and to redefine the concept of 'vascular delusion'. The clinical features and MRI findings were reviewed retrospectively in a series of seven patients with 'delusional disorder due to cerebrovascular disease' as defined in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSMIV). The average age of onset is 64. No patient had a prior personal or family history of major psychiatric illness. The illness is presented as acute, subacute or stepwise course. Hypertension was present in all patients. Two had diabetes mellitus, and one had atrial fibrillation. Three had clinical evidence of previous cerebrovascular attacks, only one showed minor neurological deficits. Three had diffuse cortical slow wave in electroencephalogram. No patient had significant cognitive impairment but had multiple cortical and subcortical cerebrovascular lesions in MRI, with white-matter lesions (WML) in bilateral frontal areas. Delusional disorder due to diffuse cerebrovascular change is characterized by late-onset, stepwise course, and comorbid medical and neurological diseases. The results of vascular changes in the present study did not establish a cause-effect relationship and should be considered as multifactorial in pathogenesis. The findings suggested the hypothesis of neural circuit theory. Further studies in larger numbers of patients and newer neuroimaging techniques are needed to expand the knowledge learned from these findings.

  12. Comparison of a Gross Anatomy Laboratory to Online Anatomy Software for Teaching Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if…

  13. Anatomy and art.

    PubMed

    Laios, Konstantinos; Tsoukalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci, Jean Falcon, Andreas Vesalius, Henry Gray, Henry Vandyke Carter and Frank Netter created some of the best atlases of anatomy. Their works constitute not only scientific medical projects but also masterpieces of art.

  14. Oral anatomy laboratory examinations in a physical therapy program.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days. During the time that a tagged examination is being created, student productivity may be reduced as the anatomy laboratory is inaccessible to students. Further, the type of questions that can be asked in a tagged laboratory examination may limit student assessment to lower level cognitive abilities and may limit the instructors' ability to assess the students' understanding of anatomical and clinical concepts. Anatomy is a foundational science in the Physical Therapy curriculum and a thorough understanding of anatomy is necessary to progress through the subsequent clinical courses. Physical therapy curricula have evolved to reflect the changing role of physical therapists to primary caregivers by introducing a greater scope of clinical courses earlier in the curriculum. Physical therapy students must have a thorough understanding of clinical anatomy early in the education process. However, traditional anatomy examination methods may not be reflective of the clinical thought processes required of physical therapy students. Traditional laboratory examination methods also reduce student productivity by limiting access during examination set-up and breakdown. To provide a greater complexity of questions and reduced overall laboratory time required for examinations, the Physical Therapy Program at Mercer University has introduced oral laboratory examinations for the gross anatomy course series.

  15. Teaching Anatomy in the XXI Century: New Aspects and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Veronica; Vaccarezza, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation, racial background, or medical school system. By learning gross anatomy, medical students get a first “impression” about the structure of the human body which is the basis for understanding pathologic and clinical problems. Although the importance of teaching anatomy to both undergraduate and postgraduate students remains undisputed, there is currently a relevant debate concerning methods of anatomy teaching. In the past century, dissection and lectures were its sole pedagogy worldwide. Recently, the time allocated for anatomy teaching was dramatically reduced to such an extent that some suggest that it has fallen below an adequate standard. Traditional anatomy education based on topographical structural anatomy taught in lectures and gross dissection classes has been replaced by a multiple range of study modules, including problem-based learning, plastic models or computer-assisted learning, and curricula integration. “Does the anatomical theatre still have a place in medical education?” And “what is the problem with anatomic specimens?” We endeavor to answer both of these questions and to contribute to the debate on the current situation in undergraduate and graduate anatomy education. Doctors without anatomy are like moles.They work in the dark and the work of their hands are mounds. Friedrich TiedemannThe foundation of the study of the art of operating must be laid in the dissecting room. Robert Liston PMID:24367240

  16. Patent foramen ovale and cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Desai, Amish J; Fuller, Cindy J; Jesurum, Jill T; Reisman, Mark

    2006-08-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) has been linked to ischemic strokes of undetermined cause (cryptogenic strokes). PFO-a remnant of fetal circulation when the foramen ovale does not seal after birth-can permit microemboli to escape the pulmonary filter into the intracranial circulation, causing stroke. Coexistent atrial septal aneurysm, pelvic deep vein thrombosis and inherited clotting factor deficiencies could potentiate stroke risk in patients with PFO. Transcatheter PFO closure, a minimally invasive procedure, is one technique used to prevent recurrent cerebrovascular events. A connection between PFO and migraine headache has been conceptualized from retrospective evidence of reduced migraine frequency and severity after PFO closure; however, prospective randomized trials are needed to verify the efficacy of PFO closure on migraine prevention. In this review we discuss embryologic origins, diagnostic techniques and treatment options for prevention of paradoxical embolism thought to be related to PFO, and the relation of PFO to cryptogenic stroke and migraine.

  17. Cysticercosis and cerebrovascular disease: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, O H

    1992-01-01

    Ischaemic cerebrovascular disease is a relatively common but under-recognised complication of neurocysticercosis. It is usually caused by inflammatory occlusion of the arteries at the base of the brain secondary to cysticercotic arachnoiditis. In most cases, the involved vessels are of small diameter and the neurological picture is limited to a lacunar syndrome secondary to a small cerebral infarct. However, large infarcts related to the occlusion of the middle cerebral artery or even the internal carotid artery have also been reported in this setting. CT and CSF examination usually support the cause-and-effect relationship between neurocysticercosis and the cerebral infarct by showing abnormalities compatible with cysticercotic arachnoiditis. An accurate diagnosis of this condition is important since early treatment with steroids is advised to ameliorate the subarachnoid inflammatory reaction which may cause recurrent cerebral infarcts. PMID:1583508

  18. Aging and cerebrovascular dysfunction: contribution of hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vasilevko, Vitaly; Passos, Giselle F; Quiring, Daniel; Head, Elizabeth; Kim, Richard C; Fisher, Mark; Cribbs, David H

    2010-10-01

    Age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs), microbleeds, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cognitive decline. Importantly, there is increasing recognition that this dysfunction plays a critical secondary role in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Atherosclerosis, hypertension, and CAA are the most common causes of blood-brain barrier (BBB) lesions. The accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in the cerebrovascular system is a significant risk factor for ICH and has been linked to endothelial transport failure and blockage of perivascular drainage. Moreover, recent anti-Aβ immunotherapy clinical trials demonstrated efficient clearance of parenchymal amyloid deposits but have been plagued by CAA-associated adverse events. Although management of hypertension and atherosclerosis can reduce the incidence of ICH, there are currently no approved therapies for attenuating CAA. Thus, there is a critical need for new strategies that improve BBB function and limit the development of β-amyloidosis in the cerebral vasculature.

  19. Crowdsourcing Precision Cerebrovascular Health: Imaging and Cloud Seeding A Million Brains Initiative™.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, an unorthodox approach in medicine, creates an unusual paradigm to study precision cerebrovascular health, eliminating the relative isolation and non-standardized nature of current imaging data infrastructure, while shifting emphasis to the astounding capacity of big data in the cloud. This perspective envisions the use of imaging data of the brain and vessels to orient and seed A Million Brains Initiative™ that may leapfrog incremental advances in stroke and rapidly provide useful data to the sizable population around the globe prone to the devastating effects of stroke and vascular substrates of dementia. Despite such variability in the type of data available and other limitations, the data hierarchy logically starts with imaging and can be enriched with almost endless types and amounts of other clinical and biological data. Crowdsourcing allows an individual to contribute to aggregated data on a population, while preserving their right to specific information about their own brain health. The cloud now offers endless storage, computing prowess, and neuroimaging applications for postprocessing that is searchable and scalable. Collective expertise is a windfall of the crowd in the cloud and particularly valuable in an area such as cerebrovascular health. The rise of precision medicine, rapidly evolving technological capabilities of cloud computing and the global imperative to limit the public health impact of cerebrovascular disease converge in the imaging of A Million Brains Initiative™. Crowdsourcing secure data on brain health may provide ultimate generalizability, enable focused analyses, facilitate clinical practice, and accelerate research efforts.

  20. Crowdsourcing Precision Cerebrovascular Health: Imaging and Cloud Seeding A Million Brains Initiative™

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, an unorthodox approach in medicine, creates an unusual paradigm to study precision cerebrovascular health, eliminating the relative isolation and non-standardized nature of current imaging data infrastructure, while shifting emphasis to the astounding capacity of big data in the cloud. This perspective envisions the use of imaging data of the brain and vessels to orient and seed A Million Brains Initiative™ that may leapfrog incremental advances in stroke and rapidly provide useful data to the sizable population around the globe prone to the devastating effects of stroke and vascular substrates of dementia. Despite such variability in the type of data available and other limitations, the data hierarchy logically starts with imaging and can be enriched with almost endless types and amounts of other clinical and biological data. Crowdsourcing allows an individual to contribute to aggregated data on a population, while preserving their right to specific information about their own brain health. The cloud now offers endless storage, computing prowess, and neuroimaging applications for postprocessing that is searchable and scalable. Collective expertise is a windfall of the crowd in the cloud and particularly valuable in an area such as cerebrovascular health. The rise of precision medicine, rapidly evolving technological capabilities of cloud computing and the global imperative to limit the public health impact of cerebrovascular disease converge in the imaging of A Million Brains Initiative™. Crowdsourcing secure data on brain health may provide ultimate generalizability, enable focused analyses, facilitate clinical practice, and accelerate research efforts. PMID:27921034

  1. Contemporary art and the ethics of anatomy.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2007-01-01

    The ethics of anatomy bears on the ways in which we present and behold human bodies and human remains, as well as on the duties we have with regard to the persons whose bodies or body parts are presented. Anatomy is also a mode of thought and of social organization. Following Merleau-Ponty's assertion that the human body belongs both to the particular and to the metaphysical, I contend that art's ways of rendering of the particular in human anatomy often bring into relief metaphysical and ethical insights relevant to clinical medicine. This paper discusses the art of Gideon Gechtman, Mary Ellen Mark, Shari Zolla, and Christine Borland. It considers the relationship of these artists to earlier artistic traditions and the implications of their work for contemporary medicine and the biopsychosocial paradigm. Andrew Wyeth, the Visible Male Project, the Isenheim Altarpiece by GrA(1/4)newald, and an anonymous Dutch Baroque portrait are also discussed.

  2. Anatomy and ethics: an exploration of some ethical dimensions of contemporary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Jones, D G

    1998-01-01

    Anatomy and ethics have traditionally been viewed as inhabiting different conceptual worlds on the assumption that the practice of anatomy is ethically neutral. This assumption is challenged by critiquing the nature of anatomy and by demonstrating that ethical issues pervade anatomical study. This should come as no surprise since anatomy deals with the structure of the human body, and it is the human body and human tissues that are central to bioethical questions concerning human life in both health and disease, at its beginning and end and in research and clinical practice. Furthermore, many issues of interest to anatomists, such as the mechanisms of organ and fetal tissue transplantation, the neurological bases of aging and dementia, and definitions of brain death, are best tackled by venturing into questions usually dealt with in a clinical context. By the same token, a number of clinical issues can be approached helpfully from starting points provided by anatomy, although they too have ethical dimensions. To illustrate the close interrelationship between anatomical and ethical issues, two topic areas are discussed: research on archeological human remains and the notion of the pre-embryo.

  3. [Laurentius on anatomy].

    PubMed

    Sawai, Tadashi; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2005-03-01

    Andreas Laurentius wrote Opera anatomica (1593) and Historia anatomica (1600). These books were composed of two types of chapters; 'historia' and 'quaestio'. His description is not original, but take from other anatomists. 'Historia' describes the structure, action and usefulness of the body parts clarified after dissection. 'Quaestio' treats those questions which could not be solved only by dissection. Laurentius cited many previous contradicting interpretations to these questions and choose a best interpretation for the individual questions. In most cases, Laurentius preferred Galen's view. Historia anatomica retained almost all the 'historia' and 'quaestio' from Opera anatomica, and added some new 'historia' and 'quaestio', especially in regard to the components of the body, such as ligaments, membranes, vessels, nerves and glands. Other new 'historia' and 'quaestio' in Historia anatomica concerned several topics on anatomy in general to comprehensively analyze the history of anatomy, methods of anatomy, and usefulness of anatomy. Historia anatomica reviewed what was anatomy by describing in 'historia' what was known and in 'quaestio' what was unresolved. Till now Laurentius's anatomical works have attracted little attention because his description contained few original findings and depended on previous books. However, the important fact that Historia anatomica was very popular in the 17th century tells us that people needed non-original and handbook style of this textbook. Historia anatomica is important for further research on the propagation of anatomical knowledge from professional anatomists to non-professionals in the 17th century.

  4. [Viennese school of anatomy].

    PubMed

    Angetter, D C

    1999-10-01

    Anatomical science played a minor role in Vienna for centuries until Gerard van Swieten, in the 18th century, recognized the importance of anatomy for medical education. In the 19th century the anatomical school at the University of Vienna development to its height. A new building and a collection of preparations attracted a large number of students. Finally, a second department of anatomy was established. Political ideologies started to affect this institution in the beginning of the 20th century. Anti-Semitism emerged and caused uproars and fights among the students of the two departments. In 1938 both were united under Eduard Pernkopf, a dedicated Nazi and chairman of the department of anatomy, Decan of the medical faculty (1938-1943) and later on President of the University of Vienna (1943-1945). He was suspected of using cadavers of executed persons for the purpose of research and education.

  5. Surgical anatomy of the larynx.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, G; Lichtenegger, R

    1997-09-01

    Modern functionally oriented surgery of the larynx increasingly requires exact knowledge of the anatomy and landmarks of the endolaryngeal structures in relation to the laryngeal skeleton. Review of the literature reveals several opposing statements and controversial anatomical definitions regarding several clinically critical points. In order to obtain basic anatomical data morphological measurements were performed on a total of 50 laryngeal specimens. Measurements were taken on whole organs and on cuts in the horizontal and in the frontal plane, as well. The data were evaluated statistically, which resulted in the determination of average configurations and dimensions of cartilages and soft tissues of the larynx. In particular, the projection of the deeper structures on the surface and the distances and angles between the different structures were taken into consideration. In order to make these data clinically applicable a scale model has been developed that will allow a direct correlation and application for individual surgery.

  6. Comparison of a gross anatomy laboratory to online anatomy software for teaching anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if equivalent learning outcomes could be achieved regardless of learning tool used. In addition, it was important to determine why students chose the gross anatomy laboratory over online AnatomyTV. A two group, post-test only design was used with data gathered at the end of the course. Primary outcomes were students' grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction. In addition, a survey was used to collect descriptive data. One cadaver prosection was available for every four students in the gross anatomy laboratory. AnatomyTV was available online through the university library. At the conclusion of the course, the gross anatomy laboratory group had significantly higher grade percentage, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction than the AnatomyTV group. However, the practical significance of the difference is debatable. The significantly greater time spent in gross anatomy laboratory during the laboratory portion of the course may have affected the study outcomes. In addition, some students may find the difference in (B+) versus (A-) grade as not practically significant. Further research needs to be conducted to identify what specific anatomy teaching resources are most effective beyond prosection for students without access to a gross anatomy laboratory.

  7. Anatomy for biomedical engineers.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephen W; Robb, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that were of particular interest to them. Following completion of all the dissections, the students presented what they had learned to the entire class in the anatomy laboratory. This course has fulfilled an important need for our students.

  8. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians.

  9. Elderly woman with cerebrovascular accident and refractory arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sethi, S K; Sarm, P S A

    2009-11-01

    Fatal bilateral cerebro-vascular accident with variable atrio-ventricular blocks, atrial fibrillation and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in a previously healthy 75-years-old hypertensive female is presented.

  10. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  11. Screening for cerebrovascular disease in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II): an evidence-based proposal.

    PubMed

    Perry, Luke D; Robertson, Fergus; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2013-04-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (OMIM 210720) is a rare autosomal recessive condition frequently associated with early-onset cerebrovascular disease. Presymptomatic detection and intervention could prevent the adverse consequences associated with this. We reviewed published cases of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II to ascertain prevalence and characteristics of cerebrovascular disease and use these data to propose an evidence-based approach to cerebrovascular screening. Of 147 cases identified, 47 had cerebrovascular disease (32%), including occlusive arteriopathy (including moyamoya) and cerebral aneurysmal disease. Occlusive disease occurred in younger individuals, and progression can be both rapid and clinically silent. A reasonable screening approach would be magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the cervical and intracranial circulation at diagnosis, repeated at yearly intervals until 10 years, and every 2 years thereafter, unless clinical concerns occur earlier. At present it would appear that this needs to be life-long. Families and professionals should be alerted to the potential significance of neurologic symptoms and measures should be taken to maintain good vascular health in affected individuals.

  12. [Hospital mortality of cerebrovascular insult in the Western Herzegovina Canton in the period 1998-2002].

    PubMed

    Vasilj, Ivan; Cavaljuga, Semra; Lucić, Tomo; Kvesić, Ferdo

    2005-01-01

    Cerebro-vascular insult is defined as sudden focal neurological deficit, caused by a cerebro-vascular disease lasting more then 24 hours. In this paper result of a retrospective epidemiological study of cerebro-vascular insult hospitalized and died patients from West Hercegovina Canton, was given. The study was done in Clinical hospital Mostar, for the period from 1998 to 2002. The source of the data was this hospital medical documentation. This hospital serves a total of 88,257 population of West Hercegovina Canton. A total of 393 insult cases were analyzed, out of which were 189 or 48.1% of male and 204 or 51.9% female patients. Hospital lethality found for that period was 37.4% (147 patients died out of 393 treated). Out of a total number of exited patients 37.1% (70 out of 189) were male and 37.7% (77 out of 204) were female patients. The highest lethality among both sexes was above the age of 65 years of life (37.4%), while the least was among patients between 30 to 49 years of life (25.0%).

  13. Requirements for an on-line knowledge-based anatomy information system.

    PubMed Central

    Brinkley, J. F.; Rosse, C.

    1998-01-01

    User feedback from the Digital Anatomist Web-based anatomy atlases, together with over 20 years of anatomy teaching experience, were used to formulate the requirements and system design for a next-generation anatomy information system. The main characteristic of this system over current image-based approaches is that it is knowledge-based. A foundational model of anatomy is accessed by an intelligent agent that uses its knowledge about the available anatomy resources and the user types to generate customized interfaces. Current usage statistics suggest that even partial implementation of this design will be of great practical value for both clinical and educational needs. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929347

  14. [The importance of bronchoscopic anatomy for anesthesiologists].

    PubMed

    Hoşten, Tülay; Topçu, Salih

    2011-01-01

    One-lung ventilation (OLV) is a sine qua non of thoracic surgery and requires knowledge and talent. Close familiarity with equipments used for OLV as well as bronchoscopy and respiratory tract anatomy is important for successful OLV. We aim to outline the bronchoscopic anatomy of the tracheobronchial tree and OLV equipment for anesthetists and thoracic surgeons in this review. The recorded preoperative and intraoperative bronchoscopic applications of the patients hospitalized in our Thoracic Surgery clinic for diagnosis and treatment have been evaluated from an anesthetist's perspective. Anatomic landmarks were identified in the bronchoscopic evaluation. Optimal and misplacement images of double-lumen tubes (DLT) and bronchial blockers (BB) used for OLV in our clinic were obtained via fiber optic bronchoscopy. While left lung isolation can be made more safely due to the anatomy of the left main bronchus, placement of both DLTs and BBs to the right main bronchus requires greater care. Success in OLV procedures would increase with anesthetists being well informed about the fiber optic bronchoscopic anatomy of the tracheobronchial tree and in close cooperation with the surgical team.

  15. Complementing anatomy education using three-dimensional anatomy mobile software applications on tablet computers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T L; Burnett, B; Tunstall, R G; Abrahams, P H

    2014-04-01

    Anatomy has traditionally been a cornerstone of medical education, which has been taught via dissection and didactic lectures. The rising prevalence of mobile tablet technology means medical software applications ("apps") play an increasingly important role in medical education. The applications highlighted in this article will aid anatomical educators to identify which are the most useful in clinical, academic, and educational environments. These have been systematically identified by downloading all applications with keywords related to anatomy and then carrying out qualitative assessment. Novel anatomy applications from developers such as Visible Body, 3D4Medical, and Pocket Anatomy allow students to visualize and manipulate complex anatomical structures using detailed 3D models. They often contain additional content including clinical correlations and a range of media from instructional videos to interactive quiz functions. The strength of tablet technology lies in its ability to consolidate and present anatomical information to the user in the most appropriate manner for their learning style. The only question mark remains over the level of detail and accuracy of these applications. Innovative medical educators who embrace tablet technology will find that anatomy applications serve as a useful learning tool when used in conjunction with existing teaching setups.

  16. Cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reserve capacity: estimation by dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, W G; Gückel, F; Stritzke, P; Schmiedek, P; Schwartz, A; Brix, G

    1998-10-01

    We have developed a new method for estimation of regional CBF (rCBF) and cerebrovascular reserve capacity on a pixel-by-pixel basis by means of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen healthy volunteers, 8 patients with occlusion and/or high grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA), and 2 patients with acute stroke underwent dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast enhanced MRI. Using principles of indicator dilution theory and deconvolution analysis, maps of rCBF, regional cerebral blood volume, and of the mean transit time (MTT) were calculated. In patients with ICA occlusion/stenosis, cerebrovascular reserve capacity was assessed by the rCBF increase after acetazolamide stimulation. Mean gray and white matter rCBF values in normals were 67.1 and 23.7 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1), respectively. Before acetazolamide stimulation, six of eight patients with ICA occlusions showed decreased rCBF values; and in seven patients increased MTT values were observed in tissue ipsilateral to the occlusion. After acetazolamide stimulation, decreased cerebrovascular reserve capacity was observed in five of eight patients with ICA occlusion. In acute stroke, rCBF in the central core of ischemia was less than 8 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1). In peri-infarct tissue, rCBF and MTT were higher than in unaffected tissue but rCBF was normal. Dynamic MRI provides important clinical information on the hemodynamic state of brain tissue in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease or acute stroke.

  17. Neuroimaging of Cerebrovascular Disease in the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay; Nair, Sreejit; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Kishore, Sirish; Johnson, Carl E.; Comunale, Joseph P.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease remains a significant public health burden with its greatest impact on the elderly population. Advances in neuroimaging techniques allow detailed and sophisticated evaluation of many manifestations of cerebrovascular disease in the brain parenchyma as well as in the intracranial and extracranial vasculature. These tools continue to contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial processes that occur in the age-dependent development of cerebrovascular disease. Structural abnormalities related to vascular disease in the brain and vessels have been well characterized with CT and MRI based techniques. We review some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in the aging brain and cerebral vasculature and the related structural abnormalities detectable on neuroimaging, including evaluation of age-related white matter changes, atherosclerosis of the cerebral vasculature, and cerebral infarction. In addition, newer neuroimaging techniques, such as diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion techniques, and assessment of cerebrovascular reserve, are also reviewed, as these techniques can detect physiologic alterations which complement the morphologic changes that cause cerebrovascular disease in the aging brain.Further investigation of these advanced imaging techniques has potential application to the understanding and diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease in the elderly. PMID:23185721

  18. Illustrated Speech Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, William M.

    Written for students in the fields of speech correction and audiology, the text deals with the following: structures involved in respiration; the skeleton and the processes of inhalation and exhalation; phonation and pitch, the larynx, and esophageal speech; muscles involved in articulation; muscles involved in resonance; and the anatomy of the…

  19. Anatomy of the Honeybee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postiglione, Ralph

    1977-01-01

    In this insect morphology exercise, students study the external anatomy of the worker honeybee. The structures listed and illustrated are discussed in relation to their functions. A goal of the exercise is to establish the bee as a well-adapted, social insect. (MA)

  20. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The…

  1. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  2. Initial and serial evoked potentials in cerebrovascular critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Walter F; Pawlik, Gunter; Thiel, Alexander

    2006-10-01

    Results of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) examinations performed early in the clinical course of patients with acute cerebrovascular disease correlate statistically significantly with outcome regardless of type and localization of the primary lesion. The prognostic value of serial examinations of SEP and BAEP has not been studied yet. The authors examined a group of 215 patients suffering from acute stroke requiring neurocritical care composed of 75 supratentorial and 36 infratentorial ischemic strokes, 58 supratentorial and 18 infratentorial hemorrhages, and 28 aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhages prospectively using spinal and cortical SEP and BAEP according to routine procedures on admission as well as after 1 and 2 weeks. The findings were correlated to outcome at 4 weeks. Statistical assessment was performed using standard methods of contingency analysis. In all groups, SEP findings were significantly correlated with outcome at initial and all subsequent examinations, similar correlations were also found for BAEP. However, after partialling out the prognostic information gained from the initial examination of SEP and BAEP, the follow-up examinations rendered only a marginal increase in prognostic information. Therefore, the initial examination of evoked potentials supplies valuable prognostic information, however, serial examinations of evoked potentials during the first weeks of disease improve the prognostic information only marginally.

  3. [Nuts, cardio and cerebrovascular risks. A Spanish perspective].

    PubMed

    Nus, Meritxell; Ruperto, Mar; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2004-06-01

    Nuts have been included in human diets for ages. They are very appreciated and used as a central component of sweets and desserts. However, during the last decades, scientific interest in those foods has increased enormously as many epidemiologic studies show protective effects of nut consumption on coronary heart disease in different population groups. To date, many clinical trials have analyzed the positive effects of nuts consumption (almond, walnut, pistachio, Macadamia nut, and pecan) on the lipid profile, decreasing total and low density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol. However, whether these effects are only due to their fatty acid composition or to any other bioactive compounds, such as tocopherols, phytosterols and phytoestrogens, it is still unknown. This paper, aims to review comparative composition aspects of nuts, such as the positive effects on body weight, lipoprotein metabolism, and protection against cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The inclusion of 25 g/day of nuts, mainly raw, into a prudent diet seems to be recommended. Further investigations, as actual information is still scarce, in order to dilucidate the relationship between nuts consumption and vascular diseases are proposed.

  4. Cerebrovascular disease, beta-amyloid and cognition in aging

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Natalie L.; Reed, Bruce R.; DeCarli, Charles S.; Madison, Cindee M.; Weiner, Michael W.; Chui, Helena C.; Jagust, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated cerebrovascular disease (CVD), β-amyloid (Aβ), and cognition in clinically normal elderly adults. Fifty-four participants underwent MRI, PIB-PET imaging, and neuropsychological evaluation. High white matter hyperintensity burden and/or presence of infarct defined CVD status (CVD−: N = 27; CVD+: N = 27). PIB-PET ratios of Aβ deposition were extracted using Logan plotting (cerebellar reference). Presence of high levels of Aβ in prespecified regions determined PIB status (PIB−: N = 33; PIB+: N = 21). Executive functioning and episodic memory were measured using composite scales. CVD and Aβ, defined as dichotomous or continuous variables, were unrelated to one another. CVD+ participants showed lower executive functioning (P = 0.001) when compared to CVD− individuals. Neither PIB status nor amount of Aβ affected cognition (Ps ≥ .45), and there was no statistical interaction between CVD and PIB on either cognitive measure. Within this spectrum of normal aging CVD and Aβ aggregation appear to be independent processes with CVD primarily affecting cognition. PMID:22048124

  5. Cerebrovascular complications in pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Anil; Sharma, Rachna; Gupta, Dhiren

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular complications are being frequently recognized in the pediatric intensive care unit in the recent few years. The epidemiology and risk factors for pediatric stroke are different from that of the adults. The incidence of ischemic stroke is almost slightly more than that of hemorrhagic stroke. The list of diagnostic causes is increasing with the availability of newer imaging modalities and laboratory tests. The diagnostic work up depends on the age of the child and the rapidity of presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and arteriography and venography are the mainstay of diagnosis and to differentiate between ischemic and hemorrhagic events. Very sophisticated molecular diagnostic tests are required in a very few patients. There are very few pediatric studies on the management of stroke. General supportive management is as important as the specific treatment. Most of the treatment guidelines and suggestions are extrapolated from the adult studies. Few guidelines are available for the use of anticoagulants and thrombolytic agents in pediatric patients. So, our objective was to review the available literature on the childhood stroke and to provide an insight into the subject for the pediatricians and critical care providers. PMID:21253346

  6. The integrated anatomy practical paper: A robust assessment method for anatomy education today.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire F; McManus, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Assessing anatomy in a way that tests higher cognitive domains and clinical application is not always straightforward. The old "spotter" examination has been criticized for only testing low level "identify" knowledge, whereas other assessment modalities such as multiple choice questions do not reflect the three dimensional and application nature of clinical anatomy. Medical curricula are frequently integrated and subject specific examinations do not reflect the case based, spiral, integrative nature of the curricula. The integrated anatomy practical paper (IAPP) is a hybrid of the old "spotter" and an objective structured clinical examination but it demonstrates how higher levels of taxonomy can be assessed, together with clinical features and integrates well with other disciplines. Importantly, the IAPP has shown to be reliable and practical to administer. Data gathered from the Bachelor of Medicine five-year program over two academic years for four IAPP examinations, each being 40 minutes with (K = 60 items) based on 440 students revealed consistently strong reliability coefficients (Cronbach alpha) of up to 0.923. Applying Blooms taxonomy to questions has shown a marked shift resulting in an increase in the complexity level being tested; between 2009 and 2013 a reduction of 26% in the number of low level "remember knowledge" domain questions was noted with up to an increase of 15% in "understanding" domain and 12% increase in the "applying" knowledge domain. Our findings highlight that it is possible to test, based in a laboratory, anatomy knowledge and application that is integrated and fit for practice.

  7. Interprofessional approach for teaching functional knee joint anatomy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jakob J; Obmann, Markus M; Gießler, Marianne; Schuldis, Dominik; Brückner, Ann-Kathrin; Strohm, Peter C; Sandeck, Florian; Spittau, Björn

    2017-03-01

    Profound knowledge in functional and clinical anatomy is a prerequisite for efficient diagnosis in medical practice. However, anatomy teaching does not always consider functional and clinical aspects. Here we introduce a new interprofessional approach to effectively teach the anatomy of the knee joint. The presented teaching approach involves anatomists, orthopaedists and physical therapists to teach anatomy of the knee joint in small groups under functional and clinical aspects. The knee joint courses were implemented during early stages of the medical curriculum and medical students were grouped with students of physical therapy to sensitize students to the importance of interprofessional work. Evaluation results clearly demonstrate that medical students and physical therapy students appreciated this teaching approach. First evaluations of following curricular anatomy exams suggest a benefit of course participants in knee-related multiple choice questions. Together, the interprofessional approach presented here proves to be a suitable approach to teach functional and clinical anatomy of the knee joint and further trains interprofessional work between prospective physicians and physical therapists as a basis for successful healthcare management.

  8. Anatomy for nurses: providing students with the best learning experience.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amy N B

    2010-07-01

    A good understanding of human anatomy is clinically relevant for many health care professionals. A detailed knowledge of where, as well as how, to palpate, percuss or auscultate is essential for adequate assessment, provision of treatment and ongoing care of patients. Thus, the linking of human anatomy and clinical assessment is essential. However, Australian nursing students are often excluded from experiences, such as exposure to cadaveric material, which might enable them to gain a good working knowledge of internal human anatomy. Herein systematic student feedback from nursing students who were provided with a single exposure to prosected human anatomical material and were able to manipulate and interact with that material is presented, in the context of the integrative educational aims and goals of this learning and teaching activity. Thus, this study aims to add to the literature informing ongoing dialog regarding the best set of tools to teach anatomy to students of nursing.

  9. Best teaching practices in anatomy education: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Estai, Mohamed; Bunt, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    In this report we review the range of teaching resources and strategies used in anatomy education with the aim of coming up with suggestions about the best teaching practices in this area. There is much debate about suitable methods of delivering anatomical knowledge. Competent clinicians, particularly surgeons, need a deep understanding of anatomy for safe clinical procedures. However, because students have had very limited exposure to anatomy during clinical training, there is a concern that medical students are ill-prepared in anatomy when entering clerkships and residency programs. Therefore, developing effective modalities for teaching anatomy is essential to safe medical practice. Cadaver-based instruction has survived as the main instructional tool for hundreds of years, however, there are differing views on whether full cadaver dissection is still appropriate for a modern undergraduate training. The limitations on curricular time, trained anatomy faculty and resources for gross anatomy courses in integrated or/and system-based curricula, have led many medical schools to abandon costly and time-consuming dissection-based instruction in favour of alternative methods of instruction including prosection, medical imaging, living anatomy and multimedia resources. To date, no single teaching tool has been found to meet curriculum requirements. The best way to teach modern anatomy is by combining multiple pedagogical resources to complement one another, students appear to learn more effectively when multimodal and system-based approaches are integrated. Our review suggests that certain professions would have more benefit from certain educational methods or strategies than others. Full body dissection would be best reserved for medical students, especially those with surgical career intentions, while teaching based on prosections and plastination is more suitable for dental, pharmacy and allied health science students. There is a need to direct future research

  10. Computerized grading of anatomy laboratory practical examinations.

    PubMed

    Krippendorf, Beth B; Bolender, David L; Kolesari, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the items were anatomical structures that could be tagged on a given lab practical examination. Each lab exam featured an anatomy laboratory component and a computer laboratory component. For the anatomy lab component, students moved from one question station to another at timed intervals and identified tagged anatomical structures. As students identified a tagged structure, they referred to a copy of the list (provided with their answer sheet) and wrote the number corresponding to the structure on their answer sheet. Immediately after the anatomy lab component, students were escorted to a computer instruction laboratory where they typed their answer numbers into a secured testing component of a learning management system that recorded their answers for automatic grading. After a brief review of examination scores and item analysis by faculty, exam scores were reported to students electronically. Adding this brief computer component to each lab exam greatly reduced faculty grading time, reduced grading errors and provided faster performance feedback for students without changing overall student performance.

  11. Anatomy and physiology of genital organs - women.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Gambini, Dania

    2015-01-01

    "Anatomy is destiny": Sigmund Freud viewed human anatomy as a necessary, although not a sufficient, condition for understanding the complexity of human sexual function with a solid biologic basis. The aim of the chapter is to describe women's genital anatomy and physiology, focusing on women's sexual function with a clinically oriented vision. Key points include: embryology, stressing that the "female" is the anatomic "default" program, differentiated into "male" only in the presence of androgens at physiologic levels for the gestational age; sex determination and sex differentiation, describing the interplay between anatomic and endocrine factors; the "clitoral-urethral-vaginal" complex, the most recent anatomy reading of the corpora cavernosa pattern in women; the controversial G spot; the role of the pelvic floor muscles in modulating vaginal receptivity and intercourse feelings, with hyperactivity leading to introital dyspareunia and contributing to provoked vestibulodynia and recurrent postcoital cystitis, whilst lesions during delivery reduce vaginal sensations, genital arousability, and orgasm; innervation, vessels, bones, ligaments; and the physiology of women's sexual response. Attention to physiologic aging focuses on "low-grade inflammation," genital and systemic, with its impact on women sexual function, especially after the menopause, if the woman does not or cannot use hormone replacement therapy.

  12. [Epidemiology of cerebrovascular disease in Spain].

    PubMed

    Brea, Angel; Laclaustra, Martín; Martorell, Esperanza; Pedragosa, Angels

    2013-01-01

    In Spain, cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is a very common cause of morbidity and hospitalization. They are the second leading cause of mortality in the general population, and the first in women. They also constitute a very high social spending, which is estimated to increase in coming years, due to the aging of our population. Data from the Hospital Morbidity Survey of the National Statistics Institute recorded, in 2011, 116,017 strokes and 14,933 transient ischemic attacks, corresponding, respectively, to an incidence of 252 and 32 events per 100,000 people. In 2002, the cost of hospitalization for each stroke was estimated at €3,047. The amount of total cost health care throughout the life of a stroke patient is calculated at €43,129. Internationally, the direct costs of stroke constitute 3% of national health spending, this being similar amount in different countries around us. Hypertension was the cardiovascular risk factor (CVRF) more prevalent in both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, followed by dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Peripheral arterial disease and hypertension were more frequently associated with atherothrombotic events, atrial fibrillation with cardioembolic strokes, and obesity and high blood pressure to lacunar infarcts. In Spain, as showing several studies, we are far from optimal control of CVRF, especially in secondary prevention of stroke. According to the ICTUSCARE study, achieving recommended values was 17.6% in the case of hypertension, 29.8% in LDL-cholesterol, 74.9% of smoking, and 50.2% in diabetes mellitus. In this review, we analyze in detail the epidemiology, prevention and costs originated by CVD.

  13. Learning of Musculoskeletal Ligament Stress Testing in a Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, David A.; Youdas, James W.; Hollman, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Human anatomy in physical therapy programs is a basic science course serving as a foundation for subsequent clinical courses. Integration of anatomy with a clinical emphasis throughout a curriculum provides opportunities for reinforcement of previously learned material. Considering the human cadaver laboratory as a fixed cost to our program, we…

  14. On the assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity using hypercapnia BOLD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yezhuvath, Uma S.; Lewis-Amezcua, Kelly; Varghese, Rani; Xiao, Guanghua; Lu, Hanzhang

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to dilate and is an important marker for brain vascular reserve. It may provide a useful addition to the traditional baseline blood flow measurement when assessing vascular factors in brain disorders. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent MRI under CO2 inhalation offers a non-invasive and quantitative means to estimate CVR in humans. In this study, we investigated several important methodological aspects of this technique with the goal of optimizing the experimental and data processing strategies for clinical use. Comparing 4 min of 5% CO2 inhalation (less comfortable) to a 1 min inhalation (more comfortable) duration, it was found that the CVR values were 0.31 ±0.05%/mmHg (N = 11) and 0.31 ±0.08%/mmHg (N = 9), respectively, showing no significant differences between the two breathing paradigms. Therefore, the 1 min paradigm is recommended for future application studies for patient comfort and tolerability. Furthermore, we have found that end-tidal CO2 recording was useful for accurate quantification of CVR because it provided both timing and amplitude information regarding the input function to the brain vascular system, which can be subject-dependent. Finally, we show that inter-subject variations in CVR are of physiologic origin and affect the whole brain in a similar fashion. Based on this, it is proposed that relative CVR (normalized against the CVR of the whole brain or a reference tissue) may be a more sensitive biomarker than absolute CVR in clinical applications as it minimizes inter-subject variations. With these technological optimizations, CVR mapping may become a useful method for studies of neurological and psychiatric diseases. PMID:19388006

  15. Anatomy of female continence.

    PubMed

    Sampselle, C M; DeLancey, J O

    1998-03-01

    Various muscle, connective tissue, and neurologic structures within the pelvic floor play critical roles in the maintenance of both urinary and fecal continence. Recent advances in technology, combined with greater precision during anatomic study, have expanded our understanding of the role played by the pelvic floor in maintaining continence. The goal of this article is to summarize recent research on female pelvic anatomy, with a particular emphasis on the evidence base related to urinary incontinence. The content is organized to accomplish three aims: (1) identify, within the context of pelvic floor anatomy, the structures that comprise the urinary continence system, (2) Describe the functional dynamics of urinary continence, including factors in resting urethral pressure and pressure transmission, and (3) Present the rationale, technique, and interpretation of various methods of measuring pelvic floor function.

  16. Authenticity in Anatomy Art.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Jessica

    2017-01-12

    The aim of this paper is to observe the evolution and evaluate the 'realness' and authenticity in Anatomy Art, an art form I define as one which incorporates accurate anatomical representations of the human body with artistic expression. I examine the art of 17th century wax anatomical models, the preservations of Frederik Ruysch, and Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds plastinates, giving consideration to authenticity of both body and art. I give extra consideration to the works of Body Worlds since the exhibit creator believes he has created anatomical specimens with more educational value and bodily authenticity than ever before. Ultimately, I argue that von Hagens fails to offer Anatomy Art 'real human bodies,' and that the lack of bodily authenticity of his plastinates results in his creations being less pedagogic than he claims.

  17. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  18. Deep dissection: motivating students beyond rote learning in veterinary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Cake, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    The profusion of descriptive, factual information in veterinary anatomy inevitably creates pressure on students to employ surface learning approaches and "rote learning." This phenomenon may contribute to negative perceptions of the relevance of anatomy as a discipline. Thus, encouraging deep learning outcomes will not only lead to greater satisfaction for both instructors and learners but may have the added effect of raising the profile of and respect for the discipline. Consideration of the literature reveals the broad scope of interventions required to motivate students to go beyond rote learning. While many of these are common to all disciplines (e.g., promoting active learning, making higher-order goals explicit, reducing content in favor of concepts, aligning assessment with outcomes), other factors are peculiar to anatomy, such as the benefits of incorporating clinical tidbits, "living anatomy," the anatomy museum, and dissection classes into a "learning context" that fosters deep approaches. Surprisingly, the 10 interventions discussed focus more on factors contributing to student perceptions of the course than on drastic changes to the anatomy course itself. This is because many traditional anatomy practices, such as dissection and museum-based classes, are eminently compatible with active, student-centered learning strategies and the adoption of deep learning approaches by veterinary students. Thus the key to encouraging, for example, dissection for deep learning ("deep dissection") lies more in student motivation, personal engagement, curriculum structure, and "learning context" than in the nature of the learning activity itself.

  19. Congenital spine deformities: a new screening indication for blunt cerebrovascular injuries after cervical trauma?

    PubMed

    Capone, Christine; Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad

    2010-12-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) carry significant morbidity if not diagnosed and treated early. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to recognize the injury patterns associated with this condition and to order the requisite imaging studies needed to diagnose it accurately. We report of BCVI associated with a congenital cervical spine malformation after blunt trauma. We recommend inclusion of cervical spine malformations to the current Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma screening criteria for BCVI and explain our rationale for the same.

  20. Anatomy integration blueprint: A fourth-year musculoskeletal anatomy elective model.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Michelle D; Kauffman, Gordon L; Kothari, Milind J; Mosher, Timothy J; Silvis, Matthew L; Wawrzyniak, John R; Anderson, Daniel T; Black, Kevin P

    2014-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical school curricular trends focus on both vertical integration of clinical knowledge into the traditionally basic science-dedicated curricula and increasing basic science education in the clinical years. This latter type of integration is more difficult and less reported on than the former. Here, we present an outline of a course wherein the primary learning and teaching objective is to integrate basic science anatomy knowledge with clinical education. The course was developed through collaboration by a multi-specialist course development team (composed of both basic scientists and physicians) and was founded in current adult learning theories. The course was designed to be widely applicable to multiple future specialties, using current published reports regarding the topics and clinical care areas relying heavily on anatomical knowledge regardless of specialist focus. To this end, the course focuses on the role of anatomy in the diagnosis and treatment of frequently encountered musculoskeletal conditions. Our iterative implementation and action research approach to this course development has yielded a curricular template for anatomy integration into clinical years. Key components for successful implementation of these types of courses, including content topic sequence, the faculty development team, learning approaches, and hidden curricula, were developed. We also report preliminary feedback from course stakeholders and lessons learned through the process. The purpose of this report is to enhance the current literature regarding basic science integration in the clinical years of medical school.

  1. [The French lessons of anatomy].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Alain

    2003-01-01

    The "Lessons of Anatomy" can be considered as a step of Medicine to Art. For several centuries the exhibition of a corpse's dissection was printed on the title-page of published works. Since the seventeenth century, the "Lessons of Anatomy" became a picture on the title-page in order to highlight the well-known names of the european anatomists. The study is limited to the French Lessons of Anatomy found in books or pictures after the invention of printing.

  2. Mechanisms of Lethal Cerebrovascular Accidents in Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    A case of intracerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is reported with an analysis of possible causes of cerebrovascular accidents in this condition. A 42-year-old woman with known Turner syndrome died soon after hospital admission having been found unconscious at her home address. At autopsy, she showed typical features of Turner syndrome with short stature, webbing of the neck, underdeveloped breasts, and an increased carrying angle of the arm. Death was due to a large left-sided intracerebral hemorrhage extending from the left basal ganglia into the white matter of the frontal lobe and lateral ventricle. Cases of unexpected death in Turner syndrome may arise from occult cerebrovascular accidents which may be hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic. Associated features include hypertension, vascular malformations, accelerated atherogenesis, cystic medial necrosis, and moyamoya syndrome. The possibility of Turner syndrome should be considered in cases where there has been a lethal cerebrovascular event in a younger woman.

  3. Engineering theranostic nanovehicles capable of targeting cerebrovascular amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Agyare, Edward K; Jaruszewski, Kristen M; Curran, Geoffry L; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Lowe, Val J; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2014-07-10

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins within the walls of the cerebral vasculature with subsequent aggressive vascular inflammation leading to recurrent hemorrhagic strokes. The objective of the study was to develop theranostic nanovehicles (TNVs) capable of a) targeting cerebrovascular amyloid; b) providing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for the early detection of CAA; and c) treating cerebrovascular inflammation resulting from CAA. The TNVs comprised of a polymeric nanocore made from Magnevist (MRI contrast agent) conjugated chitosan. The nanocore was also loaded with cyclophosphamide (CYC), an immunosuppressant shown to reduce the cerebrovascular inflammation in CAA. Putrescine modified F(ab')2 fragment of anti-amyloid antibody, IgG4.1 (pF(ab')24.1) was conjugated to the surface of the nanocore to target cerebrovascular amyloid. The average size of the control chitosan nanoparticles (conjugated with albumin and are devoid of Magnevist, CYC, and pF(ab')24.1) was 164±1.2 nm and that of the TNVs was 239±4.1 nm. The zeta potential values of the CCNs and TNVs were 21.6±1.7 mV and 11.9±0.5 mV, respectively. The leakage of Magnevist from the TNVs was a modest 0.2% over 4 days, and the CYC release from the TNVs followed Higuchi's model that describes sustained drug release from polymeric matrices. The studies conducted in polarized human microvascular endothelial cell monolayers (hCMEC/D3) in vitro as well as in mice in vivo have demonstrated the ability of TNVs to target cerebrovascular amyloid. In addition, the TNVs provided contrast for imaging cerebrovascular amyloid using MRI and single photon emission computed tomography. Moreover, the TNVs were shown to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production by the Aβ challenged blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelium more effectively than the cyclophosphamide alone.

  4. Dynamic estimation of three-dimensional cerebrovascular deformation from rotational angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chong; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; De Craene, Mathieu; and others

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of detecting and quantifying 3D cerebrovascular wall motion from a single 3D rotational x-ray angiography (3DRA) acquisition within a clinically acceptable time and computing from the estimated motion field for the further biomechanical modeling of the cerebrovascular wall. Methods: The whole motion cycle of the cerebral vasculature is modeled using a 4D B-spline transformation, which is estimated from a 4D to 2D+t image registration framework. The registration is performed by optimizing a single similarity metric between the entire 2D+t measured projection sequence and the corresponding forward projections of the deformed volume at their exact time instants. The joint use of two acceleration strategies, together with their implementation on graphics processing units, is also proposed so as to reach computation times close to clinical requirements. For further characterizing vessel wall properties, an approximation of the wall thickness changes is obtained through a strain calculation. Results: Evaluation on in silico and in vitro pulsating phantom aneurysms demonstrated an accurate estimation of wall motion curves. In general, the error was below 10% of the maximum pulsation, even in the situation when substantial inhomogeneous intensity pattern was present. Experiments on in vivo data provided realistic aneurysm and vessel wall motion estimates, whereas in regions where motion was neither visible nor anatomically possible, no motion was detected. The use of the acceleration strategies enabled completing the estimation process for one entire cycle in 5-10 min without degrading the overall performance. The strain map extracted from our motion estimation provided a realistic deformation measure of the vessel wall. Conclusions: The authors' technique has demonstrated that it can provide accurate and robust 4D estimates of cerebrovascular wall motion within a clinically acceptable time, although it

  5. Protocol for intraoperative assessment of the human cerebrovascular glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Haeren, R H L; Vink, H; Staals, J; van Zandvoort, M A M J; Dings, J; van Overbeeke, J J; Hoogland, G; Rijkers, K; Schijns, O E M G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adequate functioning of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is important for brain homoeostasis and normal neuronal function. Disruption of the BBB has been described in several neurological diseases. Recent reports suggest that an increased permeability of the BBB also contributes to increased seizure susceptibility in patients with epilepsy. The endothelial glycocalyx is coating the luminal side of the endothelium and can be considered as the first barrier of the BBB. We hypothesise that an altered glycocalyx thickness plays a role in the aetiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common type of epilepsy. Here, we propose a protocol that allows intraoperative assessment of the cerebrovascular glycocalyx thickness in patients with TLE and assess whether its thickness is decreased in patients with TLE when compared with controls. Methods and analysis This protocol is designed as a prospective observational case–control study in patients who undergo resective brain surgery as treatment for TLE. Control subjects are patients without a history of epileptic seizures, who undergo a craniotomy or burr hole surgery for other indications. Intraoperative glycocalyx thickness measurements of sublingual, cortical and hippocampal microcirculation are performed by video microscopy using sidestream dark-field imaging. Demographic details, seizure characteristics, epilepsy risk factors, intraoperative haemodynamic parameters and histopathological evaluation are additionally recorded. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been ethically approved by the local medical ethical committee (ID: NL51594.068.14) and complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and principles of Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent is obtained before study enrolment and only coded data will be stored in a secured database, enabling an audit trail. Results will be submitted to international peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences. Trial registration number

  6. Who Is Repeating Anatomy? Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study,…

  7. [Pandora's box of anatomy].

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Uri; Reis, Shmuel

    2008-05-01

    Physicians in Nazi Germany were among the first to join the Nazi party and the SS, and were considered passionate and active supporters of the regime. Their actions included development and implementation of the racial theory thus legitimizing the development of the Nazi genocide plan, leadership and execution of the sterilization and euthanasia programs as well as atrocious human experimentation. Nazi law allowed the use of humans and their remains in research institutions. One of the physicians whose involvement in the Nazi regime was particularly significant was Eduard Pernkopf. He was the head of the Anatomy Institute at the University of Vienna, and later became the president of the university. Pernkopf was a member of the Nazi party, promoted the idea of "racial hygiene", and in 1938, "purified" the university from all Jews. In Pernkopfs atlas of anatomy, the illustrators expressed their sympathy to Nazism by adding Nazi symbols to their illustrations. In light of the demand stated by the "Yad Vashem" Institute, the sources of the atlas were investigated. The report, which was published in 1998, determined that Pernkopfs Anatomy Institute received almost 1400 corpses from the Gestapo's execution chambers. Copies of Pernkopfs atlas, accidentally exposed at the Rappaport School of Medicine in the Technion, led to dilemmas concerning similar works with a common background. The books initiated a wide debate in Israel and abroad, regarding ethical aspects of using information originated in Nazi crimes. Moreover, these findings are evidence of the evil to which science and medicine can give rise, when they are captured as an unshakable authority.

  8. Alterations in physiology and anatomy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eng Kien; Tan, Eng Loy

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergo profound anatomical and physiological changes so that they can cope with the increased physical and metabolic demands of their pregnancies. The cardiovascular, respiratory, haematological, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems all undergo important physiological alterations and adaptations needed to allow development of the fetus and to allow the mother and fetus to survive the demands of childbirth. Such alterations in anatomy and physiology may cause difficulties in interpreting signs, symptoms, and biochemical investigations, making the clinical assessment of a pregnant woman inevitably confusing but challenging. Understanding these changes is important for every practicing obstetrician, as the pathological deviations from the normal physiological alterations may not be clear-cut until an adverse outcome has resulted. Only with a sound knowledge of the physiology and anatomy changes can the care of an obstetric parturient be safely optimized for a better maternal and fetal outcome.

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  10. Neuroimaging Assessment of Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Concussion: Current Concepts, Methodological Considerations, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael J.; Ryner, Lawrence N.; Sobczyk, Olivia; Fierstra, Jorn; Mikulis, David J.; Fisher, Joseph A.; Duffin, James; Mutch, W. Alan C.

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that presents with a wide spectrum of subjective symptoms and few objective clinical findings. Emerging research suggests that one of the processes that may contribute to concussion pathophysiology is dysregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) leading to a mismatch between CBF delivery and the metabolic needs of the injured brain. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is defined as the change in CBF in response to a measured vasoactive stimulus. Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques can be used as a surrogate measure of CBF in clinical and laboratory studies. In order to provide an accurate assessment of CVR, these sequences must be combined with a reliable, reproducible vasoactive stimulus that can manipulate CBF. Although CVR imaging currently plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of many cerebrovascular diseases, only recently have studies begun to apply this assessment tool in patients with concussion. In order to evaluate the quality, reliability, and relevance of CVR studies in concussion, it is important that clinicians and researchers have a strong foundational understanding of the role of CBF regulation in health, concussion, and more severe forms of TBI, and an awareness of the advantages and limitations of currently available CVR measurement techniques. Accordingly, in this review, we (1) discuss the role of CVR in TBI and concussion, (2) examine methodological considerations for MRI-based measurement of CVR, and (3) provide an overview of published CVR studies in concussion patients. PMID:27199885

  11. Cerebrovascular insult hospital cases in West Hercegovina Canton from 1998 to 2002.

    PubMed

    Vasilj, Ivan; Cavaljuga, Semra; Lucić, Tomo; Kvesić, Ferdo

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of a cerebro-vascular insult hospitalised cases from West Herzegovina Canton as a retrospective epidemiological study was done in Clinical hospital Mostar for the period from 1998 to 2002. The major source of data was medical documentation of this hospital, the only hospital for the treatment of 88,257 inhabitants from this Canton. The study included a total of 393 cerebro-vascular insult cases from this Canton treated in the Clinical hospital Mostar. Among them 189 (48.1%) were male patients, while 204 (51.9%) cases were female. The majority of the cases were above 50 years of life. Majority of treated female patients were older then 65, while among male patients the majority were between 50 and 65 years old. The least number of cases was under 50 years in both groups. During the same period risk factors research for entire FBiH was performed on the sample of 2,750 national insurance holders. Out of them 1.7% was found to suffer of cerebro vascular insult.

  12. Cerebrovascular function and cognition in childhood: a systematic review of transcranial doppler studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The contribution of cerebrovascular function to cognitive performance is gaining increased attention. Transcranial doppler (TCD) is portable, reliable, inexpensive and extremely well tolerated by young and clinical samples. It enables measurement of blood flow velocity in major cerebral arteries at rest and during cognitive tasks. Methods We systematically reviewed evidence for associations between cognitive performance and cerebrovascular function in children (0-18 years), as measured using TCD. A total of 2778 articles were retrieved from PsychInfo, Pubmed, and EMBASE searches and 25 relevant articles were identified. Results Most studies investigated clinical groups, where decreased blood flow velocities in infants were associated with poor neurological functioning, and increased blood flow velocities in children with Sickle cell disease were typically associated with cognitive impairment and lower intelligence. Studies were also identified assessing autistic behaviour, mental retardation and sleep disordered breathing. In healthy children, the majority of studies reported cognitive processing produced lateralised changes in blood flow velocities however these physiological responses did not appear to correlate with behavioural cognitive performance. Conclusion Poor cognitive performance appears to be associated with decreased blood flow velocities in premature infants, and increased velocities in Sickle cell disease children using TCD methods. However knowledge in healthy samples is relatively limited. The technique is well tolerated by children, is portable and inexpensive. It therefore stands to make a valuable contribution to knowledge regarding the underlying functional biology of cognitive performance in childhood. PMID:24602446

  13. Primarily chronic and cerebrovascular course of Lyme neuroborreliosis: case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, M.; Eiffert, H.; Christen, H.; Hanefeld, F.

    2000-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study aiming to define the clinical spectrum of neuroborreliosis in childhood, we have identified four patients with unusual clinical manifestations. Two patients suffered from a primarily chronic form of neuroborreliosis and displayed only non-specific symptoms. An 11 year old boy presented with long standing symptoms of severe weight loss and chronic headache, while the other patient had pre-existing mental and motor retardation and developed seizures and failure to thrive. Two further children who presented with acute hemiparesis as a result of cerebral ischaemic infarction had a cerebrovascular course of neuroborreliosis. One was a 15 year old girl; the other, a 5 year old boy, is to our knowledge the youngest patient described with this course of illness. Following adequate antibiotic treatment, all patients showed substantial improvement of their respective symptoms. Laboratory and magnetic resonance imaging findings as well as clinical course are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed.

 PMID:10869004

  14. Radiological sinonasal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Alrumaih, Redha A.; Ashoor, Mona M.; Obidan, Ahmed A.; Al-Khater, Khulood M.; Al-Jubran, Saeed A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common radiological variants of sinonasal anatomy among Saudi population and compare it with the reported prevalence of these variants in other ethnic and population groups. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 121 computerized tomography scans of the nose and paranasal sinuses of patients presented with sinonasal symptoms to the Department of Otorhinolarngology, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between January 2014 and May 2014. Results: Scans of 121 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria were reviewed. Concha bullosa was found in 55.4%, Haller cell in 39.7%, and Onodi cell in 28.9%. Dehiscence of the internal carotid artery was found in 1.65%. Type-1 and type-2 optic nerve were the prevalent types. Type-II Keros classification of the depth of olfactory fossa was the most common among the sample (52.9%). Frontal cells were found in 79.3%; type I was the most common. Conclusions: There is a difference in the prevalence of some radiological variants of the sinonasal anatomy between Saudi population and other study groups. Surgeon must pay special attention in the preoperative assessment of patients with sinonasal pathology to avoid undesirable complications. PMID:27146614

  15. The quail anatomy portal

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Avnika A.; Simkin, Johanna E.; Salgado, David; Newgreen, Donald F.; Martins, Gabriel G.; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a widely used model organism for the study of embryonic development; however, anatomical resources are lacking. The Quail Anatomy Portal (QAP) provides 22 detailed three-dimensional (3D) models of quail embryos during development from embryonic day (E)1 to E15 generated using optical projection tomography. The 3D models provided can be virtually sectioned to investigate anatomy. Furthermore, using the 3D nature of the models, we have generated a tool to assist in the staging of quail samples. Volume renderings of each stage are provided and can be rotated to allow visualization from multiple angles allowing easy comparison of features both between stages in the database and between images or samples in the laboratory. The use of JavaScript, PHP and HTML ensure the database is accessible to users across different operating systems, including mobile devices, facilitating its use in the laboratory.The QAP provides a unique resource for researchers using the quail model. The ability to virtually section anatomical models throughout development provides the opportunity for researchers to virtually dissect the quail and also provides a valuable tool for the education of students and researchers new to the field. Database URL: http://quail.anatomyportal.org (For review username: demo, password: quail123) PMID:24715219

  16. The quail anatomy portal.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Avnika A; Simkin, Johanna E; Salgado, David; Newgreen, Donald F; Martins, Gabriel G; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a widely used model organism for the study of embryonic development; however, anatomical resources are lacking. The Quail Anatomy Portal (QAP) provides 22 detailed three-dimensional (3D) models of quail embryos during development from embryonic day (E)1 to E15 generated using optical projection tomography. The 3D models provided can be virtually sectioned to investigate anatomy. Furthermore, using the 3D nature of the models, we have generated a tool to assist in the staging of quail samples. Volume renderings of each stage are provided and can be rotated to allow visualization from multiple angles allowing easy comparison of features both between stages in the database and between images or samples in the laboratory. The use of JavaScript, PHP and HTML ensure the database is accessible to users across different operating systems, including mobile devices, facilitating its use in the laboratory.The QAP provides a unique resource for researchers using the quail model. The ability to virtually section anatomical models throughout development provides the opportunity for researchers to virtually dissect the quail and also provides a valuable tool for the education of students and researchers new to the field. DATABASE URL: http://quail.anatomyportal.org (For review username: demo, password: quail123).

  17. Cerebrovascular reactivity alterations in asymptomatic high school football players.

    PubMed

    Svaldi, Diana O; Joshi, Chetas; Robinson, Meghan E; Shenk, Trey E; Abbas, Kausar; Nauman, Eric A; Leverenz, Larry J; Talavage, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is impaired following brain injury, increasing susceptibility to subsequent injury. CVR was tracked in football and non-collision athletes throughout one season. CVR transiently decreased in football athletes during the first half of the season. Results indicate the brain adapts slowly to increases in loading, increasing risk for injury.

  18. Reliability of Doppler sonography in extracranial cerebro-vascular stenosis.

    PubMed

    Colon, E J; de Weerd, J P; Notermans, S L; Vingerhoets, H M

    1979-01-01

    Of our patients who underwent quantitative Doppler sonography (Haemato-Tacho-Graphy), 382 underwent carotid angiography and 61 vertebral artery angiography. The reliability of the method proved to be between 90 and 95 percent for carotid as well as for vertebral arteries. The HTG proved to be a useful addition to angiography in patients with extracranial cerebro-vascular stenosis.

  19. Cerebrovascular effects of apolipoprotein E: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2013-04-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) has 3 isoforms: apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4. APOE4 is a major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease and is associated with dementia in Down syndrome and poor neurological outcome after traumatic brain injury, cerebral hemorrhage, and other neuropathological disorders. While apoE4 can induce neuropathology by participating in various cellular and molecular pathways, herein I review data supporting the hypothesis that apoE4 has direct toxic effects on the cerebrovascular system that in turn can lead to secondary neuronal dysfunction and degeneration as well as accumulation of neurotoxins in brain such as β-amyloid (Aβ) in Alzheimer disease. I review Aβ-independent cerebrovascular effects of apoE, particularly activation of a proinflammatory cyclophilin A-mediated pathway in brain vascular pericytes by apoE4 that has recently been shown to lead to a loss of cerebrovascular integrity and blood-brain barrier breakdown causing neuronal injury. I also review Aβ-dependent cerebrovascular effects of apoE such as faulty Aβ clearance from brain to circulation by apoE4. Finally, I discuss isoform-specific interactions of apoE with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 on brain vascular cells (ie, endothelial cells, pericytes), which play an important role in Aβ-independent and Aβ-dependent effects of apoE on cerebral vasculature.

  20. Effectiveness of a computer-aided neuroanatomy program for entry-level physical therapy students: anatomy and clinical examination of the dorsal column-medial lemniscal system.

    PubMed

    McKeough, D Michael; Mattern-Baxter, Katrin; Barakatt, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a computer-aided instruction learning module improves students' knowledge of the neuroanatomy/physiology and clinical examination of the dorsal column-medial lemniscal (DCML) system. Sixty-one physical therapy students enrolled in a clinical neurology course in entry-level PT educational programs at two universities participated in the study. Students from University-1 (U1;) had not had a previous neuroanatomy course, while students from University-2 (U2;) had taken a neuroanatomy course in the previous semester. Before and after working with the learning module, students took a paper-and-pencil test on the neuroanatomy/physiology and clinical examination of the DCML system. Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests were used to determine if differences existed between neuroanatomy/physiology examination scores and clinical examination scores before and after taking the learning module, and between student groups based on university attended. For students from U1, neuroanatomy/physiology post-test scores improved significantly over pre-test scores (p < 0.001), while post-test scores of students from U2 did not (p = 0.60). Neuroanatomy/physiology pre-test scores from U2 were significantly better than those from U1 (p < 0.001); there was no significant difference in post-test scores (p = 0.062). Clinical examination pre-test and post-test scores from U2 were significantly better than those from U1 (p < 0.001). Clinical examination post-test scores improved significantly from the pre-test scores for both U1 (p < 0.001) and U2 (p < 0.001).

  1. Cerebrovascular disease, associated risk factors and antithrombotic therapy in a population screening cohort: Insights from the Belgian Heart Rhythm Week programme.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Marco; Mairesse, Georges H; Goethals, Peter; Scavee, Christophe; Vijgen, Johan; Blankoff, Ivan; Vandekerckhove, Yves; Lip, Gregory Yh

    2017-02-01

    Background Cerebrovascular disease confers a major healthcare burden worldwide and is a major cause of death and disability. Several well-established risk factors, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), are associated with cerebrovascular disease and antithrombotic therapy reduces risk. Design This study was a subgroup analysis from the Belgian Heart Rhythm Week, a nationwide AF awareness programme. Methods We studied subjects screened between 2012 and 2014 with available data on clinical risk factors and antithrombotic treatment. Results Of the 38,034 subjects eligible for this analysis, 1513 (4.0%) reported a positive clinical history for cerebrovascular disease. Logistic regression analysis found that age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, history of vascular disease, history of heart failure and history of AF (all p < 0.001) were independently associated with cerebrovascular disease. Among subjects with history of cerebrovascular disease and AF, 1.7% were taking oral anticoagulant drugs only, while both oral anticoagulant drugs and aspirin were used in 61.5% of subjects, aspirin in 4.3% of patients and no antithrombotic therapy in 32.5% of subjects. Among those subjects without AF, the corresponding figures were 0.8, 9.5, 2.0 and 87.6%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in this contemporary population screening project was higher than that reported in the general population and was associated with the major known stroke risk factors. Sub-optimal antithrombotic therapy management was evident, with a low use of oral anticoagulant drugs among patients with AF and a low use of aspirin among subjects without AF.

  2. The balance between cognitive reserve and brain imaging biomarkers of cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alison D; Staff, Roger T; McNeil, Christopher J; Salarirad, Sima; Ahearn, Trevor S; Mustafa, Nazahah; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2011-12-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis explains the disparity between clinical and pathological phenotypes and why, in two individuals with the same extent of neuropathology, one may be demented while the other remains cognitively intact. We examined the balance between brain magnetic resonance imaging measures of the two most common pathologies associated with brain ageing, cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease, and parameters of cerebral reserve in well-characterized participants born in 1936, for whom childhood intelligence is known. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was carried out at 1.5T using fluid attenuation inversion recovery and T(1)-weighted volumetric sequences in 249 participants. Cerebrovascular disease was quantified by measuring brain white matter hyperintensities on fluid attenuation inversion recovery images using Scheltens' scale and Alzheimer's disease was measured from volumetric data using FreeSurfer to extract whole brain volume and hippocampal volumes in turn. The effect of these measures of brain burden on life-long cognitive ageing from the age of 11 to 68 years was compared with the effect of educational attainment and occupational grade using structural equation modelling. Complete brain burden and reserve data were available in 224 participants. We found that educational attainment, but not occupation, has a measurable and positive effect, with a standardized regression weight of +0.23, on late life cognitive ability in people without cognitive impairment aged 68 years, allowing for the influence of childhood intelligence and the two most common subclinical brain pathological burdens in the ageing brain. In addition, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the contribution of education is greater than the negative impact of either neuropathological burden alone, with standardized regression weights of -0.14 for white matter hyperintensities and -0.20 for hippocampal atrophy. This study illustrates how education counteracts the

  3. Avoidable 30-Day Readmissions Among Patients With Stroke and Other Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nahab, Fadi; Takesaka, Jennifer; Mailyan, Eugene; Judd, Lilith; Culler, Steven; Webb, Adam; Frankel, Michael; Choi, Dennis; Helmers, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited data on factors associated with 30-day readmissions and the frequency of avoidable readmissions among patients with stroke and other cerebrovascular disease. Methods: University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) database records were used to identify patients discharged with a diagnosis of stroke or other cerebrovascular disease at a university hospital from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009 and readmitted within 30 days to the index hospital. Logistic regression models were used to identify patient and clinical characteristics associated with 30-day readmission. Two neurologists performed chart reviews on readmissions to identify avoidable cases. Results: Of 2706 patients discharged during the study period, 174 patients had 178 readmissions (6.4%) within 30 days. The only factor associated with 30-day readmission was the index length of stay >10 days (vs <5 days; odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% CI [1.4, 3.7]). Of 174 patients readmitted within 30 days (median time to readmission 10 days), 92 (53%) were considered avoidable readmissions including 38 (41%) readmitted for elective procedures within 30 days of discharge, 27 (29%) readmitted after inadequate outpatient care coordination, 15 (16%) readmitted after incomplete initial evaluations, 8 (9%) readmitted due to delayed palliative care consultation, and 4 (4%) readmitted after being discharged with inadequate discharge instructions. Only 5% of the readmitted patients had outpatient follow-up recommended within 1 week. Conclusions: More than half of the 30-day readmissions were considered avoidable. Coordinated timing of elective procedures and earlier outpatient follow-up may prevent the majority of avoidable readmissions among patients with stroke and other cerebrovascular disease. PMID:23983857

  4. The Vulnerability of Vessels Involved in the Role of Embolism and Hypoperfusion in the Mechanisms of Ischemic Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Accurate definition and better understanding of the mechanisms of stroke are crucial as this will guide the effective care and therapy. In this paper, we review the previous basic and clinical researches on the causes or mechanisms of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (ICVD) and interpret the correlation between embolism and hypoperfusion based on vascular stenosis and arterial intimal lesions. It was suggested that if there is no embolus (dynamic or in situ emboli), there might be no cerebral infarction. Three kinds of different clinical outcomes of TIA were theoretically interpreted based on its mechanisms. We suppose that there is a correlation between embolism and hypoperfusion, and which mechanisms (hypoperfusion or hypoperfusion induced microemboli) playing the dominant role in each type of ICVD depends on the unique background of arterial intimal lesions (the vulnerability of vessels). That is to say, the vulnerability of vessels is involved in the role of embolism and hypoperfusion in the mechanisms of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. This inference might enrich and provide better understandings for the underlying etiologies of ischemic cerebrovascular events. PMID:27314040

  5. Von Willebrand Factor Regulation in Patients with Acute and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease: A Pilot, Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Peter; Drechsler, Christiane; Gunreben, Ignaz; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Heuschmann, Peter Ulrich; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In animal models, von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in thrombus formation and propagation of ischemic stroke. However, the pathophysiological relevance of this molecule in humans, and its potential use as a biomarker for the risk and severity of ischemic stroke remains unclear. This study had two aims: to identify predictors of altered VWF levels and to examine whether VWF levels differ between acute cerebrovascular events and chronic cerebrovascular disease (CCD). Methods A case–control study was undertaken between 2010 and 2013 at our University clinic. In total, 116 patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) or transitory ischemic attack (TIA), 117 patients with CCD, and 104 healthy volunteers (HV) were included. Blood was taken at days 0, 1, and 3 in patients with AIS or TIA, and once in CCD patients and HV. VWF serum levels were measured and correlated with demographic and clinical parameters by multivariate linear regression and ANOVA. Results Patients with CCD (158±46%) had significantly higher VWF levels than HV (113±36%, P<0.001), but lower levels than AIS/TIA patients (200±95%, P<0.001). Age, sex, and stroke severity influenced VWF levels (P<0.05). Conclusions VWF levels differed across disease subtypes and patient characteristics. Our study confirms increased VWF levels as a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease and, moreover, suggests that it may represent a potential biomarker for stroke severity, warranting further investigation. PMID:24937073

  6. Libman-Sacks Endocarditis and Embolic Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos A.; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.; Qualls, Clifford R.; Jung, Rex E.; Greene, Ernest R.; Gasparovic, Charles M.; Hayek, Reyaad; Charlton, Gerald A.; Crookston, Kendall

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Libman-Sacks endocarditis is a pathogenic factor for cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Background A cardioembolic pathogenesis of SLE CVD manifested as 1) neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) including stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA), 2) neurocognitive dysfunction, and 3) MRI focal brain lesions has not been established. Methods A 6-year study of 30 patients with acute NPSLE (27 women, age 38±12 years), 46 age-and-sex matched SLE controls without NPSLE (42 women, age 36±12 years), and 26 age-and-sex matched healthy controls (22 women, age 34±11 years) who underwent clinical and laboratory evaluations, TEE, carotid duplex, transcranial Doppler, neurocognitive testing, and brain MRI/MRA. NPSLE patients were re-evaluated after 4.5 months of therapy. All patients were followed clinically for a median of 52 months. Results Libman-Sacks vegetations (87%), cerebromicroembolism (27% with 2.5 times more events per hour), neurocognitive dysfunction (60%), and cerebral infarcts (47%) were more common in NPSLE than in SLE (28%, 20%, 33%, and 0%) and healthy controls (8%, 0%, 4%, and 0%, respectively) (all p≤0.009). Patients with vegetations had 3 times more cerebromicroemboli per hour, lower cerebral blood flow, more stroke/TIA and overall NPSLE events, neurocognitive dysfunction, cerebral infarcts, and brain lesion load than those without (all p≤0.01). Libman-Sacks vegetations were independent risk factors of NPSLE (OR=13.4, p<0.001), neurocognitive dysfunction (OR=8.0, p=0.01), brain lesions (OR=5.6, p=0.004), and all 3 outcomes combined (OR=7.5, p<0.001). Follow-up re-evaluations in 18 (78%) of 23 surviving NPSLE patients demonstrated improvement of vegetations, microembolism, brain perfusion, neurocognitive dysfunction, and lesion load (all p≤0.04). Finally, patients with vegetations had reduced event free survival time to stroke/TIA, cognitive disability, or death (p=0.007). Conclusion The

  7. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Anatomy Learning: Learning Styles and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Barry S.; Xu, Qin; Jin, Lixian; Patten, Debra; Gouldsborough, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Cultural influences on anatomy teaching and learning have been investigated by application of a questionnaire to medical students in British and Chinese Medical Schools. Results from the responses from students of the two countries were analyzed. Both groups found it easier to understand anatomy in a clinical context, and in both countries,…

  8. Browsing Software of the Visible Korean Data Used for Teaching Sectional Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Dong Sun; Chung, Min Suk; Park, Hyo Seok; Park, Jin Seo; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation of computed tomographs (CTs) and magnetic resonance images (MRIs) to diagnose clinical conditions requires basic knowledge of sectional anatomy. Sectional anatomy has traditionally been taught using sectioned cadavers, atlases, and/or computer software. The computer software commonly used for this subject is practical and…

  9. DYNAMIC CEREBROVASCULAR AND INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE REACTIVITY ASSESMENT OF IMPAIRED CEREBROVASCULAR AUTOREGULATION IN INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Bragin, Denis E.; Statom, Gloria; Nemoto, Edwin M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY We previously suggested that the discrepancy between the critical cerebral perfusion pressures (CPP) of 30 mmHg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure (ICP), and 60 mmHg, obtained by decreasing arterial pressure, was due to pathological microvascular shunting at high ICP [1] and that the determination of the critical CPP by the static cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation curve is not valid with intracranial hypertension. Here we demonstrated that critical CPP, measured by induced dynamic ICP reactivity (iPRx) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVRx), accurately identifies the critical CPP in the hypertensive rat brain which differs from that obtained by the static autoregulation curve. Step changes in CPP from 70 to 50 and 30 mmHg were made by increasing ICP using an artificial cerebrospinal fluid reservoir connected to the cisterna magna. At each CPP, a transient 10-mmHg rise in arterial pressure was induced by bolus i.v. dopamine. iPRx and iCVRx were calculated as ΔICP/ΔMAP and as ΔCBF/ΔMAP, respectively. The critical CPP at high ICP, obtained by iPRx and iCVRx, is 50 mmHg, where compromised capillary flow, transition of blood flow to non-nutritive microvascular shunts, tissue hypoxia and BBB leakage begin to occur, which is higher than the 30 mmHg determined by static autoregulation. PMID:27165917

  10. A reappraisal of adult abdominal surface anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S Ali; McFadden, Sara L; Buckenham, Tim; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-10-01

    Descriptions of clinically important surface landmarks often vary between and within contemporary anatomical texts. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface anatomy of major abdominal vessels, kidneys, spleen, gastroesophageal junction, and duodenojejunal flexure in living adults using computed tomography (CT). After excluding patients with distorting space-occupying lesions, scoliosis, abnormal lordosis, and obvious visceromegaly, 108 abdominal CT scans of supine adults (mean age 60 years, range 18-97 years; 64 female) at end tidal inspiration were available for analysis by dual consensus reporting. Intra-observer agreement was assessed by repeat blind assessment of a random sample of scans. The vertebral level of the aortic bifurcation and almost all of its major branches, and the origin of the inferior vena cava were consistent with current descriptions. Important differences from contemporary descriptions of surface anatomy were as follows: the renal arteries were most commonly at the L1 vertebral level (left 55%, right 43%); the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2 (left 68%, right 40%); the 11th rib was a posterior relation of the left kidney in only 28% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs (48%) with its long axis in line with the 11th rib (55%). Although the majority of vascular surface landmarks are consistent with standard descriptions, the surface anatomy of the kidneys, renal arteries, and spleen needs to be revised in accordance with observations using modern imaging techniques in vivo.

  11. Developmental anatomy of lampreys.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael K; Admiraal, Jeroen; Wright, Glenda M

    2010-02-01

    Lampreys are a group of aquatic chordates whose relationships to hagfishes and jawed vertebrates are still debated. Lamprey embryology is of interest to evolutionary biologists because it may shed light on vertebrate origins. For this and other reasons, lamprey embryology has been extensively researched by biologists from a range of disciplines. However, many of the key studies of lamprey comparative embryology are relatively inaccessible to the modern scientist. Therefore, in view of the current resurgence of interest in lamprey evolution and development, we present here a review of lamprey developmental anatomy. We identify several features of early organogenesis, including the origin of the nephric duct, that need to be re-examined with modern techniques. The homologies of several structures are also unclear, including the intriguing subendothelial pads in the heart. We hope that this review will form the basis for future studies into the phylogenetic embryology of this interesting group of animals.

  12. The Anatomy of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Rampazzo, Roberto; Zaggia, Simone; Longair, Malcolm S.; Ferrarese, Laura; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; van der Kruit, Pieter C.; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Combes, Françoise; Bertin, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Calzetti, Daniela; Moss, David L.; Matteucci, Francesca; Djorgovski, Stanislav George; Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Graham, Alister W. McK.; Tully, Brent R.

    Just after WWII Astronomy started to live its "Golden Age", not differently to many other sciences and human activities, especially in the west side countries. The improved resolution of telescopes and the appearance of new efficient light detectors (e.g. CCDs in the middle eighty) greatly impacted the extragalactic researches. The first morphological analysis of galaxies were rapidly substituted by "anatomic" studies of their structural components, star and gas content, and in general by detailed investigations of their properties. As for the human anatomy, where the final goal was that of understanding the functionality of the organs that are essential for the life of the body, galaxies were dissected to discover their basic structural components and ultimately the mystery of their existence.

  13. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  14. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Consequently, HIT is being promoted as a more time-efficient and practical approach to optimize health thereby reducing the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity. However, no studies to date have examined the impact of HIT on the cerebrovasculature and corresponding implications for cognitive function. This review critiques the implications of HIT for cerebrovascular function, with a focus on the mechanisms and translational impact for patient health and well-being. It also introduces similarly novel interventions currently under investigation as alternative means of accelerating exercise-induced cerebrovascular adaptation. We highlight a need for studies of the mechanisms and thereby also the optimal dose-response strategies to guide exercise prescription, and for studies to explore alternative approaches to optimize exercise outcomes in brain-related health and disease prevention. From a clinical perspective, interventions that selectively target the aging brain have the potential to prevent stroke and associated neurovascular diseases. PMID:25833341

  15. Heterogeneity of efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapy in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gebel, James M

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effects of antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention in patients with prior cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, including stroke, transient ischemic attack, and myocardial infarction, have been demonstrated repeatedly over the past decade. It is increasingly apparent that pathophysiologic differences between patients with different types of prior vascular events have an important effect on treatment outcomes. Several large, important trials of antiplatelet therapies, including MATCH, CHARISMA, ESPRIT, and TRITON-TIMI 38, underscore the heterogeneity of the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet agents in patients with recent cerebrovascular disease, compared with patients with recent acute coronary syndromes. Trial data therefore support an individualized approach to antithrombotic therapy for secondary vascular-event prevention that is appropriate for any probable future vascular events and actively reduces the impact of modifiable risk factors common to all vascular events. The potential for benefit in reducing recurrent vascular events must be weighed against the increased risk of bleeding and of patient non-responsiveness to treatment. A number of other factors also need to be considered, including drug interactions, patient compliance, and adverse-effect profiles. Overall, there is now a substantial body of clinical trial evidence that supports the need to carefully individualize antiplatelet therapy and other risk-reducing strategies on the basis of each patient's pathology and specific needs.

  16. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-06-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Consequently, HIT is being promoted as a more time-efficient and practical approach to optimize health thereby reducing the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity. However, no studies to date have examined the impact of HIT on the cerebrovasculature and corresponding implications for cognitive function. This review critiques the implications of HIT for cerebrovascular function, with a focus on the mechanisms and translational impact for patient health and well-being. It also introduces similarly novel interventions currently under investigation as alternative means of accelerating exercise-induced cerebrovascular adaptation. We highlight a need for studies of the mechanisms and thereby also the optimal dose-response strategies to guide exercise prescription, and for studies to explore alternative approaches to optimize exercise outcomes in brain-related health and disease prevention. From a clinical perspective, interventions that selectively target the aging brain have the potential to prevent stroke and associated neurovascular diseases.

  17. Pharmacologically targeted NMDA receptor antagonism by NitroMemantine for cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Xia, Peng; Cui, Jiankun; Talantova, Maria; Bodhinathan, Karthik; Li, Wenjun; Holland, Emily A.; Tong, Gary; Piña-Crespo, Juan; Zhang, Dongxian; Nakanishi, Nobuki; Larrick, James W.; McKercher, Scott R.; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Wang, Yuqiang; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke and vascular dementia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Neuroprotective therapies have been proposed but none have proven clinically tolerated and effective. While overstimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) is thought to contribute to cerebrovascular insults, the importance of NMDARs in physiological function has made this target, at least in the view of many in ‘Big Pharma,’ ‘undruggable’ for this indication. Here, we describe novel NitroMemantine drugs, comprising an adamantane moiety that binds in the NMDAR-associated ion channel that is used to target a nitro group to redox-mediated regulatory sites on the receptor. The NitroMemantines are both well tolerated and effective against cerebral infarction in rodent models via a dual allosteric mechanism of open-channel block and NO/redox modulation of the receptor. Targeted S-nitrosylation of NMDARs by NitroMemantine is potentiated by hypoxia and thereby directed at ischemic neurons. Allosteric approaches to tune NMDAR activity may hold therapeutic potential for cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:26477507

  18. Essential role for smooth muscle BK channels in alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengchong; Xi, Qi; Ahmed, Abu; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Dopico, Alejandro M.

    2004-12-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cerebrovascular spasm and stroke. Acute exposure to ethanol at concentrations obtained during binge drinking constricts cerebral arteries in several species, including humans, but the mechanisms underlying this action are largely unknown. In a rodent model, we used fluorescence microscopy, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and pharmacological studies in intact cerebral arteries to pinpoint the molecular effectors of ethanol cerebrovascular constriction. Clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol elevated wall intracellular Ca2+ concentration and caused a reversible constriction of cerebral arteries (EC50 = 27 mM; Emax = 100 mM) that depended on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry into myocytes. However, ethanol did not directly increase voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in isolated myocytes. Constriction occurred because of an ethanol reduction in the frequency (-53%) and amplitude (-32%) of transient Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents. Ethanol inhibition of BK transients was caused by a reduction in Ca2+ spark frequency (-49%), a subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal that evokes the BK transients, and a direct inhibition of BK channel steady-state activity (-44%). In contrast, ethanol failed to modify Ca2+ waves, a major vasoconstrictor mechanism. Selective block of BK channels largely prevented ethanol constriction in pressurized arteries. This study pinpoints the Ca2+ spark/BK channel negative-feedback mechanism as the primary effector of ethanol vasoconstriction.

  19. Current Perspectives on the Beneficial Role of Ginkgo biloba in Neurological and Cerebrovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin M.; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract is an alternative medicine available as a standardized formulation, EGb 761®, which consists of ginkgolides, bilobalide, and flavonoids. The individual constituents have varying therapeutic mechanisms that contribute to the pharmacological activity of the extract as a whole. Recent studies show anxiolytic properties of ginkgolide A, migraine with aura treatment by ginkgolide B, a reduction in ischemia-induced glutamate excitotoxicity by bilobalide, and an alternative antihypertensive property of quercetin, among others. These findings have been observed in EGb 761 as well and have led to clinical investigation into its use as a therapeutic for conditions such as cognition, dementia, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review explores the therapeutic mechanisms of the individual EGb 761 constituents to explain the pharmacology as a whole and its clinical application to cardiovascular and neurological disorders, in particular ischemic stroke. PMID:26604665

  20. [Semax in prevention of disease progress and development of exacerbations in patients with cerebrovascular insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Gusev, E I; Skvortsova, V I; Chukanova, E I

    2005-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-seven patients with different stages of cerebrovascular insufficiency (CI) have been examined. A diagnosis of CI was based on the results of neurological and neuropsychological study, ultrasonic dopplerography, rheo- and encephalography, electrocardiography, brain MRI and eyegrounds examination. Neurological scales were used for neurological status assessment and further data processing. The study aimed at evaluation of tolerability and clinical efficacy of the medication and complications in CI course. Semax treatment resulted in significant clinical improvement, stabilization of the disease progress and reduced a risk of stroke and transitory ischemic attacks in the disease course. The drug is featured by minor percent of side-effects and is well tolerated by patients, including those of older age groups.

  1. LAMBL’S EXCRESCENCES: ASSOCIATION WITH CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE AND PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos A.; Schevchuck, Oleksandr; Tolstrup, Kirsten; Roldan, Paola C.; Macias, Leonardo; Qualls, Clifford R.; Greene, Ernest R.; Hayek, Reyaad; Charlton, Gerald; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lambl’s excrescences (LEx) are detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and are characterized as thin, elongated, and hypermobile structures located at the leaflets’ coaptation point of the heart valves. The association of LEx with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is still undefined and yet patients with LEx and suspected CVD receive unproven effective antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy or even undergo valve surgery. Also, the association of LEx with aging and atherogenic, inflammatory, or thrombogenic parameters has not been reported. Methods 77 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (71 women, age 37±12 years) and 26 age-and-sex matched healthy controls (22 women, age 34±11 years) prospectively underwent routine history and physical exam, transcranial Doppler, brain MRI, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), carotid duplex, and clinical and laboratory evaluations of atherogenesis, inflammation, platelet activity, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Subjects without stroke/TIA on enrollment (with and without LEx) had a median follow-up of 57 months. Results On enrollment, 33 (43%) of 77 patients had CVD manifested as acute stroke/TIA (23 patients), cerebromicroembolism by transcranial Doppler (17 patients), or cerebral infarcts by MRI (14 patients). Mitral or aortic valve LEx were equally frequent in healthy controls (46%) as in patients with and without any CVD (39% and 43%), stroke/TIA (35% and 43%), cerebromicroembolism (41% and 42%), or cerebral infarcts (36% and 43%) (all p≥0.72). Also, other mechanisms for CVD other than LEx such as Libman-Sacks vegetations, patent foramen ovale or interatrial septal aneurysm, aortic or carotid atherosclerosis, or thrombogenesis were found in ≥94% of patients with CVD. In addition, 36 subjects with and 44 without LEx had similar low incidence of stroke/TIA [1(1.3%) and 2(2.5%), respectively, p=1.0] during follow-up. Finally, LEx were not associated with aging, atherogenic risk factors

  2. Real-Time Three-Dimensional Echocardiography: Characterization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function—Current Clinical Applications and Literature Review Update

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Omar; Beckett, Morgan Q.; James, Aaron W.; Loehr, Megan N.; Lewis, Taylor G.; Hassan, Tahmin; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Our review of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) discusses the diagnostic utility of RT3DE and provides a comparison with two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) in clinical cardiology. A Pubmed literature search on RT3DE was performed using the following key words: transthoracic, two-dimensional, three-dimensional, real-time, and left ventricular (LV) function. Articles included perspective clinical studies and meta-analyses in the English language, and focused on the role of RT3DE in human subjects. Application of RT3DE includes analysis of the pericardium, right ventricular (RV) and LV cavities, wall motion, valvular disease, great vessels, congenital anomalies, and traumatic injury, such as myocardial contusion. RT3DE, through a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), allows for increasingly accurate volume and valve motion assessment, estimated LV ejection fraction, and volume measurements. Chamber motion and LV mass approximation have been more accurately evaluated by RT3DE by improved inclusion of the third dimension and quantification of volumetric movement. Moreover, RT3DE was shown to have no statistical significance when comparing the ejection fractions of RT3DE to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Analysis of RT3DE data sets of the LV endocardial exterior allows for the volume to be directly quantified for specific phases of the cardiac cycle, ranging from end systole to end diastole, eliminating error from wall motion abnormalities and asymmetrical left ventricles. RT3DE through TTE measures cardiac function with superior diagnostic accuracy in predicting LV mass, systolic function, along with LV and RV volume when compared with 2DE with comparable results to CMR. PMID:28303211

  3. Integrating Radiology and Anatomy Teaching in Medical Education in the UK--The Evidence, Current Trends, and Future Scope.

    PubMed

    Heptonstall, N B; Ali, T; Mankad, K

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents the current evidence of the importance of integrating radiology and anatomy in medical education in the UK, a recommendation by a number of key anatomy, education, and radiology organizations. Current evidence highlights that on average only 5% of total teaching time in medical education is dedicated to radiology. Often, radiology teaching does not adequately fulfill students' learning needs and potentially leaves them underprepared for medical practice. Benefits of integrating radiology and anatomy include improved clinical application of anatomy, an increase in student's interest in anatomy, and ultimately improved radiological interpretation. Various modalities exist for the integration of radiology and anatomy, facilitated by the vast portability of radiological images. It appears that combining radiological resources with traditional anatomy teaching methodology in a blended approach is most beneficial.

  4. Computer-assisted learning in anatomy at the international medical school in Debrecen, Hungary: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kish, Gary; Cook, Samuel A; Kis, Gréta

    2013-01-01

    The University of Debrecen's Faculty of Medicine has an international, multilingual student population with anatomy courses taught in English to all but Hungarian students. An elective computer-assisted gross anatomy course, the Computer Human Anatomy (CHA), has been taught in English at the Anatomy Department since 2008. This course focuses on an introduction to anatomical digital images along with clinical cases. This low-budget course has a large visual component using images from magnetic resonance imaging and computer axial tomogram scans, ultrasound clinical studies, and readily available anatomy software that presents topics which run in parallel to the university's core anatomy curriculum. From the combined computer images and CHA lecture information, students are asked to solve computer-based clinical anatomy problems in the CHA computer laboratory. A statistical comparison was undertaken of core anatomy oral examination performances of English program first-year medical students who took the elective CHA course and those who did not in the three academic years 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. The results of this study indicate that the CHA-enrolled students improved their performance on required anatomy core curriculum oral examinations (P < 0.001), suggesting that computer-assisted learning may play an active role in anatomy curriculum improvement. These preliminary results have prompted ongoing evaluation of what specific aspects of CHA are valuable and which students benefit from computer-assisted learning in a multilingual and diverse cultural environment.

  5. [Cerebrovascular disease in childhood. Case series].

    PubMed

    Graziano, Ana P; Sancilio, Andrea; Bugalter, Mariela; Barbosa, Walter; Rodríguez, Facundo; Montali, César; García Munitis, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Stroke in childhood is considered rare. It may be ischemic or hemorrhagic. Its presentation is often acute and it is a leading cause of mortality in pediatrics. The aim of our work is to present the general features of stroke of 18 patients under 15 years of age admitted to the Hospital El Cruce, between July 2009 and June 2014, and their clinical outcome a year later. We observed a predominance of male patients and the median age of 5 years. The main clinical features were hemiparesis, seizures, headache and vomiting and sensory impairment. The most frequent type was ischemic and the middle cerebral artery territory was the most commonly involved. Twelve patients had no sequelae. The signs and symptoms were guiding stroke, neuroimaging studies were essential for diagnosis and patients evolved favorably with low number of recurrence and death.

  6. Analysis of Anaphylactic Shock Caused by 17 Types of Traditional Chinese Medicine Injections Used to Treat Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Jiao; Wang, De-Wang; Meng, Ling; Wang, Yong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Several reports describing anaphylactic shock following treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese herbal injections were described. Our analysis of these reports showed that anaphylactic shock caused by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injections for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases is common but also sometimes fatal. Therefore, we proposed the following four suggestions for improving the clinical safety of delivering Chinese herbal injections and reducing the occurrence of allergic shock. First, patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are at high risk, so they should only be given TCM injections after a doctor's diagnosis and approval. Second, people in allergic groups can suffer anaphylactic shock, so vigilance is important in the treatment of all age groups, although even more caution should be exercised when treating children or elderly people. In fact, TCM injections may not be appropriate for those age groups, so that they should be carefully considered before treatment. Third, no significant gender differences have been noted in patients with anaphylactic shock, so all patients should be carefully monitored, irrespective of gender. Fourth, the timeframe in which different drugs cause anaphylactic shock varies; thus, patients should be observed as long as possible. PMID:26000291

  7. The anatomy of the mermaid.

    PubMed

    Heppell, D

    Investigation of the anatomy of the mermaid and of mermaid lore has revealed a tangled web of stories, sightings and specimens of the most diverse nature, extending worldwide into the realms of folklore and legend, zoology and cryptozoology, anatomy, physiology, radiography and folk medicine, ethnography, social history and the history of science. The stereotype we know as the mermaid is surely a fit subject for further serious study

  8. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either damage of the cerebrovascular system including silent strokes or causes dysregulation of beta-amyloid clearance at the blood-brain barrier resulting in increased brain beta-amyloid. A cascade of subsequent downstream events may lead to disturbed metabolic changes, and neuroinflammation and tau pathology. The role of NGF on the cell death of cholinergic neurons is discussed. Additional risk factors (e.g. acidosis, metals) contribute to plaque development. PMID:21112383

  9. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  10. Cerebrovascular Involvement in Liposome - Induced Cardiopulmonary Distress in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    expressed as mean ± SD. There was no statistical treament for data on the 24 pigs (Table 1); only percentage values were calculated. All applied...new, promising field for use of liposomes as a vehicle is in the treatment of cerebrovascular disease through gene therapy (Saito et al., 2004; Shi...brain by means of liposomes. Tohoku J. Exp. Med. 136:219-229. Toyoda, K., Chu, Y., Heistad, D. D. (2003). Gene therapy for cerebral vascular disease

  11. Microbubbles as drug delivery systems in cerebrovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Mariacarmela; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco

    2009-11-01

    The field of neurovascular ultrasound is growing rapidly with new applications. While ultrasound contrast agents were initially used to overcome poor transcranial bone windows for identification of cerebral arteries, newgeneration microbubbles in combination with innovative contrast-specific ultrasound techniques now enable potential therapeutic procedures. This article will provide a review of recent and emerging developments along with patents in ultrasound technology and contrast-specific therapeutic techniques for cerebrovascular patients.

  12. Digital subtraction angiography in pediatric cerebrovascular occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Faerber, E.N.; Griska, L.A.B.; Swartz, J.D.; Capitanio, M.A.; Popky, G.L.

    1984-08-01

    While conventional angiography has been used to demonstrate cerebrovascular occlusive disease in the past, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is capable of showing progressive vascular involvement with ease, simplicity, and extremely low morbidity, making it particularly well suited for children and outpatients either alone or coordinated with computed tomography. The authors discuss the usefulness and advantages of DSA as demonstrated in 7 infants and children with hemiplegia, 4 of whom had sickle-cell disease.

  13. Antioxidants and Dementia Risk: Consideration through a Cerebrovascular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Virginie; Hackett, Mark; Takechi, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    A number of natural and chemical compounds that exert anti-oxidative properties are demonstrated to be beneficial for brain and cognitive function, and some are reported to reduce the risk of dementia. However, the detailed mechanisms by which those anti-oxidative compounds show positive effects on cognition and dementia are still unclear. An emerging body of evidence suggests that the integrity of the cerebrovascular blood-brain barrier (BBB) is centrally involved in the onset and progression of cognitive impairment and dementia. While recent studies revealed that some anti-oxidative agents appear to be protective against the disruption of BBB integrity and structure, few studies considered the neuroprotective effects of antioxidants in the context of cerebrovascular integrity. Therefore, in this review, we examine the mechanistic insights of antioxidants as a pleiotropic agent for cognitive impairment and dementia through a cerebrovascular axis by primarily focusing on the current available data from physiological studies. Conclusively, there is a compelling body of evidence that suggest antioxidants may prevent cognitive decline and dementia by protecting the integrity and function of BBB and, indeed, further studies are needed to directly examine these effects in addition to underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:27999412

  14. Oropharynx in patients with cerebrovascular disease: evaluation with videofluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, M Y; Ott, D J; Peele, V N; Gelfand, D W

    1990-09-01

    Forty-six patients with cerebrovascular disease underwent videofluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx to assess location and severity of swallowing dysfunction with use of boluses of various consistencies. Low- and high-viscosity barium suspensions, a barium paste, and a paste-coated cookie were used; not all patients were given all materials. Thirty-nine patients had abnormalities of both oral and pharyngeal function. Two patients had oral dysfunction only, and five had pharyngeal abnormalities only. Mild swallowing difficulties occurred in 18 patients (39%), moderate dysfunction in 23 (50%), and severe dysfunction in five (11%). Thirty-one patients had pharyngeal stasis, which was symmetric in 25 patients (81%), right-sided in three, and left-sided in three. Asymmetric stasis did not correlate to the site of cerebrovascular disease. Twenty-four episodes of aspiration occurred, half of them with the low-viscosity barium suspension. Thus, video-fluoroscopy can be used to define the location and severity of oropharyngeal abnormalities, which is critical for feeding recommendations. The abnormalities present, however, were not useful in predicting the type of cerebrovascular disease.

  15. Cerebrovascular regulation in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; Petty, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have symptoms of orthostatic intolerance despite having a normal orthostatic blood pressure (BP), which suggests some impairment of cerebrovascular regulation. Cerebrovascular autoregulation refers to the maintenance of normal cerebral blood flow in spite of changing BP. Mechanisms of autoregulation include myogenic, metabolic and neurogenic vasoregulation. Beat-to-beat recording of blood-flow velocity (BFV) is possible using transcranial Doppler imaging. It is possible to evaluate autoregulation by regressing deltaBFV to deltaBP during head-up tilt. A number of dynamic methods, relating deltaBFV to deltaBP during sudden induced changes in BP by occluding then releasing peripheral arterial flow or by the Valsalva maneuver. The deltaBFV to deltaBP provides an index of autoregulation. In orthostatic hypotension, the autoregulated range is typically expanded. In contrast, paradoxical vasoconstriction occurs in POTS because of an increased depth of respiration, resulting in hypocapnic cerebrovascular constriction, and impaired autoregulation.

  16. Correlation of cerebrovascular disorder and anxiety: The Kecskemet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Kornel; Bodo, Michael; Szalay, Piroska; Szucs, Attila

    2010-04-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that anxiety is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, specifically stroke, we simultaneously measured anxiety and cerebral vascular alternation, using a computer-based system, "Cerberus." Sixty nine psychiatric patients (including an alcoholic subgroup) were selected as subjects for measurements conducted in Kecskemet, Hungary. The five-item short form of anxiety test (STAI) was administered twice during the same session. Between each test, brain pulse waves were recorded by rheoencephalogram (REG). A REG peak time above 180 milliseconds was considered a cerebrovascular alteration (modified after Jenkner). Data were sorted into two groups: low anxiety (N=10) and high anxiety (N=10). Significant differences were found between cardiovascular risk factors (p< 0.001), REG peak time (p<0.043), and heart rate (p< 0.045). Six subjects showed cerebrovascular alteration in the high anxiety group, and two in the low anxiety group. For the two anxiety groups, there were no significant differences in body mass index, cardiovascular sympathetic-parasympathetic balance, age and symptoms of transient ischemic attack. The correlation of REG and age was significantly different only for the alcoholic subgroup (Szalay et al, 2007). These data support the hypothesis that a correlation exists between cerebrovascular disorder and anxiety in the studied population.

  17. Cerebrovascular Responses During Lower Body Negative Pressure-Induced Presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Kana; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan R.; Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Reduced orthostatic tolerance is commonly observed after space flight, occasionally causing presyncopal conditions. Although the cerebrovascular system may play an important role in presyncope, there have been few reports concerning cerebral hemodynamics during presyncope. The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebrovascular responses during presyncope induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Seven healthy male volunteers were exposed to LBNP in steps of -10 mmHg every 3 min until presyncopal symptoms were detected. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured with a finger cuff. Cerebral tissue oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were estimated using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity at the middle cerebral artery was measured with Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD). We focused on the data during the 2 min before endpoint. BP marked a gradual decrease (91 to 86 mmHg from 2 min to 30 sec before endpoint), which was accelerated along with HR decrease during the final 30 sec (86 to 71 mmHg). Cerebral oxy-Hb concentration decreases as presyncope is approached while total-Hb concentration remains fairly constant. TCD reveals a decrease in the CBF velocity. The TCD and NIRS results suggest that CBF decreases along with the BP decrease. Cerebrovascular responses during presyncope are closely related to cardiovascular responses.

  18. CEREBROVASCULAR DAMAGE MEDIATES RELATIONS BETWEEN AORTIC STIFFNESS AND MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Woodard, Todd; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; van Buchem, Mark A.; Torjesen, Alyssa A.; Inker, Lesley A.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is associated with cognitive decline. Here, we examined the association between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and cognitive function and investigated whether cerebrovascular remodeling and parenchymal small vessel disease damage mediate the relation. Analyses were based on 1820 (60% women) participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility – Reykjavik Study. Multivariable linear regression models adjusted for vascular and demographic confounders showed that higher carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was related to lower memory score (standardized β: −0.071±0.023; P=0.002). Cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities were each associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and memory (P<0.05). Together, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities (total indirect effect: −0.029; 95% CI: −0.043, −0.017) attenuated the direct relation between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and memory (direct effect: −0.042; 95% CI: −0.087, 0.003; P=0.07) and explained approximately 41% of the observed effect. Our results suggest that in older adults, associations between aortic stiffness and memory are mediated by pathways that include cerebral microvascular remodeling and microvascular parenchymal damage. PMID:26573713

  19. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  20. [Pediatric cerebrovascular accident secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Escalona, A Olloqui; Pradel, Z Galve; Pisón, J López; Oguiza, A García; Montañés, N Clavero; Delgado, R Pérez; Hidalgo, M Lafuente; Guelbenzu, S; Segura, J L Peña

    2009-10-01

    We present the case of a 13 year-old patient diagnosed with fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) by angiographic study, with "string of beads" image of internal carotid, after undergoing two ischemic strokes in nine days. Conservative treatment with acetylsalicylic acid at antiaggregant doses was decided. Twenty months later the clinical progress is favorable without presenting any new episodes. FMD is a very uncommon cause of stroke in childhood. Little is known about its etiology. In spite of it usually being an asymptomatic disease, it must be considered in cases of repeated or inexplicable strokes. Its prognosis and treatment is controversial, due to the limited number of pediatric patients with this pathology.

  1. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of an Innovative Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J.; Rando, William C.; O'Brien, Michael K.; Haims, Andrew H.; Abrahams, James J.; Stewart, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Starting in 2004, a medical school gross anatomy course faced with a 30% cut in hours went through an extensive redesign, which transformed a traditional dissection course into a course with a clinical focus, learning societies, and extensive on-line learning support. Built into the redesign process was an extensive and ongoing assessment process,…

  2. Development of a Synergistic Case-Based Micro anatomy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Prayson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of an interactive approach to teaching and assessing a micro anatomy curriculum in an innovative medical school program. As an alternative to lectures and labs, students are engaged in interactive seminars focused on discussion of clinical and research-based cases matched with normal histology and pathology…

  3. Outcomes of a Rotational Dissection System in Gross Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, David W.; Oakes, Joanne; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Chuang, Alice Z.; Cleary, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Texas Houston Medical School, a rotational dissection system was introduced to improve coordination between the Gross Anatomy and the Introduction to Clinical Medicine (ICM) courses. Six students were assigned to each cadaver and divided into two teams. For each laboratory, one team was assigned to dissect and the other to…

  4. Anatomy of trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wallisa; Zurada, Anna; Zurada-ZieliŃSka, Agnieszka; Gielecki, Jerzy; Loukas, Marios

    2016-07-01

    Trisomy 18 is the second most common aneuploidy after trisomy 21. Due to its multi-systemic defects, it has a poor prognosis with a 50% chance of survival beyond one week and a <10% chance of survival beyond one year of life. However, this prognosis has been challenged by the introduction of aggressive interventional therapies for patients born with trisomy 18. As a result, a review of the anatomy associated with this defect is imperative. While any of the systems can be affected by trisomy 18, the following areas are the most likely to be affected: craniofacial, musculoskeletal system, cardiac system, abdominal, and nervous system. More specifically, the following features are considered characteristic of trisomy 18: low-set ears, rocker bottom feet, clenched fists, and ventricular septal defect. Of particular interest is the associated cardiac defect, as surgical repairs of these defects have shown an improved survivability. In this article, the anatomical defects associated with each system are reviewed. Clin. Anat. 29:628-632, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Penile embryology and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yiee, Jenny H; Baskin, Laurence S

    2010-06-29

    Knowledge of penile embryology and anatomy is essential to any pediatric urologist in order to fully understand and treat congenital anomalies. Sex differentiation of the external genitalia occurs between the 7th and 17th weeks of gestation. The Y chromosome initiates male differentiation through the SRY gene, which triggers testicular development. Under the influence of androgens produced by the testes, external genitalia then develop into the penis and scrotum. Dorsal nerves supply penile skin sensation and lie within Buck's fascia. These nerves are notably absent at the 12 o'clock position. Perineal nerves supply skin sensation to the ventral shaft skin and frenulum. Cavernosal nerves lie within the corpora cavernosa and are responsible for sexual function. Paired cavernosal, dorsal, and bulbourethral arteries have extensive anastomotic connections. During erection, the cavernosal artery causes engorgement of the cavernosa, while the deep dorsal artery leads to glans enlargement. The majority of venous drainage occurs through a single, deep dorsal vein into which multiple emissary veins from the corpora and circumflex veins from the spongiosum drain. The corpora cavernosa and spongiosum are all made of spongy erectile tissue. Buck's fascia circumferentially envelops all three structures, splitting into two leaves ventrally at the spongiosum. The male urethra is composed of six parts: bladder neck, prostatic, membranous, bulbous, penile, and fossa navicularis. The urethra receives its blood supply from both proximal and distal directions.

  6. Anatomy of an incident

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Trujillo, Stanley; Lawton, Cindy M.; Land, Whitney M.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2016-03-23

    A traditional view of incidents is that they are caused by shortcomings in human competence, attention, or attitude. It may be under the label of “loss of situational awareness,” procedure “violation,” or “poor” management. A different view is that human error is not the cause of failure, but a symptom of failure – trouble deeper inside the system. In this perspective, human error is not the conclusion, but rather the starting point of investigations. During an investigation, three types of information are gathered: physical, documentary, and human (recall/experience). Through the causal analysis process, apparent cause or apparent causes are identified as the most probable cause or causes of an incident or condition that management has the control to fix and for which effective recommendations for corrective actions can be generated. A causal analysis identifies relevant human performance factors. In the following presentation, the anatomy of a radiological incident is discussed, and one case study is presented. We analyzed the contributing factors that caused a radiological incident. When underlying conditions, decisions, actions, and inactions that contribute to the incident are identified. This includes weaknesses that may warrant improvements that tolerate error. Measures that reduce consequences or likelihood of recurrence are discussed.

  7. Anatomy of an incident

    DOE PAGES

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Trujillo, Stanley; Lawton, Cindy M.; ...

    2016-03-23

    A traditional view of incidents is that they are caused by shortcomings in human competence, attention, or attitude. It may be under the label of “loss of situational awareness,” procedure “violation,” or “poor” management. A different view is that human error is not the cause of failure, but a symptom of failure – trouble deeper inside the system. In this perspective, human error is not the conclusion, but rather the starting point of investigations. During an investigation, three types of information are gathered: physical, documentary, and human (recall/experience). Through the causal analysis process, apparent cause or apparent causes are identifiedmore » as the most probable cause or causes of an incident or condition that management has the control to fix and for which effective recommendations for corrective actions can be generated. A causal analysis identifies relevant human performance factors. In the following presentation, the anatomy of a radiological incident is discussed, and one case study is presented. We analyzed the contributing factors that caused a radiological incident. When underlying conditions, decisions, actions, and inactions that contribute to the incident are identified. This includes weaknesses that may warrant improvements that tolerate error. Measures that reduce consequences or likelihood of recurrence are discussed.« less

  8. A reappraisal of adult thoracic surface anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S Ali; Hale, Samuel J M; Buckenham, Tim; Wilson, Ben; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. Numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings exist between and within anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic surface anatomical landmarks in vivo using computed tomographic (CT) imaging. High-resolution thoracic CT scans from 153 supine adults (mean age 63, range 19-89 years; 53% female) taken at end tidal inspiration were analyzed by dual consensus reporting to determine the surface anatomy of the sternal angle, central veins, heart, lungs, and diaphragm. Patients with kyphosis/scoliosis, distorting space-occupying lesions, or visceromegaly were excluded. The position of the cardiac apex, formation of the brachiocephalic veins, and vertebral levels of the sternal angle, xiphisternal joint, and aortic hiatus were consistent with commonly accepted surface markings although there was a wide range of normal variation. In contrast, common surface markings were markedly inaccurate for the following: the position of the tracheal bifurcation, aortic arch, and azygos vein termination (below the plane of the sternal angle at T5-T6 vertebral level in most individuals); the superior vena cava/right atrial junction (most often behind the fourth costal cartilage); the lower border of the lung (adjacent to T12 vertebra posteriorly); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T11 in most). Surface anatomy must be reappraised using modern imaging in vivo if it is to be evidence based and fit for purpose. The effects of gender, age, posture, respiration, build, and ethnicity also deserve greater emphasis.

  9. The anatomy and physiology of the avian endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Midge; Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine system of birds is comparable to that of mammals, although there are many unique aspects to consider when studying the anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry. Avian endocrinology is a field of veterinary medicine that is unfamiliar to many practitioners; however, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding when evaluating companion birds in clinical practice. This article covers the anatomy and physiology of the normal avian, and readers are referred to other articles for a more detailed explanation of altered physiology and pathology.

  10. The adolescent female: Breast and reproductive embryology and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lemaine, Valerie; Simmons, Patricia S

    2013-01-01

    Congenital breast and genital tract anomalies are seen frequently in the care of children and adolescents. Breast and internal gynecologic anomalies more often present in adolescence than in early childhood. Management is best delivered through a multidisciplinary team approach. Carefully timed surgical intervention is of importance to optimize psychological, aesthetic and functional outcomes. An understanding of the female breast and genital tract embryology and anatomy is important for a meticulous clinical examination and appropriate surgical treatment. This article will review the normal embryology and anatomy of the adolescent female breast and genital tract.

  11. Building the body: active learning laboratories that emphasize practical aspects of anatomy and integration with radiology.

    PubMed

    Zumwalt, Ann C; Lufler, Rebecca S; Monteiro, Joseph; Shaffer, Kitt

    2010-01-01

    Active learning exercises were developed to allow advanced medical students to revisit and review anatomy in a clinically meaningful context. In our curriculum, students learn anatomy two to three years before they participate in the radiology clerkship. These educational exercises are designed to review anatomy content while highlighting its relevance to the study of radiology. Laboratory exercises were developed using inexpensive materials in the form of hands-on stations designed for use by students working together in small groups. Station exercises include model building, exploring relevant radiological imaging, and practicing clinical techniques. Students are encouraged to move from abstract conceptualization of the anatomy using models to applying knowledge to living tissues by using a portable ultrasound to explore superficial anatomy on each other. Stations are designed to integrate knowledge and reemphasize concepts in different contexts, so that upon completion students have a reinforced understanding of the three-dimensional anatomy of the region in question, the appearance of the anatomy on radiological images, and an appreciation of the relevance of the anatomy to radiological procedures.

  12. Resident Perceptions of Anatomy Education: A Survey of Medical School Alumni from Two Different Anatomy Curricula and Multiple Medical Specialties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohl, Michael A.; Gest, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the University of Michigan Medical School reduced its gross anatomy curriculum. To determine the effect of this reduction on resident perceptions of their clinical preparedness, we surveyed alumni that included residents from the original and new shortened curricula. A Likert-scale survey was sent to four classes of alumni. Respondents…

  13. Novel imaging approaches to cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hage, Ziad A; Alaraj, Ali; Arnone, Gregory D; Charbel, Fady T

    2016-09-01

    Imaging techniques available to the physician treating neurovascular disease have substantially grown over the past several decades. New techniques as well as advances in imaging modalities continuously develop and provide an extensive array of modalities to diagnose, characterize, and understand neurovascular pathology. Modern noninvasive neurovascular imaging is generally based on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, or nuclear imaging and includes CT angiography, CT perfusion, xenon-enhanced CT, single-photon emission CT, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, MR perfusion, functional magnetic resonance imaging with global and regional blood oxygen level dependent imaging, and magnetic resonance angiography with the use of the noninvasive optional vessel analysis software (River Forest, Ill). In addition to a brief overview of the technique, this review article discusses the clinical indications, advantages, and disadvantages of each of those modalities.

  14. Acute cerebrovascular incident in a young woman: Venous or arterial stroke? – Comparative analysis based on two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Katarzyna; Zimny, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edyta; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Cerebrovascular diseases are the most common neurological disorders. Most of them are arterial strokes, mainly ischemic, less often of hemorrhagic origin. Changes in the course of cerebral venous thrombosis are less common causes of acute cerebrovascular events. Clinical and radiological presentation of arterial and venous strokes (especially in emergency head CT) may pose a diagnostic problem because of great resemblance. However, the distinction between arterial and venous stroke is important from a clinical point of view, as it carries implications for the treatment and determinates patient’s prognosis. Case Report In this article, we present cases of two young women (one with an acute venous infarction, the second with an arterial stroke) who presented with similar both clinical and radiological signs of acute vascular incident in the cerebral cortex. We present main similarities and differences between arterial and venous strokes regarding the etiology, clinical symptoms and radiological appearance in various imaging techniques. Conclusions We emphasize that thorough analysis of CT (including cerebral vessels), knowledge of symptoms and additional clinical information (e.g. risk factors) may facilitate correct diagnosis and allow planning further diagnostic imaging studies. We also emphasize the importance of MRI, especially among young people, in the differential diagnosis of venous and arterial infarcts. PMID:24505227

  15. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    PubMed Central

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Han, Roger; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discussed for a more comprehensive understanding of ulnar-sided wrist pain. PMID:19722104

  16. Delayed diagnosis of a cerebrovascular accident associated with anabolic steroid use

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Isabelle; Reeve, Nina; Doherty, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of atherosclerotic stroke in a 46-year-old recreational bodybuilder with a 20 year history of anabolic-adrenergic steroid (AAS) abuse. Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurred during his third week of hospital admission for an acute abdomen and on day 8, postemergency laparotomy. CVA presented with collapse, generalised seizures, reduced Glasgow Coma Score and severe hypertension. He was subsequently admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), where initial investigations did not illustrate an underlying diagnosis. By day 4 in ICU, there had been no significant clinical improvement and radiological investigations were repeated, identifying a left frontal lobe infarct in the middle cerebral artery territory. The authors propose CVA was secondary to AAS. After a prolonged and complicated period of rehabilitation, he has been discharged home; he requires carers due to dyspraxia and is mobilising independently. PMID:22693186

  17. Anatomy of the ward round.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient's narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient's right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  18. Anatomy education in Namibia: balancing facility design and curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed toward simplification of work flow and ease of use by faculty, staff, and students. From the onset, the integration of state of the art technology was pursued to facilitate teaching and promote a student-centered pedagogical approach to dissections. The program, as realized, is comprised of three 16-week semesters with seven hours of contact time per week, namely three hours of lectures and four hours of dissection laboratory and microscopy time. Set outcomes were established, each revolving around clinical cases with integrated medical imaging. The design of the facility itself was not constrained by a legacy structure, allowing the School of Medicine, in collaboration with architects and contractors, to design the building from scratch. A design was implemented that allows for the sequential processing of cadaveric material in a unidirectional flow from reception, to preparation, embalming, storage, dissection, and maceration. Importantly, the odor of formaldehyde typically associated with anatomy facilities was eliminated outside of the dissection areas and minimized within via a high-performance ventilation system. By holistically incorporating an integrated curriculum, facility design, and teaching at an early stage, the authors believe they have created a system that might serve as a model for new anatomy programs.

  19. An anatomy precourse enhances student learning in veterinary anatomy.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Margaret A; Stevens-Sparks, Cathryn; Taboada, Joseph; Daniel, Annie; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2016-07-08

    Veterinary anatomy is often a source of trepidation for many students. Currently professional veterinary programs, similar to medical curricula, within the United States have no admission requirements for anatomy as a prerequisite course. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of a week-long precourse in veterinary anatomy on both objective student performance and subjective student perceptions of the precourse educational methods. Incoming first year veterinary students in the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine professional curriculum were asked to participate in a free precourse before the start of the semester, covering the musculoskeletal structures of the canine thoracic limb. Students learned the material either via dissection only, instructor-led demonstrations only, or a combination of both techniques. Outcome measures included student performance on examinations throughout the first anatomy course of the professional curriculum as compared with those who did not participate in the precourse. This study found that those who participated in the precourse did significantly better on examinations within the professional anatomy course compared with those who did not participate. Notably, this significant improvement was also identified on the examination where both groups were exposed to the material for the first time together, indicating that exposure to a small portion of veterinary anatomy can impact learning of anatomical structures beyond the immediate scope of the material previously learned. Subjective data evaluation indicated that the precourse was well received and students preferred guided learning via demonstrations in addition to dissection as opposed to either method alone. Anat Sci Educ 9: 344-356. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Papilian's anatomy - celebrating six decades.

    PubMed

    Dumitraşcu, Dinu Iuliu; Crivii, Carmen Bianca; Opincariu, Iulian

    2017-01-01

    Victor Papilian was born an artist, during high school he studied music in order to become a violinist in two professional orchestras in Bucharest. Later on he enrolled in the school of medicine, being immediately attracted by anatomy. After graduating, with a briliant dissertation, he became a member of the faculty and continued to teach in his preferred field. His masters, Gh. Marinescu and Victor Babes, proposed him for the position of professor at the newly established Faculty of Medicine of Cluj. Here he reorganized the department radically, created an anatomy museum and edited the first dissection handbook and the first Romanian anatomy (descriptive and topographic) treatise, both books received with great appreciation. He received the Romanian Academy Prize. His knowledge and skills gained him a well deserved reputation and he created a prestigious school of anatomy. He published over 250 scientific papers in national and international journals, ranging from morphology to functional, pathological and anthropological topics. He founded the Society of Anthropology, with its own newsletter; he was elected as a member of the French Society of Anatomy. In parallel he had a rich artistic and cultural activity as writer and playwright: he was president of the Transylvanian Writers' Society, editor of a literary review, director of the Cluj theater and opera, leader of a book club and founder of a symphony orchestra.

  1. [History of anatomy in Lyon].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, A

    1978-06-01

    1. We know very little concerning the teaching of anatomy during the Middle Ages. Only two authors, who both came to live in Lyon, Lanfranc and Guy de Chauliac, wrote on the subject. On the other hand, the important development of printing in Lyon from the sixteenth century onwards, made it possible to spread the translations of classic works and most of the books on Anatomy of the Renaissance. 2. However, Lyonese Anatomy developed very slowly because hospital training was more often badly organized. The only true supporter of Anatomy has been Marc Antoine Petit, chief surgeon of the Hôtel-Dieu before the French Revolution. 3. Apart from the parallel but only transient teaching of the Royal College of Surgery, one will have to wait for the creation of an official teaching first assumed by "schools" (secondary school and preparatory school) and finally by the Faculty of Medicine created in 1877. The names of Testut and of Latarjet contributed to the reknown of the Faculty of Medicine by their anatomical studies of great value for several generations of students. 4. Recently the Faculty of Medicine has been divided into four "universities". The new buildings are larger. The "gift of corpses" has brought a remedy to the shortage of the last twenty years. Anatomical research can be pursued thanks to micro-anatomy and bio-mechanics while conventional teaching is completed by dissection.

  2. First translational 'Think Tank' on cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Barone, Frank C; Gustafson, Deborah; Crystal, Howard A; Moreno, Herman; Adamski, Mateusz G; Arai, Ken; Baird, Alison E; Balucani, Clotilde; Brickman, Adam M; Cechetto, David; Gorelick, Philip; Biessels, Geert Jan; Kiliaan, Amanda; Launer, Lenore; Schneider, Julie; Sorond, Farzaneh A; Whitmer, Rachel; Wright, Clinton; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-02-13

    As the human population continues to age, an increasing number of people will exhibit significant deficits in cognitive function and dementia. It is now recognized that cerebrovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases all play major roles in the evolution of cognitive impairment and dementia. Thus with our more recent recognition of these relationships and our need to understand and more positively impact on this world health problem, "The Leo and Anne Albert Charitable Trust" (Gene Pranzo, Trustee with significant support from Susan Brogan, Meeting Planner) provided generous support for this inaugural international workshop that was held from April 13-16, 2015 at the beautiful Ritz Carlton Golf Resort in North Naples, Florida. Researchers from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY organized the event by selecting the present group of translationally inclined preclinical, clinical and population scientists focused on cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk and its progression to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia. Participants at the workshop addressed important issues related to aging, cognition and dementia by: (1) sharing new data, information and perspectives that intersect vascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, (2) discussing gaps in translating population risk, clinical and preclinical information to the progression of cognitive loss, and (3) debating new approaches and methods to fill these gaps that can translate into future therapeutic interventions. Participants agreed on topics for group discussion prior to the meeting and focused on specific translational goals that included promoting better understanding of dementia mechanisms, the identification of potential therapeutic targets for intervention, and discussed/debated the potential utility of diagnostic/prognostic markers. Below summarizes the new data-presentations, concepts, novel directions and specific discussion topics addressed by this international

  3. Clinical anatomy of the pelvis and hip.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Canoso, Juan J; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Kalish, Robert A

    The contents of this review may appear odd. After a brief description of the coxofemoral joint, the entities discussed include ilioinguinal neuropathy within the context of the nerves that may be damaged during lower abdominal surgery, meralgia paresthetica, piriformis syndrome with the appropriate caveats, trochanteric syndrome, "ischial bursitis" and trochanteric syndrome caused by ischemia. These cases were chosen to stress our belief that rheumatologists are first and foremost internists. We further believe that being current in other pathologies such as peripheral neuropathies and certain vascular syndromes sooner or later benefits our patients.

  4. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  5. Study on the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR perfusion weighted imaging in SHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Dong, Yang; Chen, WenLi; Lin, Xueying; Xing, Da; Huang, Li

    2007-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death, and approximately 50% of survivors have a residual neurologic deficit and greater than 25% require chronic care. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) describes how far cerebral perfusion can increase from a baseline value after stimulation. High blood pressure is the most important independent risk factor for stroke and other vascular diseases. The incidence of stroke in the hypertensive is six times higher than in the patient with normal blood pressure. CVRC in the hypertensive was even lower than in control patients. MR perfusion weighted imaging (MR PWI) with the well-established acetazolamide (ACZ) stimulation test has been used for assessing brain function. The aim of this work is to assess the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR PWI with "ACZ" tolerance test in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to identify its value in evaluating the CVRC. Experimental animal including 3 groups: Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) (12-week-old) as control group, SHR (12-week-old and 20-week-old) as experimental group. MR PWI was performed respectively before and after acetazolamide administrated orally in 3 groups on a clinical 1.5 Tesla GE Signa MR fx/i whole-body MR system. The ROI was chosen in the bilateral frontal lobe to measure the value of rCBV, rCBF and MTT. The results showed that before ACZ-test, there was statistic differences between the WKY and SHR(12-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the values of rCBV and rCBF (P>0.05), and after ACZ-test, there were statistic differences between WKY and SHR (20-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the rCBV value (P<0.05). It is concluded that the method of MRI PWI combined with the "ACZ stress test" can provide more qualitative and half-quantitative information on the cerebral perfusion to evaluate the CVRC in SHR.

  6. Antidepressants Alter Cerebrovascular Permeability and Metabolic Rate in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    1982-07-01

    External detection of the annihilation radiation produced by water labeled with oxygen-15 was used to measure cerebrovascular permeability and cerebral blood flow in six rhesus monkeys. Use of oxygen-15 also permitted assessment of cerebral metabolic rate in two of the monkeys. Amitriptyline produced a dose-dependent, reversible increase in permeability at plasma drug concentrations which are therapeutic for depressed patients. At the same concentrations the drug also produced a 20 to 30 percent reduction in cerebral metabolic rate. At higher doses normal autoregulation of cerebral blood flow was suspended, but responsivity to arterial carbon dioxide was normal.

  7. Anatomy Adventure: A Board Game for Enhancing Understanding of Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Emeka G.

    2014-01-01

    Certain negative factors such as fear, loss of concentration and interest in the course, lack of confidence, and undue stress have been associated with the study of anatomy. These are factors most often provoked by the unusually large curriculum, nature of the course, and the psychosocial impact of dissection. As a palliative measure, Anatomy…

  8. The Anatomy of Anatomy: A Review for Its Modernization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugand, Kapil; Abrahams, Peter; Khurana, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation or specialty. Until recently, dissection and didactic lectures were its sole pedagogy. Teaching methodology has been revolutionized with more reliance on models, imaging, simulation, and the Internet to further consolidate and enhance the learning experience.…

  9. Anatomy that must be taught to a medical undergraduate: an interview-based survey in an Indian medical school.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Satheesha; Ramnarayan, K; Somayaji, S N

    2005-07-01

    Confusion still exists about the anatomy to be taught to the medical undergraduate. We did an interview-based survey at the Melaka Manipal Medical College in Manipal, India, to try to evaluate the quantum of anatomy that should be taught to the medical undergraduate. The results suggest that excluding trivia and making anatomy more clinically oriented would be advantageous. A hybrid approach to anatomy including both problem-based learning and discipline-based curricula would be a better option than the regional or systemic approaches.

  10. Animating functional anatomy for the web.

    PubMed

    Guttmann, G D

    2000-04-15

    The instructor sometimes has a complex task in explaining the concepts of functional anatomy and embryology to health professional students. However, animations can easily illustrate functional anatomy, clinical procedures, or the developing embryo. Web animation increases the accessibility of this information and makes it much more useful for independent student learning. A modified version of the animation can also be used for patient education. This article defines animation, provides a brief history of animation, discusses the principles of animation, illustrates and evaluates some of the video-editing or movie-making computer software programs, and shows examples of two of the author's animations. These two animations are the inferior alveolar nerve block from the mandibular nerve anesthetics unit and normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function from the muscles of the mastication and the TMJ function unit. The software discussed are the industry leaders and have made the job of producing computer-based animations much easier. The programs are Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects, Apple QuickTime and Macromedia Flash .

  11. Anatomy of the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Safieddine, Najib; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-05-01

    In the case of the thymus gland, the most common indications for resection are myasthenia gravis or thymoma. The consistency and appearance of the thymus gland make it difficult at times to discern from mediastinal fatty tissues. Having a clear understanding of the anatomy and the relationship of the gland to adjacent structures is important.

  12. DAGAL: Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, Johan H.

    2017-03-01

    The current IAU Symposium is closely connected to the EU-funded network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies), with the final annual network meeting of DAGAL being at the core of this international symposium. In this short paper, we give an overview of DAGAL, its training activities, and some of the scientific advances that have been made under its umbrella.

  13. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  14. Functional Anatomy of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Glenn C.; Chopp, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Movements of the human shoulder represent the result of a complex dynamic interplay of structural bony anatomy and biomechanics, static ligamentous and tendinous restraints, and dynamic muscle forces. Injury to 1 or more of these components through overuse or acute trauma disrupts this complex interrelationship and places the shoulder at increased risk. A thorough understanding of the functional anatomy of the shoulder provides the clinician with a foundation for caring for athletes with shoulder injuries. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE for the years 1980 to 1999, using the key words “shoulder,” “anatomy,” “glenohumeral joint,” “acromioclavicular joint,” “sternoclavicular joint,” “scapulothoracic joint,” and “rotator cuff.” Data Synthesis: We examine human shoulder movement by breaking it down into its structural static and dynamic components. Bony anatomy, including the humerus, scapula, and clavicle, is described, along with the associated articulations, providing the clinician with the structural foundation for understanding how the static ligamentous and dynamic muscle forces exert their effects. Commonly encountered athletic injuries are discussed from an anatomical standpoint. Conclusions/Recommendations: Shoulder injuries represent a significant proportion of athletic injuries seen by the medical provider. A functional understanding of the dynamic interplay of biomechanical forces around the shoulder girdle is necessary and allows for a more structured approach to the treatment of an athlete with a shoulder injury. PMID:16558636

  15. Orbital anatomy for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Timothy A; Golden, Brent A

    2012-11-01

    An anatomic description of the orbit and its contents and the eyelids directed toward surgeons is the focus of this article. The bone and soft tissue anatomic nuances for surgery are highlighted, including a section on osteology, muscles, and the orbital suspensory system. Innervation and vascular anatomy are also addressed.

  16. Integrating Anatomy Training into Radiation Oncology Residency: Considerations for Developing a Multidisciplinary, Interactive Learning Module for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation…

  17. Design and Validation of a Novel Learning Tool, the "Anato-Rug," for Teaching Equine Topographical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braid, Francesca; Williams, Sarah B.; Weller, Renate

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of anatomical landmarks in live animals (and humans) is key for clinical practice, but students often find it difficult to translate knowledge from dissection-based anatomy onto the live animal and struggle to acquire this vital skill. The purpose of this study was to create and evaluate the use of an equine anatomy rug…

  18. Medicare Expenditure Correlates of Atrophy and Cerebrovascular Disease in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Last, Briana S; García Rubio, Maria-José; Zhu, Carolyn W; Cosentino, Stephanie; Manly, Jennifer J; DeCarli, Charles; Stern, Yaakov; Brickman, Adam M

    2017-01-01

    Background/Study Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of cerebrovascular disease and atrophy are common in older adults and are associated with cognitive and medical burden. However, the extent to which they are related to health care expenditures has not been examined. We studied whether increased Medicare expenditures were associated with brain markers of atrophy and cerebrovascular disease in older adults.

  19. Effects of Dehydration on Cerebrovascular Control During Standing After Heavy Resistance Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-29

    flow; weight training ; cerebrovascular control PRESERVATION OF CEREBRAL PERFUSION is essential for maintaining consciousness. Heavy resistance exercise...cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory mechanisms. Subjects also received famil- iarization training with the experimental protocol and procedures...increases in the power of MCAv LF oscillations was induced by breathing through an inspiratory threshold device and was associated with an improvement in

  20. Wavelet assessment of cerebrospinal compensatory reserve and cerebrovascular pressure reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, M.; Turalska, M.; Kolodziej, W.; Latka, D.; West, B.

    2006-03-01

    We employ complex continuous wavelet transforms to develop a consistent mathematical framework capable of quantifying both cerebrospinal compensatory reserve and cerebrovascular pressure--reactivity. The wavelet gain, defined as the frequency dependent ratio of time averaged wavelet coefficients of intracranial (ICP) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) fluctuations, characterizes the dampening of spontaneous arterial blood oscillations. This gain is introduced as a novel measure of cerebrospinal compensatory reserve. For a group of 10 patients who died as a result of head trauma (Glasgow Outcome Scale GOS =1) the average gain is 0.45 calculated at 0.05 Hz significantly exceeds that of 16 patients with favorable outcome (GOS=2): with gain of 0.24 with p=4x10-5. We also study the dynamics of instantaneous phase difference between the fluctuations of the ABP and ICP time series. The time-averaged synchronization index, which depends upon frequency, yields the information about the stability of the phase difference and is used as a cerebrovascular pressure--reactivity index. The average phase difference for GOS=1 is close to zero in sharp contrast to the mean value of 30^o for patients with GOS=2. We hypothesize that in patients who died the impairment of cerebral autoregulation is followed by the break down of residual pressure reactivity.

  1. Integration of gross anatomy in an organ system-based medical curriculum: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Brooks, William S; Woodley, Kristina T C Panizzi; Jackson, James R; Hoesley, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    The University of Alabama School of Medicine (UASOM) instituted a fully integrated, organ system-based preclinical curriculum in 2007. Gross anatomy and embryology were integrated with other basic science disciplines throughout the first two years of undergraduate medical education. Here we describe the methods of instruction and integration of gross anatomy and embryology in this curriculum as well as challenges faced along the way. Gross anatomy and embryology are taught through a combination of didactic lectures, team-based learning activities, and cadaveric dissection laboratories. Vertical integration occurs through third- and fourth-year anatomy and embryology elective courses. Radiology is integrated with anatomy instruction through self-study modules and hands-on ultrasound sessions. Our model of anatomy instruction is time efficient, clinically relevant, and effective as demonstrated by student performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination(®) (USMLE(®) ) Step 1 examination. We recommend that medical schools considering full integration of gross anatomy and embryology (1) carefully consider the sequencing of organ system modules, (2) be willing to sacrifice anatomical detail for clinical application, (3) provide additional electives to third- and fourth-year students, and (4) integrate radiology with anatomical education.

  2. Anatomy of ageing face.

    PubMed

    Ilankovan, V

    2014-03-01

    Ageing is a biological process that results from changes at a cellular level, particularly modification of mRNA. The face is affected by the same physiological process and results in skeletal, muscular, and cutaneous ageing; ligamentous attenuation, descent of fat, and ageing of the appendages. I describe these changes on a structural and clinical basis and summarise possible solutions for a rejuvenation surgeon.

  3. The Anatomy of Riddance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers the meaning, reference and clinical relevance of Winnicott's concept of "riddance". Taking its starting point from the infant's behaviour in letting go the spatula, as described in his paper, "The observation of infants in a set situation", it explores his explanation of riddance activity in the context of…

  4. A fresh look at the anatomy and physiology of equine mastication.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Padraic M; du Toit, Nicole; Staszyk, Carsten

    2013-08-01

    There have been many significant and interesting developments in equine dental anatomy during the past 20 years that are of major clinical significance in better understanding the physiology of equine mastication, the etiopathogenesis of some dental disorders, and their safe treatment. The many recent significant developments include descriptions of the enamel infolding of cheek teeth and of infundibular anatomy, including the frequent absence of cementum infilling in many infundibulae, which can lead to infundibular caries. Many important developments in equine dental anatomy are summarized in this article.

  5. The future of gross anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Seiden, D

    1995-01-01

    A survey of U.S. departments of anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry shows that 39% of the respondent anatomy departments reported declines in the numbers of graduate students taking the human gross anatomy course. Similarly, 42% of the departments reported decreases in the numbers of graduate students teaching human gross anatomy. These decreases were greater in anatomy than in physiology and in biochemistry. The percentages of departments reporting increases in students taking or teaching their courses was 6% for human gross anatomy and 0% to 19% for physiology and biochemistry courses. To reverse this trend the establishment of specific programs for the training of gross anatomy teachers is advocated. These new teachers will be available as the need for them is increasingly recognized in the future.

  6. Anatomy of Teaching Anatomy: Do Prosected Cross Sections Improve Students Understanding of Spatial and Radiological Anatomy?

    PubMed Central

    Vithoosan, S.; Kokulan, S.; Dissanayake, M. M.; Dissanayake, Vajira; Jayasekara, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cadaveric dissections and prosections have traditionally been part of undergraduate medical teaching. Materials and Methods. Hundred and fifty-nine first-year students in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, were invited to participate in the above study. Students were randomly allocated to two age and gender matched groups. Both groups were exposed to identical series of lectures regarding anatomy of the abdomen and conventional cadaveric prosections of the abdomen. The test group (n = 77, 48.4%) was also exposed to cadaveric cross-sectional slices of the abdomen to which the control group (n = 82, 51.6%) was blinded. At the end of the teaching session both groups were assessed by using their performance in a timed multiple choice question paper as well as ability to identify structures in abdominal CT films. Results. Scores for spatial and radiological anatomy were significantly higher among the test group when compared with the control group (P < 0.05, CI 95%). Majority of the students in both control and test groups agreed that cadaveric cross section may be useful for them to understand spatial and radiological anatomy. Conclusion. Introduction of cadaveric cross-sectional prosections may help students to understand spatial and radiological anatomy better. PMID:27579181

  7. Classic versus millennial medical lab anatomy.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion; Matsler, Nik; Delamarter, Taylor

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the integration, implementation, and use of cadaver dissection, hospital radiology modalities, surgical tools, and AV technology during a 12-week contemporary anatomy course suggesting a millennial laboratory. The teaching of anatomy has undergone the greatest fluctuation of any of the basic sciences during the past 100 years in order to make room for the meteoric rise in molecular sciences. Classically, anatomy consisted of a 2-year methodical, horizontal, anatomy course; anatomy has now morphed into a 12-week accelerated course in a vertical curriculum, at most institutions. Surface and radiological anatomy is the language for all clinicians regardless of specialty. The objective of this study was to investigate whether integration of full-body dissection anatomy and modern hospital technology, during the anatomy laboratory, could be accomplished in a 12-week anatomy course. Literature search was conducted on anatomy text, journals, and websites regarding contemporary hospital technology integrating multiple image mediums of 37 embalmed cadavers, surgical suite tools and technology, and audio/visual technology. Surgical and radiology professionals were contracted to teach during the anatomy laboratory. Literature search revealed no contemporary studies integrating full-body dissection with hospital technology and behavior. About 37 cadavers were successfully imaged with roentograms, CT, and MRI scans. Students were in favor of the dynamic laboratory consisting of multiple activity sessions occurring simultaneously. Objectively, examination scores proved to be a positive outcome and, subjectively, feedback from students was overwhelmingly positive. Despite the surging molecular based sciences consuming much of the curricula, full-body dissection anatomy is irreplaceable regarding both surface and architectural, radiological anatomy. Radiology should not be a small adjunct to understand full-body dissection, but rather, full-body dissection

  8. Anatomy and physiology for nursing students: is problem-based learning effective?

    PubMed

    Mayner, Lidia; Gillham, David; Sansoni, Julita

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether problem-based learning (PBL) was an effective strategy for nursing students learning anatomy and physiology. Anatomy and physiology are subject areas that have posed long standing difficulty for nursing students. Since anatomy and physiology underpin clinical decision making it is important that nursing students are able to understand and retain this knowledge and apply it to practice. Problem-based learning offers potential advantages for teaching anatomy and physiology as clinical cases can provide the impetus for student problem solving. This project trialled a simple PBL scenario and investigated students' response to the task of problem solving in a laboratory setting adapted to simulate a hospital ward. The study found students learn better, retain the knowledge and merge theory with simulated practice when a PBL teaching mode is used. While PBL was effective, blended, web based and hybrid PBL models warrant investigation.

  9. Anatomy of a Bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a stunning rare case of a triple merger of galaxies. This system, which astronomers have dubbed 'The Bird' - albeit it also bears resemblance with a cosmic Tinker Bell - is composed of two massive spiral galaxies and a third irregular galaxy. ESO PR Photo 55a/07 ESO PR Photo 55a/07 The Tinker Bell Triplet The galaxy ESO 593-IG 008, or IRAS 19115-2124, was previously merely known as an interacting pair of galaxies at a distance of 650 million light-years. But surprises were revealed by observations made with the NACO instrument attached to ESO's VLT, which peered through the all-pervasive dust clouds, using adaptive optics to resolve the finest details [2]. Underneath the chaotic appearance of the optical Hubble images - retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope archive - the NACO images show two unmistakable galaxies, one a barred spiral while the other is more irregular. The surprise lay in the clear identification of a third, clearly separate component, an irregular, yet fairly massive galaxy that seems to be forming stars at a frantic rate. "Examples of mergers of three galaxies of roughly similar sizes are rare," says Petri Väisänen, lead author of the paper reporting the results. "Only the near-infrared VLT observations made it possible to identify the triple merger nature of the system in this case." Because of the resemblance of the system to a bird, the object was dubbed as such, with the 'head' being the third component, and the 'heart' and 'body' making the two major galaxy nuclei in-between of tidal tails, the 'wings'. The latter extend more than 100,000 light-years, or the size of our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 55b/07 ESO PR Photo 55b/07 Anatomy of a Bird Subsequent optical spectroscopy with the new Southern African Large Telescope, and archive mid-infrared data from the NASA Spitzer space observatory, confirmed the separate nature of the 'head', but also added

  10. Abraham Colles and his contributions to anatomy.

    PubMed

    Shayota, Brian J; Oelhafen, Kim; Shoja, Mohammadali; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-07-01

    Abraham Colles is known among the medical community for his detailed description of Colles' fracture, one of the most common occurring skeletal injuries. It is remarkable that something as seemingly simple as the diagnosis of Colles' fracture had not been established until nearly 200 years ago. While that may have been his most well known accomplishment, Colles made several other contributions to medicine across multiple fields of practice. In the field of anatomy, he is also credited for his discovery and description of Colles' fascia and Colles' ligament. Less commonly known, however, are his clinical observations and offered treatment regimens for syphilis, as well as his achievement in performing the first surgery for axillary artery aneurysm. The current paper will review the life and contributions of this early surgeon and anatomist.

  11. Pharmacological removal of serum amyloid P component from intracerebral plaques and cerebrovascular Aβ amyloid deposits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Millar, David J.; Richard-Londt, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Human amyloid deposits always contain the normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP), owing to its avid but reversible binding to all amyloid fibrils, including the amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils in the cerebral parenchyma plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). SAP promotes amyloid fibril formation in vitro, contributes to persistence of amyloid in vivo and is also itself directly toxic to cerebral neurons. We therefore developed (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC), a drug that removes SAP from the blood, and thereby also from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in patients with AD. Here we report that, after introduction of transgenic human SAP expression in the TASTPM double transgenic mouse model of AD, all the amyloid deposits contained human SAP. Depletion of circulating human SAP by CPHPC administration in these mice removed all detectable human SAP from both the intracerebral and cerebrovascular amyloid. The demonstration that removal of SAP from the blood and CSF also removes it from these amyloid deposits crucially validates the strategy of the forthcoming ‘Depletion of serum amyloid P component in Alzheimer's disease (DESPIAD)’ clinical trial of CPHPC. The results also strongly support clinical testing of CPHPC in patients with CAA. PMID:26842068

  12. The vascular steal phenomenon is an incomplete contributor to negative cerebrovascular reactivity in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Daniel F; Strother, Megan K; Faraco, Carlos C; Jordan, Lori C; Ladner, Travis R; Dethrage, Lindsey M; Singer, Robert J; Mocco, J; Clemmons, Paul F; Ayad, Michael J; Donahue, Manus J

    2014-09-01

    'Vascular steal' has been proposed as a compensatory mechanism in hemodynamically compromised ischemic parenchyma. Here, independent measures of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) responses to a vascular stimulus in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease are recorded. Symptomatic intracranial stenosis patients (n=40) underwent a multimodal 3.0T MRI protocol including structural (T1-weighted and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) and hemodynamic (BOLD and CBF-weighted arterial spin labeling) functional MRI during room air and hypercarbic gas administration. CBF changes in regions demonstrating negative BOLD reactivity were recorded, as well as clinical correlates including symptomatic hemisphere by infarct and lateralizing symptoms. Fifteen out of forty participants exhibited negative BOLD reactivity. Of these, a positive relationship was found between BOLD and CBF reactivity in unaffected (stenosis degree<50%) cortex. In negative BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity regions, three patients exhibited significant (P<0.01) reductions in CBF consistent with vascular steal; six exhibited increases in CBF; and the remaining exhibited no statistical change in CBF. Secondary findings were that negative BOLD reactivity correlated with symptomatic hemisphere by lateralizing clinical symptoms and prior infarcts(s). These data support the conclusion that negative hypercarbia-induced BOLD responses, frequently assigned to vascular steal, are heterogeneous in origin with possible contributions from autoregulation and/or metabolism.

  13. Surgical anatomy of oropharynx and supraglottic larynx for transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gun, Ramazan; Ozer, Enver

    2015-12-01

    Traditional external surgical approaches have been used for the surgical management of the oropharyngeal and laryngeal tumors. Trans-oral robotic surgery allows surgeon to operate oropharyngeal and supraglottic tumors through the mouth with preservation of functions. The surgeons must be knowledgeable about the anatomy of the oral cavity and oropharynx medial to lateral perspective. In this article, we will describe the relevant inside out surgical anatomy and its clinical implications for trans-oral robotic surgery.

  14. The anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament and its relevance to the technique of reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Śmigielski, R; Zdanowicz, U; Drwięga, M; Ciszek, B; Williams, A

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is commonly performed and has been for many years. Despite this, the technical details related to ACL anatomy, such as tunnel placement, are still a topic for debate. In this paper, we introduce the flat ribbon concept of the anatomy of the ACL, and its relevance to clinical practice. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1020-6.

  15. Tooth anatomy risk factors influencing root canal working length accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lu; Sun, Tuo-qi; Gao, Xiao-jie; Zhou, Xue-dong; Huang, Ding-ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the specific influence of root canal anatomy on the accessibility of working length during root canal therapy. Four hundred seventy-six root canal therapy cases (amounting to a total of 1 005 root canals) were examined. The anatomy risk factors assessed in each case included: tooth type (tooth location), root canal curvature, and root canal calcification, as well as endodontic retreatment. The investigation examined the correlation between each of these anatomic factors and the working length, with statistical analysis consisting of Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analysis. In an independent factor analysis, tooth type (tooth location), root canal curvature, canal calcification, and endodontic retreatment were determined to be the primary risk factors. In a multiple-factor regression model, root curvature and canal calcification were found to most significantly influence root canal working length accessibility (P<0.05). Root canal anatomy increases the difficulty of root canal preparation. Appropriate consideration of tooth anatomy will assist in accurate determination of preparation difficulty before instrumentation. This study alerts clinical therapists to anatomical factors influencing the working length accessibility, and allows for a direct estimate of success rate given in situ measurements of tooth factors during the root canal treatment procedure. PMID:21789962

  16. Cadaver treasure hunt: introducing geriatrics concepts in the anatomy class.

    PubMed

    McNicoll, Lynn; Fulton, Ana Tuya; Ritter, Dale; Besdine, Richard W

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an educational program introducing geriatrics to medical students during anatomy. Observational study of an educational intervention in medical school was the design utilized. First-year medical students in an anatomy laboratory were participants. The program consists of a lecture and a workshop. First, a geriatrics lecture early in the course presents demographic data on the cadavers, followed by comparison with national data on leading causes of death. Second, there is a "treasure hunt" in the anatomy laboratory conducted by geriatricians. Each geriatrician spends 45 minutes with one-four-student cadaver group at a time, reviewing anatomical findings and facilitating a discussion of clinical correlations and implications. A list of common anatomical findings, aging- and disease-related, is distributed to the students as an aid in identifying findings of interest. Students have been surprised to learn that the mean age of the 24 cadavers exceeded 80 years (mean 81, median 85 for 2 years), and that causes of death mirrored national data. The students begin understanding aging and appreciate the valuable resource of cadavers. The students acquire a new holistic perspective regarding their cadavers that is not apparent during the dissections. Students and faculty find the experience valuable in understanding the interplay of disease and aging. Evaluations have been mostly positive (82-87% positive responses). The anatomy lecture and "treasure hunt" experience are unique strategies for using cadavers to introduce geriatrics principles into the medical school.

  17. [State of clinical and neurologic condition of Temirtau inhabitants].

    PubMed

    Battakova, Sh B; Amanbekov, U A; Mukhametzhanova, S E; Fazylova, M-D A; Miianova, G A; Shraĭmanov, B S; Abdikulova, A A

    2011-01-01

    The article covers results of studies concerning psychologic and clinical neurologic state of Temirtau inhabitants. Early clinical forms of cerebro-vascular diseases were more frequent among males, but cryptogenic encephalopathies were more prevalent among females. Among the males examined, the early clinical signs of cerebro-vascular diseases were seen in all age groups, more often at the age of 20-29. Among the females, cryptogenic encephalopathies were more often at the age over 40. Early clinical forms of cerebro-vascular diseases and cryptogenic encephalopathies were associated with asthenic, astheno-hypochondriac, astheno-depressive syndrome and vegetative dysfunction syndrome. The group with early clinical signs of cerebro-vascular diseases was characterized by prevalent asthenic syndrome, but the cryptogenic encephalopathy group had more often astheno-hypochondriac syndrome.

  18. Controlling the vocabulary for anatomy.

    PubMed Central

    Baud, R. H.; Lovis, C.; Rassinoux, A. M.; Ruch, P.; Geissbuhler, A.

    2002-01-01

    When confronted with the representation of human anatomy, natural language processing (NLP) system designers are facing an unsolved and frequent problem: the lack of a suitable global reference. The available sources in electronic format are numerous, but none fits adequately all the constraints and needs of language analysis. These sources are usually incomplete, difficult to use or tailored to specific needs. The anatomist's or ontologist's view does not necessarily match that of the linguist. The purpose of this paper is to review most recognized sources of knowledge in anatomy usable for linguistic analysis. Their potential and limits are emphasized according to this point of view. Focus is given on the role of the consensus work of the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists (IFAA) giving the Terminologia Anatomica. PMID:12463780

  19. Design and validation of a novel learning tool, the "Anato-Rug," for teaching equine topographical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Braid, Francesca; Williams, Sarah B; Weller, Renate

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of anatomical landmarks in live animals (and humans) is key for clinical practice, but students often find it difficult to translate knowledge from dissection-based anatomy onto the live animal and struggle to acquire this vital skill. The purpose of this study was to create and evaluate the use of an equine anatomy rug ("Anato-Rug") depicting topographical anatomy and key areas of lung, heart, and gastrointestinal auscultation, which could be used together with a live horse to aid learning of "live animal" anatomy. Over the course of 2 weeks, 38 third year veterinary students were randomly allocated into an experimental group, revising topographical anatomy from the "Anato-Rug," or a control group, learning topographical anatomy from a textbook. Immediately post activity, both groups underwent a test on live anatomy knowledge and were retested 1 week later. Both groups then completed a questionnaire to ascertain their perceptions of their learning experiences. Results showed that the experimental groups scored significantly higher than the control group at the first testing session, experienced more enjoyment during the activity and gained more confidence in identifying anatomical landmarks than the control group. There was not a significant difference in scores between groups at the second testing session. The findings indicate that the anatomy rug is an effective learning tool that aids understanding, confidence, and enjoyment in learning equine thorax and abdominal anatomy; however it was not better than traditional methods with regards to longer term memory recall.

  20. Cerebrovascular injury as a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin R; Goldacre, Raph; Talbot, Kevin; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use an unbiased method to test a previously reported association between cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embolisation and the subsequent development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods A hospital record linkage database was used to create cohorts of individuals coded as having cerebral and peripheral vessel AVMs, stroke (separately for haemorrhagic and ischaemic), transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The rate ratio for subsequent ALS was compared to a reference cohort. Results An increased rate ratio for ALS was found in relation to prior AVM (2.69; p=0.005), all strokes (1.38; p<0.001), and TIA (1.47; p<0.001). Conclusions Cerebrovascular injury from a variety of causes, rather than the presence of AVM or the associated embolisation procedure per se, may be a risk factor for ALS within the context of a more complex multiple-hit model of pathogenesis. PMID:26260352

  1. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives.

  2. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming.

    PubMed

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Klohs, Jan; Székely, Gábor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to a probabilistic model. Starting from an overconnected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (μCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of our probabilistic model and we perform experiments on in-vivo magnetic resonance microangiography (μMRA) images of mouse brains. We finally discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.

  3. Cerebrovascular Accident Incidence in the NASA Astronaut Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPelusa, Michael B.; Charvat, Jacqueline M.; Lee, Lesley R.; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is strongly associated with an increased risk for cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), including stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA). Certain unique occupational exposures that individuals in the NASA astronaut corps face, specifically high-performance aircraft training, SCUBA training, and spaceflight, are hypothesized to cause changes to the cardiovascular system. These changes, which include (but are not limited to) oxidative damage as a result of radiation exposure and circadian rhythm disturbance, increased arterial stiffness, and increased carotid-intima-media thickness (CIMT), may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and subsequent CVA. The purpose of this study was to review cases of CVA in the NASA astronaut corps and describe the comorbidities and occupational exposures associated with CVA.

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide induces cerebrovascular effects in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, W M; Kisch-Wedel, H; Kemming, G I; Meisner, F; Bruhn, S; Koehler, C; Flondor, M; Messmer, K; Zwissler, B

    2003-09-11

    Although inhaled nitric oxide (NO(i)) is considered to act selectively on pulmonary vessels, EEG abnormalities and even occasional neurotoxic effects of NO(i) have been proposed. Here, we investigated cerebrovascular effects of increasing concentrations of 5, 10 and 50 ppm NO(i) in seven anesthetized pigs. Cerebral hemodynamics were assessed non-invasively by use of near-infared spectroscopy and indicator dilution techniques. NO(i) increased cerebral blood volume significantly and reversibly. This effect was not attributable to changes of macrohemodynamic parameters or arterial blood gases. Simultaneously, cerebral transit time increased while cerebral blood flow remained unchanged. These data demonstrate a vasodilatory action of NO(i) in the cerebral vasculature, which may occur preferentially in the venous compartment.

  5. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming

    DOE PAGES

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; ...

    2015-04-23

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to the probabilistic model. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (µCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of ourmore » probabilistic model. As a result, we perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (µMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.« less

  6. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming

    SciTech Connect

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Klohs, Jan; Szekely, Gabor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2015-04-23

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to the probabilistic model. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (µCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of our probabilistic model. As a result, we perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (µMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.

  7. Digital dissection system for medical school anatomy training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Carmichael, Stephen W.; Korinek, Mark J.; Schroeder, Kathryn K.; Segovis, Colin M.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    As technology advances, new and innovative ways of viewing and visualizing the human body are developed. Medicine has benefited greatly from imaging modalities that provide ways for us to visualize anatomy that cannot be seen without invasive procedures. As long as medical procedures include invasive operations, students of anatomy will benefit from the cadaveric dissection experience. Teaching proper technique for dissection of human cadavers is a challenging task for anatomy educators. Traditional methods, which have not changed significantly for centuries, include the use of textbooks and pictures to show students what a particular dissection specimen should look like. The ability to properly carry out such highly visual and interactive procedures is significantly constrained by these methods. The student receives a single view and has no idea how the procedure was carried out. The Department of Anatomy at Mayo Medical School recently built a new, state-of-the-art teaching laboratory, including data ports and power sources above each dissection table. This feature allows students to access the Mayo intranet from a computer mounted on each table. The vision of the Department of Anatomy is to replace all paper-based resources in the laboratory (dissection manuals, anatomic atlases, etc.) with a more dynamic medium that will direct students in dissection and in learning human anatomy. Part of that vision includes the use of interactive 3-D visualization technology. The Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic has developed, in collaboration with the Department of Anatomy, a system for the control and capture of high resolution digital photographic sequences which can be used to create 3-D interactive visualizations of specimen dissections. The primary components of the system include a Kodak DC290 digital camera, a motorized controller rig from Kaidan, a PC, and custom software to synchronize and control the components. For each dissection procedure, the

  8. [Surgical anatomy of the nose].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Duron, J B; Jallut, Y; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the nose is an essential prerequisite for preoperative analysis and the understanding of surgical techniques. Like a tent supported by its frame, the nose is an osteo-chondral structure covered by a peri-chondroperiosteal envelope, muscle and cutaneous covering tissues. For didactic reasons, we have chosen to treat this chapter in the form of comments from eight key configurations that the surgeon should acquire before performing rhinoplasty.

  9. Applying problem-based learning to the teaching of anatomy: the example of Harvard Medical School.

    PubMed

    Yiou, René; Goodenough, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    The introduction of problem-based learning techniques into the teaching of anatomy has been subject to great controversies. This paper debates the rationale behind this concept using the example of the curriculum of Harvard Medical School in which problem-based learning techniques have been used during the past 20 years. The anatomy curriculum is covered during the eight first weeks of the medical studies, and is an original combination of discussions of clinical cases in small groups, and work in gross anatomy, histology and radiology laboratories. The lectures are reduced to the minimum and emphasize general concepts. In this setting, the learning of anatomy is mostly led by students who have prepared for the different laboratory sessions and tutorials. The implementation of problem-based learning to the teaching of anatomy requires a close follow-up of each student with regular feedbacks on his work. Tutorials must be considered as a cornerstone between lectures and work in laboratories. Traditional aspects of the teaching of anatomy, such as work in dissection laboratories, are given an important role as they are aimed to clear-up misunderstood points. Further studies are required to compare at the long term the level of medical students who learned anatomy in a problem based versus traditional learning setting.

  10. Development of a supported self-directed learning approach for anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Gordon S; Kristmundsdottir, Fanney; Parson, Simon H; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    The ability to deliver sufficient core anatomical knowledge and understanding to medical students with limited time and resources remains a major challenge for anatomy educators. Here, we report the results of switching from a primarily didactic method of teaching to supported self-directed learning for students studying anatomy as part of undergraduate medicine at the University of Edinburgh. The supported self-directed approach we have developed makes use of an integrated range of resources, including formal lectures and practical sessions (incorporating gross anatomy specimens, medical imaging technologies, anatomical models, clinical scenarios, and surface anatomy workstations). In practical sessions, students are provided with a custom-made workbook that guides them through each session, with academic staff, postgraduate tutors, and near-peer teaching assistants present to deal with misunderstandings and explain more complicated topics. This approach retains many of the best attributes of didactic teaching but blends them with the advantages associated with self-directed learning approaches. The switch to supported self-directed learning-initially introduced in 2005-resulted in a significant improvement in anatomy examination scores over the subsequent period of five years, manifesting as an increase in the average anatomy practical spot examination mark, less students failing to obtain the pass mark and more students passing with distinction. We conclude that the introduction of supported self-directed learning improved students' engagement, leading to deeper learning and better understanding and knowledge of anatomy.

  11. An anatomy of illness.

    PubMed

    Biro, David

    2012-03-01

    Because it focuses primarily on the sick body (disease), medicine ignores many of the concerns and needs of sick people. By listening to the stories of patients in the clinic, on the Internet, and in published book form, health care providers could gain a better understanding of the impact of disease on the person (illness), what it means to patients over and above their physical symptoms and what they might require over and above surgery or chemotherapy. Only by familiarizing themselves with the entire emotional landscape of illness, which includes fear, anger, shame, guilt, and above all loneliness, can the healthy--medicine as well as society in general--hope to heal in a comprehensive manner.

  12. The cerebrum. Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rhoton, Albert L

    2007-07-01

    The cerebrum is the crown jewel of creation and evolution. It is a remarkably delicate, intricate, and beautiful structure. The goal of this chapter is to provide the information needed to permit the neurosurgeon to navigate accurately, gently, and safely around and through the cerebrum and intracranial space. The location of deep structures is frequently described in relation to cranial and superficial cerebral landmarks in order to develop the concept of see-through, x-ray type knowledge of the cerebrum. In numerous illustrations, stepwise dissections are used to clarify the relationship between structures in different layers. Important clinical and surgical concepts are intermixed with the description of the cerebrum and its arteries, veins, and ventricles.

  13. Oxidative stress upregulates the NMDA receptor on cerebrovascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Betzen, Christian; White, Robin; Zehendner, Christoph M; Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2009-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a variety of neuropathological diseases. Although some interactions between both phenomena have been elucidated, possible influences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the NMDA-R itself have so far been neglected. The objective of this study was to examine how the cerebroendothelial NMDA-R is affected by exposure to oxidative stress and to assess possible influences on BBB integrity. RT-PCR confirmed several NMDA-R subunits (NR1, NR2B-D) expressed in the bEnd3 cell line (murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells). NR1 protein expression after exposure to ROS was observed via in-cell Western. The functionality of the expressed NMDA-R was determined by measuring DiBAC fluorescence in ROS-preexposed cells upon stimulation with the specific agonist NMDA. Finally, the effects on barrier integrity were evaluated using the ECIS system to detect changes in monolayer impedance upon NMDA-R stimulation after exposure to ROS. The expression of NR1 significantly (p<0.001) increased 72 h after 30 min exposure to superoxide (+33.8+/-7.5%), peroxynitrite (+84.9+/-10.7%), or hydrogen peroxide (+92.8+/-7.6%), resulting in increased cellular response to NMDA-R stimulation and diminished monolayer impedance. We conclude that oxidative stress upregulates NMDA-R on cerebrovascular endothelium and thus heightens susceptibility to glutamate-induced BBB disruption.

  14. Cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction induced by mercury exposure at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Briones, Ana María; Avendaño, María Soledad; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) has many harmful vascular effects by increasing oxidative stress, inflammation and vascular/endothelial dysfunction, all of which may contribute to cerebrovascular diseases development. We aimed to explore the effects of chronic low-mercury concentration on vascular function in cerebral arteries and the mechanisms involved. Basilar arteries from control (vehicle-saline solution, im) and mercury chloride (HgCl2)-treated rats for 30 days (first dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent dose 0.07μg/kg/day, im, to cover daily loss) were used. Vascular reactivity, protein expression, nitric oxide (NO) levels and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production were analyzed. HgCl2 exposure increased serotonin contraction and reduced the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to bradykinin. After NO synthase inhibition, serotonin responses were enhanced more in control than in mercury-treated rats while bradykinin-induced relaxation was abolished. NO levels were greater in control than Hg-treated rats. Tiron and indomethacin reduced vasoconstriction and increased the bradykinin-induced relaxation only in HgCl2-treated rats. Vascular O2(-) production was greater in mercury-treated when compared to control rats. Protein expressions of endothelial NO synthase, copper/zinc (Cu/Zn), Manganese (Mn) and extracellular-superoxide dismutases were similar in cerebral arteries from both groups. Results suggest that Hg treatment increases cerebrovascular reactivity by reducing endothelial negative modulation and NO bioavailability; this effect seems to be dependent on increased reactive oxygen species and prostanoids generation. These findings show, for the first time, that brain vasculature are also affected by chronic mercury exposure and offer further evidence that even at small concentration, HgCl2 is hazardous and might be an environmental risk factor accounting for cerebral vasospasm development.

  15. Paediatric cerebrovascular CT angiography—towards better image quality

    PubMed Central

    Thust, Stefanie C.; Chong, Wui Khean Kling; Gunny, Roxana; Mazumder, Asif; Poitelea, Marius; Welsh, Anna; Ederies, Ash

    2014-01-01

    Background Paediatric cerebrovascular CT angiography (CTA) can be challenging to perform due to variable cardiovascular physiology between different age groups and the risk of movement artefact. This analysis aimed to determine what proportion of CTA at our institution was of diagnostic quality and identify technical factors which could be improved. Materials and methods a retrospective analysis of 20 cases was performed at a national paediatric neurovascular centre assessing image quality with a subjective scoring system and Hounsfield Unit (HU) measurements. Demographic data, contrast dose, flow rate and triggering times were recorded for each patient. Results Using a qualitative scoring system, 75% of studies were found to be of diagnostic quality (n=9 ‘good’, n=6 ‘satisfactory’) and 25% (n=5) were ‘poor’. Those judged subjectively to be poor had arterial contrast density measured at less than 250 HU. Increased arterial opacification was achieved for cases performed with an increased flow rate (2.5-4 mL/s) and higher intravenous contrast dose (2 mL/kg). Triggering was found to be well timed in nine cases, early in four cases and late in seven cases. Of the scans triggered early, 75% were poor. Of the scans triggered late, less (29%) were poor. Conclusions High flow rates (>2.5 mL/s) were a key factor for achieving high quality paediatric cerebrovascular CTA imaging. However, appropriate triggering by starting the scan immediately on contrast opacification of the monitoring vessel plays an important role and could maintain image quality when flow rates were lower. Early triggering appeared more detrimental than late. PMID:25525579

  16. Effects of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular responses to carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Okazaki, Kazunobu; Shibasaki, Manabu; Subudhi, Andrew W; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2014-06-01

    In normoxic conditions, a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension causes cerebral vasoconstriction, thereby reducing cerebral blood flow and modifying dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). It is unclear to what extent these effects are altered by acute hypoxia and the associated hypoxic ventilatory response (respiratory chemoreflex). This study tested the hypothesis that acute hypoxia attenuates arterial CO2 tension-mediated regulation of cerebral blood flow to help maintain cerebral O2 homeostasis. Eight subjects performed three randomly assigned respiratory interventions following a resting baseline period, as follows: (1) normoxia (21% O2); (2) hypoxia (12% O2); and (3) hypoxia with wilful restraint of the respiratory chemoreflex. During each intervention, 0, 2.0, 3.5 or 5.0% CO2 was sequentially added (8 min stages) to inspired gas mixtures to assess changes in steady-state cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity and dCA. During normoxia, the addition of CO2 increased internal carotid artery blood flow and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean), while reducing dCA (change in phase = -0.73 ± 0.22 rad, P = 0.005). During acute hypoxia, internal carotid artery blood flow and MCA Vmean remained unchanged, but cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (internal carotid artery, P = 0.003; MCA Vmean, P = 0.031) and CO2-mediated effects on dCA (P = 0.008) were attenuated. The effects of hypoxia were not further altered when the respiratory chemoreflex was restrained. These findings support the hypothesis that arterial CO2 tension-mediated effects on the cerebral vasculature are reduced during acute hypoxia. These effects could limit the degree of hypocapnic vasoconstriction and may help to regulate cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 homeostasis during acute periods of hypoxia.

  17. Anatomy of the infant head

    SciTech Connect

    Bosma, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    This text is mainly an atlas of illustration representing the dissection of the head and upper neck of the infant. It was prepared by the author over a 20-year period. The commentary compares the anatomy of the near-term infant with that of a younger fetus, child, and adult. As the author indicates, the dearth of anatomic information about postnatal anatomic changes represents a considerable handicap to those imaging infants. In part 1 of the book, anatomy is related to physiologic performance involving the pharynx, larynx, and mouth. Sequential topics involve the regional anatomy of the head (excluding the brain), the skeleton of the cranium, the nose, orbit, mouth, larynx, pharynx, and ear. To facilitate use of this text as a reference, the illustrations and text on individual organs are considered separately (i.e., the nose, the orbit, the eye, the mouth, the larynx, the pharynx, and the ear). Each part concerned with a separate organ includes materials from the regional illustrations contained in part 2 and from the skeleton, which is treated in part 3. Also included in a summary of the embryologic and fetal development of the organ.

  18. The Architecture of an Automatic eHealth Platform With Mobile Client for Cerebrovascular Disease Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingce; Bie, Rongfang; Wu, Zhongke; Zhou, Mingquan; Cao, Rongfei; Xie, Lizhi; Zhang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, cerebrovascular disease has been the leading cause of death and adult disability in the world. This study describes an efficient approach to detect cerebrovascular disease. Objective In order to improve cerebrovascular treatment, prevention, and care, an automatic cerebrovascular disease detection eHealth platform is designed and studied. Methods We designed an automatic eHealth platform for cerebrovascular disease detection with a four-level architecture: object control layer, data transmission layer, service supporting layer, and application service layer. The platform has eight main functions: cerebrovascular database management, preprocessing of cerebral image data, image viewing and adjustment model, image cropping compression and measurement, cerebrovascular segmentation, 3-dimensional cerebrovascular reconstruction, cerebrovascular rendering, cerebrovascular virtual endoscope, and automatic detection. Several key technologies were employed for the implementation of the platform. The anisotropic diffusion model was used to reduce the noise. Statistics segmentation with Gaussian-Markov random field model (G-MRF) and Stochastic Estimation Maximization (SEM) parameter estimation method were used to realize the cerebrovascular segmentation. Ball B-Spline curve was proposed to model the cerebral blood vessels. Compute unified device architecture (CUDA) based on ray-casting volume rendering presented by curvature enhancement and boundary enhancement were used to realize the volume rendering model. We implemented the platform with a network client and mobile phone client to fit different users. Results The implemented platform is running on a common personal computer. Experiments on 32 patients’ brain computed tomography data or brain magnetic resonance imaging data stored in the system verified the feasibility and validity of each model we proposed. The platform is partly used in the cranial nerve surgery of the First Hospital

  19. Anatomy-Specific Virtual Reality Simulation in Temporal Bone Dissection.

    PubMed

    Locketz, Garrett D; Lui, Justin T; Chan, Sonny; Salisbury, Kenneth; Dort, Joseph C; Youngblood, Patricia; Blevins, Nikolas H

    2017-03-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of anatomy-specific virtual reality (VR) surgical rehearsal on surgeon confidence and temporal bone dissection performance. Study Design Prospective pre- and poststudy of a novel virtual surgical rehearsal platform. Setting Academic otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency training programs. Subjects and Methods Sixteen otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents from 2 North American training institutions were recruited. Surveys were administered to assess subjects' baseline confidence in performing 12 subtasks of cortical mastoidectomy with facial recess. A cadaver temporal bone was randomly assigned to each subject. Cadaver specimens were scanned with a clinical computed tomography protocol, allowing the creation of anatomy-specific models for use in a VR surgical rehearsal platform. Subjects then rehearsed a virtual mastoidectomy on data sets derived from their specimens. Surgical confidence surveys were administered again. Subjects then dissected assigned cadaver specimens, which were blindly graded with a modified Welling scale. A final survey assessed the perceived utility of rehearsal on dissection performance. Results Of 16 subjects, 14 (87.5%) reported a significant increase in overall confidence after conducting an anatomy-specific VR rehearsal. A significant correlation existed between perceived utility of rehearsal and confidence improvement. The effect of rehearsal on confidence was dependent on trainee experience and the inherent difficulty of the surgical subtask. Postrehearsal confidence correlated strongly with graded dissection performance. Subjects rated anatomy-specific rehearsal as having a moderate to high contribution to their dissection performance. Conclusion Anatomy-specific virtual rehearsal improves surgeon confidence in performing mastoid dissection, dependent on surgeon experience and task difficulty. The subjective confidence gained through rehearsal correlates positively with subsequent

  20. Practical anatomy of the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Mitchell B; Donovan, James P

    2002-05-01

    carpal tunnel and surrounding structures have been reviewed with emphasis on clinical applications to endoscopic and open carpal tunnel surgery. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the carpal tunnel is essential in order to avoid complications and to ensure optimal patient outcome. An understanding of the contents and their positions and relationships to each other allows the surgeon to perform a correct approach and accurately identify structures during procedures at or near the carpal tunnel.

  1. Assessment outcomes: computerized instruction in a human gross anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Elaine L

    2002-01-01

    New and traditional educational media were used to study alternative methods of instruction in a human gross anatomy course. Three consecutive entry-level physical therapy (PT) classes (55 students total) participated in this study. No other anatomy course was available to these students during this time. During the first year, all entering PT students (n = 18) completed a traditional cadaver anatomy course. This traditional group attended weekly lectures and dissection laboratories for 15 weeks. During the second year, the next entering class of PT students (n = 17) completed a self-study, computerized noncadaver anatomy course. This self-study group attended an introductory session to receive course objectives and instruction in using the computer package chosen for the study. After the introductory session, this group worked independently for the remainder of their 15-week course. During the third year, the entering class of PT students (n = 20) attended weekly lectures and completed a self-study, computerized non-cadaver laboratory course. This lecture and self-study group attended an introductory session to review course objectives and receive instruction in using the computer package. For the remainder of their 15-week course, this group attended a weekly lecture and worked independently on the computer for the laboratory portion of their course. All groups kept time logs, recording class and study time for each day of the course. The time logs were collected on the last day of each course. Each group's performance in anatomy-based system courses was followed through the remainder of the PT curricula, including clinical rotations, and through the completion of the state board licensure examination. Data were analyzed using a multivariate analysis of variance and a Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. There was no significant difference in anatomy course class means, class study times, performance throughout the remainder of the PT curricula, and performance

  2. Remediation Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course and Assessment of an Anatomy Supplemental Study Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Audra Faye

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy A215: Basic Human Anatomy (Anat A215) is an undergraduate human anatomy course at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB) that serves as a requirement for many degree programs at IUB. The difficulty of the course, coupled with pressure to achieve grades for admittance into specific programs, has resulted in high remediation rates. In an…

  3. Problem-based learning in regional anatomy education at Peking University.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Weiguang; Qin, Lihua; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shuyong; Gu, Jin; Zhou, Changman

    2010-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been introduced to medical schools around the world and has increasingly become a popular pedagogical technique in Asian countries since 1990. Gross anatomy is a fundamental basic science course in virtually all medical training programs, and the methods used to teach it are under frequent scrutiny and revision. Students often struggle with the vast collection of new terms and complex relationships between structures that they must learn. To help students with this process, our department teaches separate systemic and regional anatomy courses, the latter in a PBL format. After three years of using PBL in our regional anatomy course, we have worked out a set of effective instructions that we would like to share with other medical schools. We report here evidence that our clinical PBL approach stimulates students' interest in learning and enhances anatomy education in a way that can foster better practices in our future medical work force.

  4. [EDAS (encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis) for occlusive/stenotic cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, M; Awaya, S; Fukuda, S; Teramoto, A

    2001-02-01

    The efficacy of encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) using superficial temporal artery was evaluated for the treatment of the occlusive/stenotic cerebrovascular disease. Nine patients with the occlusive/stenotic cerebrovascular disease underwent EDAS in our hospital. The mean follow-up period was 6.6 months. Postoperative angiography showed no collateral formation via EDAS in any of the nine patients. We analyzed the following points: 1) operative procedure, 2) follow up period after surgery, 3) preoperative cerebral blood flow, and 4) age of the patients. Results showed that EDAS as a treatment of occlusive/stenotic cerebrovascular disease was not effective. This study failed to reinforce the suggestion that indirect extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery is effective as the treatment of occlusive/stenotic cerebrovascular disease.

  5. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, dementia, and cerebrovascular pathology in elders receiving home services

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D deficiency has potential adverse effects on neurocognitive health and subcortical function. However, no studies have examined the association between vitamin D status, dementia, and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators of cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Cross-sectional inves...

  6. Mapping of cerebral perfusion territories using territorial arterial spin labeling: techniques and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B; Bokkers, Reinoud P H; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2013-08-01

    A knowledge of the exact cerebral perfusion territory which is supplied by any artery is of great importance in the understanding and diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. The development and optimization of territorial arterial spin labeling (T-ASL) MRI techniques in the past two decades have made it possible to visualize and determine the cerebral perfusion territories in individual patients and, more importantly, to do so without contrast agents or otherwise invasive procedures. This review provides an overview of the development of ASL techniques that aim to visualize the general cerebral perfusion territories or the territory of a specific artery of interest. The first efforts of T-ASL with pulsed, continuous and pseudo-continuous techniques are summarized and subsequent clinical studies using T-ASL are highlighted. In the healthy population, the perfusion territories of the brain-feeding arteries are highly variable. This high variability requires special consideration in specific patient groups, such as patients with cerebrovascular disease, stroke, steno-occlusive disease of the large arteries and arteriovenous malformations. In the past, catheter angiography with selective contrast injection was the only available method to visualize the cerebral perfusion territories in vivo. Several T-ASL methods, sometimes referred to as regional perfusion imaging, are now available that can easily be combined with conventional brain MRI examinations to show the relationship between the cerebral perfusion territories, vascular anatomy and brain infarcts or other pathology. Increased availability of T-ASL techniques on clinical MRI scanners will allow radiologists and other clinicians to gain further knowledge of the relationship between vasculature and patient diagnosis and prognosis. Treatment decisions, such as surgical revascularization, may, in the near future, be guided by information provided by T-ASL MRI in close correlation with structural MRI and quantitative

  7. Learning Surgically Oriented Anatomy in a Student-Run Extracurricular Club: An Education through Recreation Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Shahnoor M.; Bodrogi, Andrew; Cristea, Octav; Johnson, Marjorie; McAlister, Vivian C.

    2012-01-01

    Didactic and laboratory anatomical education have seen significant reductions in the medical school curriculum due, in part, to the current shift from basic science to more clinically based teaching in North American medical schools. In order to increase medical student exposure to anatomy, with clinical applicability, a student-run initiative…

  8. Carpal tunnel: Normal anatomy, anatomical variants and ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Presazzi, A; Bortolotto, C; Zacchino, M; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2011-03-01

    The carpal tunnel is an osteofibrous canal situated in the volar wrist. The boundaries are the carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum. In addition to the medial nerve, the carpal tunnel contains nine tendons: the flexor pollicis longus, the four flexor digitorum superficialis and the four flexor digitorum profundus. Ultrasound (US) study of the carpal tunnel generally involves short-axis imaging of the tendons, and in the presence of disease, long-axis imaging and dynamic maneuvers are added. There are numerous reports of anatomical variants of the wrist involving vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles, and they can all be studied by US. Some are particularly relevant from a clinical point of view and will therefore be accurately described. The anatomy is complex, and the US operator should therefore be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy as well as the anatomical variants that may have a role in the pathogenesis of carpal tunnel syndrome or influence treatment.

  9. Impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve in seizure patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Fierstra, Jorn; Conklin, John; Krings, Timo; Slessarev, Marat; Han, Jay S; Fisher, Joseph A; Terbrugge, Karel; Wallace, M Christopher; Tymianski, Michael; Mikulis, David J

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common presentation in patients with newly diagnosed brain arteriovenous malformations, but the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the seizures remain poorly understood. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and conventional angiography to determine whether seizure-prone patients with brain arteriovenous malformations exhibit impaired cerebrovascular reserve or morphological angiographic features predictive of seizures. Twenty consecutive patients with untreated brain arteriovenous malformations were recruited (10 with and 10 without epileptic seizures) along with 12 age-matched healthy controls. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI was performed while applying iso-oxic step changes in end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) to obtain quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity measurements. The brain arteriovenous malformation morphology was evaluated by angiography, to determine to what extent limitations of arterial blood supply or the presence of restricted venous outflow and tissue congestion correlated with seizure susceptibility. Only patients with seizures exhibited impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reactivity by magnetic resonance imaging (0.11 ± 0.10 versus 0.25 ± 0.07, respectively; P < 0.001) and venous drainage patterns suggestive of tissue congestion on angiography. However, cerebrovascular reactivity changes were not of a magnitude suggestive of arterial steal, and were probably compatible with venous congestion in aetiology. Our findings demonstrate a strong association between impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve and epileptic seizure presentation in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation. The impaired cerebrovascular reserve may be associated with venous congestion. Quantitative measurements of cerebrovascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent MRI appear to correlate with seizure susceptibility in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation.

  10. Gross anatomy of network security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Information security involves many branches of effort, including information assurance, host level security, physical security, and network security. Computer network security methods and implementations are given a top-down description to permit a medically focused audience to anchor this information to their daily practice. The depth of detail of network functionality and security measures, like that of the study of human anatomy, can be highly involved. Presented at the level of major gross anatomical systems, this paper will focus on network backbone implementation and perimeter defenses, then diagnostic tools, and finally the user practices (the human element). Physical security measures, though significant, have been defined as beyond the scope of this presentation.

  11. Anatomy, pathology, and MRI findings in the sports hernia.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Conor P; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Meyers, William C

    2008-03-01

    "Sports hernia" is a frequently used term on athletic injury reports and in the sportscasting media, but its true definition remains elusive in the medical literature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful tool in the evaluation of clinical athletic pubalgia, yet specific pathologies associated with this commonly encountered syndrome are poorly described in the imaging literature. In this article we review the musculoskeletal anatomy of the pubic region as well as several reproducible patterns of pathology on MRI we have encountered in patients with a clinical diagnosis of sports hernia.

  12. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    their bulky size and linear scanning requirements for 3D. Therefore, capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) two-dimensional arrays compatible with standard ultrasound scanners were used to generate real-time 3D photoacoustic images. Future probes, designed incorporating CMUT arrays, would be relatively simple to fabricate and a convenient upgrade to existing clinical ultrasound equipment. Eventually, a handheld tool with the ability to visualize, in real-time 3D, the desired microvasculature, would assist surgical procedures. The potential implications of PAI devices compatible with standard ultrasound equipment would be a streamlined cost efficient solution for translating photoacoustics into clinical practice. The practitioner could then explore the benefits of the enhanced contrast adjunctive to current ultrasound applications. Clinical availability of PAI could enhance breast cancer diagnostics and cerebrovascular surgical outcomes.

  13. Vascular cognitive impairment neuropathology guidelines (VCING): the contribution of cerebrovascular pathology to cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Skrobot, Olivia A; Attems, Johannes; Esiri, Margaret; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Ironside, James W; Kalaria, Rajesh N; King, Andrew; Lammie, George A; Mann, David; Neal, James; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2016-09-02

    /severe occipital leptomeningeal cerebral amyloid angiopathy, moderate/severe arteriolosclerosis in occipital white matter, and at least one large infarct (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 77%). The presence of 0, 1, 2 or 3 of these features resulted in predicted probabilities of vascular cognitive impairment of 16%, 43%, 73% or 95%, respectively. We have developed VCING criteria that are reproducible and clinically predictive. Assuming our model can be validated in an independent dataset, we believe that this will be helpful for neuropathologists in reporting a low, intermediate or high likelihood that cerebrovascular disease contributed to cognitive impairment.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww214_video_abstractaww214_video_abstract.

  14. Shark Attack! Sinking Your Teeth into Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Presents a real life shark attack story and studies arm reattachment surgery to teach human anatomy. Discusses how knowledge of anatomy can be put to use in the real world and how the arm functions. Includes teaching notes and suggestions for classroom management. (YDS)

  15. Frank Netter's Legacy: Interprofessional Anatomy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niekrash, Christine E.; Copes, Lynn E.; Gonzalez, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have recently described new innovations in interprofessional interactions in gross anatomy courses. The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT has developed and implemented two contrasting interprofessional experiences in first-year medical student gross anatomy dissection laboratories:…

  16. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  17. Anatomy Education Faces Challenges in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Ismail K.

    2009-01-01

    Anatomy education in Pakistan is facing many of the same challenges as in other parts of the world. Roughly, a decade ago, all medical and dental colleges in Pakistan emphasized anatomy as a core basic discipline within a traditional medical science curriculum. Now institutions are adopting problem based learning (PBL) teaching philosophies, and…

  18. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article. PMID:27826575

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Ennio; Nota, Alessandro; Ehsani, Shideh; Gatto, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a) studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b) studies performed with CBCT images; (c) studies on human subjects; (d) studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e) studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years). Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted. PMID:28261607

  20. [Evaluation of cerebro-vascular diseases with persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Uozumi, T; Kurisu, K; Sumida, M; Nakahara, A; Migita, K

    1994-12-01

    Five cases of cerebro-vascular diseases with carotid-basilar anastomosis were evaluated. Case 1: a 73-year-old female was diagnosed as having subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery bifurcation and demonstrated that a left proatlantal intersegmental artery. Case 2: a 38-year-old female showed intraventricle hemorrhage due to arteriovenous malformation and showed left primitive hypoglossal artery. Case 3: 73-year-old female was diagnosed as having subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured basilar top aneurysm and demonstrated that a right primitive hypoglossal artery. Case 4: a 29-year-old male with unruptured aneurysm of the left internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery bifurcation, and right trigeminal artery was detected incidentally by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Furthermore, right proatlantal intersegmental artery was detected by conventional angiography. Case 5: a 76-year-old male was diagnosed as having subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. MRA showed the aneurysm and a primitive trigeminal artery. No clinical symptom related with carotid-basilar anastomosis was detected. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was useful for diagnosis of asymptomatic carotid-basilar anastomosis. Especially, axial view of MRA by time of flight method detected two cases of a primitive trigeminal artery. And coronal view of MRA by phase contrast method is useful for diagnosis of primitive proatlantal intersegmental artery. More asymptomatic persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis may be detected by MRA.

  1. Acute exercise stress reveals cerebrovascular benefits associated with moderate gains in cardiorespiratory fitness.

    PubMed

    Brugniaux, Julien V; Marley, Christopher J; Hodson, Danielle A; New, Karl J; Bailey, Damian M

    2014-12-01

    Elevated cardiorespiratory fitness improves resting cerebral perfusion, although to what extent this is further amplified during acute exposure to exercise stress and the corresponding implications for cerebral oxygenation remain unknown. To examine this, we recruited 12 moderately active and 12 sedentary healthy males. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and prefrontal cortical oxyhemoglobin (cO(2)Hb) concentration were monitored continuously at rest and throughout an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Despite a subtle elevation in the maximal oxygen uptake (active: 52±9 ml/kg per minute versus sedentary: 33±5 ml/kg per minute, P<0.05), resting MCAv was not different between groups. However, more marked increases in both MCAv (+28±13% versus +18±6%, P<0.05) and cO(2)Hb (+5±4% versus -2±3%, P<0.05) were observed in the active group during the transition from low- to moderate-intensity exercise. Collectively, these findings indicate that the long-term benefits associated with moderate increase in physical activity are not observed in the resting state and only become apparent when the cerebrovasculature is challenged by acute exertional stress. This has important clinical implications when assessing the true extent of cerebrovascular adaptation.

  2. Reconstruction and visualization of irregularly sampled three- and four-dimensional ultrasound data for cerebrovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Meairs, S; Beyer, J; Hennerici, M

    2000-02-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the potential value of compounded data for improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and speckle contrast for three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasonography, clinical applications are lacking. We investigated the potential of six degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) scanhead position and orientation measurement (POM) devices for registration of in vivo multiplanar, irregularly sampled ultrasound (US) images to a regular 3-D volume space. The results demonstrate that accurate spatial and temporal registration of four-dimensional (4-D) US data can be achieved using a 6-DOF scanhead tracking system. For reconstruction of arbitrary, irregularly sampled US data, we introduce a technique based upon a weighted, ellipsoid Gaussian convolution kernel. Volume renderings of 3-D and 4-D compounded in vivo US data are presented. The results, although restricted to the field of cerebrovascular disease, will be of value to other applications of 3-D sonography, particularly those in which compounding of data through irregular sampling may provide superior information on tissue or vessel structure.

  3. Increased levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease in humans: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    GHIZONI, Janaina Salomon; TAVEIRA, Luís Antônio de Assis; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; GHIZONI, Marcos Flávio; PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; DIONÍSIO, Thiago José; BROZOSKI, Daniel Thomas; SANTOS, Carlos Ferreira; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of periodontal disease in the development of stroke or cerebral infarction in patients by evaluating the clinical periodontal conditions and the subgingival levels of periodontopathogens. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with ischemic (I-CVA) or hemorrhagic (H-CVA) cerebrovascular episodes (test group) and 60 systemically healthy patients (control group) were evaluated for: probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were both identified and quantified in subgingival plaque samples by conventional and real-time PCR, respectively. Results: The test group showed a significant increase in each of the following parameters: pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, plaque index and number of missing teeth when compared to control values (p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Likewise, the test group had increased numbers of sites that were contaminated with P. gingivalis (60%x10%; p<0.001; chi-squared test) and displayed greater prevalence of periodontal disease, with an odds ratio of 48.06 (95% CI: 5.96-387.72; p<0.001). Notably, a positive correlation between probing depth and the levels of P. gingivalis in ischemic stroke was found (r=0.60; p=0.03; Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test). A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA was not detected in any of the groups by conventional or real-time PCR. Conclusions: Stroke patients had deeper pockets, more severe attachment loss, increased bleeding on probing, increased plaque indexes, and in their pockets harbored increased levels of P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that periodontal disease is a risk factor for the development of cerebral hemorrhage or infarction. Early treatment of periodontitis may counteract the development of cerebrovascular episodes. PMID:22437687

  4. [Treatment and rehabilitation of dysphagia following cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    López-Liria, Remedios; Fernández-Alonso, Melodie; Vega-Ramírez, Francisco A; Salido-Campos, M Ángeles; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2014-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Bronchopneumonia is a frequent complication in the first days after a cerebrovascular disease and is linked with a higher rate of mortality. It occurs in patients with an altered level of consciousness or tussigenic reflex, and could be prevented with an early dysphagia rehabilitation programme. AIMS. To review the scientific literature on the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with dysphagia after suffering a stroke, published between 2002 and 2012. DEVELOPMENT. A search conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane, PEDro, CINAHL and ENFISPO databases yielded 15 papers that fulfilled eligibility criteria and the initial aims of the study, providing information about 3,212 patients. The different protocols and techniques for re-education in dysphagia are described and include compensatory strategies, orofacial regulation therapy, music therapy, sensory stimulation, lip muscle, tongue, pharynx, larynx and respiratory tract training, Mendelsohn manoeuvre, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS. The studies examined in this research claim that the treatment of dysphagia following a stroke can improve the function of deglutition (coordination, speed, volume), quality of life and people's social relationships. Further work needs to be carried out to establish or define what kind of therapies, techniques, exercises or manoeuvres are the most effective in dysphagia. Generally agreed treatment or rehabilitation protocols also need to be drawn up within units that address stroke in an integrated manner.

  5. Cerebrovascular diseases and depression: epidemiology, mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Göthe, F; Enache, D; Wahlund, L O; Winblad, B; Crisby, M; Lökk, J; Aarsland, D

    2012-09-01

    Both cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and depression are common conditions in the elderly, and there is emerging evidence of a bi-directional relationship: 1) depression can cause CVD and stroke, transient ischemic attack; and 2) subcortical CVD are associated with increased risk for depression. The frequency of poststroke depression is highest during the first month after the stroke, but remains high even after several years. Depression is associated with poorer functional prognosis and higher mortality after stroke. There is good evidence that severity of functional impairment, high neuroticism, low social support as well as genetic factors are associated with an increased risk for post-stroke depression. Deep white matter lesions are the most consistent imaging correlate of depression. Potential mechanisms mediating the association between depression and CVD are neuroinflammation and HPA-axis activation, fronto-subcortical circuit lesions, and serotonergic dysfunction. Antidepressants have demonstrated effect on poststroke depression in meta-analyses, and such drugs as well as vitamin B can reduce the incidence of depression in stroke survivors. In addition, serotonergic drugs may strengthen poststroke motor and cognitive recovery, potentially through restorative mechanisms. Psychotherapeutic strategies such as problem-solving therapy seem to be effective. There is emerging evidence that treatment of cardiovascular disease and risk-factors can reduce the risk for late-life depression, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  6. Factors influencing students' decisions to participate in a short "dissection experience" within a systemic anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Theresa A; McAndrew, Darryl J

    2013-01-01

    Changes in medical education have affected both curriculum design and delivery. Many medical schools now use integrated curricula and a systemic approach, with reduced hours of anatomy teaching. While learning anatomy via dissection is invaluable in educational, professional, and personal development, it is time intensive and supports a regional approach to learning anatomy; the use of prosections has replaced dissection as the main teaching method in many medical schools. In our graduate-entry medical degree, we use an integrated curriculum, with prosections to teach anatomy systemically. However, to not exclude dissection completely, and to expose students to its additional and unique benefits, we implemented a short "Dissection Experience" at the beginning of Year 2. Students attended three two-hour anatomy sessions and participated in dissection of the clinically relevant areas of the cubital fossa, femoral triangle, and infraclavicular region. This activity was voluntary and we retrospectively surveyed all students to ascertain factors influencing their decision of whether to participate in this activity, and to obtain feedback from those students who did participate. The main reasons students did not participate were previous dissection experience and time constraints. The reasons most strongly affecting students' decisions to participate related to experience (lack of previous or new) and new skill. Students' responses as to the most beneficial component of the dissection experience were based around practical skills, anatomical education, the learning process, and the body donors. We report here on the benefits and practicalities of including a short dissection experience in a systemic, prosection-based anatomy course.

  7. Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771): father of pathologic anatomy and pioneer of modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjib Kumar

    2016-09-14

    Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771) was an Italian anatomist who introduced the anatomo-clinical concept in medicine and established anatomy as the instrument to identify the seat and etiology of any disease. He was professor of anatomy at the prestigious University of Padua for more than 50 years. His first documented text in anatomy, Adversaria Anatomica was published in three volumes between 1706 and 1719. His accurate anatomical descriptions of human organs enhanced his reputation as the most famous anatomist of Europe during that period. Morgagni published the most important work of his life, the masterpiece in pathologic anatomy, De Sedibus, in 1761. The text is based on his pathologic observations from about 700 autopsy dissections of patients whom he had treated during their lifetime. De Sedibus provides the reader with a precise correlation between the anatomo-pathologic findings at post-mortem and the clinical symptoms of a disease observed during a lifetime. Morgagni's ability to integrate and synthesize information set him apart from his contemporaries, and his anatomo-clinical method was a major breakthrough in the history of medicine as it helped physicians to diagnose a disease, analyse the prognosis of that disease and prepare a management protocol for the same. His achievements led to the emergence of pathologic anatomy as an exact science and with him began modern medicine.

  8. The Extensor Pollicis Brevis: A Review of Its Anatomy and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Jabir, Shehab; Lyall, Harry; Iwuagwu, Fortune C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The standard anatomical description of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon provided in textbooks of anatomy is at odds with that of published anatomical studies. It is crucial to the hand surgeon that he or she has a clear understanding of its anatomy, including its variations. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on the anatomy and variants of the extensor pollicis brevis. It is hoped that this review will be indispensable to the hand surgeon in informing him or her about the anatomy and variants encountered when dealing with the extensor pollicis brevis. Methods: Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and a literature search was carried out on MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar from inception to March 2013 for studies on the topic of extensor pollicis brevis anatomy. The following key words were used: “extensor pollicis brevis,” “anatomy,” “anatomic variations,” “cadaveric study,” “clinical study,” “case report,” and “dissection”. Results: The search retrieved a total of 52 studies following removal of duplicates. Forty-five studies were excluded following screening of the title and abstract. Three studies were excluded as they did not meet the eligibility criteria, leaving 4 cadaveric studies for inclusion in the review. Conclusion: We recommend the use of ultrasound scanning to determine anatomy of the extensor pollicis brevis before reconstructive procedures involving the extensor pollicis brevis, as well as in traumatic injuries to the extensor pollicis brevis. There appears to be ethnicity-related variations in the anatomy of the extensor pollicis brevis, and further study into these variations may be indicated. PMID:23882301

  9. A Literature Review of Renal Surgical Anatomy and Surgical Strategies for Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Tobias; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gratzke, Christian; Kaouk, Jihad; Kutikov, Alexander; Macchi, Veronica; Mottrie, Alexandre; Porpiglia, Francesco; Porter, James; Rogers, Craig G.; Russo, Paul; Thompson, R. Houston; Uzzo, Robert G.; Wood, Christopher G.; Gill, Inderbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Context A detailed understanding of renal surgical anatomy is necessary to optimize preoperative planning and operative technique and provide a basis for improved outcomes. Objective To evaluate the literature regarding pertinent surgical anatomy of the kidney and related structures, nephrometry scoring systems, and current surgical strategies for partial nephrectomy (PN). Evidence acquisition A literature review was conducted. Evidence synthesis Surgical renal anatomy fundamentally impacts PN surgery. The renal artery divides into anterior and posterior divisions, from which approximately five segmental terminal arteries originate. The renal veins are not terminal. Variations in the vascular and lymphatic channels are common; thus, concurrent lymphadenectomy is not routinely indicated during PN for cT1 renal masses in the setting of clinically negative lymph nodes. Renal-protocol contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is used for standard imaging. Anatomy-based nephrometry scoring systems allow standardized academic reporting of tumor characteristics and predict PN outcomes (complications, remnant function, possibly histology). Anatomy-based novel surgical approaches may reduce ischemic time during PN; these include early unclamping, segmental clamping, tumor-specific clamping (zero ischemia), and unclamped PN. Cancer cure after PN relies on complete resection, which can be achieved by thin margins. Post-PN renal function is impacted by kidney quality, remnant quantity, and ischemia type and duration. Conclusions Surgical renal anatomy underpins imaging, nephrometry scoring systems, and vascular control techniques that reduce global renal ischemia and may impact post-PN function. A contemporary ideal PN excises the tumor with a thin negative margin, delicately secures the tumor bed to maximize vascularized remnant parenchyma, and minimizes global ischemia to the renal remnant with minimal complications. Patient summary In this report

  10. Exercises in anatomy: cardiac isomerism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Sarwark, Anne E; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that the patients with the most complex cardiac malformations are those with so-called visceral heterotaxy. At present, it remains a fact that most investigators segregate these patients on the basis of their splenic anatomy, describing syndromes of so-called asplenia and polysplenia. It has also been known for quite some time, nonetheless, that the morphology of the tracheobronchial tree is usually isomeric in the setting of heterotaxy. And it has been shown that the isomerism found in terms of bronchial arrangement correlates in a better fashion with the cardiac anatomy than does the presence of multiple spleens, or the absence of any splenic tissue. In this exercise in anatomy, we use hearts from the Idriss archive of Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago to demonstrate the isomeric features found in the hearts obtained from patients known to have had heterotaxy. We first demonstrate the normal arrangements, showing how it is the extent of the pectinate muscles in the atrial appendages relative to the atrioventricular junctions that distinguishes between morphologically right and left atrial chambers. We also show the asymmetry of the normal bronchial tree, and the relationships of the first bronchial branches to the pulmonary arteries supplying the lower lobes of the lungs. We then demonstrate that diagnosis of multiple spleens requires the finding of splenic tissue on either side of the dorsal mesogastrium. Turning to hearts obtained from patients with heterotaxy, we illustrate isomeric right and left atrial appendages. We emphasize that it is only the appendages that are universally isomeric, but point out that other features support the notion of cardiac isomerism. We then show that description also requires a full account of veno-atrial connections, since these can seemingly be mirror-imaged when the arrangement within the heart is one of isomerism of the atrial appendages. We show how failure to recognize the presence of such isomeric

  11. Statistical Modeling to Characterize Relationships between Knee Anatomy and Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Smoger, Lowell M.; Fitzpatrick, Clare K.; Clary, Chadd W.; Cyr, Adam J.; Maletsky, Lorin P.; Rullkoetter, Paul J.; Laz, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of the knee are complex and dependent on the shape of the articular surfaces and their relative alignment. Insight into how anatomy relates to kinematics can establish biomechanical norms, support the diagnosis and treatment of various pathologies (e.g. patellar maltracking) and inform implant design. Prior studies have used correlations to identify anatomical measures related to specific motions. The objective of this study was to describe relationships between knee anatomy and tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) kinematics using a statistical shape and function modeling approach. A principal component (PC) analysis was performed on a 20-specimen dataset consisting of shape of the bone and cartilage for the femur, tibia and patella derived from imaging and six-degree-of-freedom TF and PF kinematics from cadaveric testing during a simulated squat. The PC modes characterized links between anatomy and kinematics; the first mode captured scaling and shape changes in the condylar radii and their influence on TF anterior-posterior translation, internal-external rotation, and the location of the femoral lowest point. Subsequent modes described relations in patella shape and alta/baja alignment impacting PF kinematics. The complex interactions described with the data-driven statistical approach provide insight into knee mechanics that is useful clinically and in implant design. PMID:25991502

  12. High-resolution anatomy from in situ human brain.

    PubMed

    Toga, A W; Ambach, K L; Schluender, S

    1994-11-01

    We have generated a spatially accurate, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) volume of brain anatomy from cryosectioned whole human head. The head of a female cadaver was cryosectioned on a heavy duty cryomacrotome (PMV, Stockholm Sweden) modified for quantitative digital image capture. Serial images (1024(2), 24-bit) were captured directly from the cryoplaned specimen blockface in 500-micron intervals and reconstructed to a 3D data volume. Data were placed into the Talairach coordinate system to create a volume of brain anatomy for atlas reference. We resampled the volume at 500 microns along the sagittal, coronal, and horizontal planes and enhanced the images by digitally editing the background. The spatial resolution of the original digitized images provided sufficient anatomic detail to clearly delineate gray and white matter and neural structures, including major fiber pathways, subthalamic nuclei, and laminae. We developed a compact disk and controlling software program to enable the viewer to select planes of orientation, display, and copy individual to sections at higher resolution. Animation proved useful in the conveyance of system anatomy as structures are shown traversing through the neuroaxis. Postmortem cryosectioning paired with this computerized presentation allowed the complete 3D volume data to be distributed and shared as an educational, clinical, and research resource.

  13. Inside Out: Modern Imaging Techniques to Reveal Animal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Wang, Tobias; Agger, Peter; Andersen, Jonas L.; Knudsen, Peter S.; Rasmussen, Anne S.; Uhrenholt, Lars; Pedersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Animal anatomy has traditionally relied on detailed dissections to produce anatomical illustrations, but modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT, now represent an enormous resource that allows for fast non-invasive visualizations of animal anatomy in living animals. These modalities also allow for creation of three-dimensional representations that can be of considerable value in the dissemination of anatomical studies. In this methodological review, we present our experiences using MRI, CT and μCT to create advanced representation of animal anatomy, including bones, inner organs and blood vessels in a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and spiders. The images have a similar quality to most traditional anatomical drawings and are presented together with interactive movies of the anatomical structures, where the object can be viewed from different angles. Given that clinical scanners found in the majority of larger hospitals are fully suitable for these purposes, we encourage biologists to take advantage of these imaging techniques in creation of three-dimensional graphical representations of internal structures. PMID:21445356

  14. Anatomy and Aesthetics of the Labia Minora: The Ideal Vulva?

    PubMed

    Clerico, C; Larry, A; Mojallal, A; Boucher, F

    2017-03-10

    Female genital cosmetic surgery is becoming more and more widespread both in the field of plastic and gynaecological surgery. The increased demand for vulvar surgery is spurred by the belief that the vulva is abnormal in appearance. What is normal in terms of labial anatomy? Labia minora enlargement or hypertrophy remains a clinical diagnosis which is poorly defined as it could be considered a variation of the normal anatomy. Enlarged labia minora can cause functional, aesthetic and psychosocial problems. In reality, given the wide variety of vulvar morphology among people, it is a very subjective issue to define the "normal" vulva. The spread of nudity in the general media plays a major role in creating an artificial image and standards with regard to the ideal form. Physicians should be aware that the patient's self-perception of the normal or ideal vulva is highly influenced by the arguably distorted image related to our socio-psychological environment, as presented to us by the general media and internet. As physicians, we have to educate our patients on the variation of vulvar anatomy and the potential risks of these surgeries. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these evidence-based medicine ratings, please refer to Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  15. Art, antiquarianism and early anatomy.

    PubMed

    Guest, Clare E L

    2014-12-01

    Discussions of the early relationship between art and anatomy are shaped by Vasari's account of Florentine artists who dissected bodies in order to understand the causes of movement, and the end of movement in action. This account eclipses the role of the study of antiquities in Renaissance anatomical illustration. Beyond techniques of presentation, such as sectioning and analytic illustration, or a preoccupation with the mutilated fragment, antiquarianism offered a reflection on the variant and the role of temperament which could be adapted for anatomical purposes. With its play on ambiguities of life and death, idealisation and damage, antiquarianism also provided a way of negotiating the difficulties of content inherent in anatomical illustration. As such, it goes beyond exclusively historical interest to provoke reflection on the modes, possibilities and humane responsibilities of medical illustration.

  16. Facial anatomy of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, P; Romero, R; Staudach, A; Hobbins, J C

    1986-11-01

    Real-time ultrasonography was used in this study to demonstrate details of the anatomy of the face and neck of the fetus. Details such as the ocular globe, vitreous body, lens, anterior chamber, rectus muscles, optic nerve and disc, and the ophthalmic artery are visible at the level of the eye. The helix, scaphoid fossa, triangular fossa, concha, antihelix, antitragus, intertragic incisure, and lobule can be seen at the level of the ear. The tip of the nose, the alae nasi, and the columna are also seen. The epiglottis is visible in the vestibulum of the larynx. The fetal face is an important structure that can provide invaluable information in the search for congenital malformations, and possibly also in fetal behavior.

  17. Arterial anatomy of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Ames, E L; Bissonnette, M; Acland, R; Lister, G; Firrell, J

    1993-08-01

    The anatomical literature has indicated that the arterial supply to the thumb comes from the princeps pollicis artery. However, this simplified description does not often correlate with intraoperative findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate and clarify this important area of anatomy by dissection of fresh cadaver hands. 40 dissections were completed on 35 intravascularly injected and five non-injected hands. Five patterns were identified. The most common pattern showed both a superficial and deep vessel to the first web space in 54% of specimens. Dominant vessels included the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery in 8%, first palmar metacarpal artery in 18% and dorsal metacarpal artery in 8%. Only three specimens correlated with the textbook description. We conclude that the term "princeps pollicis" is actually a misnomer.

  18. Ulnar intrinsic anatomy and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul C; Sforzo, Christopher R

    2005-01-01

    Normal hand function is a balance between the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature. Although individually the intrinsics are small muscles in diameter, collectively they represent a large muscle that contributes approximately 50% of grip strength. Dysfunction of the intrinsics consequently leads to impaired grip and pinch strength as well recognized deformities. Low ulnar nerve palsy preserves ulnar innervated extrinsics resulting in sensory loss, digital clawing, thumb deformity, abduction of the small finger, and asynchronous finger motion. High ulnar nerve palsy is characterized by the above plus paralysis of the ulnar profundi and the flexor carpi ulnaris. Understanding the normal anatomy allows the clinician to identify the site of the lesion and plan appropriate surgical intervention. This article revisits the classic work of Richard J. Smith on ulnar nerve palsy with contemporary perspective.

  19. Imaging of cerebrovascular pathology in animal models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Klohs, Jan; Rudin, Markus; Shimshek, Derya R.; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular pathology may interact with neurodegeneration and thus aggravate cognitive decline. As the relationship between these two processes is poorly understood, research has been increasingly focused on understanding the link between cerebrovascular alterations and AD. This has at last been spurred by the engineering of transgenic animals, which display pathological features of AD and develop cerebral amyloid angiopathy to various degrees. Transgenic models are versatile for investigating the role of amyloid deposition and vascular dysfunction, and for evaluating novel therapeutic concepts. In addition, research has benefited from the development of novel imaging techniques, which are capable of characterizing vascular pathology in vivo. They provide vascular structural read-outs and have the ability to assess the functional consequences of vascular dysfunction as well as to visualize and monitor the molecular processes underlying these pathological alterations. This article focusses on recent in vivo small animal imaging studies addressing vascular aspects related to AD. With the technical advances of imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance, nuclear and microscopic imaging, molecular, functional and structural information related to vascular pathology can now be visualized in vivo in small rodents. Imaging vascular and parenchymal amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition as well as Aβ transport pathways have been shown to be useful to characterize their dynamics and to elucidate their role in the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and AD. Structural and functional imaging read-outs have been employed to describe the deleterious affects of Aβ on vessel morphology, hemodynamics and vascular integrity. More recent imaging studies have also addressed how inflammatory processes partake in the pathogenesis of the disease. Moreover, imaging can be pivotal in the search for novel therapies targeting the vasculature. PMID:24659966

  20. Haemodynamic and cerebrovascular responses to glycerol infusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, J L; Wang, Y C; Wang, J Y

    1989-11-01

    1. The response of cerebral blood vessels to hyperosmolar agents in vivo remains controversial, and little is known about the effect of glycerol on cerebral vessels. In this study we investigated the cerebrovascular response to intravenous administration of glycerol (1 g/kg, infused over 25 min) in dogs under pentobarbital anaesthesia. 2. intracranial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, serum osmolarity and packed cell volume were continuously monitored, and blood gases were checked frequently. Through a parietal cranial window, pial vessel diameter was measured by means of a surgical microscope and a video image-analyser. 3. Pial vessel diameter increased gradually with a maximum at 30 min after the beginning of glycerol infusion. The maximum increase in diameter in small (less than or equal to 100 microns) vessels was 14.3%, whereas that in large (greater than 100 microns) vessels was 10.3%. There was only a slight increase (less than 4%) in pial vessel diameter in vehicle-infused animals. The intracranial pressure decreased drastically after glycerol infusion, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure remained constant. There were correlations between the rise in serum osmolarity, fall in packed cell volume and vasodilatation, indicating that glycerol caused vasodilatation accompanied by plasma volume expansion. 4. Our data suggest that glycerol produces cerebral vasodilatation, which might be beneficial in cerebral ischaemia and vasospasm, in addition to its intracranial pressure-reducing effect on normal or oedematous brain. The degree of vasodilatation was not sufficient to affect the predominant intracranial pressure drop resulting from cerebral dehydration.

  1. Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Philip D; Faulkner, James; O’Donnell, Terrence; Lanford, Jeremy; Wong, Lai-kin; Saleem, Saqib; Woolley, Brandon; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age-matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low- (0.02–0.07 Hz), low- (0.07–0.20 Hz), and high-frequency (0.20–0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ≥ 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ≥ 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R2 = 0.20–0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ≥ 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA. PMID:26537345

  2. Chronic Stress Decreases Cerebrovascular Responses During Rat Hindlimb Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sohee; Kang, Bok-Man; Shin, Min-Kyoo; Min, Jiwoong; Heo, Chaejeong; Lee, Yubu; Baeg, Eunha; Suh, Minah

    2015-01-01

    Repeated stress is one of the major risk factors for cerebrovascular disease, including stroke, and vascular dementia. However, the functional alterations in the cerebral hemodynamic response induced by chronic stress have not been clarified. Here, we investigated the in vivo cerebral hemodynamic changes and accompanying cellular and molecular changes in chronically stressed rats. After 3 weeks of restraint stress, the elicitation of stress was verified by behavioral despair in the forced swimming test and by physical indicators of stress. The evoked changes in the cerebral blood volume and pial artery responses following hindpaw electrical stimulation were measured using optical intrinsic signal imaging. We observed that, compared to the control group, animals under chronic restraint stress exhibited a decreased hemodynamic response, with a smaller pial arterial dilation in the somatosensory cortex during hindpaw electrical stimulation. The effect of chronic restraint stress on vasomodulator enzymes, including neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2), was assessed in the somatosensory cortex. Chronic restraint stress downregulated nNOS and HO-2 compared to the control group. In addition, we examined the subtypes of cells that can explain the environmental changes due to the decreased vasomodulators. The expression of parvalbumin in GABAergic interneurons and glutamate receptor-1 in neurons were decreased, whereas the microglial activation was increased. Our results suggest that the chronic stress-induced alterations in cerebral vascular function and the modulations of the cellular expression in the neuro-vasomodulatory system may be crucial contributing factors in the development of various vascular-induced conditions in the brain. PMID:26778944

  3. [Lipid and glucose profile in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular accidents in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Ousmane, Cisse; Lemine, Dadah Samy Mohamed; Fatoumata, Ba; Makhtar, Ba El Hadji; Soda, Diop Marieme; Side, Diagne Ngor; Dieynaba, Sow Adjaratou; Modji, Basse Anna; Kamadore, Touré; Moustapha, Ndiaye; Gallo, Diop Amadou; Mansour, Ndiaye Mouhamadou

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is defined as the rapid development of localized or global clinical signs of neurological dysfunction with no apparent cause other than that of vascular origin. A variety of risk factors have been identified and associated with the occurrence of Ischemic CVA, including glucose and lipid metabolism disturbances. We conducted a retrospective study at the Clinic of Neurology, Fann. Our study focused on medical records of patients with ICVA confirmed by imaging, hospitalized from January 1 to December 31 2010. All patients underwent complete lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL; LDL level was calculated using Friedwald formula), kidney function tests and fasting blood sugar test were performed within 48 hours of admission. Data were analysed using univariate technique and then using bivariate technique tanks to SPSS 16.0 software. We collected 235 files. We here report a case series of patients between ages 10-99 years, with an average age of 67,06 years. Males were 42,55%, sex-ratio was 0,74 in favour of women. 26% of cases had impaired fasting glucose levels during the acute phase of ICVA. The lipid profile showed an increase in total cholesterol level in 52.34% of patients. Low levels of HDL cholesterol were found in 34.47% of patients. Hypertriglyceridemia was only observed in 3% of patients. LDL levels were high in 12,76% of patients. Atherogenicity index was high in 25,53% of patients. Disturbances of blood glucose and lipid profile are often associated with ICVA and should be taken into account to ensure better secondary prevention.

  4. Anatomy online: presentation of a detailed WWW atlas of human gross anatomy--reference for medical education.

    PubMed

    Jastrow, Holger; Vollrath, Lutz

    2002-11-01

    We present an online anatomy atlas based on the Visible Human Project (VHP) of the US National Library of Medicine. The objective is to provide original unlabeled as well as labeled sections of the human body of high quality and resolution on the Internet, for use in basic and continuing medical education. For a representative overview of the body, 370 axial sections were selected from the male and female data base of the VHP with special regard to regions of clinical interest. Each section is accompanied by its corresponding computer tomography (CT) image and, if available, magnetic resonance images (MRI) for quick and easy comparison of morphologic and radiologic structures. The sections can be studied unlabeled or labeled according to the current Terminologia Anatomica. A linked vocabulary with more than 850 terms explains the labeling. Animations of the sections as well as of CT and MR images allow for further visualization of the topographic relationships of anatomical structures. The responses to the project indicate that students and physicians regard the Internet Atlas of Human Gross Anatomy as a most useful aid for learning and reviewing anatomical details. The atlas is accessible on: http://www.uni-mainz.de/FB/Medizin/Anatomie/workshop/vishuman/Eready.html.

  5. The anatomic basis for ventricular arrhythmia in the normal heart: what the student of anatomy needs to know.

    PubMed

    Hai, Jo Jo; Lachman, Nirusha; Syed, Faisal F; Desimone, Christopher V; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2014-09-01

    The traditional route for teaching cardiac anatomy involves didactic instruction, cadaver dissections, and familiarization with the main structure and relationships of the cardiac chambers, valves, and vasculature. In contemporary cardiac electrophysiology, however, a very different view of anatomy is required including details rarely appreciated with a general overview. In this review, we discuss the critical advances in cardiac electrophysiology that were possible only because of understanding detailed anatomic relationships. While we briefly discuss the clinical relevance, we explain in depth the necessary structural information for the student of clinical anatomy. Interspersed through the text are boxes that highlight and summarize the critical pieces of knowledge to be borne in mind while studying the fascinating structural anatomy of the human heart.

  6. Real-time cadaveric laparoscopy and laparoscopic video demonstrations in gross anatomy: an observation of impact on learning and career choice.

    PubMed

    Saberski, Ean R; Orenstein, Sean B; Matheson, Dale; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2015-01-01

    Medical curricula are continually evolving and increasing clinical relevance. Gross anatomy educators have tested innovations to improve the clinical potency of anatomic dissection and found that clinical correlations are an effective method to accomplish this goal. Recently, surgical educators defined a role for laparoscopy in teaching anatomy. We aimed to expand this role by using surgical educators to create clinical correlates between gross anatomy and clinical surgery. We held supplements to traditional anatomy open dissection for medical students, including viewing prerecorded operative footage and live laparoscopic dissection performed on cadavers. The main outcome measures were assessed through pre- and postsession surveys. Greater than 75 per cent of students found the demonstrations highly valuable, and students perceived a significant increase in their understanding of abdominopelvic anatomy (P < 0.01). Additionally, 62 per cent of students with previous interest in surgery and 10 per cent of students without previous interest in surgery reported increased interest in pursuing surgical careers. Our demonstrations advance the use of minimally invasive surgical technology to teach gross anatomy. Live laparoscopic demonstrations augment traditional anatomic instruction by reinforcing the clinical relevance of abdominopelvic anatomy. Additionally, laparoscopic demonstrations generate interest in surgery that would otherwise be absent in the preclinical years.

  7. Nonlinear effects of respiration on the crosstalk between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Rossato, Gianluca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems are vital control mechanisms responsible for guaranteeing homeostasis and are affected by respiration. This work proposes the investigation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems and the nonlinear influences of respiration on both regulations through joint symbolic analysis (JSA), conditioned or unconditioned on respiration. Interactions between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems were evaluated as well by performing correlation analysis between JSA indexes describing the two control systems. Heart period, systolic and mean arterial pressure, mean cerebral blood flow velocity and respiration were acquired on a beat-to-beat basis in 13 subjects experiencing recurrent syncope episodes (SYNC) and 13 healthy individuals (non-SYNC) in supine resting condition and during head-up tilt test at 60° (TILT). Results showed that JSA distinguished conditions and groups, whereas time domain parameters detected only the effect of TILT. Respiration affected cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems in a nonlinear way and was able to modulate the interactions between the two control systems with different outcome in non-SYNC and SYNC groups, thus suggesting that the analysis of the impact of respiration on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems might improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the development of postural-related syncope.

  8. Learning surgically oriented anatomy in a student-run extracurricular club: an education through recreation initiative.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Shahnoor M; Bodrogi, Andrew; Cristea, Octav; Johnson, Marjorie; McAlister, Vivian C

    2012-01-01

    Didactic and laboratory anatomical education have seen significant reductions in the medical school curriculum due, in part, to the current shift from basic science to more clinically based teaching in North American medical schools. In order to increase medical student exposure to anatomy, with clinical applicability, a student-run initiative called surgically oriented anatomy prosectors (SOAP) club was created within the extracurricular program at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. SOAP invites surgeons and residents from various surgical specialties to demonstrate, on a cadaver, a surgical procedure of their choosing. During the demonstration, the anatomy, as it relates to the surgical procedure, is discussed. The students then break into smaller groups to examine the relevant anatomy on the cadavers, during which time the discussion is broadened. The group continues the conversation in a social environment with refreshments. SOAP is one of the most popular extracurricular clubs with 65% of first and second year medical students registered as members. The high demand for SOAP, along with the positive participant feedback, may be due to its utilization of the principle of education through recreation, which seeks to provide opportunities for learning seamlessly throughout all facets of life. It also demonstrates the desire, amongst certain medical students, to learn applied anatomy, particularly within a surgical context.

  9. CPR Instruction in a Human Anatomy Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutton, Lewis M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction can be included in a college anatomy and physiology course. Equipment and instructors are provided locally by the Red Cross or American Heart Association. (MA)

  10. Neuromodulators: available agents, physiology, and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Nettar, Kartik; Maas, Corey

    2011-12-01

    Neuromodulators have risen to the forefront of aesthetic medicine. By reversibly relaxing target muscles, neuromodulators exhibit their effect by softening hyperfunctional lines. An understanding of their physiology, relevant facial anatomy, and current agents is imperative for a successful aesthetic practice.

  11. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colds Prevention Treatment Children Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose ... cm (3/8 inch) per minute. What a Common Cold Is A common cold is an illness caused ...

  12. Curricular Guidelines for Teaching Dental Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okeson, Jeffrey; Buckman, James

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Dental Anatomy and Occlusion of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. (MLW)

  13. Anatomy Ontology Matching Using Markov Logic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhua; Zhao, Pengpeng; Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The anatomy of model species is described in ontologies, which are used to standardize the annotations of experimental data, such as gene expression patterns. To compare such data between species, we need to establish relationships between ontologies describing different species. Ontology matching is a kind of solutions to find semantic correspondences between entities of different ontologies. Markov logic networks which unify probabilistic graphical model and first-order logic provide an excellent framework for ontology matching. We combine several different matching strategies through first-order logic formulas according to the structure of anatomy ontologies. Experiments on the adult mouse anatomy and the human anatomy have demonstrated the effectiveness of proposed approach in terms of the quality of result alignment. PMID:27382498

  14. Normal anatomy of the skull base.

    PubMed

    Lustrin, E S; Robertson, R L; Tilak, S

    1994-08-01

    CT and MR imaging increasingly are being used for the evaluation of the skull base. New innovative techniques have revolutionized radiologic understanding of normal skull base anatomy. Thus, normal anatomic relationships with radiographic correlation are vital for accurate pathologic assessment.

  15. Regional specificity in anatomy at the lamina cribrosa.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1981-03-01

    Specimens cut in cross section at the level of the lamina cribrosa in normal primate eyes are examined by light microscopy. The density of structural elements, consisting of crosswise-oriented connective-tissue trabeculae, is examined in different regions of the nerve head. It is noted that nasal more than temporal more than superior or inferior regions of the lamina cross section contain increased connective-tissue elements. This regional variation in nerve head anatomy is contrasted with susceptibility patterns of nerve head tissue to pressure elevation in both experimental and clinical glaucoma.

  16. Using ultrasound to teach anatomy in the undergraduate medical curriculum: an evaluation of the experiences of tutors and medical students.

    PubMed

    Patten, Debra

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes the experiences of staff and students at two UK medical schools, who introduced portable ultrasound (PU) as an imaging technology to deliver clinical anatomy teaching and to aid skill development in interpretation of cross-sectional anatomy (CSA). A sonographer contributed to curriculum design and teaching, but mostly anatomy tutors delivered the teaching. This case study method evaluates staff and student perspectives on the ultrasound-based anatomy teaching. Quantitative data and qualitative data were collected and analysed. Staff were positive about the experience. They described their expectations for students and solutions for practical issues regarding the teaching, but were concerned about their competency in scanning and wanted bespoke training for sonoanatomy teaching. Curriculum development was accelerated through engagement with a sonographer and an ultrasound champion. Students were extremely positive about their experience; they valued the expertise of a sonographer who taught more challenging sonoanatomy, but were equally positive regarding teaching sessions led by well-trained anatomy tutors who taught more simple sonoanatomy. Students affirmed most tutors' expectations that ultrasound could reinforce existing anatomical knowledge, added clinical contextualisation, but not that use of ultrasound (US) assisted in interpreting CSA. Students valued the introduction to the technology and found sonoimage interpretation challenging, but not insurmountable. Students wanted more instruction on ultrasound physics, an expansion of ultrasound curriculum, with smaller groups and opportunities to scan volunteers. These data support the case for the use of PU to deliver anatomy teaching and to prime medical students for later clinical encounters with PU.

  17. Design, implementation, and evaluation of an innovative anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J; Rando, William C; O'Brien, Michael K; Haims, Andrew H; Abrahams, James J; Stewart, William B

    2010-01-01

    Starting in 2004, a medical school gross anatomy course faced with a 30% cut in hours went through an extensive redesign, which transformed a traditional dissection course into a course with a clinical focus, learning societies, and extensive on-line learning support. Built into the redesign process was an extensive and ongoing assessment process, which included student focus groups, faculty development, surveys, and examinations. These assessments were used formatively, to enhance the course from year to year, and summatively, to determine how well the course was meeting the new learning objectives. The assessments from focus groups and faculty development prompted changes in support structures provided to students and the training and preparation of faculty. Survey results showed that, after student satisfaction declined the first year, satisfaction increased steadily through the fourth iteration as the course gained acceptance by students and faculty alike. There was a corresponding increase in the performance of students on course examinations. An additional examination given to students one and a half and three years after their anatomy course ended demonstrated the redesigned course's long-term effectiveness for retaining anatomical knowledge and applying it to clinical cases. Compared to students who took the original course, students who took the shorter, more clinical course performed as well, or better, on each section of the examination. We attribute these positive results to the innovative course design and to the changes made based on our formative assessment program.

  18. The postauricular fascia: classification, anatomy, and potential surgical applications.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, Kayvan; Taylor, James Paul; Le Roux, Cara M; Ashton, Mark W; Rozen, Warren M; Jones, Nicholas S; Payne, Anthony

    2014-07-01

    In recent times, there has been evolving interest in the fascial structure of the ear, especially in relation to otoplasty techniques. Although the fascial tissues used in these procedures are referred to as "postauricular/retroauricular fascia," the sparse anatomical studies that exist use this terminology to describe what is the adjacent thicker and more fibrous structure of the superficial temporal area continuous with the mastoid region, rather than the tissue actually used in these procedures which is adherent to the posterior surface of the ear. There are clear clinical differences in the properties of these two structures, and this study set out to identify the anatomical nature of these differences, looking in detail at the anatomy and vascularity of the fascia directly posterior and adherent to the ear itself, highlighting its unique properties, and how it interfaces with the rest of the fascia. We provide a nomenclature to differentiate the fascia adherent to the posterior of the ear (the intrinsic postauricular fascia) from the more fibrous tissues continuous with the scalp fascia (the extrinsic postauricular fascia). Clinical applications for the fascia are suggested based on the vascularity and anatomy described, and our clinical experience.

  19. Correlation of Barometer Pressure and Incidence of Cerebrovascular Insult

    PubMed Central

    Slatina, Enes; Music, Miralem; Babic, nermina; Pleho –Kapic, Amna; Dervisevic, Senad; Salibasic, Mirhan; Mujaric, ekrema

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The intention of this work is to research whether the link between the barometer pressure and the cerebrovascular insult (CVI) exists. The stroke is the first cause of non-traumatic disability and third illness by mortality in the majority of available relevant literature. Goals: Goal of the sudy was to research all the cases of the patients who suffered from the acute stroke in the Canton of Sarajevo and those who were treated in the pre-hospital phase by Emergency Medical Institute staff and their working diagnosis was established as CVI ac. Material and methods: The criteria in the research were established for inclusion and exclusion of cases. The days with and without CVI cases were compared with the meteorological data obtained from the Hydro-meteorological Institute of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina . Since the approval was requested and obtained from the Hydro-meteorological Institute, all the meteorological data could be compared. The meteorological data comprise the barometer pressure measuring every day at 7 h, 14 h and 21 h. Results and discussion: In the retrospective study, there will be followed, during three years (2004, 2005 and 2006), the cases of the patients who suffered from the stroke, and, the emergency medical care was offered to them by the side of the Emergency Medical Institute of Canton of Sarajevo staff. All the cases in the Canton of Sarajevo were followed regardless of the place of incidence: whether the help was offered in Institute’s outpatient departments, patient’s flat or at public place. Due to the extensiveness of data (in the analysis comprising three years, there was the total of 1930 cases), the test of normal distribution was used. Since it was about the pre-hospital research, the acute stroke was looked at generally without division by types. The certain diagnostics by types can only be established in the hospital. Conclusion: The results in the research indicate that the extreme values of barometer

  20. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  1. Effect of Visual-Spatial Ability on Medical Students' Performance in a Gross Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lufler, Rebecca S.; Zumwalt, Ann C.; Romney, Carla A.; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to mentally manipulate objects in three dimensions is essential to the practice of many clinical medical specialties. The relationship between this type of visual-spatial ability and performance in preclinical courses such as medical gross anatomy is poorly understood. This study determined if visual-spatial ability is associated with…

  2. Application of the One-Minute Preceptor Technique by Novice Teachers in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lap Ki; Yang, Jian; Irby, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The one-minute preceptor (OMP) was originally developed in the ambulatory care setting as a time-efficient teaching technique for learner-centered clinical training. There are also possible advantages of using the OMP in the gross anatomy laboratory. However, in a previous study it was found that providing training to experienced gross anatomy…

  3. Physician Opinions about an Anatomy Core Curriculum: A Case for Medical Imaging and Vertical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsbon, Courtney P.; Kaiser, Rebecca S.; Ross, Callum F.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical anatomy curricula must provide medical students with the knowledge needed in a variety of medical and surgical specialties. But do physicians within specialties agree about what anatomical knowledge is most important in their practices? And, what is the common core of anatomical knowledge deemed essential by physicians in different…

  4. Andreas Vesalius on the anatomy and function of the lower thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Biesbrouck, Maurits; Vanden Berghe, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Some remarkable statements made by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) in his principal work De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543) about the anatomy and function of the lower thoracic vertebrae are discussed in the light of information from the literature. Their accuracy is evaluated on the basis of several pieces of anatomical evidence and clinical cases.

  5. Medical Students' Attitudes toward the Anatomy Dissection Room in Relation to Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plaisant, Odile; Courtois, Robert; Toussaint, Paule Joanne; Mendelsohn, Gerald A.; John, Oliver P.; Delmas, Vincent; Moxham, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the personalities of medical students could enable medical educators to formulate strategies for the best development of academic and clinical competencies. In this article, we focus on the experience of students in the anatomy dissecting room. While there have been many attempts to evaluate the emotional responses of medical…

  6. [Association between periodontal disease and cerebrovascular disease. A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Leira, Yago; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Juan; Castillo, José

    2015-07-01

    Periodontal disease and cerebrovascular disease are two of the most prevalent processes in elderly people. Various studies have shown an association between them, although some methodological differences exist and this difficult the data interpretation. The aim of this paper is to conduct a critical review of the studies published about this association. Eleven prospective studies and 11 retrospective studies are included in this review. We analyse the different methodological outcomes (study population, periodontal diagnosis, cerebrovascular disease definition, adjusted outcomes and odds ratio/relative risk). Furthermore, we review several pathogenic mechanisms implicated in the progression and the relationship between both processes.

  7. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  8. Epidemiology of non-fatal cerebrovascular stroke and transient ischemic attacks in Al Quseir, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa MA; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Abdel-Hakeem, Nabil M; Rageh, Tarek A; Badry, Reda; Kandil, Mahmoud R

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Stroke is a medical emergency that can cause permanent neurological damage, complications, and disability. We aim to determine the epidemiology of non-fatal cerebrovascular stroke (CVS) and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in Al Quseir City, Red Sea, Egypt. Methods The total population (n=33,285) was screened through a door to door study by three specialists of neurology and 15 female social workers (for demographic data collection). All suspected stroke patients were subjected to a full clinical examination, computerized tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their brain, blood sugar, lipogram, serum uric acid, complete blood cells, blood urea, and serum creatinine, as well as evaluated by Barthel Index and Scandinavian Stroke Scale. Carotid doppler, echocardiography, and thyroid functions were done for selected cases. Results CVS was recorded among 130 patients out of 19,848 subjects aged 20 years and more, yielding a total prevalence of 6.55/1,000 population. From June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011, 36 patients were recorded to have stroke within 1-year, yielding an incidence rate of 1.81/1,000. Prevalence and incidence rates were higher among males than females, and both indices increased steadily with advancing age to reach the highest prevalence (37.02/1,000) and incidence rate (9.5/1,000) among aged persons 60 years and more. Conclusion The prevalence of non-fatal stroke in Al Quseir city (6.55/1,000) was at the lower range of that recorded in developing countries (5–10/1,000) and slightly higher than that recorded in industrialized countries (5/1,000 population). Ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke. The prevalence of TIAs was 0.15/1,000. PMID:24293992

  9. Lack of CAR impacts neuronal function and cerebrovascular integrity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boussadia, Baddreddine; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Rousset, Marie-Claude; de Bock, Frederic; Lassere, Frederic; Ghosh, Chaitali; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Janigro, Damir; Marchi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a group of transcription factors emerging as players in normal and pathological CNS development. Clinically, an association between the constitutive androstane NR (CAR) and cognitive impairment was proposed, however never experimentally investigated. We wished to test the hypothesis that the impact of CAR on neurophysiology and behavior is underlined by cerebrovascular-neuronal modifications. We have used CAR(-/-) C57BL/6 and wild type mice and performed a battery of behavioral tests (recognition, memory, motor coordination, learning and anxiety) as well as longitudinal video-electroencephalographic recordings (EEG). Brain cell morphology was assessed using 2-photon or electron microscopy and fluorescent immunohistochemistry. We observed recognition memory impairment and increased anxiety-like behavior in CAR(-/-) mice, while locomotor activity was not affected. Concomitantly to memory deficits, EEG monitoring revealed a decrease in 3.5-7Hz waves during the awake/exploration and sleep periods. Behavioral and EEG abnormalities in CAR(-/-) mice mirrored structural changes, including tortuous fronto-parietal penetrating vessels. At the cellular level we found reduced ZO-1, but not CLDN5, tight junction protein expression in cortical and hippocampal isolated microvessel preparations. Interestingly, the neurotoxin kainic acid, when injected peripherally, provoked a rapid onset of generalized convulsions in CAR(-/-) as compared to WT mice, supporting the hypothesis of vascular permeability. The morphological phenotype of CAR(-/-) mice also included some modifications of GFAP/IBA1 glial cells in the parenchymal or adjacent to collagen-IV(+) or FITC(+) microvessels. Neuronal defects were also observed including increased cortical NEUN(+) cell density, hippocampal granule cell dispersion and increased NPY immunoreactivity in the CA1 region in CAR(-/-) mice. The latter may contribute to the in vivo phenotype. Our results indicate that behavioral

  10. Team-based learning in anatomy: an efficient, effective, and economical strategy.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Nagaswami S; DeFouw, David O; Compton, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) strategy is being adopted in medical education to implement interactive small group learning. We have modified classical TBL to fit our curricular needs and approach. Anatomy lectures were replaced with TBL that required preparation of assigned content specific discussion topics (in the text referred as "discussion topics"), an individual self-assessment quiz (IRAT), analysis of the discussion topics, and then the team retaking the same quiz (GRAT) for discussion and deeper learning. Embryology and clinical correlations were given as lectures. Unit examinations consisted of graded IRAT and GRAT. The National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Examination was the comprehensive final examination. To evaluate the effect of TBL on student performance we compared the departmental and NBME subject examination scores between the traditional and TBL curricula. We collected five years of data on student performance in TBL-based anatomy and lecture-based preclinical courses. Our results show that departmental and NBME subject examination scores for TBL-based anatomy were higher than those for lecture-based anatomy. We subsequently compared average NBME scores for anatomy with those in other preclinical courses that were lecture-based. Average NBME anatomy scores were significantly higher than those for all the lecture-based preclinical courses. Since the introduction of TBL in anatomy, student performance has progressively improved in the NBME subject examination. Students perceived TBL as a motivator to be a responsible team member and to contribute to collective learning by the team. Further, it reinforced self-directed learning and fostered an appreciation for peer respect. Interestingly, these perceptions were uniform irrespective of student course performance.

  11. Radiology of external ear: indications, normal anatomy, and pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Mazón, M; Pont, E; Montesinos, P; Carreres-Polo, J; Más-Estellés, F

    2016-01-01

    The external ear is accessible to direct examination; the clinical history and otoscopy are sufficient to diagnose and treat most diseases of the external ear. We aim to describe the normal anatomy of the external ear, specify the indications for imaging tests, and review the clinical and radiological manifestations of the most common diseases affecting the external ear. We classify these diseases according to their origin into congenital, inflammatory, infectious, or traumatic disease or benign bone tumors or malignant tumors. Imaging does not play an important role in diseases of the external ear, but in certain clinical scenarios it can be crucial for reaching a concrete diagnosis and establishing the best treatment. Computed tomography is the first-choice technique for most diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging complements computed tomography and makes it possible to differentiate among different tissue types and to evaluate the extension of disease accurately.

  12. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  13. Molecular Anatomy of Palate Development.

    PubMed

    Potter, Andrew S; Potter, S Steven

    2015-01-01

    The NIH FACEBASE consortium was established in part to create a central resource for craniofacial researchers. One purpose is to provide a molecular anatomy of craniofacial development. To this end we have used a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA-Seq to define the gene expression programs driving development of the murine palate. We focused on the E14.5 palate, soon after medial fusion of the two palatal shelves. The palate was divided into multiple compartments, including both medial and lateral, as well as oral and nasal, for both the anterior and posterior domains. A total of 25 RNA-Seq datasets were generated. The results provide a comprehensive view of the region specific expression of all transcription factors, growth factors and receptors. Paracrine interactions can be inferred from flanking compartment growth factor/receptor expression patterns. The results are validated primarily through very high concordance with extensive previously published gene expression data for the developing palate. In addition selected immunostain validations were carried out. In conclusion, this report provides an RNA-Seq based atlas of gene expression patterns driving palate development at microanatomic resolution. This FACEBASE resource is designed to promote discovery by the craniofacial research community.

  14. Functional anatomy of the spine.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Among other important features of the functional anatomy of the spine, described in this chapter, is the remarkable difference between the design and function of the cervical spine and that of the lumbar spine. In the cervical spine, the atlas serves to transmit the load of the head to the typical cervical vertebrae. The axis adapts the suboccipital region to the typical cervical spine. In cervical intervertebrtal discs the anulus fibrosus is not circumferential but is crescentic, and serves as an interosseous ligament in the saddle joint between vertebral bodies. Cervical vertebrae rotate and translate in the sagittal plane, and rotate in the manner of an inverted cone, across an oblique coronal plane. The cervical zygapophysial joints are the most common source of chronic neck pain. By contrast, lumbar discs are well designed to sustain compression loads, but rely on posterior elements to limit axial rotation. Internal disc disruption is the most common basis for chronic low-back pain. Spinal muscles are arranged systematically in prevertebral and postvertebral groups. The intrinsic elements of the spine are innervated by the dorsal rami of the spinal nerves, and by the sinuvertebral nerves. Little modern research has been conducted into the structure of the thoracic spine, or the causes of thoracic spinal pain.

  15. Hair anatomy for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Sperling, L C

    1991-07-01

    The rational evaluation of hair disorders requires familiarity with follicular anatomy. Hair structure can be easily examined by studying clipped hair shafts, entire hairs gently pulled or forcibly plucked from the scalp, and scalp biopsies (sectioned vertically or transversely). Anatomic features will be different depending on whether a given hair is in the anagen, catagen, or telogen phase. Follicle size will also vary, from the minute vellus hair to the long, thick terminal hair. Each follicle can be divided into distinct regions--bulb, suprabulbar zone, isthmus, and infundibulum. Activity growing (anagen) hairs are characterized by a hair matrix surrounding a dermal papilla; inner and outer root sheaths are present and well developed. A catagen hair can be identified by its markedly thickened vitreous layer and fibrous root sheath, which surrounds an epithelial column; above this column, the presumptive club forms. A telogen hair is distinguished by its fully keratinized club, which is surrounded by an epithelial sac. Below this lies the secondary hair germ and condensed dermal papilla, waiting for the mysterious signal that initiates a new life cycle.

  16. Brain anatomy in Diplura (Hexapoda)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the past decade neuroanatomy has proved to be a valuable source of character systems that provide insights into arthropod relationships. Since the most detailed description of dipluran brain anatomy dates back to Hanström (1940) we re-investigated the brains of Campodea augens and Catajapyx aquilonaris with modern neuroanatomical techniques. The analyses are based on antibody staining and 3D reconstruction of the major neuropils and tracts from semi-thin section series. Results Remarkable features of the investigated dipluran brains are a large central body, which is organized in nine columns and three layers, and well developed mushroom bodies with calyces receiving input from spheroidal olfactory glomeruli in the deutocerebrum. Antibody staining against a catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (DC0) was used to further characterize the mushroom bodies. The japygid Catajapyx aquilonaris possesses mushroom bodies which are connected across the midline, a unique condition within hexapods. Conclusions Mushroom body and central body structure shows a high correspondence between japygids and campodeids. Some unique features indicate that neuroanatomy further supports the monophyly of Diplura. In a broader phylogenetic context, however, the polarization of brain characters becomes ambiguous. The mushroom bodies and the central body of Diplura in several aspects resemble those of Dicondylia, suggesting homology. In contrast, Archaeognatha completely lack mushroom bodies and exhibit a central body organization reminiscent of certain malacostracan crustaceans. Several hypotheses of brain evolution at the base of the hexapod tree are discussed. PMID:23050723

  17. The LiverAnatomyExplorer: a WebGL-based surgical teaching tool.

    PubMed

    Birr, Steven; Mönch, Jeanette; Sommerfeld, Dirk; Preim, Uta; Preim, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The LiverAnatomyExplorer is a real-time surgical teaching tool based on state-of-the-art Web technologies such as SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics), X3D (Extensible3D), and WebGL (Web Graphics Library). Unlike other medical e-learning systems, the LiverAnatomyExplorer combines traditional clinical 2D imagery with interactive Web-based 3D models derived from patient-specific image data. The tool is enhanced by surgical videos, a self-assessment tool, and an online authoring tool with which instructors can manage the presented case studies and create multiple-choice quizzes.

  18. The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Michael; Demeusy, Valentin; Kikinis, Ron

    2017-01-01

    The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser’s functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.

  19. The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases.

    PubMed

    Halle, Michael; Demeusy, Valentin; Kikinis, Ron

    2017-01-01

    The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser's functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.

  20. Contribution to the anatomical nomenclature concerning general anatomy and anatomical variations.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Musil, Vladimir; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-09-01

    Nomenclature of the general and variant anatomy belongs to the most neglected parts of the Latin anatomical nomenclature in Terminologia Anatomica. Although many important small structures are included in Terminologia Anatomica, when describing and teaching particular anatomy of any part of the human body, the general terms are necessary, such as planes, lines and flexion grooves. Moreover, Terminologia Anatomica contains only 149 terms of variant structures, enlisted in the parentheses to differentiate them from constant ones. They are only a rather representative selection and some more should be added, both from the educational and clinical point of view. The authors present some terms, completed with their definitions or explanations concerning the general and variant anatomy to evoke broader discussion on this topic which should issue in incorporation of proposed terms (or their equivalents) into the Terminologia Anatomica.

  1. Comprehensive Modeling and Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology from CT Imaging and Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guanglei; Sun, Peng; Zhou, Haoyin; Ha, Seongmin; Hartaigh, Briain O; Truong, Quynh A; Min, James K

    2017-02-01

    In clinical cardiology, both anatomy and physiology are needed to diagnose cardiac pathologies. CT imaging and computer simulations provide valuable and complementary data for this purpose. However, it remains challenging to gain useful information from the large amount of high-dimensional diverse data. The current tools are not adequately integrated to visualize anatomic and physiologic data from a complete yet focused perspective. We introduce a new computer-aided diagnosis framework, which allows for comprehensive modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy and physiology from CT imaging data and computer simulations, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease. The following visual information is presented: (1) Anatomy from CT imaging: geometric modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy, including four heart chambers, left and right ventricular outflow tracts, and coronary arteries; (2) Function from CT imaging: motion modeling, strain calculation, and visualization of four heart chambers; (3) Physiology from CT imaging: quantification and visualization of myocardial perfusion and contextual integration with coronary artery anatomy; (4) Physiology from computer simulation: computation and visualization of hemodynamics (e.g., coronary blood velocity, pressure, shear stress, and fluid forces on the vessel wall). Substantially, feedback from cardiologists have confirmed the practical utility of integrating these features for the purpose of computer-aided diagnosis of ischemic heart disease.

  2. Near-peer teaching in an anatomy course with a low faculty-to-student ratio.

    PubMed

    Durán, Claudia Elisa Pámanes; Bahena, Eduardo Navarro; Rodríguez, María de Los Ángeles García; Baca, Guillermo Jacobo; Uresti, Antonio Sánchez; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; López, Santos Guzmán

    2012-01-01

    Near-peer teaching is an educational format which utilizes tutors who are more advanced in a curriculum's content to supervise students' activities and to act as instructors in laboratory settings. This format is often used in anatomy laboratory courses. The goal of the present study is to describe the design and implementation of near-peer teaching in an anatomy course and to evaluate students' perceptions of the program. A total of 700 students were registered for this anatomy course which employed near-peer instructors. Of enrolled students, 558 (79.7%) agreed to participate in this study. In general, the practical section (e.g., the clinical hour, image-based anatomy session, and gross anatomy laboratory) of the course was viewed more favorably compared to the theory section (54.8%, n = 306), with dissection and prosection in the laboratory rated as the most valued experiences (34.9%, n = 195). Near-peer teaching is a viable option that satisfies the demands of modern curricula using small groups. This format stimulates learning within courses that have large numbers of students and low faculty-to-student ratios.

  3. Commentary: the importance of musculoskeletal medicine and anatomy in medical education.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles S; Ahn, Christine S

    2010-03-01

    Medical schools in the United States have continued to demonstrate deficiencies in musculoskeletal education. In response to the findings of numerous studies and to the objectives of the U.S. Bone and Joint Decade (an international collaborative movement sanctioned by the United Nations and the World Health Organization for the purpose of promoting awareness of musculoskeletal disease), several institutions, including Harvard Medical School, have reassessed the preclinical musculoskeletal curriculum at their respective medical schools. A cross-sectional survey at Harvard in 2004 found that students lacked clinical confidence in dealing with the musculoskeletal system. In addition, only one quarter of the graduating class of medical students passed a nationally validated exam in basic musculoskeletal competency. In 2005, 33 total hours of musculoskeletal medicine were added to the musculoskeletal blocks of the preclinical anatomy, pathophysiology, and physical examination courses. Alongside this movement toward more musculoskeletal education, there has been continued debate over the relevance and cost-effectiveness of cadaveric and surface anatomy labs. With the advent of advanced imaging technology, some argue that dissection anatomy is outdated and labor-intensive, whereas three-dimensional images are more accessible and time-effective for today's students. However, knowledge of anatomy is a critical foundation to learning musculoskeletal medicine. Thus, making room for more musculoskeletal curriculum time by cutting out cadaveric anatomy labs may ultimately be counterproductive.

  4. The impact of gross anatomy on the future head and neck surgeon.

    PubMed

    Archibald, David J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2009-01-01

    Gross anatomy is not only a rite of passage for medical students as they enter the world of practicing medicine but may also be an unrecognized fork in the road in their pursuit of choosing a medical specialty. Otolaryngology: head and neck surgery tends to be poorly represented in medical school curriculum, often only offered as an elective rotation. However, head and neck anatomy remains a constant in most medical schools, granting some exposure to otolaryngology whether students realize it or not. A common thread among most head and neck surgeons in their decision to pursue this surgical specialty is a love for head and neck anatomy, spawned in that first year gross anatomy course. This first and potentially only exposure to otolaryngology should be optimized, as it can have a profound effect in the selection of otolaryngology as a specialty. This introduction can be facilitated by (1) inviting otolaryngology residents to assist during the dissection of the head and neck, (2) soliciting otolaryngology attending physicians to provide clinical correlation lectures, and (3) anatomy professors should identify students who excel in the head and neck portion of the curriculum and direct them towards otolaryngology mentors. There may be a great missed opportunity if a career in otolaryngology is not discussed with students during the dissection of the head and neck.

  5. A digital interactive human brain atlas based on Chinese visible human datasets for anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyu; Ran, Xu; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Tan, Liwen; Qiu, Mingguo

    2014-01-01

    As we know, the human brain is one of the most complicated organs in the human body, which is the key and difficult point in neuroanatomy and sectional anatomy teaching. With the rapid development and extensive application of imaging technology in clinical diagnosis, doctors are facing higher and higher requirement on their anatomy knowledge. Thus, to cultivate medical students to meet the needs of medical development today and to improve their ability to read and understand radiographic images have become urgent challenges for the medical teachers. In this context, we developed a digital interactive human brain atlas based on the Chinese visible human datasets for anatomy teaching (available for free download from http://www.chinesevisiblehuman.com/down/DHBA.rar). The atlas simultaneously provides views in all 3 primary planes of section. The main structures of the human brain have been anatomically labeled in all 3 views. It is potentially useful for anatomy browsing, user self-testing, and automatic student assessment. In a word, it is interactive, 3D, user friendly, and free of charge, which can provide a new, intuitive means for anatomy teaching.

  6. Comprehensive Modeling and Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology from CT Imaging and Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Zhou, Haoyin; Ha, Seongmin; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Truong, Quynh A.; Min, James K.

    2016-01-01

    In clinical cardiology, both anatomy and physiology are needed to diagnose cardiac pathologies. CT imaging and computer simulations provide valuable and complementary data for this purpose. However, it remains challenging to gain useful information from the large amount of high-dimensional diverse data. The current tools are not adequately integrated to visualize anatomic and physiologic data from a complete yet focused perspective. We introduce a new computer-aided diagnosis framework, which allows for comprehensive modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy and physiology from CT imaging data and computer simulations, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease. The following visual information is presented: (1) Anatomy from CT imaging: geometric modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy, including four heart chambers, left and right ventricular outflow tracts, and coronary arteries; (2) Function from CT imaging: motion modeling, strain calculation, and visualization of four heart chambers; (3) Physiology from CT imaging: quantification and visualization of myocardial perfusion and contextual integration with coronary artery anatomy; (4) Physiology from computer simulation: computation and visualization of hemodynamics (e.g., coronary blood velocity, pressure, shear stress, and fluid forces on the vessel wall). Substantially, feedback from cardiologists have confirmed the practical utility of integrating these features for the purpose of computer-aided diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. PMID:26863663

  7. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, W. Tyler Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  8. Towards an Elastographic Atlas of Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Fehlner, Andreas; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral viscoelastic constants can be measured in a noninvasive, image-based way by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for the detection of neurological disorders. However, MRE brain maps of viscoelastic constants are still limited by low spatial resolution. Here we introduce three-dimensional multifrequency MRE of the brain combined with a novel reconstruction algorithm based on a model-free multifrequency inversion for calculating spatially resolved viscoelastic parameter maps of the human brain corresponding to the dynamic range of shear oscillations between 30 and 60 Hz. Maps of two viscoelastic parameters, the magnitude and the phase angle of the complex shear modulus, |G*| and φ, were obtained and normalized to group templates of 23 healthy volunteers in the age range of 22 to 72 years. This atlas of the anatomy of brain mechanics reveals a significant contrast in the stiffness parameter |G*| between different anatomical regions such as white matter (WM; 1.252±0.260 kPa), the corpus callosum genu (CCG; 1.104±0.280 kPa), the thalamus (TH; 1.058±0.208 kPa) and the head of the caudate nucleus (HCN; 0.649±0.101 kPa). φ, which is sensitive to the lossy behavior of the tissue, was in the order of CCG (1.011±0.172), TH (1.037±0.173), CN (0.906±0.257) and WM (0.854±0.169). The proposed method provides the first normalized maps of brain viscoelasticity with anatomical details in subcortical regions and provides useful background data for clinical applications of cerebral MRE. PMID:23977148

  9. Surgical anatomy of selected physes.

    PubMed

    Birch, J G; Herring, J A; Wenger, D R

    1984-03-01

    Recent advances have allowed successful resection of partial physeal arrest in children whose physes have been damaged by trauma, infection, irradiation, and other causes. Underlying physeal anatomy and the relationship of overlying structures to the physis are vital in preparing for precise surgical excision of the bony bar. The cadaver of a 5-year-old child was dissected with special emphasis on the surgical accessibility of the physes and adjacent metaphyses of the distal radius, distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal tibia and fibula. The physis of the distal radius was found to be completely extracapsular. The synovial reflection of the suprapatellar pouch obscured portions of the anterior, medial, and lateral aspects of the distal femur. The capsular attachment extended to the level of the physis anteriorly and posteriorly. The capsular attachment to the medial distal femur was more distal and peripheral than to the lateral. The insertion of the adductor magnus tendon medially and the intermuscular septum laterally served as landmarks to the level of the physis. The physis of the proximal tibia was completely extracapsular. The posterior aspects of the physis and the metaphysis were obscured in the midline by the popliteus muscle, and this posterolateral region was the least surgically accessible of any of the regions studied. The distal tibial physis was entirely extracapsular. The anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligaments inserted across the anterolateral and posterolateral aspects of the physis of the distal fibula. This physis on its medial aspect lay intraarticularly at the level of the articular cartilage of the distal tibia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Restructuring a basic science course for core competencies: an example from anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Jeremy K; Lachman, Nirusha; Camp, Christopher L; Chen, Laura P; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-09-01

    Medical schools revise their curricula in order to develop physicians best skilled to serve the public's needs. To ensure a smooth transition to residency programs, undergraduate medical education is often driven by the six core competencies endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME): patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning, interpersonal skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. Recent curricular redesign at Mayo Medical School provided an opportunity to restructure anatomy education and integrate radiology with first-year gross and developmental anatomy. The resulting 6-week (120-contact-hour) human structure block provides students with opportunities to learn gross anatomy through dissection, radiologic imaging, and embryologic correlation. We report more than 20 educational interventions from the human structure block that may serve as a model for incorporating the ACGME core competencies into basic science and early medical education. The block emphasizes clinically-oriented anatomy, invites self- and peer-evaluation, provides daily formative feedback through an audience response system, and employs team-based learning. The course includes didactic briefing sessions and roles for students as teachers, leaders, and collaborators. Third-year medical students serve as teaching assistants. With its clinical focus and competency-based design, the human structure block connects basic science with best-practice clinical medicine.

  11. Ligament of the head of femur: A comprehensive review of its anatomy, embryology, and potential function.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Vivek; Woodley, Stephanie J; Nicholson, Helen D

    2016-03-01

    The functional significance of the ligament of the head of femur (LHF), or ligamentum teres has often been debated. Having gained recent attention in clinical practice, it is suggested to partly provide some mechanical stability to the hip joint. However, the anatomy of this ligament is not well studied. This paper systematically reviews the anatomy of the LHF with the aim of exploring our current understanding of this structure and identifying any gaps in knowledge regarding its morphology and function. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, ProQuest, Web of Science, and Scopus databases was undertaken and relevant data extracted, analyzed. A total of 69 references were obtained, that included 53 full text articles, three published abstracts, and 13 textbooks. Many publications related to clinical studies (n = 11) rather than gross anatomy (n = 7), with one report on variation of the LHF. Considerable inconsistency in the naming and description of the LHF morphology was observed. Variable attachment sites were reported except for the acetabular notch, transverse acetabular ligament, and the femoral fovea. Presence and patency of the ligamental arteries supplying the head of the femur and their exact location were variably described and were often incomplete. The LHF is believed to be taught in extreme hip adduction, but there is little evidence to support this. In conclusions, further investigation of the anatomy of the LHF is recommended, particularly to clarify its mechanical role, innervation, and vascular contribution to the developing and adult femur, so to better inform clinical practice.

  12. Students’ perceptions of anatomy across the undergraduate problem-based learning medical curriculum: a phenomenographical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To get insight in how theoretical knowledge is transformed into clinical skills, important information may arise from mapping the development of anatomical knowledge during the undergraduate medical curriculum. If we want to gain a better understanding of teaching and learning in anatomy, it may be pertinent to move beyond the question of how and consider also the what, why and when of anatomy education. Methods A purposive sample of 78 medical students from the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th year of a PBL curriculum participated in 4 focus groups. Each group came together twice, and all meetings were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with template analysis using a phenomenographical approach. Results Five major topics emerged and are described covering the students’ perceptions on their anatomy education and anatomical knowledge: 1) motivation to study anatomy, 2) the relevance of anatomical knowledge, 3) assessment of anatomical knowledge, 4) students’ (in)security about their anatomical knowledge and 5) the use of anatomical knowledge in clinical practice. Conclusions Results indicated that a PBL approach in itself was not enough to ensure adequate learning of anatomy, and support the hypothesis that educational principles like time-on-task and repetition, have a stronger impact on students’ perceived and actual anatomical knowledge than the educational approach underpinning a curriculum. For example, students state that repetitive studying of the subject increases retention of knowledge to a greater extent than stricter assessment, and teaching in context enhances motivation and transfer. Innovations in teaching and assessment, like spiral curriculum, teaching in context, teaching for transfer and assessment for learning (rewarding understanding and higher order cognitive skills), are required to improve anatomy education. PMID:24252155

  13. Medical student preferences for self-directed study resources in gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Choi-Lundberg, Derek L; Low, Tze Feng; Patman, Phillip; Turner, Paul; Sinha, Sankar N

    2016-01-01

    Gross anatomy instruction in medical curricula involve a range of resources and activities including dissection, prosected specimens, anatomical models, radiological images, surface anatomy, textbooks, atlases, and computer-assisted learning (CAL). These resources and activities are underpinned by the expectation that students will actively engage in self-directed study (SDS) to enhance their knowledge and understanding of anatomy. To gain insight into preclinical versus clinical medical students' preferences for SDS resources for learning gross anatomy, and whether these vary on demographic characteristics and attitudes toward anatomy, students were surveyed at two Australian medical schools, one undergraduate-entry and the other graduate-entry. Lecture/tutorial/practical notes were ranked first by 33% of 156 respondents (mean rank ± SD, 2.48 ± 1.38), textbooks by 26% (2.62 ± 1.35), atlases 20% (2.80 ± 1.44), videos 10% (4.34 ± 1.68), software 5% (4.78 ± 1.50), and websites 4% (4.24 ± 1.34). Among CAL resources, Wikipedia was ranked highest. The most important factor in selecting CAL resources was cost (ranked first by 46%), followed by self-assessment, ease of use, alignment with curriculum, and excellent graphics (each 6-9%). Compared with preclinical students, clinical students ranked software and Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy higher and felt radiological images were more important in selecting CAL resources. Along with other studies reporting on the quality, features, and impact on learning of CAL resources, the diversity of students' preferences and opinions on usefulness and ease of use reported here can help guide faculty in selecting and recommending a range of CAL and other resources to their students to support their self-directed study.

  14. [Anatomia practica: features from the history of early patho-anatomy].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Olaf Myhre

    2002-01-01

    Since the anatomy school of Alexandria during the fourth og third century before Christ dissection of the human body seems not to have been practiced until late Medieval or early Renaissance period, undoubtedly due to ethical and religious aversions. The teaching of anatomy was based on Galen using animal dissection. In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, however, anatomical examinations of the human body slowly began, seemingly for the purpose of describing both the normal structure and the abnormal structure caused by diseases, maldevelopment or trauma. This latter branch of anatomy was called practical, medical or correlative anatomy and corresponds to what we today name as patho-anatomy. Antonio Benivieni of Florence (1442-1502) is the first one to collect (and publish) a series of clinical observations some of which could be correlated to post mortem findings. It is unknown, however, whether the autopsies were performed by himself; and there is no mentioning of technique or circumstances for sectioning. Studies of the dead body by incision for the purpose of displaying diseased organs (autopsy) seem to have been an accepted practice for which relatives consented in those days. Other medical doctors in the years to follow, as for instance Fernel (1485-1558) in Paris, Eustachius (1524-1574) in Rome, Felix Plater (1536-1614) in Basle and Th. Bartholin (1616-1680) in Copenhagen have used the anatomical method for the study of diseases. Further, Schenck (1530-1598) in Freiburg and Bonet (1620-1689) in Genéva collected and published large series of clinical symptoms which had been related to post mortem findings dating back to ancient observers. This is the scientific background for anatomists as Morgagni, Lieutaud, Baillie, Bichât and others who founded the morbid anatomy on which the study of disease flourished in the classical patho-anatomical era of the nineteenth century with names as Rokitanski and Virchow.

  15. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions: Etiology, Treatment Options and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke movement disorders are uncommon, but comprise an important part of secondary movement disorders. These exert variable and heterogeneous clinical courses according to the stroke lesion and its temporal relationships. Moreover, the predominant stroke symptoms hinder a proper diagnosis in clinical practice. This article describes the etiology, treatment options and prognosis of post-stroke movement disorders. PMID:27240807

  16. Cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected individuals in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Belinda; Cysique, Lucette A; Markus, Romesh; Brew, Bruce J

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected individuals mostly in developed countries has dramatically improved their prognosis. In such advantaged regions of the world, therefore, many patients are now transitioning from middle into older age, with altered patterns of disease. While previously a rare complication of HIV infection, cerebrovascular disease (particularly that associated with atherosclerosis) is becoming relatively more important in this treated group of individuals. This review summarises the evidence regarding the shifting epidemiology of cerebrovascular diseases affecting HIV-infected individuals. While outlining the association between HIV infection and AIDS and cerebrovascular disease, as well as opportunistic diseases and HIV-associated vasculopathies, the current evidence supporting an increase in atherosclerotic disease in treated HIV-infected individuals is emphasised and a management approach to ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected individuals is presented. Evidence supporting the important role of HAART and HIV infection itself in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease is discussed, together with preventative approaches to this increasingly important disease process as the population ages. Finally, a discussion regarding the significant association between cerebrovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder is presented, together with possible mechanisms behind this relationship.

  17. Central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity: a rebreathing demonstration illustrating integrative human physiology.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Christina M; Skow, Rachel J; Tymko, Michael M; Boulet, Lindsey M; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D; Ainslie, Philip N; Lemieux, Chantelle C M; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    One of the most effective ways of engaging students of physiology and medicine is through laboratory demonstrations and case studies that combine 1) the use of equipment, 2) problem solving, 3) visual representations, and 4) manipulation and interpretation of data. Depending on the measurements made and the type of test, laboratory demonstrations have the added benefit of being able to show multiple organ system integration. Many research techniques can also serve as effective demonstrations of integrative human physiology. The "Duffin" hyperoxic rebreathing test is often used in research settings as a test of central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. We aimed to demonstrate the utility of the hyperoxic rebreathing test for both respiratory and cerebrovascular responses to increases in CO2 and illustrate the integration of the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems. In the present article, methods such as spirometry, respiratory gas analysis, and transcranial Doppler ultrasound are described, and raw data traces can be adopted for discussion in a tutorial setting. If educators have these instruments available, instructions on how to carry out the test are provided so students can collect their own data. In either case, data analysis and quantification are discussed, including principles of linear regression, calculation of slope, the coefficient of determination (R(2)), and differences between plotting absolute versus normalized data. Using the hyperoxic rebreathing test as a demonstration of the complex interaction and integration between the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems provides senior undergraduate, graduate, and medical students with an advanced understanding of the integrative nature of human physiology.

  18. Prevalence and Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Cerebrovascular Accident in Ageing Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, J.; Rozeboom, W.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological information on age-related cardiovascular disease in people with intellectual disability (ID) is scarce and inconclusive. We compared prevalence and incidence of cerebrovascular accident and myocardial infarction over age 50 in a residential population with ID to that in a general practice population. Method: Lifetime…

  19. Cardiomyopathy and Cerebrovascular Accident Associated with Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mochizuki, Ronald M.; Richter, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 32 year-old male bodybuilder who sustained an ischemic cerebrovascular accident and showed signs of cardiomyopathy. Although no cause was found, the man had been taking steroids for 16 years. Harmful effects of steroid use are discussed. (IAH)

  20. Deconstructing Racial Differences: The Effects of Quality of Education and Cerebrovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Janessa O.; Tommet, Doug; Crane, Paul K.; Thomas, Michael L.; Claxton, Amy; Habeck, Christian; Manly, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of vascular conditions and education quality on cognition over time in White and African American (AA) older adults. Method. We investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal racial differences in executive functioning (EF) and memory composites among Whites (n = 461) and AAs (n = 118) enrolled in a cohort study. We examined whether cerebrovascular risk factors and Shipley Vocabulary scores (a proxy for education quality) accounted for racial differences. Results. On average, AAs had lower quality of education and more cerebrovascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. AAs had lower mean EF and memory at baseline, but there were no group differences in rates of decline. Cross-sectional racial differences in EF and memory persisted after controlling for vascular disease, but disappeared when controlling for Shipley Vocabulary. Discussion. Quality of education appears to be more important than cerebrovascular risk factors in explaining cross-sectional differences in memory and EF performance between White and AA older adults. Further investigation is needed regarding the relative contribution of education quality and cerebrovascular risk factors to cognitive decline among ethnically/racially diverse older adults. PMID:25098527