Science.gov

Sample records for clinical discipline diagnostic

  1. Filtering Medline for a clinical discipline: diagnostic test assessment framework

    PubMed Central

    Iansavichus, Arthur V; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Kastner, Monika; Baier, Leslie A; Shariff, Salimah Z; Rehman, Faisal; Weir, Matthew; McKibbon, K Ann; Haynes, R Brian

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a Medline filter that allows clinicians to search for articles within a clinical discipline, rather than searching the entire Medline database. Design Diagnostic test assessment framework with development and validation phases. Setting Sample of 4657 articles published in 2006 from 40 journals. Reviews Each article was manually reviewed, and 19.8% contained information relevant to the discipline of nephrology. The performance of 1 155 087 unique renal filters was compared with the manual review. Main outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of each filter. Results The best renal filters combined two to 14 terms or phrases and included the terms “kidney” with multiple endings (that is, truncation), “renal replacement therapy”, “renal dialysis”, “kidney function tests”, “renal”, “nephr” truncated, “glomerul” truncated, and “proteinuria”. These filters achieved peak sensitivities of 97.8% and specificities of 98.5%. Performance of filters remained excellent in the validation phase. Conclusions Medline can be filtered for the discipline of nephrology in a reliable manner. Storing these high performance renal filters in PubMed could help clinicians with their everyday searching. Filters can also be developed for other clinical disciplines by using similar methods. PMID:19767336

  2. Clinical telehealth across the disciplines: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Chan, Elmira; Payne, Ryan; Plohman, Kerenza; Ho, Kendall

    2008-09-01

    Videoconferencing technologies can vastly expand the reach of healthcare practitioners by providing patients (particularly those in rural/remote areas) with unprecedented access to services. While this represents a fundamental shift in the way that healthcare professionals care for their patients, very little is known about the impact of these technologies on clinical workflow practices and interprofessional collaboration. In order to better understand this, we have conducted a focused literature review, with the aim of providing policymakers, administrators, and healthcare professionals with an evidence-based foundation for decision-making. A total of 397 articles focused on videoconferencing in clinical contexts were retrieved, with 225 used to produce this literature review. Literature in the fields of medicine (including general and family practitioners and specialists in neurology, dermatology, radiology, orthopedics, rheumatology, surgery, cardiology, pediatrics, pathology, renal care, genetics, and psychiatry), nursing (including hospital-based, community-based, nursing homes, and home-based care), pharmacy, the rehabilitation sciences (including occupational and physical therapy), social work, and speech pathology were included in the review. Full utilization of the capacity of videoconferencing tools in clinical contexts requires some basic necessary technical conditions to be in place (including basic technological infrastructure, site-to-site technological compatibility, and available technical support). The available literature also elucidates key strategies for organizational readiness and technology adoption (including the development of a change management and user training plan, understanding program cost and remuneration issues, development of organizational protocols for system use, and strategies to promote interprofessional collaboration).

  3. Immunosensors in Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Justino, Celine I L; Duarte, Armando C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P

    2016-01-01

    The application of simple, cost-effective, rapid, and accurate diagnostic technologies for detection and identification of cardiac and cancer biomarkers has been a central point in the clinical area. Biosensors have been recognized as efficient alternatives for the diagnostics of various diseases due to their specificity and potential for application on real samples. The role of nanotechnology in the construction of immunological biosensors, that is, immunosensors, has contributed to the improvement of sensitivity, since they are based in the affinity between antibody and antigen. Other analytes than biomarkers such as hormones, pathogenic bacteria, and virus have also been detected by immunosensors for clinical point-of-care applications. In this chapter, we first introduced the various types of immunosensors and discussed their applications in clinical diagnostics over the recent 6 years, mainly as point-of-care technologies for the determination of cardiac and cancer biomarkers, hormones, pathogenic bacteria, and virus. The future perspectives of these devices in the field of clinical diagnostics are also evaluated. PMID:26975970

  4. Malaria diagnostics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Shott, Joseph P; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R; Stewart, V Ann

    2013-11-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests.

  5. Clinical pharmacy: is it a credible academic discipline?

    PubMed

    Walker, R

    1996-11-01

    A review of the development of clinical pharmacy in the UK reveals that its origins stem from the mid 70's when many undergraduates received short clinical attachments with physicians. The evolution was accelerated by the appointment of pharmacists who held joint university and hospital contracts. Innovative postgraduate diploma and masters programmes in clinical pharmacy established in the early 80's secured a steady supply of skilled individuals to undertake the various roles that arose. Acceptance within academia was marked by the establishment of a series of Chairs in clinical pharmacy in the late 80's and early 90's along with PhD research programmes in clinical pharmacy. As an emerging discipline the forthcoming university research assessment exercise will mark a milestone in the progress of clinical pharmacy. There is, however, concern that the assessment exercise will use criteria not entirely sympathetic to the uniqueness of clinical pharmacy. PMID:8973164

  6. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline.

    PubMed

    Shirts, Brian H; Jackson, Brian R; Baird, Geoffrey S; Baron, Jason M; Clements, Bryan; Grisson, Ricky; Hauser, Ronald George; Taylor, Julie R; Terrazas, Enrique; Brimhall, Brad

    2015-01-01

    The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the "big data" clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed.

  7. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    PubMed Central

    Shirts, Brian H.; Jackson, Brian R.; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Baron, Jason M.; Clements, Bryan; Grisson, Ricky; Hauser, Ronald George; Taylor, Julie R.; Terrazas, Enrique; Brimhall, Brad

    2015-01-01

    The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and “meaningful use.” The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the “big data” clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed. PMID:25774320

  8. Applications of Aptasensors in Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ping; Li, Wenli; Li, Jinming

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers are artificial oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) selected in vitro that bind a broad range of targets with high affinity and specificity; a sensitive yet simple method to utilize aptamers as recognition elements for the development of biosensors (aptasensors) is to transduce the signal electrochemically. So far, aptasensors have been applied to clinical diagnostics and several technologies are in development. Aptasensors will extend the limits of current clinical diagnostics. Although the potential diagnostic applications are unlimited, the most current applications are foreseen in the areas of biomarker detection, cancer clinical testing, detection of infectious microorganisms and viruses. This review attempts to list examples of the research progresses of aptamers in biosensor platforms that have been published in recent years; in particular, we display cases of aptasensors that are already incorporated in clinical diagnostics or have potential applications in clinical diagnostics. PMID:22438706

  9. Diagnostic imaging, a "parallel" discipline. Can current technology provide a reliable digital diagnostic radiology department?

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Eddleston, B

    1985-04-01

    Only recently has any detailed criticism been voiced about the practicalities of the introduction of generalised, digital, imaging complexes in diagnostic radiology. Although attendant technological problems are highlighted we argue that the fundamental causes of current difficulties are not in the generation but in the processing, filing and subsequent retrieval for display of digital image records. In the real world, looking at images is a parallel process of some complexity and so it is perhaps untimely to expect versatile handling of vast image data bases by existing computer hardware and software which, by their current nature, perform tasks serially. Successes in applying new imaging devices using digital technology, numerical methods and more easily available computing power are directing radiology towards the concept of all-digital departmental complexes. Hence a critical discussion of fundamental problems should be encouraged, to promote a thorough understanding of what may be involved (Gray et al, 1984) in following such a course. It is equally important to gain some perspective about the development possibilities for existing, commercially available equipment being offered to the medical community.

  10. The biomedical disciplines and the structure of biomedical and clinical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Nederbragt, H

    2000-11-01

    The relation between biomedical knowledge and clinical knowledge is discussed by comparing their respective structures. The knowledge of a disease as a biological phenomenon is constructed by the interaction of facts and theories from the main biomedical disciplines: epidemiology, diagnostics, clinical trial, therapy development and pathogenesis. Although these facts and theories are based on probabilities and extrapolations, the interaction provides a reliable and coherent structure, comparable to a Kuhnian paradigma. In the structure of clinical knowledge, i.e. knowledge of the patient with the disease, not only biomedical knowledge contributes to the structure but also economic and social relations, ethics and personal experience. However, the interaction between each of the participating "knowledges" in clinical knowledge is not based on mutual dependency and accumulation of different arguments from each, as in biomedical knowledge, but on competition and partial exclusion. Therefore, the structure of biomedical knowledge is different from that of clinical knowledge. This difference is used as the basis for a discussion in which the place of technology, evidence-based medicine and the gap between scientific and clinical knowledge are evaluated. PMID:11196221

  11. The biomedical disciplines and the structure of biomedical and clinical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Nederbragt, H

    2000-11-01

    The relation between biomedical knowledge and clinical knowledge is discussed by comparing their respective structures. The knowledge of a disease as a biological phenomenon is constructed by the interaction of facts and theories from the main biomedical disciplines: epidemiology, diagnostics, clinical trial, therapy development and pathogenesis. Although these facts and theories are based on probabilities and extrapolations, the interaction provides a reliable and coherent structure, comparable to a Kuhnian paradigma. In the structure of clinical knowledge, i.e. knowledge of the patient with the disease, not only biomedical knowledge contributes to the structure but also economic and social relations, ethics and personal experience. However, the interaction between each of the participating "knowledges" in clinical knowledge is not based on mutual dependency and accumulation of different arguments from each, as in biomedical knowledge, but on competition and partial exclusion. Therefore, the structure of biomedical knowledge is different from that of clinical knowledge. This difference is used as the basis for a discussion in which the place of technology, evidence-based medicine and the gap between scientific and clinical knowledge are evaluated.

  12. Inferences of clinical diagnostic reasoning and diagnostic error.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Anton E; Daniel, Erno S

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses clinical diagnostic reasoning in terms of a pattern of If/then/Therefore reasoning driven by data gathering and the inference of abduction, as defined in the present paper, and the inferences of retroduction, deduction, and induction as defined by philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce. The complex inferential reasoning driving clinical diagnosis often takes place subconsciously and so rapidly that its nature remains largely hidden from the diagnostician. Nevertheless, we propose that raising such reasoning to the conscious level reveals not its basic pattern and basic inferences, it also reveals where errors can and do occur and how such errors might be reduced or even eliminated.

  13. Inferences of clinical diagnostic reasoning and diagnostic error.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Anton E; Daniel, Erno S

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses clinical diagnostic reasoning in terms of a pattern of If/then/Therefore reasoning driven by data gathering and the inference of abduction, as defined in the present paper, and the inferences of retroduction, deduction, and induction as defined by philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce. The complex inferential reasoning driving clinical diagnosis often takes place subconsciously and so rapidly that its nature remains largely hidden from the diagnostician. Nevertheless, we propose that raising such reasoning to the conscious level reveals not its basic pattern and basic inferences, it also reveals where errors can and do occur and how such errors might be reduced or even eliminated. PMID:20093196

  14. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (168)

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yusheng Keefe; Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old Chinese male patient presented with constipation lasting five days, colicky abdominal pain, lethargy, weakness and body aches. He was able to pass flatus. Abdominal radiography showed a distended stomach causing inferior displacement of the transverse colon. Computed tomography revealed a dilated oesophagus, stomach and duodenum up to its third portion, with a short aortomesenteric distance and narrow angle. There was also consolidation in the lungs bilaterally. Based on the constellation of clinical and imaging findings, a diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome complicated by aspiration pneumonia was made. The patient was subsequently started on intravenous hydration, nasogastric tube aspiration and antibiotics. Following stabilisation of his acute condition, a nasojejunal feeding tube was inserted and a feeding plan was implemented to promote weight gain. The clinical presentation, differentials, diagnosis and treatment of superior mesenteric artery syndrome are discussed. PMID:27212130

  15. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (167)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien Jin; Aljefri, Ahmad Mohammad; Elliott, Marc Bruce; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman who had previously undergone an anatomic left total shoulder arthroplasty presented with increasing left shoulder pain and significant reduction in motion of the left shoulder joint. No evidence of prosthetic loosening or periprosthetic fracture was detected on the radiographs or fluoroscopic arthrogram images. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) images revealed evidence of loosening of the glenoid component and secondary rotator cuff failure. This case illustrates how a combination of detailed clinical history, careful physical examination and DECT arthrogram evaluation may be used to identify complications of an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27075207

  16. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (170).

    PubMed

    Shah, Mohammad Taufik Bin Mohamed; Wong, Bak Siew Steven

    2016-09-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of left posterior heel pain. Physical examination revealed a tender, inflamed and indurated posterior heel with a visible bony prominence of the posterosuperior aspect of the calcaneus. Lateral ankle radiography showed a prominent left posterosuperior calcaneal tuberosity and thickening of the distal Achilles tendon outline. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated high-signal inflammatory fluid in the retrocalcaneal bursa, increased signal intensity and thickening of the Achilles tendon, and prominence of the posterior calcaneus tuberosity with reactive marrow oedema. The findings are consistent with Haglund's deformity. The patient underwent hind foot surgery after failing a six-month course of conservative therapy. There was no further recurrence of symptoms after surgery. The clinical and radiological features of Haglund's deformity are described, including a short discussion of other causes of hind foot pain. PMID:27663032

  17. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (170)

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mohammad Taufik Bin Mohamed; Wong, Bak Siew Steven

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of left posterior heel pain. Physical examination revealed a tender, inflamed and indurated posterior heel with a visible bony prominence of the posterosuperior aspect of the calcaneus. Lateral ankle radiography showed a prominent left posterosuperior calcaneal tuberosity and thickening of the distal Achilles tendon outline. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated high-signal inflammatory fluid in the retrocalcaneal bursa, increased signal intensity and thickening of the Achilles tendon, and prominence of the posterior calcaneus tuberosity with reactive marrow oedema. The findings are consistent with Haglund’s deformity. The patient underwent hind foot surgery after failing a six-month course of conservative therapy. There was no further recurrence of symptoms after surgery. The clinical and radiological features of Haglund’s deformity are described, including a short discussion of other causes of hind foot pain. PMID:27663032

  18. The Clinical and Health Economic Value of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cheryl; Anderson, Andy; Farkas, Norbert; Batrla, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of diagnostic testing is to guide disease management in order to improve patient outcomes and patient well-being. Patient populations are rarely homogenous and accurate diagnostic tests can dissect the patient population and identify those patients with similar symptoms but very different underlying pathophysiology that will respond differently to different treatments. This stratification of patients can direct patients to appropriate treatment and is likely to result in clinical benefits for patients and economic benefits for the healthcare system. In this article we look at the clinical and economic benefits afforded by clinical laboratory diagnostics in three disease areas that represent substantial clinical and healthcare burdens to society; heart failure, Alzheimer’s disease and asthma.

  19. The Clinical and Health Economic Value of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cheryl; Anderson, Andy; Farkas, Norbert; Batrla, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of diagnostic testing is to guide disease management in order to improve patient outcomes and patient well-being. Patient populations are rarely homogenous and accurate diagnostic tests can dissect the patient population and identify those patients with similar symptoms but very different underlying pathophysiology that will respond differently to different treatments. This stratification of patients can direct patients to appropriate treatment and is likely to result in clinical benefits for patients and economic benefits for the healthcare system. In this article we look at the clinical and economic benefits afforded by clinical laboratory diagnostics in three disease areas that represent substantial clinical and healthcare burdens to society; heart failure, Alzheimer’s disease and asthma. PMID:27683481

  20. [Clinical decision making and critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process].

    PubMed

    Müller-Staub, Maria

    2006-10-01

    The daily routine requires complex thinking processes of nurses, but clinical decision making and critical thinking are underestimated in nursing. A great demand for educational measures in clinical judgement related with the diagnostic process was found in nurses. The German literature hardly describes nursing diagnoses as clinical judgements about human reactions on health problems / life processes. Critical thinking is described as an intellectual, disciplined process of active conceptualisation, application and synthesis of information. It is gained through observation, experience, reflection and communication and leads thinking and action. Critical thinking influences the aspects of clinical decision making a) diagnostic judgement, b) therapeutic reasoning and c) ethical decision making. Human reactions are complex processes and in their course, human behavior is interpreted in the focus of health. Therefore, more attention should be given to the nursing diagnostic process. This article presents the theoretical framework of the paper "Clinical decision making: Fostering critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process through case studies".

  1. Quantifying discipline practices using absolute versus relative frequencies: clinical and research implications for child welfare.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne; Kolko, David J

    2014-01-01

    In the parent intervention outcome literatures, discipline practices are generally quantified as absolute frequencies or, less commonly, as relative frequencies. These differences in methodology warrant direct comparison as they have critical implications for study results and conclusions among treatments targeted at reducing parental aggression and harsh discipline. In this study, we directly compared the absolute frequency method and the relative frequency method for quantifying physically aggressive, psychologically aggressive, and nonaggressive discipline practices. Longitudinal data over a 3-year period came from an existing data set of a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a psychosocial treatment in reducing parental physical and psychological aggression and improving child behavior (N = 139). Discipline practices (aggressive and nonaggressive) were assessed using the Conflict Tactics Scale. The two methods yielded different patterns of results, particularly for nonaggressive discipline strategies. We suggest that each method makes its own unique contribution to a more complete understanding of the association between parental aggression and intervention effects.

  2. Assembling Amperometric Biosensors for Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Belluzo, María Soledad; Ribone, María Élida; Lagier, Claudia Marina

    2008-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis and disease prevention routinely require the assessment of species determined by chemical analysis. Biosensor technology offers several benefits over conventional diagnostic analysis. They include simplicity of use, specificity for the target analyte, speed to arise to a result, capability for continuous monitoring and multiplexing, together with the potentiality of coupling to low-cost, portable instrumentation. This work focuses on the basic lines of decisions when designing electron-transfer-based biosensors for clinical analysis, with emphasis on the strategies currently used to improve the device performance, the present status of amperometric electrodes for biomedicine, and the trends and challenges envisaged for the near future.

  3. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances.

  4. Reducing Diagnostic Error with Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenes, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision…

  5. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F

    2016-04-19

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly.

  6. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J.; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S.; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M.; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M.; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly. PMID:27090146

  7. Clinically based diagnostic wax-up for optimal esthetics: the diagnostic mock-up.

    PubMed

    Simon, Harel; Magne, Pascal

    2008-05-01

    A diagnostic wax-up can enhance the predictability of treatment by modeling the desired result in wax prior to treatment. It is critical to correlate the wax-up to the patient to avoid a result that appears optimal on the casts but does not correspond to the patient's smile. This article reviews the applications and techniques for clinically based diagnostic wax-up, and focuses on the diagnostic mock-up philosophy as a means to obtain predictable esthetics and function.

  8. Cost of carrying out clinical diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, D J; Bingle, J P; Garratt, C J

    1978-01-01

    The total cost of performing diagnostic tests in a hospital laboratory during one year was assessed. The largest single item of expenditure was the cost of the salaries of the technical staff, while the cost of reagents (including radiopharmaceuticals) was relatively small. The total costs of carrying out diagnostic tests are much higher than is often recognised by those who request them. The use of relatively expensive, commercially available assay kits saves time and gives good value for money. It may be worth taking this into account when planning hospital budgets. PMID:647338

  9. Clinical Physiology: A Successful Academic and Clinical Discipline is Threatened in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arheden, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Clinical physiologists in Sweden are physicians (the majority with a PhD degree) with thorough training in system physiology and pathophysiology. They investigate patients in a functional approach and are engaged in basic and applied physiology teaching and research. In 1954, clinical physiology was founded as an independent academic and clinical…

  10. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (95). Os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Poh, A C C; Peh, W C G

    2004-03-01

    A 19-year-old boy presented to the Accident and Emergency Department after sustaining trauma to his left ankle and foot while playing soccer. The radiograph of his left ankle showed a well-corticated triangular fragment of bone posterior to the left talus, typical of an os trigonum. This accessory bone was initially mistaken for a fracture fragment and a plaster cast was applied. The term, do not touch lesion, has been coined to describe this group of benign bony entities which may be classified into three broad categories, namely: normal variants, lesions that are real but obviously benign, and lesions that are related to degenerative disease. The importance of recognising the characteristic radiographical appearances of these entities is emphasised, as the need for further imaging or diagnostic tests can usually be avoided.

  11. Prime time to resuscitate clinical medicine and kill diagnostic greed?

    PubMed Central

    Rajasoorya, C

    2016-01-01

    Modern healthcare faces the challenges of rising costs, increasing expectations of patients and changing disease patterns. Physicians practise medicine in an era of easy availability and access to a plethora of modern and sometimes expensive diagnostic aids. The powerful utility of clinical skills cannot be underestimated nor lost. The physician has a powerful platform to encourage the rational use of tests, prevent wasteful overutilisation and ensure that tests do not cause more harm than benefit in physical, emotional or financial terms. Diagnostic skills should not be substituted by diagnostic greed. It is possible to do more for the patient rather than to the patient. PMID:27664173

  12. Prime time to resuscitate clinical medicine and kill diagnostic greed?

    PubMed

    Rajasoorya, C

    2016-09-01

    Modern healthcare faces the challenges of rising costs, increasing expectations of patients and changing disease patterns. Physicians practise medicine in an era of easy availability and access to a plethora of modern and sometimes expensive diagnostic aids. The powerful utility of clinical skills cannot be underestimated nor lost. The physician has a powerful platform to encourage the rational use of tests, prevent wasteful overutilisation and ensure that tests do not cause more harm than benefit in physical, emotional or financial terms. Diagnostic skills should not be substituted by diagnostic greed. It is possible to do more for the patient rather than to the patient. PMID:27664173

  13. Translating genomic biomarkers into clinically useful diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Haga, Susanne B

    2006-03-01

    The landmark sequencing of the human genome has ushered in a new field of large-scale research. Advances in understanding the molecular basis of disease have opened up new opportunities to develop genomics-based tools to diagnose, predict disease onset or recurrence, tailor treatment options, and assess treatment response. Although still in the early stages of research and development, genomic biomarker research has the capability of providing a comprehensive insight into pathophysiological processes as well as more precise predictors of outcome not previously attainable with traditional biomarkers. Before genomic biomarkers are incorporated into clinical practice, several issues will need to be addressed in order to generate the necessary levels of evidence to demonstrate analytical and clinical validity and utility. In addition, efforts will be needed to educate health professionals and the public about genomics-based tools, revise regulatory oversight mechanisms, and ensure privacy safeguards of the information generated from these new tests.

  14. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  15. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  16. Clinical consequences of new diagnostic tools for intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, L; Roestenberg, M

    2015-06-01

    Following the success of nucleic acid-based detection in virology and bacteriology, multiplex real-time PCRs are increasingly used as first-line diagnostics in clinical parasitology, replacing microscopy. The detection and quantification of parasite-specific DNA in faeces is highly sensitive and specific and allows for cost-effective high-throughput screening. In this paper we discuss the clinical consequences of this radical change in diagnostic approach, as well as its potential drawbacks. In the Netherlands, routine diagnostic laboratories have been pioneering the implementation of multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of pathogenic intestinal protozoa and this has resulted in increased detection rates of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. As a consequence of this new diagnostic approach, expertise in the field of parasite morphology by conventional light microscopy seems to be disappearing in most of the high-throughput microbiological laboratories. As a result, to maintain a high standard of care, a formalized exchange of critical information between clinicians and laboratory staff is necessary to determine the most appropriate testing either in local laboratories or in reference centres, based on clinical signs and symptoms, exposure and immune status. If such a diagnostic algorithm is lacking, important infections in travellers, immigrants and immunocompromised patients may be missed.

  17. Hashimoto thyroiditis: clinical and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, P; De Remigis, A; Rose, N R

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), now considered the most common autoimmune disease, was described over a century ago as a pronounced lymphoid goiter affecting predominantly women. In addition to this classic form, several other clinico-pathologic entities are now included under the term HT: fibrous variant, IgG4-related variant, juvenile form, Hashitoxicosis, and painless thyroiditis (sporadic or post-partum). All forms are characterized pathologically by the infiltration of hematopoietic mononuclear cells, mainly lymphocytes, in the interstitium among the thyroid follicles, although specific features can be recognized in each variant. Thyroid cells undergo atrophy or transform into a bolder type of follicular cell rich in mitochondria called Hürthle cell. Most HT forms ultimately evolve into hypothyroidism, although at presentation patients can be euthyroid or even hyperthyroid. The diagnosis of HT relies on the demonstration of circulating antibodies to thyroid antigens (mainly thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin) and reduced echogenicity on thyroid sonogram in a patient with proper clinical features. The treatment remains symptomatic and based on the administration of synthetic thyroid hormones to correct the hypothyroidism as needed. Surgery is performed when the goiter is large enough to cause significant compression of the surrounding cervical structures, or when some areas of the thyroid gland mimic the features of a nodule whose cytology cannot be ascertained as benign. HT remains a complex and ever expanding disease of unknown pathogenesis that awaits prevention or novel forms of treatment.

  18. The ritual abuse of children: clinical features and diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Nurcombe, B; Unützer, J

    1991-03-01

    A case of alleged ritual sexual abuse is presented. Clinical recognition and diagnostic reasoning are discussed. After a brief account of modern satanism, it is concluded that, although the evidence for the occurrence of ritual abuse is sketchy, a high index of suspicion is appropriate.

  19. [The issues and basic principles of training of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Morozova, V T; Naumova, E V

    2012-07-01

    The article considers the main positions concerning the clinical laboratory diagnostics as an independent clinical specialty and the principles of professional training and improvement of specialists. The basic issues complicating the training and improvement of personnel to be kept in line with actual needs of laboratory service of public health system are discussed. Among them are the availability of laboratory academic sub disciplines demanding a profound special theoretical education and technical skills; the need to account in the process of professional training the variety of forms, sizes and types of laboratory structures in different medical institutions; the need of special training programs for numerous specialists with non-medical basic education. The combination of the present system of postgraduate training of specialists on chairs of state educational organizations with initiative involvement of specialists in various public forms of permanent professional improvement (professional scientific societies meetings, research conferences, internet seminars, etc.) is supported Along with a positive appraisal of the existing system of training in the state educational institutions and corresponding regulation documents, a critique is expressed regarding certain actual documents which improperly limit the administrative functions of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics and complicate training of bacteriologists for clinical laboratories.

  20. Translating RNA sequencing into clinical diagnostics: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Byron, Sara A; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R; Engelthaler, David M; Carpten, John D; Craig, David W

    2016-05-01

    With the emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technologies, RNA-based biomolecules hold expanded promise for their diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applicability in various diseases, including cancers and infectious diseases. Detection of gene fusions and differential expression of known disease-causing transcripts by RNA-seq represent some of the most immediate opportunities. However, it is the diversity of RNA species detected through RNA-seq that holds new promise for the multi-faceted clinical applicability of RNA-based measures, including the potential of extracellular RNAs as non-invasive diagnostic indicators of disease. Ongoing efforts towards the establishment of benchmark standards, assay optimization for clinical conditions and demonstration of assay reproducibility are required to expand the clinical utility of RNA-seq.

  1. Translating biological parameters into clinically useful diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Carney, Stuart; Boutros, Nash N

    2009-08-01

    Psychiatry has lagged behind other specialties in developing diagnostic laboratory tests for the purpose of confirming or ruling out a diagnosis. Biological research into the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders has, however, yielded some highly replicable abnormalities that have the potential for development into clinically useful diagnostic tests. To achieve this goal, a process for systematic translation must be developed and implemented. Building on our previous work, we review a proposed process using four clearly defined steps. We conclude that biological parameters currently face challenges in their pathways to becoming diagnostic tests because of both the premature release and premature abandonment of tests. Attention to a systematic translation process aided by these principles may help to avoid these problems.

  2. Companion diagnostics for targeted cancer drugs - clinical and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Dana; Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US Food and Drug Administration has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity, they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world. PMID:24904822

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnostic approaches in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Burbige, Eugene J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a functional gastrointestinal disorder long considered a diagnosis of exclusion, has chronic symptoms that vary over time and overlap with those of non-IBS disorders. Traditional symptom-based criteria effectively identify IBS patients but are not easily applied in clinical practice, leaving >40% of patients to experience symptoms up to 5 years before diagnosis. Objective: To review the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected IBS, strengths and weaknesses of current methodologies, and newer diagnostic tools that can augment current symptom-based criteria. Methods: The peer-reviewed literature (PubMed) was searched for primary reports and reviews using the limiters of date (1999–2009) and English language and the search terms irritable bowel syndrome, diagnosis, gastrointestinal disease, symptom-based criteria, outcome, serology, and fecal markers. Abstracts from Digestive Disease Week 2008–2009 and reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Results: A disconnect is apparent between practice guidelines and clinical practice. The American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology recommend diagnosing IBS in patients without alarm features of organic disease using symptom-based criteria (eg, Rome). However, physicians report confidence in a symptom-based diagnosis without further testing only up to 42% of the time; many order laboratory tests and perform sigmoidoscopies or colonoscopies despite good evidence showing no utility for this work-up in uncomplicated cases. In the absence of diagnostic criteria easily usable in a busy practice, newer diagnostic methods, such as stool-form examination, fecal inflammatory markers, and serum biomarkers, have been proposed as adjunctive tools to aid in an IBS diagnosis by increasing physicians’ confidence and changing the diagnostic paradigm to one of inclusion rather than exclusion. Conclusion: New adjunctive testing for IBS can

  4. Clinical diagnostic criteria and classification controversies in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    RASCOVSKY, KATYA; GROSSMAN, MURRAY

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can manifest as a spectrum of clinical syndromes, ranging from behavioural impairment to language or motor dysfunction. Recently, revised diagnostic criteria have been proposed for the behavioural and progressive aphasia syndromes associated with frontotemporal degeneration. The present review will summarize these diagnostic guidelines and highlight some lingering controversies in the classification of FTLD clinical syndromes. We will discuss common tools and methods used to identify the insidious changes of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), the value of new, patient-based tasks of orbitofrontal function, and the issue of a benign or ‘phenocopy’ variant of bvFTD. With regard to primary progressive aphasia (PPA), we will discuss the scope of the semantic disorder in semantic-variant PPA, the nature of the speech disorder in non-fluent, agrammatic PPA, and the preliminary utility of a logopenic PPA classification. PMID:23611345

  5. Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, Holger F; Kessler, Harald H; Kortenbusch, Marhild; Steinhorst, Andreas; Raggam, Reinhard B; Berger, Annemarie

    2007-10-01

    This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed ("home-brewed") tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and for isolation of viruses on cell cultures in the routine virology laboratory.

  6. Paracoccidioidomycosis: epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment up-dating*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an acute - to chronic systemic mycosis caused by fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides. Due to its frequent tegument clinical expression, paracoccidioidomycosis is an important disease for dermatologists, who must be up-to-date about it. This article focuses on recent epidemiological data and discusses the new insights coming from molecular studies, as well as those related to clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. In the latter section, we give particular attention to the guideline on paracoccidioidomycosis organized by specialists in this subject. PMID:24173174

  7. Saliva-based biosensors: noninvasive monitoring tool for clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Malon, Radha S P; Sadir, Sahba; Balakrishnan, Malarvili; Córcoles, Emma P

    2014-01-01

    Saliva is increasingly recognised as an attractive diagnostic fluid. The presence of various disease signalling salivary biomarkers that accurately reflect normal and disease states in humans and the sampling benefits compared to blood sampling are some of the reasons for this recognition. This explains the burgeoning research field in assay developments and technological advancements for the detection of various salivary biomarkers to improve clinical diagnosis, management, and treatment. This paper reviews the significance of salivary biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic applications, with focus on the technologies and biosensing platforms that have been reported for screening these biomarkers.

  8. Saliva-Based Biosensors: Noninvasive Monitoring Tool for Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Malon, Radha S. P.; Balakrishnan, Malarvili; Córcoles, Emma P.

    2014-01-01

    Saliva is increasingly recognised as an attractive diagnostic fluid. The presence of various disease signalling salivary biomarkers that accurately reflect normal and disease states in humans and the sampling benefits compared to blood sampling are some of the reasons for this recognition. This explains the burgeoning research field in assay developments and technological advancements for the detection of various salivary biomarkers to improve clinical diagnosis, management, and treatment. This paper reviews the significance of salivary biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic applications, with focus on the technologies and biosensing platforms that have been reported for screening these biomarkers. PMID:25276835

  9. Reducing diagnostic error with computer-based clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Greenes, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision making (Schiff). In addition, several other considerations relating to this topic are interesting to ponder. We are moving toward increased understanding of gene regulation and gene expression, identification of biomarkers, and the ability to predict patient response to disease and to tailor treatments to these individual variations-referred to as "personalized" or, more recently, "predictive" medicine. Consequently, diagnostic decision making is more and more linked to management decision making, and generic diagnostic labels like "diabetes" or "colon cancer" will no longer be sufficient, because they don't tell us what to do. Ultimately, if we have more complete data including more structured capture of phenomic data as well as the characterization of the patient's genome, direct prediction from responses of highly refined subsets of similar patients in a database can be used to select appropriate management, the effectiveness of which was demonstrated in projects in selected limited domains as early as the 1970s. In general, there are six classes of methodologies, including the above, which can be applied to delivering CDS. In addition, patients are becoming more knowledgeable and should be regarded as active participants, not only in helping to obtain data but also in their own status assessment and as recipients of decision support. With the above advances, this is a very promising time to be engaged in pursuit of methods of CDS. PMID:19669915

  10. Clinical Validation of Quantum Dot Barcode Diagnostic Technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisung; Biondi, Mia J; Feld, Jordan J; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-04-26

    There has been a major focus on the clinical translation of emerging technologies for diagnosing patients with infectious diseases, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. However, most developments still remain at the academic stage where researchers use spiked target molecules to demonstrate the utility of a technology and assess the analytical performance. This approach does not account for the biological complexities and variabilities of human patient samples. As a technology matures and potentially becomes clinically viable, one important intermediate step in the translation process is to conduct a full clinical validation of the technology using a large number of patient samples. Here, we present a full detailed clinical validation of Quantum Dot (QD) barcode technology for diagnosing patients infected with Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). We further demonstrate that the detection of multiple regions of the viral genome using multiplexed QD barcodes improved clinical sensitivity from 54.9-66.7% to 80.4-90.5%, and describe how to use QD barcodes for optimal clinical diagnosis of patients. The use of QDs in biology and medicine was first introduced in 1998 but has not reached clinical care. This study describes our long-term systematic development strategy to advance QD technology to a clinically feasible product for diagnosing patients. Our "blueprint" for translating the QD barcode research concept could be adapted for other nanotechnologies, to efficiently advance diagnostic techniques discovered in the academic laboratory to patient care.

  11. Advanced clinical monitoring: considerations for real-time hemodynamic diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J M; Cordova, M J

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to ease staffing burdens and potentially improve patient outcome in an intensive care unit (ICU) environment, we are developing a real-time system to accurately and efficiently diagnose cardiopulmonary emergencies. The system is being designed to utilize all relevant routinely-monitored physiological data in order to automatically diagnose potentially fatal events. The initial stage of this project involved formulating the overall system design and appropriate methods for real-time data acquisition, data storage, data trending, waveform analysis, and implementing diagnostic rules. Initially, we defined a conceptual analysis of the minimum physiologic data set, and the monitoring time-frames (trends) which would be required to diagnose cardiopulmonary emergencies. Following that analysis, we used a fuzzy logic diagnostic engine to analyze physiological data during a simulated arrhythmic cardiac arrest (ACA) in order to assess the validity of our diagnostic methodology. We used rate, trend, and morphologic data extracted from the following signals: expired CO2 time-concentration curve (capnogram), electrocardiogram, and arterial blood pressure. The system performed well: The fuzzy logic engine effectively diagnosed the likelihood of ACA from the subtle hemodynamic trends which preceded the complete arrest. As the clinical picture worsened, the fuzzy logic-based system accurately indicated the change in patient condition. Termination of the simulated arrest was rapidly detected by the diagnostic engine. In view of the effectiveness of this fuzzy logic implementation, we plan to develop additional fuzzy logic modules to diagnose other cardiopulmonary emergencies.

  12. Hemicrania continua: functional imaging and clinical features with diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Sahler, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on summarizing 2 pivotal articles in the clinical and pathophysiologic understanding of hemicrania continua (HC). The first article, a functional imaging project,identifies both the dorsal rostral pons (a region associated with the generation of migraines) and the posterior hypothalamus(a region associated with the generation of cluster and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing [SUNCT]) as active during HC. The second article is a summary of the clinical features seen in a prospective cohort of HC patients that carry significant diagnostic implications. In particular, they identify a wider range of autonomic signs than what is currently included in the International Headache Society criteria (including an absence of autonomic signs in a small percentage of patients), a high frequency of migrainous features, and the presence of aggravation and/or restlessness during attacks. Wide variations in exacerbation length, frequency, pain description, and pain location (including side-switching pain) are also noted. Thus, a case is made for widening and modifying the clinical diagnostic criteria used to identify patients with HC.

  13. Hemicrania Continua: Functional Imaging and Clinical Features With Diagnostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Sahler, Kristen

    2013-04-10

    This review focuses on summarizing 2 pivotal articles in the clinical and pathophysiologic understanding of hemicrania continua (HC). The first article, a functional imaging project, identifies both the dorsal rostral pons (a region associated with the generation of migraines) and the posterior hypothalamus (a region associated with the generation of cluster and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing [SUNCT]) as active during HC. The second article is a summary of the clinical features seen in a prospective cohort of HC patients that carry significant diagnostic implications. In particular, they identify a wider range of autonomic signs than what is currently included in the International Headache Society criteria (including an absence of autonomic signs in a small percentage of patients), a high frequency of migrainous features, and the presence of aggravation and/or restlessness during attacks. Wide variations in exacerbation length, frequency, pain description, and pain location (including side-switching pain) are also noted. Thus, a case is made for widening and modifying the clinical diagnostic criteria used to identify patients with HC.

  14. Risk, diagnostic error, and the clinical science of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Andrew; Cruse, Damian; Naci, Lorina; Weijer, Charles; Owen, Adrian M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new neuroimaging techniques have detected covert awareness in some patients previously thought to be in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. This raises worries for patients, families, and physicians, as it indicates that the existing diagnostic error rate in this patient group is higher than assumed. Recent research on a subset of these techniques, called active paradigms, suggests that false positive and false negative findings may result from applying different statistical methods to patient data. Due to the nature of this research, these errors may be unavoidable, and may draw into question the use of active paradigms in the clinical setting. We argue that false positive and false negative findings carry particular moral risks, which may bear on investigators' decisions to use certain methods when independent means for estimating their clinical utility are absent. We review and critically analyze this methodological problem as it relates to both fMRI and EEG active paradigms. We conclude by drawing attention to three common clinical scenarios where the risk of diagnostic error may be most pronounced in this patient group. PMID:25844313

  15. Clinical Utility of Prostate Carcinoma Molecular Diagnostic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Shappell, Scott B

    2008-01-01

    Instead of relying on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to identify patients for prostate biopsy, new laboratory tests are needed that have improved specificity for prostate carcinoma (CaP), allow accurate classification of clinically insignificant CaPs, allow for detection of clinically significant CaP in patients without elevated serum PSA, and allow for identification of aggressive forms of CaP, which may warrant adjunctive or even molecularly targeted therapy in the future. Over the last several years, high-throughput gene expression profiling and proteinomics have led to the identification of genes and proteins that are specifically overexpressed in CaP. Molecular diagnostic techniques readily translated to the clinical laboratory have been incorporated into the development of new tests based on these novel molecular alterations in CaP. Some of these tests already have well-documented clinical utility, such as in facilitating prostate biopsy decisions, and are routinely available. The current review focuses on the biological, clinical, and laboratory aspects of the most promising of these current and near-future molecular CaP tests. PMID:18470278

  16. Diagnostic and clinical considerations in prolonged grief disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maercker, Andreas; Lalor, John

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the similarities and differences between prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It highlights how a PTSD-related understanding aids the investigation and clinical management of PGD. Grief has long been understood as a natural response to bereavement, as serious psychological and physiological stress has been regarded as a potential outcome of extreme or traumatic stress. PTSD was first included in DSM-III in 1980. In the mid-1980s, the first systematic investigation began into whether there is an extreme or pathological form of mourning. Meanwhile, there is much research literature on complicated, traumatic, or prolonged grief This literature is reviewed in this article, with the following questions: Is it possible to distinguish normal from non-normal grief? Which clinical presentation does PGD have—and how does this compare with PTSD? Finally, diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic approaches and existing tools are presented. PMID:22754289

  17. Tuberculosis in otorhinolaryngology: clinical presentation and diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Michael, Rajiv C; Michael, Joy S

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis affects all tissues of the body, although some more commonly than the others. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common type of tuberculosis accounting for approximately 80% of the tuberculosis cases. Tuberculosis of the otorhinolaryngeal region is one of the rarer forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis but still poses a significant clinical and diagnostic challenge. Over three years, only five out of 121 patients suspected to have tuberculosis of the otorhinolaryngeal region (cervical adenitis excluded) had Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-proven disease. Additional 7 had histology-proven tuberculosis. Only one patient had concomitant sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. We look at the various clinical and laboratory aspects of tuberculosis of the otorhinolaryngeal region that would help to diagnose this uncommon but important form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. Dental pulp neurophysiology: part 1. Clinical and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elmeguid, Ashraf; Yu, Donald C

    2009-02-01

    Diagnosis in endodontics requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, and their relationship to the various diagnostic tests commonly used in dental practice. Thermal changes in the oral environment cause rapid displacement of dentinal tubular contents, resulting in pain. This effect, known as the hydrodynamic effect, is the regulator of pain sensation in thermal-pulp testing. Hundreds of axons enter the tooth from the apical foramen to provide it with its sensory supply. The nerve supply of the dentin-pulp complex is mainly made up of A fibres (both delta and beta) and C fibres. They are classified according to their diameter and their conduction velocity. The A fibres are mainly stimulated by an application of cold, producing sharp pain, whereas stimulation of the C fibres produces a dull aching pain. Because of their location and arrangement, the C fibres are responsible for referred pain. This first part of a 2-part review examines the relation between clinical sensations during the diagnostic visit and the neurophysiology of the dental pulp to explore the connection between the art (clinical diagnosis) and the science (neurophysiology) of endodontics.

  19. Laser-scan cytometry: a new tool for clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hambsch, Joerg; Hennig, Bert; Nuesse, Michael; Schmid, Thomas; Schneider, Peter; Zotz, Rainer; Tarnok, Attila

    1999-04-01

    The common usage of flow cytometry (FCM) in research and clinical diagnostic is limited by the lack visualizing the fluorescence labelled cells. The Laser Scanning Cytometer (LSC) enables multicolor cytometric measurements on a slide featuring relocation of single cells for further investigation via brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, it is possible to capture these images for documentation. In a FISH application, the LSC was successfully used for automated scoring techniqeus for evaluating the frequency of aneuploid sperm in humans and mice. In just 30 minutes, we were able to acquire more than 15,000 sperms, a task which normally takes more than a day. After relocation, genetic defects were identified and confirmed via fluorescence microscopy. In an on going study, we investigate via the LSC the remain of a new radiopaque material for high resolution echocardiography in the blood circulation. At first the result exhibited that the radiopaque material is endocysed by leukocytes just after application but is still detectable via echocardiography for up to 40 minutes. In conclusion, with the additional data acquisition by the LSC, it is possible to perform further detailed information from very small samples. Therefore, we are working up to now on developing new methods to introduce the LSC in our clinical diagnostic of neonates undergoing cardiac surgery.

  20. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Kallenberg, K.; Summers, D. M.; Romero, C.; Taratuto, A.; Heinemann, U.; Breithaupt, M.; Varges, D.; Meissner, B.; Ladogana, A.; Schuur, M.; Haik, S.; Collins, S. J.; Jansen, Gerard H.; Stokin, G. B.; Pimentel, J.; Hewer, E.; Collie, D.; Smith, P.; Roberts, H.; Brandel, J. P.; van Duijn, C.; Pocchiari, M.; Begue, C.; Cras, P.; Will, R. G.; Sanchez-Juan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Several molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications have demonstrated a potentially important role for magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Magnetic resonance imaging signal alterations correlate with distinct sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease molecular subtypes and thus might contribute to the earlier identification of the whole spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease cases. This multi-centre international study aimed to provide a rationale for the amendment of the clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging were recruited from 12 countries. Patients referred as ‘suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease’ but with an alternative diagnosis after thorough follow up, were analysed as controls. All magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed for signal changes according to a standard protocol encompassing seven cortical regions, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated in 436 sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients and 141 controls. The pattern of high signal intensity with the best sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease was identified. The optimum diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of rapid progressive dementia was obtained when either at least two cortical regions (temporal, parietal or occipital) or both caudate nucleus and putamen displayed a high signal in fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging magnetic resonance imaging. Based on our analyses, magnetic

  1. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Zerr, I; Kallenberg, K; Summers, D M; Romero, C; Taratuto, A; Heinemann, U; Breithaupt, M; Varges, D; Meissner, B; Ladogana, A; Schuur, M; Haik, S; Collins, S J; Jansen, Gerard H; Stokin, G B; Pimentel, J; Hewer, E; Collie, D; Smith, P; Roberts, H; Brandel, J P; van Duijn, C; Pocchiari, M; Begue, C; Cras, P; Will, R G; Sanchez-Juan, P

    2009-10-01

    Several molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications have demonstrated a potentially important role for magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Magnetic resonance imaging signal alterations correlate with distinct sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease molecular subtypes and thus might contribute to the earlier identification of the whole spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease cases. This multi-centre international study aimed to provide a rationale for the amendment of the clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging were recruited from 12 countries. Patients referred as 'suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease' but with an alternative diagnosis after thorough follow up, were analysed as controls. All magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed for signal changes according to a standard protocol encompassing seven cortical regions, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated in 436 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients and 141 controls. The pattern of high signal intensity with the best sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was identified. The optimum diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of rapid progressive dementia was obtained when either at least two cortical regions (temporal, parietal or occipital) or both caudate nucleus and putamen displayed a high signal in fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging magnetic resonance imaging. Based on our analyses, magnetic resonance imaging was

  2. Novel clinical and diagnostic aspects of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Pelkum, Johannes; Radice, Antonella; Norman, Gary L; Lόpez Hoyos, Marcos; Lakos, Gabriella; Buchner, Carol; Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto; Stinton, Laura; Mahler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are the serological hallmark of some idiopathic systemic vasculitides. Besides the investigation of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and constant effort for a standardized nomenclature and classification of the AAV, a main focus of research during the last few years has been to constantly improve the performance of enzyme immunoassays. With the latest so called third generation ELISA, this goal seemed to be fulfilled. The International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of ANCA gave recommendations for standardized strategies for the serological diagnosis of ANCA. New developments now target the system immanent drawbacks of the respective diagnostic methods, be it the need for batching and the long time to result for ELISA, or the high likelihood of error and subjectivity of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Random access technology and multiplexing for solid phase assays as well as digital imaging for IIF are tools which may help to expedite and simplify routine diagnostics in the lab and in emergency settings. Recent findings indicate that PR3-ANCA have clinical utility beyond the diagnosis of AAV. PR3-ANCA can also serve as an aid for the differentiation between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CrD) and the stratification of UC patients. This review provides a detailed review of what is known about ANCA and highlights the latest research and state-of-the-art developments in this area. PMID:24995343

  3. Updates on chikungunya epidemiology, clinical disease, and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sam, I-Ching; Kümmerer, Beate M; Chan, Yoke-Fun; Roques, Pierre; Drosten, Christian; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Aedes-borne alphavirus, historically found in Africa and Asia, where it caused sporadic outbreaks. In 2004, CHIKV reemerged in East Africa and spread globally to cause epidemics, including, for the first time, autochthonous transmission in Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania. The epidemic strains were of the East/Central/South African genotype. Strains of the Asian genotype of CHIKV continued to cause outbreaks in Asia and spread to Oceania and, in 2013, to the Americas. Acute disease, mainly comprising fever, rash, and arthralgia, was previously regarded as self-limiting; however, there is growing evidence of severe but rare manifestations, such as neurological disease. Furthermore, CHIKV appears to cause a significant burden of long-term morbidity due to persistent arthralgia. Diagnostic assays have advanced greatly in recent years, although there remains a need for simple, accurate, and affordable tests for the developing countries where CHIKV is most prevalent. This review focuses on recent important work on the epidemiology, clinical disease and diagnostics of CHIKV.

  4. Clinical Laboratories – Production Factories or Specialized Diagnostic Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Judit

    2016-01-01

    Since a large proportion of medical decisions are based on laboratory results, clinical laboratories should meet the increasing demand of clinicians and their patients. Huge central laboratories may process over 10 million tests annually; they act as production factories, measuring emergency and routine tests with sufficient speed and accuracy. At the same time, they also serve as specialized diagnostic centers where well-trained experts analyze and interpret special test results. It is essential to improve and constantly monitor this complex laboratory service, by several methods. Sample transport by pneumatic tube system, use of an advanced laboratory information system and point-of-care testing may result in decreased total turnaround time. The optimization of test ordering may result in a faster and more cost-effective laboratory service. Autovalidation can save time for laboratory specialists, when the analysis of more complex results requires their attention. Small teams of experts responsible for special diagnostic work, and their interpretative reporting according to predetermined principles, may help to minimize subjectivity of these special reports. Although laboratory investigations have become so diversely developed in the past decades, it is essential that the laboratory can provide accurate results relatively quickly, and that laboratory specialists can support the diagnosis and monitoring of patients by adequate interpretation of esoteric laboratory methods.

  5. Clinical Laboratories – Production Factories or Specialized Diagnostic Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Judit

    2016-01-01

    Since a large proportion of medical decisions are based on laboratory results, clinical laboratories should meet the increasing demand of clinicians and their patients. Huge central laboratories may process over 10 million tests annually; they act as production factories, measuring emergency and routine tests with sufficient speed and accuracy. At the same time, they also serve as specialized diagnostic centers where well-trained experts analyze and interpret special test results. It is essential to improve and constantly monitor this complex laboratory service, by several methods. Sample transport by pneumatic tube system, use of an advanced laboratory information system and point-of-care testing may result in decreased total turnaround time. The optimization of test ordering may result in a faster and more cost-effective laboratory service. Autovalidation can save time for laboratory specialists, when the analysis of more complex results requires their attention. Small teams of experts responsible for special diagnostic work, and their interpretative reporting according to predetermined principles, may help to minimize subjectivity of these special reports. Although laboratory investigations have become so diversely developed in the past decades, it is essential that the laboratory can provide accurate results relatively quickly, and that laboratory specialists can support the diagnosis and monitoring of patients by adequate interpretation of esoteric laboratory methods. PMID:27683528

  6. Better clinical decision making and reducing diagnostic error.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, P; Nimmo, G R

    2011-06-01

    A major amount of our time working in clinical practice involves thinking and decision making. Perhaps it is because decision making is such a commonplace activity that it is assumed we can all make effective decisions. However, this is not the case and the example of diagnostic error supports this assertion. Until quite recently there has been a general nihilism about the ability to change the way that we think, but it is now becoming accepted that if we can think about, and understand, our thinking processes we can improve our decision making, including diagnosis. In this paper we review the dual process model of decision making and highlight ways in which decision making can be improved through the application of this model to our day-to-day practice and by the adoption of de-biasing strategies and critical thinking. PMID:21677922

  7. Diagnostic and clinical classification of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Frenkian-Cuvelier, Mélinée; Eymard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is characterized by muscle weakness and abnormal fatigability. It is an autoimmune disease caused by the presence of antibodies against components of the muscle membrane localized at the neuromuscular junction. In most cases, the autoantibodies are against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Recently, other targets have been described such as the MuSK protein (muscle-specific kinase) or the LRP4 (lipoprotein related protein 4). Myasthenia gravis can be classified according to the profile of the autoantibodies, the location of the affected muscles (ocular versus generalized), the age of onset of symptoms and thymic abnormalities. The disease generally begins with ocular symptoms (ptosis and/or diplopia) and extends to other muscles in 80% of cases. Other features that characterize MG include the following: variability, effort induced worsening, successive periods of exacerbation during the course of the disease, severity dependent on respiratory and swallowing impairment (if rapid worsening occurs, a myasthenic crisis is suspected), and an association with thymoma in 20% of patients and with other autoimmune diseases such as hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease. The diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the benefit of the cholinesterase inhibitors, the detection of specific autoantibodies (anti-AChR, anti-MuSK or anti-LRP4), and significant decrement evidenced by electrophysiological tests. In this review, we briefly describe the history and epidemiology of the disease and the diagnostic and clinical classification. The neonatal form of myasthenia is explained, and finally we discuss the main difficulties of diagnosis.

  8. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis I. Diagnostics and nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    More than 120,000 patients are treated annually in Germany to resolve repeated episodes of acute tonsillitis. Therapy is aiming at symptom regression, avoidance of complications, reduction in the number of disease-related absences in school or at work, increased cost-effectiveness and improved quality of life. The purpose of this part of the guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through different conservative treatment options in order to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical management in terms of intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsillectomy (i.e. tonsillotomy) is the subject of part II of this guideline. To estimate the probability of tonsillitis caused by β-hemolytic streptococci, a diagnostic scoring system according to Centor or McIsaac is suggested. If therapy is considered, a positive score of ≥3 should lead to pharyngeal swab or rapid test or culture in order to identify β-hemolytic streptococci. Routinely performed blood tests for acute tonsillitis are not indicated. After acute streptococcal tonsillitis, there is no need to repeat a pharyngeal swab or any other routine blood tests, urine examinations or cardiological diagnostics such as ECG. The determination of the antistreptolysin O-titer (ASLO titer) and other antistreptococcal antibody titers do not have any value in relation to acute tonsillitis with or without pharyngitis and should not be performed. First-line therapy of β-hemolytic streptococci consists of oral penicillin. Instead of phenoxymethylpenicillin-potassium (penicillin V potassium), also phenoxymethlpenicillin-benzathine with a clearly longer half-life can be used. Oral intake for 7 days of one of both the drugs is recommended. Alternative treatment with oral cephalosporins (e.g. cefadroxil, cefalexin) is indicated only in cases of penicillin failure, frequent recurrences, and whenever a more

  9. Advancing Porous Silicon Biosensor Technology for Use in Clinical Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Lisa Marie

    Inexpensive and robust analytical techniques for detecting molecular recognition events are in great demand in healthcare, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Despite vast research in this area, challanges remain to develop practical biomolecular platforms that, meet the rigorous demands of real-world applications. This includes maintaining low-cost devices that are sensitive and specific in complex test specimens, are stable after storage, have short assay time, and possess minimal complexity of instrumentation for readout. Nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) material has been identified as an ideal candidate towards achieving these goals and the past decade has seen diverse proof-of-principle studies developing optical-based sensing techniques. In Part 1 of this thesis, the impact of surface chemistry and PSi morphology on detection sensitivity of target molecules is investigated. Initial proof-of-concept that PSi devices facilitate detection of protein in whole blood is demonstrated. This work highlights the importance of material stability and blocking chemistry for sensor use in real world biological samples. In addition, the intrinisic filtering capability of the 3-D PSi morphology is shown as an advantage in complex solutions, such as whole blood. Ultimately, this initial work identified a need to improve detection sensitivity of the PSI biosensor technique to facilitate clinical diagnostic use over relevant target concentration ranges. The second part of this thesis, builds upon sensitivity challenges that are highlighted in the first part of the thesis and development of a surface-bound competitive inhibition immunoassay facilitated improved detection sensitivity of small molecular weight targets (opiates) over a relevant clinical concentration range. In addition, optimization of assay protocol addressed issues of maintaining stability of sensors after storage. Performance of the developed assay (specificity and sensitivity) was then validated in a

  10. Diagnostic Methods for Bile Acid Malabsorption in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Altered bile acid (BA) concentrations in the colon may cause diarrhea or constipation. BA malabsorption (BAM) accounts for >25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea and chronic diarrhea in Western countries. As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are desired in clinical practice to help direct the most effective treatment course for the chronic bowel dysfunction. This review appraises the methodology, advantages and disadvantages of 4 tools that directly measure BAM: 14C-glycocholate breath and stool test, 75Selenium HomotauroCholic Acid Test (SeHCAT), 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. 14C-glycocholate is a laborious test no longer widely utilized. 75SeHCAT is validated, but not available in the United States. Serum C4 is a simple, accurate method that is applicable to a majority of patients, but requires further clinical validation. Fecal measurements to quantify total and individual fecal BAs are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the U.S., and a therapeutic trial with a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data suggest there is an advantage to studying fecal excretion of the individual BAs and their role in BAM; this may constitute a significant advantage of the fecal BA method over the other tests. Fecal BA test could become a routine addition to fecal fat measurement in patients with unexplained diarrhea. In summary, availability determines the choice of test among C4, SeHCAT and fecal BA; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients. PMID:23644387

  11. Proposed Diagnostic Criteria for the DSM-5 of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Female Adolescents: Diagnostic and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is included as conditions for further study in the DSM-5. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the proposed diagnostic criteria and the diagnostic and clinical correlates for the validity of a diagnostic entity. The authors investigated the characteristics of NSSI disorder and the proposed diagnostic criteria. A sample of 73 female inpatient adolescents and 37 nonclinical adolescents (aged 13 to 19 years) was recruited. Patients were classified into 4 groups (adolescents with NSSI disorder, adolescents with NSSI without impairment/distress, clinical controls without NSSI, and nonclinical controls). Adolescents were compared on self-reported psychopathology and diagnostic cooccurrences. Results indicate that adolescents with NSSI disorder have a higher level of impairment than adolescents with other mental disorders without NSSI. Most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression, social phobia, and PTSD. There was some overlap of adolescents with NSSI disorder and suicidal behaviour and borderline personality disorder, but there were also important differences. Results further suggest that the proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for NSSI are useful and necessary. In conclusion, NSSI is a highly impairing disorder characterized by high comorbidity with various disorders, providing further evidence that NSSI should be a distinct diagnostic entity. PMID:24236273

  12. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  13. Disciplined Decision Making in an Interdisciplinary Environment: Some Implications for Clinical Applications of Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical applications of statistical process control (SPC) in human service organizations are considered. SPC is seen as providing a standard set of criteria that serves as a common interface for data-based decision making, which may bring decision making under the control of established contingencies rather than the immediate contingencies of…

  14. Should MD-PhD Programs Encourage Graduate Training in Disciplines Beyond Conventional Biomedical or Clinical Sciences?

    PubMed Central

    O'Mara, Ryan J.; Hsu, Stephen I.; Wilson, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of MD–PhD training programs is to produce physician–scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician–scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD–PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant since the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician–scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD–PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, non-traditional MD–PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce. PMID:25354071

  15. Should MD-PhD programs encourage graduate training in disciplines beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences?

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Ryan J; Hsu, Stephen I; Wilson, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    The goal of MD-PhD training programs is to produce physician-scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician-scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD-PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant because the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician-scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD-PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, nontraditional MD-PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce.

  16. Variability in pathogenicity prediction programs: impact on clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Walters-Sen, Lauren C; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Reshmi, Shalini; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Astbury, Caroline; Pyatt, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Current practice by clinical diagnostic laboratories is to utilize online prediction programs to help determine the significance of novel variants in a given gene sequence. However, these programs vary widely in their methods and ability to correctly predict the pathogenicity of a given sequence change. The performance of 17 publicly available pathogenicity prediction programs was assayed using a dataset consisting of 122 credibly pathogenic and benign variants in genes associated with the RASopathy family of disorders and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Performance metrics were compared between the programs to determine the most accurate program for loss-of-function and gain-of-function mechanisms. No one program correctly predicted the pathogenicity of all variants analyzed. A major hindrance to the analysis was the lack of output from a significant portion of the programs. The best performer was MutPred, which had a weighted accuracy of 82.6% in the full dataset. Surprisingly, combining the results of the top three programs did not increase the ability to predict pathogenicity over the top performer alone. As the increasing number of sequence changes in larger datasets will require interpretation, the current study demonstrates that extreme caution must be taken when reporting pathogenicity based on statistical online protein prediction programs in the absence of functional studies. PMID:25802880

  17. Thermographic diagnostics to discriminate skin lesions: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringasci, Mirian Denise; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is responsible for about 13% of all causes of death in the world. Over 7 million people die annually of this disease. In most cases, the survival rates are greater when diagnosed in early stages. It is known that tumor lesions present a different temperature compared with the normal tissues. Some studies have been performed in an attempt to establish new diagnosis methods, targeting this temperature difference. In this study, we aim to investigate the use of a handheld thermographic camera to discriminate skin lesions. The patients presenting Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Actinic Keratosis, Pigmented Seborrheic Keratosis, Melanoma or Intradermal Nevus lesions have been investigated at the Skin Departament of Amaral Carvalho Hospital. Patients are selected by a dermatologist, and the lesion images are recorded using an infrared camera. The images are evaluated taken into account the temperature level, and differences into lesion areas, borders, and between altered and normal skin. The present results show that thermography may be an important tool for aiding in the clinical diagnostics of superficial skin lesions.

  18. Robert Apfel's contribution to clinical diagnostic ultrasound: The mechanical index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical index, MI, resulted from theoretical considerations of the short-pulse acoustic threshold for inertial cavitation in water populated with microbubbles of all sizes [R. E. Apfel and C. K. Holland, Ultrasound Med Biol. 17, 179-185 (1991)]. In this review, the onset of cavitation will be discussed with reference to Robert Apfel's legacy of theoretical and experimental data. The questions arise: Can the utility of the MI be extended to situations in which the threshold MI is exceeded, thereby allowing for some estimate of the quantification of a potential bioeffect due to microcavitation? Also, can the MI be extended to situations in which pulses are, unlike the original formulation, not short? Is there a theoretical or semi-empirical basis for the MI threshold below which cavitation is unlikely? Can the MI be used to predict gas contrast agent destruction? The possible consequences of gas body activation associated with aerated lung tissue, intestinal gas pockets or encapsulated gas contrast agents represent specific instances of cavitation considerations relevant to clinical practice. Monitoring the real-time display of the MI (mandated by the FDA) helps clinicians evaluate and minimize the potential risks in the use of diagnostic ultrasound instrumentation. [Research supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R29 HL58761.

  19. The Importance of Considering Clinical Utility in the Construction of a Diagnostic Manual.

    PubMed

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Lengel, Gregory J; DeShong, Hilary L

    2016-01-01

    The development of major diagnostic manuals primarily has been guided by construct validity rather than clinical utility. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent research and theory examining the importance of clinical utility when constructing and evaluating a diagnostic manual. We suggest that construct validity is a necessary but not sufficient criterion for diagnostic constructs. This article discusses components of clinical utility and how these have applied to the current and forthcoming diagnostic manuals. Implications and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:26666967

  20. Health informatics and analytics - building a program to integrate business analytics across clinical and administrative disciplines.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Monica Chiarini; Deckard, Gloria J; Klein, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Health care organizations must develop integrated health information systems to respond to the numerous government mandates driving the movement toward reimbursement models emphasizing value-based and accountable care. Success in this transition requires integrated data analytics, supported by the combination of health informatics, interoperability, business process design, and advanced decision support tools. This case study presents the development of a master's level cross- and multidisciplinary informatics program offered through a business school. The program provides students from diverse backgrounds with the knowledge, leadership, and practical application skills of health informatics, information systems, and data analytics that bridge the interests of clinical and nonclinical professionals. This case presents the actions taken and challenges encountered in navigating intra-university politics, specifying curriculum, recruiting the requisite interdisciplinary faculty, innovating the educational format, managing students with diverse educational and professional backgrounds, and balancing multiple accreditation agencies. PMID:27274022

  1. From bariatric to metabolic surgery: definition of a new discipline and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Bariatric surgery indicates a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) surgical procedures originally designed to induce weight reduction in morbidly obese patients. Benefits of bariatric surgery, however, extend well beyond weight loss and include dramatic improvement of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and reduction of overall mortality. Furthermore, studies in rodents and humans show that the anti-diabetes effect of certain bariatric procedures results from a variety of neuroendocrine and metabolic mechanisms secondary to changes in GI anatomy. The recognition that benefits and mechanisms of GI operations are not limited to weight reduction provided a rationale for the emergence of metabolic surgery intended as a surgical approach primarily aimed to the treatment of diabetes and metabolic disease. Consistent with the goals of improving glycemic and metabolic control, in contrast to mere weight loss, metabolic surgery implies the development of a new model of care distinct from traditional bariatric surgery. This paper discusses the definition of metabolic surgery and its clinical practice.

  2. Health informatics and analytics - building a program to integrate business analytics across clinical and administrative disciplines.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Monica Chiarini; Deckard, Gloria J; Klein, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Health care organizations must develop integrated health information systems to respond to the numerous government mandates driving the movement toward reimbursement models emphasizing value-based and accountable care. Success in this transition requires integrated data analytics, supported by the combination of health informatics, interoperability, business process design, and advanced decision support tools. This case study presents the development of a master's level cross- and multidisciplinary informatics program offered through a business school. The program provides students from diverse backgrounds with the knowledge, leadership, and practical application skills of health informatics, information systems, and data analytics that bridge the interests of clinical and nonclinical professionals. This case presents the actions taken and challenges encountered in navigating intra-university politics, specifying curriculum, recruiting the requisite interdisciplinary faculty, innovating the educational format, managing students with diverse educational and professional backgrounds, and balancing multiple accreditation agencies.

  3. Disciplined analyses in clinical trials: the dark heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Moyé, Lemuel A

    2008-06-01

    Clinical research analyses must balance the desire to ;learn all that is learnable' from the database with the observation that sample-based data commonly lead to conclusions that are perfectly correct for the sample, but wholly incorrect for the population from which the data were based. Investigators who defend exploratory analyses as reliable, misuse important tools that have taken over three hundred years to develop. Statistical estimators in clinical trials function appropriately when they incorporate random data that is gathered in response to a fixed research question. Their prediction ability degrades rapidly when the selection of the research question is itself random, that is, left to the data. Operating like blind guides, these estimators mislead the medical community about what it would see in the population, based on sample observations. The result is a wavering research focus, leaping from one provocative but misleading finding to the next on the powerful waves of sampling error. Therefore, a primary purpose of the prospective design is to fix the research questions prospectively, thereby anchoring the analysis plan. Prospective statements of the research questions and rejection of tempting databased changes to the protocol preserve the best estimates of effect sizes, standard errors, confidence intervals and p-values. Embracing these principles promotes the prosecution of a successful research program, that is, the construction and protection of a research environment that permits an objective assessment of the therapy or exposure being studied. If there is any fixed star in the research constellation, it is that sample-based research must be hypothesis-driven and concordantly executed to have real meaning for both the scientific community and the patient populations that we serve.

  4. Constructive Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, G. Roy

    1985-01-01

    As complaints about the lack of discipline in schools increase, more educators are turning to student conduct codes as one component of a discipline program. In setting up an effective conduct code, the top priority should be clear communication of rules. To ensure this, all relevant parties--administrators, teachers, parents, and students--should…

  5. Diagnostic and functional structure of a high-resolution thyroid nodule clinic.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Mancha-Doblas, Isabel; Ortega-Jiménez, María Victoria; Ruiz-Escalante, José Francisco; Castells-Fusté, Ignasi; Tofé-Povedano, Santiago; Argüelles-Jiménez, Iñaki; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Appearance of a thyroid nodule has become a daily occurrence in clinical practice. Adequate thyroid nodule assessment requires several diagnostic tests and multiple medical appointments, which results in a substantial delay in diagnosis. Implementation of a high-resolution thyroid nodule clinic largely avoids these drawbacks by condensing in a single appointment all tests required for adequate evaluation of thyroid nodule. This paper reviews the diagnostic and functional structure of a high-resolution thyroid nodule clinic.

  6. Diagnostic considerations and prosthetic rehabilitation of a cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Hofstede, Theresa M; Jacob, Rhonda F

    2010-01-01

    The intranasal inhalation of cocaine has numerous complications. In addition to its systemic effects, cocaine can cause extensive destruction of the osteocartilaginous midline structures of the palate, nose, and sinuses. Without an accurate social and clinical history, a cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion can cause diagnostic difficulties, because its clinical presentation closely mimics other diseases. This clinical report describes an oronasal defect caused by cocaine use, the diagnostic considerations of these lesions, and prosthetic management of the defect. PMID:20105673

  7. Translating diagnostic assays from the laboratory to the clinic: analytical and clinical metrics for device development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Thompson, Matthew J; Posner, Jonathan D

    2016-04-21

    As lab-on-a-chip health diagnostic technologies mature, there is a push to translate them from the laboratory to the clinic. For these diagnostics to achieve maximum impact on patient care, scientists and engineers developing the tests should understand the analytical and clinical statistical metrics that determine the efficacy of the test. Appreciating and using these metrics will benefit test developers by providing consistent measures to evaluate analytical and clinical test performance, as well as guide the design of tests that will most benefit clinicians and patients. This paper is broken into four sections that discuss metrics related to general stages of development including: (1) laboratory assay development (analytical sensitivity, limit of detection, analytical selectivity, and trueness/precision), (2) pre-clinical development (diagnostic sensitivity, diagnostic specificity, clinical cutoffs, and receiver-operator curves), (3) clinical use (prevalence, predictive values, and likelihood ratios), and (4) case studies from existing clinical data for tests relevant to the lab-on-a-chip community (HIV, group A strep, and chlamydia). Each section contains definitions of recommended statistical measures, as well as examples demonstrating the importance of these metrics at various stages of the development process. Increasing the use of these metrics in lab-on-a-chip research will improve the rigor of diagnostic performance reporting and provide a better understanding of how to design tests that will ultimately meet clinical needs. PMID:27043204

  8. A semi-automated, field-portable microscopy platform for clinical diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Srinivasan, Rajesh; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2015-08-01

    Clinical microscopy is a versatile diagnostic platform used for diagnosis of a multitude of diseases. In the recent past, many microfluidics based point-of-care diagnostic devices have been developed, which serve as alternatives to microscopy. However, these point-of-care devices are not as multi-functional and versatile as clinical microscopy. With the use of custom designed optics and microfluidics, we have developed a versatile microscopy-based cellular diagnostic platform, which can be used at the point of care. The microscopy platform presented here is capable of detecting infections of very low parasitemia level (in a very small quantity of sample), without the use of any additional computational hardware. Such a cost-effective and portable diagnostic device, would greatly impact the quality of health care available to people living in rural locations of the world. Apart from clinical diagnostics, it's applicability to field research in environmental microbiology has also been outlined.

  9. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR... FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.506 Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory...

  10. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O’Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes. PMID:26392755

  11. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  12. The Added Value of the Combined Use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule: Diagnostic Validity in a Clinical Swedish Sample of Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zander, Eric; Sturm, Harald; Bölte, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic validity of the new research algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the revised algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was examined in a clinical sample of children aged 18-47 months. Validity was determined for each instrument separately and their combination against a clinical consensus…

  13. Diagnostic measure to quantify loss of clinical components in multi-lead electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, R K; Sharma, L N; Dandapat, S

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, a novel principal component (PC)-based diagnostic measure (PCDM) is proposed to quantify loss of clinical components in the multi-lead electrocardiogram (MECG) signals. The analysis of MECG shows that, the clinical components are captured in few PCs. The proposed diagnostic measure is defined as the sum of weighted percentage root mean square difference (PRD) between the PCs of original and processed MECG signals. The values of the weight depend on the clinical importance of PCs. The PCDM is tested over MECG enhancement and a novel MECG data reduction scheme. The proposed measure is compared with weighted diagnostic distortion, wavelet energy diagnostic distortion and PRD. The qualitative evaluation is performed using Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient (SROCC) and Pearson linear correlation coefficient. The simulation result demonstrates that the PCDM performs better to quantify loss of clinical components in MECG and shows a SROCC value of 0.9686 with subjective measure. PMID:27222735

  14. Salivary biomarkers: toward future clinical and diagnostic utilities.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Janice M; Schafer, Christopher A; Schafer, Jason J; Farrell, James J; Paster, Bruce J; Wong, David T W

    2013-10-01

    The pursuit of timely, cost-effective, accurate, and noninvasive diagnostic methodologies is an endeavor of urgency among clinicians and scientists alike. Detecting pathologies at their earliest stages can significantly affect patient discomfort, prognosis, therapeutic intervention, survival rates, and recurrence. Diagnosis and monitoring often require painful invasive procedures such as biopsies and repeated blood draws, adding undue stress to an already unpleasant experience. The discovery of saliva-based microbial, immunologic, and molecular biomarkers offers unique opportunities to bypass these measures by utilizing oral fluids to evaluate the condition of both healthy and diseased individuals. Here we discuss saliva and its significance as a source of indicators for local, systemic, and infectious disorders. We highlight contemporary innovations and explore recent discoveries that deem saliva a mediator of the body's physiological condition. Additionally, we examine the current state of salivary diagnostics and its associated technologies, future aspirations, and potential as the preferred route of disease detection, monitoring, and prognosis. PMID:24092855

  15. Interesting clinical presentation of anterior knee pain causing diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Samer S; Balasubramanian, S; Teanby, D

    2009-09-01

    A diverse variety of lesions may occasionally occur in the patella. In this case report, we are presenting an interesting case of anterior knee pain in middle aged gentleman. Initial investigations including Magnetic Resonance Imaging not showed any abnormality. Due to prolonged continued pain he had bone scan and MRI, which confirmed the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess. We are presenting this case of Brodie's abscess of the patella causing diagnostic dilemma because of its rarity.

  16. Destruction thresholds of echogenic liposomes with clinical diagnostic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise A B; Porter, Tyrone M; Martinez, Janet; Huang, Shaoling; MacDonald, Robert C; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2007-05-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are submicron-sized phospholipid vesicles that contain both gas and fluid. With antibody conjugation and drug incorporation, these liposomes can be used as novel targeted diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound contrast agents. The utility of liposomes for contrast depends upon their stability in an acoustic field, whereas the use of liposomes for drug delivery requires the liberation of encapsulated gas and drug payload at the desired treatment site. The objective of this study was twofold: (1) to characterize the stability of liposome echogenicity after reconstitution and (2) to quantitate the acoustic destruction thresholds of liposomes as a function of peak rarefactional pressure (P(r)), pulse duration (PD) and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The liposomes were insonified in an anechoic sample chamber using a Philips HDI 5000 diagnostic ultrasound scanner with a L12-5 linear array. Liposome stability was evaluated with 6.9-MHz fundamental and 4.5-MHz harmonic B-mode pulses at various P(r) at a fixed PRF. Liposome destruction thresholds were determined using 6.0-MHz Doppler pulses, by varying the PD with a fixed PRF of 1.25 kHz and by varying the PRF with a fixed PD of 3.33 micros. Videos or freeze-captured images were acquired during each insonation experiment and analyzed for echogenicity in a fixed region of interest as a function of time. An initial increase in echogenicity was observed for fundamental and harmonic B-mode imaging pulses. The threshold for acoustically driven diffusion of gas out of the liposomes using 6.0-MHz Doppler pulses was weakly dependent upon PRF and PD. The rapid fragmentation thresholds, however, were highly dependent upon PRF and PD. The quantification of acoustic destruction thresholds of ELIP is an important first step in their development as diagnostic and drug delivery agents.

  17. Diagnostic Consideration for Sinonasal Wegener's Granulomatosis Clinically Mistaken for Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Cristina; Emmanuele, Carmela; Tranchina, Maria Grazia; Ippolito, Massimo; Cosentino, Sebastiano; Saita, Vincenzo; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Wegener's granulomatosis clinically mistaken for carcinoma in a 21-year-old girl presenting with an ulcerated mass of the nasopharynx associated with enlarged laterocervical nodes. The lesion was clinically suspected as malignant on the basis of clinical and radiological findings (namely, computed tomography scan and positron emission tomography). However, multiple biopsies were not conclusive for malignancy showing histological change suggestive of Wegener's granulomatosis. A serum determination of cANCA supported the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. Clinical findings and image studies suggested an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy whereas a definitive diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis was achieved only after repeated biopsies thus leading to a correct therapeutic approach. The Wegener granulomatosis must be added to the list of the differential diagnoses of the masses of the nasopharynx associated with or without enlarged laterocervical nodes. PMID:24106630

  18. Clinical diagnostic clues in Crohn's disease: a 41-year experience.

    PubMed

    Quintana, C; Galleguillos, L; Benavides, E; Quintana, J C; Zúñiga, A; Duarte, I; Klaassen, J; Kolbach, M; Soto, R M; Iacobelli, S; Alvarez, M; O'Brien, A

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data?

  19. Cerebral radiation necrosis: diagnostic challenge and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Eisele, S C; Dietrich, J

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral radiation is an indispensable cornerstone in the treatment of many primary and metastatic brain tumors. However, besides its desired therapeutic effect on tumor cells, a significant proportion of patients will experience neurotoxic side effects as the consequence of radiotherapy. Radiation necrosis can result in progressive neurological symptoms and radiographic changes. To differentiate radiation necrosis from progressive tumor based on imaging can pose a diagnostic challenge because the MRI characteristics may be similar in both situations. Therefore, surgical biopsy and pathological confirmation is sometimes necessary to guide further management. Effective treatment options for cerebral radiation necrosis exist and should be offered to symptomatic patients. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular processes underlying the development of radiation necrosis is necessary to prevent and minimize radiation-associated morbidity and to improve treatment strategies.

  20. Diagnostic agreement predicts treatment process and outcomes in youth mental health clinics.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Weisz, John R

    2008-10-01

    Several studies have documented low rates of agreement between clinician- and researcher-generated diagnoses. However, little is known about whether this lack of agreement has implications for the processes and outcomes of subsequent treatment. To study this possibility, the authors used diagnostic agreement to predict therapy engagement and outcomes for 197 youths treated in 5 community mental health clinics. Diagnostic agreement predicted better therapy engagement, with the agree group having fewer therapy no-shows and cancellations and a decreased likelihood of therapy dropout. Additionally, support for a link between agreement and treatment outcomes was found, as the agree group obtained larger reductions in parent-reported internalizing problems during treatment. These findings suggest that diagnostic accuracy may be an important precursor to successful treatment and highlight the importance of future research to find ways to incorporate standardized diagnostic procedures into clinical care settings. PMID:18837589

  1. High-throughput cell analysis and sorting technologies for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; Reece, Lisa M.; Szaniszlo, Peter; Prow, Tarl W.; Wang, Nan

    2001-05-01

    A number of theoretical and practical limits of high-speed flow cytometry/cell sorting are important for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. Three applications include: (1) stem cell isolation with tumor purging for minimal residual disease monitoring and treatment, (2) identification and isolation of human fetal cells from maternal blood for prenatal diagnostics and in-vitro therapeutics, and (3) high-speed library screening for recombinant vaccine production against unknown pathogens.

  2. Ceramics Studio to Podiatry Clinic: The Impact of Multimedia Resources in the Teaching of Practical Skills across Diverse Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, Ruth; Mathieson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on the experiences of students from two vastly different disciplines to both explore the theoretical background supporting the use of multimedia resources to teach practical skills and provide a qualitative evaluation of student perceptions and experiences of using bespoke resources. Within ceramics and podiatry, practical skills…

  3. Clinical and diagnostic aspects of gluten related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tovoli, Francesco; Masi, Chiara; Guidetti, Elena; Negrini, Giulia; Paterini, Paola; Bolondi, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Gluten is one of the most abundant and widely distributed components of food in many areas. It can be included in wheat, barley, rye, and grains such as oats, barley, spelt, kamut, and triticale. Gluten-containing grains are widely consumed; in particular, wheat is one of the world’s primary sources of food, providing up to 50% of the caloric intake in both industrialized and developing countries. Until two decades ago, celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders were believed to be exceedingly rare outside of Europe and were relatively ignored by health professionals and the global media. In recent years, however, the discovery of important diagnostic and pathogenic milestones led CD from obscurity to global prominence. In addition, interestingly, people feeding themselves with gluten-free products greatly outnumber patients affected by CD, fuelling a global consumption of gluten-free foods with approximately $2.5 billion in United States sales each year. The acknowledgment of other medical conditions related to gluten that has arisen as health problems, providing a wide spectrum of gluten-related disorders. In February 2011, a new nomenclature for gluten-related disorders was created at a consensus conference in London. In this review, we analyse innovations in the field of research that emerged after the creation of the new classification, with particular attention to the new European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines for CD and the most recent research about non-celiac gluten sensitivity. PMID:25789300

  4. Clinical and diagnostic aspects of gluten related disorders.

    PubMed

    Tovoli, Francesco; Masi, Chiara; Guidetti, Elena; Negrini, Giulia; Paterini, Paola; Bolondi, Luigi

    2015-03-16

    Gluten is one of the most abundant and widely distributed components of food in many areas. It can be included in wheat, barley, rye, and grains such as oats, barley, spelt, kamut, and triticale. Gluten-containing grains are widely consumed; in particular, wheat is one of the world's primary sources of food, providing up to 50% of the caloric intake in both industrialized and developing countries. Until two decades ago, celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders were believed to be exceedingly rare outside of Europe and were relatively ignored by health professionals and the global media. In recent years, however, the discovery of important diagnostic and pathogenic milestones led CD from obscurity to global prominence. In addition, interestingly, people feeding themselves with gluten-free products greatly outnumber patients affected by CD, fuelling a global consumption of gluten-free foods with approximately $2.5 billion in United States sales each year. The acknowledgment of other medical conditions related to gluten that has arisen as health problems, providing a wide spectrum of gluten-related disorders. In February 2011, a new nomenclature for gluten-related disorders was created at a consensus conference in London. In this review, we analyse innovations in the field of research that emerged after the creation of the new classification, with particular attention to the new European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines for CD and the most recent research about non-celiac gluten sensitivity. PMID:25789300

  5. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  6. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  7. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-09-09

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample.

  8. Clinical and neuropathological picture of ethylmalonic aciduria - diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, Ewa; Paprocka, Justyna; Adamek, Dariusz; Pytel, Justyna; Szczechowska, Katarzyna; Grabska, Natalia; Malec, Michalina; Głuszkiewicz, Ewa; Daab, Michał; Wodołażski, Anatolij

    2011-01-01

    Increased ethylmalonic acid (EMA) in urine is a non-specific finding, and is observed in a number of inborn errors of metabolism, as well as in individuals who carry one of two common polymorphisms identified in the SCAD coding region. The authors present an 8-month-old girl with a suspicion of neuroinfection, although the clinical presentation led to diagnosis of ethylmalonic aciduria. From the neuropathological point of view the most remarkable changes were observed in the brain cortex, which was diffusely damaged practically in all regions of the brain. Of note, the most severe destruction was observed in the deepest regions of the sulci. The cortex of the affected regions showed no normal stratification and its structure was almost totally replaced by a form of "granulation tissue" with a markedly increased number of capillaries. To the authors' knowledge this is the first clinical report of ethylmalonic aciduria with brain autopsy findings.

  9. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (58). Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Kaw, G J; Sitoh, Y Y

    2001-02-01

    A 36-year-old Korean man presented with a history of epilepsy. MR imaging of the brain revealed multiple conglomerated round nodules that were hypointense on both T1-and-T2 weighted images. These were located at the left temporal and occipital lobes and had surrounding encephalomalacia. CT scan confirmed the presence of large calcified nodules in the corresponding regions. These imaging findings were typical of chronic cerebral paragonimiasis. The clinical, CT and MR features of cerebral paragonimiasis are reviewed.

  10. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (90). Childhood nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ng, B K; Chong, C L; Tan, A M; Hwang, W S

    2003-10-01

    An 11-year-old boy presented with a nasopharyngeal mass that was thought to represent a juvenile angiofibroma based on the initial clinical and radiological evaluation. Partial tumour resection was performed. Resected specimen revealed histological diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma. Further evaluation of the tumour including MR imaging, radioisotope bone scan, CT thorax and abdomen were performed. Differential diagnoses of childhood nasopharyngeal masses were discussed. The differences between childhood NPC and adult NPC, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant lymphoma and juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma were also discussed.

  11. Intrathecal administration of iopamidol in children: clinical and diagnostic results.

    PubMed

    Wells, R G; Seidel, F G; Sty, J R; Swick, H M

    1988-01-01

    An open label, noncomparative clinical trial of intrathecal iopamidol in children was performed. Sixty-one subjects between the ages of 24 days and 17 years were studied. Opacification of the subarachnoid space was adequate in all cases. Mild adverse reactions were detected in 10% of the participants. Seizures, EEG alterations or other severe reactions did not occur. The findings confirm the efficacy and safety of iopamidol as an intrathecal contrast medium in pediatrics.

  12. Diagnostic value of magnetocardiography in coronary artery disease and cardiac arrhythmias: a review of clinical data.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Joey S W; Leithäuser, Boris; Park, Jai-Wun; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2013-09-01

    Despite the availability of several advanced non-invasive diagnostic tests such as echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging, electrocardiography (ECG) remains as the most widely used diagnostic technique in clinical cardiology. ECG detects electrical potentials that are generated by cardiac electrical activity. In addition to electrical potentials, the same electrical activity of the heart also induces magnetic fields. These extremely weak cardiac magnetic signals are detected by a non-invasive, contactless technique called magnetocardiography (MCG), which has been evaluated in a number of clinical studies for its usefulness in diagnosing heart diseases. We reviewed the basic principles, history and clinical data on the diagnostic role of MCG in coronary artery disease and cardiac arrhythmias.

  13. Evidence of clinical utility: an unmet need in molecular diagnostics for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, David R; McCormack, Robert T; Keating, Susan M; Gutman, Steven I; Hamilton, Stanley R; Mansfield, Elizabeth A; Piper, Margaret A; Deverka, Patricia; Frueh, Felix W; Jessup, J Milburn; McShane, Lisa M; Tunis, Sean R; Sigman, Caroline C; Kelloff, Gary J

    2014-03-15

    This article defines and describes best practices for the academic and business community to generate evidence of clinical utility for cancer molecular diagnostic assays. Beyond analytical and clinical validation, successful demonstration of clinical utility involves developing sufficient evidence to demonstrate that a diagnostic test results in an improvement in patient outcomes. This discussion is complementary to theoretical frameworks described in previously published guidance and literature reports by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Institute of Medicine, and Center for Medical Technology Policy, among others. These reports are comprehensive and specifically clarify appropriate clinical use, adoption, and payer reimbursement for assay manufacturers, as well as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratories, including those that develop assays (laboratory developed tests). Practical criteria and steps for establishing clinical utility are crucial to subsequent decisions for reimbursement without which high-performing molecular diagnostics will have limited availability to patients with cancer and fail to translate scientific advances into high-quality and cost-effective cancer care. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "The Precision Medicine Conundrum: Approaches to Companion Diagnostic Co-development." PMID:24634466

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of preoperative clinical examination in upper limb injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Shemshaki, Hamidreza; Eshaghi, Mohammad Amin; Teimouri, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Injuries in hands and forearms may cause significant discomfort and disability. Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative clinical examination in depicting lesions caused by penetrating wounds of hands or forearms. Setting and Design: This prospective study was conducted from August 2006 to September 2009 at Kashani University Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients with clean penetrating injury to the hand/forearm were enrolled in this study. After patient's data registration, a careful clinical examination and routine exploration without expansion of wound were done by an orthopedic resident. Each tendon was tested at each joint level. Nerves were evaluated with a two-point discrimination test, and arteries were tested with palpable pulses. Surgical exploration was done by a single hand surgeon in operation room. Accuracy of clinical examination was compared to surgical examination. Results: During the study period, 180 (72%) males and 70 (28%) females with mean age of 28±4 years participated. The preoperative examination showed a predominance of the volar zone IV injuries followed by volar zone II, III, thumb zone II, volar zone V and thumb zone III. Despite the enough accuracy of preoperative examinations in dorsal side injuries of hands and forearms (error rate = 8.3%), the preoperative examinations significantly underestimated the amount of damage to soft tissues on the volar side of hands and forearms (error rate = 14%). Conclusions: The precise surgical evaluations should be considered in patients with penetrating injury to the hand or forearm, especially in those with volar side injuries. PMID:22090738

  15. [Modern clinical and radiological approach to diagnostics of odontogenic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Khomutova, E Yu; Ignat'ev, Yu T; Demyanchuk, A N; Demyanchuk, A B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the maxillary sinuses affect up to 70% of the adult population. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis represents 13-86% of the inflammatory processes of maxillofacial area, with the incidence range being explained rather by varying diagnosis criteria than the true incidence difference of odontogenic lesions. The aim of the study was to summarize the clinical and radiological characteristics of odontogenic sinusitis according to patients records in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery of Omsk Clinical Hospital No11 and the oral surgery department of BUZ GKSP No1 in 2009-2014. A total of 948 records of patient (aged 17 to 68 years) with maxillary sinusitis were identified. X-ray examinations were performed by CT PISASSO TRIO ("KoYo", South Korea) and MSCT Brillians 6 and Brillians 64 ((Philips HealthCare), Netherlands). Images were obtained in axial projection with slice thickness of 0.2-0.6 mm with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) in a variety of direct and oblique projections. Altogether 664 patients were diagnosed with foreign bodies in the maxillary sinuses (filling material in 569 cases, roots or root fragments? implants, rubber drains, fragments of endodontic instruments in 95 cases). In 284 persons odontogenic cysts were found. Almost every fifth case was complicated by mycotic infection. Analysis of the results showed that only a multidisciplinary approach including dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, otolaryngologists and radiologists, as well as dental volumetric tomography or multislice CT can ensure the correct clinical and radiological approaches to determine the tactics of treatment in patients with sinusitis, reduce the incidence of relapses and chronic inflammatory processes in the maxillary sinuses.

  16. Anti-Ku antibodies: Clinical, genetic and diagnostic insights.

    PubMed

    Belizna, C; Henrion, D; Beucher, A; Lavigne, C; Ghaali, A; Lévesque, H

    2010-08-01

    Anti-Ku antibodies are reported in various connective tissue diseases and the Ku complex can be responsible for a very strong autoimmune answer in autoimmune disease. Nowadays, anti-Ku antibodies are detected by ELISA, counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE), immunoblot (IB) and new highly performant techniques. Although the prevalence of anti-Ku antibodies is not homogenous, depending on several features such as disease type, genetic and geographical clustering, and also method of detection, they could be found in 55% overlap PM/systemic sclerosis patients. Moreover, anti-Ku antibodies are not associated with a particular clinical outcome, and especially with cancer related to myositis.

  17. Towards a Role for Clinical Pathology Diagnostics for Childhood Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, EL; Ji, J; Trickett, P; Kaplan, CD; Mennen, F

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports from the Center for Disease Control and Kaiser Permanente demonstrate that early life adverse experience leads to morbidity and mortality in adulthood. To date there are no objective tests that help care-givers or local child protective services make informed decisions for children with a history of abuse, neglect or trauma. This is the first report from a new group of trans-disciplinary investigators describing a new approach to identify the biological impact of childhood maltreatment using clinical pathology testing. Such new quantitative measurements will be useful to identify children at risk for poor mental and physical health outcomes and to follow response to interventions. PMID:26640822

  18. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (114). Rupture of the right testis.

    PubMed

    Muttarak, M; Thinyu, S; Lojanapiwat, B

    2007-03-01

    A 22-year-old man, who was kicked in the scrotum during Thai kickboxing, presented with a painful swelling of the right hemiscrotum. Scrotal ultrasonography (US) showed an enlarged right testis with heterogeneous echogenicity and irregular contours. Colour Doppler US showed vascularity in the upper pole of the right testis and avascularity in the lower pole. Emergency exploration of the right hemiscrotum revealed laceration of the lower pole of the right testis. Debridement and repair of the right testis were performed. The clinical manifestations, role of US and US findings of scrotal trauma are discussed.

  19. Paper-based diagnostic devices for clinical paraquat poisoning diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Chen-Meng; Lin, Szu-Ting; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Wang, Yu-Lin; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-05-01

    This article unveils the development of a paper-based analytical device designed to rapidly detect and clinically diagnose paraquat (PQ) poisoning. Using wax printing technology, we fabricated a PQ detection device by pattering hydrophobic boundaries on paper. This PQ detection device employs a colorimetric sodium dithionite assay or an ascorbic acid assay to indicate the PQ level in a buffer system or in a human serum system in 10 min. In this test, colorimetric changes, blue in color, were observable with the naked eye. By curve fitting models of sodium dithionite and ascorbic acid assays in normal human serum, we evaluated serum PQ levels for five PQ-poisoned patients before hemoperfusion (HP) treatment and one PQ-poisoned patient after HP treatment. As evidenced by similar detection outcomes, the analytical performance of our device can compete with that of the highest clinical standard, i.e., spectrophotometry, with less complicated sample preparation and with more rapid results. Accordingly, we believe that our rapid PQ detection can benefit physicians determining timely treatment strategies for PQ-poisoned patients once they are taken to hospitals, and that this approach will increase survival rates. PMID:27462379

  20. Gaucher disease in Iraqi children (Clinical, diagnostic & therapeutic aspects)

    PubMed Central

    Thejeal, Rabab Farhan; Kadhum, Ausama Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Gaucher disease is the most common inherited lysosomal storage disorder. It is a multi organ disease affecting bone marrow, liver, spleen, lungs, and other organs contributes to pancytopenia and massive hepatosplenomegaly. This study aimed to spotlight on clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Gaucher disease to raise awareness among physicians about the disease and to evaluate the outcome of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Methods: Clinical courses were reviewed in 30 patients with age (2-22 years) with Gaucher disease. After starting (ERT), assessment of response included serial measurements of hematological parameters, spleen and liver sizes, symptoms and signs of bone disease, growth and severity scores were also evaluated. Results: The most presenting age group was (1 – 5) years (60%). Abdominal distension was the most common presenting symptom, Splenomegaly presented in all of the patients. A significant response to ERT was observed, weight and height increased, both liver and spleen sizes decreased. Hemoglobin level normalizedin (67%) of the anemic patients, platelet count normalized in (53.8%)after 6 months from (ERT), the mean of severity scoring index decreased with ERT from (10.2±5.8) to (7.8±5.7) after one year of treatment. Conclusion: Using ERT was safe and effective in the reversal of hematological complications and organomegaly in most of the patients. PMID:27182231

  1. [Diagnostics of the genetic causes of autism spectrum disorders - a clinical geneticist's view].

    PubMed

    Szczaluba, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the genetic basis of autism spectrum disorders has, for many decades, been a part of interest of researchers and clinicians. In recent years, thanks to modern molecular and cytogenetic techniques, a significant progress has been achieved in the diagnosis of genetic causes of autism. This applies particularly, but not exclusively, to those cases of autism that are accompanied by other clinical signs (i. e. complex phenotypes). The important clinical markers belong to different categories, and include congenital defects/anomalies, dysmorphism and macro-/microcephaly, to name the few. Thus, the choice of the diagnostic strategy depends on the clinical and pedigree information and, under Polish circumstances, the availability of specific diagnostic techniques and the amount of reimbursement under the National Health Service. Overall, the identification of the genetic causes of autism spectrum disorders is possible in about 10-30% of patients. In this paper the practical aspects of the use of different diagnostic techniques are briefly described. Some clinical examples and current recommendations for the diagnosis of patients with autism spectrum disorders are also presented. The point of view of a specialist in clinical genetics, increasingly involved, as part of the multidisciplinary care team, in the diagnostics of an autistic child has been demonstrated.

  2. Severe scrub typhus infection: Clinical features, diagnostic challenges and management

    PubMed Central

    Peter, John Victor; Sudarsan, Thomas I; Prakash, John Anthony J; Varghese, George M

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus infection is an important cause of acute undifferentiated fever in South East Asia. The clinical picture is characterized by sudden onset fever with chills and non-specific symptoms that include headache, myalgia, sweating and vomiting. The presence of an eschar, in about half the patients with proven scrub typhus infection and usually seen in the axilla, groin or inguinal region, is characteristic of scrub typhus. Common laboratory findings are elevated liver transaminases, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis. About a third of patients admitted to hospital with scrub typhus infection have evidence of organ dysfunction that may include respiratory failure, circulatory shock, mild renal or hepatic dysfunction, central nervous system involvement or hematological abnormalities. Since the symptoms and signs are non-specific and resemble other tropical infections like malaria, enteric fever, dengue or leptospirosis, appropriate laboratory tests are necessary to confirm diagnosis. Serological assays are the mainstay of diagnosis as they are easy to perform; the reference test is the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the detection of IgM antibodies. However in clinical practice, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay is done due to the ease of performing this test and a good sensitivity and sensitivity when compared with the IFA. Paired samples, obtained at least two weeks apart, demonstrating a ≥ 4 fold rise in titre, is necessary for confirmation of serologic diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is the tetracycline group of antibiotics or chloramphenicol although macrolides are used alternatively. In mild cases, recovery is complete. In severe cases with multi-organ failure, mortality may be as high as 24%. PMID:26261776

  3. Severe scrub typhus infection: Clinical features, diagnostic challenges and management.

    PubMed

    Peter, John Victor; Sudarsan, Thomas I; Prakash, John Anthony J; Varghese, George M

    2015-08-01

    Scrub typhus infection is an important cause of acute undifferentiated fever in South East Asia. The clinical picture is characterized by sudden onset fever with chills and non-specific symptoms that include headache, myalgia, sweating and vomiting. The presence of an eschar, in about half the patients with proven scrub typhus infection and usually seen in the axilla, groin or inguinal region, is characteristic of scrub typhus. Common laboratory findings are elevated liver transaminases, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis. About a third of patients admitted to hospital with scrub typhus infection have evidence of organ dysfunction that may include respiratory failure, circulatory shock, mild renal or hepatic dysfunction, central nervous system involvement or hematological abnormalities. Since the symptoms and signs are non-specific and resemble other tropical infections like malaria, enteric fever, dengue or leptospirosis, appropriate laboratory tests are necessary to confirm diagnosis. Serological assays are the mainstay of diagnosis as they are easy to perform; the reference test is the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the detection of IgM antibodies. However in clinical practice, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay is done due to the ease of performing this test and a good sensitivity and sensitivity when compared with the IFA. Paired samples, obtained at least two weeks apart, demonstrating a ≥ 4 fold rise in titre, is necessary for confirmation of serologic diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is the tetracycline group of antibiotics or chloramphenicol although macrolides are used alternatively. In mild cases, recovery is complete. In severe cases with multi-organ failure, mortality may be as high as 24%.

  4. Early lymphoid lesions: conceptual, diagnostic and clinical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Karthik A.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Odejide, Oreofe O.; Freedman, Arnold S.; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2014-01-01

    There are no “benign lymphomas”, a fact due to the nature of lymphoid cells to circulate and home as part of their normal function. Thus, benign clonal expansions of lymphocytes are only rarely recognized when localized. Recent studies have identified a number of lymphoid proliferations that lie at the interface between benign and malignant. Some of these are clonal proliferations that carry many of the molecular hallmarks of their malignant counterparts, such as BCL2/IGH and CCND1/IGH translocations associated with the in situ forms of follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, respectively. There are other clonal B-cell proliferations with low risk of progression; these include the pediatric variants of follicular lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma. Historically, early or incipient forms of T/NK-cell neoplasia also have been identified, such as lymphomatoid papulosis and refractory celiac disease. More recently an indolent form of T-cell lymphoproliferative disease affecting the gastrointestinal tract has been described. Usually, CD8+, the clonal cells are confined to the mucosa. The clinical course is chronic, but non-progressive. NK-cell enteropathy is a clinically similar condition, composed of cytologically atypical NK-cells that may involve the stomach, small bowel or colon. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a cytologically alarming lesion that is self-limited if confined to the seroma cavity. Atypical lymphoid proliferations that lie at the border of benign and malignant can serve as instructive models of lymphomagenesis. It is also critical that they be correctly diagnosed to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful therapy. PMID:25176983

  5. Diagnostic Assessment of Osteosarcoma Chemoresistance Based on Virtual Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rejniak, K.A.; Lloyd, M.C.; Reed, D.R.; Bui, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in pediatric and young adult patients. Successful treatment of osteosarcomas requires a combination of surgical resection and systemic chemotherapy, both neoadjuvant (prior to surgery) and adjuvant (after surgery). The degree of necrosis following neoadjuvant chemotherapy correlates with the subsequent probability of disease-free survival. Tumors with less than 10% of viable cells after treatment represent patients with a more favorable prognosis. However, being able to predict early, such as at the time of the pre-treatment tumor biopsy, how the patient will respond to the standard chemotherapy would provide an opportunity for more personalized patient care. Patients with unfavorable predictions could be studied in a protocol, rather than a standard setting, towards improving therapeutic success. The onset of necrotic cells in osteosarcomas treated with chemotherapeutic agents is a measure of tumor sensitivity to the drugs. We hypothesize that the remaining viable cells, i.e., cells that have not responded to the treatment, are chemoresistant, and that the pathological characteristics of these chemoresistant tumor cells within the osteosarcoma pre-treatment biopsy can predict tumor response to the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic treatment. This hypothesis can be tested by comparing patient histopathology samples before, as well as after treatment to identify both morphological and immunochemical cellular features that are characteristic of chemoresistant cells, i.e., cells that survived treatment. Consequently, using computational simulations of dynamic changes in tumor pathology under the simulated standard of care chemotherapeutic treatment, one can couple the pre- and post-treatment morphological and spatial patterns of chemoresistant cells, and correlate them with patient clinical diagnoses. This procedure, that we named ‘Virtual Clinical Trials’, can serve as a potential predictive biomarker providing a

  6. Diagnostic tests for influenza and other respiratory viruses: determining performance specifications based on clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Patterson, Bruce K

    2010-06-01

    The lack of sensitivity of rapid immunoassays in detecting the novel 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection has led to recommendations on influenza diagnostic testing for clinicians treating patients as well as advising clinicians on testing decisions. Studies have also shown that rapid immunoassays for seasonal influenza virus show considerable variability in performance characteristics, based on age of patient, prevalence of disease, course of infection, and the quality of the kit used. While public health authorities are currently focused on influenza virus diagnostics, a lack of sensitivity of rapid immunoassays for other viral respiratory pathogens has been widely reported, such as the very limited value of rapid immunoassays for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus in adults. In light of the lack of sensitivity of diagnostic tests for suspected 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection, as well as their variable performance characteristics for seasonal influenza virus, a number of recommendations have been made by public health authorities advising clinicians on the need for clinical judgment as an important part of testing and treatment decisions as well as reliance on local epidemiologic and surveillance data. With the availability of new molecular methodologies that are user-friendly and allow the front-line physician as well as hospital infection control programs to significantly improve respiratory viral diagnostics, there is a need to carefully determine the most optimal diagnostic testing methodology based on the clinical setting. This review will describe the historical, current, and changing dynamics of respiratory virus infection diagnostics.

  7. Development and clinical evaluation of a rapid diagnostic kit for feline leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Shik; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Kim, Hak-Yong; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jeong, Wooseog; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jae-In

    2014-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) causes a range of neoplastic and degenerative diseases in cats. To obtain a more sensitive and convenient diagnosis of the disease, we prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for the FeLV p27 to develop a rapid diagnostic test with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Among these antibodies, we identified two clones (hybridomas 8F8B5 and 8G7D1) that specifically bound to FeLV and were very suitable for a diagnostic kit. The affinity constants for 8F8B5 and 8G7D1 were 0.35 × 109 and 0.86 × 109, respectively. To investigate the diagnostic abilities of the rapid kit using these antibodies, we performed several clinical studies. Assessment of analytical sensitivity revealed that the detection threshold of the rapid diagnostic test was 2 ng/mL for recombinant p27 and 12.5 × 104 IU/mL for FeLV. When evaluating 252 cat sera samples, the kit was found to have a kappa value of 0.88 compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating a significant correlation between data from the rapid diagnostic test and PCR. Sensitivity and specificity of the kit were 95.2% (20/21) and 98.5% (257/261), respectively. Our results demonstrated that the rapid diagnostic test would be a suitable diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of FeLV infection in cats. PMID:24136209

  8. The clinical benefits, ethics, and economics of stratified medicine and companion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Trusheim, Mark R; Berndt, Ernst R

    2015-12-01

    The stratified medicine companion diagnostic (CDx) cut-off decision integrates scientific, clinical, ethical, and commercial considerations, and determines its value to developers, providers, payers, and patients. Competition already sharpens these issues in oncology, and might soon do the same for emerging stratified medicines in autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, respiratory, and other conditions. Of 53 oncology targets with a launched therapeutic, 44 have competing therapeutics. Only 12 of 141 Phase III candidates addressing new targets face no competition. CDx choices might alter competitive positions and reimbursement. Under current diagnostic incentives, payers see novel stratified medicines that improve public health and increase costs, but do not observe companion diagnostics for legacy treatments that would reduce costs. It would be in the interests of payers to rediscover their heritage of direct investment in diagnostic development. PMID:26542060

  9. [Clinical and diagnostic contribution of childhood food allergy].

    PubMed

    Berjón, M C; Andión, R; Linares, P; Fernández, L A; Blanco, A

    1987-02-01

    Two thousand six hundred and ninety are reviewed and 148 cases of food allergy are found, aged 1 month to 14 years. Food allergy is 5.5%. Diagnosis was based on history, positive of dietary elimination-challenge and immunological investigations (skin tests, total serum IgE and RAST). Ninety four children (64%) were multisensitized. Ninety three children (63%) had multisystem involvement. The onset of iron deficiency anemia without responsive to the therapy was the manifestation in 7.8% of cow's milk protein or egg allergy children. There were not significative different between breast or bottle fed children. The symptoms occurred at the first known exposure to egg in 23.7% of egg hypersensitivity children and the same feature was observed in 17% of fish allergic children. The date indicate that food allergy has a clinical complexity. It may be useful to make easy its diagnosis to know some aspects regarding to sensitisation, immunological mechanism, effects of breast-feeding and pathogenesis of iron deficiency anemia without responsive to the therapy, an uncommon manifestation of food allergy. PMID:3565960

  10. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  11. A Diagnostic Approach to Autoimmune Disorders: Clinical Manifestations: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Shashi; Adams, Matthew; Kamat, Deepak

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune disorders are not commonly encountered in a general pediatric practice, but they may mimic many other disorders. Although they occur infrequently, it is always important to pause and consider an autoimmune disorder in the differential diagnosis. A detailed history and careful physical examination play an important role in guiding laboratory evaluation for these disorders. Many autoimmune disorders present with symptoms that involve multiple organ systems. The common symptoms that may make one consider a rheumatic disorder in the differential diagnosis are fever, fatigue, joint pain, rash, ulcers, and muscle weakness. The most common reason for referral to a pediatric rheumatologist is joint pain. A good joint examination may be performed by the use of the pediatric Gait, Arms, Legs, Spine screen, which is a validated screening tool. A small portion of children with fever of unknown origin may have an autoimmune disorder, with a majority of them having an infectious disease. Some patients with undiagnosed rheumatic disorders may present to the emergency. department. The characteristics of historic and clinical examination features of various autoimmune disorders are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e223-e229.]. PMID:27294498

  12. [Peripheral precocious puberty: clinical, diagnostic and therapeutical principles].

    PubMed

    Soriano Guillén, L; Argente, J

    2012-04-01

    Peripheral precocious puberty (PPP) is the result of the presence of precocious puberty due to the increase of sex steroids with no evidence of activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It is much less common than central precocious puberty (CPP) and it is secondary to either genetic disorders or very heterogeneous acquired diseases. In recent years, molecular advances have made remarkable progress in understanding the pathophysiology of some of these disorders, most notably in McCune-Albright syndrome and testotoxicosis. In addition, new imaging techniques and better hormone assays have improved the early diagnosis of acquired disorders, particularly tumour disease causing PPP. Unfortunately, medical advances in the diagnosis of these disorders have not been reflected in the medical treatment of McCune-Albright syndrome and testotoxicosis. Despite having tried various treatment options in both disorders, the results are very disappointing, especially in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome. To our knowledge, this failure is based on the absence of well-designed clinical trials that include an adequate number of patients followed up until the end of their growth.

  13. [Beta-thalassemias: molecular, epidemiological, diagnostical and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Pondarre, Corinne; Badens, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is one of most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. In France, 5 to 10 new major or intermedia forms are diagnosed annually and the global prevalence is about 500 cases. Since 20 years and thanks to the generalization of iron chelator treatments, the life expectancy has dramatically increased. Nearly 90% of the β-thalassemic alleles are point mutations easily identified by Sanger sequencing or dedicated methods. The remaining 10% are deletions detectable by MLPA or CGH Array. The alpha-globin genotype is also essential in the exploration of beta-thalassemia because an alpha-thalassemia improves the clinical state whereas an alpha triplication worsens it. The additional genotyping of a few HbF inducer polymorphisms allows to predict the age of the first transfusion, thanks to a recent dedicated algorithm, making beta-thalassemia one of the first potential application of predictive medicine. Gene therapy, pre-implantatory diagnosis and new drugs (Sotatercept®, hepcidin-like molecules) have also recently contributed to make beta-thalassemia a main scientific topic again. PMID:25486662

  14. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  15. [Cystinic nephrolythiasis: clinical experience and new diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gentili, Anna; Ria, Paolo; Lupo, Antonio; Fabris, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Cystinuria is an inherited autosomal recessive disease with a prevalence 1:7000 and typical age of onset in the second decade of life. This nephrolithiasis is not always well known and well studied and for this reason it is often underdiagnosed. Cystinuria is characterized by increased urinary excretion of cystine and dibasic amino acids (lysine, ornithine, arginine) caused by defective transport of these amino acids across the luminal membrane of proximal tubule and small intestine cells. Two mutated genes responsible of this tubular defect are SLC3A1 on chromosome 2 and SLC7A9 on chromosome 19. Clinical manifestations of cystinuria are essentially those related to stones formation and their movement across the urinary tract, like flank pain/abdomen pain and hematuria, as occurred in other nephrolithiasis types. Diagnosis is based on biochemical urine analysis, stone analysis and imaging. Genetic study of this disease may be a new and stimulating approach to better understand the defects and identify new therapeutic targets. A wider knowledge and a more detailed approach to cystinuria may help to ameliorate patients quality of life, to prevent recurrences and complications and to develop more specific and adequate treatments. PMID:27374390

  16. Impact of Crop Management Diagnostic Clinics on Advisors' Recommendations and Producer Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortmann, Charles S.; Glewen, Keith L.; Williams, Susan N.

    2011-01-01

    Adoption resulting from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Crop Management Diagnostic Clinic (CMDC) field days was evaluated using an on-line survey. Respondents reported significant gains in skills because of CMDC, but the gains were similar across skill areas. Adoption was affected by compatibility with the cropping system, relative advantage,…

  17. Significant roadblocks exist in developing sputum sample libraries for clinical validation of novel in vitro diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Dollow, Joshua M; Green, Justin A

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing rise of multiresistant pathogens, reliable, cost-effective, and novel diagnostics are urgently required by clinicians and clinical trialists to diagnose conditions such as respiratory tract infections to enable rational antimicrobial choice and enhance clinical outcomes. However, during product development, validation of these in vitro diagnostic devices, a key regulatory hurdle, requires sputum samples in large numbers. The Rapid Point-of-Care test Platform for Infectious Diseases (RAPP-ID) consortium is tasked with producing point of care test (POCT) platforms for rapid diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis and blood stream infections. Validation of diagnostic platforms would ideally use well-characterized samples in a sputum library taken from a range of clinical settings to allow for a wide panel of pathogens to be assessed. These samples would be stored in specific stable conditions (monitored temperature, specific medium) until required for validation. Therefore we reviewed the current literature for details of storage conditions of sputum samples and for previous validation studies of other diagnostic tests using this methodology. However, we conclude that little data exists, and thus the acquisition and successful storage of good quality clinical samples are major roadblocks in the validation of novel POCT platforms, and that while not without limitations, spiked sputum samples appear the best solution until sputum library laboratory techniques allowing careful preservation of pathogens are improved. PMID:24489460

  18. Use of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in a Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Cynthia A.; Murray, Donna S.; Akers, Rachel; Mitchell, Terry; Manning-Courtney, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) as it is commonly used in clinical practice. ADOS classifications were compared to final diagnoses given by a multidisciplinary team to 584 children referred for evaluation for possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical…

  19. Medicare Program; Medicare Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Payment System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-23

    This final rule implements requirements of section 216 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA), which significantly revises the Medicare payment system for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This final rule also announces an implementation date of January 1, 2018 for the private payor rate-based fee schedule required by PAMA. PMID:27373013

  20. Outbreak!: Teaching Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology Methodologies with an Interactive Online Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sherri; Smith, Geoffrey Battle

    2004-01-01

    Outbreak! is an online, interactive educational game that helps students and teachers learn and evaluate clinical microbiology skills. When the game was used in introductory microbiology laboratories, qualitative evaluation by students showed very positive responses and increased learning. Outbreak! allows students to design diagnostic tests and…

  1. Towards a rapid molecular diagnostic for melioidosis: Comparison of DNA extraction methods from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Leisha J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Bowers, Jolene R; Tuanyok, Apichai; Schupp, Jim; Engelthaler, David; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S; Currie, Bart J

    2012-01-01

    Optimising DNA extraction from clinical samples for Burkholderia pseudomallei Type III secretion system real-time PCR in suspected melioidosis patients confirmed that urine and sputum are useful diagnostic samples. Direct testing on blood remains problematic; testing DNA extracted from plasma was superior to DNA from whole blood or buffy coat.

  2. Medicare Program; Medicare Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Payment System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-23

    This final rule implements requirements of section 216 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA), which significantly revises the Medicare payment system for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This final rule also announces an implementation date of January 1, 2018 for the private payor rate-based fee schedule required by PAMA.

  3. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new...

  4. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new...

  5. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new...

  6. Comparative Capabilities of Clinical Assessment, Diagnostic Criteria, and Polysomnography in Detecting Sleep Bruxism

    PubMed Central

    Palinkas, Marcelo; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Rodrigues, Laíse Angélica Mendes; Bataglion, César; Siéssere, Selma; Semprini, Marisa; Regalo, Simone Cecilio Hallak

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic capability of signs and symptoms of sleep bruxism (SB) as per the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) criteria and a diagnostic grading system proposed by international experts for assessing SB. Methods: The study was conducted in three phases (interview, physical examination, and sleep studies). Subjects were asked about self-reported tooth grinding sounds occurring during sleep, muscle fatigue, temporal headaches, jaw muscle pain, and jaw locking. A visual examination was conducted to check for presence of abnormal tooth wear. A full-night polysomnography (PSG) was performed. After three phases, the subjects were divided into two groups matched by age and gender: Case Group, 45 SB subjects, and Control Group, 45 non-SB subjects. Diagnostic accuracy measurements were calculated for each sign or symptom individually and for the two diagnostic criteria analyzed. Results: Muscle fatigue, temporal headaches, and AASM criteria were associated with highest sensitivity (78%, 67%, 58%, respectively) and also with highest diagnostic odds ratio (OR = 9.63, 9.25, 6.33, respectively). Jaw locking, muscle pain, and the criterion of “probable SB” were associated with the worst sensitivity (16%, 18%, 22%, respectively). Conclusions: Presence of muscle fatigue and temporal headaches can be considered good tools to screen SB patients. None of the diagnostic criteria evaluated was able to accurately identify patients with SB. AASM criteria had the strongest diagnostic capabilities and—although they do not attain diagnostic values high enough to replace the current gold standard (PSG)—should be used as a screening tool to identify SB. Citation: Palinkas M, De Luca Canto G, Rodrigues LA, Bataglion C, Siéssere S, Semprini M, Regalo SC. Comparative capabilities of clinical assessment, diagnostic criteria, and polysomnography in detecting sleep bruxism. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1319–1325. PMID:26235152

  7. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  8. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  9. Conceptualization of category-oriented likelihood ratio: a useful tool for clinical diagnostic reasoning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the diagnostic reasoning process medical students and novice physicians need to be made aware of the diagnostic values of the clinical findings (including history, signs, and symptoms) to make an appropriate diagnostic decision. Diagnostic reasoning has been understood in light of two paradigms on clinical reasoning: problem solving and decision making. They advocate the reasoning strategies used by expert physicians and the statistical models of reasoning, respectively. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) applies decision theory to the clinical diagnosis, which can be a challenging topic in medical education. This theoretical article tries to compare evidence-based diagnosis with expert-based strategies in clinical diagnosis and also defines a novel concept of category-oriented likelihood ratio (LR) to propose a new model combining both aforementioned methods. Discussion Evidence-based medicine advocates the use of quantitative evidence to estimate the probability of diseases more accurately and objectively; however, the published evidence for a given diagnosis cannot practically be utilized in primary care, especially if the patient is complaining of a nonspecific problem such as abdominal pain that could have a long list of differential diagnoses. In this case, expert physicians examine the key clinical findings that could differentiate between broader categories of diseases such as organic and non-organic disease categories to shorten the list of differential diagnoses. To approach nonspecific problems, not only do the experts revise the probability estimate of specific diseases, but also they revise the probability estimate of the categories of diseases by using the available clinical findings. Summary To make this approach analytical and objective, we need to know how much more likely it is for a key clinical finding to be present in patients with one of the diseases of a specific category versus those with a disease not included in that category. In

  10. Feasibility of streamlining an interactive Bayesian-based diagnostic support tool designed for clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Hao; Botzolakis, Emmanuel; Mohan, Suyash; Bryan, R. N.; Cook, Tessa

    2016-03-01

    In radiology, diagnostic errors occur either through the failure of detection or incorrect interpretation. Errors are estimated to occur in 30-35% of all exams and contribute to 40-54% of medical malpractice litigations. In this work, we focus on reducing incorrect interpretation of known imaging features. Existing literature categorizes cognitive bias leading a radiologist to an incorrect diagnosis despite having correctly recognized the abnormal imaging features: anchoring bias, framing effect, availability bias, and premature closure. Computational methods make a unique contribution, as they do not exhibit the same cognitive biases as a human. Bayesian networks formalize the diagnostic process. They modify pre-test diagnostic probabilities using clinical and imaging features, arriving at a post-test probability for each possible diagnosis. To translate Bayesian networks to clinical practice, we implemented an entirely web-based open-source software tool. In this tool, the radiologist first selects a network of choice (e.g. basal ganglia). Then, large, clearly labeled buttons displaying salient imaging features are displayed on the screen serving both as a checklist and for input. As the radiologist inputs the value of an extracted imaging feature, the conditional probabilities of each possible diagnosis are updated. The software presents its level of diagnostic discrimination using a Pareto distribution chart, updated with each additional imaging feature. Active collaboration with the clinical radiologist is a feasible approach to software design and leads to design decisions closely coupling the complex mathematics of conditional probability in Bayesian networks with practice.

  11. [The characteristics of the clinical manifestations and diagnostic criteria of progressive tubal pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mundzhal, S; Zhuk, S I; Hryhorenko, A M

    2000-01-01

    An analysis was performed of clinical manifestations and chief diagnostic criteria of progressive tubal pregnancy to allow some judgement about their informative value. The findings secured show the presence of bloody discharges, gnawing pain in the lower area of the abdomen, nausea, vomiting to be of most informative value. In vaginal examination, the following findings can be regarded as main diagnostic criteria: the presence of tumour-like formation in the projection of the adnexa uteri, softening of the uterus sizes. The best supplementary investigatory methods capable of providing relevant information included determination of beta-HG by laboratory means, laparoscopic diagnosis and transvaginal ultrasonography.

  12. 42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.509 Section 414.509 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory...

  13. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory...

  14. The development of the ICD-11 Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines for Mental and Behavioural Disorders

    PubMed Central

    First, Michael B; Reed, Geoffrey M; Hyman, Steven E; Saxena, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization is in the process of preparing the eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), scheduled for presentation to the World Health Assembly for approval in 2017. The International Advisory Group for the Revision of the ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders made improvement in clinical utility an organizing priority for the revision. The uneven nature of the diagnostic information included in the ICD-10 Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (CDDG), especially with respect to differential diagnosis, is a major shortcoming in terms of its usefulness to clinicians. Consequently, ICD-11 Working Groups were asked to collate diagnostic information about the disorders under their purview using a standardized template (referred to as a “Content Form”). Using the information provided in the Content Forms as source material, the ICD-11 CDDG are being developed with a uniform structure. The effectiveness of this format in producing more consistent clinical judgments in ICD-11 as compared to ICD-10 is currently being tested in a series of Internet-based field studies using standardized case material, and will also be tested in clinical settings. PMID:25655162

  15. Prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain in clinical populations: implications for the diagnostic triage paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Marcuzzi, Anna

    2012-07-01

    SUMMARY Contemporary clinical assessment of back pain is based on the diagnostic triage paradigm. The most common diagnostic classification is nonspecific back pain, considered to be of nociceptive etiology. A small proportion are diagnosed with radicular pain, of neuropathic origin. In this study we review the body of literature on the prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain, revealing that the point prevalence is 17% in primary care, 34% in mixed clinical settings and 53% in tertiary care. There is evidence that neuropathic features of back pain are not restricted to typical clinical radicular pain phenotypes and may be under-recognized, particularly in primary care. The consequence of this is that in the clinic, diagnostic triage may erroneously classify patients with nonspecific back pain or radicular pain. A promising alternative is the development of mechanism-based pain phenotyping in patients with back pain. Timely identification of contributory pain mechanisms may enable greater opportunity to select appropriate therapeutic targets and improve patient outcomes.

  16. [Evaluation of the clinical diagnostic reasoning. Use of dynamic attractors as an alternative].

    PubMed

    Prado-Vega, Rodolfo; Zacatelco-Ramírez, Oliva R; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Ponce de León-Castañeda, Ma Eugenia

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply diagnostic clinical reasoning, based upon cognitive teaching, to help the student develop their own mental structure of an ailment or disease. Such a structure is built as mathematical chaotic deterministic type that can be evaluated through identification of dynamic attractors. To achieve our purpose, clinical diagnostic reasoning skills of two groups of students was compared against those of an expert through revision of 17 clinical cases. Such revision, selection of relevant data, allows for construction of conceptual maps in which several dynamic attractors can be identified, based on the largest number of connections that stem from some concepts. In the majority of cases, statistical analysis showed similarity among types of connections established by the expert; several similar dynamic attractors could be identified, leading us to conclude that cognitive-based teaching of diagnostic clinical reasoning is useful in developing this type of skill, and that it can be evaluated through identification of dynamic attractors. PMID:12404724

  17. Diagnostic Validity of Clinical Signs Associated with a Large Exophoria at Near

    PubMed Central

    Cacho-Martínez, Pilar; García-Muñoz, Ángel; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the diagnostic validity of accommodative and binocular tests in a sample of patients with a large near exophoria with moderate to severe symptoms. Methods. Two groups of patients between 19 and 35 years were recruited from a university clinic: 33 subjects with large exophoria at near vision and moderate or high visual discomfort and 33 patients with normal heterophoria and low visual discomfort. Visual discomfort was defined using the Conlon survey. A refractive exam and an exhaustive evaluation of accommodation and vergence were assessed. Diagnostic validity by means of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, sensitivity (S), specificity (Sp), and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+, LR−) were assessed. This analysis was also carried out considering multiple tests as serial testing strategy. Results. ROC analysis showed the best diagnostic accuracy for receded near point of convergence (NPC) recovery (area = 0.929) and binocular accommodative facility (BAF) (area = 0.886). Using the cut-offs obtained with ROC analysis, the best diagnostic validity was obtained for the combination of NPC recovery and BAF (S  =  0.77, Sp = 1, LR+ = value tending to infinity, LR− = 0.23) and the combination of NPC break and recovery with BAF (S  =  0.73, Sp = 1, LR+ = tending to infinity, LR− = 0.27). Conclusions. NPC and BAF tests were the tests with the best diagnostic accuracy for subjects with large near exophoria and moderate to severe symptoms. PMID:23997945

  18. Self-Disorders: Clinical and Conceptual Implications for the Diagnostic Concept of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Parnas, Josef; Jansson, Lennart B

    2015-01-01

    The release of DSM-5 and the preparations for the launch of the ICD-11 provoked a series of critiques of psychiatric classification, which continues to depend largely on clinical description. Among the immediate problems are those of arbitrary diagnostic thresholds, tendency to reification, rigid category boundaries, comorbidity, diagnostic 'epidemics' and differential diagnostic dilemmas. We argue that many of those problems stem from the polythetic-operational definitions of psychiatric categories, which thereby come to lack an organizing prototype-directed or gestaltic intelligibility principle. We illustrate these issues by briefly examining the current operational diagnosis of schizophrenia, its demarcation from affective illness and the status of the spectrum concept and the prodrome of schizophrenia. We point out that European research on schizophrenia always allocated an important diagnostic weight to a certain prototypical trait core of the illness, phenomenologically indispensable for its demarcation from other, nonschizophrenic psychotic conditions. We believe that the notion of self-disorder (reflective of the structural alterations of subjectivity), itemized into its various aspects in the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience scale, is an important step forward in a more precise psychopathological articulation of that core, strengthening its clinical and research utility. PMID:26346370

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of the clinical feeding evaluation in detecting aspiration in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Irene; Conway, Aifric; Henriques, Filipa; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of clinical feeding evaluation (CFE) compared to instrumental assessments in detecting oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) in children. This is important to support clinical decision-making and to provide safe, cost-effective, higher quality care. All published and unpublished studies in all languages assessing the diagnostic accuracy of CFE compared to videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and/or fibre-optic endoscopic examination of swallowing (FEES) in detecting OPA in paediatric populations were sought. Databases were searched from inception to April 2015. Grey literature, citations, and references were also searched. Two independent reviewers extracted and analysed data. Accuracy estimates were calculated. Research reports were translated into English as required. Six studies examining the diagnostic accuracy of CFE using VFSS and/or FEES were eligible for inclusion. Sample sizes, populations studied, and CFE characteristics varied widely. The overall methodological quality of the studies, assessed with QUADAS-2, was considered 'low'. Results suggested that CFEs trialling liquid consistencies might provide better accuracy estimates than CFEs trialling solids exclusively. This systematic review highlights the critical lack of evidence on the accuracy of CFE in detecting OPA in children. Larger well-designed primary diagnostic test accuracy studies in this area are needed to inform dysphagia assessment in paediatrics. PMID:26862075

  20. [The clinical manifestations and diagnostics of otitis media caused by tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kriukov, A I; Garov, E V; Ivoĭlov, A Y U; Shadrin, G B; Sidorina, N G; Lavrova, A S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the characteristic pathognomonic features of middle ear lesions associated with tuberculosis and the approaches to their diagnostics under the present-day conditions. The study included 11 cases (18 ears) of tuberculosis otitis media and the related lesions of the mastoid process diagnosed with the use of clinical, roentgenological, cytological, bacteriological, pathomorphological, and molecular-genetic methods (including PCR diagnostics). The primary localization of tuberculosis in the middle ear was documented in 6 patients; in 5 patients, it was associated with pulmonary involvement. Five patients presented with smoldering exudative otitis media and the remaining six ones with suppurative perforating otitis media. The tuberculous process was diagnosed with the use of various methods including clinical examination, bacteriological (9%), cytological (27.3%), pathomorphological (18%) studies, and PCR diagnostics (55%). Diagnosis was made within a period from 1 month to 1.5 years after the application of the patients for medical assistance which suggests the difficulty of verification of tuberculous etiology of the disease of the middle ear. It is concluded that the high index of suspicion in the case of smoldering middle ear pathology facilitates its early diagnostics and successful treatment.

  1. The Diagnostic Validity and Reliability of an Internet-Based Clinical Assessment Program for Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Britt; Meyer, Denny; Austin, David William; Abbott, Jo-Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet-based assessment has the potential to assist with the diagnosis of mental health disorders and overcome the barriers associated with traditional services (eg, cost, stigma, distance). Further to existing online screening programs available, there is an opportunity to deliver more comprehensive and accurate diagnostic tools to supplement the assessment and treatment of mental health disorders. Objective The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic criterion validity and test-retest reliability of the electronic Psychological Assessment System (e-PASS), an online, self-report, multidisorder, clinical assessment and referral system. Methods Participants were 616 adults residing in Australia, recruited online, and representing prospective e-PASS users. Following e-PASS completion, 158 participants underwent a telephone-administered structured clinical interview and 39 participants repeated the e-PASS within 25 days of initial completion. Results With structured clinical interview results serving as the gold standard, diagnostic agreement with the e-PASS varied considerably from fair (eg, generalized anxiety disorder: κ=.37) to strong (eg, panic disorder: κ=.62). Although the e-PASS’ sensitivity also varied (0.43-0.86) the specificity was generally high (0.68-1.00). The e-PASS sensitivity generally improved when reducing the e-PASS threshold to a subclinical result. Test-retest reliability ranged from moderate (eg, specific phobia: κ=.54) to substantial (eg, bulimia nervosa: κ=.87). Conclusions The e-PASS produces reliable diagnostic results and performs generally well in excluding mental disorders, although at the expense of sensitivity. For screening purposes, the e-PASS subclinical result generally appears better than a clinical result as a diagnostic indicator. Further development and evaluation is needed to support the use of online diagnostic assessment programs for mental disorders. Trial Registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials

  2. [INITIAL RESULTS OF DIAGNOSTIC APPLICATION OF ENDOBRONCHIAL ULTRASOUND IN CLINICAL HOSPITAL DUBRAVA].

    PubMed

    Zivković, Nevenka Piskac; Ostović, Karmen Trutin; Bosnjak, Danica; Tudorić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) enables visualization of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes as well as, in case of clinical indication, its transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA). Simultaneous application of color doppler gives the additional prospects to investigate the blood vessels. The primary indication for EBUS is radiographic finding of mediastinal and/or hilar lymph nodes enlargement as well as the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this article we present the initial results of application of this valuable diagnostic procedure performed at the Department for pulmonary diseases in Clinical hospital Dubrava in Zagreb. According to its high sensitivity and specificity, and being safe and well tolerated, EBUS-TBNA was positioned as basic diagnostic procedure in patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. PMID:27290812

  3. Vertigo in childhood: proposal for a diagnostic algorithm based upon clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Casani, A P; Dallan, I; Navari, E; Sellari Franceschini, S; Cerchiai, N

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse, after clinical experience with a series of patients with established diagnoses and review of the literature, all relevant anamnestic features in order to build a simple diagnostic algorithm for vertigo in childhood. This study is a retrospective chart review. A series of 37 children underwent complete clinical and instrumental vestibular examination. Only neurological disorders or genetic diseases represented exclusion criteria. All diagnoses were reviewed after applying the most recent diagnostic guidelines. In our experience, the most common aetiology for dizziness is vestibular migraine (38%), followed by acute labyrinthitis/neuritis (16%) and somatoform vertigo (16%). Benign paroxysmal vertigo was diagnosed in 4 patients (11%) and paroxysmal torticollis was diagnosed in a 1-year-old child. In 8% (3 patients) of cases, the dizziness had a post-traumatic origin: 1 canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal and 2 labyrinthine concussions, respectively. Menière's disease was diagnosed in 2 cases. A bilateral vestibular failure of unknown origin caused chronic dizziness in 1 patient. In conclusion, this algorithm could represent a good tool for guiding clinical suspicion to correct diagnostic assessment in dizzy children where no neurological findings are detectable. The algorithm has just a few simple steps, based mainly on two aspects to be investigated early: temporal features of vertigo and presence of hearing impairment. A different algorithm has been proposed for cases in which a traumatic origin is suspected.

  4. The impact of companion diagnostic device measurement performance on clinical validation of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Yu, Tinghui; Hu, Yun-Fu

    2015-06-30

    A key component of personalized medicine is companion diagnostics that measure biomarkers, for example, protein expression, gene amplification or specific mutations. Most of the recent attention concerning molecular cancer diagnostics has been focused on the biomarkers of response to therapy, such as V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer, epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in metastatic malignant melanoma. The presence or absence of these markers is directly linked to the response rates of particular targeted therapies with small-molecule kinase inhibitors or antibodies. Therefore, testing for these markers has become a critical step in the target therapy of the aforementioned tumors. The core capability of personalized medicine is the companion diagnostic devices' (CDx) ability to accurately and precisely stratify patients by their likelihood of benefit (or harm) from a particular therapy. There is no reference in the literature discussing the impact of device's measurement performance, for example, analytical accuracy and precision on treatment effects, variances, and sample sizes of clinical trial for the personalized medicine. In this paper, using both analytical and estimation method, we assessed the impact of CDx measurement performance as a function of positive and negative predictive values and imprecision (standard deviation) on treatment effects, variances of clinical outcome, and sample sizes for the clinical trials. PMID:25779099

  5. The porphyrias: clinic, diagnostics, novel investigative tools and evolving molecular therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    van Serooskerken, A-M van Tuyll; Poblete-Gutiérrez, P; Frank, J

    2010-01-01

    The porphyrias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous metabolic disorders resulting from a predominantly hereditary dysfunction of specific enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis. Today, the clinical, biochemical, and genetic characteristics of this fascinating group of diseases are well established. Recently, different in vitro and animal models have facilitated the investigation of etiopathologic mechanisms in the different types of porphyria and the development of causal treatment strategies such as pathway interference, enzyme replacement, and gene therapy. The continuous progress in basic science has made an invaluable contribution to the rapid translation of discoveries made in the laboratory into new diagnostics and therapeutics in the near future.

  6. A Vision for Better Health: Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Gemperline, Erin; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules from small molecules to large proteins by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. Its usefulness in biomarker discovery towards clinical applications has obtained success by correlating the molecular expression of tissues acquired from MSI with well-established histology. Results To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in clinical applications, such as biomarker diagnostics of different diseases, prognostics of disease severities and metabolic response to drug treatment, etc. These studies have provided significant insight in clinical studies over the years and current technical advances are further facilitating the improvement of this field. Although the underlying concept is simple, factors such as choice of ionization method, sample preparation, instrumentation and data analysis must be taken into account for successful applications of MSI. Herein, we briefly reviewed these key elements yet focused on the clinical applications of MSI that cannot be addressed by other means. Conclusions Challenges and future perspectives in this field are also discussed to conclude that the ever-growing applications with continuous development of this powerful analytical tool will lead to a better understanding of the biology of diseases and improvements in clinical diagnostics. PMID:23078851

  7. Clinical research and diagnostic efficacy studies in the oral and maxillofacial radiology literature: 1996–2005

    PubMed Central

    Kim, IH; Patel, MJ; Hirt, SL; Kantor, ML

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the level of evidence that is published in the oral and maxillofacial radiology (OMR) literature. Methods OMR papers published in Dentomaxillofacial Radiology and Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology between 1996 and 2005 were classified using epidemiological study design and diagnostic efficacy hierarchies. The country of origin and number of authors were noted. Results Of the 725 articles, 384 could be classified with the epidemiological study design hierarchy: 155 (40%) case reports/series and 207 (54%) cross-sectional studies. The distribution of study designs was not statistically significant across time (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.06) or regions (P = 0.89). The diagnostic efficacy hierarchy was applicable to 246 articles: 71 (29%) technical efficacy and 166 (67%) diagnostic accuracy studies. The distribution of efficacy levels was not statistically significant across time (P = 0.22) but was significant across regions (P < 0.01). Authors from Japan produced 26% of the papers with a mean ± standard deviation of 5.78 ± 1.98 authors per paper (APP); American authors, 23% (3.78 ± 1.72 APP); and all others, 51% (3.76 ± 1.51 APP). Conclusion The OMR literature consisted mostly of case reports/series, cross-sectional, technical efficacy and diagnostic accuracy studies. Such studies do not provide strong evidence for clinical decision making nor do they address the impact of diagnostic imaging on patient care. More studies at the higher end of the study design and efficacy hierarchies are needed in order to make wise choices regarding clinical decisions and resource allocations. PMID:21697152

  8. Clinical utility of machine-learning approaches in schizophrenia: improving diagnostic confidence for translational neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Liddle, Peter F; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning approaches are becoming commonplace in the neuroimaging literature as potential diagnostic and prognostic tools for the study of clinical populations. However, very few studies provide clinically informative measures to aid in decision-making and resource allocation. Head-to-head comparison of neuroimaging-based multivariate classifiers is an essential first step to promote translation of these tools to clinical practice. We systematically evaluated the classifier performance using back-to-back structural MRI in two field strengths (3- and 7-T) to discriminate patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) from healthy controls (n = 20). Gray matter (GM) and white matter images were used as inputs into a support vector machine to classify patients and control subjects. Seven Tesla classifiers outperformed the 3-T classifiers with accuracy reaching as high as 77% for the 7-T GM classifier compared to 66.6% for the 3-T GM classifier. Furthermore, diagnostic odds ratio (a measure that is not affected by variations in sample characteristics) and number needed to predict (a measure based on Bayesian certainty of a test result) indicated superior performance of the 7-T classifiers, whereby for each correct diagnosis made, the number of patients that need to be examined using the 7-T GM classifier was one less than the number that need to be examined if a different classifier was used. Using a hypothetical example, we highlight how these findings could have significant implications for clinical decision-making. We encourage the reporting of measures proposed here in future studies utilizing machine-learning approaches. This will not only promote the search for an optimum diagnostic tool but also aid in the translation of neuroimaging to clinical use. PMID:24009589

  9. Clinical Utility of Machine-Learning Approaches in Schizophrenia: Improving Diagnostic Confidence for Translational Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J.; Liddle, Peter F.; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning approaches are becoming commonplace in the neuroimaging literature as potential diagnostic and prognostic tools for the study of clinical populations. However, very few studies provide clinically informative measures to aid in decision-making and resource allocation. Head-to-head comparison of neuroimaging-based multivariate classifiers is an essential first step to promote translation of these tools to clinical practice. We systematically evaluated the classifier performance using back-to-back structural MRI in two field strengths (3- and 7-T) to discriminate patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) from healthy controls (n = 20). Gray matter (GM) and white matter images were used as inputs into a support vector machine to classify patients and control subjects. Seven Tesla classifiers outperformed the 3-T classifiers with accuracy reaching as high as 77% for the 7-T GM classifier compared to 66.6% for the 3-T GM classifier. Furthermore, diagnostic odds ratio (a measure that is not affected by variations in sample characteristics) and number needed to predict (a measure based on Bayesian certainty of a test result) indicated superior performance of the 7-T classifiers, whereby for each correct diagnosis made, the number of patients that need to be examined using the 7-T GM classifier was one less than the number that need to be examined if a different classifier was used. Using a hypothetical example, we highlight how these findings could have significant implications for clinical decision-making. We encourage the reporting of measures proposed here in future studies utilizing machine-learning approaches. This will not only promote the search for an optimum diagnostic tool but also aid in the translation of neuroimaging to clinical use. PMID:24009589

  10. Standardizing in vitro diagnostics tasks in clinical trials: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio; Bossuyt, Patrick; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Translational research is defined as the process of applying ideas, insights and discoveries generated through basic scientific inquiry to treatment or prevention of human diseases. Although precise information is lacking, several lines of evidence attest that up to 95% early-phase studies may not translate into tangible outcomes for improving clinical management. Major theoretical hurdles exist in the translational process, but is it also undeniable that many studies may have failed for practical reasons, such as the use of inappropriate diagnostic testing for evaluating efficacy, effectiveness or safety of a given medical intervention, or poor quality in laboratory testing. This can generate biased test results and result in misconceptions during data interpretation, eventually leading to no clinical benefit, possible harm, and a waste of valuable resources. From a genuine economic perspective, it can be estimated that over 10 million euros of funding may be lost each year in clinical trials in the European Union due to preanalytical and analytical problems. These are mostly attributions to the heterogeneity of current guidelines and recommendations for the testing process, to the poor evidence base for basic pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical requirements in clinical trials, and to the failure to thoughtfully integrate the perspectives of clinicians, patients, nurses and diagnostic companies in laboratory best practices. The most rational means for filling the gap between what we know and what we practice in clinical trials cannot discount the development of multidisciplinary teams including research scientists, clinicians, nurses, patients associations and representative of in vitro diagnostic (IVD) companies, who should actively interplay and collaborate with laboratory professionals to adapt and disseminate evidence-based recommendations about biospecimen collection and management into the research settings, from preclinical to phase III studies

  11. Clinical utility of machine-learning approaches in schizophrenia: improving diagnostic confidence for translational neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Liddle, Peter F; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning approaches are becoming commonplace in the neuroimaging literature as potential diagnostic and prognostic tools for the study of clinical populations. However, very few studies provide clinically informative measures to aid in decision-making and resource allocation. Head-to-head comparison of neuroimaging-based multivariate classifiers is an essential first step to promote translation of these tools to clinical practice. We systematically evaluated the classifier performance using back-to-back structural MRI in two field strengths (3- and 7-T) to discriminate patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) from healthy controls (n = 20). Gray matter (GM) and white matter images were used as inputs into a support vector machine to classify patients and control subjects. Seven Tesla classifiers outperformed the 3-T classifiers with accuracy reaching as high as 77% for the 7-T GM classifier compared to 66.6% for the 3-T GM classifier. Furthermore, diagnostic odds ratio (a measure that is not affected by variations in sample characteristics) and number needed to predict (a measure based on Bayesian certainty of a test result) indicated superior performance of the 7-T classifiers, whereby for each correct diagnosis made, the number of patients that need to be examined using the 7-T GM classifier was one less than the number that need to be examined if a different classifier was used. Using a hypothetical example, we highlight how these findings could have significant implications for clinical decision-making. We encourage the reporting of measures proposed here in future studies utilizing machine-learning approaches. This will not only promote the search for an optimum diagnostic tool but also aid in the translation of neuroimaging to clinical use.

  12. Clinical, anthropometric and laboratory nutritional markers of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency: Prevalence and diagnostic use.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Björn; Phillips, Mary E; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) frequently occurs secondary to exocrine pancreatic disease (e.g. chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, cancer) or pancreatic/gastrointestinal surgery, resulting in the maldigestion of nutrients and consequently malnutrition. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is the cornerstone of PEI management. Despite its clinical relevance, the diagnosis of PEI in clinical practice is challenging, as the current gold standard test is cumbersome, and alternatives have limited availability or accuracy. There is a need for accurate and easily applicable diagnostic modalities. We review the prevalence of clinical symptoms and changes in anthropometric measurements and laboratory nutritional markers indicative of malnutrition in patients with PEI, and the relevance of these findings in diagnosing PEI and monitoring PERT efficacy. Based on limited available evidence, assessment of clinical symptoms, body weight, body mass index and other anthropometric parameters are not sensitive methods for PEI diagnosis, owing to high variability and multiple confounding factors, but appear useful in monitoring PERT efficacy. Limited evidence precludes strong recommendations but suggests that serum levels of vitamin E, magnesium, and plasma proteins, notably retinol binding protein, albumin, and prealbumin, may have diagnostic utility in PEI. Studies show that assessment of changes in these and other nutritional parameters is helpful in monitoring PERT efficacy. Further research is needed to confirm the diagnostic accuracy of these parameters for PEI. Until such data are available, a nutritional evaluation including circulating vitamin E, magnesium, retinol binding protein, albumin, and prealbumin may be used to evaluate the probability of PEI in clinical practice when reliable pancreatic function tests are not available. PMID:26243045

  13. Standardizing in vitro diagnostics tasks in clinical trials: a call for action

    PubMed Central

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio; Bossuyt, Patrick; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Translational research is defined as the process of applying ideas, insights and discoveries generated through basic scientific inquiry to treatment or prevention of human diseases. Although precise information is lacking, several lines of evidence attest that up to 95% early-phase studies may not translate into tangible outcomes for improving clinical management. Major theoretical hurdles exist in the translational process, but is it also undeniable that many studies may have failed for practical reasons, such as the use of inappropriate diagnostic testing for evaluating efficacy, effectiveness or safety of a given medical intervention, or poor quality in laboratory testing. This can generate biased test results and result in misconceptions during data interpretation, eventually leading to no clinical benefit, possible harm, and a waste of valuable resources. From a genuine economic perspective, it can be estimated that over 10 million euros of funding may be lost each year in clinical trials in the European Union due to preanalytical and analytical problems. These are mostly attributions to the heterogeneity of current guidelines and recommendations for the testing process, to the poor evidence base for basic pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical requirements in clinical trials, and to the failure to thoughtfully integrate the perspectives of clinicians, patients, nurses and diagnostic companies in laboratory best practices. The most rational means for filling the gap between what we know and what we practice in clinical trials cannot discount the development of multidisciplinary teams including research scientists, clinicians, nurses, patients associations and representative of in vitro diagnostic (IVD) companies, who should actively interplay and collaborate with laboratory professionals to adapt and disseminate evidence-based recommendations about biospecimen collection and management into the research settings, from preclinical to phase III studies

  14. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  15. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin.

  16. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  17. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin. PMID:25904126

  18. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  19. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  20. Synergies and distinctions between computational disciplines in biomedical research: perspective from the Clinical andTranslational Science Award programs.

    PubMed

    Bernstam, Elmer V; Hersh, William R; Johnson, Stephen B; Chute, Christopher G; Nguyen, Hien; Sim, Ida; Nahm, Meredith; Weiner, Mark G; Miller, Perry; DiLaura, Robert P; Overcash, Marc; Lehmann, Harold P; Eichmann, David; Athey, Brian D; Scheuermann, Richard H; Anderson, Nick; Starren, Justin; Harris, Paul A; Smith, Jack W; Barbour, Ed; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Krusch, David A; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Becich, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Clinical and translational research increasingly requires computation. Projects may involve multiple computationally oriented groups including information technology (IT) professionals, computer scientists, and biomedical informaticians. However, many biomedical researchers are not aware of the distinctions among these complementary groups, leading to confusion, delays, and suboptimal results. Although written from the perspective of Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) programs within academic medical centers, this article addresses issues that extend beyond clinical and translational research. The authors describe the complementary but distinct roles of operational IT, research IT, computer science, and biomedical informatics using a clinical data warehouse as a running example. In general, IT professionals focus on technology. The authors distinguish between two types of IT groups within academic medical centers: central or administrative IT (supporting the administrative computing needs of large organizations) and research IT (supporting the computing needs of researchers). Computer scientists focus on general issues of computation such as designing faster computers or more efficient algorithms, rather than specific applications. In contrast, informaticians are concerned with data, information, and knowledge. Biomedical informaticians draw on a variety of tools, including but not limited to computers, to solve information problems in health care and biomedicine. The paper concludes with recommendations regarding administrative structures that can help to maximize the benefit of computation to biomedical research within academic health centers. PMID:19550198

  1. Synergies and distinctions between computational disciplines in biomedical research: perspective from the Clinical andTranslational Science Award programs.

    PubMed

    Bernstam, Elmer V; Hersh, William R; Johnson, Stephen B; Chute, Christopher G; Nguyen, Hien; Sim, Ida; Nahm, Meredith; Weiner, Mark G; Miller, Perry; DiLaura, Robert P; Overcash, Marc; Lehmann, Harold P; Eichmann, David; Athey, Brian D; Scheuermann, Richard H; Anderson, Nick; Starren, Justin; Harris, Paul A; Smith, Jack W; Barbour, Ed; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Krusch, David A; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Becich, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Clinical and translational research increasingly requires computation. Projects may involve multiple computationally oriented groups including information technology (IT) professionals, computer scientists, and biomedical informaticians. However, many biomedical researchers are not aware of the distinctions among these complementary groups, leading to confusion, delays, and suboptimal results. Although written from the perspective of Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) programs within academic medical centers, this article addresses issues that extend beyond clinical and translational research. The authors describe the complementary but distinct roles of operational IT, research IT, computer science, and biomedical informatics using a clinical data warehouse as a running example. In general, IT professionals focus on technology. The authors distinguish between two types of IT groups within academic medical centers: central or administrative IT (supporting the administrative computing needs of large organizations) and research IT (supporting the computing needs of researchers). Computer scientists focus on general issues of computation such as designing faster computers or more efficient algorithms, rather than specific applications. In contrast, informaticians are concerned with data, information, and knowledge. Biomedical informaticians draw on a variety of tools, including but not limited to computers, to solve information problems in health care and biomedicine. The paper concludes with recommendations regarding administrative structures that can help to maximize the benefit of computation to biomedical research within academic health centers.

  2. Opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris; Aziz, Nazneen; Farkas, Daniel H; Furtado, Manohar; Gonzalez, Andrea Ferreira; Greiner, Timothy C; Grody, Wayne W; Hambuch, Tina; Kalman, Lisa; Kant, Jeffrey A; Klein, Roger D; Leonard, Debra G B; Lubin, Ira M; Mao, Rong; Nagan, Narasimhan; Pratt, Victoria M; Sobel, Mark E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Gibson, Jane S

    2012-11-01

    This report of the Whole Genome Analysis group of the Association for Molecular Pathology illuminates the opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing. With the reality of clinical application of next-generation sequencing, technical aspects of molecular testing can be accomplished at greater speed and with higher volume, while much information is obtained. Although this testing is a next logical step for molecular pathology laboratories, the potential impact on the diagnostic process and clinical correlations is extraordinary and clinical interpretation will be challenging. We review the rapidly evolving technologies; provide application examples; discuss aspects of clinical utility, ethics, and consent; and address the analytic, postanalytic, and professional implications.

  3. Small-Fiber Neuropathy: A Diabetic Microvascular Complication of Special Clinical, Diagnostic, and Prognostic Importance.

    PubMed

    Körei, A E; Istenes, I; Papanas, N; Kempler, P

    2016-01-01

    Damage of small nerve fibers may lead to a large variety of clinical symptoms. Small-fiber neuropathy underlies the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy, which may decrease quality of life. It also contributes to the poor prognosis of diabetic neuropathy because it plays a key role in the pathogenesis of foot ulceration and autonomic neuropathy. Impairment of small nerve fibers is considered the earliest alteration in the course of diabetic neuropathy. Therefore, assessment of functional and morphological abnormalities of small nerve fibers may enable timely diagnosis. The definition, symptoms, and clinical significance of small-fiber neuropathy are considered in the present review. An apparently more complex interaction between small-fiber impairment and microcirculation is extensively discussed. Diagnostic modalities include morphometric and functional methods. Corneal confocal microscopy and punch skin biopsy are considered gold standards, but noninvasive functional tests are also diagnostically useful. However, in routine clinical practice, small-fiber neuropathy is diagnosed by its typical clinical presentation. Finally, prompt treatment should be initiated following diagnosis.

  4. [The reactions of hypersensitivity: the mechanisms of development, clinical manifestations, principles of diagnostic (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Tukavkina, S Yu; Kharseyeva, G G

    2014-05-01

    The article considers the principles of modern classification of hypersensitivity, pathogenic mechanisms of formation of its various types resulting in development of typical clinical symptoms and syndromes. The knowledge and comprehension of these issues is important for physicians of different specializations since it permits to properly make out and formulate diagnosis and timely send patient for examination and treatment to such specialist as allergist-immunologist. The particular attention was paid to description of pathogenesis of diseases and syndromes underlaid by IgE-mediated type of hypersensitivity since their share is highest and clinical manifestations frequently require emergency medical care. The diagnostic of allergic diseases is to be implemented sequentially (step-by-step) and include common clinical and special (specific) methods. In case of choosing of extent of specialized allergological examination the diagnostic significance of techniques and their safety is to be taken into account concerning condition of patient. The diagnosis is objectively formulated only by complex of examination results. It is worth to remember about possibility of development of syndromes similar to IgE-mediated allergy by their clinical manifestations but belonging to non-allergic type of hypersensitivity. It is important to know main causes, mechanisms and ways of formation of such reactions previously named as anaphylactoid ones.

  5. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument ("Canary") development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, R. J.; Sivagurunathan, K.; Garcia, J.; Matvienko, A.; Mandelis, A.; Abrams, S.

    2010-03-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  6. Diagnostic Implication and Clinical Relevance of Ancillary Techniques in Clinical Pathology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Jaafar S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematoxylin–eosin-stained slide preparation is one of the most durable techniques in medicine history, which has remained unchanged since implemented. It allows an accurate microscopic diagnosis of the vast majority of tissue samples. In many circumstances, this technique cannot answer all the questions posed at the initial diagnostic level. The pathologist has always been looking for additional ancillary techniques to answer pending questions. In our daily histopathology practice, we referred to those techniques as special stains, but nowadays, they are more than stains and are collectively called ancillary tests. They include a wide range of techniques starting from histochemical stains and ending in one or more advanced techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular studies, cytogenetic studies, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27042154

  7. Diagnostic Implication and Clinical Relevance of Ancillary Techniques in Clinical Pathology Practice.

    PubMed

    Makki, Jaafar S

    2016-01-01

    Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slide preparation is one of the most durable techniques in medicine history, which has remained unchanged since implemented. It allows an accurate microscopic diagnosis of the vast majority of tissue samples. In many circumstances, this technique cannot answer all the questions posed at the initial diagnostic level. The pathologist has always been looking for additional ancillary techniques to answer pending questions. In our daily histopathology practice, we referred to those techniques as special stains, but nowadays, they are more than stains and are collectively called ancillary tests. They include a wide range of techniques starting from histochemical stains and ending in one or more advanced techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular studies, cytogenetic studies, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27042154

  8. A Diagnostic Model for Dementia in Clinical Practice—Case Methodology Assisting Dementia Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Londos, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Dementia diagnosis is important for many different reasons. Firstly, to separate dementia, or major neurocognitive disorder, from MCI (mild cognitive impairment), mild neurocognitive disorder. Secondly, to define the specific underlying brain disorder to aid treatment, prognosis and decisions regarding care needs and assistance. The diagnostic method of dementias is a puzzle of different data pieces to be fitted together in the best possible way to reach a clinical diagnosis. Using a modified case methodology concept, risk factors affecting cognitive reserve and symptoms constituting the basis of the brain damage hypothesis, can be visualized, balanced and reflected against test results as well as structural and biochemical markers. The model’s origin is the case method initially described in Harvard business school, here modified to serve dementia diagnostics. PMID:26854146

  9. Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype-1: A Review of Disease Distribution, Clinical Symptoms, and Laboratory Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Nichole L.; Miller, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) is capable of infecting a wide range of avian species leading to a broad range of clinical symptoms. Ease of transmission has allowed the virus to spread worldwide with varying degrees of virulence depending on the virus strain and host species. Classification systems have been designed to group isolates based on their genetic composition. The genetic composition of the fusion gene cleavage site plays an important role in virulence. Presence of multiple basic amino acids at the cleavage site allows enzymatic cleavage of the fusion protein enabling virulent viruses to spread systemically. Diagnostic tests, including virus isolation, real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and sequencing, are used to characterize the virus and identify virulent strains. Genetic diversity within APMV-1 demonstrates the need for continual monitoring for changes that may arise requiring modifications to the molecular assays to maintain their usefulness for diagnostic testing. PMID:22577610

  10. A basic concept in the clinical ethics of managed care: physicians and institutions as economically disciplined moral co-fiduciaries of populations of patients.

    PubMed

    McCullough, L B

    1999-02-01

    Managed care employs two business tools of managed practice that raise important ethical issues: paying physicians in ways that impose conflicts of interest on them; and regulating physicians' clinical judgment, decision making, and behavior. The literature on the clinical ethics of managed care has begun to develop rapidly in the past several years. Professional organizations of physicians have made important contributions to this literature. The statements on ethical issues in managed care of four such organizations are considered here, the American Medical Association, the American College of Physicians, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Three themes common to these statements are identified and critically assessed: the primacy of meeting the medical needs of each individual patient; disclosure of conflicts of interest in how physicians are paid; and opposition to gag orders. The paper concludes with an argument for a basic concept in the clinical ethics of managed care: physicians and institutions as economically disciplined moral co-fiduciaries of populations of patients.

  11. En Route to the Clinic: Diagnostic Sequencing Applications Using the Ion Torrent ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Muzny, Donna [Baylor College of Medicine

    2016-07-12

    Donna Muzny on "En route to the clinic: Diagnostic sequencing applications using the Ion Torrent" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. En Route to the Clinic: Diagnostic Sequencing Applications Using the Ion Torrent ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Muzny, Donna

    2012-06-01

    Donna Muzny on "En route to the clinic: Diagnostic sequencing applications using the Ion Torrent" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. Diagnostic Value of Clinical Findings in Evaluation of Thoracolumbar Blunt Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Shahrami, Ali; Shojaee, Majid; Tabatabaee, Seyed Mohammadreza; Mianehsaz, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Necessity of imaging for symptom-free conscious patients presented to emergency department (ED) following traumatic thoracolumbar spine injuries has been a matter of debate. The present study was aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of clinical findings in prediction of traumatic thoracolumbar injuries compared tocomputed tomography (CT) scan. Methods: The present diagnostic value study was carried out using non-random convenience sampling during the time between October 2013 and March 2014. All trauma patients > 15 years old underwent thoracolumbar CT scan were included. Correlation between clinical and CT findings was measured using SPSS 21.0 and screening performance characteristics of clinical findings in prediction of thoracolumbar fracture were calculated. Results: 169 patients with mean age of 37.8 ± 17.3 years (rage: 15-86) were evaluated (69.8% male). All fracture patients had at least 1 positive finding in history and physical examination. The fracture was confirmed in only 24.6% of the patients with positive findings in history or physical examination. In 37.5% of patients the location of fracture, matched the area of positive physical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, PLR, and NLR of clinical findings in comparison to thoracolumbar CT scan were 100 (95% CI: 89 - 100), 1.5 (95% CI: 0.2-6), 24.5 (95% CI: 18.3-31.9), 100 (95% CI: 19.7-100), 32.5 (95% CI: 24.6-43.03), and infinite, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present study, show the excellent screening performance characteristics of clinical findings in prediction of traumatic thoracolumbar fracture (100% sensitivity). It could be concluded that in conscious patients with stable hemodynamic, who have no distracting pain and are not intoxicated, probability of thoracolumbar fracture is very low and near to zero in case of no positive clinical finding. PMID:27299140

  14. Factor structure and diagnostic validity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II with adult clinical inpatients: comparison to a gold-standard diagnostic interview.

    PubMed

    Subica, Andrew M; Fowler, J Christopher; Elhai, Jon D; Frueh, B Christopher; Sharp, Carla; Kelly, Erin L; Allen, Jon G

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) among adult clinical inpatients, a group at high risk for major depressive disorder (MDD). Data from 1,904 adult inpatients were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Cronbach's alpha, and Pearson's correlations. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses evaluating MDD diagnostic performance were conducted with a subsample (n = 467) using a structured diagnostic interview for reference. CFA of 3 previous 2-factor oblique solutions, observed in adolescent and older adult inpatient clinical samples, and 3 corresponding bifactor solutions indicated that BDI-II common item variance was overwhelmingly accounted for by 1 general factor specified to all items, with minor additional variance contributed by 2 specific factors. Analyses revealed high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .93) and significant (p < .01) intercorrelations between the BDI-II total scale and Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24's Depression/Functioning (r = .79) and Overall (r = .82) subscales. ROC analyses generated low area under the curve (.695; 95% confidence interval [.637, .752]) and cutoff scores with poor sensitivity/specificity balance. BDI-II use as a screening instrument for overall depressive symptomology was supported, but MDD diagnostic performance was suboptimal. Clinicians are advised to use the BDI-II to gauge severity of depression and measure clinical changes to depressive symptomology over time but to be mindful of the limitations of the BDI-II as a diagnostic tool for adult inpatients.

  15. Neurobrucellosis: clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic features and outcome. Unusual clinical presentations in an endemic region.

    PubMed

    Ceran, Nurgul; Turkoglu, Recai; Erdem, Ilknur; Inan, Asuman; Engin, Derya; Tireli, Hulya; Goktas, Pasa

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection and has endemic characteristics. Neurobrucellosis is an uncommon complication of this infection. The aim of this study was to present unusual clinical manifestations and to discuss the management and outcome of a series of 18 neurobrucellosis cases. Initial clinical manifestations consist of pseudotumor cerebri in one case, white matter lesions and demyelinating syndrome in three cases, intracranial granuloma in one case, transverse myelitis in two cases, sagittal sinus thrombosis in one case, spinal arachnoiditis in one case, intracranial vasculitis in one case, in addition to meningitis in all cases. Eleven patients were male and seven were female. The most prevalent symptoms were headache (83%) and fever (44%). All patients were treated with rifampicin, doxycycline plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or ceftriaxone. Duration of treatment (varied 3-12 months) was determined on basis of the CSF response. In four patients presented with left mild sequelae including aphasia, hearing loss, hemiparesis. In conclusion, although mortality is rare in neurobrucellosis, its sequelae are significant. In neurobrucellosis various clinical and neuroradiologic signs and symptoms can be confused with other neurologic diseases. In inhabitants or visitors of endemic areas, neurobrucellosis should be kept in mind in cases that have unusual neurological manifestations.

  16. [The challenges of standardization in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V

    2013-04-01

    The generalized data concerning the conditions of application of regulations of national standards in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations is presented. The primary information was provided by 14 regions of 6 federal administrative okrugs of Russia. The causes of challenges of application of requirements of standards are presented. They are mostly related with insufficient financial support, lacking of manpower, difficulties with reagents supply, inadequate technical maintenance of devices and absence of support of administration of medical organizations. The recommendations are formulated concerning the necessity of publishing the document of Minzdrav of Russia to determine the need in application of standards in laboratory practice.

  17. Transcriptomics in cancer diagnostics: developments in technology, clinical research and commercialization.

    PubMed

    Sager, Monica; Yeat, Nai Chien; Pajaro-Van der Stadt, Stefan; Lin, Charlotte; Ren, Qiuyin; Lin, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomic technologies are evolving to diagnose cancer earlier and more accurately to provide greater predictive and prognostic utility to oncologists and patients. Digital techniques such as RNA sequencing are replacing still-imaging techniques to provide more detailed analysis of the transcriptome and aberrant expression that causes oncogenesis, while companion diagnostics are developing to determine the likely effectiveness of targeted treatments. This article examines recent advancements in molecular profiling research and technology as applied to cancer diagnosis, clinical applications and predictions for the future of personalized medicine in oncology. PMID:26565429

  18. Ocular static and dynamic light scattering: a noninvasive diagnostic tool for eye research and clinical practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.

    2004-01-01

    The noninvasive techniques of static and dynamic light scattering are emerging as valuable diagnostic tools for the early detection of ocular and systemic diseases. These include corneal abnormalities, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, glaucoma, cataract, diabetic vitreopathy, and possibly macular degeneration. Systemic conditions such as diabetes and possibly Alzheimer's disease can potentially be detected early via ocular tissues. The current state of development of these techniques for application to ophthalmic research and ultimately clinical practice is reviewed. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  19. Design of a Web-tool for diagnostic clinical trials handling medical imaging research.

    PubMed

    Baltasar Sánchez, Alicia; González-Sistal, Angel

    2011-04-01

    New clinical studies in medicine are based on patients and controls using different imaging diagnostic modalities. Medical information systems are not designed for clinical trials employing clinical imaging. Although commercial software and communication systems focus on storage of image data, they are not suitable for storage and mining of new types of quantitative data. We sought to design a Web-tool to support diagnostic clinical trials involving different experts and hospitals or research centres. The image analysis of this project is based on skeletal X-ray imaging. It involves a computerised image method using quantitative analysis of regions of interest in healthy bone and skeletal metastases. The database is implemented with ASP.NET 3.5 and C# technologies for our Web-based application. For data storage, we chose MySQL v.5.0, one of the most popular open source databases. User logins were necessary, and access to patient data was logged for auditing. For security, all data transmissions were carried over encrypted connections. This Web-tool is available to users scattered at different locations; it allows an efficient organisation and storage of data (case report form) and images and allows each user to know precisely what his task is. The advantages of our Web-tool are as follows: (1) sustainability is guaranteed; (2) network locations for collection of data are secured; (3) all clinical information is stored together with the original images and the results derived from processed images and statistical analysis that enable us to perform retrospective studies; (4) changes are easily incorporated because of the modular architecture; and (5) assessment of trial data collected at different sites is centralised to reduce statistical variance.

  20. Updates on Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Diagnostic Criteria for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Jacqueline F.; Waubant, Emmanuelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is a central nervous system demyelinating event isolated in time that is compatible with the possible future development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Early risk stratification for conversion to MS helps with treatment decisions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the most useful tool to evaluate risk. Cerebrospinal fluid studies and evoked potentials may also be used to assess the likelihood of MS. Four clinical trials evaluating the benefits of either interferon β (IFN-β) or glatiramer acetate (GA) within the first 3 months after a high-risk CIS demonstrate decreased rates of conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS) and a lesser degree of MRI progression with early treatment. In the 3-, 5-, and 10-year extension studies of 2 formulations of IFN-β, the decreased conversion rate to CDMS remained meaningful when comparing early treatment of CIS to treatment delayed by a median of 2 to 3 years. Diagnostic criteria have been developed based on the clinical and MRI follow-up of large cohorts with CIS and provide guidance on how to utilize clinical activity in combination with radiographic information to diagnose MS. The most recent 2010 McDonald criteria simplify requirements for dissemination in time and space and allow for diagnosis of MS from a baseline brain MRI if there are both silent gadolinium-enhancing lesions and nonenhancing lesions on the same imaging study. The diagnostic criteria for MS require special consideration in children at risk for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), in older adults who may have small vessel ischemic disease, and in ethnic groups that more commonly develop neuromyelitis optica (NMO). PMID:23983889

  1. Suitability of stx-PCR directly from fecal samples in clinical diagnostics of STEC.

    PubMed

    Tunsjø, Hege S; Kvissel, Anne K; Follin-Arbelet, Benoit; Brotnov, Beth-Marie; Ranheim, Trond E; Leegaard, Truls M

    2015-10-01

    PCR-based testing for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) directly from fecal samples is increasingly being implemented in routine diagnostic laboratories. These methods aim to detect clinically relevant amounts of microbes and not stx-carrying phages or low backgrounds of STEC. We present a diagnostic procedure and results from 1 year of stx-targeted real-time PCR of fecal samples from patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in Norway. A rapid stx2 subtyping strategy is described, which aims to quickly reveal the virulence potential of the microbe. stx was detected in 22 of 3320 samples, corresponding to a PCR positive rate of 0.66%. STEC were cultured from 72% of the PCR positive samples. Four stx1 isolates, eight stx2 isolates, and four isolates with both stx1 and stx2 were identified. With the method presented, stx-carrying phages are not commonly detected. Our results support the use of molecular testing combined with classical culture techniques for routine diagnostic purposes.

  2. Establishing cross-discipline consensus on contraception, pregnancy and breast feeding-related educational messages and clinical practices to support women with rheumatoid arthritis: an Australian Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joanne E; Ackerman, Ilana N; Van Doornum, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recognising the need for a best-practice and consistent approach in providing care to women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to (1) general health, (2) contraception, (3) conception and pregnancy, (4) breast feeding and (5) early parenting, we sought to achieve cross-discipline, clinical consensus on key messages and clinical practice behaviours in these 5 areas. Design 3-round eDelphi study. In round 1, panellists provided free-text responses to open-ended questions about care for women with RA across the 5 areas. Subsequently, panellists refined and scored the synthesised responses, presented as metathemes, themes and detailed elements. Where ≥5% of panellists did not support a theme in a given round, it was removed. Setting Panel of practicing Australian rheumatologists (n=22), obstetricians/obstetric medicine physicians (n=9) and pharmacists (n=5). Results 34 (94.4%) panellists participated in all 3 rounds. The panel supported 18 themes across the 5 areas (support/strongly support: 88.2–100%) underpinned by 5 metathemes. Metathemes focused on coordination in information delivery, the mode and timing of information delivery, evidence underpinning information, engagement of the right health professionals at the right time and a non-judgemental approach to infant feeding. Themes included practices for primary prevention of chronic disease and their sequelae, the importance of contraception and planning pregnancy and breast feeding, close monitoring of medications, supporting mental well-being, managing disease activity and providing practical support for early parenting. Conclusions A cross-disciplinary clinical panel highly supported key information and clinical practices in the care for women with RA across the continuum of contraception to early parenting within a whole-person, chronic disease management approach. PMID:27633637

  3. Specificity of Incident Diagnostic Outcomes in Patients at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jadon R.; Addington, Jean; Perkins, Diana O.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; Heinssen, Robert K.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tarbox, Sarah I.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Walker, Elaine F.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Woods, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    It is not well established whether the incident outcomes of the clinical high-risk (CHR) syndrome for psychosis are diagnostically specific for psychosis or whether CHR patients also are at elevated risk for a variety of nonpsychotic disorders. We collected 2 samples (NAPLS-1, PREDICT) that contained CHR patients and a control group who responded to CHR recruitment efforts but did not meet CHR criteria on interview (help-seeking comparison patients [HSC]). Incident diagnostic outcomes were defined as the occurrence of a SIPS-defined psychosis or a structured interview diagnosis from 1 of 3 nonpsychotic Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) groups (anxiety, bipolar, or nonbipolar mood disorder), when no diagnosis in that group was present at baseline. Logistic regression revealed that the CHR vs HSC effect did not vary significantly across study for any emergent diagnostic outcome; data from the 2 studies were therefore combined. CHR (n = 271) vs HSC (n = 171) emergent outcomes were: psychosis 19.6% vs 1.8%, bipolar disorders 1.1% vs 1.2%, nonbipolar mood disorders 4.4% vs 5.3%, and anxiety disorders 5.2% vs 5.3%. The main effect of CHR vs HSC was statistically significant (OR = 13.8, 95% CI 4.2–45.0, df = 1, P < .001) for emergent psychosis but not for any emergent nonpsychotic disorder. Sensitivity analyses confirmed these findings. Within the CHR group emergent psychosis was significantly more likely than each nonpsychotic DSM-IV emergent disorder, and within the HSC group emergent psychosis was significantly less likely than most emergent nonpsychotic disorders. The CHR syndrome is specific as a marker for research on predictors and mechanisms of developing psychosis. PMID:26272875

  4. Non invasive radiofrequency diagnostics of cancer. The Bioscanner — Trimprob technology and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedruccio, Clarbruno; Ricci Vedruccio, Carla

    2011-12-01

    A new paper by Pokorny, Vedruccio, Cifra, Kucera, titled Cancer physics: Diagnostics based on damped cellular elasto-electrical vibrations in microtubules, recently available on Eur. Biophys. J., discloses the mechanism of active grown cancer tissues interaction with a Non- Linear Resonance Interaction (NLRI) Bioscanner Trimprob diagnostic device that is certified and ready to be used to investigate suspected cases of disease and cancer. This technology spreads early capabilities of cancer detection by means of low level radiofrequency oscillations in UHF band. The system is based on an unique and extremely innovative non- linear radiofrequency oscillator working on 462-465 MHz plus the harmonics. The diseased tissues suspected of cancer, are irradiated by means of a handy probe near field emission, while a spectrum analyzer placed in the far field detects by means of a small antenna, the oscillator interaction within the tissues. The Bioscanner is characterized by a high dynamic range, in the order of 30 or more decibel, and is useful for detection of small cancer agglomerates, if used by a well trained operator. At the resonance, the free running oscillator locks-in on the specific interaction frequency, in a sharp frequency window centered on 462 MHz; the resulting effect is evidenced by a deep decrease of the 462 MHz spectral line propagation in the far field around the oscillator probe. The NLRI provides a selective characterization, like a sort of a electronic biopsy response of biologic tissues in support of modern imaging diagnostics. Further to existing literature describing methods for cancer detections by means of electromagnetic fields this paper shows this innovative in vivo medical diagnostic equipment and some clinical applications.

  5. Clinical Study of Endometrial Polyp and Role of Diagnostic Hysteroscopy and Blind Avulsion of Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Remadevi, Chithra; Sumathy, Sudha; Sharma, Deepti; Sreedhar, Sarala; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial polyp is one of the common causes of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) in the reproductive age group as well as postmenopausal age group. Aim To study the clinical features of endometrial polyp and the safety and feasibility of blind polypectomy following diagnostic hysteroscopy. Materials and Methods Total of 256 women who were diagnosed to have endometrial polyp by transvaginal ultrasound and underwent diagnostic hysteroscopy and blind polypectomy by simple avulsion in the period of January 2008 to December 2014 were included in our study. Polyp was confirmed by the histopathology. Results The prevalence of polyp among women who underwent diagnostic hysteroscopy and blind polypectomy was more common in the age group of 40-49years. Polyps manifested as AUB in 45.6% of our study population. The mean size of the polyp was not significantly different between premenopausal and postmenopausal women and single and multiple polyps. Histopathological study of the polyp showed two malignant polyps in our study population. Premalignant lesions i.e., endometrial hyperplasia without atypia and with atypia was found in 33 women. There was one uterine perforation, one cervical tear; one false passage and one patient had mild bleeding after the procedure. In our study, in the mean follow-up period of 37.57±28.12 months, 3.9% (7 women) had recurrence. In the follow-up period of 16.56±18.96 months, 78.9% women didn’t have recurrence. Conclusion Diagnostic hysteroscopy and blind polypectomy has low complication rate and recurrence rate and technically feasible for the practicing gynaecologists which don’t need much training and is cost-effective also. PMID:27504357

  6. [Gastrointestinal causes of weight loss: clinical presentation, diagnostic workup and therapy].

    PubMed

    Fromhold-Treu, Sophie; Lamprecht, Georg

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the gasterointestinal entities, their pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup and therapy that typically involve weight loss as the major presenting symptom. The differentiation of malassimilation into maldigestion and malabsorption is clinically mostly not helpful. Instead primary malasssimilation can be distinguished from secondary due to another disease. Celiac disease, lambliasis, small bowel CD, CVIDS and Whipple's disease result in loss of absorptive surface. Chronic intestinal pseudobstruction leads to weight loss through dysmotility and postprandial pain. Microscopic colitis involves some weight loss and needs to be considered because of its high prevalence. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and the various protein loosing enteropathies may be primary or secondary syndromes. Dumping, bile acid malabsorption and short bowel syndrome occur after typical operative procedures. Chronic radiation enteritis, chronic intestinal ischemia and intestinal diabetic polyneuropathy are due to chronic intestinal injury. PMID:26886038

  7. A diagnostic approach for neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: clinical features, genetics and brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Rubens Paulo Araújo; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gama, Maria Thereza Drumond; Dutra, Lívia Almeida; Maciel, Ricardo Horta; Godeiro-Junior, Clécio; Chien, Hsin Fen; Teive, Hélio A G; Cardoso, Francisco; Barsottini, Orlando G P

    2016-07-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) represents a heterogeneous and complex group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by excessive iron accumulation, particularly in the basal ganglia. Common clinical features of NBIA include movement disorders, particularly parkinsonism and dystonia, cognitive dysfunction, pyramidal signs, and retinal abnormalities. The forms of NBIA described to date include pantothenase kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), phospholipase A2 associated neurodegeneration (PLAN), neuroferritinopathy, aceruloplasminemia, beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN), fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration (FAHN), coenzyme A synthase protein-associated neurodegeneration (CoPAN) and Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome. This review is a diagnostic approach for NBIA cases, from clinical features and brain imaging findings to the genetic etiology.

  8. A diagnostic algorithm combining clinical and molecular data distinguishes Kawasaki disease from other febrile illnesses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease is an acute vasculitis of infants and young children that is recognized through a constellation of clinical signs that can mimic other benign conditions of childhood. The etiology remains unknown and there is no specific laboratory-based test to identify patients with Kawasaki disease. Treatment to prevent the complication of coronary artery aneurysms is most effective if administered early in the course of the illness. We sought to develop a diagnostic algorithm to help clinicians distinguish Kawasaki disease patients from febrile controls to allow timely initiation of treatment. Methods Urine peptidome profiling and whole blood cell type-specific gene expression analyses were integrated with clinical multivariate analysis to improve differentiation of Kawasaki disease subjects from febrile controls. Results Comparative analyses of multidimensional protein identification using 23 pooled Kawasaki disease and 23 pooled febrile control urine peptide samples revealed 139 candidate markers, of which 13 were confirmed (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC 0.919)) in an independent cohort of 30 Kawasaki disease and 30 febrile control urine peptidomes. Cell type-specific analysis of microarrays (csSAM) on 26 Kawasaki disease and 13 febrile control whole blood samples revealed a 32-lymphocyte-specific-gene panel (ROC AUC 0.969). The integration of the urine/blood based biomarker panels and a multivariate analysis of 7 clinical parameters (ROC AUC 0.803) effectively stratified 441 Kawasaki disease and 342 febrile control subjects to diagnose Kawasaki disease. Conclusions A hybrid approach using a multi-step diagnostic algorithm integrating both clinical and molecular findings was successful in differentiating children with acute Kawasaki disease from febrile controls. PMID:22145762

  9. Primary ciliary dyskinesia. Recent advances in diagnostics, genetics, and characterization of clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Daniels, Leigh Anne; Davis, Stephanie D; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Leigh, Margaret W

    2013-10-15

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder of motile cilia that leads to oto-sino-pulmonary diseases and organ laterality defects in approximately 50% of cases. The estimated incidence of PCD is approximately 1 per 15,000 births, but the prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine, primarily because of limitations in diagnostic methods that focus on testing ciliary ultrastructure and function. Diagnostic capabilities have recently benefitted from (1) documentation of low nasal nitric oxide production in PCD and (2) discovery of biallelic mutations in multiple PCD-causing genes. The use of these complementary diagnostic approaches shows that at least 30% of patients with PCD have normal ciliary ultrastructure. More accurate identification of patients with PCD has also allowed definition of a strong clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress in >80% of cases, daily nasal congestion and wet cough starting soon after birth, and early development of recurrent/chronic middle-ear and sinus disease. Recent studies, using advanced imaging and pulmonary physiologic assessments, clearly demonstrate early onset of lung disease in PCD, with abnormal air flow mechanics by age 6-8 years that is similar to cystic fibrosis, and age-dependent onset of bronchiectasis. The treatment of PCD is not standardized, and there are no validated PCD-specific therapies. Most patients with PCD receive suboptimal management, which should include airway clearance, regular surveillance of pulmonary function and respiratory microbiology, and use of antibiotics targeted to pathogens. The PCD Foundation is developing a network of clinical centers, which should improve diagnosis and management of PCD.

  10. The Effects of Acute Blood Loss for Diagnostic Bloodwork and Fluid Replacement in Clinically Ill Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marx, James O; Jensen, JanLee A; Seelye, Stacie; Walton, Raquel M; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great value of diagnostic bloodwork for identifying disease in animals, the volume of blood required for these analyses limits its use in laboratory mice, particularly when they are clinically ill. We sought to determine the effects of acute blood loss (ABL) following blood collection for diagnostic bloodwork in healthy mice compared with streptozotocin-induced diabetic and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated dehydrated mice. ABL caused several mild changes in the control mice, with significant decreases in body weight, temperature, and activity in both experimental groups; increased dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice; and a significant drop in the blood pressure of the diabetic mice. To determine whether these negative outcomes could be ameliorated, we treated mice with intraperitoneal lactated Ringers solution either immediately after or 30 min before ABL. Notably, preABL administration of fluids helped prevent the worsening of the dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice and the changes in blood pressure in the diabetic mice. However, fluid administration provided no benefit in control of blood pressure when administered after ABL in the diabetic mice. Furthermore, fluid therapy did not prevent ABL-induced drops in body weight and activity. Although one mouse not receiving fluid therapy became moribund at the 24-h time point, no animals died during the 24-h study. This investigation demonstrates that blood for diagnostic bloodwork can be collected safely from clinically ill mice and that preemptive fluid therapy mitigates some of the negative changes associated with this blood loss. PMID:26141445

  11. Next-Generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cancer: Advantages and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Chen, Hui; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Singh, R Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize cancer genomes has resulted in the discovery of numerous genetic markers. Consequently, the number of markers that warrant routine screening in molecular diagnostic laboratories, often from limited tumor material, has increased. This increased demand has been difficult to manage by traditional low- and/or medium-throughput sequencing platforms. Massively parallel sequencing capabilities of NGS provide a much-needed alternative for mutation screening in multiple genes with a single low investment of DNA. However, implementation of NGS technologies, most of which are for research use only (RUO), in a diagnostic laboratory, needs extensive validation in order to establish Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and College of American Pathologists (CAP)-compliant performance characteristics. Here, we have reviewed approaches for validation of NGS technology for routine screening of tumors. We discuss the criteria for selecting gene markers to include in the NGS panel and the deciding factors for selecting target capture approaches and sequencing platforms. We also discuss challenges in result reporting, storage and retrieval of the voluminous sequencing data and the future potential of clinical NGS. PMID:26473927

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cancer: Advantages and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Chen, Hui; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Singh, R Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize cancer genomes has resulted in the discovery of numerous genetic markers. Consequently, the number of markers that warrant routine screening in molecular diagnostic laboratories, often from limited tumor material, has increased. This increased demand has been difficult to manage by traditional low- and/or medium-throughput sequencing platforms. Massively parallel sequencing capabilities of NGS provide a much-needed alternative for mutation screening in multiple genes with a single low investment of DNA. However, implementation of NGS technologies, most of which are for research use only (RUO), in a diagnostic laboratory, needs extensive validation in order to establish Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and College of American Pathologists (CAP)-compliant performance characteristics. Here, we have reviewed approaches for validation of NGS technology for routine screening of tumors. We discuss the criteria for selecting gene markers to include in the NGS panel and the deciding factors for selecting target capture approaches and sequencing platforms. We also discuss challenges in result reporting, storage and retrieval of the voluminous sequencing data and the future potential of clinical NGS.

  13. Risks to the fetus from diagnostic imaging during pregnancy: review and proposal of a clinical protocol.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mafalda; Matias, Alexandra; Macedo, Filipe

    2015-12-01

    Every day, medical practitioners face the dilemma of exposing pregnant or possibly pregnant patients to radiation from diagnostic examinations. Both doctors and patients often have questions about the risks of radiation. The most vulnerable period is between the 8th and 15th weeks of gestation. Deterministic effects like pregnancy loss, congenital malformations, growth retardation and neurobehavioral abnormalities have threshold doses above 100-200 mGy. The risk is considered negligible at 50 mGy and in reality no diagnostic examination exceeds this limit. The risk of carcinogenesis is slightly higher than in the general population. Intravenous iodinated contrast is discouraged, except in highly selected patients. Considering all the possible noxious effects of radiation exposure, measures to diminish radiation are essential and affect the fetal outcome. Nonionizing procedures should be considered whenever possible and every radiology center should have its own data analysis on fetal radiation exposure. In this review, we analyze existing literature on fetal risks due to radiation exposure, producing a clinical protocol to guide safe radiation use in a clinical setting.

  14. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches.

    PubMed

    Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón de; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana's signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission.

  15. Preeclampsia – Aetiology, Current Diagnostics and Clinical Management, New Therapy Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tallarek, A.-C.; Huppertz, B.; Stepan, H.

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a multisystem disease for which the exact causes have not yet been sufficiently clarified. However, in the past few years it has become clear that a placental imbalance between angiogenic and anti-angiogenic proteins is the decisive pathogenetic factor for the occurrence of preeclampsia. With the possibility to measure these angiogenic factors (sFlt-1/PlGF ratio) in maternal blood full new diagnostic possibilities have been opened that enable the certain diagnosis or exclusion of the diseases as well as a short-term prognosis to be made. In secondary prevention the current data situation for ASA confirms a moderate but measurable utility. The management concept depends on gestational age. In the case of early clinical manifestations (< 34th week of pregnancy) the clinical management in a perinatal centre remains unchanged with foeto-maternal monitoring and induction of pulmonary maturation, symptomatic therapy under careful blood pressure lowering and determination of the optimal delivery time. A balance must be made here between foetal immaturity and maternal risks upon prolongations. The pathomechanism of anti-angiogenic overload with sFlt-1 provides a starting point for first therapeutic interventions. The present article gives an overview of current diagnostic options and presents possible future therapeutic perspectives for discussion. PMID:26640284

  16. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    PubMed Central

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cancer: Advantages and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Chen, Hui; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Singh, R. Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize cancer genomes has resulted in the discovery of numerous genetic markers. Consequently, the number of markers that warrant routine screening in molecular diagnostic laboratories, often from limited tumor material, has increased. This increased demand has been difficult to manage by traditional low- and/or medium-throughput sequencing platforms. Massively parallel sequencing capabilities of NGS provide a much-needed alternative for mutation screening in multiple genes with a single low investment of DNA. However, implementation of NGS technologies, most of which are for research use only (RUO), in a diagnostic laboratory, needs extensive validation in order to establish Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and College of American Pathologists (CAP)-compliant performance characteristics. Here, we have reviewed approaches for validation of NGS technology for routine screening of tumors. We discuss the criteria for selecting gene markers to include in the NGS panel and the deciding factors for selecting target capture approaches and sequencing platforms. We also discuss challenges in result reporting, storage and retrieval of the voluminous sequencing data and the future potential of clinical NGS. PMID:26473927

  18. Clinical Factors and Disease Course Related to Diagnostic Delay in Korean Crohn's Disease Patients: Results from the CONNECT Study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang Mo; Jung, Sung-Ae; Kim, Seong-Eun; Song, Hyun Joo; Jung, Yunho; Ye, Byong Duk; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Joo Sung; Han, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic delay frequently occurs in Crohn's disease (CD) patients because of diagnostic limitations. However, diagnostic delay and its related factors remain poorly defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors associated with diagnostic delay and to evaluate the impact of diagnostic delay on clinical course in a Korean CD patient cohort. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 1,047 CD patients registered in the Crohn's Disease Clinical Network and Cohort study in Korea. The mean interval of diagnostic delay was 16.0 ± 33.1 months. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at diagnosis (≥40 years) (p = 0.014), concomitant upper gastrointestinal (UGI) disease (p = 0.012) and penetrating disease behavior at diagnosis (p = 0.001) were positively associated with long diagnostic delay (≥18 months). During the longitudinal follow-up, long diagnostic delay was independently predictive of further development of intestinal stenosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.93; p = 0.017), internal fistulas (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.33; p = 0.011), and perianal fistulas (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.80; p = 0.016). However, as for the risk of abscess formation, bowel perforation, and CD-related abdominal surgery, no significant association with diagnostic delay was observed. Older age at diagnosis, UGI involvement, and penetrating behavior are associated with long diagnostic delay in Korean CD patients. Moreover, diagnostic delay is associated with an increased risk of CD-related complications such as intestinal stenosis, internal fistulas, and perianal fistulas.

  19. Clinical Investigations in Mathematics Education. Thematic Addresses from the Fourth National Conference on Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, William R.

    Five invitational addresses presented at the Fourth National Conference of the Research Council for Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics are included in this document. "The Nature of the Clinical Investigation" (Romberg and Uprichard) discusses the validity of clinical investigations and suggests guidelines for conducting such studies of…

  20. Assessment Procedures for Narcissistic Personality Disorder: A Comparison of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 and Best-Estimate Clinical Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joshua D.; Campbell, W. Keith; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Morse, Jennifer Q.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the degree of correspondence between two assessments for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in a mixed clinical and community sample--one using a self-report measure (Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4) and the other using clinical judgments derived from an assessment based on the longitudinal, expert, all data (LEAD)…

  1. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical...

  2. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical...

  3. 42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.509 Section 414.509 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical...

  4. 42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.509 Section 414.509 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical...

  5. Clinical Diagnostics in Human Genetics with Semantic Similarity Searches in Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Sebastian; Schulz, Marcel H.; Krawitz, Peter; Bauer, Sebastian; Dölken, Sandra; Ott, Claus E.; Mundlos, Christine; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2009-01-01

    The differential diagnostic process attempts to identify candidate diseases that best explain a set of clinical features. This process can be complicated by the fact that the features can have varying degrees of specificity, as well as by the presence of features unrelated to the disease itself. Depending on the experience of the physician and the availability of laboratory tests, clinical abnormalities may be described in greater or lesser detail. We have adapted semantic similarity metrics to measure phenotypic similarity between queries and hereditary diseases annotated with the use of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) and have developed a statistical model to assign p values to the resulting similarity scores, which can be used to rank the candidate diseases. We show that our approach outperforms simpler term-matching approaches that do not take the semantic interrelationships between terms into account. The advantage of our approach was greater for queries containing phenotypic noise or imprecise clinical descriptions. The semantic network defined by the HPO can be used to refine the differential diagnosis by suggesting clinical features that, if present, best differentiate among the candidate diagnoses. Thus, semantic similarity searches in ontologies represent a useful way of harnessing the semantic structure of human phenotypic abnormalities to help with the differential diagnosis. We have implemented our methods in a freely available web application for the field of human Mendelian disorders. PMID:19800049

  6. Diagnosing alcohol abuse in alcohol dependent individuals: diagnostic and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Lara A.; Hutchison, Kent E.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Miranda, Robert; Francione, Caren; Chelminski, Iwona; Young, Diane; Zimmerman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In DMS-IV, the diagnosis of alcohol abuse is precluded by the diagnosis of alcohol dependence. The goal of this study was to examine the diagnostic and clinical implications of diagnosing alcohol abuse among alcohol dependent individuals. Treatment-seeking psychiatric outpatients with a lifetime history of alcohol dependence (n = 544), some of whom (n = 45) did not meet lifetime criteria for alcohol abuse completed in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured clinical assessments of DSM-IV axis I and axis II psychopathology. Alcohol dependent patients who did not meet criteria for alcohol abuse were significantly more likely to be female, have a later age of onset for alcohol dependence, have fewer dependence symptoms, and have a lower rate of positive family history for alcoholism, and were less likely to report a lifetime history of DSM-IV drug use disorders and PTSD. These findings suggest that diagnosing alcohol abuse among alcohol dependent patients may be clinically useful as an index of severity and higher likelihood of comorbid drug abuse and dependence. Future studies are needed to establish whether these differences are clinically significant in terms of the course of the disorder and response to treatment. PMID:19362427

  7. Clinical diagnostics in human genetics with semantic similarity searches in ontologies.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Sebastian; Schulz, Marcel H; Krawitz, Peter; Bauer, Sebastian; Dölken, Sandra; Ott, Claus E; Mundlos, Christine; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N

    2009-10-01

    The differential diagnostic process attempts to identify candidate diseases that best explain a set of clinical features. This process can be complicated by the fact that the features can have varying degrees of specificity, as well as by the presence of features unrelated to the disease itself. Depending on the experience of the physician and the availability of laboratory tests, clinical abnormalities may be described in greater or lesser detail. We have adapted semantic similarity metrics to measure phenotypic similarity between queries and hereditary diseases annotated with the use of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) and have developed a statistical model to assign p values to the resulting similarity scores, which can be used to rank the candidate diseases. We show that our approach outperforms simpler term-matching approaches that do not take the semantic interrelationships between terms into account. The advantage of our approach was greater for queries containing phenotypic noise or imprecise clinical descriptions. The semantic network defined by the HPO can be used to refine the differential diagnosis by suggesting clinical features that, if present, best differentiate among the candidate diagnoses. Thus, semantic similarity searches in ontologies represent a useful way of harnessing the semantic structure of human phenotypic abnormalities to help with the differential diagnosis. We have implemented our methods in a freely available web application for the field of human Mendelian disorders.

  8. Writing for the Discipline in the Discipline?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzi, Olivier; Grimes, Susan; Rolls, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the issue of students' writing skills in the discipline of Engineering and beyond. It is the result of a discussion between three academics from different discipline backgrounds: Teaching and Learning, the Humanities and Engineering. We start with a review of the strategies commonly used to address problems in students'…

  9. Diagnostic Criteria, Clinical Features, and Incidence of Thyroid Storm Based on Nationwide Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Tetsurou; Isozaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Wakino, Shu; Iburi, Tadao; Tsuboi, Kumiko; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Kouki, Tsuyoshi; Otani, Hajime; Teramukai, Satoshi; Uehara, Ritei; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagai, Masaki; Mori, Masatomo

    2012-01-01

    bilirubin concentration >3 mg/dL. Conclusions TS is still a life-threatening disorder with more than 10% mortality in Japan. We present newly formulated diagnostic criteria for TS and clarify its clinical features, prognosis, and incidence based on nationwide surveys in Japan. This information will help diagnose TS and in understanding the factors contributing to mortality and irreversible complications. PMID:22690898

  10. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. Results: The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%), pharmacopoeia availability (92%), equipment calibration (87%) and identifying responsibilities (86%). Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%). The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%), pharmacies, blood bank services (83%) reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%). There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO) and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. Conclusion: There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits) can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA

  11. Next-generation sequencing-based genome diagnostics across clinical genetics centers: implementation choices and their effects.

    PubMed

    Vrijenhoek, Terry; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Elferink, Martin; de Ligt, Joep; Kranendonk, Elcke; Santen, Gijs; Nijman, Isaac J; Butler, Derek; Claes, Godelieve; Costessi, Adalberto; Dorlijn, Wim; van Eyndhoven, Winfried; Halley, Dicky J J; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; van Hove, Steven; Johansson, Lennart F; Jongbloed, Jan D H; Kamps, Rick; Kockx, Christel E M; de Koning, Bart; Kriek, Marjolein; Lekanne Dit Deprez, Ronald; Lunstroo, Hans; Mannens, Marcel; Mook, Olaf R; Nelen, Marcel; Ploem, Corrette; Rijnen, Marco; Saris, Jasper J; Sinke, Richard; Sistermans, Erik; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Sleutels, Frank; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Tienhoven, Marianne; Vermaat, Martijn; Vogel, Maartje; Waisfisz, Quinten; Marjan Weiss, Janneke; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; van Workum, Wilbert; Ijntema, Helger; van der Zwaag, Bert; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; den Dunnen, Johan; Veltman, Joris A; Hennekam, Raoul; Cuppen, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    Implementation of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technology into routine diagnostic genome care requires strategic choices. Instead of theoretical discussions on the consequences of such choices, we compared NGS-based diagnostic practices in eight clinical genetic centers in the Netherlands, based on genetic testing of nine pre-selected patients with cardiomyopathy. We highlight critical implementation choices, including the specific contributions of laboratory and medical specialists, bioinformaticians and researchers to diagnostic genome care, and how these affect interpretation and reporting of variants. Reported pathogenic mutations were consistent for all but one patient. Of the two centers that were inconsistent in their diagnosis, one reported to have found 'no causal variant', thereby underdiagnosing this patient. The other provided an alternative diagnosis, identifying another variant as causal than the other centers. Ethical and legal analysis showed that informed consent procedures in all centers were generally adequate for diagnostic NGS applications that target a limited set of genes, but not for exome- and genome-based diagnosis. We propose changes to further improve and align these procedures, taking into account the blurring boundary between diagnostics and research, and specific counseling options for exome- and genome-based diagnostics. We conclude that alternative diagnoses may infer a certain level of 'greediness' to come to a positive diagnosis in interpreting sequencing results. Moreover, there is an increasing interdependence of clinic, diagnostics and research departments for comprehensive diagnostic genome care. Therefore, we invite clinical geneticists, physicians, researchers, bioinformatics experts and patients to reconsider their role and position in future diagnostic genome care. PMID:25626705

  12. Clinical Implications of Referral Bias in the Diagnostic Performance of Exercise Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ladapo, Joseph A.; Blecker, Saul; Elashoff, Michael R.; Federspiel, Jerome J.; Vieira, Dorice L.; Sharma, Gaurav; Monane, Mark; Rosenberg, Steven; Phelps, Charles E.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise testing with echocardiography or myocardial perfusion imaging is widely used to risk‐stratify patients with suspected coronary artery disease. However, reports of diagnostic performance rarely adjust for referral bias, and this practice may adversely influence patient care. Therefore, we evaluated the potential impact of referral bias on diagnostic effectiveness and clinical decision‐making. Methods and Results Searching PubMed and EMBASE (1990–2012), 2 investigators independently evaluated eligibility and abstracted data on study characteristics and referral patterns. Diagnostic performance reported in 4 previously published meta‐analyses of exercise echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging was adjusted using pooled referral rates and Bayesian methods. Twenty‐one studies reported referral patterns in 49 006 patients (mean age 60.7 years, 39.6% women, and 0.8% prior history of myocardial infarction). Catheterization referral rates after normal and abnormal exercise tests were 4.0% (95% CI, 2.9% to 5.0%) and 42.5% (36.2% to 48.9%), respectively, with odds ratio for referral after an abnormal test of 14.6 (10.7 to 19.9). After adjustment for referral, exercise echocardiography sensitivity fell from 84% (80% to 89%) to 34% (27% to 41%), and specificity rose from 77% (69% to 86%) to 99% (99% to 100%). Similarly, exercise myocardial perfusion imaging sensitivity fell from 85% (81% to 88%) to 38% (31% to 44%), and specificity rose from 69% (61% to 78%) to 99% (99% to 100%). Summary receiver operating curve analysis demonstrated only modest changes in overall discriminatory power but adjusting for referral increased positive‐predictive value and reduced negative‐predictive value. Conclusions Exercise echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging are considerably less sensitive and more specific for coronary artery disease after adjustment for referral. Given these findings, future work should assess the comparative ability of

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Rapid Diagnostic Test Kit for Scrub Typhus with Improved Performance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of scrub typhus is challenging due to its more than twenty serotypes and the similar clinical symptoms with other acute febrile illnesses including leptospirosis, murine typhus and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Accuracy and rapidity of a diagnostic test to Orientia tsutsugamushi is an important step to diagnose this disease. To discriminate scrub typhus from other diseases, the improved ImmuneMed Scrub Typhus Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) was evaluated in Korea and Sri Lanka. The sensitivity at the base of each IgM and IgG indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) in Korean patients was 98.6% and 97.1%, and the specificity was 98.2% and 97.7% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for retrospective diagnosis at the base of IFA in Sri Lanka was 92.1% and 96.1%. ImmuneMed RDT was not reactive to any serum from seventeen diseases including hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (n = 48), leptospirosis (n = 23), and murine typhus (n = 48). ImmuneMed RDT shows superior sensitivity (98.6% and 97.1%) compared with SD Bioline RDT (84.4% at IgM and 83.3% at IgG) in Korea. The retrospective diagnosis of ImmuneMed RDT exhibits 94.0% identity with enzyme-linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using South India patient serum samples. These results suggest that this RDT can replace other diagnostic tests and is applicable for global diagnosis of scrub typhus. This rapid and accurate diagnosis will be beneficial for diagnosing and managing scrub typhus. PMID:27478327

  14. Clinical Evaluation of Rapid Diagnostic Test Kit for Scrub Typhus with Improved Performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Sungman; Premaratna, Ranjan; Selvaraj, Stephen; Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Sora; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Min Soo; Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Kyung-Chan; Kwon, Soon-Hwan; Seo, Wonjun; Lee, Nam Taek; Kim, Seung-Han; Kang, Heui Keun; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis of scrub typhus is challenging due to its more than twenty serotypes and the similar clinical symptoms with other acute febrile illnesses including leptospirosis, murine typhus and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Accuracy and rapidity of a diagnostic test to Orientia tsutsugamushi is an important step to diagnose this disease. To discriminate scrub typhus from other diseases, the improved ImmuneMed Scrub Typhus Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) was evaluated in Korea and Sri Lanka. The sensitivity at the base of each IgM and IgG indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) in Korean patients was 98.6% and 97.1%, and the specificity was 98.2% and 97.7% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for retrospective diagnosis at the base of IFA in Sri Lanka was 92.1% and 96.1%. ImmuneMed RDT was not reactive to any serum from seventeen diseases including hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (n = 48), leptospirosis (n = 23), and murine typhus (n = 48). ImmuneMed RDT shows superior sensitivity (98.6% and 97.1%) compared with SD Bioline RDT (84.4% at IgM and 83.3% at IgG) in Korea. The retrospective diagnosis of ImmuneMed RDT exhibits 94.0% identity with enzyme-linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using South India patient serum samples. These results suggest that this RDT can replace other diagnostic tests and is applicable for global diagnosis of scrub typhus. This rapid and accurate diagnosis will be beneficial for diagnosing and managing scrub typhus. PMID:27478327

  15. Internal Amplification Control for a Cryptosporidium Diagnostic PCR: Construction and Clinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry; Ghonaim, M M; Al-Hazmi, Ayman S

    2015-04-01

    Various constituents in clinical specimens, particularly feces, can inhibit the PCR assay and lead to false-negative results. To ensure that negative results of a diagnostic PCR assay are true, it should be properly monitored by an inhibition control. In this study, a cloning vector harboring a modified target DNA sequence (≈375 bp) was constructed to be used as a competitive internal amplification control (IAC) for a conventional PCR assay that detects ≈550 bp of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene sequence in human feces. Modification of the native PCR target was carried out using a new approach comprising inverse PCR and restriction digestion techniques. IAC was included in the assay, with the estimated optimum concentration of 1 fg per reaction, as duplex PCR. When applied on fecal samples spiked with variable oocysts counts, ≈2 oocysts were theoretically enough for detection. When applied on 25 Cryptosporidium-positive fecal samples of various infection intensities, both targets were clearly detected with minimal competition noticed in 2-3 samples. Importantly, both the analytical and the diagnostic sensitivities of the PCR assay were not altered with integration of IAC into the reactions. When tried on 180 randomly collected fecal samples, 159 were Cryptosporidium-negatives. Although the native target DNA was absent, the IAC amplicon was obviously detected on gel of all the Cryptosporidium-negative samples. These results imply that running of the diagnostic PCR, inspired with the previously developed DNA extraction protocol and the constructed IAC, represents a useful tool for Cryptosporidium detection in human feces.

  16. Optical diagnostics based on elastic scattering: Recent clinical demonstrations with the Los Alamos Optical Biopsy System

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.; Loree, T.R.; Mourant, J.; Shimada, T.; Story-Held, K.; Glickman, R.D.; Conn, R.

    1993-08-01

    A non-invasive diagnostic tool that could identify malignancy in situ and in real time would have a major impact on the detection and treatment of cancer. We have developed and are testing early prototypes of an optical biopsy system (OBS) for detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. The OBS invokes a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathologies based on the elastic scattering properties, over a wide range of wavelengths, of the microscopic structure of the tissue. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be strongly wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes in an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength dependence of elastic scattering. The data acquisition and storage/display time with the OBS instrument is {approximately}1 second. Thus, in addition to the reduced invasiveness of this technique compared with current state-of-the-art methods (surgical biopsy and pathology analysis), the OBS offers the possibility of impressively faster diagnostic assessment. The OBS employs a small fiber-optic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope, catheter or hypodermic, or to direct surface examination (e.g. as in skin cancer or cervical cancer). It has been tested in vitro on animal and human tissue samples, and clinical testing in vivo is currently in progress.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy and implementation of computed tomography angiography for gastrointestinal hemorrhage according to clinical severity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Kyung Su; Suh, Gil Joon; Kwon, Woon Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in patients with various severities of gastrointestinal hemorrhage (GIH). Methods We retrospectively enrolled adult patients (n=262) with GIH who had undergone CT angiography from January 2012 to December 2013. Age, sex, comorbidities, presenting symptoms, initial vital signs, laboratory results, transfusion volume, emergency department disposition, and hospital mortality were abstracted from patient records. CT angiography findings were reviewed and compared to reference standards consisting of endoscopy, conventional angiography, bleeding scan, capsule endoscopy, and surgery, either alone or in combination. Clinical severity was stratified according to the number of packed red blood cell units transfused during the first two days: the first quartile was categorized as mild severity, while the second and third quartiles were categorized as moderate severity. The fourth quartile was categorized as severe. Results Patients were categorized into the mild (n=75, 28.6%), moderate (n=139, 53.1%), and severe (n=48, 18.3%) groups. The mean number of transfused packed red blood cell units was 0, 3, and 9.6 in the mild, moderate, and severe groups, respectively. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT angiography were 73.8%, 94.0%, 97.3%, and 55.3%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the diagnostic performance of CT angiography was 0.780, 0.841, and 0.930 in the mild, moderate, and severe groups, respectively, which significantly differed among groups (P=0.006). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of CT angiography is better in patients with more severe GIH. PMID:27752620

  18. Redefined clinical features and diagnostic criteria in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferre, Elise M.N.; Rose, Stacey R.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Romito, Kimberly R.; Niemela, Julie E.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Break, Timothy J.; Gu, Wenjuan; Hunsberger, Sally; Browne, Sarah K.; Hsu, Amy P.; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Collar, Amanda L.; Kong, Heidi H.; Chascsa, David; Simcox, Thomas; Pham, Angela; Bondici, Anamaria; Natarajan, Mukil; Monsale, Joseph; Kleiner, David E.; Quezado, Martha; Alevizos, Ilias; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Yockey, Lynne; Frein, Cathleen; Soldatos, Ariane; Calvo, Katherine R.; Adjemian, Jennifer; Similuk, Morgan N.; Lang, David M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Uzel, Gulbu; Bishop, Rachel J.; Holland, Steven M.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Heller, Theo; Winer, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder typically caused by homozygous AIRE mutations. It classically presents with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and autoimmunity that primarily targets endocrine tissues; hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency are most common. Developing any two of these classic triad manifestations establishes the diagnosis. Although widely recognized in Europe, where nonendocrine autoimmune manifestations are uncommon, APECED is less defined in patients from the Western Hemisphere. We enrolled 35 consecutive American APECED patients (33 from the US) in a prospective observational natural history study and systematically examined their genetic, clinical, autoantibody, and immunological characteristics. Most patients were compound heterozygous; the most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13. All but one patient had anti–IFN-ω autoantibodies, including 4 of 5 patients without biallelic AIRE mutations. Urticarial eruption, hepatitis, gastritis, intestinal dysfunction, pneumonitis, and Sjögren’s-like syndrome, uncommon entities in European APECED cohorts, affected 40%–80% of American cases. Development of a classic diagnostic dyad was delayed at mean 7.38 years. Eighty percent of patients developed a median of 3 non-triad manifestations before a diagnostic dyad. Only 20% of patients had their first two manifestations among the classic triad. Urticarial eruption, intestinal dysfunction, and enamel hypoplasia were prominent among early manifestations. Patients exhibited expanded peripheral CD4+ T cells and CD21loCD38lo B lymphocytes. In summary, American APECED patients develop a diverse syndrome, with dramatic enrichment in organ-specific nonendocrine manifestations starting early in life, compared with European patients. Incorporation of these new manifestations into American diagnostic criteria would accelerate diagnosis by approximately 4 years and

  19. Clinical evaluation of a wireless ECG sensor system for arrhythmia diagnostic purposes.

    PubMed

    Fensli, Rune; Gundersen, Torstein; Snaprud, Tormod; Hejlesen, Ole

    2013-06-01

    In a clinical study, a novel wireless electrocardiogram (ECG) recorder has been evaluated with regard to its ability to perform arrhythmia diagnostics. As the ECG recorder will detect a "non-standard" ECG signal, it has been necessary to compare those signals to "standard" ECG recording signals in order to evaluate the arrhythmia detection ability of the new system. Simultaneous recording of ECG signals from both the new wireless ECG recorder and a conventional Holter recorder was compared by two independent cardiology specialists with regard to signal quality for performing arrhythmia diagnosis. In addition, calculated R-R intervals from the two systems were correlated. A total number of 16 patients participated in the study. It can be considered that recorded ECG signals obtained from the wireless ECG system had an acceptable quality for arrhythmia diagnosis. Some of the patients used the wireless sensor while doing physical sport activities, and the quality of the recorded ECG signals made it possible to perform arrhythmia diagnostics even under such conditions. Consequently, this makes possible improvements in correlating arrhythmias to physical activities.

  20. Clinicians' emotional responses and Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual adult personality disorders: A clinically relevant empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Gazzillo, Francesco; Lingiardi, Vittorio; Del Corno, Franco; Genova, Federica; Bornstein, Robert F; Gordon, Robert M; McWilliams, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between level of personality organization and type of personality disorder as assessed with the categories in the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM; PDM Task Force, 2006) and the emotional responses of treating clinicians. We asked 148 Italian clinicians to assess 1 of their adult patients in treatment for personality disorders with the Psychodiagnostic Chart (PDC; Gordon & Bornstein, 2012) and the Personality Diagnostic Prototype (PDP; Gazzillo, Lingiardi, & Del Corno, 2012) and to complete the Therapist Response Questionnaire (TRQ; Betan, Heim, Zittel-Conklin, & Westen, 2005). The patients' level of overall personality pathology was positively associated with helpless and overwhelmed responses in clinicians and negatively associated with positive emotional responses. A parental and disengaged response was associated with the depressive, anxious, and dependent personality disorders; an exclusively parental response with the phobic personality disorder; and a parental and criticized response with narcissistic disorder. Dissociative disorder evoked a helpless and parental response in the treating clinicians whereas somatizing disorder elicited a disengaged reaction. An overwhelmed and disengaged response was associated with sadistic and masochistic personality disorders, with the latter also associated with a parental and hostile/criticized reaction; an exclusively overwhelmed response with psychopathic patients; and a helpless response with paranoid patients. Finally, patients with histrionic personality disorder evoked an overwhelmed and sexualized response in their clinicians whereas there was no specific emotional reaction associated with the schizoid and the obsessive-compulsive disorders. Clinical implications of these findings were discussed.

  1. [Cowpox virus infection in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - clinical symptoms, laboratory diagnostic findings and pathological changes].

    PubMed

    Goerigk, D; Theuß, T; Pfeffer, M; Konrath, A; Kalthoff, D; Woll, D; Vahlenkamp, T W; Beer, M; Starke, A

    2014-01-01

    Orthopoxvirus infections appear to be rare in South American Camelids, because only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Based on a generalized infection with cowpox virus in an alpaca, the clinical symptoms, laboratory diagnostic findings and the pathological changes are described. The case history showed a long treatment because of chronic skin lesions. The main clinical symptom was miliary papules over the entire skin. Furthermore, a bilateral mucopurulent conjunctivitis occurred as well as excessive salivation due to a severe erosive-ulcerative stomatitis. Although the animal received intensive treatment, it died 8 days after admission to the clinic. During necropsy, an erosive-ulcerative laryngitis as well as a necrotising pneumonia and lymphadenitis were observed. Histopathological examination of representative organ samples led to the diagnosis of a suspected orthopoxvirus infection. Electron microscopy and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of tissue samples confirmed this diagnosis. The virus could be isolated in tissue culture and a PCR with subsequent nucleotide sequencing identified cowpox virus as the causative agent for this generalised infection.

  2. Relapsing Polychondritis: an Update on Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, Diagnostic Tools, and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Sota, Jurgen; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare multisystemic disease widely accepted as a complex autoimmune disorder affecting proteoglycan-rich structures and cartilaginous tissues, especially the auricular pinna, cartilage of the nose, tracheobronchial tree, eyes, and heart's connective components. The clinical spectrum may vary from intermittent inflammatory episodes leading to unesthetic structural deformities to life-threatening cardiopulmonary manifestations, such as airway collapse and valvular regurgitation. The frequent association with other rheumatologic and hematologic disorders has been extensively reported over time, contributing to define its complexity at a diagnostic and also therapeutic level. Diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis is mainly based on clinical clues, while laboratory data have only a supportive contribution. Conversely, radiology is showing a relevant role in estimating the rate of systemic involvement as well as disease activity. The present review is aimed at providing an update on scientific data reported during the last 3 years about relapsing polychondritis in terms of pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and new treatment options. PMID:26711694

  3. Clinical use of the autism diagnostic observation schedule-second edition with children who are deaf.

    PubMed

    Mood, Deborah; Shield, Aaron

    2014-11-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Second Edition (ADOS-2) was administered to eight children who are deaf and who are native American Sign Language (ASL) users with previous autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis. Classification on two different module selection criteria was compared based on: (1) standardized administration rules (signs not counted as equivalent to words) and (2) commonly utilized clinical administration (sign language complexity treated equivalently to spoken language complexity). Differential module selection resulted in discrepant classification in five of the eight cases (63%) and suggests that ADOS-2 via standardized test administration may result in a failure to identify autism among children who are deaf with primary communication in ASL. Two of the eight children (25%) did not exceed the cutoff for an ASD classification on either module administered despite previous ASD diagnosis. Overall results suggest that caution should be used when utilizing the ADOS-2 with children who are deaf who primarily communicate using ASL. PMID:25321853

  4. The main challenges that remain in applying high-throughput sequencing to clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loeffelholz, Michael; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, the quality, price and availability of high-throughput sequencing instruments have improved to the point that this technology may be close to becoming a routine tool in the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Two groups of challenges, however, have to be resolved in order to move this powerful research technology into routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The computational/bioinformatics challenges include data storage cost and privacy concerns, requiring analysis to be performed without access to cloud storage or expensive computational infrastructure. The logistical challenges include interpretation of complex results and acceptance and understanding of the advantages and limitations of this technology by the medical community. This article focuses on the approaches to address these challenges, such as file formats, algorithms, data collection, reporting and good laboratory practices. PMID:26394651

  5. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors for Space Molecule Detection and Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie

    2001-01-01

    Both space molecule detection and clinical molecule diagnostics need to develop ultra sensitive biosensors for detection of less than attomole molecules such as amino acids for DNA. However all the electrode sensor systems including those fabricated from the existing carbon nanotubes, have a background level of nA (nanoAmp). This has limited DNA or other molecule detection to nA level or molecules whose concentration is, much higher than attomole level. A program has been created by NASA and NCI (National Cancer Institute) to exploit the possibility of carbon nanotube based biosensors to solve this problem for both's interest. In this talk, I will present our effort on the evaluation and novel design of carbon nanotubes as electrode biosensors with strategies to minimize background currents while maximizing signal intensity.The fabrication of nanotube electrode arrays, immobilization of molecular probes on nanotube electrodes and in vitro biosensor testing will also be discussed.

  6. [Features of clinic, diagnostics and treatment of typhoid fever in young patients].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A N; Zhdanov, K V; Volzhanin, V M; Shishkin, M K; Tokmakov, V S; Karpov, A V; Murachev, A A; Kondratenok, V A

    2011-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a dangerous infection. The article analyzes the clinical aspects, diagnostic possibilities and casual treatment of the young men in organized group with typhoid. It's shown that despite early hospitalization (at average of 5.5 days) the main manifestations peculiar to the "classical" infection retained. The majority (61.5%) had disease of moderate severity, mild form were at 37,4% of patients. Complications occurred in 5.0% of the patients: pneumonia (2.8%), myocarditis (2.2%) and pancreatits (2.2%). Pathogen isolated from patients with typhoid fever had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Antimicrobial therapy showed the advantage of the 3 generation cephalosporin (ceftriaxone) compared with ciprofloxacin or a combination of the latter with cefotaxime. PMID:21506329

  7. Clinical cognition and diagnostic error: applications of a dual process model of reasoning.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, Pat

    2009-09-01

    Both systemic and individual factors contribute to missed or delayed diagnoses. Among the multiple factors that impact clinical performance of the individual, the caliber of cognition is perhaps the most relevant and deserves our attention and understanding. In the last few decades, cognitive psychologists have gained substantial insights into the processes that underlie cognition, and a new, universal model of reasoning and decision making has emerged, Dual Process Theory. The theory has immediate application to medical decision making and provides an overall schema for understanding the variety of theoretical approaches that have been taken in the past. The model has important practical applications for decision making across the multiple domains of healthcare, and may be used as a template for teaching decision theory, as well as a platform for future research. Importantly, specific operating characteristics of the model explain how diagnostic failure occurs.

  8. [Mental disorders in pregnancy and postpartum : Prevalence, course, and clinical diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Kühner, C

    2016-09-01

    The peripartum period represents a critical phase for the onset and course of mental disorders. During this phase, mental disorders occur as first onset or, more often, as recurrent or ongoing chronic conditions with onset and further course of illness in- or outside the peripartal period. No clear risk increase exists for the more prevalent mental disorders such as depressive and anxiety disorders during this period, whereas there is an increased risk for bipolar disorder. Peripartal mental disorders may impact fetal and child development through different mechanisms. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) does not sufficiently take into account particularities of peripartal disorders with possible prognostic relevance. The present article gives an overview on prevalence, course, and clinical diagnostics and presents a proposal for consistent categorization of peripartal mental disorders. PMID:27456195

  9. Adopted Children and Discipline

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media ... Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen ...

  10. Combined central and peripheral demyelination: Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Franciotta, D; Alfonsi, E; Visigalli, N; Zardini, E; Diamanti, L; Prunetti, P; Osera, C; Gastaldi, M; Berzero, G; Pichiecchio, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Piscosquito, G; Salsano, E; Ceroni, M; Moglia, A; Bono, G; Pareyson, D; Marchioni, E

    2016-04-15

    Combined central and peripheral demyelination (CCPD) is rare, and current knowledge is based on case reports and small case series. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic results, treatment and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with CCPD. Thirty-one patients entered this retrospective, observational, two-center study. In 20 patients (65%) CCPD presented, after an infection, as myeloradiculoneuropathy, encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, length-dependent peripheral neuropathy, or pseudo-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Demyelinating features of peripheral nerve damage fulfilling European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP were found in 23 patients (74%), and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions on brain MRI fulfilling the 2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 11 (46%). Two thirds of the patients had a relapsing or progressive disease course, usually related to the appearance of new spinal cord lesions or worsening of the peripheral neuropathy, and showed unsatisfactory responses to high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The clinical presentation of CCPD was severe in 22 patients (71%), who were left significantly disabled. Our data suggest that CCPD has heterogeneous features and shows frequent post-infectious onset, primary peripheral nervous system or central nervous system involvement, a monophasic or chronic disease course, inadequate response to treatments, and a generally poor outcome. We therefore conclude that the current diagnostic criteria for MS and CIDP may not fully encompass the spectrum of possible manifestations of CCPD, whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (P<0.200), a logistic multiple regression model was derived for identifying a MLM rotator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  12. Equivalence of MammaPrint array types in clinical trials and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Inès; Witteveen, Anke; Delahaye, Leonie; Wehkamp, Diederik; Snel, Mireille; Dreezen, Christa; Zheng, John; Floore, Arno; Brink, Guido; Chan, Bob; Linn, Sabine; Bernards, Rene; van 't Veer, Laura; Glas, Annuska

    2016-04-01

    MammaPrint is an FDA-cleared microarray-based test that uses expression levels of the 70 MammaPrint genes to assess distant recurrence risk in early-stage breast cancer. The prospective RASTER study proved that MammaPrint Low Risk patients can safely forgo chemotherapy, which is further subject of the prospective randomized MINDACT trial. While MammaPrint diagnostic results are obtained from mini-arrays, clinical trials may be performed on whole-genome arrays. Here we demonstrate the equivalence and reproducibility of the MammaPrint test. MammaPrint indices were collected for breast cancer samples: (i) on both customized certified array types (n = 1,897 sample pairs), (ii) with matched fresh and FFPE tissues (n = 552 sample pairs), iii) for control samples replicated over a period of 10 years (n = 11,333), and iv) repeated measurements (n = 280). The array type indicated a near perfect Pearson correlation of 0.99 (95 % CI: 0.989-0.991). Paired fresh and FFPE samples showed an excellent Pearson correlation of 0.93 (95 % CI 0.92-0.94), in spite of the variability introduced by intratumoral tissue heterogeneity. Control samples showed high consistency over 10 year's time (overall reproducibility of 97.4 %). Precision and repeatability are overall 98.2 and 98.3 %, respectively. Results confirm that the combination of the near perfect correlation between array types, excellent equivalence between tissue types, and a very high stability, precision, and repeatability demonstrate that results from clinical trials (such as MINDACT and I-SPY 2) are equivalent to current MammaPrint FFPE and fresh diagnostics, and can be used interchangeably. PMID:27002507

  13. The Diagnostic Utility of the NINDS-CSN Neuropsychological Battery in Memory Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Chan, Qun Lin; Hilal, Saima; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Tan, Boon Yeow; Dong, Yanhong; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Collinson, Simon L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To examine the diagnostic utility of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Canadian Stroke Network (NINDS-CSN) neuropsychological battery in memory clinics comparing controls with patients with no cognitive impairment (NCI), patients with cognitive impairment-no dementia (CIND) at varying severity levels (mild/moderate), and patients with dementia. Methods A total of 405 participants with NCI, CIND or dementia were assessed with the NINDS-CSN battery. The discriminatory properties of all three protocols (5, 30 and 60 min) before and after education stratification (none/primary vs. secondary/above) were examined by receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Overall, the shorter protocols are equivalent to the longer protocol in diagnosing dementia, regardless of education. To discriminate between nondementia groups, before education stratification, the 5-min protocol showed varied discriminatory properties between different diagnostic/severity groups. After stratification, the 5-min protocol was broadly equivalent to the longer protocols in lower-education groups [area under the curve (AUC) range: 0.77-0.87] but was less accurate in the higher-education groups (AUC range: 0.68-0.78). The 30- and 60-min protocol constantly showed moderate-to-excellent differentiating capacities regardless of education (AUC range: 0.80-0.90). Conclusion The NINDS-CSN neuropsychological battery can be applied in memory clinics and effectively discriminate between cognitively intact individuals and those with cognitive impairments of varying severity. Furthermore, level of education should be taken into consideration when choosing protocols with different lengths for cognitive assessment. PMID:27504116

  14. Rapid diagnostic tests versus clinical diagnosis for managing people with fever in malaria endemic settings

    PubMed Central

    Odaga, John; Sinclair, David; Lokong, Joseph A; Donegan, Sarah; Hopkins, Heidi; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010, the World Health Organization recommended that all patients with suspected malaria are tested for malaria before treatment. In rural African settings light microscopy is often unavailable. Diagnosis has relied on detecting fever, and most people were given antimalarial drugs presumptively. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) provide a point-of-care test that may improve management, particularly of people for whom the RDT excludes the diagnosis of malaria. Objectives To evaluate whether introducing RDTs into algorithms for diagnosing and treating people with fever improves health outcomes, reduces antimalarial prescribing, and is safe, compared to algorithms using clinical diagnosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; LILACS; and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for eligible trials up to 10 January 2014. We contacted researchers in the field and reviewed the reference lists of all included trials to identify any additional trials. Selection criteria Individual or cluster randomized trials (RCTs) comparing RDT-supported algorithms and algorithms using clinical diagnosis alone for diagnosing and treating people with fever living in malaria-endemic settings. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and extracted data. We combined data from individually and cluster RCTs using the generic inverse variance method. We presented all outcomes as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included seven trials, enrolling 17,505 people with fever or reported history of fever in this review; two individually randomized trials and five cluster randomized trials. All trials were conducted in rural African settings. In most trials the health workers diagnosing and treating malaria were nurses or clinical officers with less

  15. Positive Discipline. (Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, Jane

    Understanding why children do not behave the way they used to, and why both controlling and overly-permissive discipline styles are ineffective, is the first step for parents and teachers who are facing child-discipline problems. This book describes a program of positive discipline principles aimed at assisting parents and teachers in…

  16. Classroom Discipline. Research Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    1989-01-01

    Recent research in classroom discipline tends to show that discipline is a by-product of effective instruction and classroom management. The five publications reviewed in this annotated bibliography explore aspects of the complex classroom environment that relate to student discipline. Walter Doyle's chapter on "Classroom Organization and…

  17. [The quality management in clinical diagnostic laboratory in conditions of the Federal Center of traumatology, orthopedics and endoprosthesis replacement of Minzdrav of Russia (Cheboksary)].

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, N S; Nazarova, V V; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu; Orlova, A V; Pchelova, N N

    2014-10-01

    The article presents experience of clinical diagnostic laboratory of the Federal Center of traumatology, orthopedics and endoprosthesis replacement of Minzdrav of Russia (Cheboksary) in the area of quality management of medical laboratory services on the basis of evaluation of efficacy and effectiveness of processes. The factors effecting quality of functioning of clinical diagnostic laboratory are indicated. The criteria and indicators of efficacy of work of employees of clinical diagnostic laboratory are presented.

  18. Clinical and diagnostic utility of saliva as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid:
a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Lazaro Alessandro Soares; Mussavira, Sayeeda

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review presents the latest trends in salivary research and its applications in health and disease. Among the large number of analytes present in saliva, many are affected by diverse physiological and pathological conditions. Further, the non-invasive, easy and cost-effective collection methods prompt an interest in evaluating its diagnostic or prognostic utility. Accumulating data over the past two decades indicates towards the possible utility of saliva to monitor overall health, diagnose and treat various oral or systemic disorders and drug monitoring. Advances in saliva based systems biology has also contributed towards identification of several biomarkers, development of diverse salivary diagnostic kits and other sensitive analytical techniques. However, its utilization should be carefully evaluated in relation to standardization of pre-analytical and analytical variables, such as collection and storage methods, analyte circadian variation, sample recovery, prevention of sample contamination and analytical procedures. In spite of all these challenges, there is an escalating evolution of knowledge with the use of this biological matrix. PMID:26110030

  19. Clinical and diagnostic utility of saliva as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid: 
a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Lazaro Alessandro Soares; Mussavira, Sayeeda; Bindhu, Omana Sukumaran

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review presents the latest trends in salivary research and its applications in health and disease. Among the large number of analytes present in saliva, many are affected by diverse physiological and pathological conditions. Further, the non-invasive, easy and cost-effective collection methods prompt an interest in evaluating its diagnostic or prognostic utility. Accumulating data over the past two decades indicates towards the possible utility of saliva to monitor overall health, diagnose and treat various oral or systemic disorders and drug monitoring. Advances in saliva based systems biology has also contributed towards identification of several biomarkers, development of diverse salivary diagnostic kits and other sensitive analytical techniques. However, its utilization should be carefully evaluated in relation to standardization of pre-analytical and analytical variables, such as collection and storage methods, analyte circadian variation, sample recovery, prevention of sample contamination and analytical procedures. In spite of all these challenges, there is an escalating evolution of knowledge with the use of this biological matrix.

  20. Biofluid infrared spectro-diagnostics: pre-analytical considerations for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Lovergne, L; Bouzy, P; Untereiner, V; Garnotel, R; Baker, M J; Thiéfin, G; Sockalingum, G D

    2016-06-23

    Several proof-of-concept studies on the vibrational spectroscopy of biofluids have demonstrated that the methodology has promising potential as a clinical diagnostic tool. However, these studies also show that there is a lack of a standardised protocol in sample handling and preparation prior to spectroscopic analysis. One of the most important sources of analytical errors is the pre-analytical phase. For the technique to be translated into clinics, it is clear that a very strict protocol needs to be established for such biological samples. This study focuses on some of the aspects of the pre-analytical phase in the development of the high-throughput Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of some of the most common biofluids such as serum, plasma and bile. Pre-analytical considerations that can impact either the samples (solvents, anti-coagulants, freeze-thaw cycles…) and/or spectroscopic analysis (sample preparation such as drying, deposit methods, volumes, substrates, operators dependence…) and consequently the quality and the reproducibility of spectral data will be discussed in this report. PMID:27048927

  1. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients.

  2. Biofluid infrared spectro-diagnostics: pre-analytical considerations for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Lovergne, L; Bouzy, P; Untereiner, V; Garnotel, R; Baker, M J; Thiéfin, G; Sockalingum, G D

    2016-06-23

    Several proof-of-concept studies on the vibrational spectroscopy of biofluids have demonstrated that the methodology has promising potential as a clinical diagnostic tool. However, these studies also show that there is a lack of a standardised protocol in sample handling and preparation prior to spectroscopic analysis. One of the most important sources of analytical errors is the pre-analytical phase. For the technique to be translated into clinics, it is clear that a very strict protocol needs to be established for such biological samples. This study focuses on some of the aspects of the pre-analytical phase in the development of the high-throughput Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of some of the most common biofluids such as serum, plasma and bile. Pre-analytical considerations that can impact either the samples (solvents, anti-coagulants, freeze-thaw cycles…) and/or spectroscopic analysis (sample preparation such as drying, deposit methods, volumes, substrates, operators dependence…) and consequently the quality and the reproducibility of spectral data will be discussed in this report.

  3. The Validation and Clinical Implementation of BRCAplus: A Comprehensive High-Risk Breast Cancer Diagnostic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hansook Kim; Wang, Tao; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Seidler, Sara; Lu, Hong; Keiles, Steven; Chao, Elizabeth C.; Stuenkel, A. J.; Li, Xiang; Elliott, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, with 10% of disease attributed to hereditary factors. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a high percentage of hereditary cases, there are more than 25 susceptibility genes that differentially impact the risk for breast cancer. Traditionally, germline testing for breast cancer was performed by Sanger dideoxy terminator sequencing in a reflexive manner, beginning with BRCA1 and BRCA2. The introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled the simultaneous testing of all genes implicated in breast cancer resulting in diagnostic labs offering large, comprehensive gene panels. However, some physicians prefer to only test for those genes in which established surveillance and treatment protocol exists. The NGS based BRCAplus test utilizes a custom tiled PCR based target enrichment design and bioinformatics pipeline coupled with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify mutations in the six high-risk genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, TP53, CDH1, and STK11. Validation of the assay with 250 previously characterized samples resulted in 100% detection of 3,025 known variants and analytical specificity of 99.99%. Analysis of the clinical performance of the first 3,000 BRCAplus samples referred for testing revealed an average coverage greater than 9,000X per target base pair resulting in excellent specificity and the sensitivity to detect low level mosaicism and allele-drop out. The unique design of the assay enabled the detection of pathogenic mutations missed by previous testing. With the abundance of NGS diagnostic tests being released, it is essential that clinicians understand the advantages and limitations of different test designs. PMID:24830819

  4. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Žilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009–2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1–3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists. PMID:24689080

  5. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Zilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Ounap, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009-2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1-3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists.

  6. Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: diagnostic and predictive value of clinical testing, lumbar drainage, and CSF dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Cynthia V; Dengl, Markus; Nestler, Ulf; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Eichner, Gerrit; Preuß, Matthias; Meixensberger, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to analyze the diagnostic and predictive values of clinical tests, CSF dynamics, and intracranial pulsatility tests, compared with external lumbar drainage (ELD), for shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). METHODS Sixty-eight consecutive patients with suspected iNPH were prospectively evaluated. Preoperative assessment included clinical tests, overnight intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, lumbar infusion test (LIFT), and ELD for 24-72 hours. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to identify predictive parameters concerning the outcome after shunt therapy. RESULTS Positive response to ELD correctly predicted improvement after CSF diversion in 87.9% of the patients. A Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) value below 21 was associated with nonresponse after shunt insertion (specificity 93%, sensitivity 67%). Resistance to outflow of CSF (ROut) > 12 mm Hg/ml/min was false negative in 21% of patients. Intracranial pulsatility parameters yielded different results in various parameters (correlation coefficient between pulse amplitude and ICP, slow wave amplitude, and mean ICP) but did not correlate to outcome. In multiple linear regression analysis, a calculation of presurgical MMSE versus the value after ELD, ROut, and ICP amplitude quotient during LIFT was significantly associated with outcome (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Despite a multitude of invasive tests, presurgical clinical testing and response to ELD yielded the best prediction for improvement of symptoms following surgery. The complication rate of invasive testing was 5.4%. Multiple and simple linear regression analyses indicated that outcome can only be predicted by a combination of parameters, in accordance with a multifactorial pathogenesis of iNPH. PMID:26824377

  7. Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday: From the Exome Sequencing of One Boy to the Delivery of Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Tschannen, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    For several years, there have been discussions about using both Sanger and whole genome sequencing in clinical practice. In late 2009, the Medical College of Wisconsin initiated the infrastructure to streamline the delivery of current and emerging DNA technologies into state-of-the-art molecular diagnostics. The online publication of our initial case in Genetics of Medicine in late 2010 further intensified our efforts in this endeavor. However, being relatively new to the field of NextGen sequencing, we began with the addition of Sanger diagnostic sequencing to our already successful research core, which at that point had been in operation for almost ten years. This was a great undertaking, as typically, independent research laboratories performing cutting-edge science lack the financial resources and breadth of experience to launch their custom product or application to the diagnostic industry. An independent research laboratory is able to resolve these shortages by partnering with a core laboratory staffed with diagnostic expertise. Due to our lack of diagnostic experience, we quickly aligned the research core to a consortium of individuals with clinical experience to allow us to benefit from established diagnostic facilities on campus. Difficulties faced at the onset of diagnostic startup were many, including large issues such as accreditation program (CAP vs. CLIA), SOP generation and validation, competency and proficiency testing, and reimbursement, as well as smaller problems like semiannual pipette calibration, temperature monitoring, and inventory control. The purpose of this talk is to give insight into efficient ways to resolve these problems, both large and small, and transform a decade or more of research expertise into a viable diagnostic laboratory.

  8. A Review of the Giant Protein Titin in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Gigli, Marta; Begay, Rene L.; Morea, Gaetano; Graw, Sharon L.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Taylor, Matthew R. G.; Granzier, Henk; Mestroni, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Titin (TTN) is known as the largest sarcomeric protein that resides within the heart muscle. Due to alternative splicing of TTN, the heart expresses two major isoforms (N2B and N2BA) that incorporate four distinct regions termed the Z-line, I-band, A-band, and M-line. Next-generation sequencing allows a large number of genes to be sequenced simultaneously and provides the opportunity to easily analyze giant genes such as TTN. Mutations in the TTN gene can cause cardiomyopathies, in particular dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM is the most common form of cardiomyopathy, and it is characterized by systolic dysfunction and dilation of the left ventricle. TTN truncating variants have been described as the most common cause of DCM, while the real impact of TTN missense variants in the pathogenesis of DCM is still unclear. In a recent population screening study, rare missense variants potentially pathogenic based on bioinformatic filtering represented only 12.6% of the several hundred rare TTN missense variants found, suggesting that missense variants are very common in TTN and are frequently benign. The aim of this review is to understand the clinical role of TTN mutations in DCM and in other cardiomyopathies. Whereas TTN truncations are common in DCM, there is evidence that TTN truncations are rare in the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype. Furthermore, TTN mutations can also cause arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) with distinct clinical features and outcomes. Finally, the identification of a rare TTN missense variant cosegregating with the restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) phenotype suggests that TTN is a novel disease-causing gene in this disease. Clinical diagnostic testing is currently able to analyze over 100 cardiomyopathy genes, including TTN; however, the size and presence of extensive genetic variation in TTN presents clinical challenges in determining significant disease-causing mutations. This review discusses the current

  9. A Review of the Giant Protein Titin in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Gigli, Marta; Begay, Rene L; Morea, Gaetano; Graw, Sharon L; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Taylor, Matthew R G; Granzier, Henk; Mestroni, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Titin (TTN) is known as the largest sarcomeric protein that resides within the heart muscle. Due to alternative splicing of TTN, the heart expresses two major isoforms (N2B and N2BA) that incorporate four distinct regions termed the Z-line, I-band, A-band, and M-line. Next-generation sequencing allows a large number of genes to be sequenced simultaneously and provides the opportunity to easily analyze giant genes such as TTN. Mutations in the TTN gene can cause cardiomyopathies, in particular dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM is the most common form of cardiomyopathy, and it is characterized by systolic dysfunction and dilation of the left ventricle. TTN truncating variants have been described as the most common cause of DCM, while the real impact of TTN missense variants in the pathogenesis of DCM is still unclear. In a recent population screening study, rare missense variants potentially pathogenic based on bioinformatic filtering represented only 12.6% of the several hundred rare TTN missense variants found, suggesting that missense variants are very common in TTN and are frequently benign. The aim of this review is to understand the clinical role of TTN mutations in DCM and in other cardiomyopathies. Whereas TTN truncations are common in DCM, there is evidence that TTN truncations are rare in the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype. Furthermore, TTN mutations can also cause arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) with distinct clinical features and outcomes. Finally, the identification of a rare TTN missense variant cosegregating with the restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) phenotype suggests that TTN is a novel disease-causing gene in this disease. Clinical diagnostic testing is currently able to analyze over 100 cardiomyopathy genes, including TTN; however, the size and presence of extensive genetic variation in TTN presents clinical challenges in determining significant disease-causing mutations. This review discusses the current

  10. New technology for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.

    1995-04-01

    A high-speed, 11-parameter, 6-color fluorescence, laser flow cytometer/cell sorter with a number of special and unique features has been built for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. The software for real-time data acquisition and sort control, written as C++ programming language modules with a WindowsTM graphical user interface, runs on a 66-MHz 80486 computer joined by an extended bus to 23 sophisticated multi-layered boards of special data acquisition and sorting electronics. Special features include: high-speed (> 100,000 cells/sec) real-time data classification module (U.S. Patent 5,204,884 (1993)); real-time principal component cell sorting; multi-queue signal-processing system with multiple hardware and software event buffers to reduce instrument dead time, LUT charge-pulse definition, high-resolution `flexible' sorting for optimal yield/purity sort strategies (U.S. Patent 5,199,576); pre-focusing optical wavelength correction for a second laser beam; and two trains of three fluorescence detectors-- each adjustable for spatial separation to interrogate only one of two laser beams, syringe- driven or pressure-driven fluidics, and time-windowed parameters. The system has been built to be both expandable and versatile through the use of LUT's and a modular hardware and software design. The instrument is especially useful at detection and isolation of rare cell subpopulations for which our laboratory is well-known. Cell subpopulations at frequencies as small as 10-7 have been successfully studied with this system. Current applications in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics include detection and isolation of (1) fetal cells from material blood for prenatal diagnosis of birth defects, (2) hematopoietic stem and precursor cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation, (3) metastatic breast cancer cells for molecular characterization, and (4) HIV-infected maternal cells in newborn blood to study mother

  11. Performance of physician-certified verbal autopsies: multisite validation study using clinical diagnostic gold standards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician review of a verbal autopsy (VA) and completion of a death certificate remains the most widely used approach for VA analysis. This study provides new evidence about the performance of physician-certified verbal autopsy (PCVA) using defined clinical diagnostic criteria as a gold standard for a multisite sample of 12,542 VAs. The study was also designed to analyze issues related to PCVA, such as the impact of a second physician reader on the cause of death assigned, the variation in performance with and without household recall of health care experience (HCE), and the importance of local information for physicians reading VAs. Methods The certification was performed by 24 physicians. The assignment of VA was random and blinded. Each VA was certified by one physician. Half of the VAs were reviewed by a different physician with household recall of health care experience included. The completed death certificate was processed for automated ICD-10 coding of the underlying cause of death. PCVA was compared to gold standard cause of death assignment based on strictly defined clinical diagnostic criteria that are part of the Population Health Metrics Research Consortium (PHMRC) gold standard verbal autopsy study. Results For individual cause assignment, the overall chance-corrected concordance for PCVA against the gold standard cause of death is less than 50%, with substantial variability by cause and physician. Physicians assign the correct cause around 30% of the time without HCE, and addition of HCE improves performance in adults to 45% and slightly higher in children to 48%. Physicians estimate cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) with considerable error for adults, children, and neonates. Only for neonates for a cause list of six causes with HCE is accuracy above 0.7. In all three age groups, CSMF accuracy improves when household recall of health care experience is available. Conclusions Results show that physician coding for cause of death

  12. High Diagnostic Yield of Whole Exome Sequencing in Participants with Retinal Dystrophies in a Clinical Ophthalmology Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kristy; Berg, Jonathan S.; Milko, Laura; Crooks, Kristy; Lu, Mei; Bizon, Chris; Owen, Phillips; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Weck, Karen E.; Evans, James P.; Garg, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the diagnostic yield and the practicality of implementing whole exome sequencing within a clinical ophthalmology setting. Design Evaluation of a diagnostic protocol. Methods Setting Patient participants were enrolled during clinical appointments in a university based Ophthalmic Genetics clinic. Patient Population Twenty-six patients with a variety of presumed hereditary retinal dystrophies. Intervention: Participants were offered whole exome sequencing in addition to clinically available sequencing gene panels between July 2012 and January 2013 to determine the molecular etiology of their retinal dystrophy. Main Outcome Measures Diagnostic yield and acceptability of whole exome sequencing in patients with retinal disorders. Results Twenty-six of 29 (~90%) eligible patients who were approached opted to undergo molecular testing. Each participant chose whole exome sequencing in addition to, or in lieu of, clinically available sequencing gene panels. Time to obtain informed consent was manageable in the clinical context. Whole exome sequencing successfully identified known pathogenic mutations or suspected deleterious variants in 57.7% of participants. Additionally, one participant had 2 autosomal dominant medically actionable incidental findings (unrelated to retinopathy) that were reported to enable the participant to take preventive action and reduce risk for future disease. Conclusions In this study, we identified the molecular etiology for more than half of all participants. Additionally, we found that participants were widely accepting of whole exome sequencing and the possibility of being informed about medically actionable incidental findings. PMID:25910913

  13. The Diagnostic Value of MRI in Brucella Spondylitis With Comparison to Clinical and Laboratory Findings

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Ali Baradaran; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Chokan, Niaz Mohamad Jafari; Abbasi, Bita; Akhavan, Reza; Bolvardi, Ehsan; Soroureddin, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease, especially in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions and can involve many organs and tissue. Osteoarticular involvement is the most common complication. Spondylitis is its most prevalent clinical form in adults, and there may be difficult in diagnosis and treatment. In present study, we aimed to assess these diagnostic value of MRI, in patients with spondylitis due to brucella, comparing with clinical and laboratory findings. Method: Patients with low back pain who were admitted to Sheikhol-raees MRI center were included in this study. None of these patients had any documented infectious disease. Diagnosis of brucellosis was made, based on MRI findings, which would be approved by serology. After confirmation with serology, the group with positive serology were compared with the negative group, in sex, age, MRI findings level of vertebral involvements, signal intensity in T1 weighted and T2 weighted. Results: Among 53 patients with diagnosis of brucella spondylitis, 33 underwent serology study, 20 were positive and 13 were negative and the others consider out of study. From these 20, 3 had tuberculosis spondylitis, whose mean age was 56 and the 67% of them were male. Mean age in the positive brucella spondylitis were 46 and 67% of them were male. In negative group mean age was 55, and of whom 57% were male. There was no statistically significant difference in MRI findings such as changes in signal intensity, disk space narrowing, Intracanalicular mass, Abscess formation. Level of invlovment in vertebrae. Conclusion: The results of this study shows that although MRI is Modality of choice in diagnosis of spondylitis, it is not enough specific to diagnosis the reasons of spondylitis. PMID:27147801

  14. Impact of clinical symptoms on interpretation of diagnostic assays for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Dubberke, Erik R; Han, Zhuolin; Bobo, Linda; Hink, Tiffany; Lawrence, Brenda; Copper, Susan; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Dunne, William Michael

    2011-08-01

    Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile colonization is common in hospitalized patients. Existing C. difficile assay comparisons lack data on severity of diarrhea or patient outcomes, limiting the ability to interpret their results in regard to the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). The objective of this study was to measure how including patient presentation with the C. difficile assay result impacted assay performance to diagnose CDI. Stool specimens from 150 patients that met inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected. Nine methods to detect C. difficile in stool were evaluated. All patients were interviewed prospectively to assess diarrhea severity. We then assessed how different reference standards, with and without the inclusion of patient presentation, impact the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the assays to diagnose CDI. There were minimal changes in sensitivity; however, specificity was significantly lower for the assays Tox A/B II, C. diff Chek-60, BD GeneOhm Cdiff, Xpert C. difficile, and Illumigene C. difficile and for toxigenic culture (P was <0.01 for all except Tox A/B II from fresh stool, for which the P value was 0.016) when the reference standard was recovery of toxigenic C. difficile from stool plus the presence of clinically significant diarrhea compared to when the reference standard was having at least four assays positive while ignoring diarrhea severity. There were 15 patients whose assay result was reported as negative but subsequently found to be positive by at least four assays in the comparison. None suffered from any CDI-related adverse events. In conclusion, clinical presentation is important when interpreting C. difficile diagnostic assays.

  15. Compression ultrasonography for diagnostic management of patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, A.; Lensing, A. W.; Koopman, M. M.; Piovella, F.; Siragusa, S.; Wells, P. S.; Villalta, S.; Büller, H. R.; Turpie, A. G.; Prandoni, P.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of withholding anticoagulant treatment from patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis but normal findings on compression ultrasonography. DESIGN: Compression ultrasonography was done with a simplified diagnostic procedure limited to the common femoral vein in the groin and the popliteal vein extending down to the trifurcation of the calf veins. Patients with normal ultrasonography findings at presentation were retested 1 week later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of venous thromboembolic complications during follow up for 6 months in patients in whom anticoagulant treatment was withheld on the basis of normal results on two ultrasonography tests 1 week apart. SETTING: University research centres in four hospitals. RESULTS: A total of 1702 patients were included in the study. Abnormal results on compression ultrasonography at presentation or at 1 week were found in 400 and 12 patients, respectively, for a prevalence of deep vein thrombosis of 24%. None of the patients were lost to follow up. Venous thromboembolic complications during the week of serial testing occurred in a single patient and in eight patients during 6 months' follow up, resulting in a cumulative rate of venous thromboembolic complications of 0.7% (95% confidence interval 0.3% to 1.2%). The mean number of extra hospital visits and additional tests required per initially referred patient was 0.8. CONCLUSION: It is safe to withhold anticoagulant treatment from patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis who have a normal result on compression ultrasonography at the time of presentation and at 1 week. PMID:9451260

  16. Optical diagnostics based on elastic scattering: An update of clinical demonstrations with the Optical Biopsy System

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Mourant, J.R.; Conn, R.; Bohorfoush, A.

    1994-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. Our clinical studies have expanded since the last Biomedical Optics Europe conference (Budapest, September 1993), and we report here on the latest results of clinical tests in gastrointestinal tract. The OBS invokes a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathologies based on the elastic scattering properties, over a wide range of wavelengths, of the tissue. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes in an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. The OBS employs a small fiberoptic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination. The probe is designed to be used in optical contact with the tissue under examination and has separate illuminating and collecting fibers. Thus, the light that is collected and transmitted to the analyzing spectrometer must first scatter through a small volume of the tissue before entering the collection fiber(s). Consequently, the system is also sensitive to the optical absorption spectrum of the tissue, over an effective operating range of <300 to 950 nm, and such absorption adds valuable complexity to the scattering spectral signature.

  17. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Innovative Genomic Information Is Transforming the Diagnostic and Clinical Landscape.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Amar; Bowers, Daniel C; Karajannis, Matthias A; Leary, Sarah; Witt, Hendrik; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2015-09-20

    Pediatric neuro-oncology has undergone an exciting and dramatic transformation during the past 5 years. This article summarizes data from collaborative group and institutional trials that have advanced the science of pediatric brain tumors and survival of patients with these tumors. Advanced genomic analysis of the entire spectrum of pediatric brain tumors has heralded an era in which stakeholders in the pediatric neuro-oncology community are being challenged to reconsider their current research and diagnostic and treatment strategies. The incorporation of this new information into the next-generation treatment protocols will unleash new challenges. This review succinctly summarizes the key advances in our understanding of the common pediatric brain tumors (ie, medulloblastoma, low- and high-grade gliomas, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, and ependymoma) and some selected rare tumors (ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor and CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The potential impact of this new information on future clinical protocols also is discussed. Cutting-edge genomics technologies and the information gained from such studies are facilitating the identification of molecularly defined subgroups within patients with particular pediatric brain tumors. The number of evaluable patients in each subgroup is small, particularly in the subgroups of rare diseases. Therefore, international collaboration will be crucial to draw meaningful conclusions about novel approaches to treating pediatric brain tumors.

  18. [Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Toledano-Sierra, Pilar; Arriola-Hernández, Maite; Orueta-Sánchez, Ramón

    2015-01-19

    Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  19. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  20. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Innovative Genomic Information Is Transforming the Diagnostic and Clinical Landscape.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Amar; Bowers, Daniel C; Karajannis, Matthias A; Leary, Sarah; Witt, Hendrik; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2015-09-20

    Pediatric neuro-oncology has undergone an exciting and dramatic transformation during the past 5 years. This article summarizes data from collaborative group and institutional trials that have advanced the science of pediatric brain tumors and survival of patients with these tumors. Advanced genomic analysis of the entire spectrum of pediatric brain tumors has heralded an era in which stakeholders in the pediatric neuro-oncology community are being challenged to reconsider their current research and diagnostic and treatment strategies. The incorporation of this new information into the next-generation treatment protocols will unleash new challenges. This review succinctly summarizes the key advances in our understanding of the common pediatric brain tumors (ie, medulloblastoma, low- and high-grade gliomas, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, and ependymoma) and some selected rare tumors (ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor and CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The potential impact of this new information on future clinical protocols also is discussed. Cutting-edge genomics technologies and the information gained from such studies are facilitating the identification of molecularly defined subgroups within patients with particular pediatric brain tumors. The number of evaluable patients in each subgroup is small, particularly in the subgroups of rare diseases. Therefore, international collaboration will be crucial to draw meaningful conclusions about novel approaches to treating pediatric brain tumors. PMID:26304884

  1. Immune reactions in tuberculous and chronic constrictive pericarditis. Clinical data and diagnostic significance of antimyocardial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maisch, B; Maisch, S; Kochsiek, K

    1982-11-01

    Humoral immune reactions were analyzed in 12 patients with exudative tuberculous pericarditis, 10 patients with constrictive pericarditis due to former tuberculosis, 10 patients with viral pericarditis, 20 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, and 98 healthy donors. Pericarditis occurred in 12.5% of the patients with tuberculosis, whereas the incidence of tuberculosis in the 149 patients with pericarditis was 8%. Repeated pericardial puncture and pericardial effusions of greater than 500 ml with impending cardiac tamponade had to be performed in 4 patients. Clinical data indicated probable myocardial involvement in 4 of 12 patients. Antimyolemmal antibodies, which are a muscle-specific subtype of antisarcolemmal antibodies, were found in all patients with exudative tuberculous pericarditis and viral perimyocarditis, in only 1 of 12 patients with constrictive pericarditis, and in no patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Antifibrillary antibodies--primarily of the antimyosin type--were missed in patients with viral heart disease but were demonstrated in 75% of patients with tuberculous pericarditis. Only sera with complement-fixing antimyolemmal antibodies of the IgG type in titers greater than 1:40 induced cytolysis of vital adult heterologous cardiocytes isolated and enriched by silica sol gradient centrifugation. These findings suggest not only that antimyolemmal antibodies are diagnostic indicators of perimyocardial involvement in tuberculous pericarditis, but also that they may play a significant role in its pathogenesis. PMID:6753555

  2. [Some problems of clinical characteristics, diagnostics and treatment of pleomorphic adenoma of salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Stojnev, I

    1989-01-01

    The author evaluates the clinical characteristics in the light of the concepts proceeding from the International histological classification of tumours of the salivary glands on the base of his own experience in the treatment of 208 patients with pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands. The existing hospital documentation of the treated patients was analyzed as well as a repeated evaluation of the histological diagnosis made during the treatment and control of the therapeutic results via periodical inquiry of the treated patients. The author confirms the ratified unified nomenclature of the International classification and the benign nature of the pleomorphic adenoma. In that aspect he defends the surgical treatment of the pleomorphic adenoma as the method of choice and the high diagnostic value of the urgent intraoperative histological study. He advances the thesis for the application of more radical methods in the surgical treatment of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. According to the author, the morphological characteristics of the pleomorphic adenoma have no effect on the choice of the surgical methods for the treatment of that tumour.

  3. Disentangling screening and diagnostic Chlamydia test positivity among females testing at title x-funded and adolescent health clinics, san francisco 2009.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Sally C; Snell, Ameera; Liska, Sally; Rauch, Leah; Philip, Susan S; Bernstein, Kyle T

    2011-07-01

    By using a reason-for-test code, we compared positivity for female chlamydia and gonorrhea. At family planning clinics, there were no statistically significant differences in screening versus diagnostic positivity for either chlamydia or gonorrhea among women. However, at adolescent health clinics, diagnostic positivity was higher than screening positivity for chlamydia and gonorrhea.

  4. DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN A DIRECT-ACCESS SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINIC: A 2-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE PRACTICE ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dedekam, Erik A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Dembowski, Scott C.; Westrick, Richard B.; Goss, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Background While advanced diagnostic imaging is a large contributor to the growth in health care costs, direct-access to physical therapy is associated with decreased rates of diagnostic imaging. No study has systematically evaluated with evidence-based criteria the appropriateness of advanced diagnostic imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when ordered by physical therapists. The primary purpose of this study was to describe the appropriateness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) exams ordered by physical therapists in a direct-access sports physical therapy clinic. Study Design Retrospective observational study of practice. Hypothesis Greater than 80% of advanced diagnostic imaging orders would have an American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria rating of greater than 6, indicating an imaging order that is usually appropriate. Methods A 2-year retrospective analysis identified 108 MRI/MRA examination orders from four physical therapists. A board-certified radiologist determined the appropriateness of each order based on ACR appropriateness criteria. The principal investigator and co-investigator radiologist assessed agreement between the clinical diagnosis and MRI/surgical findings. Results Knee (31%) and shoulder (25%) injuries were the most common. Overall, 55% of injuries were acute. The mean ACR rating was 7.7; scores from six to nine have been considered appropriate orders and higher ratings are better. The percentage of orders complying with ACR appropriateness criteria was 83.2%. Physical therapist's clinical diagnosis was confirmed by MRI/MRA findings in 64.8% of cases and was confirmed by surgical findings in 90% of cases. Conclusions Physical therapists providing musculoskeletal primary care in a direct-access sports physical therapy clinic appropriately ordered advanced diagnostic imaging in over 80% of cases. Future research should prospectively compare physical therapist

  5. Impact of social and clinical factors on diagnostic delay of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dianatinasab, Mostafa; Fararouei, Mohammad; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One of the reasons for high mortality of breast cancer is long delay in seeking medical care. This study was designed to measure the association of a wide range of socio-demographic and clinical factors with the diagnostic delay in breast cancer among Iranian patients. This study was conducted on 505 newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer from southern part of Iran. Medical files of the patients who were admitted to the hospital from November 2013 to May 2015 were examined and clinical and demographic information were extracted. According to the results, illiterate patients were diagnosed on average 87.42 days later compared with those with a college degree (95%CI: 29.68–145.16, P = 0.003) and those from rural area were diagnosed on average 72.48 days later (95%CI: 35.94–109.03, P = 0.001) compared with urban residences. Single women were diagnosed 65.99 days later (95%CI: 7.37–124.61, P = 0.02) compared with those married. Lobular or medullary types of cancer were diagnosed 65.19 days later (95%CI: 2.67–127.70, P = 0.04) compared with ductal type. On the other hand, those who were able to perform breast self-exam were diagnosed 49.07 days earlier compared with others (95%CI: 18.69–79.45, P = 0.002). Those felt lump as the initiating symptom were diagnosed 62.01 days earlier, (95%CI: 8.17–115.85, P = 0.02) compared with those with other initial symptoms. The only factor associated with doctors diagnosis delay was the place of residence as rural residences were diagnosed on average 87.42 days later compared with urban residences, (95%CI: 53.82–121.92, P = 0.001). Higher education, living in cities, ductal type of tumor, and noticing lump in breast were the most important demographic and clinical factors associated with shorter breast cancer diagnosis delay. Informing women and doctors, especially general physicians who are practicing in rural areas, of the common symptoms of breast cancer as well as training women to perform breast self

  6. Prescription for Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Kathy H.

    1983-01-01

    The establishment of a code of discipline leads to better classroom management. Using behavior modification techniques discipline problems are minimized and both teachers and students are the winners. Lists seven rules for the music room and describes methods of positive reinforcement and appropriate punishment. (CS)

  7. Classroom Discipline and Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Kayoun

    This study explored how children are socialized through discipline in the preschool classroom. Using detailed descriptions of teacher-student interactions and an interpretive method, the study mapped the process of the children's socialization and the role of discipline. The case study in one 4-year-olds' room examined early socialization…

  8. Inclusion and Discipline Referrals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krank, H. Mark; Moon, Charles E.; Render, Gary F.

    2002-01-01

    Discipline referrals for special needs students and other students in a rural K-8 school were examined before and after the school shifted to inclusive-school policies and practices. In the year after the shift, discipline referrals declined sharply for special needs students and slightly for other students, reflecting positive social outcomes of…

  9. Discipline and Internalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Martin L.

    1994-01-01

    Although Grusec and Goodnow make interesting suggestions concerning discipline variables that may affect internalization, their ideas are not integrated into a theory, and their definition of internalization is limited because parent-child similarity may result from children's attributing their values to parents. A theory linking discipline and…

  10. Fostering Self-Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, George G.; Duquette, Jeffrey F.

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, a primary goal of public education has been to develop self-discipline among students, best seen as them exhibiting socially and morally responsible behavior. This goal coincides with another important educational imperative, as well as an alternative meaning of the term "discipline": to correct misbehavior to create and…

  11. Diagnostic yield in adults screened at the Marfan outpatient clinic using the 1996 and 2010 Ghent nosologies.

    PubMed

    Aalberts, Jan J J; Thio, Chris H L; Schuurman, Agnes G; van Langen, Irene M; van der Pol, Bert A E; van Tintelen, J Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P

    2012-05-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is diagnosed according to the Ghent nosology, which has recently been revised. In the Netherlands, evaluation for possible MFS is performed in specialized Marfan outpatient clinics. We investigated the diagnostic yield in our clinic and the impact of the 2010 nosology. All adult patients (n = 343) who visited our clinic between 1998 and 2008 were included. We analyzed their reasons for referral, characteristics, and established diagnoses. In addition, we applied the 2010 nosology to all patients and compared the outcomes to those obtained with the 1996 nosology. Diagnoses that were made using the 1996 and the 2010 Ghent nosology included MFS (44/343 vs. 47/343), familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (22/343 vs. 22/343 patients), Loeys-Dietz syndrome (4/343 vs. 4/343 patients), and (familial) mitral valve prolapse (MVPS; 5/343 vs. 28/343 patients). In both nosologies, 77% of MFS patients had an FBN1 mutation. The 2010 nosology led to an increase in the number of diagnoses made: 4 additional cases of MFS were identified (one patient was "lost" who no longer fulfilled the criteria) and 23 additional cases of MVPS were diagnosed. The diagnostic yield of patients with aortic root dilatation was 65% using the 1996 nosology and 70% using the 2010 nosology. The change in diagnoses did not lead to a difference in clinical follow-up. We conclude that the diagnostic yield of our specialized clinic was high, in particular in patients with aortic root dilatation. Further more the 2010 Ghent nosology led to a significant increase in the number of diagnoses made, mainly due to lowering of the diagnostic threshold for MVPS.

  12. Clinical approved fluorescent dyes coupled to endomicroscopy for in vivo diagnostic of peritoneal carcinomatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaci, Muriel; Dartigues, Peggy; Soufan, Ranya; De Leeuw, Frederic; Fabre, Monique; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is metastatic stage aggravating digestive, gynecological or bladder cancer dissemination and the preoperative evaluation of lesions remains difficult. There is therefore a need for minimal invasive innovative techniques to establish a precise preoperative assessment of cancer peritoneal cavity. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) provides dynamic images of the microarchitecture of tissues during an endoscopy. The PERSEE project proposes new developments in robotics and pCLE for the exploration of the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopy. Two fluorescent dyes, Patent blue V and Indocyanine green have been evaluated on human ex vivo samples to improve the contrast of pCLE images. For a future implementation in clinical study, two topically staining protocols operable in vivo have been validated on 70 specimens from 25 patients with a peritoneal carcinomatosis. The specimens were then imaged by pCLE with an optical probe designed for the application. A histo-morphological correlative study was performed on 350 pCLE images and 70 standard histological preparations. All images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists. Differential histological diagnostics such as normal peritoneum or pseudomyxoma could be recognized on fluorescence images. The statistical analysis of the correlative study is underway. These dyes already approved for human use are interesting for pCLE imaging because some micromorphological criteria look like to conventional histology and are readable by pathologist. Thus pCLE images using both dyes do not require a specific semiology unlike to what is described in the literature, for pCLE associated with fluorescein for the in vivo imaging of pancreatic cysts.

  13. Clinically Unjustified Diagnostic Imaging – a Worrisome Tendency in Today’s Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sobiecka, Aleksandra; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Rutkowska, Milena; Latos, Tomasz; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study was to evaluate the percentage of unjustified examinations among all the CT and MRI studies performed by two radiology departments and to determine the types of examinations which are most commonly carried out unnecessarily. Material/Methods Three radiologists assessed the justification of CT and MRI examinations performed during a period of 14 days based on the referrals. The radiologists assessed 799 referrals for CT scans (847 examinations of a particular part of the body) and 269 MRI referrals (269 examinations). The criteria for justification were: medical expertise and the guidelines. During the first stage radiologists divided the examinations into 3 groups: justified, unjustified and the examinations of questionable justification. The second step was to determine the reasons why the studies were considered as unjustified or of questionable justification. Results 73 of 1116 examinations (6.54%) were considered to be unjustified or of a questionable justification. There were 59 CT scans (59/847=6.97%) and 14 MRI studies (14/269=5.20%). The most common reasons to consider them as unjustified or of questionable justification were: inadequate method of diagnostic imaging chosen as a first-line tool and lacking or insufficient clinical details. Conclusions In our investigation 6.54% of both CT and MRI examinations were considered as unjustified or of questionable justification, which is lower than described in other studies (from 7% to 26%). The assessment was based only on referrals, therefore a total share of these examinations is likely to be higher. PMID:27471577

  14. Bibliometric Analysis of Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research (Dentistry Section; 2007-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, P; Singla, Ashish; Singh, Khushboo; Kundu, Hansa; Vashishtha, Vaibhav; Pandita, Venisha; Malhi, Ravneet

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of scientific journals in diffusion of data concerning researches in the field of Public Health Dentistry is of premier importance. Bibliometric analysis involves analysis of publications reflecting the type of research work. Aim: The present study was conducted with an aim to determine the number and trends of published articles in Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research (JCDR) from Feb. 2007 to Oct.2014. Settings and Design: A retrospective observational study was conducted for JCDR. Materials and Methods: All issues of JCDR were electronically searched for the parameters : study design, area of interest of research, state /college where research was conducted, authorship pattern, source of articles published each year, changing study trends, disease under study and publication bias. Statistical Analysis used: The data was organized and analyzed using software SPSS - version 21.0; descriptive statistics was used. Results: Bibliometric analysis was done for 601 articles of JCDR published from Feb. 2007 to Oct. 2014. The total number of articles published under Dentistry section have tremendously increased from mere 2 articles in 2007 to 328 articles in 2014.Majority of the study designs published in both the journal were case reports (42.6%) followed by cross sectional studies (24.8%). 96.3% of the articles were from India. Majority of the articles published were of multi authors (65.2%) and from Educational institutes (98.4%). The trends of the articles published indicated that the case reports/series formed the major bulk (others=59.1%) followed by research studies (21.3%). Conclusion: It was concluded that most articles published were case reports followed by researches indicating an inclination towards better quality methodology. The SJR and the citation count of the articles published also indicated the quality of the scientific articles published. PMID:26023643

  15. PCDH8 is Frequently Inactivated by Promoter Hypermethylation in Liver Cancer: Diagnostic and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Peng, Yunfei; Yang, Fan; Qin, Ruixi; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Cuijuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Protocadherin-8 (PCDH8) plays an important role in signaling pathways of cell adhesin, proliferation, and migration. It has been reported that PCDH8 is mutated or methylated in several human cancers. However, little is known about PCDH8 in liver cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression and promoter methylation status of PCDH8 in liver cancer and evaluate the association between PCDH8 methylation and the clinicopathological features. METHODS: The methylation status of PCDH8 in 42 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 8 Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and 50 normal liver tissues were examined using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and the protein expression of PCDH8 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The relationships between PCDH8 methylation and clinicopathological features as well as overall survival of patients were evaluated. RESULTS: The PCDH8 methylation was more frequent in liver cancer tissues than that in the normal liver tissues (88% vs. 32%, P < 0.001), and is significantly associated with loss of its protein expression (P = 0.004). Moreover, there is a significant correlation between PCDH8 methylation and the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (P = 0.008). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients with PCDH8 methylation have shorter OS and PFS than those without PCDH8 methylation (P = 0.041 and P = 0.028, respectively). CONCLUSION: PCDH8 is often inactivated by promoter methylation in liver cancer. PCDH8 methylation can serve as a valuable diagnostic biomarker for early detection of liver cancer and might be useful to predict an unfavorable clinical feature. PMID:26918058

  16. Investigation of the clinical performance of a novel solid-state diagnostic dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jason; McLean, Donald

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the clinical performance of a novel solid-state diagnostic dosimeter, the RaySafe Xi transparent detector, by comparing its performance to a reference-class ionization chamber. Firstly a comparison of dosimeter response "free-in-air" with standard beam qualities was made, followed by an investigation into its relative transparency in an X-ray field and angular sensitivity dependence. The second part of the study looked at the overall performance of the transparent detector under scatter conditions with a number of beam qualities, including standard beam and those hardened by copper (Cu) filtration of thickness up to 0.9 mm, as would be encountered in the equipment testing of fluoroscopy systems. Overall, the transparent detector has demonstrated equivalent measurement properties to the ionization chamber under standard conditions and provided similar X-ray attenuation as reflected by the nearly identical radiographic parameters selected for both dosimeters by the automatic dose rate control (ADRC) system. Yet, it also possessed an asymmetric angular response which respectively under- and overestimated the dose contribution from the rear and lateral directions by the same amount of 50%. The transparent detector provided comparable dose reading of ± 3% to the ionization chamber with standard beam qualities and backscatter radiation present. These results were in good agreement with those of free-in-air measurement, indicating that the angular under- and overresponse might potentially compensate one another for accurate measurement. However, for identical Cu filtered beam qualities and setups, the transparent detector on average overresponded by 5.4% across the useful tube voltage range. In conclusion, the transparent detector, with its novel design, is essentially equivalent, within a 5% tolerance, to an ionization chamber, except in situations where beams hardened with Cu filtration are used with backscatter radiation present requiring

  17. [Neurofibromatosis von Recklinghausen type 1 (NF1) - clinical picture and molecular-genetics diagnostic].

    PubMed

    Petrák, Bořivoj; Bendová, Šárka; Lisý, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Zatrapa, Tomáš; Glombová, Marie; Zámečník, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis von Recklinghausen type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem, autosomal dominant hereditary neurocutaneous disease characterized by skin, central and peripheral nervous system , eyes , bone, endocrine, gastrointestinal and blood vessel wall involvement. It has an estimated frequency of 1 in 3000. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is caused by mutations in the large NF1 gene located on chromosome 17q11.2, encoding the cytoplasmic protein neurofibromin. It is expressed in multiple cell types but is highly expressed in Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, astrocytes and leukocytes. Neurofibromin is known to act as a tumor suppressor via Ras-GTPase activation, which causes down-regulation of cellular signaling via the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Failure of this function is associated with a tendency to form tumors which are histologically hamartomas as well as benign tumors. Tumors of the central nervous system include low-grade gliomas (pilocytic astrocytomas grade I), especially optic pathway gliomas. They are often clinically asymptomatic. Other intracranial tumors are in the brain stem and also elsewhere in the brain and spinal cord. Hydrocephalus may be a complication of NF1 gliomas or due to stenosis of the distal part of the aqueduct Silvii. Cutaneous and subcutaneous neurofibromas or plexiform neurofibromas are localized in the peripheral nervous system. Plexiform neurofibromas have a significant lifetime risk of malignancy. The clinical diagnosis of NF1 is defined by diagnostic criteria. The NF1 diagnosis is satisfied when at least two of the seven conditions are met. The method of direct DNA analysis of large NF1 gene (61 exons) is available. The results of studies of genotype - phenotype established few correlations. But predicting the disease by finding mutations is not currently possible. NF1 exhibits a wide range of variability of expression and complete penetrance, even within the same family. About half of cases are new

  18. Is there any superiority among diagnostic methods in organizing pneumonia in terms of clinical features of the patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kavakli, Kuthan; Ocal, Nesrin; Dogan, Deniz; Cicek, Ali Fuat; Isik, Hakan; Gurkok, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Background Organizing pneumonia (OP) can be idiopathic or secondary to some clinical situations. If an etiological cause is not present, this phenomenon is called cryptogenic OP. Secondary OP is associated with various diseases that are known to induce the OP. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features of the cases with OP and compare the patients diagnosed by bronchoscopic transbronchial biopsy with patients diagnosed by surgical lung biopsy. Patients and methods Medical records of 41 patients diagnosed with OP between 2004 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Results Totally, 41 patients with OP were identified. In all, 39.02% of the cases were diagnosed by bronchoscopic methods, and 60.97% of the cases were diagnosed by surgical procedures. Although the frequency of ground glass opacities, consolidations, and micronodules was higher in the group diagnosed by bronchoscopy, mass-like lesions were more common in the cases diagnosed by surgery. Bronchoscopy, performed in 30 patients totally, had a diagnostic efficacy of 53.33%. Diagnostic value of bronchoscopy was significantly higher in cryptogenic OPs. Although diffuse radiological pattern was more common in “successful bronchoscopy” group, frequency of focal pattern was higher in “failed bronchoscopy” group. Ground glass opacity in successful bronchoscopy group and mass-like lesions in failed bronchoscopy group reached significant differences. Conclusion There were significant differences between the diagnostic procedures in terms of radiological patterns. This is the first study about the relationship between the diagnostic methods and the characteristics of OP. PMID:27713632

  19. Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, C. Ellie; Gillan, Nicola; Spain, Deborah; Robertson, Dene; Roberts, Gedeon; Murphy, Clodagh M.; Maltezos, Stefanos; Zinkstok, Janneke; Johnston, Katie; Dardani, Christina; Ohlsen, Chris; Deeley, P. Quinton; Craig, Michael; Mendez, Maria A.; Happé, Francesca; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2013-01-01

    An Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is often used to access services. We investigated whether ASD diagnostic outcome varied when DSM-5 was used compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR in a clinical sample of 150 intellectually able adults. Of those diagnosed with an ASD using ICD-10R, 56% met DSM-5 ASD criteria. A further 19% met DSM-5 (draft)…

  20. Improved Genotyping Vaccine and Wild-Type Poliovirus Strains by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: Clinical Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulou, Amalia; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Spyrou, Niki; Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5′ noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC53-UG52 primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  1. CLINICAL APPROACH TO THE DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION OF HERDITARY AND ACQUIRED NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the context of a neuromuscular disease diagnostic evaluation, the clinician still must be able to obtain a relevant patient and family history and perform focused general, musculoskeletal, neurologic and functional physical examinations to direct further diagnostic evaluations. Laboratory studies for hereditary neuromuscular diseases include relevant molecular genetic studies. The EMG and nerve conduction studies remain an extension of the physical examination and help to guide further diagnostic studies such as molecular genetic studies, and muscle and nerve biopsies. All diagnostic information needs to be interpreted not in isolation, but within the context of relevant historical information, family history, physical examination findings, and laboratory data, electrophysiologic findings, pathologic findings, and molecular genetic findings if obtained. PMID:22938875

  2. Does MRI Increase the Diagnostic Confidence of Physicians in an Outpatient Memory Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Boelaarts, Leo; Scheltens, Philip; de Jonghe, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Data showing the usefulness of MRI to improve the accuracy of the diagnostic process in cognitive disorders were derived from studies in tertiary referral centers. MRI is widely used as a diagnostic tool in everyday practice, but it is unknown what the actual added value of MRI is. We studied the usefulness of MRI in the diagnostic process by measuring the change of confidence of the physician. Methods Physicians indicated confidence in their diagnosis before and after presentation of MR images using a visual analogue scale from 0-100%. Results Use of MRI increased the level of confidence by 3% in experienced clinicians and by 9% in inexperienced physicians. In 2/125 cases, MRI showed an unexpected finding. Conclusion MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in everyday practice of diagnosing cognitive disorders. PMID:27489558

  3. [Clinical signs, diagnostic approach and therapy for the so-called ovarian remnant syndrome in the bitch].

    PubMed

    Günzel-Apel, A-R; Buschhaus, J; Urhausen, C; Masal, C; Wolf, K; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Piechotta, M; Beyerbach, M; Schoon, H-A

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian remnant syndrome arises as a consequence of incomplete ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy. Remnant ovarian tissue which has been left mostly unintentionally in the bitch may show endocrine activity a few weeks to several years after surgery, provoking a variety of clinical signs. The majority of affected bitches return to heat, in other cases signs of pseudopregnancy and endometritis may be observed. Occasionally, bitches with unclear clinical signs are presented with the suspicion of an inactive ovarian remnant. The following article intends to place the origin of the ovarian remnant syndrome into a factual context regarding the responsibility of the veterinarian and to demonstrate a reasonable diagnostic procedure according to the respective clinical signs. In this regard, the clinical-gynaecological examination, including vaginal cytology, must receive high priority, with the addition of progesterone analysis in peripheral blood plasma or serum if required. Using these combined diagnostic tools, ovarian remnants in stages of endocrine activity (follicular and luteal phases as well as cystic or tumourous ovarian tissue) can be easily unequivocally diagnosed. The application of a GnRH-stimulation test is only reasonable in bitches in which clinical signs are missing. In this context, the usefulness of semi-quantitative LH-assays is also discussed.

  4. Random forests for verbal autopsy analysis: multisite validation study using clinical diagnostic gold standards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computer-coded verbal autopsy (CCVA) is a promising alternative to the standard approach of physician-certified verbal autopsy (PCVA), because of its high speed, low cost, and reliability. This study introduces a new CCVA technique and validates its performance using defined clinical diagnostic criteria as a gold standard for a multisite sample of 12,542 verbal autopsies (VAs). Methods The Random Forest (RF) Method from machine learning (ML) was adapted to predict cause of death by training random forests to distinguish between each pair of causes, and then combining the results through a novel ranking technique. We assessed quality of the new method at the individual level using chance-corrected concordance and at the population level using cause-specific mortality fraction (CSMF) accuracy as well as linear regression. We also compared the quality of RF to PCVA for all of these metrics. We performed this analysis separately for adult, child, and neonatal VAs. We also assessed the variation in performance with and without household recall of health care experience (HCE). Results For all metrics, for all settings, RF was as good as or better than PCVA, with the exception of a nonsignificantly lower CSMF accuracy for neonates with HCE information. With HCE, the chance-corrected concordance of RF was 3.4 percentage points higher for adults, 3.2 percentage points higher for children, and 1.6 percentage points higher for neonates. The CSMF accuracy was 0.097 higher for adults, 0.097 higher for children, and 0.007 lower for neonates. Without HCE, the chance-corrected concordance of RF was 8.1 percentage points higher than PCVA for adults, 10.2 percentage points higher for children, and 5.9 percentage points higher for neonates. The CSMF accuracy was higher for RF by 0.102 for adults, 0.131 for children, and 0.025 for neonates. Conclusions We found that our RF Method outperformed the PCVA method in terms of chance-corrected concordance and CSMF accuracy for

  5. Diagnostic Work-up and Follow-up in Children with Tall Stature: A Simplified Algorithm for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Stalman, Susanne E.; Pons, Anke; Wit, Jan M.; Kamp, Gerdine A.; Plötz, Frans B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: No evidence-based guideline has been published about optimal referral criteria and diagnostic work-up for tall stature in children. The aim of our study was to describe auxological and clinical characteristics of a cohort of children referred for tall stature, to identify potential candidates for adult height reduction, and to use these observations for developing a simple algorithm for diagnostic work-up and follow-up in clinical practice. Methods: Data regarding family and medical history, auxological measurements, bone age development, physical examination, additional diagnostic work-up, and final diagnosis were collected from all children referred for tall stature, irrespective of their actual height standard deviation score (HSDS). Predicted adult height (PAH) was calculated in children above 10 years. Characteristics of patients with an indication for adult height reduction were determined. Results: Hundred thirty-two children (43 boys) with a mean ± SD age of 10.9±3.2 (range 0.5-16.9) years were included in the study. Fifty percent of the referred children had an HSDS ≤2.0 (n=66). Two pathological cases (1.5%) were found (HSDS 2.3 and 0.9). Tall children without pathology were diagnosed as idiopathic tall, further classified as familial tall stature (80%), constitutional advancement of growth (5%), or unexplained non-familial tall stature (15%). Of the 74 children in whom PAH was calculated, epiphysiodesis was considered in six (8%) and performed in four (5%) patients. Conclusion: The incidence of pathology was very low in children referred for tall stature, and few children were potential candidates for adult height reduction. We propose a simple diagnostic algorithm for clinical practice. PMID:26777036

  6. The use of rapid dengue diagnostic tests in a routine clinical setting in a dengue-endemic area of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Lyda; Uribe, Marcela; Ardila, Gloria Ines; Orejuela, Yaneth; Velasco, Margarita; Bonelo, Anilza; Parra, Beatriz

    2015-06-01

    There is insufficient evidence of the usefulness of dengue diagnostic tests under routine conditions. We sought to analyse how physicians are using dengue diagnostics to inform research and development. Subjects attending 14 health institutions in an endemic area of Colombia with either a clinical diagnosis of dengue or for whom a dengue test was ordered were included in the study. Patterns of test-use are described herein. Factors associated with the ordering of dengue diagnostic tests were identified using contingency tables, nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A total of 778 subjects were diagnosed with dengue by the treating physician, of whom 386 (49.5%) were tested for dengue. Another 491 dengue tests were ordered in subjects whose primary diagnosis was not dengue. Severe dengue classification [odds ratio (OR) 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.5], emergency consultation (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.5) and month of the year (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.7-5.5) were independently associated with ordering of dengue tests. Dengue tests were used both to rule in and rule out diagnosis. The latter use is not justified by the sensitivity of current rapid dengue diagnostic tests. Ordering of dengue tests appear to depend on a combination of factors, including physician and institutional preferences, as well as other patient and epidemiological factors.

  7. Clinical Research and Development of Tuberculosis Diagnostics: Moving From Silos to Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter S.; Evans, Carlton A.; Alland, David; Barer, Michael; Diefenbach, Jane; Ellner, Jerrold; Hafner, Richard; Hamilton, Carol Dukes; Iademarco, Michael F.; Ireton, Gregory; Kimerling, Michael E.; Lienhardt, Christian; MacKenzie, William R.; Murray, Megan; Perkins, Mark D.; Posey, Jamie E.; Roberts, Teri; Sizemore, Christine; Stevens, Wendy S.; Via, Laura; Williams, Sharon D.; Yew, Wing W.; Swindells, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The development, evaluation, and implementation of new and improved diagnostics have been identified as critical needs by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis researchers and clinicians alike. These needs exist in international and domestic settings and in adult and pediatric populations. Experts in tuberculosis and HIV care, researchers, healthcare providers, public health experts, and industry representatives, as well as representatives of pertinent US federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health, United States Agency for International Development) assembled at a workshop proposed by the Diagnostics Working Group of the Federal Tuberculosis Taskforce to review the state of tuberculosis diagnostics development in adult and pediatric populations. PMID:22476718

  8. MALDI TOF imaging mass spectrometry in clinical pathology: a valuable tool for cancer diagnostics (review).

    PubMed

    Kriegsmann, Jörg; Kriegsmann, Mark; Casadonte, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an evolving technique in cancer diagnostics and combines the advantages of mass spectrometry (proteomics), detection of numerous molecules, and spatial resolution in histological tissue sections and cytological preparations. This method allows the detection of proteins, peptides, lipids, carbohydrates or glycoconjugates and small molecules.Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue can also be investigated by IMS, thus, this method seems to be an ideal tool for cancer diagnostics and biomarker discovery. It may add information to the identification of tumor margins and tumor heterogeneity. The technique allows tumor typing, especially identification of the tumor of origin in metastatic tissue, as well as grading and may provide prognostic information. IMS is a valuable method for the identification of biomarkers and can complement histology, immunohistology and molecular pathology in various fields of histopathological diagnostics, especially with regard to identification and grading of tumors.

  9. Hemicrania continua in a headache clinic: referral source and diagnostic delay in a series of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, Elisa; Guerrero, Angel L; Herrero, Sonia; Mulero, Patricia; Muñoz, Irene; Pedraza, María I; Peñas, María L; Rojo, Esther; Campos, Dulce; Fernández, Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a unilateral and continuous primary headache with superimposed exacerbations frequently associated with autonomic features. Diagnostic criteria of HC, according to II Edition of International Classification of Headache Disorders require complete response to indomethacin. HC is probably misdiagnosed more often than other primary headaches. We aim to analyze characteristics of a series of 22 consecutive cases of HC. We recruited patients from a headache outpatient clinic in a tertiary hospital over a 3-year period (January 2008 to January 2011). We prospectively gathered demographic and nosological characteristics and considered referral source and delay between onset of headache and diagnosis of HC. Twenty-two patients (14 females, 8 males) out of 1,150, who attended the mentioned clinic during the inclusion period (1.9 %) were diagnosed with HC. All cases responded to indomethacin. No patient received a diagnosis of HC before attending our headache office. Mean latency of diagnosis was 86.1 ± 106.5 months (range 3-360). 11 patients (50 %) were referred from primary care, with 9 (40.9 %) from other neurology clinics and 2 (9.1 %) from other specialities offices. According to our series, HC is not an infrequent diagnosis in a headache outpatient clinic. Diagnostic delay is comparable to data collected in previous studies. As HC is frequently misdiagnosed, we thing there is a need for increasing the understanding of this entity, potentially responsive to indomethacin.

  10. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Measures of Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema: Area Under the Curve

    PubMed Central

    Smoot, Betty J.; Wong, Josephine F.; Dodd, Marylin J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare diagnostic accuracy of measures of breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL). Design Cross-sectional design comparing clinical measures with the criterion standard of previous diagnosis of BCRL. Setting University of California San Francisco Translational Science Clinical Research Center. Participants Women older than 18 years and more than 6 months posttreatment for breast cancer (n=141; 70 with BCRL, 71 without BCRL). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity, specificity, receiver operator characteristic curve, and area under the curve (AUC) were used to evaluate accuracy. Results A total of 141 women were categorized as having (n=70) or not having (n=71) BCRL based on past diagnosis by a health care provider, which was used as the reference standard. Analyses of ROC curves for the continuous outcomes yielded AUC of .68 to .88 (P<.001); of the physical measures bioimpedance spectroscopy yielded the highest accuracy with an AUC of .88 (95% confidence interval, .80–.96) for women whose dominant arm was the affected arm. The lowest accuracy was found using the 2-cm diagnostic cutoff score to identify previously diagnosed BCRL (AUC, .54–.65). Conclusions Our findings support the use of bioimpedance spectroscopy in the assessment of existing BCRL. Refining diagnostic cutoff values may improve accuracy of diagnosis and warrant further investigation. PMID:21440706

  11. The road map towards providing a robust Raman spectroscopy-based cancer diagnostic platform and integration into clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Katherine; Isabelle, Martin; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Old, Oliver; Shepherd, Neil; Bell, Ian M.; Dorney, Jennifer; Lewis, Aaran; Gaifulina, Riana; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Kendall, Catherine; Stone, Nicolas; Thomas, Geraint; Reece, David

    2016-03-01

    Despite the demonstrated potential as an accurate cancer diagnostic tool, Raman spectroscopy (RS) is yet to be adopted by the clinic for histopathology reviews. The Stratified Medicine through Advanced Raman Technologies (SMART) consortium has begun to address some of the hurdles in its adoption for cancer diagnosis. These hurdles include awareness and acceptance of the technology, practicality of integration into the histopathology workflow, data reproducibility and availability of transferrable models. We have formed a consortium, in joint efforts, to develop optimised protocols for tissue sample preparation, data collection and analysis. These protocols will be supported by provision of suitable hardware and software tools to allow statistically sound classification models to be built and transferred for use on different systems. In addition, we are building a validated gastrointestinal (GI) cancers model, which can be trialled as part of the histopathology workflow at hospitals, and a classification tool. At the end of the project, we aim to deliver a robust Raman based diagnostic platform to enable clinical researchers to stage cancer, define tumour margin, build cancer diagnostic models and discover novel disease bio markers.

  12. Clinical assessment of the sensory ataxias; diagnostic algorithm with illustrative cases.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, S K; Gow, D; Shaunak, S; Varma, A

    2014-08-01

    Ataxia is a common neurological syndrome resulting from cerebellar, vestibular or sensory disorders. The recognition and characterisation of sensory ataxia remains a challenge. Cerebellar ataxia is the more common and easier to identify; sensory ataxia is often mistaken for cerebellar ataxia, leading to diagnostic errors and delays. A coherent aetiological work-up is only possible if clinicians initially recognise sensory ataxia. We discuss ways to separate sensory from cerebellar ataxia, the causes of sensory ataxia and the clinico-neurophysiological syndromes causing the sensory ataxia syndromes. We summarise a logical tiered approach as a diagnostic algorithm.

  13. Clinical Diagnostic and Sociocultural Dimensions of Deliberate Self-Harm in Mumbai, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkar, Shubhangi R.; Dawani, Varsha; Weiss, Mitchell G.

    2006-01-01

    Patients' accounts complement psychiatric assessment of deliberate self-harm (DSH). In this study we examined psychiatric disorders, and sociocultural and cross-cultural features of DSH. SCID diagnostic interviews and a locally adapted EMIC interview were used to study 196 patients after DSH at a general hospital in Mumbai, India. Major depression…

  14. Atypical phenotypes associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants and a proposal for broadening CHARGE syndrome clinical diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Hale, Caitlin L; Niederriter, Adrienne N; Green, Glenn E; Martin, Donna M

    2016-02-01

    CHARGE syndrome (Coloboma of the eye, Heart defects, Atresia of the choanae, Retardation of growth and/or development, Genital and/or urinary anomalies, and Ear malformations, including deafness and vestibular disorders) is a genetic condition characterized by a specific and recognizable pattern of features. Heterozygous pathogenic variants in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) are the major cause of CHARGE syndrome, and have been identified in 70-90% of individuals fulfilling clinical diagnostic criteria. Since 2004, when CHD7 was discovered as the causative gene for CHARGE syndrome, the phenotypic spectrum associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants has expanded. Predicted pathogenic CHD7 variants have been identified in individuals with isolated features of CHARGE including autism and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we present genotype and phenotype data from a cohort of 28 patients who were considered for a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, including one patient with atypical presentations and a pathogenic CHD7 variant. We also summarize published literature on pathogenic CHD7 variant positive individuals who have atypical clinical presentations. Lastly, we propose a revision to current clinical diagnostic criteria, including broadening of the major features associated with CHARGE syndrome and addition of pathogenic CHD7 variant status as a major criterion. PMID:26590800

  15. Positive Approaches to Classroom Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Betty B.; Quilling, Joan

    To provide educators with an alternative perspective on discipline, this handbook examines the concept of discipline, presents four models of disciplinary strategy, and discusses factors related to classroom discipline. After briefly analyzing different definitions of discipline and their positive and negative outcomes, the authors discuss each of…

  16. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Dissociative Disorders: preliminary report on a new diagnostic instrument.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, M; Rounsaville, B; Cicchetti, D V

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), which investigates five groups of dissociative symptoms (amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alteration) and systematically rates both the severity of individual symptoms and the evaluation of overall diagnosis of dissociative disorder. Preliminary findings from a study of 48 subjects with and without psychiatric diagnoses indicate good to excellent reliability and discriminant validity for the SCID-D as a diagnostic instrument for the five dissociative disorders and as a tool for the evaluation of dissociative symptoms encountered within nondissociative syndromes.

  17. Navigating the Rapids: The Development of Regulated Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Clinical Trial Assays and Companion Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Saumya; Weiner, Russell; Marton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has experienced meteoric growth in the aspects of platform, technology, and supporting bioinformatics development allowing its widespread and rapid uptake in research settings. More recently, NGS-based genomic data have been exploited to better understand disease development and patient characteristics that influence response to a given therapeutic intervention. Cancer, as a disease characterized by and driven by the tumor genetic landscape, is particularly amenable to NGS-based diagnostic (Dx) approaches. NGS-based technologies are particularly well suited to studying cancer disease development, progression and emergence of resistance, all key factors in the development of next-generation cancer Dxs. Yet, to achieve the promise of NGS-based patient treatment, drug developers will need to overcome a number of operational, technical, regulatory, and strategic challenges. Here, we provide a succinct overview of the state of the clinical NGS field in terms of the available clinically targeted platforms and sequencing technologies. We discuss the various operational and practical aspects of clinical NGS testing that will facilitate or limit the uptake of such assays in routine clinical care. We examine the current strategies for analytical validation and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approval of NGS-based assays and ongoing efforts to standardize clinical NGS and build quality control standards for the same. The rapidly evolving companion diagnostic (CDx) landscape for NGS-based assays will be reviewed, highlighting the key areas of concern and suggesting strategies to mitigate risk. The review will conclude with a series of strategic questions that face drug developers and a discussion of the likely future course of NGS-based CDx development efforts. PMID:24860780

  18. Clinical applications of autoimmunity to citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis, from improving diagnostics to future therapies.

    PubMed

    Kinloch, Andrew J; Ng, Karen; Wright, Graham P

    2011-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although widely considered to be the most commonly occurring autoimmune disease, has only truly been substantiated as a distinct autoimmune disease very recently. The lack of understanding of the specific autoimmune system/s at work in rheumatoid patients resulted in an absence of robust diagnostic tools and had meant that the rational choice for use and design of therapy was based on broad-spectrum immunosuppression. The revelation that the autoimmune response specific for patients with RA is to particular protein antigens bearing the post-translational modification 'citrulline' has therefore revolutionized diagnostics and has helped explain why patients carrying particular MHC alleles are predisposed to the disease. The last two decades have seen the characterization of citrullinated antigens targeted by both antibodies and T cells in rheumatoid patients. In more recent years, we have also witnessed the success of biological therapies in the treatment of RA that specifically target T cells and B cells. Ongoing mapping of antibody targets is increasing the percentage of patients who can be definitively diagnosed with, and prognosed to develop, RA. These advances have led to a great number of patents for citrullinated peptides that have been and may be, in the coming years, used in diagnostic test kits. More recently, characterization of T cell targets (citrullinated peptides) has resulted in the patenting of peptides that could be used in antigen specific therapy. This review focuses on the characterization of the autoimmune response to citrullinated protein targets in RA and how the community is translating this knowledge to improve diagnostics, prognostics and therapy. PMID:21453269

  19. The impact of patents on the development of genome-based clinical diagnostics: an analysis of case studies

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Kuszler, Patricia C.; Stanford, Janet L.; Austin, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Fragmented ownership of diagnostic gene patents has the potential to create an ‘anticommons’ in the area of genomic diagnostics, making it difficult and expensive to assemble the patent rights necessary to develop a panel of genetic tests. The objectives of this study were to identify U.S. patents that protect existing panels of genetic tests, describe how (or if) test providers acquired rights to these patents, and determine if fragmented patent ownership has inhibited the commercialization of these panels. Methods As case studies, we selected four clinical applications of genetic testing (cystic fibrosis, maturity-onset diabetes of the young, long QT syndrome, and hereditary breast cancer) that utilize tests protected by ≥3 U.S. patents. We summarized publically available information on relevant patents, test providers, licenses, and litigation. Results For each case study, all tests of major genes/mutations were patented, and at least one party held the collective rights to conduct all relevant tests, often as a result of licensing agreements. Conclusions We did not find evidence that fragmentation of patent rights has inhibited commercialization of genetic testing services. However, as knowledge of genetic susceptibility increases, it will be important to consider the potential consequences of fragmented ownership of diagnostic gene patents. PMID:19367193

  20. Feminism across the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Robinson, Joyce

    A course taught at St. Augustine's College uses "A Voice from the South" (1893) by Anna J. Cooper (a collection of essays representing women as being bold, in-charge decision makers) as an example of how "Feminism across the Disciplines" is expressed. These essays, as well as works of a number of other writers, can be used in developing…

  1. Teaching as Disciplined Enquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper is designed to raise issues around how we view teaching and some of the implication that has for thinking about teaching as a discipline. The paper is built around the concept of "noticing" from some of my earlier work and aims to push ideas about teaching in ways that are intended to provoke readers into thinking more deeply about how…

  2. Robotics technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montemerlo, Melvin D.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on robotics technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: mechanisms; sensors; systems engineering processes for integrated robotics; man/machine cooperative control; 3D-real-time machine perception; multiple arm redundancy control; manipulator control from a movable base; multi-agent reasoning; and surfacing evolution technologies.

  3. The Discipline Controversy Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumrind, Diana

    1996-01-01

    Found that neither the authoritative model nor the liberal (permissive) model offers parents an efficacious model of childrearing. Each polarized model contains an element of truth, but each demonizes the other. Argues that within a responsive and supportive parent-child relationship, prudent use of punishment is a necessary tool in discipline.…

  4. Discipline Gets the Boot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2010-01-01

    For the past 15 years, zero-tolerance policies for violence in schools have been the driving force behind many school discipline policies around the country. But the disciplinary landscape is starting to change in a growing number of schools, especially those in urban districts, where administrators have taken their cues from high-profile reports…

  5. Discipline Seminar. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Mary R.; And Others

    For three weeks participants in a Seattle (Washington) seminar conducted an intensive review of school discipline problems that included a survey of all staff; a sample survey of students at three shcool levels; five community meetings; presentations by 61 individuals, agencies, or groups; a review of district statistics, practices, and…

  6. Arbitrators, Blacks and Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Kenneth

    1975-01-01

    A discussion of the handling of disciplinary problems of black employees concludes that management should be concerned because of the effect that grievance resolution may have on the company's overall employee discipline program and the additional appeal alternatives available to the black employee. (Author/EA)

  7. Different Disciplines, Different Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Leigh; Solomonides, Ian

    2008-01-01

    There is not just one mathematics taught at university level, nor is there one group of students. Mathematics is taught differently depending on the discipline and the perceived background of the student. There is engineering mathematics for the students heading towards engineering degrees, life science mathematics for those heading towards…

  8. Disciplining the Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansilla, Veronica Boix; Gardner, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Most students in most schools today study subject matter. They and their teachers conceive of the educational task as committing to memory large numbers of facts, formulas, and figures. A far more sophisticated perspective emphasizes teaching disciplines and disciplinary thinking. The goal of this approach is to instill in students the disposition…

  9. The Discipline of Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Loren

    1967-01-01

    In spite of the diversity of subjects subsumed under the generic term speech, all areas of this discipline are based on oral communication with its essential elements--voice, action, thought, and language. Speech may be viewed as a community of persons with a common tradition participating in a common dialog, described in part by the memberships…

  10. Using Assertive Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Debra A.; And Others

    Assertive Discipline (AD) is a modified version of assertion training skills. It is a systematic combination of verbal assertiveness training combined with teachers using everyday rewards and punishments to positively influence relationships and students' behavior. When using the AD model, the teacher must: (1) clearly convey their rules and…

  11. Tradition, Discipline, Literary History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kargiotis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    In its attempt to respond to changing historical realities the university has undergone significant transformations, most of which, however, have focused on teaching material, tools, methods or practices adapted to the new demands. Taking as a case study the literary disciplines, this article focuses on the theoretical, mostly implicit,…

  12. Fungal Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Thomas R.; Wickes, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical to effective treatment. There are many impediments to diagnosis such as a diminishing number of clinical mycologists, cost, time to result, and requirements for sensitivity and specificity. In addition, fungal diagnostics must meet the contrasting needs presented by the increasing diversity of fungi found in association with the use of immunosuppressive agents in countries with high levels of medical care and the need for diagnostics in resource-limited countries where large numbers of opportunistic infections occur in patients with AIDS. Traditional approaches to diagnosis include direct microscopic examination of clinical samples, histopathology, culture, and serology. Emerging technologies include molecular diagnostics and antigen detection in clinical samples. Innovative new technologies that use molecular and immunoassay platforms have the potential to meet the needs of both resource-rich and resource-limited clinical environments. PMID:24692193

  13. Early-Onset Psychoses: Comparison of Clinical Features and Adult Outcome in 3 Diagnostic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledda, Maria Giuseppina; Fratta, Anna Lisa; Pintor, Manuela; Zuddas, Alessandro; Cianchetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of clinical features and adult outcome in adolescents with three types of psychotic disorders: schizophrenic (SPh), schizoaffective (SA) and bipolar with psychotic features (BPP). Subjects (n = 41) were finally diagnosed (DSM-IV criteria) with SPh (n = 17), SA (n = 11) or BPP (n = 13). Clinical evaluation took place at onset and at a…

  14. Short-Term Memory and Auditory Processing Disorders: Concurrent Validity and Clinical Diagnostic Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maerlender, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Auditory processing disorders (APDs) are of interest to educators and clinicians, as they impact school functioning. Little work has been completed to demonstrate how children with APDs perform on clinical tests. In a series of studies, standard clinical (psychometric) tests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition…

  15. Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an adult autism spectrum disorder diagnostic clinic.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C Ellie; Gillan, Nicola; Spain, Deborah; Robertson, Dene; Roberts, Gedeon; Murphy, Clodagh M; Maltezos, Stefanos; Zinkstok, Janneke; Johnston, Katie; Dardani, Christina; Ohlsen, Chris; Deeley, P Quinton; Craig, Michael; Mendez, Maria A; Happé, Francesca; Murphy, Declan G M

    2013-11-01

    An Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is often used to access services. We investigated whether ASD diagnostic outcome varied when DSM-5 was used compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR in a clinical sample of 150 intellectually able adults. Of those diagnosed with an ASD using ICD-10R, 56 % met DSM-5 ASD criteria. A further 19 % met DSM-5 (draft) criteria for Social Communication Disorder. Of those diagnosed with Autistic Disorder/Asperger Syndrome on DSM-IV-TR, 78 % met DSM-5 ASD criteria. Sensitivity of DSM-5 was significantly increased by reducing the number of criteria required for a DSM-5 diagnosis, or by rating 'uncertain' criteria as 'present', without sacrificing specificity. Reduced rates of ASD diagnosis may mean some ASD individuals will be unable to access clinical services.

  16. Current views on the etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics, treatment and correlation with other nosological entities of SIBO.

    PubMed

    Miazga, Angelika; Osiński, Maciej; Cichy, Wojciech; Żaba, Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a disease of great clinical and socioeconomic importance caused by an excessive amount of bacteria in the upper alimentary tract. Physiological microbiota are replaced by pathogenic bacteria mainly from large intestine, which is called dysbacteriosis. SIBO disturbs digestion and absorption in the alimentary tract, which seems to cause inflammation. SIBO affects the morphology and function of the digestive system and causes systemic complications (e.g. osteoporosis, macrocytic anemia). Inflammation interferes with gene expression responsible for producing and secreting mucus, therefore, a correlation between SIBO and cystic fibrosis, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic abdominal pain are postulated. All conditions leading to bacterial growth such as congenital and anatomical abnormalities in the digestive tract, motility disorder or immunological deficits are risk factors of SIBO. A typical clinical manifestation of SIBO comprises meteorism, enterectasia, abdominal discomfort and diarrhea. Diagnostic procedures such as glucose, lactulose, methane, 13C mixed triglyceride breath tests are being used in diagnosing SIBO. PMID:25657082

  17. Rapid diagnostics of tuberculosis and drug resistance in the industrialized world: clinical and public health benefits and barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we give an overview of new technologies for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and drug resistance, consider their advantages over existing methodologies, broad issues of cost, cost-effectiveness and programmatic implementation, and their clinical as well as public health impact, focusing on the industrialized world. Molecular nucleic-acid amplification diagnostic systems have high specificity for TB diagnosis (and rifampicin resistance) but sensitivity for TB detection is more variable. Nevertheless, it is possible to diagnose TB and rifampicin resistance within a day and commercial automated systems make this possible with minimal training. Although studies are limited, these systems appear to be cost-effective. Most of these tools are of value clinically and for public health use. For example, whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offers a powerful new approach to the identification of drug resistance and to map transmission at a community and population level. PMID:23987891

  18. Optical coherence tomography system requirements for clinical diagnostic middle ear imaging.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, Dan; Rainsbury, James; Brown, Jeremy; Bance, Manohar; Adamson, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Noninvasive middle ear imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) presents some unique challenges for real-time, clinical use in humans. We present results from a two-dimensional/three-dimensional OCT system built to assess the imaging requirements of clinical middle ear imaging, and the technical challenges associated with them. These include the need to work at a low numerical aperture, the deleterious effects of transtympanic imaging on image quality at the ossicles, sensitivity requirements for clinical fidelity of images at real-time rates, and the high dynamic-range requirements of the ear. We validated the system by imaging cadaveric specimens with simulated disorders to show the clinical applicability of the images. We also provide additional insight into the likely role of OCT in clinical otology.

  19. Evaluation of an Advanced-Practice Physical Therapist in a Specialty Shoulder Clinic: Diagnostic Agreement and Effect on Wait Times

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Susan; Kennedy, Deborah; McKnight, Cheryl; MacLeod, Anne Marie; Holtby, Richard

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To examine the role of an advanced-practice physiotherapist (APP) with respect to (1) agreement with an orthopaedic surgeon on diagnosis and management of patients with shoulder problems; (2) wait times; and (3) satisfaction with care. Methods: This prospective study involved patients with shoulder complaints who were referred to a shoulder specialist in a tertiary care centre. Agreement was examined on seven major diagnostic categories, need for further examination and surgery, and type of surgical procedure. Wait times were compared between the APP- and surgeon-led clinics from referral date to date of initial consultation, date of final diagnostic test, and date of confirmed diagnosis and planned treatment. A modified and validated version of the Visit-Specific Satisfaction Instrument assessed satisfaction in seven domains. Kappa (κ) coefficients and bias- and prevalence-adjusted kappa (PABAK) values were calculated, and strength of agreement was categorized. Wait time and satisfaction data were examined using non-parametric statistics. Results: Agreement on major diagnostic categories varied from 0.68 (good) to 0.96 (excellent). Agreement with respect to indication for surgery was κ=0.75, p<0.001; 95% CI, 0.62–0.88 (good). Wait time for APP assessment was significantly shorter than wait time for surgeon consultation at all time points (p<0.001); the surgeon's wait time was significantly reduced over 3 years. High satisfaction was reported in all components of care received from both health care providers. Conclusions: Using experienced physiotherapists in an extended role reduces wait times without compromising patient clinical management and overall satisfaction. PMID:24381382

  20. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations. PMID:20703753

  1. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations.

  2. ORF virus infection in children: clinical characteristics, transmission, diagnostic methods, and future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Edith R; Austin, Connie; Trevino, Ingrid; Reynolds, Mary G; Swanson, Holly; Cherry, Bryan; Ragsdale, Jennifer; Dunn, John; Meidl, Susan; Zhao, Hui; Li, Yu; Pue, Howard; Damon, Inger K

    2007-08-01

    Orf virus leads to self-limited, subacute cutaneous infections in children who have occupational or recreational contact with infected small ruminants. Breaches in the integument and contact with animals recently vaccinated for orf may be important risk factors in transmission. Common childhood behaviors are likely important factors in the provocation of significant contact (ie, bites) or in unusual lesion location (eg, facial lesions). Clinician recognition is important in distinguishing orf infection from life-threatening cutaneous zoonoses. Recently developed molecular techniques provide diagnostic precision and newer topical therapeutics may hasten healing.

  3. Evaluation of ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool in the management of head and neck facial space infections: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ajaz; Ahmed, Irshad; Hassan, Shahid; Samoon, Amina; Ali, Babar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Superficial facial space infections represent a significant amount of the dental problems that present to hospital. Determining whether an odontogenic swelling is a cellulitis or abscess is difficult, but important as both may require different treatments. The use of an ultrasound may aid in differentiating cellulitis and abscess. This study was done to compare the accuracy of clinical examination alone versus ultrasonography (USG) in the diagnosis of cellulitis and abscess in symptomatic patients with a diagnosis of superficial facial space infection. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (1870 years) diagnosed as superficial facial space infections by clinical and radiographic examinations were included in the study and patients with significant medical conditions were excluded. The provisional clinical diagnosis was made after a thorough history was taken and clinical examination was performed to determine if the swelling was a cellulitis or abscess. Swelling was then evaluated using the ultrasonic transducer which was placed over the swelling to aid the diagnosis which was again recorded. An incision and drainage procedure was performed after the administration of local anesthesia. The success of the ultrasound intervention versus clinical examination was based on whether frank exudation was detected during incision and drainage of such swellings. Results: The statistical analysis found that USG is a valuable diagnostic aid for detection of abscess or cellulitis in head and neck facial space infections. Interpretation and Conclusion: The findings of this prospective analysis indicate that there was statistical difference between clinical examination alone and USG in making the correct diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, negative predictive, and accuracy were not similar for all methods tested. From the results of this study, ultrasound is recommended as an adjunct to clinical examination in differentiating between

  4. [Clinical usefulness of diagnostic methods for human papilloma virus dependent lesions].

    PubMed

    Suwalska, Anna; Owczarek, Witold; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-02-01

    Persistent infection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is confirmed necessary factor for development of cervical cancer and anogenital neoplasia. DNA HPV is detected in 96% of cervical cancer, 40% of vulvar and vaginal cancer, 90% of anal cancer and 26% of oral cavity cancer cases in general population. The most common high-risk HPV types observed in anogenital intraepithelial neoplasia or anogenital cancer are HPV 16, 18 and 45. Numerous diagnostic methods of detection of HPV infection and lesions causes by persistent HPV infection are widely used. Epidemiological data reveals correlation of incidence and mortality reduction due to cervical cancer and consequent prosecution and improvement of screening programmes based on morphological assessment of exfoliative smears. In last decade some limitations of conventional smear method were pointed out and a new diagnostic techniques were introduced: liquid-based cytology and HPV DNA testing. Combination of cytological examination and HPV DNA testing seems to be optimal solution to be introduced in large population because of combining high sensitivity of molecular test with high specificity of cytological smear. PMID:24720112

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis: milestones in clinical and microbiological diagnostics in the last hundred years: a review.

    PubMed

    Budai, Irén

    2007-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis an obligate intracellular, Gram-negative bacterium is the causative agent of several acute or chronic, local and systemic human diseases such as trachoma, oculogenital and neonatal infections. It was discovered in 1907 by Halberstaedter and von Prowazek who observed it in conjunctival scrapings from an experimentally infected orangutan. In the last hundred years the detection and study of the intracellular pathogens, including chlamydiae, passed through an enormous evolution. This memorial review is dedicated to these important research and diagnostic discoveries and to the scientists who significantly contributed to this evolution starting from the application of simple light microscopy through the cell culture technique, antibiotic susceptibility, antigen and antibody detection, serotyping, to the real-time nucleic acid amplification and restriction fragment lengths polymorphism analysis. Although the majority of these old and new excellent diagnostic methods have been introduced into the rutine practice, the trachoma has remained one of the leading causes of blindness, and oculogenital chlamydial infections still are the most frequent sexually transmitted bacterial diseases, furthermore lymphogranuloma venereum is a disease emerging in the developed countries at the beginning of the 21 st century.

  6. Assessment of Diagnostic and Prognostic Role of Copeptin in the Clinical Setting of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Battista, Stefania; Audisio, Umberto; Galluzzo, Claudia; Maggiorotto, Matteo; Masoero, Monica; Forno, Daniela; Pizzolato, Elisa; Ulla, Marco; Lucchiari, Manuela; Vitale, Annarita; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico; Settanni, Fabio; Mengozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of copeptin were evaluated in septic patients, as compared to procalcitonin assessment. In this single centre and observational study 105 patients were enrolled: 24 with sepsis, 25 with severe sepsis, 15 with septic shock, and 41 controls, divided in two subgroups (15 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and 26 with suspected SIRS secondary to trauma, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism). Biomarkers were determined at the first medical evaluation and thereafter 24, 48, and 72 hours after admission. Definitive diagnosis and in-hospital survival rates at 30 days were obtained through analysis of medical records. At entry, copeptin proved to be able to distinguish cases from controls and also sepsis group from septic shock group, while procalcitonin could distinguish also severe sepsis from septic shock group. Areas under the ROC curve for copeptin and procalcitonin were 0.845 and 0.861, respectively. Noteworthy, patients with copeptin concentrations higher than the threshold value (23.2 pmol/L), calculated from the ROC curve, at admission presented higher 30-day mortality. No significant differences were found in copeptin temporal profile among different subgroups. Copeptin showed promising diagnostic and prognostic role in the management of sepsis, together with its possible role in monitoring the response to treatment. PMID:27366743

  7. Assessment of Diagnostic and Prognostic Role of Copeptin in the Clinical Setting of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Battista, Stefania; Audisio, Umberto; Galluzzo, Claudia; Maggiorotto, Matteo; Masoero, Monica; Forno, Daniela; Pizzolato, Elisa; Ulla, Marco; Lucchiari, Manuela; Vitale, Annarita; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico; Settanni, Fabio; Mengozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of copeptin were evaluated in septic patients, as compared to procalcitonin assessment. In this single centre and observational study 105 patients were enrolled: 24 with sepsis, 25 with severe sepsis, 15 with septic shock, and 41 controls, divided in two subgroups (15 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and 26 with suspected SIRS secondary to trauma, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism). Biomarkers were determined at the first medical evaluation and thereafter 24, 48, and 72 hours after admission. Definitive diagnosis and in-hospital survival rates at 30 days were obtained through analysis of medical records. At entry, copeptin proved to be able to distinguish cases from controls and also sepsis group from septic shock group, while procalcitonin could distinguish also severe sepsis from septic shock group. Areas under the ROC curve for copeptin and procalcitonin were 0.845 and 0.861, respectively. Noteworthy, patients with copeptin concentrations higher than the threshold value (23.2 pmol/L), calculated from the ROC curve, at admission presented higher 30-day mortality. No significant differences were found in copeptin temporal profile among different subgroups. Copeptin showed promising diagnostic and prognostic role in the management of sepsis, together with its possible role in monitoring the response to treatment. PMID:27366743

  8. Feasibility of using a large Clinical Data Warehouse to automate the selection of diagnostic cohorts.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Reejis; Boxwala, Aziz; Gertman, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Data from Clinical Data Warehouses (CDWs) can be used for retrospective studies and for benchmarking. However, automated identification of cases from large datasets containing data items in free text fields is challenging. We developed an algorithm for categorizing pediatric patients presenting with respiratory distress into Bronchiolitis, Bacterial pneumonia and Asthma using clinical variables from a CDW. A feasibility study of this approach indicates that case selection may be automated.

  9. The discipline of innovation.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1985-01-01

    As managers recognize the heightened importance of innovation to competitive success, they face an apparent paradox: the orderly and predictable decisions on which a business rests depend increasingly on the disorderly and unpredictable process of innovation. How can managers expect to plan for--or count on--a process that is itself so utterly dependent on creativity, inspiration, and old-fashioned luck? Drawing on his many years' experience studying innovative and entrepreneurial companies, the author argues that this paradox is apparent only, not real. Most of what happens in successful innovations is not the happy occurrence of a blinding flash of insight but, rather, the careful implementation of an unspectacular but systematic management discipline. At the heart of that discipline lies the knowledge of where to look for innovation opportunities and how to identify them. It is to this study of the sources of innovation that Mr. Drucker here addresses himself. PMID:10272260

  10. The diagnostic value of the fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen assay in clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinsky, A.; Hirsh, J.; Straumanis, G.; Carter, C.J.; Gent, M.; Sackett, D.L.; Hull, R.; Kelton, J.G.; Powers, P.; Turpie, A.G.

    1982-02-01

    We have evaluated the fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen assay as a diagnostic test in patients with clinically suspected venous thrombosis by comparing the results of this assay with venography in 272 patients. The result of the fragment E antigen assay was elevated in 79 of 80 patients with positive venograms for recent venous thrombosis (sensitivity 99%) and within the normal range in 161 of 192 patients with normal venograms (specificity 84%). The fragment E assay was also evaluated in 130 medical and surgical controls without evidence of venous thrombosis by leg scanning and the test was found to be relatively nonspecific. However, in the patient group under study, a correct clinical diagnosis of no thrombosis, based on a normal fragment E result, was made in 161 of 162 cases (negative predictive value of 99%). Therefore, a normal test result effectively excludes a diagnosis of venous thrombosis in clinically symptomatic patients. The assay, as currently performed, is technically demanding and takes 24 hr to complete. Therefore, it will have to be simplified before it can be applied to clinical practice.

  11. The diagnostic value of the fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen assay in clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinsky, A.; Hirsh, J.; Straumanis, G.; Carter, C.J.; Gent, M.; Sackett, D.L.; Hull, R.; Kelton, J.G.; Powers, P.

    1982-02-01

    We have evaluated the fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen assay as a diagnostic test in patients with clinically suspected venous thrombosis by comparing the results of this assay with venography in 272 patients. The result of the fragment E antigen assay was elevated in 79 of 80 patients with positive venograms for recent venous thrombosis (sensitivity 99%) and within the normal range in 161 of 192 patients with normal venograms (specificity 84%). The fragment E assay was also evaluated in 130 medical and surgical controls without evidence of venous thrombosis by leg scanning and the test was found to be relatively nonspecific. However, in the patient group under study, a correct clinical diagnosis of no thrombosis, based on a normal fragment E result, was made in 161 of 162 cases (negative predictive value 99%). Therefore, a normal test result effectively excludes a diagnosis of venous thrombosis in clinically symptomatic patients. The assay, as currently performed, is technically demanding and takes 24 hr to complete. Therefore, it will have to be simplified before it can be applied to clinical practice.

  12. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  13. Cardiopulmonary discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the cardiopulmonary discipline must identify possible consequences of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers inflight and upon return to a gravitational environment. The long-range goal of the NASA Cardiopulmonary Discipline Research Program is to foster research to better understand the acute and long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptation to space and to develop physiological countermeasures to ensure crew health in space and on return to Earth. The purpose of this Discipline Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of cardiopulmonary sciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of both cardiovascular and pulmonary function. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational (intramural and extramural) research and development activities in this area.

  14. The Diagnostic Accuracy and Clinical Utility of Three Noninvasive Models for Predicting Liver Fibrosis in Patients with HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqiao; Wang, Gongsui; Kang, Kaifu; Wu, Guobiao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of the fibrosis index based on the four factors (FIB-4), aspartate aminotransferase -to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and aspartate aminotransferase–alanine aminotransferase ratio index (AAR) for predicting liver fibrosis in patients with HBV infection. Methods From January 2006 to December 2010,a total of 1543 consecutive chronic hepatitis B(CHB) patients who underwent liver biopsies were enrolled. FIB-4,APRI, and AAR were calculated.The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) were calculated to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these models.The AUROCs of these models were compared by DeLong’s test.For further comparisons in different studies,the AUROCs were adjusted to conduct Adjusted AUROCs(ADjAUROCs) according to the prevalence of fibrosis stages using the difference between advanced and nonadvanced fibrosis (DANA). Results For prediction of significant fibrosis,severe fibrosis,and cirrhosis,the AUROCs of FIB-4 were 0.646(ADjAUROC 0.717),0.670(ADjAUROC 0.741), and 0.715(ADjAUROC 0.786) respectively;whereas it were 0.656(ADjAUROC 0.727),0.653(ADjAUROC 0.724) and 0.639(ADjAUROC 0.710) for APRI, 0.498(ADjAUROC 0.569),0.548(ADjAUROC 0.619) and 0.573(ADjAUROC 0.644) for AAR. The further comparisons demonstrated that there were no significant differences of AUROCs between FIB-4 and APRI in predicting significant and severe fibrosis(P > 0.05),while FIB-4 was superior to APRI in predicting cirrhosis(P < 0.001). Further subgroup analysis demonstrated that the diagnostic accuracy of FIB-4 and APRI in patients with normal alanine aminotransferase(ALT) were higher than that in patients with elevated ALT. Conclusions The results demonstrated that FIB-4 and APRI are useful for diagnosis of fibrosis. FIB-4 and APRI have similar diagnostic accuracy in predicting significant and severe fibrosis,while FIB-4 is superior to APRI in predicting cirrhosis. The clinical utility of FIB-4 and APRI

  15. Recorded gonorrhoea rates in Denmark, 1900–2010: the impact of clinical testing activity and laboratory diagnostic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Inga; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the relations between recorded gonorrhoea rates and clinical testing activity and disposable diagnostic tests. Methods In Denmark, two sources of information on the epidemiology of gonorrhoea are available: (1) a mandatory clinical notification system (since 1867) comprising summary information about geographic distribution, season, age group and gender; in 1994, more detailed anonymous individualised epidemiological information was included; (2) a voluntary countrywide laboratory surveillance system for culture-confirmed cases (since 1957) comprising information about patient's age and gender, infected anatomical sites and medical setting attended. Results Both surveillance systems showed marked simultaneous changes in gonorrhoea rates, although periodically considerable under-reporting or under-diagnosing was demonstrated. The annual incidence of notified cases peaked in 1919 (474/100 000), in 1944 (583/100 000) and in 1972 (344/100 000). Since 1995, the incidence has been at a low endemic level (1.5–10/100 000) and the total male/female incidence ratios were from 3 to 7 times higher than previously recorded. Among approximately 2 million persons tested during 1974–1988 78 213 men and 63 143 women with culture-confirmed gonorrhoea were identified. During this period, pharyngeal sampling was performed in 36% of men and 25% of women with gonorrhoea; pharyngeal gonorrhoea was found in 10% and 16%, respectively; 40% and 30% of these patients had no concomitant urogenital gonorrhoea. Among men with gonorrhoea, 34% were sampled from the rectum; 9% had rectal gonorrhoea, among whom the rectum was the only infected site in 67%. Conclusions Crucial factors for case finding are clinical sampling tradition and appropriate laboratory diagnostic facilities. When case finding is insufficient, a reservoir of asymptomatic rectal or pharyngeal gonorrhoea remains unrecognised. PMID:26621510

  16. Drug firms, the codification of diagnostic categories, and bias in clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Lisa; Wheeler, Emily E

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that industry is exerting an undue influence on the culture of medicine has profound implications for the profession's public health mission. Policy analysts, investigative journalists, researchers, and clinicians have questioned whether academic-industry relationships have had a corrupting effect on evidence-based medicine. Psychiatry has been at the heart of this epistemic and ethical crisis in medicine. This article examines how commercial entities, such as pharmaceutical companies, influence psychiatric taxonomy and treatment guidelines. Using the conceptual framework of institutional corruption, we show that organized psychiatry's dependence on drug firms has led to a distortion of science. We describe the current dependency corruption and argue that transparency alone is not a solution. We conclude by taking the position that the corruption of the evidence base in diagnostic and practice guidelines has compromised the informed consent process, and we suggest strategies to address this problem.

  17. Rapid targeted somatic mutation analysis of solid tumors in routine clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Francaviglia, Ilaria; Dal Cin, Elena; Barbieri, Gianluca; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor genotyping is an essential step in routine clinical practice and pathology laboratories face a major challenge in being able to provide rapid, sensitive and updated molecular tests. We developed a novel mass spectrometry multiplexed genotyping platform named PentaPanel to concurrently assess single nucleotide polymorphisms in 56 hotspots of the 5 most clinically relevant cancer genes, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR and PIK3CA for a total of 221 detectable mutations. To both evaluate and validate the PentaPanel performance,we investigated 1025 tumor specimens of 6 different cancer types (carcinomas of colon, lung, breast, pancreas, and biliary tract, and melanomas), systematically addressing sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of our platform. Sanger sequencing was also performed for all the study samples. Our data showed that PentaPanel is a high throughput and robust tool, allowing genotyping for targeted therapy selection of 10 patients in the same run, with a practical turnaround time of 2 working days. Importantly, it was successfully used to interrogate different DNAs isolated from routinely processed specimens (formalin-fixed paraffin embedded, frozen, and cytological samples), covering all the requirements of clinical tests. In conclusion, the PentaPanel platform can provide an immediate, accurate and cost effective multiplex approach for clinically relevant gene mutation analysis in many solid tumors and its utility across many diseases can be particularly relevant in multiple clinical trials, including the new basket trial approach, aiming to identify appropriate targeted drug combination strategies. PMID:26435479

  18. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Collette; Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-05-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated "cases." A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool.

  19. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Collette; Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-05-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated "cases." A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool. PMID:26962088

  20. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    PubMed

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. PMID:27476988

  1. Is anti-doping analysis so far from clinical, legal or forensic targets?: The added value of close relationships between related disciplines.

    PubMed

    Segura, Jordi

    2009-11-01

    There are many areas of common interest between anti-doping laboratories and those working in the clinical, legal and forensic fields. In addition to methodological similarities, there are aspects of the findings in sport drug testing that overlap with other fields in such a way that sport drug testing and clinical, legal or forensic work may benefit from mutual interaction. Three recent examples are presented from the author's experience. Case report 1 concerns the clinical relevance of hCG findings in sport drug testing as potential indicators of the presence of a (testicular) tumour in athletes. Case report 2 refers to difficulties that accredited laboratories can encounter due to differences between national legal systems and the administrative regulation systems of sport authorities. The example involves a network of blood collection for further autologous transfusion. Case report 3 relates to additional forensic-type investigations needed to interpret a situation where intoxication of a whole delegation was responsible for apparent doping cases. Clinical, legal and forensic fields must recognize the added value that some results and developments coming from anti-doping laboratories may have. At the same time anti-doping analysts should be aware of new issues, methodologies and problems appearing in related fields.

  2. Clinical and Preclinical Use of LOX-1-Specific Antibodies in Diagnostics and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Siqueira, Jonathan; Abdul Zani, Izma; Russell, David A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi

    2015-11-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (SR-E1, LOX-1, OLR1) was first discovered as a vascular receptor for modified lipoprotein particles nearly 20 years ago. Since then, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated an association between LOX-1, a soluble form (sLOX-1) and a number of diseases including atherosclerosis, arthritis, hypertension and pre-eclampsia. However, converting such discoveries into tools and drugs for routine clinical use is dependent on translational preclinical and clinical studies but such studies have only begun to emerge in the past decade. In this review, we identify the key clinical applications and corresponding criteria that need to be addressed for the effective use of LOX-1-related probes and molecules for patient benefit in different disease states. PMID:26385009

  3. Differences in the diagnostic accuracy of acute stroke clinical subtypes defined by multimodal magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Allder, S; Moody, A; Martel, A; Morgan, P; Delay, G; Gladman, J; Lennox, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Despite its importance for acute stroke management, little is known about the underlying pathophysiology when patients with acute stroke are classified using clinical methods. Objective: To examine the relation between the magnetic resonance defined stroke subtype and clinical stroke classifications using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), and angiographic magnetic resonance techniques. Methods: Consecutive patients with clinical syndromes consistent with acute anterior circulation stroke were assessed clinically within six hours of onset and scanned as soon as possible using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients were classified clinically into total or partial anterior circulation syndromes using the Oxford classification, or according the severity of the National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIHSS) (severe > 15; mild/moderate ≤ 15). At day seven, patients were classified by combining clinical course and MRI data as misdiagnosed, misclassified, suffering transient ischaemic attack, infarct with recanalisation, or infarction with persisting occlusion. Patients with occlusion were further divided on the basis of a large diffusion–perfusion mismatch. Results: 84 patients with clinical anterior circulation syndromes were studied. Using the NIHSS, 42 were mild to moderate (0–15) and 42 were severe (> 15). There were 42 with partial anterior circulation syndromes (PACS) and 42 with total anterior circulation syndromes (TACS). Patients with TACS or severe stroke were more likely to have actually suffered a stroke (Fischer's exact test, p = 0.01), to have a correctly classified stroke (χ2 28.2, p < 0.01), to have persisting occlusion (χ2 30.6, p < 0.01), and to have a large DWI–PWI mismatch (χ2 17.1, p < 0.01). Conclusions: There is more inaccuracy in patients presenting with acute PACS or clinically mild to moderate anterior circulation stroke than in those with TACS or severe acute stroke

  4. NMR-based metabolomics of prostate cancer: a protagonist in clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Gupta, Ashish; Nath, Kavindra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the application of NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer comprises a potential tactic for understanding the impaired biochemical pathways arising due to a disease evolvement and progression. This technique involves qualitative and quantitative estimation of plethora of small molecular weight metabolites of body fluids or tissues using state-of-the-art chemometric methods delivering an important platform for translational research from basic to clinical, to reveal the pathophysiological snapshot in a single step. This review summarizes the present arrays and recent advancements in NMR-based metabolomics and a glimpse of currently used medical imaging tactics, with their role in clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:26959614

  5. Evaluation of tuberculosis diagnostics in children: 1. Proposed clinical case definitions for classification of intrathoracic tuberculosis disease. Consensus from an expert panel.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stephen M; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Amanullah, Farhana; Browning, Renee; Cardenas, Vicky; Casenghi, Martina; Cuevas, Luis E; Gale, Marianne; Gie, Robert P; Grzemska, Malgosia; Handelsman, Ed; Hatherill, Mark; Hesseling, Anneke C; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Kampmann, Beate; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Lienhardt, Christian; Lighter-Fisher, Jennifer; Madhi, Shabir; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Marais, Ben J; McNeeley, David F; Menzies, Heather; Mitchell, Charles; Modi, Surbhi; Mofenson, Lynne; Musoke, Philippa; Nachman, Sharon; Powell, Clydette; Rigaud, Mona; Rouzier, Vanessa; Starke, Jeffrey R; Swaminathan, Soumya; Wingfield, Claire

    2012-05-15

    There is a critical need for improved diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in young children with intrathoracic disease as this represents the most common type of tuberculosis in children and the greatest diagnostic challenge. There is also a need for standardized clinical case definitions for the evaluation of diagnostics in prospective clinical research studies that include children in whom tuberculosis is suspected but not confirmed by culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A panel representing a wide range of expertise and child tuberculosis research experience aimed to develop standardized clinical research case definitions for intrathoracic tuberculosis in children to enable harmonized evaluation of new tuberculosis diagnostic technologies in pediatric populations. Draft definitions and statements were proposed and circulated widely for feedback. An expert panel then considered each of the proposed definitions and statements relating to clinical definitions. Formal group consensus rules were established and consensus was reached for each statement. The definitions presented in this article are intended for use in clinical research to evaluate diagnostic assays and not for individual patient diagnosis or treatment decisions. A complementary article addresses methodological issues to consider for research of diagnostics in children with suspected tuberculosis.

  6. The ANA-reflex test as a model for improving clinical appropriateness in autoimmune diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola; Morozzi, Gabriella; Radice, Antonella; Cinquanta, Luigi; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Tampoia, Marilina; Porcelli, Brunetta; Fabris, Martina; Brusca, Ignazio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Barberio, Giuseppina; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Antico, Antonio; Bassetti, Danila; Fontana, Desré Ethel; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Visentini, Daniela; Pesce, Giampaola; Bagnasco, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Reflex tests are widely used in clinical laboratories, for example, to diagnose thyroid disorders or in the follow-up of prostate cancer. Reflex tests for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have recently gained attention as a way to improve appropriateness in the immunological diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and avoid waste of resources. However, the ANA-reflex test is not as simple as other consolidated reflex tests (the TSH-reflex tests or the PSA-reflex tests) because of the intrinsic complexity of the ANA test performed by the indirect immunofluorescence method on cellular substrates. The wide heterogeneity of the ANA patterns, which need correct interpretation, and the subsequent choice of the most appropriate confirmatory test (ANA subserology), which depend on the pattern feature and on clinical information, hinder any informatics automation, and require the pathologist's intervention. In this review, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases of the Italian Society of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine provides some indications on the configuration of the ANA-reflex test, using two different approaches depending on whether clinical information is available or not. We further give some suggestions on how to report results of the ANA-reflex test. PMID:27423928

  7. [DSM-5 AND AUTISM: DIAGNOSTIC CHANGES AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD].

    PubMed

    Faroy, Michal; Meiri, Gal; Arbelle, Shoshana

    2016-05-01

    Autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterized by significant disability in interpersonal communication, social interactions and patterns of unusual behavior. In recent decades the worldwide prevalence of ASDs is rising almost exponentially, without a clear known etiological explanation. Until recently, ASDs were defined by the American Manual of Psychiatric Diagnoses: The DSM-IV-TR, under one conceptual umbrella of "Pervasive Developmental Disorders" (PDD). Under this category, there were five separate diagnoses. The DSM-5 eliminated the separate,diagnoses and created one continuum (Autism Spectrum Disorder = ASD). By this definition, the symptomatic manifestation was reduced and the criteria for diagnosis are fixed for the entire spectrum. The differences between individuals are expressed in the levels of severity rated. Studies evaluating the transition from PDD to ASD, found an increase in the specificity of the diagnosis and its potential ability to distinguish between clinical and non-clinical populations. Alongside the increase in consistency and stability, there is a decrease in sensitivity, and about a quarter of the children who were previously diagnosed with PDD are not diagnosed as such, due to a failure to meet all the necessary symptoms. These changes especially affect the clinical diagnosis of young children as their symptomatic manifestation is not yet clear and distinct enough due to their age and maturation processes. This article discusses the clinical implications of these findings and demonstrates it from a case report. PMID:27526557

  8. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M.; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  9. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs.

    PubMed

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed.

  10. Age-Related Decline and Diagnostic Performance of More and Less Prevalent Clinical Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Onge, Christina; Landry, Marjolaine; Xhignesse, Marianne; Voyer, Gilles; Tremblay-Lavoie, Stéphanie; Mamede, Sílvia; Schmidt, Henk; Rikers, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Since cognitive abilities have been shown to decrease with age, it is expected that older physicians would not perform as well as their younger counterparts on clinical cases unless their expertise can counteract the cognitive effects of aging. However, studies on the topic have shown contradictory results. This study aimed to further investigate…

  11. The ANA-reflex test as a model for improving clinical appropriateness in autoimmune diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola; Morozzi, Gabriella; Radice, Antonella; Cinquanta, Luigi; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Tampoia, Marilina; Porcelli, Brunetta; Fabris, Martina; Brusca, Ignazio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Barberio, Giuseppina; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Antico, Antonio; Bassetti, Danila; Fontana, Desré Ethel; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Visentini, Daniela; Pesce, Giampaola; Bagnasco, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Reflex tests are widely used in clinical laboratories, for example, to diagnose thyroid disorders or in the follow-up of prostate cancer. Reflex tests for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have recently gained attention as a way to improve appropriateness in the immunological diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and avoid waste of resources. However, the ANA-reflex test is not as simple as other consolidated reflex tests (the TSH-reflex tests or the PSA-reflex tests) because of the intrinsic complexity of the ANA test performed by the indirect immunofluorescence method on cellular substrates. The wide heterogeneity of the ANA patterns, which need correct interpretation, and the subsequent choice of the most appropriate confirmatory test (ANA subserology), which depend on the pattern feature and on clinical information, hinder any informatics automation, and require the pathologist's intervention. In this review, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases of the Italian Society of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine provides some indications on the configuration of the ANA-reflex test, using two different approaches depending on whether clinical information is available or not. We further give some suggestions on how to report results of the ANA-reflex test.

  12. Clinical Cognition and Diagnostic Error: Applications of a Dual Process Model of Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croskerry, Pat

    2009-01-01

    Both systemic and individual factors contribute to missed or delayed diagnoses. Among the multiple factors that impact clinical performance of the individual, the caliber of cognition is perhaps the most relevant and deserves our attention and understanding. In the last few decades, cognitive psychologists have gained substantial insights into the…

  13. The Diagnostic Validity of Clinical Tests in Temporomandibular Internal Derangement: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Ève; Stewart, Ryan; Nadeau, Gordon; Goldsmith, Charlie H.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the diagnostic validity of clinical tests for temporomandibular internal derangement relative to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: MEDLINE and Embase were searched from 1994 through 2009. Independent reviewers conducted study selection; risk of bias was assessed using Quality Assessment of studies of Diagnostic Accuracy included in Systematic reviews (QUADAS); ≥9/14) and data abstraction. Overall quality of evidence was profiled using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Agreement was measured using quadratic weighted kappa (κw). Positive (+) or negative (−) likelihood ratios (LR) with 95% CIs were calculated and pooled using the DerSimonian–Laird method and a random-effects model when homogeneous (I2≥0.40, Q-test p≤0.10). Results: We selected 8 of 36 studies identified. There is very low quality evidence that deflection (+LR: 6.37 [95% CI, 2.13–19.03]) and crepitation (LR:5.88 [95% CI, 1.95–17.76]) as single tests and crepitation, deflection, pain, and limited mouth opening as a cluster of tests are the most valuable for ruling in internal derangement without reduction (+LR:6.37 [95% CI, 2.13–19.03]), (−LR:0.27 [95% CI, 0.11–0.64]) while the test cluster click, deviation, and pain rules out internal derangement with reduction (−LR: 0.09 [95% CI, 0.01–0.72]). No single test or cluster of tests was conclusive and of significant value for ruling in internal derangement with reduction. Conclusions: Findings of this review will assist clinicians in deciding which diagnostic tests to use when internal derangement is suspected. The literature search revealed a lack of high-quality studies; further research with adequate description of patient populations, blinded assessments, and both sagittal and coronal MRI planes is therefore recommended. PMID:23449757

  14. Evaluation of a Density-Based Rapid Diagnostic Test for Sickle Cell Disease in a Clinical Setting in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Hennek, Jonathan W.; Mantina, Hamakwa; Lee, S. Y. Ryan; Patton, Matthew R.; Sambo, Pauline; Sinyangwe, Silvester; Kankasa, Chipepo; Chintu, Chifumbe; Brugnara, Carlo; Stossel, Thomas P.; Whitesides, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although simple and low-cost interventions for sickle cell disease (SCD) exist in many developing countries, child mortality associated with SCD remains high, in part, because of the lack of access to diagnostic tests for SCD. A density-based test using aqueous multiphase systems (SCD-AMPS) is a candidate for a low-cost, point-of-care diagnostic for SCD. In this paper, the field evaluation of SCD-AMPS in a large (n = 505) case-control study in Zambia is described. Of the two variations of the SCD-AMPS used, the best system (SCD-AMPS-2) demonstrated a sensitivity of 86% (82–90%) and a specificity of 60% (53–67%). Subsequent analysis identified potential sources of false positives that include clotting, variation between batches of SCD-AMPS, and shipping conditions. Importantly, SCD-AMPS-2 was 84% (62–94%) sensitive in detecting SCD in children between 6 months and 1 year old. In addition to an evaluation of performance, an assessment of end-user operability was done with health workers in rural clinics in Zambia. These health workers rated the SCD-AMPS tests to be as simple to use as lateral flow tests for malaria and HIV. PMID:25490722

  15. The role of rumination in illness trajectories in youth: linking trans-diagnostic processes with clinical staging models.

    PubMed

    Grierson, A B; Hickie, I B; Naismith, S L; Scott, J

    2016-09-01

    Research in developmental psychopathology and clinical staging models has increasingly sought to identify trans-diagnostic biomarkers or neurocognitive deficits that may play a role in the onset and trajectory of mental disorders and could represent modifiable treatment targets. Less attention has been directed at the potential role of cognitive-emotional regulation processes such as ruminative response style. Maladaptive rumination (toxic brooding) is a known mediator of the association between gender and internalizing disorders in adolescents and is increased in individuals with a history of early adversity. Furthermore, rumination shows moderate levels of genetic heritability and is linked to abnormalities in neural networks associated with emotional regulation and executive functioning. This review explores the potential role of rumination in exacerbating the symptoms of alcohol and substance misuse, and bipolar and psychotic disorders during the peak age range for illness onset. Evidence shows that rumination not only amplifies levels of distress and suicidal ideation, but also extends physiological responses to stress, which may partly explain the high prevalence of physical and mental co-morbidity in youth presenting to mental health services. In summary, the normative developmental trajectory of rumination and its role in the evolution of mental disorders and physical illness demonstrates that rumination presents a detectable, modifiable trans-diagnostic risk factor in youth. PMID:27352637

  16. A Fully Integrated Paperfluidic Molecular Diagnostic Chip for the Extraction, Amplification, and Detection of Nucleic Acids from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Natalia M.; Wong, Winnie S.; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps onto a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in under 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  17. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) diagnostic algorithm for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: eight burning questions from everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Marmo, Riccardo; Petracchini, Massimo; de Franchis, Roberto; Pennazio, Marco

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis and management of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding are often long and challenging processes. Over the last 10 years the introduction in clinical practice of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (i.e. Capsule Endoscopy, Computed Tomographic Enterography, Magnetic Resonance Enterography, and Device Assisted Enteroscopy) has revolutionized the diagnostic/therapeutic work-up of these patients. Based on evidence published in the last 10 years, international scientific societies have proposed new practice guidelines for the management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which include these techniques. However, although these algorithms (the most recent ones are endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - ASGE) allow the management of the large majority of patients, some issues still remain unsolved. The present paper reports the results of the discussion, based on the literature published up to September 2011, among a panel of experts and gastroenterologists, working with Capsule Endoscopy and with Device Assisted Enteroscopy, attending the 6th annual meeting of the Italian Club for Capsule Endoscopy and Enteroscopy. Eight unresolved issues were selected: each of them is presented as a "Burning question" and the "Answer" is the strategy proposed to manage it, according to both the available evidence and the discussion among participants.

  18. Making the Leap from Research Laboratory to Clinic: Challenges and Opportunities for Next-Generation Sequencing in Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brittany; Sichtig, Heike; Geyer, Chelsie; Ledeboer, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) has progressed enormously over the past decade, transforming genomic analysis and opening up many new opportunities for applications in clinical microbiology laboratories. The impact of NGS on microbiology has been revolutionary, with new microbial genomic sequences being generated daily, leading to the development of large databases of genomes and gene sequences. The ability to analyze microbial communities without culturing organisms has created the ever-growing field of metagenomics and microbiome analysis and has generated significant new insights into the relation between host and microbe. The medical literature contains many examples of how this new technology can be used for infectious disease diagnostics and pathogen analysis. The implementation of NGS in medical practice has been a slow process due to various challenges such as clinical trials, lack of applicable regulatory guidelines, and the adaptation of the technology to the clinical environment. In April 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM) convened a colloquium to begin to define these issues, and in this document, we present some of the concepts that were generated from these discussions. PMID:26646014

  19. Making the Leap from Research Laboratory to Clinic: Challenges and Opportunities for Next-Generation Sequencing in Infectious Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Brittany; Sichtig, Heike; Geyer, Chelsie; Ledeboer, Nathan; Weinstock, George M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) has progressed enormously over the past decade, transforming genomic analysis and opening up many new opportunities for applications in clinical microbiology laboratories. The impact of NGS on microbiology has been revolutionary, with new microbial genomic sequences being generated daily, leading to the development of large databases of genomes and gene sequences. The ability to analyze microbial communities without culturing organisms has created the ever-growing field of metagenomics and microbiome analysis and has generated significant new insights into the relation between host and microbe. The medical literature contains many examples of how this new technology can be used for infectious disease diagnostics and pathogen analysis. The implementation of NGS in medical practice has been a slow process due to various challenges such as clinical trials, lack of applicable regulatory guidelines, and the adaptation of the technology to the clinical environment. In April 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM) convened a colloquium to begin to define these issues, and in this document, we present some of the concepts that were generated from these discussions. PMID:26646014

  20. Making the Leap from Research Laboratory to Clinic: Challenges and Opportunities for Next-Generation Sequencing in Infectious Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Brittany; Sichtig, Heike; Geyer, Chelsie; Ledeboer, Nathan; Weinstock, George M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) has progressed enormously over the past decade, transforming genomic analysis and opening up many new opportunities for applications in clinical microbiology laboratories. The impact of NGS on microbiology has been revolutionary, with new microbial genomic sequences being generated daily, leading to the development of large databases of genomes and gene sequences. The ability to analyze microbial communities without culturing organisms has created the ever-growing field of metagenomics and microbiome analysis and has generated significant new insights into the relation between host and microbe. The medical literature contains many examples of how this new technology can be used for infectious disease diagnostics and pathogen analysis. The implementation of NGS in medical practice has been a slow process due to various challenges such as clinical trials, lack of applicable regulatory guidelines, and the adaptation of the technology to the clinical environment. In April 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM) convened a colloquium to begin to define these issues, and in this document, we present some of the concepts that were generated from these discussions.

  1. Clinical utility of a near patient care microarray based diagnostic test for influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Ji-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In primary care medicine, establishing a diagnosis of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections is usually based on clinical history and physical examination as well as a consideration of time of the year and circulating respiratory viruses in the community. Methods: We tested the potential clinical samples using the automated molecular assay which included rapid influenza diagnostic test, Rapid Immunochromatographic Antigen Test, Verigene Respiratory Virus Plus Nucleic Acid Test, BD VeritorTM System for Rapid Detection of RSV in the paediatric setting for diagnosis of influenza and respiratory syntactical virus infections when testing was done by the paediatrician seeing the patient. Results: Principally, with respect influenza virus specificity and sensitivity for RIAT were 100% and 68.8%; compared to 100% and 100%, respectively for RV+. The specificity and sensitivity for 92.23% and 98% for BD VeritorTM System for Rapid Detection of RSV as compared to 96.6% and 98.42% for RIDT. Conclusion: Therefore, this study confirms the clinical utility of RV+ in the pediatric setting. PMID:26629177

  2. Discipline, Corporal Punishment, and Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Gonzalo

    Discipline is a major problem in many schools and an important issue to parents and educators alike. Discipline is commonly defined as negative reinforcement--punishment--instead of leadership and good teaching. Its definition should be expanded to relate it to the overall purposes of education. Discipline policy should be integrated with…

  3. Rapid diagnostic methods for influenza virus in clinical specimens - A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. S.; Olson, B.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of five rapid viral diagnostic techniques for identifying influenza virus in nasopharyngeal aspirates has been made on patients with influenza-like illnesses. Initial results with immune electron microscopy were positive in only one of 11 specimens from which virus was isolated and further work abandoned. Four other rapid tests were carried out on 39 specimens from which influenza virus had been isolated in tissue culture in 28. Of these 28 specimens yielding virus, 24 (85.7 percent) were positive by an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) on nasopharyngeal cells, 18 (64.3 percent) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 19 (67.8 percent) by enzyme-linked fluorescent assay (ELFA), and 26 (92.8 percent) by a rapid tissue culture amplification method (TCA) in a continuous Rhesus monkey kidney line (LLC-MK2) with identification of virus by fluorescent antibody. In terms of sensitivity, simplicity, and rapidity, a combination of the IFAT and TCA methods seems to be very useful.

  4. Clinical diagnostic tools for screening of perioperative stroke in general surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Yue, Y; Leung, C C H; Chan, M T V; Gelb, A W

    2016-03-01

    Perioperative stroke is a devastating complication that carries high mortality and functional disability. Unfortunately, residual anaesthesia and analgesia may obscure important warning signs and may lead to a delay in the assessment and treatment of major stroke after surgery. The purpose of this review is to examine the utility of existing stroke scales, for the recognition of perioperative stroke in the general surgical population. A total of 21 stroke scales have been described in the literature. Diagnostic performance was reported in 17 scales. The majority of the stroke scales were designed to evaluate current neurological deficits after an established stroke event. Recent abbreviated stroke test, such as the Face, Arm, Speech Test (FAST), were developed to facilitate stroke identification in the emergency department. Only two stroke scales have been applied in the perioperative setting after cardiac, carotid and neurological surgeries. The modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale appears to be useful in detecting new subtle neurological deficits in critical care, or high dependency units after surgery. However, in the general postsurgical wards, given the concern about the workload required, abbreviated stroke tests may be more appropriate for routine regular stroke surveillance. It is hoped that these tests will provide rapid assessment of global neurological function to facilitate timely diagnosis and treatment of perioperative stroke.

  5. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants - diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Taylor, James S; Maibach, Howard I; Lidén, Carola; Bruze, Magnus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metals are challenging to evaluate and treat. Although they are uncommon, they do exist, and require appropriate and complete evaluation. This review summarizes the evidence regarding evaluation tools, especially patch and lymphocyte transformation tests, for hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metal devices. Patch test evaluation is the gold standard for metal hypersensitivity, although the results may be subjective. Regarding pre-implant testing, those patients with a reported history of metal dermatitis should be evaluated by patch testing. Those without a history of dermatitis should not be tested unless considerable concern exists. Regarding post-implant testing, a subset of patients with metal hypersensitivity may develop cutaneous or systemic reactions to implanted metals following implant. For symptomatic patients, a diagnostic algorithm to guide the selection of screening allergen series for patch testing is provided. At a minimum, an extended baseline screening series and metal screening is necessary. Static and dynamic orthopaedic implants, intravascular stent devices, implanted defibrillators and dental and gynaecological devices are considered. Basic management suggestions are provided. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive reference for use by those evaluating suspected cutaneous and systemic metal hypersensitivity reactions.

  6. Antibodies specific for nucleic acids and applications in genomic detection and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zonglin; Leppla, Stephen H; Li, Baoguang; Elkins, Christopher A

    2014-09-01

    Detection of nucleic acids using antibodies is uncommon. This is in part because nucleic acids are poor immunogens and it is difficult to elicit antibodies having high affinity to each type of nucleic acid while lacking cross-reactivity to others. We describe the origins and applications of a variety of anti-nucleic acid antibodies, including ones reacting with modified nucleosides and nucleotides, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, RNA, DNA:RNA hybrids, locked-nucleic acids or peptide nucleic acid:nucleic acid hybrids. Carefully selected antibodies can be excellent reagents for detecting bacteria, viruses, small RNAs, microRNAs, R-loops, cancer cells, stem cells, apoptotic cells and so on. The detection may be sensitive, simple, rapid, specific, reproducible, quantitative and cost-effective. Current microarray and diagnostic methods that depend on cDNA or cRNA can be replaced by using antibody detection of nucleic acids. Therefore, development should be encouraged to explore new utilities and create a robust arsenal of new anti-nucleic acid antibodies.

  7. [The syndrome of increased upper airways resistance: What are the clinical features and diagnostic procedures?].

    PubMed

    M'saad, S; Yangui, I; Feki, W; Abid, N; Bahloul, N; Marouen, F; Chakroun, A; Kammoun, S

    2015-12-01

    The upper airway resistance syndrome "UARS" is a poorly defined entity, often described as a moderate variant of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. It is associated with respiratory effort-related arousal, absence of obstructive sleep apnea, and absence of significant desaturation. It is a relatively common condition that predominantly affects non-obese young adults, with no predominance in either sex. The degree of upper airway collapsibility during sleep of patients with UARS is intermediate between that of normal subjects and that of patients with mild-to-moderate sleep apnea syndrome. Craniofacial and palatal abnormalities are often noted. Patients frequently complain of a functional somatic syndrome, especially daytime sleepiness and chronic fatigue. Polysomnography with esophageal pressure measurements remains the gold standard diagnostic test. The absence of any neurological abnormality gives UARS a good prognosis and it is potentially reversible if treated early. However, some studies suggest that untreated UARS has an increased risk of arterial hypertension. It can also evolve into obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:26525135

  8. Molecular method for the detection of Andes hantavirus infection: validation for clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vial, Cecilia; Martinez-Valdebenito, Constanza; Rios, Susana; Martinez, Jessica; Vial, Pablo A; Ferres, Marcela; Rivera, Juan C; Perez, Ruth; Valdivieso, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome is a severe disease caused by exposure to New World hantaviruses. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of specific initial symptoms. Antihantavirus antibodies are usually negative until late in the febrile prodrome or the beginning of cardiopulmonary phase, while Andes hantavirus (ANDV) RNA genome can be detected before symptoms onset. We analyzed the effectiveness of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as a diagnostic tool detecting ANDV-Sout genome in peripheral blood cells from 78 confirmed hantavirus patients and 166 negative controls. Our results indicate that RT-qPCR had a low detection limit (~10 copies), with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 94.9%. This suggests the potential for establishing RT-qPCR as the assay of choice for early diagnosis, promoting early effective care of patients, and improving other important aspects of ANDV infection management, such as compliance of biosafety recommendations for health personnel in order to avoid nosocomial transmission.

  9. The clinical utility of CA 19-9 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: diagnostic and prognostic updates.

    PubMed

    Poruk, Katherine E; Gay, D Z; Brown, K; Mulvihill, J D; Boucher, K M; Scaife, C L; Firpo, M A; Mulvihill, S J

    2013-03-01

    CA 19-9 and CEA are the most commonly used biomarkers for diagnosis and management of patients with pancreatic cancer. Since the original compendium by Steinberg in 1990, numerous studies have reported the use of CA 19-9 and, to a lesser extent, CEA in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Here we update an evaluation of the accuracy of CA 19-9 and CEA, and, unlike previous reviews, focus on discrimination between malignant and benign disease instead of normal controls. In 57 studies involving 3,285 pancreatic carcinoma cases, the combined sensitivity of CA 19-9 was 78.2% and in 37 studies involving 1,882 cases with benign pancreatic disease the specificity of CA 19-9 was 82.8%. From the combined analysis of studies reporting CEA, the sensitivity was 44.2% (1,324 cases) and the specificity was 84.8% (656 cases). These measurements more appropriately reflect the expected biomarker accuracy in the differential diagnosis of patients with periampullary diseases. We also present a summary of the use of CA 19-9 as a prognostic tool and evaluate CA 19-9 diagnostic and prognostic utility in a 10-year, single institution experience.

  10. [Diagnostic and therapy of salivary gland diseases: relevant aspects for the pathologist from the clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Wittekindt, C; Burmeister, H P; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2009-11-01

    Significant progress in the diagnosis and therapy of salivary gland diseases has been made in recent years. The new technique of diagnostic and interventional sialendoscopy has made an important contribution and is indicated in every case of obstructive sialadenitis. The number of open resections of salivary glands due to stones will clearly decrease in the future in favor of endoscopic removal. Due to recent publications on the appropriate extent of salivary gland resection in benign tumors, more and more specimens with reduced cuffs of healthy salivary gland tissue will be sent to the pathologists. Ultrasound will stay the procedure of first choice for imaging of salivary gland diseases in Germany. In combination with fine-needle aspiration cytology high sensitivity and specificity for the assessment of salivary gland tumors can be achieved. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new imaging tool and the power of distinction of pleomorphic adenoma from malignant tumors is promising. The use of botulinum toxin for salivary glands diseases is increasing. Intraglandular injections have been shown to induce salivary gland atrophy in animal experiments. The availability of biologicals is currently yielding new aspects for the treatment of Sjögren's disease.

  11. Usefulness of diagnostic indices comprising clinical, sonographic, and biomarker data for discriminating benign from malignant ovarian masses.

    PubMed

    Stukan, Maciej; Dudziak, Miroslaw; Ratajczak, Karol; Grabowski, Jacek P

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to review the accuracy of indices combining several diagnostic variables, in comparison to other models, sonography alone, and biomarker assays, for predicting benign or malignant ovarian lesions. Different single modalities were reviewed. The most useful complex models were International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) sonographic logistic regression model 2 (area under the curve, 0.949), risk of malignancy index-cancer antigen 125-human epididymis protein 4 (0.950), risk of malignancy algorithm (0.953), pelvic mass score (0.960), non-IOTA logistic regression model (0.970), and histoscanning score logistic regression model (0.970). None of the indices was superior to an expert subjective sonographic assessment (0.968). For women with adnexal tumors, indices with high accuracy are available that are applicable in clinical practice and comparable to an expert subjective sonographic assessment for discriminating benign from malignant masses.

  12. Rapid molecular diagnostic tests in patients with bacteremia: evaluation of their impact on decision making and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vardakas, K Z; Anifantaki, F I; Trigkidis, K K; Falagas, M E

    2015-11-01

    We performed a systematic review of the data regarding rapid diagnostic tests and their advantages or limitations on patients' clinical outcomes. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched independently by two reviewers. Mortality was the primary outcome. Most studies compared rapid tests with blood cultures. Although not observed in all studies, only studies comparing rapid tests in conjunction with antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) showed a mortality benefit. A reduction in hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay was also observed in almost all studies when the rapid tests, with or without ASPs, were used. Finally, treatment decisions were taken earlier in the rapid test groups. Despite a faster treatment decision, a clear mortality benefit was not seen when rapid tests were used. It is crucial to differentiate the influence of rapid tests from that of ASPs and clarify the actual effect of each factor separately.

  13. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection in patients with discordant diagnostic test results.

    PubMed

    Kaltsas, Anna; Simon, Matt; Unruh, Larissa H; Son, Crystal; Wroblewski, Danielle; Musser, Kimberlee A; Sepkowitz, Kent; Babady, N Esther; Kamboj, Mini

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with discordant test results for the cytotoxin assay (CYT) and PCR assays. A retrospective study from May to August 2008 and March to May 2010 was performed. CDI was diagnosed in 128 patients. PCR increased the yield of C. difficile cases by 2-fold compared to that of the CYT assay. Fifty-six cases (44%) were detected by PCR only (CYT negative). Forty-nine percent of patients with non-NAP1 strains were detected by PCR only, compared to 28% of those infected with NAP1 strains (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the clinical severity of illness and outcome among patients that tested positive for CDI by both tests (CYT and PCR) compared to those that tested positive by PCR only. PMID:22238444

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of diagnostics in experimentally infected young calves during subclinical and clinical paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mortier, Rienske A.R.; Barkema, Herman W.; Orsel, Karin; Muench, Gregory P.; Bystrom, Janet M.; Illanes, Oscar; De Buck, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Five calves were inoculated orally at 2 weeks of age with a dose of 5 × 109 colony-forming units of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) on 2 consecutive days. Two calves developed clinical Johne’s disease at 12 and 16 months of age after being consistently positive for MAP on fecal culture and antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), starting 2 to 3 weeks and 4 to 5 months after inoculation, respectively. PMID:26663923

  15. The diagnostic reliability of clinical dental auxiliaries in caries prevalence surveys--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kwan, S Y; Prendergast, M J; Williams, S A

    1996-09-01

    The Nuffield Report recommended the development of further education and training for dental auxiliary personnel. The extent to which clinical dental auxiliaries might carry out oral assessments is under consideration currently. While other countries have employed clinical dental auxiliaries as examiners in national surveys, there is no evidence to suggest that they are able to perform oral assessments effectively in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to investigate the possibility of using dental hygienists or therapists as examiners in epidemiological surveys. Five dentists and three clinical dental auxiliaries were trained and calibrated together using standardised BASCD training procedures. Forty 5-year-old children in Leeds were recruited to the training and calibration exercise. Data were analysed according to BASCD recommendations. There were no differences in performance between dentists and auxiliaries. All examiners fell within 95 percent confidence limits of the group mean dt, mt, ft and dmft. Mean grouped dmft scores for the benchmark examiner, dentists and auxiliaries were 1.92, 1.84 and 1.92 respectively. Sensitivity values for dentists and auxiliaries ranged from 0.54 to 1.00 and 0.80 to 0.94 respectively. Kappa scores were 0.70 to 0.90 for dentists; and 0.82 to 0.87 for the auxiliaries. It was concluded that the dental hygienists and therapist recruited to this study could be used in epidemiological surveys of caries in 5-year-old children.

  16. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  17. [Specific clinical, epidemiological patterns and laboratory diagnostics of enterovirus infection in the Republic of Belarus].

    PubMed

    Amvros'eva, T V; Poklonskaia, N V; Bogush, Z F; Kazinets, O N; Germanovich, F A; Fisenko, E G; Titov, L P; Kvacheva, Z B; Bezruchko, A A; Scheslenok, E P

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiological patterns as well as the results of the laboratory verification of the outbreak of enterovirus infection (EVI) in Minsk during the period of summer-autumn, 2000, are presented. During this outbreak a variety of clinical forms were observed, the serous meningitis being prevalent (57.5%). Practically simultaneous occurrence of infection on the territory of all administrative districts of the city, the predominant involvement of children aged up to 14 years into the outbreak, a high proportion of simultaneous casualities in the multiple foci. A number of circulating enteroviruses (EV)--ECHO 30, ECHO 6 of three serotypes and Coxsackie B5--were simultaneously isolated from clinical material. EV of the same serotypes were isolated from tap drinking water, and neutralizing antibodies to these serotypes were often detected in the patients blood sera. Infectious EV were also present in samples of bottled water and in water reservoirs used for bathing. The routes of EV transmission and the improvement of EVI control are discussed.

  18. Update on immunoglobulin a nephropathy. Part II: Clinical, diagnostic and therapeutical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by different clinical manifestations and by long-term different outcomes. Major problem for the physicians is to understanding which patients are at risk of a disease evolution and to prescribe the right therapy to the right patients. Indeed, in addition to patients with a stable disease with no trend to evolution or even with a spontaneous recovery, patients with an active disease and patients with a rapidly evolving glomerulonephritis are described. Several histopathological, biological and clinical markers have been described and are currently used to a better understanding of patients at risk, to suggest the right therapy and to monitor the therapy effect and the IgAN evolution over time. The clinical markers are the most reliable and allow to divide the IgAN patients into three categories: The low risk patients, the intermediate risk patients and the high risk patients. Accordingly, the therapeutic measures range from no therapy with the only need of repeated controls, to supportive therapy eventually associated with low dose immunosuppression, to immunosuppressive treatment in the attempt to avoid the evolution to end stage renal disease. However the current evidence about the different therapies is still matter of discussion. New drugs are in the pipeline and are described. They are object of randomized controlled trials, but studies with a number of patients adequately powered and with a long follow up are needed to evaluate efficacy and safety of these new drugs. PMID:26788460

  19. The diagnostic value of minor salivary gland biopsy in clinically diagnosed patients with Parkinson's disease: comparison with DAT PET scans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liyan; Chen, Huimin; Li, Xin; Li, Fangfei; Ou-Yang, Qiaohong; Feng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the predictive value of minor salivary gland biopsy in clinically diagnosed early stage Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and to provide more evidence of minor salivary gland biopsy as a pathological diagnostic biomarker of PD. Thirteen patients with early stage PD and 13 age-matched controls were recruited. Hoehn and Yahr stage and Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale Part III were employed to evaluate their severity of the disease. All the subjects underwent minor salivary gland biopsy and (11)C-methyl-N-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane ((11)C-CFT) DAT-PET scan. Immunohistochemical staining for Lewy-type alpha-synucleinopathy using antibody against alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) was performed in the tissues obtained from minor salivary gland. Abnormal accumulation of α-Syn was found around the gland cells in 9 of the 13 patients with PD, but in none of the control subjects. The α-Syn immunoreactive structures were located in the periacinar space. Twelve clinically diagnosed PD patients showed asymmetrical and relatively severe reduction of (11)C-CFT uptake in the posterior putamen compared with the control. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of minor salivary gland biopsy were 75, 100, 100 and 25%, respectively, when compared with the DAT-PET imaging. Our results suggest that minor salivary gland biopsy does not hold high diagnostic accuracy as DAT-PET, but still has the potential to be a useful pathologic biomarker for PD, which is worth more investigations.

  20. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  1. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  2. Computational modeling of time-resolved fluorescence transport in turbid media for non-invasive clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging methods, including fluorescence lifetime sensing, are being developed for a variety of non-invasive clinical diagnostic procedures, including applications to early cancer diagnosis. Here, both the theoretical developments and experimental validations of a versatile, numerical Monte Carlo code that models photon migration in turbid media to include simulations of time-resolved fluorescence transport are presented. The developed numerical model was used to study, for the first time, the dependence of time-resolved fluorescence signals emanating from turbid media on the optical transport coefficients, fluorophore properties and source-detector configurations in single-layered turbid media as well as more complex multi-layered turbid media. The numerical codes presented here can be adapted to model a wide range of experimental techniques measuring the optical responses of biological tissues to laser irradiation and are demonstrated here for two specific applications (a) to model time-resolved fluorescence dynamics in human colon tissues and (b) to extract the frequency-dependent optical responses of a model adult human head to an incident laser-source whose intensity was harmonically modulated i.e. simulating frequency-domain measurements. Specifically, measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decays from a previous clinical study aimed toward detecting differences in tissue pathologies in patients undergoing gastro-intestinal endoscopy were simulated using the Monte Carlo model and results demonstrated that variations in tissue optical transport coefficients (absorption and scattering) alone could not account for the fluorescence decay differences detected between tissue pathologies in vivo. However, variations in fluorescence decay time as large as those detected clinically between normal and pre-malignant tissues (of 2 ns) could be accounted for by simulated variations in tissue morphology or biochemistry while intrinsic

  3. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Reliability of Axis I Diagnoses and Selected Clinical Measures

    PubMed Central

    Look, John O.; John, Mike T.; Tai, Feng; Huggins, Kimberly H.; Lenton, Patricia A.; Truelove, Edmond L.; Ohrbach, Richard; Anderson, Gary C.; Schiffman, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    AIM To estimate inter-examiner reliability of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) protocol. METHODS Kappa (k), computed by generalized estimate equation procedures, was selected as the primary estimate of inter-examiner reliability. Intersite reliability of six examiners from 3 study sites was assessed annually over the 5-year period of the RDC/TMD Validation Project. Intrasite reliability was monitored throughout the validation study by comparing RDC/TMD data collections performed on the same day by the test examiner and a criterion examiner. RESULTS Intersite calibrations included a total of 180 subjects. Intersite reliability of RDC/TMD diagnoses was excellent (k > 0.75) when myofascial pain diagnoses (Ia or Ib) were grouped. Good reliability was observed for discrete myofascial pain diagnoses, Ia (k = 0.62) and Ib (k = 0.58), for disc displacement with reduction (k = 0.63), disc displacement without reduction with limited opening (k = 0.62), arthralgia (k = 0.55), and when joint pain (IIIa or IIIb) was grouped (k = 0.59). Reliability of less frequently observed diagnoses such as disc displacements without reduction without limited opening, and osteoarthrosis (IIIb, IIIc), was poor to marginally fair (k = 0.31- 0.43). Intrasite monitoring results (n = 705) approximated well intersite reliability estimates. The greatest difference in paired estimates was 0.18 (IIc). CONCLUSION Reliability of the RDC/TMD protocol was good to excellent for myofascial pain, arthralgia, disc displacement with reduction, and disc displacement without reduction with limited opening. Reliability was poor to marginally fair for disc displacement without reduction without limited opening and osteoarthrosis. PMID:20213029

  4. Low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast: A diagnostic and clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qing Ting; Chuwa, Esther Wee Lee; Chew, Sung Hock; Lim-Tan, Soo Kim; Lim, Swee Ho

    2015-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the breast (ASBC) is a rare variant of metaplastic breast cancer with both glandular as well as squamous differentiation. Their lack of distinct imaging characteristics, sometimes subtle histological characteristics and overlapping features with other benign lesions pose a diagnostic challenge. Unlike other forms of metaplastic breast cancer, low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma (LGAC) tends to follow an indolent course with favourable prognosis. We reviewed eight cases of LGAC in our institution from June 2005 to March 2014. In six cases, LGAC was only found after excisional biopsy. In our patients, LGAC frequently co-existed with other forms of breast pathology. Two patients had incidental findings of LGAC alongside their primary malignant tumour (adenoid cystic carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma in one, four foci between 0.5 and 4.0 mm within a radial sclerosing lesion adjacent to a malignant phyllodes tumour in the other). A further four patients had LGAC within a complex sclerosing lesion. One patient had a focus of LGAC within a fibroadenoma. One had a focus of LGAC within a benign phyllodes tumour. None of the patients had evidence of nodal involvement. A high degree of suspicion is recommended as such lesions tend to be incidental histological findings within benign tumours or within complex sclerosing lesions. Although the risk of nodal and distant metastasis is low, the potential for local recurrence necessitates aggressive local excision with margin clearance. The role of axillary dissection has yet to be defined and routine sentinel node biopsy and axillary clearance may not be necessary in view of rarity of nodal metastasis in literature. Benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy is not clearly defined. All eight patients in our study have shown no evidence of recurrence after definitive surgery but longer periods of surveillance is required. PMID:25986061

  5. Simplified Symptom Pattern Method for verbal autopsy analysis: multisite validation study using clinical diagnostic gold standards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Verbal autopsy can be a useful tool for generating cause of death data in data-sparse regions around the world. The Symptom Pattern (SP) Method is one promising approach to analyzing verbal autopsy data, but it has not been tested rigorously with gold standard diagnostic criteria. We propose a simplified version of SP and evaluate its performance using verbal autopsy data with accompanying true cause of death. Methods We investigated specific parameters in SP's Bayesian framework that allow for its optimal performance in both assigning individual cause of death and in determining cause-specific mortality fractions. We evaluated these outcomes of the method separately for adult, child, and neonatal verbal autopsies in 500 different population constructs of verbal autopsy data to analyze its ability in various settings. Results We determined that a modified, simpler version of Symptom Pattern (termed Simplified Symptom Pattern, or SSP) performs better than the previously-developed approach. Across 500 samples of verbal autopsy testing data, SSP achieves a median cause-specific mortality fraction accuracy of 0.710 for adults, 0.739 for children, and 0.751 for neonates. In individual cause of death assignment in the same testing environment, SSP achieves 45.8% chance-corrected concordance for adults, 51.5% for children, and 32.5% for neonates. Conclusions The Simplified Symptom Pattern Method for verbal autopsy can yield reliable and reasonably accurate results for both individual cause of death assignment and for determining cause-specific mortality fractions. The method demonstrates that verbal autopsies coupled with SSP can be a useful tool for analyzing mortality patterns and determining individual cause of death from verbal autopsy data. PMID:21816099

  6. Applying Automated MR-Based Diagnostic Methods to the Memory Clinic: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Stefan; Peter, Jessica; Ludl, Anna; Pilatus, Anne; Maier, Sabrina; Mader, Irina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Frings, Lars; Egger, Karl; Dukart, Juergen; Schroeter, Matthias L; Perneczky, Robert; Häussermann, Peter; Vach, Werner; Urbach, Horst; Teipel, Stefan; Hüll, Michael; Abdulkadir, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that fully automated pattern recognition methods applied to structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aid in the diagnosis of dementia, but these conclusions are based on highly preselected samples that significantly differ from that seen in a dementia clinic. At a single dementia clinic, we evaluated the ability of a linear support vector machine trained with completely unrelated data to differentiate between Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Lewy body dementia, and healthy aging based on 3D-T1 weighted MRI data sets. Furthermore, we predicted progression to AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at baseline and automatically quantified white matter hyperintensities from FLAIR-images. Separating additionally recruited healthy elderly from those with dementia was accurate with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (according to Fig. 4). Multi-class separation of patients with either AD or FTD from other included groups was good on the training set (AUC >  0.9) but substantially less accurate (AUC = 0.76 for AD, AUC = 0.78 for FTD) on 134 cases from the local clinic. Longitudinal data from 28 cases with MCI at baseline and appropriate follow-up data were available. The computer tool discriminated progressive from stable MCI with AUC = 0.73, compared to AUC = 0.80 for the training set. A relatively low accuracy by clinicians (AUC = 0.81) illustrates the difficulties of predicting conversion in this heterogeneous cohort. This first application of a MRI-based pattern recognition method to a routine sample demonstrates feasibility, but also illustrates that automated multi-class differential diagnoses have to be the focus of future methodological developments and application studies.

  7. Applying Automated MR-Based Diagnostic Methods to the Memory Clinic: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Stefan; Peter, Jessica; Ludl, Anna; Pilatus, Anne; Maier, Sabrina; Mader, Irina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Frings, Lars; Egger, Karl; Dukart, Juergen; Schroeter, Matthias L; Perneczky, Robert; Häussermann, Peter; Vach, Werner; Urbach, Horst; Teipel, Stefan; Hüll, Michael; Abdulkadir, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that fully automated pattern recognition methods applied to structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aid in the diagnosis of dementia, but these conclusions are based on highly preselected samples that significantly differ from that seen in a dementia clinic. At a single dementia clinic, we evaluated the ability of a linear support vector machine trained with completely unrelated data to differentiate between Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Lewy body dementia, and healthy aging based on 3D-T1 weighted MRI data sets. Furthermore, we predicted progression to AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at baseline and automatically quantified white matter hyperintensities from FLAIR-images. Separating additionally recruited healthy elderly from those with dementia was accurate with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (according to Fig. 4). Multi-class separation of patients with either AD or FTD from other included groups was good on the training set (AUC >  0.9) but substantially less accurate (AUC = 0.76 for AD, AUC = 0.78 for FTD) on 134 cases from the local clinic. Longitudinal data from 28 cases with MCI at baseline and appropriate follow-up data were available. The computer tool discriminated progressive from stable MCI with AUC = 0.73, compared to AUC = 0.80 for the training set. A relatively low accuracy by clinicians (AUC = 0.81) illustrates the difficulties of predicting conversion in this heterogeneous cohort. This first application of a MRI-based pattern recognition method to a routine sample demonstrates feasibility, but also illustrates that automated multi-class differential diagnoses have to be the focus of future methodological developments and application studies. PMID:26401773

  8. Optical pre-clinical diagnostics of the cervical tissues malignant changing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, Sergey; Voloshynskyi, Dmytro; Fedoruk, Olexander; Gruia, Ion; Zimnyakov, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    This work is directed to the investigation of the scope of the technique of laser polarimetry of oncological changes of the human prostate and cervical tissues under the conditions of multiple scattering, which presents a more general and real experimental clinical situation. This study is combining polarimetry and spectropolarimetry techniques for identifying the changes of optical-geometrical structure in different kinds of biotissues with solid tumours. It is researched that a linear dichroism appears in biotissues (human esophagus, muscle tissue of rats, human prostate tissue, cervical smear) with cancer diseases, magnitude of which depends on the type of the tissue and on the time of cancer process development.

  9. Musculoskeletal discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the musculoskeletal discipline must identify possible consequences of weightlessness on this system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers. The musculoskeletal system is highly plastic in that is possesses the inherent capability to adapt its structural and functional properties in accordance with the type and degree of stimuli imposed on it. Prolonged space travel is essentially a period of significant unloading of the musculoskeletal system. This results in adaptive responses in the structure and function of this system, placing it on the low end of a continuum from one of complete disuse to one of maximal use. There is a high probability that the musculoskeletal system is functionally impaired with increasing duration of weightlessness. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences division research and development activities in the area of musculoskeletal function. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines research opportunities, which encompass critical questions in the subdiscipline areas (e.g., muscle, bone, and other musculoskeletal connective tissues). These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  10. [Publication rates of Turkish medical specialty and doctorate theses on Medical Microbiology, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases disciplines in international journals].

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Oğuz Reşat; Caglayan Serin, Derya; Pullukcu, Hüsnü; Tasbakan, Meltem; Köseli Ulu, Demet; Yamazhan, Tansu; Arda, Bilgin; Sipahi, Hilal; Ulusoy, Sercan

    2014-04-01

    Writing a thesis is mandatory for getting a postgraduate medical degree in Turkey. Publication of the results of the thesis in an indexed journal makes the results available to researchers, however publication rate is usually low. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to investigate the publication rate of Turkish Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Medical Microbiology specialty theses and Microbiology doctorate theses in international peer-review journals. On August 17th 2007, the thesis database of the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Turkey (YOK) where all specialization and doctorate theses are recorded obligatorily, was searched for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology and Medical Microbiology specialty and Microbiology doctorate theses. Assuming that publication of a thesis would last at least six months, theses dated to February 2007 and after were excluded. The publication rate of those theses was found out by searching Science Citation Index-Expanded database for thesis author and supervisor between August 17-September 12, 2007. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Our search yielded a total of 834 theses dated from 1997 to 2007, however 10 of them were excluded, since they were dated to February 2007 or after. It was found that the overall publication rate was 11.4% (94/824). The publication rates for Microbiology doctorate, Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology specialty theses were 13.7% (34/249), 10.7% (33/309) and 10.2% (27/266), respectively, with no statistical significance (p> 0.05). It was determined that nine (9.6%) of the 94 published theses belonged to 1997-2001 period, whereas 85 (80.4%) were in 2002-2007 period (p< 0.05). The probable reason for this increase was thought to be related with the updated criteria of YOK carried out in 2000 for academic promotions, nevertheless the publication rate of the investigated theses in international peer

  11. Phenotypic variability in gap junction syndromic skin disorders: experience from KID and Clouston syndromes' clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, Anna; Niepokój, Katarzyna; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Giza, Aleksandra; Mordasewicz-Goliszewska, Maria; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa

    2015-08-01

    Connexins belong to the family of gap junction proteins which enable direct cell-to-cell communication by forming channels in adjacent cells. Mutations in connexin genes cause a variety of human diseases and, in a few cases, result in skin disorders. There are significant differences in the clinical picture of two rare autosomal dominant syndromes: keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Clouston syndrome), which are caused by GJB2 and GJB6 mutations, respectively. This is despite the fact that, in both cases, malfunctioning of the same family proteins and some overlapping clinical features (nail dystrophy, hair loss, and palmoplantar keratoderma) is observed. KID syndrome is characterized by progressive vascularizing keratitis, ichthyosiform erythrokeratoderma, and neurosensory hearing loss, whereas Clouston syndrome is characterized by nail dystrophy, hypotrichosis, and palmoplantar keratoderma. The present paper presents a Polish patient with sporadic KID syndrome caused by the mutation of p.Asp50Asn in GJB2. The patient encountered difficulties in obtaining a correct diagnosis. The other case presented is that of a family with Clouston syndrome (caused by p.Gly11Arg mutation in GJB6), who are the first reported patients of Polish origin suffering from this disorder. Phenotype diversity among patients with the same genotypes reported to date is also summarized. The conclusion is that proper diagnosis of these syndromes is still challenging and should always be followed by molecular verification. PMID:25575739

  12. Diagnostic testing, pre- and post-test probabilities, and their use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Sérgio; Mendes, Susana; Vizinho, Ricardo; Carneiro, António Vaz

    2004-09-01

    In the process of establishing a diagnosis, the clinician calculates the disease probabilities, which keep changing as data is gathered from clinical history, physical examination and laboratory and imaging data. This paper sets out to explain, in a simple and practical way, how the characteristics of a test can be applied in order to determine post-test probability, that is, the probability of a specific disease being present. Before applying the test, we start with a pretest probability that corresponds to the prevalence of the disease. With each additional test this probability changes, until a threshold is reached that includes or excludes the clinical diagnosis. To calculate the post-test probabilities, the sensitivity and specificity of the test are used to calculate the positive and negative predictive values for a determined pretest probability, as well as likelihood ratios (through graphics or nomograms, approximations or equations). Among the test characteristics, the most useful for calculating post-test probabilities are likelihood ratios, which have several advantages over sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Rapid diagnostic testing for community-acquired pneumonia: can innovative technology for clinical microbiology be exploited?

    PubMed

    Yu, Victor L; Stout, Janet E

    2009-12-01

    Two nonsynchronous events have affected the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP): spiraling empiricism for CAP and the "golden era" of clinical microbiology. The development of broad-spectrum antibiotics has led to widespread empiric use without ascertaining the etiology of the infecting microbe. Unfortunately, this approach clashes with the second event, which is the advent of molecular-based microbiology that can identify the causative pathogen rapidly at the point of care. The urinary antigen is a most effective rapid test that has allowed targeted therapy for Legionnaire disease at the point of care. The high specificity (> 90%) allows the clinician to administer appropriate anti-Legionella therapy based on a single rapid test; however, its low sensitivity (76%) means that a notable number of cases of Legionnaire disease will go undiagnosed if other tests, especially culture, are not performed. Further, culture for Legionella is not readily available. If a culture is not performed, epidemiologic identification of the source of the bacterium cannot be ascertained by molecular fingerprinting of the patient and the putative source strain. We recommend resurrection of the basic principles of infectious disease, which are to identify the microbial etiology of the infection and to use narrow, targeted antimicrobial therapy. To reduce antimicrobial overuse with subsequent antimicrobial resistance, these basic principles must be applied in concert with traditional and newer tests in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  14. Dural sinus obstruction following head injury: a diagnostic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Benifla, Mony; Yoel, Uri; Melamed, Israel; Merkin, Vladimir; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with skull fracture adjacent to a dural venous sinus (DVS) and evaluate the role of CT venography (CTV) in the diagnosis of the effect of this fracture on the involved DVS. METHODS The study comprised patients with vault or skull base fracture adjacent to a DVS who were admitted to 1 medical center during a 2-year period. The medical records were reviewed for the clinical and radiographic characteristics. All patients had undergone CTV to evaluate potential DVS pathology. The clinical and radiological findings of the patients with DVS pathology were compared with those of the patients with normal DVS. The groups were compared using the chi-square and t-tests for categorical and continuous data, respectively. The potential risk for poor outcome among the patients with DVS pathology was also investigated. RESULTS Of 434 patients with skull fractures, 41 (9.4%) had fractures adjacent to a DVS. DVS pathology was detected in 51% of patients (21 of 41 patients). For 9 (43%) patients, obstruction was extraluminal without thrombosis, and 12 (57%) patients had dural sinus thrombosis (DST). In patients with a positive-CTV scan, the severity of injury according to the Glasgow Coma Scale score at presentation was correlated with the presence of DST (p = 0.007). The sensitivity of noncontrast CT (NCCT) for DVS involvement was 38% among the patients with positive-CTV scans. For patients with DVS pathology, poor outcome was correlated with DST (intraluminal), rather than extraluminal obstruction without thrombosis (p = 0.02), and superior sagittal sinus (SSS) involvement (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS NCCT is not sensitive enough to detect DVS obstruction in patients with skull fracture adjacent to a DVS, and CTV should be performed in order to rule it out. A correlation was found between the severity of injury and the presence of DST, rather than extraluminal obstruction. The authors' findings

  15. The implications on clinical diagnostics of using microRNA-based biomarkers in exercise.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Clarissa P C; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Wang, Kai; He, Yuqing

    2015-06-01

    Regular exercise is one of the best ways to maintain health and to prevent and control several chronic diseases. Identifying the molecular mechanisms associated with benefits of exercise is crucial and miRNAs have been suggested to be key players. Understanding the roles of miRNAs in these processes provides an opportunity to improve the clinical application of using exercise as a therapeutic intervention. Circulating miRNAs particularly are promising candidates for non-invasive biomarkers, which would enable oriented interventions. Furthermore, better and easier ways to assess exercise capacity can impact exercise evaluations and prescriptions, minimizing risks and monitoring the exercise response better. This review summarizes the current knowledge of miRNAs, recent advancements in miRNAs associated with exercise and addresses their role as biomarkers for exercise-related biological responses.

  16. Interleukins and interleukin receptors in rheumatoid arthritis: Research, diagnostics and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Magyari, Lili; Varszegi, Dalma; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Sarlos, Patricia; Farago, Bernadett; Javorhazy, Andras; Sumegi, Katalin; Banfai, Zsolt; Melegh, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, resulting in a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder. It may affect many tissues and organs, but it primarily affects the flexible joints. In clinical practice patient care generates many questions about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. It is challenging for health care specialists to keep up to date with the medical literature. This review summarizes the pathogenesis, the polymorphisms of interleukin and interleukin genes and the standard available and possible future immunologic targets for RA treatment. The identification of disease-associated interleukin and interleukin receptor genes can provide precious insight into the genetic variations prior to disease onset in order to identify the pathways important for RA pathogenesis. The knowledge of the complex genetic background may prove useful for developing novel therapies and making personalized medicine based on the individual’s genetics. PMID:25232528

  17. A Case Report of Cornelia De Lange Syndrome in Northern Iran; A Clinical and Diagnostic Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininejad, Seyyed-Mohsen; Bazrafshan, Behnaz

    2016-01-01

    As a rare multisystem congenital anomaly disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is featured by delayed growth and development, distinct facial dimorphism, limb malformations and multiple organ defects. CdLS is a genetic syndrome affecting 1/10000-1/60000 neonates with unknown genetic basis. Delayed growth and development, hirsute, structural anomalies of the limbs and distinct facial dimorphism are considered as its main clinical characteristics. Introducing CdLS cases of different ethnic backgrounds could add distinctions to the phenotypic picture of the syndrome and be useful in diagnosis. Early diagnosis and decreased death rates are achievable through enhanced awareness on this syndrome. We present here a 45-day-old girl, as the first case of Cornelia in Golestan (Northern Iran), referred to our hospital with the symptoms as mentioned above. PMID:27042551

  18. [Clinical case--voluminous diaphragmatic hernia--surgically acute abdomen: diagnostic and therapeutical challenges].

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, D; Savlovschi, C; Borcan, R; Pantu, H; Serban, D; Gradinaru, S; Smarandache, G; Trotea, T; Branescu, C; Musat, L; Comandasu, M; Priboi, M; Baldir, M; Sandolache, B; Oprescu, S

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 58-year old male patient admitted in the surgery section of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest and diagnosed with acute abdomen. The minimal clinical-paraclinical investigation (i.e., thorax-pulmonary Xray, biological probes) raises questions as to the differentiated diagnosis and other associated diseases, also suggesting the existence of voluminous diaphragmatic hernia. The CT thorax-abdomen examination confirms the diaphragmatic hernia suspicion, with intra-thorax ascent of the colon up to the anterior C4 level, but does not explain the abdominal suffering; thus we suspected a biliary ileus or acute appendicitis. Medial laparotomy was imperative. Intrasurgically peritonitis was noticed located by gangrenous acute apendicitis, perforated, with coprolite, for which apendictomy and lavage-drainage pf the peritoneal cavity was performed. Post-surgical status: favourable to recovery.

  19. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; Tan, Esther; Landgren, Ola

    2011-07-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be replaced by newer and more sensitive imaging techniques, which may have a prognostic impact and change our definition of MGUS and SMM. Bisphosphonates are recommended to prevent skeletal events in patients with MM, and have also been studied in SMM and MGUS. This article summarizes the current knowledge of bone disease in plasma cell disorders, and discusses the current standard and future role of novel imaging techniques, as well as the evidence and current guidelines for bisphosphonates in MM, SMM and MGUS. PMID:21745013

  20. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; Tan, Esther; Landgren, Ola

    2011-07-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be replaced by newer and more sensitive imaging techniques, which may have a prognostic impact and change our definition of MGUS and SMM. Bisphosphonates are recommended to prevent skeletal events in patients with MM, and have also been studied in SMM and MGUS. This article summarizes the current knowledge of bone disease in plasma cell disorders, and discusses the current standard and future role of novel imaging techniques, as well as the evidence and current guidelines for bisphosphonates in MM, SMM and MGUS.

  1. Ebola virus disease: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

    PubMed

    Dulaurier, Marlie; Moyer, Katherine; Wallihan, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a severe multisystem disease. Prehospital personnel, hospitals, and clinicians must be prepared to provide care for patients with EVD, with special attention to rigorous infection control in order to limit the spread of infection. Children with EVD are an especially challenging population, as the initial symptoms are nonspecific and difficult to differentiate from several common infections. For children presenting with a syndrome consistent with EVD, it is extremely important that healthcare workers identify epidemiologic risk factors, such as recent travel to an affected country or exposure to a patient with suspected or known EVD. Given the high morbidity and mortality of this disease, clinical efforts should focus on early diagnosis, appropriate infection control, and supportive care. PMID:27328168

  2. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (163). Transient lateral patellar dislocation with trochlear dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwei; Lee, Chin Hwee

    2015-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with left knee pain and swelling after an injury. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a transient lateral patellar dislocation with patellar osteochondral fracture, medial patellofemoral ligament tear and underlying femoral trochlear dysplasia. Open reduction and internal fixation of the osteochondral fracture, plication of the medial patellar retinaculum and lateral release were performed. As lateral patellar dislocation is often clinically unsuspected, an understanding of its characteristic imaging features is important in making the diagnosis. Knowledge of the various predisposing factors for patellar instability may also influence the choice of surgical management. We also discuss signs of acute injury and chronic instability observed on MR imaging, and the imaging features of anatomical variants that predispose an individual to lateral patellar dislocation. Treatment options and postsurgical imaging appearances are also briefly described. PMID:26512145

  3. [Clinical manifestations of the onset and diagnostic problems in children with moyamoya disease].

    PubMed

    Lvova, O A; Jevneronok, I V; Shalkevich, L V; Prusakova, T S

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease in children is a rarely diagnosed entity. Frequent headache is the first symptom of the disease. Headache associated with moya-moya disease (HAMD) is a separated entity reported in the literature. Variants of onset, a spectrum of primary diagnoses and diagnosis verification rate of moyamoya disease in 7 children are presented. A clinical case of moya-moya disease in a 9-year boy, who was primarily diagnosed with migraine with aura, is reported. The results presented by the authors as well as literature data indicate the necessity of using magnetic-resonance angiography in children with headache attacks and focal neurologic symptoms to identify this progressive vascular pathology and timely recommend a surgical treatment.

  4. Clinical and laboratory diagnostic characteristics and cytotoxigenic potential of Hafnia alvei and Hafnia paralvei strains.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sharon L; Moler, Silvia; Green, Nicole; Tran, Robert K; Wainwright, Katlyn; Janda, J Michael

    2011-09-01

    A collection of 68 Hafnia strains previously identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing were investigated for simple phenotypic properties that could aid in their recognition in the clinical laboratory. Four tests, including malonate utilization, fermentation of salicin and d-arabinose, and expression of β-glucosidase activity, correctly assigned each strain to either Hafnia alvei or H. paralvei. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles were generated for 35 H. alvei and H. paralvei isolates using Etest strips for 24 antibiotics. All strains were susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, carbapenems, and monobactams. Most of the Hafnia isolates had a colistin MIC of ≥2 μg/ml. Sequencing of an internal ampC gene fragment allowed genotypic differentiation of the two Hafnia species. Approximately 70% of the hafniae tested additionally produced a cytolytic toxin active on Vero cells which may play a role in gastroenteritis. PMID:21795516

  5. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA) a Clinical Diagnostic Tool in the Prenatal and Postnatal Settings.

    PubMed

    Batzir, Nurit Assia; Shohat, Mordechai; Maya, Idit

    2015-09-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is a technology used for the detection of clinically-significant microdeietions or duplications, with a high sensitivity for submicroscopic aberrations. It is able to detect changes as small as 5-10Kb in size - a resolution up to 1000 times higher than that of conventional karyotyping. CMA is used for uncovering copy number variants (CNVs) thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders, primarily neurodevelopmental disorders and congenital anomalies. CMA may be applied in the prenatal or postnatal setting, with unique benefits and limitations in each setting. The growing use of CMA makes it essential for practicing physicians to understand the principles of this technology and be aware of its powers and limitations.

  6. Connecting Personality Structure and Dynamics: Towards a More Evidence-Based and Clinically Useful Diagnostic Scheme.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Zimmermann, Johannes; Pincus, Aaron L; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this special issue of the Journal of Personality Disorders is to promote the integration of personality structure and dynamics towards more evidence-based and clinically useful conceptualizations of personality pathology. In this article, we describe a contemporary model of personality structure that is useful for distinguishing patients from one another and the connections between this structure and within-person dynamics that occur across different levels of an individual personality, across situations, and within situations. In so doing, we connect the personality trait tradition that has tended to emphasize stable individual differences with traditions that have tended to focus on the more dynamic aspects of interpersonal behavior and emotional experience. We then introduce the empirical articles in this special issue within this integrative context, in order to demonstrate the value in connecting personality structure to dynamics for research and practice.

  7. West Nile virus in raptors from Virginia during 2003: clinical, diagnostic, and epidemiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Priscilla H; Kelly, Sean; Shreve, Allison A; Snead, Sarah E; Sleeman, Jonathan M; Pettit, Denise A

    2006-04-01

    Sixty-one birds of prey admitted to The Wildlife Center of Virginia (WCV; Waynesboro, Virginia, USA) from June to November 2003 were tested for West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Choanal and/or cloacal swabs were obtained and submitted to Virginia's Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (Richmond, Virginia, USA) for analysis with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Forty birds of prey were positive for WNV by RT-PCR. Five avian families and nine species of raptors were represented, with great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) most frequently affected. Presenting clinical signs were consistent with previous reports of WNV infection in raptors; however, these differed between species. Of WNV positive birds, nonspecific signs of illness were the most common clinical findings, particularly in red-tailed hawks; signs included dehydration (n = 20), emaciation (n = 18), and depression (n = 15). Neurologic abnormalities were frequently identified, especially in great horned owls, and included head tremors (n = 17), ataxia (n = 13), head incoordination (n = 7), torticollis (n = 3), nystagmus (n = 3), and head tilt (n = 3). Great horned owls exhibited anemia and leukocytosis with heterophilia, eosinophilia, and monocytosis consistent with chronic inflammation. Red-tailed hawks were anemic with a heterophilic leukocytosis and regenerative left shift. The majority of WNV cases occurred during August and September; there was a marked increase in the number of raptors admitted to WCV during these months followed by a marked decrease during October, November, and December. This pattern differed from mean monthly admissions during the previous 10 years and suggests a negative impact on local raptor populations. The effects of WNV on avian populations are largely unknown; however, because of their ecological importance, further investigation of the effects of WNV on raptor populations is warranted. PMID

  8. CNV Workshop: an integrated platform for high-throughput copy number variation discovery and clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that copy number variations (CNVs) are frequent in higher eukaryotes and associated with a substantial portion of inherited and acquired risk for various human diseases. The increasing availability of high-resolution genome surveillance platforms provides opportunity for rapidly assessing research and clinical samples for CNV content, as well as for determining the potential pathogenicity of identified variants. However, few informatics tools for accurate and efficient CNV detection and assessment currently exist. Results We developed a suite of software tools and resources (CNV Workshop) for automated, genome-wide CNV detection from a variety of SNP array platforms. CNV Workshop includes three major components: detection, annotation, and presentation of structural variants from genome array data. CNV detection utilizes a robust and genotype-specific extension of the Circular Binary Segmentation algorithm, and the use of additional detection algorithms is supported. Predicted CNVs are captured in a MySQL database that supports cohort-based projects and incorporates a secure user authentication layer and user/admin roles. To assist with determination of pathogenicity, detected CNVs are also annotated automatically for gene content, known disease loci, and gene-based literature references. Results are easily queried, sorted, filtered, and visualized via a web-based presentation layer that includes a GBrowse-based graphical representation of CNV content and relevant public data, integration with the UCSC Genome Browser, and tabular displays of genomic attributes for each CNV. Conclusions To our knowledge, CNV Workshop represents the first cohesive and convenient platform for detection, annotation, and assessment of the biological and clinical significance of structural variants. CNV Workshop has been successfully utilized for assessment of genomic variation in healthy individuals and disease cohorts and is an ideal platform for

  9. Types, Risk Factors, Clinical symptoms and Diagnostic Tests of Acute Adult Meningitis in Northern Iran During 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Babamahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment and otherwise associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess types, risk factors, clinical symptoms and diagnostic tests of meningitis in hospitalized patients of Mazandaran University of medical sciences hospitals during 2006-2012. Matherials and Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study. Following approval of the ethics committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, records of adult patients diagnosed with acute meningitis from 2006 to 2012 were extracted from Mazandaran Provincial Health Center and patients attending hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Statistical Analysis Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, standard deviation, and median). Results In this study, of the 137 patients with meningitis, 73 (53.9%) were viral, 61 (46%) bacterial, 1 (0.7%) fungal, and 2 (1.4%) unknown. The majority of risk factors in patients were head trauma, upper respiratory infection, and drug addiction. The most common clinical signs were headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, and stiff neck. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of meningitis was much lower than any other country. It could be due to geographic variation or incomplete recording of patient's data. It is recommended to perform a longitudinal study during the coming years on patients with meningitis. PMID:26155497

  10. Improving diagnostic capability for HPV disease internationally within the NIH-NIAID-Division of AIDS Clinical Trial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Catherine C.; Michelow, Pamela M.; Godard, Mandana; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Darden, Janice; Firnhaber, Cynthia S.; Wetherall, Neal T.; Bremer, James; Coombs, Robert W.; Wilkin, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate an external quality assurance (EQA) program for the laboratory diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease that was established to improve international research capability within the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease–supported Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group network. Methods A three-component EQA scheme was devised comprising assessments of diagnostic accuracy of cytotechnologists and pathologists using available EQA packages, review of quality and accuracy of clinical slides from local sites by an outside expert, and HPV DNA detection using the commercially available HPV test kit. Results Seven laboratories and 17 pathologists in Africa, India, and South America participated. EQA scores were suboptimal for standard packages in three of seven laboratories. There was good agreement between the local laboratory and the central reader 70% of the time (90% confidence interval, 42%-98%). Performance on the College of American Pathologists’ HPV DNA testing panel was successful in all laboratories tested. Conclusions The prequalifying EQA round identified correctable issues that will improve the laboratory diagnosis of HPV related cervical disease at the international sites and will provide a mechanism for ongoing education and continuous quality improvement. PMID:24225757

  11. Terbium to Quantum Dot FRET Bioconjugates for Clinical Diagnostics: Influence of Human Plasma on Optical and Assembly Properties

    PubMed Central

    Morgner, Frank; Stufler, Stefan; Geißler, Daniel; Medintz, Igor L.; Algar, W. Russ; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2011-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from luminescent terbium complexes (LTC) as donors to semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as acceptors allows extraordinary large FRET efficiencies due to the long Förster distances afforded. Moreover, time-gated detection permits an efficient suppression of autofluorescent background leading to sub-picomolar detection limits even within multiplexed detection formats. These characteristics make FRET-systems with LTC and QDs excellent candidates for clinical diagnostics. So far, such proofs of principle for highly sensitive multiplexed biosensing have only been performed under optimized buffer conditions and interactions between real-life clinical media such as human serum or plasma and LTC-QD-FRET-systems have not yet been taken into account. Here we present an extensive spectroscopic analysis of absorption, excitation and emission spectra along with the luminescence decay times of both the single components as well as the assembled FRET-systems in TRIS-buffer, TRIS-buffer with 2% bovine serum albumin, and fresh human plasma. Moreover, we evaluated homogeneous LTC-QD FRET assays in QD conjugates assembled with either the well-known, specific biotin-streptavidin biological interaction or, alternatively, the metal-affinity coordination of histidine to zinc. In the case of conjugates assembled with biotin-streptavidin no significant interference with the optical and binding properties occurs whereas the histidine-zinc system appears to be affected by human plasma. PMID:22163719

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-operative imaging findings in presumed clinical T1a renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, KAZUFUMI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; IZUMI, KOUJI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; GABATA, TOSHIFUMI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of recent imaging modalities, certain pathological misdiagnoses remain for surgical specimens of presumed small renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In the present study, a retrospective analysis of benign pathological lesions diagnosed as small RCC prior to surgery was performed. In total, the cases of 196 sporadic renal tumors that was surgically treated as clinical T1a RCCs were reviewed, and the accuracy of the pathological diagnoses was calculated. The pre-operative findings for benign pathological lesions was investigated, and the lesions were observed in 13 (6.63%) of the 196 tumors. Pre-operative computed tomography images were obtained in all cases, and magnetic resonance images were available in 10 cases. The diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities was significantly lower in the tumors with a diameter of ≤20 mm. In all cases, the possible pathological diagnosis of RCC could not be excluded even by retrospective imaging analysis. Several benign pathological lesions were found in small renal masses presumed to be clinical T1a RCC. In conclusion, there may be limitations to the pre-operative imaging for certain types of small renal mass. PMID:27123087

  13. A modified artificial immune system based pattern recognition approach -- an application to clinic diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This paper introduces a modified artificial immune system (AIS)-based pattern recognition method to enhance the recognition ability of the existing conventional AIS-based classification approach and demonstrates the superiority of the proposed new AIS-based method via two case studies of breast cancer diagnosis. Methods and materials Conventionally, the AIS approach is often coupled with the k nearest neighbor (k-NN) algorithm to form a classification method called AIS-kNN. In this paper we discuss the basic principle and possible problems of this conventional approach, and propose a new approach where AIS is integrated with the radial basis function – partial least square regression (AIS-RBFPLS). Additionally, both the two AIS-based approaches are compared with two classical and powerful machine learning methods, back-propagation neural network (BPNN) and orthogonal radial basis function network (Ortho-RBF network). Results The diagnosis results show that: (1) both the AIS-kNN and the AIS-RBFPLS proved to be a good machine leaning method for clinical diagnosis, but the proposed AIS-RBFPLS generated an even lower misclassification ratio, especially in the cases where the conventional AIS-kNN approach generated poor classification results because of possible improper AIS parameters. For example, based upon the AIS memory cells of “replacement threshold = 0.3”, the average misclassification ratios of two approaches for study 1 are 3.36% (AIS-RBFPLS) and 9.07% (AIS-kNN), and the misclassification ratios for study 2 are 19.18% (AIS-RBFPLS) and 28.36% (AIS-kNN); (2) the proposed AIS-RBFPLS presented its robustness in terms of the AIS-created memory cells, showing a smaller standard deviation of the results from the multiple trials than AIS-kNN. For example, using the result from the first set of AIS memory cells as an example, the standard deviations of the misclassification ratios for study 1 are 0.45% (AIS-RBFPLS) and 8.71% (AIS-kNN) and those for

  14. Emerging from obscurity: biological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eugene H; Windsor, Jeffrey J; Clark, C Graham

    2004-07-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence. PMID:15258093

  15. [Clinical-diagnostic features of the acute period of brain concussion in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 78 patients aged 16-45 years in acute period of closed craniocereberal trauma (CCRCT) has been carried out. Physical examination was done on the first 10th and 30th day of the treatment. The author used specially developed multiple-aspect scales and questionnaires for objectification of patient complaints, magnetic resonance tomography, brain electroencephalography. A complex clinical and neuropsychological examination revealed that all cases of brain concussion were accompanied by various signs of asthenic disorders and in 81% of cases--by cognitive disorders. Patients in the acute period of brain concussion had significantly low indicators of cerebral neurodynamics in comparison with healthy individuals. It was shown by increase in signs of irritation, changes of bioelectric activity of the brain that was expressed by considerable blurriness of regional disjunctions and fading of an alpha rhythm. Specific changes of brain tissue in acute period of brain concussion were not registered when CT or MRT were used.

  16. Clinical manifestations and diagnostic approach to metastatic cancer of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Glaser, C; Lang, S; Pruckmayer, M; Millesi, W; Rasse, M; Marosi, C; Leitha, T

    1997-10-01

    In a 12-month period, metastatic cancer was diagnosed in eight patients. Six of them presented with pain mimicking toothache, temporomandibular joint disorders or trigeminal neuralgia, while two showed osteopenic bone lesions in the panoramic radiography, and perimandibular swelling. Anesthesia of the lower lip was the only common clinical feature. In seven of the eight patients, a whole body bone scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the skull in combination with a whole body and SPECT anti-granulocyte (Tc-99m MAK 250/183) bone marrow scintigraphy was performed. One patient did not have combined scintigraphy performed secondary to severe systemic illness. In six of the seven, the results were conclusive for a metastatic bone lesion. Biopsies confirmed three patients to have a previously unrecognized primary cancer, one patient to have previously unrecognized recurrent cancer, and three patients to exhibit new metastatic spread of an already diagnosed cancer. Histology revealed breast, lung, renal cancer and a malignancy of inconclusive origin. In the remaining patient, combined scintigraphy suggested osteomyelitis, yet biopsy revealed a prostate cancer metastasis with acute inflammatory cell infiltration. Thus, the scintigraphy pattern of a hot spot in the bone scan and a cold lesion in the bone marrow scintigraphy is highly suggestive of a mandibular metastasis, if accompanied by anesthesia of the lower lip.

  17. The clinical and diagnostic utility of S100B in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Serpero, Laura D; Pluchinotta, Francesca; Gazzolo, Diego

    2015-04-15

    Preterm birth is still the most important cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Follow-up studies showed that the majority of neurological abnormalities during childhood are already present in the first week after birth. In this light, the knowledge of the timing of the insult and/or of the contributing factors is of utmost relevance in order to avoid adverse neurological outcome. Notwithstanding, the considerable advances in perinatal clinical care and monitoring, the early detection of cases at risk for brain damage is still a challenge because, when radiological pictures are still negative, brain damage may be already at a subclinical stage, with symptoms hidden by therapeutic strategies. Thus, it could be very relevant to measure quantitative parameters, such as neuroproteins, able to detect subclinical lesions at a stage when routine brain monitoring procedures are still silent. In the last decade, the assay of the brain-specific protein S100B in different biological fluids proved useful information on brain function and damage in the perinatal period. Therefore, the present study provides an overview of the most recent findings on S100B role as a reliable marker of brain development/damage in preterm high risk fetuses and newborns. PMID:25704302

  18. Emerging from Obscurity: Biological, Clinical, and Diagnostic Aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eugene H.; Windsor, Jeffrey J.; Clark, C. Graham

    2004-01-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence. PMID:15258093

  19. Clinical diagnostic of pleural effusions using a high-speed viscosity measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurth, Cedric; Klein, Katherine; van Nimwegen, Lena; Korn, Ronald; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2011-08-01

    We present a novel bio-analytical method to discriminate between transudative and exudative pleural effusions based on a high-speed video analysis of a solid glass sphere impacting a liquid. Since the result depends on the solution viscosity, it can ultimately replace the battery of biochemical assays currently used. We present results obtained on a series of 7 pleural effusions obtained from consenting patients by analyzing both the splash observed after the glass impactor hits the liquid surface, and in a configuration reminiscent of the drop ball viscometer with added sensitivity and throughput provided by the high-speed camera. The results demonstrate distinction between the pleural effusions and good correlation with the fluid chemistry analysis to accurately differentiate exudates and transudates for clinical purpose. The exudative effusions display a viscosity around 1.39 ± 0.08 cP whereas the transudative effusion was measured at 0.89 ± 0.09 cP, in good agreement with previous reports.

  20. Dogs'olfactory diagnostics applied on human species: state of the art and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, B; Nardo, B; Lippi, G; Palmieri, L; Vadalà, M; Laurino, C

    2016-01-01

    Dogs'smell ability is about 10000-100000 more developed than humans' one. Dogs smell is usually exploited in forensic medicine, to find missing people and specific substances showing peculiar sensorial features. In clinic, there is the possibility to take advantage of dogs smell, which are conveniently trained, for the screening of cancers and other diseases. The common feature is the presence of molecules in organic samples that may be considered as biomarkers of a specific pathology. In cancer, scientific evidences exist about screening of melanoma, lung, breast, rectum, ovarian, prostate and bladder cancer. Instead, other pathologies manifest the presence of organic volatile compounds in biologic materials, such as spit, faeces and urine that may be studied by dogs smell in order to identify the presence of a specific disease. This review shows the state of the art of actual dogs' olfactory ability based on scientific principles and the advantages and the disadvantages of this method. The authors also reveal some potential pathologies joined by the presence of organic volatile compounds, which may be investigated by dogs smell. PMID:27598027

  1. Clinical manifestations and diagnostic approach to metastatic cancer of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Glaser, C; Lang, S; Pruckmayer, M; Millesi, W; Rasse, M; Marosi, C; Leitha, T

    1997-10-01

    In a 12-month period, metastatic cancer was diagnosed in eight patients. Six of them presented with pain mimicking toothache, temporomandibular joint disorders or trigeminal neuralgia, while two showed osteopenic bone lesions in the panoramic radiography, and perimandibular swelling. Anesthesia of the lower lip was the only common clinical feature. In seven of the eight patients, a whole body bone scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the skull in combination with a whole body and SPECT anti-granulocyte (Tc-99m MAK 250/183) bone marrow scintigraphy was performed. One patient did not have combined scintigraphy performed secondary to severe systemic illness. In six of the seven, the results were conclusive for a metastatic bone lesion. Biopsies confirmed three patients to have a previously unrecognized primary cancer, one patient to have previously unrecognized recurrent cancer, and three patients to exhibit new metastatic spread of an already diagnosed cancer. Histology revealed breast, lung, renal cancer and a malignancy of inconclusive origin. In the remaining patient, combined scintigraphy suggested osteomyelitis, yet biopsy revealed a prostate cancer metastasis with acute inflammatory cell infiltration. Thus, the scintigraphy pattern of a hot spot in the bone scan and a cold lesion in the bone marrow scintigraphy is highly suggestive of a mandibular metastasis, if accompanied by anesthesia of the lower lip. PMID:9327288

  2. Multiplex molecular testing for management of infectious gastroenteritis in a hospital setting: a comparative diagnostic and clinical utility study.

    PubMed

    Halligan, E; Edgeworth, J; Bisnauthsing, K; Bible, J; Cliff, P; Aarons, E; Klein, J; Patel, A; Goldenberg, S

    2014-08-01

    Laboratory diagnosis and clinical management of inpatients with diarrhoea is complex and time consuming. Tests are often requested sequentially and undertaken in different laboratories. This causes prolonged unnecessary presumptive isolation of patients, because most cases are non-infectious. A molecular multiplex test (Luminex(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP)) was compared with conventional testing over 8 months to determine diagnostic accuracy, turnaround times, laboratory costs, use of isolation facilities and user acceptability. A total of 262 (12%) patients had a pathogen detected by conventional methods compared with 483 (22.1%) by GPP. Most additional cases were detected in patients developing symptoms in the first 4 days of admission. Additional cases were detected because of presumed improved diagnostic sensitivity but also because clinicians had not requested the correct pathogen. Turnaround time (41.8 h) was faster than bacterial culture (66.5 h) and parasite investigation (66.5 h) but slower than conventional testing for Clostridium difficile (17.3 h) and viruses (27 h). The test could allow simplified requesting by clinicians and a consolidated laboratory workflow, reducing the overall number of specimens received by the laboratory. A total of 154 isolation days were saved at an estimated cost of £30 800. Consumables and labour were estimated at £150 641 compared with £63 431 for conventional testing. Multiplex molecular testing using a panel of targets allowed enhanced detection and a consolidated laboratory workflow. This is likely to be of greater benefit to cases that present within the first 4 days of hospital admission. PMID:24274687

  3. Presentation of Diagnostic Information to Doctors May Change Their Interpretation and Clinical Management: A Web-Based Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Collin, Simon M.; Quekett, James; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Whiting, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little evidence on how best to present diagnostic information to doctors and whether this makes any difference to clinical management. We undertook a randomised controlled trial to see if different data presentations altered clinicians’ decision to further investigate or treat a patient with a fictitious disorder (“Green syndrome”) and their ability to determine post-test probability. Methods We recruited doctors registered with the United Kingdom’s largest online network for medical doctors between 10 July and 6” November 2012. Participants were randomised to one of four arms: (a) text summary of sensitivity and specificity, (b) Fagan’s nomogram, (c) probability-modifying plot (PMP), (d) natural frequency tree (NFT). The main outcome measure was the decision whether to treat, not treat or undertake a brain biopsy on the hypothetical patient and the correct post-test probability. Secondary outcome measures included knowledge of diagnostic tests. Results 917 participants attempted the survey and complete data were available from 874 (95.3%). Doctors randomized to the PMP and NFT arms were more likely to treat the patient than those randomized to the text-only arm. (ORs 1.49, 95% CI 1.02, 2.16) and 1.43, 95% CI 0.98, 2.08 respectively). More patients randomized to the PMP (87/218–39.9%) and NFT (73/207–35.3%) arms than the nomogram (50/194–25.8%) or text only (30/255–11.8%) arms reported the correct post-test probability (p <0.001). Younger age, postgraduate training and higher self-rated confidence all predicted better knowledge performance. Doctors with better knowledge were more likely to view an optional learning tutorial (OR per correct answer 1.18, 95% CI 1.06, 1.31). Conclusions Presenting diagnostic data using a probability-modifying plot or natural frequency tree influences the threshold for treatment and improves interpretation of tests results compared to text summary of sensitivity and specificity or Fagan

  4. Integrating carthage-specific T1rho MRI into knee clinic diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Douglas R; Klocke, Noelle F; Thedens, Daniel R; Martin, James A; Williams, Glenn N; Amendola, Annunziato

    2011-01-01

    With a rise in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, OA no longer is considered just a disease of aging. The 'gold standard' for OA diagnosis has long been planar radiographs for visualizing osteophytes, joint space narrowing and sclerotic changes. A typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol will acquire proton density, T1, T2, and fat suppressed images that give a comprehensive picture of morphologic changes associated with injury and subsequent degenerative processes. However, the earliest events of cartilage degeneration occur within the tissue, before measureable changes in morphology. MRI methods have been proposed to display and quantify changes in composition and integrity of such elements of cartilage extracellular matrix as collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content in vivo. T1ρ the spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, has come to the forefront for visualizing water proton-PG interactions in articular cartilage. The purpose of this T1ρ MRI study was to define an objective femoral condyle-specific registration method, in which zone-dependent cartilage compositional changes could be assessed from the bone outward through the existing cartilage, at pre-ACL reconstruction and subsequent follow-up times, when the loss of thickness to surface-down cartilage erosion might occur later in the OA pathogenesis. Additionally, this study explores the effects of reducing the number of spin-lock times on the absolute T1ρ relaxation times; a major parameter in expanding T1ρ coverage to the whole joint while satisfying clinical imaging time and specific absorption rate (SAR) safety constraints. The developed image analysis tools serve as the first step toward quantitative functional assessment of cartilage health with noninvasive T1ρ MRI, which has the potential to become an important new tool for the early diagnosis of cartilage degeneration following ACL trauma.

  5. Decision Making for Borderline Cases in Pass/Fail Clinical Anatomy Courses: The Practical Value of the Standard Error of Measurement and Likelihood Ratio in a Diagnostic Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severo, Milton; Silva-Pereira, Fernanda; Ferreira, Maria Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the standard error of measurement (SEM) can be used as an additional “safety net” to reduce the frequency of false-positive or false-negative student grading classifications. Practical examinations in clinical anatomy are often used as diagnostic tests to admit students to course final examinations. The aim of this…

  6. Hemicrania continua: a clinical study of 39 patients with diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, Elisabetta; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-07-01

    reliable clinical marker of that response, we recommend an indometacin test, either orally or by injection, for any patient with unilateral pain, with or without cranial autonomic symptoms.

  7. Importance of high-throughput cell separation technologies for genomics/proteomics-based clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; Szaniszlo, Peter; Prow, Tarl W.; Reece, Lisa M.; Wang, Nan; Asmuth, David M.

    2002-06-01

    be about 100 times more sensitive than they are now to be able to do many biologically and biomedically meaningful experiments and clinical tests.

  8. Direct estimation of cause-specific mortality fractions from verbal autopsies: multisite validation study using clinical diagnostic gold standards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Verbal autopsy (VA) is used to estimate the causes of death in areas with incomplete vital registration systems. The King and Lu method (KL) for direct estimation of cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) from VA studies is an analysis technique that estimates CSMFs in a population without predicting individual-level cause of death as an intermediate step. In previous studies, KL has shown promise as an alternative to physician-certified verbal autopsy (PCVA). However, it has previously been impossible to validate KL with a large dataset of VAs for which the underlying cause of death is known to meet rigorous clinical diagnostic criteria. Methods We applied the KL method to adult, child, and neonatal VA datasets from the Population Health Metrics Research Consortium gold standard verbal autopsy validation study, a multisite sample of 12,542 VAs where gold standard cause of death was established using strict clinical diagnostic criteria. To emulate real-world populations with varying CSMFs, we evaluated the KL estimations for 500 different test datasets of varying cause distribution. We assessed the quality of these estimates in terms of CSMF accuracy as well as linear regression and compared this with the results of PCVA. Results KL performance is similar to PCVA in terms of CSMF accuracy, attaining values of 0.669, 0.698, and 0.795 for adult, child, and neonatal age groups, respectively, when health care experience (HCE) items were included. We found that the length of the cause list has a dramatic effect on KL estimation quality, with CSMF accuracy decreasing substantially as the length of the cause list increases. We found that KL is not reliant on HCE the way PCVA is, and without HCE, KL outperforms PCVA for all age groups. Conclusions Like all computer methods for VA analysis, KL is faster and cheaper than PCVA. Since it is a direct estimation technique, though, it does not produce individual-level predictions. KL estimates are of similar

  9. The Context of Secondary School Discipline: Discipline as Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitson, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    Discipline is viewed in its broad organizational context as control of behavior. The context of secondary school discipline is analyzed in both its theoretical and practical aspects. Available from: Australian College of Education, 916 Swanston Street, Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia, $2.50 single copy. (Author/MLF)

  10. Clinical spectrum, diagnostic criteria, and polymerase chain reaction of aqueous humor in viral and toxoplasma detection in Fuchs’ uveitis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sabhapandit, Swapnali; Murthy, Somasheila I; Balne, Praveen K; Sangwan, Virender Singh; Sumanth, V; Reddy, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the clinical features and diagnostic criteria of Fuchs’ uveitis (FU) and to determine whether it has an association with virus and toxoplasma in the aqueous humor during cataract surgery. Setting and Design: This is a prospective, case–control study. Materials and Methods: Patients with FU (n = 25), anterior uveitis (n = 15), and no uveitis (normal) (n = 50) were included based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria for all three groups. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of aqueous humor and serum for rubella, herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and toxoplasma was done using conventional uniplex PCR. Statistical Analysis: It was done using SPSS software using Chi-square test for categorical variables, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ninety patients were enrolled in the study in three groups, comparable for age, gender, and laterality of ocular involvement. All patients had diffuse keratic precipitates in FU group (P = 0001) with none having posterior synechiae (P = 0.046) which was statistically significant when compared to anterior uveitis patients. Iris nodules were noted in one case in both groups. Serum and aqueous PCR was negative for detection of VZV, CMV, toxoplasma, and rubella in all groups. PCR for HSV was positive in one patient in “normal” group but was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study shows that diagnosis of FU is mainly clinical. There appears to be no role of aqueous humor testing for viruses by PCR to aid in etiological diagnosis. PMID:27688274

  11. The discipline of innovation.

    PubMed

    Drucker, P F

    1998-01-01

    Some innovations spring from a flash of genius. But as Peter Drucker points out in this HBR Classic, most result from a conscious, purposeful search for opportunities. For managers seeking innovation, engaging in disciplined work is more important than having an entrepreneurial personality. Writing originally in the May-June 1985 issue, Drucker describes the major sources of opportunities for innovation. Within a company or industry, opportunities can be found in unexpected occurrences, incongruities of various kinds, process needs, or changes in an industry or market. Outside a company, opportunities arise from demographic changes, changes in perception, or new knowledge. These seven sources overlap, and the potential for innovation may well lie in more than one area at a time. Innovations based on new knowledge, of course, tend to have the greatest effect on the marketplace. But it often takes decades before the ideas are translated into actual products, processes, or services. The other sources of innovation are easier and simpler to handle, yet they still require managers to look beyond established practices. Drucker emphasizes that in seeking opportunities, innovators need to look for simple, focused solutions to real problems. The greatest praise an innovation can receive is for people to say, "This is obvious!" Grandiose ideas designed to revolutionize an industry rarely work. Innovation, like any other endeavor, takes talent, ingenuity, and knowledge. But Drucker cautions that if diligence, persistence, and commitment are lacking, companies are unlikely to succeed at the business of innovation.

  12. Quantitative Clinical Diagnostic Analysis of Acetone in Human Blood by HPLC: A Metabolomic Search for Acetone as Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Akgul Kalkan, Esin; Sahiner, Mehtap; Ulker Cakir, Dilek; Alpaslan, Duygu; Yilmaz, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) as a derivatizing reagent, an analytical method was developed for the quantitative determination of acetone in human blood. The determination was carried out at 365 nm using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array detector (DAD). For acetone as its 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, a good separation was achieved with a ThermoAcclaim C18 column (15 cm × 4.6 mm × 3 μm) at retention time (tR) 12.10 min and flowrate of 1 mL min−1 using a (methanol/acetonitrile) water elution gradient. The methodology is simple, rapid, sensitive, and of low cost, exhibits good reproducibility, and allows the analysis of acetone in biological fluids. A calibration curve was obtained for acetone using its standard solutions in acetonitrile. Quantitative analysis of acetone in human blood was successfully carried out using this calibration graph. The applied method was validated in parameters of linearity, limit of detection and quantification, accuracy, and precision. We also present acetone as a useful tool for the HPLC-based metabolomic investigation of endogenous metabolism and quantitative clinical diagnostic analysis. PMID:27298750

  13. Towards a more representative morphology: clinical and ethical considerations for including diverse populations in diagnostic genetic atlases

    PubMed Central

    Koretzky, Maya; Bonham, Vence L.; Berkman, Benjamin E.; Kruszka, Paul; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Muenke, Maximilian; Hull, Sara Chandros

    2016-01-01

    An important gap exists in textbooks (or atlases) of dysmorphology used by health-care professionals to help diagnose genetic syndromes. The lack of varied phenotypic images in available atlases limits the utility of these atlases as diagnostic tools in globally diverse populations, causing geneticists difficulty in diagnosing conditions in individuals of different ancestral backgrounds who may present with variable morphological features. Proposals to address the underinclusion of images from diverse populations in existing atlases can take advantage of the Internet and digital photography to create new resources that take into account the broad global diversity of populations affected by genetic disease. Creating atlases that are more representative of the global population will expand resources available to care for diverse patients with these conditions, many of whom have been historically underserved by the medical system. However, such projects also raise ethical questions that are grounded in the complex intersection of imagery, medicine, history, and race and ethnicity. We consider here the benefits of producing such a resource while also considering ethical and practical concerns, and we offer recommendations for the ethical creation, structure, equitable use, and maintenance of a diverse morphological atlas for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26963283

  14. Diagnostic yield of computed tomography-guided bone biopsy and clinical outcomes of tuberculous and pyogenic spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun-Jeong; Yeom, Joon-Sup; Ha, Young Eun; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Chong-Suh; Kim, Eun-Sang; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo-Ryeon; Song, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided bone biopsy for the diagnosis of spinal infection and compared the clinical outcomes between tuberculous and pyogenic spinal infections. Methods: The retrospective cohort study included patients who received CT-guided bone biopsy at a tertiary hospital over the 13 years. Results: Among 100 patients, 67 had pyogenic spondylitis and 33 had tuberculous spondylitis. Pathogens were isolated from bone specimens obtained by CT-guided biopsy in 42 cases, with diagnostic yields of 61% (20/33) for tuberculous spondylitis and 33% (22/67) for pyogenic spondylitis. For 36 culture-proven pyogenic cases, Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism. Patients with pyogenic spondylitis more frequently presented with fever accompanied by an increase in inflammatory markers than did those with tuberculosis. Among all patients who underwent surgery, the incidence of late surgery performed one month after diagnosis was higher in patients with tuberculous infection (56.3%) than in those with pyogenic disease (23.3%, p = 0.026). Conclusions: Results obtained by CT-guided bone biopsy contributed to prompt diagnoses of spinal infections, especially those caused by tuberculosis. Despite administration of anti-tuberculous agents, patients with tuberculous spondylitis showed an increased tendency to undergo late surgery. PMID:27079327

  15. A Bacterial Analysis Platform: An Integrated System for Analysing Bacterial Whole Genome Sequencing Data for Clinical Diagnostics and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Ahrenfeldt, Johanne; Cisneros, Jose Luis Bellod; Jurtz, Vanessa; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in whole genome sequencing have made the technology available for routine use in microbiological laboratories. However, a major obstacle for using this technology is the availability of simple and automatic bioinformatics tools. Based on previously published and already available web-based tools we developed a single pipeline for batch uploading of whole genome sequencing data from multiple bacterial isolates. The pipeline will automatically identify the bacterial species and, if applicable, assemble the genome, identify the multilocus sequence type, plasmids, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance genes. A short printable report for each sample will be provided and an Excel spreadsheet containing all the metadata and a summary of the results for all submitted samples can be downloaded. The pipeline was benchmarked using datasets previously used to test the individual services. The reported results enable a rapid overview of the major results, and comparing that to the previously found results showed that the platform is reliable and able to correctly predict the species and find most of the expected genes automatically. In conclusion, a combined bioinformatics platform was developed and made publicly available, providing easy-to-use automated analysis of bacterial whole genome sequencing data. The platform may be of immediate relevance as a guide for investigators using whole genome sequencing for clinical diagnostics and surveillance. The platform is freely available at: https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/CGEpipeline-1.1 and it is the intention that it will continue to be expanded with new features as these become available. PMID:27327771

  16. A comparison of diagnostic methods for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in experimental clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    West, K; Bogdan, J; Hamel, A; Nayar, G; Morley, P S; Haines, D M; Ellis, J A

    1998-01-01

    Virus shedding was monitored in nasal secretions of 12 calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) using an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detecting the nucleoprotein (NP) antigen of BRSV, by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifying the fusion protein of BRSV, and by a microisolation assay combined with immunoperoxidase staining for the F protein of BRSV. Under the conditions of this study, similar limits of detection and quantitative results were obtained from all three assays. BRSV was detected in nasal secretions of all calves for a minimum of 4 d. Virus shedding began on Day 2 after infection, peaked on Days 3-5, and was cleared in most calves by Day 8. The PCR, and to a lesser extent the ELISA, may detect virus shedding for a longer period after infection than virus isolation, possibly due to neutralization of the virus by rising mucosal antibody. Simulated environmental conditions likely to be experienced during transport of clinical field specimens markedly reduced the sensitivity of virus isolation but had a minimal effect on the results of the NP ELISA. Actual field transport conditions (overnight on ice) had minimal apparent effect on the results of the PCR assay. The less stringent specimen handling requirements, combined with low limits of detection, of both the nucleoprotein ELISA and PCR, indicate either of these assays are more suitable for diagnostic applications than virus isolation. PMID:9798088

  17. Positive Approaches Toward Student Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This report presents a number of discipline policy recommendations based on the results of a survey of students, teachers, and administrators in 60 randomly selected high schools in New York State. The bulk of the report is contained in the appendix and presents exemplary discipline programs in public and private secondary schools in New York.…

  18. Managerial Responsibility for Employee Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafner, Arthur W.; Kibble-Smith, Brian G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses corrective action and employee discipline in library management, covering: (1) factors affecting the library manager's right to discipline; (2) employee orientation and training; (3) employee performance measurement; (4) corrective strategies; (5) termination as an option; (6) the importance of fairness; and (7) positive results of…

  19. Group Portrait: Internationalizing the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groennings, Sven, Ed.; Wiley, David S., Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays in seven academic disciplines on the topic of international perspectives in those academic fields. The disciplines represented are geography, history, political science, sociology, psychology, journalism and mass communication, and philosophy. The book includes the following essays: "Higher Education,…

  20. Cultivating Spontaneous Self-Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shaughnessy, Molly

    1998-01-01

    Draws on contemporary sources to provide strategies for cultivating self-discipline. Advocates self-healing for the adult to be free from destructive attitudes and personal history that can keep adults from being mindful of the child's needs, perspective, and potential. Concludes with ways to facilitate a truly Montessori approach to discipline.…

  1. Maintaining Discipline in Classroom Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnagey, William J.

    This document focuses on classroom discipline and how the teacher can maintain an environment that will optimize appropriate learning. Part 1 defines classroom discipline. Part 2 discusses classroom misbehavior and describes a number of classroom management techniques. Part 3 offers suggestions for control techniques. Part 4 discusses techniques…

  2. Discipline Based Arts Education. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Lori

    This 5-part video lesson deals with discipline-based art education in the elementary school. The video features a university professor who is a specialist in methods and the integration of art into the elementary classroom; each part of the video lesson is 30 minutes in length. First defining discipline-based art education as an approach, not a…

  3. The importance of diagnostic test parameters in the interpretation of clinical test findings: The Prone Hip Extension Test as an example

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The use of diagnostic tests is a crucial aspect of clinical practice since they assist clinicians in establishing whether a patient has or does not have a particular condition. In order for any clinical test to be used most appropriately, it is essential that several parameters be established regarding the test and that these are made known to clinicians to inform their clinical decision making. These include the test’s sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. This article reviews their importance as well as provides an illustrative example that highlights how knowledge of the parameters for a given test allows clinicians to better interpret their test findings in practice. PMID:21629460

  4. Multicountry Prospective Clinical Evaluation of Two Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays and Two Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Diagnosing Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Dauner, Allison L.; Valks, Andrea; Forshey, Brett M.; Long, Kanya C.; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Sierra, Gloria; Picos, Victor; Talmage, Sara; Morrison, Amy C.; Halsey, Eric S.; Comach, Guillermo; Yasuda, Chadwick; Loeffelholz, Michael; Jarman, Richard G.; Fernandez, Stefan; An, Ung Sam; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Jasper, Louis E.; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated four dengue diagnostic devices from Alere, including the SD Bioline Dengue Duo (nonstructural [NS] 1 Ag and IgG/IgM), the Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette (IgM/IgG) rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and the Panbio dengue IgM and IgG capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in a prospective, controlled, multicenter study in Peru, Venezuela, Cambodia, and the United States, using samples from 1,021 febrile individuals. Archived, well-characterized samples from an additional 135 febrile individuals from Thailand were also used. Reference testing was performed on all samples using an algorithm involving virus isolation, in-house IgM and IgG capture ELISAs, and plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) to determine the infection status of the individual. The primary endpoints were the clinical sensitivities and specificities of these devices. The SD Bioline Dengue Duo had an overall sensitivity of 87.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.1 to 90.2%) and specificity of 86.8% (95% CI, 83.9 to 89.3%) during the first 14 days post-symptom onset (p.s.o.). The Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette demonstrated a sensitivity of 92.1% (87.8 to 95.2%) and specificity of 62.2% (54.5 to 69.5%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. The Panbio IgM capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 87.6% (82.7 to 91.4%) and specificity of 88.1% (82.2 to 92.6%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. Finally, the Panbio IgG capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 69.6% (62.1 to 76.4%) and a specificity of 88.4% (82.6 to 92.8%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. for identification of secondary dengue infections. This multicountry prospective study resulted in reliable real-world performance data that will facilitate data-driven laboratory test choices for managing patient care during dengue outbreaks. PMID:25588659

  5. Multicountry prospective clinical evaluation of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and two rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pal, Subhamoy; Dauner, Allison L; Valks, Andrea; Forshey, Brett M; Long, Kanya C; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Sierra, Gloria; Picos, Victor; Talmage, Sara; Morrison, Amy C; Halsey, Eric S; Comach, Guillermo; Yasuda, Chadwick; Loeffelholz, Michael; Jarman, Richard G; Fernandez, Stefan; An, Ung Sam; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Jasper, Louis E; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated four dengue diagnostic devices from Alere, including the SD Bioline Dengue Duo (nonstructural [NS] 1 Ag and IgG/IgM), the Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette (IgM/IgG) rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and the Panbio dengue IgM and IgG capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in a prospective, controlled, multicenter study in Peru, Venezuela, Cambodia, and the United States, using samples from 1,021 febrile individuals. Archived, well-characterized samples from an additional 135 febrile individuals from Thailand were also used. Reference testing was performed on all samples using an algorithm involving virus isolation, in-house IgM and IgG capture ELISAs, and plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) to determine the infection status of the individual. The primary endpoints were the clinical sensitivities and specificities of these devices. The SD Bioline Dengue Duo had an overall sensitivity of 87.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.1 to 90.2%) and specificity of 86.8% (95% CI, 83.9 to 89.3%) during the first 14 days post-symptom onset (p.s.o.). The Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette demonstrated a sensitivity of 92.1% (87.8 to 95.2%) and specificity of 62.2% (54.5 to 69.5%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. The Panbio IgM capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 87.6% (82.7 to 91.4%) and specificity of 88.1% (82.2 to 92.6%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. Finally, the Panbio IgG capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 69.6% (62.1 to 76.4%) and a specificity of 88.4% (82.6 to 92.8%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. for identification of secondary dengue infections. This multicountry prospective study resulted in reliable real-world performance data that will facilitate data-driven laboratory test choices for managing patient care during dengue outbreaks. PMID:25588659

  6. Multicountry prospective clinical evaluation of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and two rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pal, Subhamoy; Dauner, Allison L; Valks, Andrea; Forshey, Brett M; Long, Kanya C; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Sierra, Gloria; Picos, Victor; Talmage, Sara; Morrison, Amy C; Halsey, Eric S; Comach, Guillermo; Yasuda, Chadwick; Loeffelholz, Michael; Jarman, Richard G; Fernandez, Stefan; An, Ung Sam; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Jasper, Louis E; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated four dengue diagnostic devices from Alere, including the SD Bioline Dengue Duo (nonstructural [NS] 1 Ag and IgG/IgM), the Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette (IgM/IgG) rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and the Panbio dengue IgM and IgG capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in a prospective, controlled, multicenter study in Peru, Venezuela, Cambodia, and the United States, using samples from 1,021 febrile individuals. Archived, well-characterized samples from an additional 135 febrile individuals from Thailand were also used. Reference testing was performed on all samples using an algorithm involving virus isolation, in-house IgM and IgG capture ELISAs, and plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) to determine the infection status of the individual. The primary endpoints were the clinical sensitivities and specificities of these devices. The SD Bioline Dengue Duo had an overall sensitivity of 87.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.1 to 90.2%) and specificity of 86.8% (95% CI, 83.9 to 89.3%) during the first 14 days post-symptom onset (p.s.o.). The Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette demonstrated a sensitivity of 92.1% (87.8 to 95.2%) and specificity of 62.2% (54.5 to 69.5%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. The Panbio IgM capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 87.6% (82.7 to 91.4%) and specificity of 88.1% (82.2 to 92.6%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. Finally, the Panbio IgG capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 69.6% (62.1 to 76.4%) and a specificity of 88.4% (82.6 to 92.8%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. for identification of secondary dengue infections. This multicountry prospective study resulted in reliable real-world performance data that will facilitate data-driven laboratory test choices for managing patient care during dengue outbreaks.

  7. Impact of social and clinical factors on diagnostic delay of breast cancer: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Dianatinasab, Mostafa; Fararouei, Mohammad; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    One of the reasons for high mortality of breast cancer is long delay in seeking medical care. This study was designed to measure the association of a wide range of socio-demographic and clinical factors with the diagnostic delay in breast cancer among Iranian patients.This study was conducted on 505 newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer from southern part of Iran. Medical files of the patients who were admitted to the hospital from November 2013 to May 2015 were examined and clinical and demographic information were extracted.According to the results, illiterate patients were diagnosed on average 87.42 days later compared with those with a college degree (95%CI: 29.68-145.16, P = 0.003) and those from rural area were diagnosed on average 72.48 days later (95%CI: 35.94-109.03, P = 0.001) compared with urban residences. Single women were diagnosed 65.99 days later (95%CI: 7.37-124.61, P = 0.02) compared with those married. Lobular or medullary types of cancer were diagnosed 65.19 days later (95%CI: 2.67-127.70, P = 0.04) compared with ductal type. On the other hand, those who were able to perform breast self-exam were diagnosed 49.07 days earlier compared with others (95%CI: 18.69-79.45, P = 0.002). Those felt lump as the initiating symptom were diagnosed 62.01 days earlier, (95%CI: 8.17-115.85, P = 0.02) compared with those with other initial symptoms. The only factor associated with doctors diagnosis delay was the place of residence as rural residences were diagnosed on average 87.42 days later compared with urban residences, (95%CI: 53.82-121.92, P = 0.001).Higher education, living in cities, ductal type of tumor, and noticing lump in breast were the most important demographic and clinical factors associated with shorter breast cancer diagnosis delay. Informing women and doctors, especially general physicians who are practicing in rural areas, of the common symptoms of breast cancer as well as training women to perform breast self-examination are effective

  8. Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction: Clinical characteristics and diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Li, Hai-Fei; Chen, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible predisposing factors of bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction (BI-SBO) and to discuss the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography, particularly contrast-enhanced scanning, in this condition. METHODS: A total of 35 BI-SBO cases treated at our hospital from January 2007 to December 2013 were retrospectively analysed. Complete clinical and computed tomography (CT) data of the patients were available and confirmed by surgery. SBO was clinically diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations. Of the 35 patients, 18 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT and 17 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT combined with contrast-enhanced examination. Original images were processed using a GE ADW4.3 workstation to obtain MPR, CPR, MIP and CTA images. The images of all patients were evaluated by two abdominal imaging experts. The main analytical contents of planar scanning included intestinal bezoar conditions, changes in the intestinal wall and changes in peri-intestinal conditions. Vascular hyperaemia and arterial blood supply conditions at a specific obstruction site and the distal end of the obstruction site were evaluated through contrast-enhanced examination. RESULTS: The proportion of males to females among the 35 cases was 1:1.69 (13:22); median age was 63.3 years. The following cases were observed: 29 (82.8%) cases occurred in autumn and winter and showed a history of consuming high amounts of persimmon and hawthorn; 19 (54.3%) cases revealed a history of gastrointestinal surgery; 19 exhibited incomplete dentition, with missing partial or whole posterior teeth; 26 suffered from obstruction at the ileum. A total of 51 bezoars were found in these patients, of whom 16 (45.7%) had multiple bezoars. CT planar scanning of bezoars showed lumps with mottled gas inside the intestinal cavity. Furthermore, 9 cases of bezoars had envelopes and 11 cases

  9. Neuroscience discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past two decades, NASA's efforts in the neurosciences have developed into a program of research directed at understanding the acute changes that occur in the neurovestibular and sensorimotor systems during short-duration space missions. However, the proposed extended-duration flights of up to 28 days on the Shuttle orbiter and 6 months on Space Station Freedom, a lunar outpost, and Mars missions of perhaps 1-3 years in space, make it imperative that NASA's Life Sciences Division begin to concentrate research in the neurosciences on the chronic effects of exposure to microgravity on the nervous system. Major areas of research will be directed at understanding (1) central processing, (2) motor systems, (3) cognitive/spatial orientation, and (4) sensory receptors. The purpose of the Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of neurosciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of nervous system function. It contains a general plan that will be used by NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  10. Clinical Use of the Pediatric Attention Disorders Diagnostic Screener for Children at Risk for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Case Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiser, Ashley; Reddy, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The Pediatric Attention Disorders Diagnostic Screener is a multidimensional, computerized screening tool designed to assess attention and global aspects of executive functioning in children at risk for attention disorders. The screener consists of a semi-structured diagnostic interview, brief parent and teacher rating scales, 3 computer-based…

  11. Advancing the education in molecular diagnostics: the IFCC-Initiative "Clinical Molecular Biology Curriculum" (C-CMBC); a ten-year experience.

    PubMed

    Lianidou, Evi; Ahmad-Nejad, Parviz; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Izuhara, Kenji; Cremonesi, Laura; Schroeder, Maria-Eugenia; Richter, Karin; Ferrari, Maurizio; Neumaier, Michael

    2014-09-25

    Molecular techniques are becoming commonplace in the diagnostic laboratory. Their applications influence all major phases of laboratory medicine including predisposition/genetic risk, primary diagnosis, therapy stratification and prognosis. Readily available laboratory hardware and wetware (i.e. consumables and reagents) foster rapid dissemination to countries that are just establishing molecular testing programs. Appropriate skill levels extending beyond the technical procedure are required for analytical and diagnostic proficiency that is mandatory in molecular genetic testing. An international committee (C-CMBC) of the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) was established to disseminate skills in molecular genetic testing in member countries embarking on the respective techniques. We report the ten-year experience with different teaching and workshop formats for beginners in molecular diagnostics.

  12. Clinical reappraisal of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Santiago, Patcho N; Colpe, Lisa J; Dempsey, Catherine L; First, Michael B; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B; Fullerton, Carol S; Gruber, Michael J; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    A clinical reappraisal study was carried out in conjunction with the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) All-Army Study (AAS) to evaluate concordance of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnoses based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist (PCL) with diagnoses based on independent clinical reappraisal interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV [SCID]). Diagnoses included: lifetime mania/hypomania, panic disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder; six-month adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; and 30-day major depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and substance (alcohol or drug) use disorder (abuse or dependence). The sample (n = 460) was weighted for over-sampling CIDI-SC/PCL screened positives. Diagnostic thresholds were set to equalize false positives and false negatives. Good individual-level concordance was found between CIDI-SC/PCL and SCID diagnoses at these thresholds (area under curve [AUC] = 0.69-0.79). AUC was considerably higher for continuous than dichotomous screening scale scores (AUC = 0.80-0.90), arguing for substantive analyses using not only dichotomous case designations but also continuous measures of predicted probabilities of clinical diagnoses.

  13. How do clinicians actually use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in clinical practice and why we need to know more.

    PubMed

    First, Michael B; Bhat, Venkat; Adler, David; Dixon, Lisa; Goldman, Beth; Koh, Steve; Levine, Bruce; Oslin, David; Siris, Sam

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is explicitly stated as a goal for both the DSM Fourth Edition and DSM Fifth Edition (DSM-5) revisions. Many uses assume a relatively faithful application of the DSM diagnostic definitions. However, studies demonstrate significant discrepancies between clinical psychiatric diagnoses with those made using structured interviews suggesting that clinicians do not systematically apply the diagnostic criteria. The limited information regarding how clinicians actually use the DSM raises important questions: a) How can the clinical use be improved without first having a baseline assessment? b) How can potentially significant shifts in practice patterns based on wording changes be assessed without knowing the extent to which the criteria are used as written? Given the American Psychiatric Association's plans for interim revisions to the DSM-5, the value of a detailed exploration of its actual use in clinical practice remains a significant ongoing concern and deserves further study including a number of survey and in vivo studies.

  14. Diagnostic Intervals and Its Association with Breast, Prostate, Lung and Colorectal Cancer Survival in England: Historical Cohort Study Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Redaniel, Maria Theresa; Martin, Richard M.; Ridd, Matthew J.; Wade, Julia; Jeffreys, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic pathways for cancer have been implemented, but evidence whether shorter diagnostic intervals (time from primary care presentation to diagnosis) improves survival is lacking. Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we identified patients diagnosed with female breast (8,639), colorectal (5,912), lung (5,737) and prostate (1,763) cancers between 1998 and 2009, and aged >15 years. Presenting symptoms were classified as alert or non-alert, according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance. We used relative survival and excess risk modeling to determine associations between diagnostic intervals and five-year survival. The survival of patients with colorectal, lung and prostate cancer was greater in those with alert, compared with non-alert, symptoms, but findings were opposite for breast cancer. Longer diagnostic intervals were associated with lower mortality for colorectal and lung cancer patients with non-alert symptoms, (colorectal cancer: Excess Hazards Ratio, EHR >6 months vs <1 month: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72-1.00; Lung cancer: EHR 3-6 months vs <1 month: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80-0.95; EHR >6 months vs <1 month: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.74-0.89). Prostate cancer mortality was lower in patients with longer diagnostic intervals, regardless of type of presenting symptom. The association between diagnostic intervals and cancer survival is complex, and should take into account cancer site, tumour biology and clinical practice. Nevertheless, unnecessary delay causes patient anxiety and general practitioners should continue to refer patients with alert symptoms via the cancer pathways, and actively follow-up patients with non-alert symptoms in the community. PMID:25933397

  15. Concept of computer-assisted clinical diagnostic documentation systems for the practice with the option of later scientific evaluations.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, M O; Jaeger, D; Jakstat, H A

    2010-01-01

    Treatment data from practices and specialization centers, especially in the increasingly specialized areas which university clinics do not cover, are very important for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of dental examination and treatment methods. In the case of paper-based documentation, the evaluation of these data usually fails because of the cost it entails. With the use of electronic medical records, this expense can be markedly lower, provided the data acquisition and storage is structured accordingly. Since access to sensitive person-related data is simplified considerably by this method, such health data are protected, especially on the European level. Other than generally assumed, this protection is not restricted solely to the confidentiality principle, but also comprises the power of disposition over the data (data protection). The result is that from a legal point of view, the treatment data cannot be readily used for scientific studies, not even by dentists and physicians who have collected the data legally during the course of their therapeutic work. The technical separation of treatment data from the personal data offers a legally acceptable solution to this problem. It must ensure that a later assignment to individual persons will not be feasible at a realistic expense ("effective anonymization"). This article describes the legal and information technology principles and their practical implementation, as illustrated by the concept of a respective compliant IT architecture for the dentaConcept CMD fact diagnostic software. Here, a special export function automatically separates the anonymized treatment data and thus facilitates multicentric studies within an institution and among dental practices. PMID:20879462

  16. Examination of the Section III DSM-5 diagnostic system for personality disorders in an outpatient clinical sample

    PubMed Central

    Few, Lauren R.; Miller, Joshua D.; Rothbaum, Alex; Meller, Suzanne; Maples, Jessica; Terry, Douglas P.; Collins, Brittany; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    The DSM-5 includes a novel approach to the diagnosis of personality disorders (PDs) in Section III, in order to stimulate further research with the possibility that this proposal will be included more formally in future DSM iterations. The current study provides the first test of this proposal in a clinical sample by simultaneously examining its two primary components: a system for rating personality impairment and a newly developed dimensional model of pathological personality traits. Participants were community adults currently receiving outpatient mental health treatment who completed a semi-structured interview for DSM-IV PDs and were then rated in terms of personality impairment and pathological traits. Data on the pathological traits were also collected via self-reports using the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Both sets of trait scores were compared to self-report measures of general personality traits, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing behaviors. Inter-rater reliabilities for the clinicians’ ratings of impairment and the pathological traits were fair. The impairment ratings manifested substantial correlations with symptoms of depression and anxiety, DSM-5 PDs, and DSM-5 pathological traits. The clinician and self-reported personality trait scores demonstrated good convergence with one another, both accounted for substantial variance in DSM-IV PD constructs, and both manifested expected relations with the external criteria. The traits but not the impairment ratings demonstrated incremental validity in the prediction of the DSM-IV PDs. Overall, the current results support the general validity of several of the components of this new PD diagnostic system and point to areas that may require further modification. PMID:24364607

  17. Diagnostic Performance of Ultrasonography for Detection of Abruption and Its Clinical Correlation and Maternal and Foetal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Vaswani, Babita Prakash; Patange, R.P.; Laddad, Manisha Manish; Bhosale, Rajashree Babasaheb

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Placental abruption complicates about 1% of singleton pregnancies and is an important cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Though sensitivity and reliability of ultrasound are poor for detecting or excluding placental abruption, because of the advances in ultrasound resolution, imaging and interpretation, sensitivity of ultrasound is better than what was reported previously. Aim To determine the diagnostic performance of Ultrasonography (USG) for the detection of placental abruption and whether sonographic results correlate with maternal and foetal management and outcome. Materials and Methods Thirty patients with clinical diagnosis of placental abruption were studied in the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, over a period of 6 months. These patients underwent ultrasonography for confirmation. Obstetric and neonatal outcome and sonographic results were compared and reviewed. Sonographic sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Results Incidence of abruption in present study was 1.56% (28 patients out of 1786 total deliveries). Sensitivity of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of abruption was 57% (CI 37.15%-75.57%) while its specificity was 100% (CI 15.81%-100%) with a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 79.42%-100%) and a 14% (CI 1.78% - 42.83%) negative predictive value. An 87.5% of patients(14 out of 16) with a positive USG finding of abruption had Intrauterine foetal Death (IUD)/still birth while 91.6% of patients (11 out of 12) with negative USG findings of abruption gave birth to babies who required NICU admission. Conclusion Sonography is not sensitive for the detection of placental abruption but it is highly specific. Positive sonographic findings are associated with increased maternal morbidity, require more aggressive obstetric management and it is associated with worse perinatal outcome. In case of a negative USG finding, but a strong clinical

  18. Diagnostic tests in HIV management: a review of clinical and laboratory strategies to monitor HIV-infected individuals in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Goldie, Sue J.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review on the performance of diagnostic tests for clinical and laboratory monitoring of HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Diagnostic test information collected from computerized databases, bibliographies and the Internet were categorized as clinical (non-laboratory patient information), immunologic (information from immunologic laboratory tests), or virologic (information from virologic laboratory tests). Of the 51 studies selected for the review 28 assessed immunologic tests, 12 virologic tests and seven clinical and immunologic tests. Methods of performance evaluation were primarily sensitivity and specificity for the clinical category and correlation coefficients for immunologic and virologic categories. In the clinical category, the majority of test performance measures was reported as >70% sensitive and >65% specific. In the immunologic category, correlation coefficients ranged from r=0.54 to r=0.99 for different CD4 count enumeration techniques, while correlation for CD4 and total lymphocyte counts was between r=0.23 and r=0.74. In the virologic category, correlation coefficients for different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ribonucleic acid (RNA) quantification techniques ranged from r=0.54 to r=0.90. Future research requires consensus on designing studies, and collecting and reporting data useful for decision-makers. We recommend classifying information into clinically relevant categories, using a consistent definition of disease across studies and providing measures of both association and accuracy. PMID:16878233

  19. To what do psychiatric diagnoses refer? A two-dimensional semantic analysis of diagnostic terms.

    PubMed

    Maung, Hane Htut

    2016-02-01

    In somatic medicine, diagnostic terms often refer to the disease processes that are the causes of patients' symptoms. The language used in some clinical textbooks and health information resources suggests that this is also sometimes assumed to be the case with diagnoses in psychiatry. However, this seems to be in tension with the ways in which psychiatric diagnoses are defined in diagnostic manuals, according to which they refer solely to clusters of symptoms. This paper explores how theories of reference in the philosophy of language can help to resolve this tension. After the evaluation of descriptive and causal theories of reference, I put forward a conceptual framework based on two-dimensional semantics that allows the causal analysis of diagnostic terms in psychiatry, while taking seriously their descriptive definitions in diagnostic manuals. While the framework is presented as a solution to a problem regarding the semantics of psychiatric diagnoses, it can also accommodate the analysis of diagnostic terms in other medical disciplines.

  20. An Update on Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Not Just Café-au-Lait Spots, Freckling, and Neurofibromas. An Update. Part I. Dermatological Clinical Criteria Diagnostic of the Disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, A; Duat-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome and probably the one best known to dermatologists, who are generally the first physicians to suspect its diagnosis. Although the genetic locus of NF1 was identified on chromosome 17 in 1987, diagnosis of the disease is still mainly based on clinical observations and the diagnostic criteria of the National Institute of Health, dating from 1988. Cutaneous manifestations are particularly important because café-au-lait spots, freckling on flexural areas, and cutaneous neurofibromas comprise 3 of the 7 clinical diagnostic criteria. However, café-au-lait spots and freckling can also be present in other diseases. These manifestations are therefore not pathognomonic and are insufficient for definitive diagnosis in the early years of life. NF1 is a multisystemic disease associated with a predisposition to cancer. A multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary and dermatologists play an important role. PMID:26979265

  1. An Update on Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Not Just Café-au-Lait Spots, Freckling, and Neurofibromas. An Update. Part I. Dermatological Clinical Criteria Diagnostic of the Disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, A; Duat-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome and probably the one best known to dermatologists, who are generally the first physicians to suspect its diagnosis. Although the genetic locus of NF1 was identified on chromosome 17 in 1987, diagnosis of the disease is still mainly based on clinical observations and the diagnostic criteria of the National Institute of Health, dating from 1988. Cutaneous manifestations are particularly important because café-au-lait spots, freckling on flexural areas, and cutaneous neurofibromas comprise 3 of the 7 clinical diagnostic criteria. However, café-au-lait spots and freckling can also be present in other diseases. These manifestations are therefore not pathognomonic and are insufficient for definitive diagnosis in the early years of life. NF1 is a multisystemic disease associated with a predisposition to cancer. A multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary and dermatologists play an important role.

  2. Employee discipline: a changing paradigm.

    PubMed

    Raper, J L; Myaya, S N

    1993-12-01

    To increase the receptiveness of health care supervisors to a broader meaning of discipline and to simulate investigation of nontraditional methods of encouragement to employees who fail to meet minimum standards of conduct and thereby negatively affect the quality of patient care, a subjectively realistic view of the implications of the traditional punitive disciplinary paradigm is presented. Through the use of a case study, the authors present, explain, and apply the contemporary concept of discipline without punishment as first described by J. Huberman.

  3. JAK2 V617F in myeloid disorders: molecular diagnostic techniques and their clinical utility: a paper from the 2005 William Beaumont Hospital Symposium on Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2006-09-01

    In early 2005, several groups of investigators studying myeloid malignancies described a novel somatic point mutation (V617F) in the conserved autoinhibitory pseudokinase domain of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) protein, which plays an important role in normal hematopoietic growth factor signaling. The V617F mutation is present in blood and marrow from a large proportion of patients with classic BCR/ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders and of a few patients with other clonal hematological diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome, atypical myeloproliferative disorders, and acute myeloid leukemia. The JAK2 V617F mutation causes constitutive activation of the kinase, with deregulated intracellular signaling that mimics continuous hematopoietic growth factor stimulation. Within 7 months of the first electronic publication describing this new mutation, clinical molecular diagnostic laboratories in the United States and Europe began offering JAK2 mutation testing on a fee-for-service basis. Here, I review the various techniques used by research groups and clinical laboratories to detect the genetic mutation underlying JAK2 V617F, including fluorescent dye chemistry sequencing, allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR, DNA-melting curve analysis, pyrosequencing, and others. I also discuss diagnostic sensitivity, performance, and other practical concerns relevant to the clinical laboratorian in addition to the potential diagnostic utility of JAK2 mutation tests.

  4. Diagnostic performance of a rapid in-clinic test for the detection of Canine Parvovirus under different storage conditions and vaccination status.

    PubMed

    Kantere, Maria C; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Kontos, Vassilios; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios C; Tsokana, Constantina N; Billinis, Charalambos

    2015-04-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common causes of acute haemorrhagic enteritis in young dogs, while clinical diagnosis is often indecisive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an in-clinic rapid test in the detection of CPV infection in dogs. To this end, we compared the Rapid Diagnostic Kit of Canine Parvovirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus antigen (Quicking(®)) to PCR, which is considered as the most reliable diagnostic method. A total of 78 duplicated faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic dogs. Vaccination history within a month prior to the onset of diarrhoea was reported for 12 of the sampled dogs. The rapid diagnostic test was performed in 23 of the faecal samples directly, while the rest were placed into a sterile cotton tipped swab suitable for collection and transportation of viruses (Sigma Σ-VCM(®)) and stored at -20 °C. The sensitivity of the Quicking rapid diagnostic test compared to PCR in the total number of samples, in samples from non-vaccinated dogs and in samples tested directly after collection were 22.22% (95% CI: 13.27-33.57%), 26.67% (95% CI: 16.08-39.66%) and 76.47% (95% CI: 50.10-93.04%) respectively, while the specificity of the test was 100% in any case. In conclusion, negative results do not exclude parvoenteritis from the differential diagnosis, especially in dogs with early vaccination history, but a positive result almost certainly indicates CPV infection. An improved sensitivity may be expected when the test is performed immediately.

  5. Diagnostic performance of a rapid in-clinic test for the detection of Canine Parvovirus under different storage conditions and vaccination status.

    PubMed

    Kantere, Maria C; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Kontos, Vassilios; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios C; Tsokana, Constantina N; Billinis, Charalambos

    2015-04-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common causes of acute haemorrhagic enteritis in young dogs, while clinical diagnosis is often indecisive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an in-clinic rapid test in the detection of CPV infection in dogs. To this end, we compared the Rapid Diagnostic Kit of Canine Parvovirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus antigen (Quicking(®)) to PCR, which is considered as the most reliable diagnostic method. A total of 78 duplicated faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic dogs. Vaccination history within a month prior to the onset of diarrhoea was reported for 12 of the sampled dogs. The rapid diagnostic test was performed in 23 of the faecal samples directly, while the rest were placed into a sterile cotton tipped swab suitable for collection and transportation of viruses (Sigma Σ-VCM(®)) and stored at -20 °C. The sensitivity of the Quicking rapid diagnostic test compared to PCR in the total number of samples, in samples from non-vaccinated dogs and in samples tested directly after collection were 22.22% (95% CI: 13.27-33.57%), 26.67% (95% CI: 16.08-39.66%) and 76.47% (95% CI: 50.10-93.04%) respectively, while the specificity of the test was 100% in any case. In conclusion, negative results do not exclude parvoenteritis from the differential diagnosis, especially in dogs with early vaccination history, but a positive result almost certainly indicates CPV infection. An improved sensitivity may be expected when the test is performed immediately. PMID:25707551

  6. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications: Recommendations of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network* and Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group†

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond; Look, John; Anderson, Gary; Goulet, Jean-Paul; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Gonzalez, Yoly; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambra; Brooks, Sharon L.; Ceusters, Werner; Drangsholt, Mark; Ettlin, Dominik; Gaul, Charly; Goldberg, Louis J.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hollender, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T.; De Laat, Antoon; de Leeuw, Reny; Maixner, William; van der Meulen, Marylee; Murray, Greg M.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Palla, Sandro; Petersson, Arne; Pionchon, Paul; Smith, Barry; Visscher, Corine M.; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Dworkin, Samuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. Methods Through a series of workshops and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I diagnostic algorithms were assessed for validity by using the Validation Project's data set, and for reliability by using newly collected data from the ongoing TMJ Impact Project—the follow-up study to the Validation Project. New Axis II instruments were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature providing valid instruments that, relative to the RDC/TMD, are shorter in length, are available in the public domain, and currently are being used in medical settings. Results The newly recommended Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) Axis I protocol includes both a valid screener for detecting any pain-related TMD as well as valid diagnostic criteria for differentiating the most common pain-related TMD (sensitivity ≥ 0.86, specificity ≥ 0

  7. Clinical reappraisal of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Santiago, Patcho N.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Dempsey, Catherine L.; First, Michael B.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gruber, Michael J.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A clinical reappraisal study was carried out in conjunction with the Army STARRS All-Army Study (AAS) to evaluate concordance of DSM-IV diagnoses based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview screening scales (CIDI-SC) and PTSD Checklist (PCL) with diagnoses based on independent clinical reappraisal interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV [SCID]). Diagnoses included: lifetime mania/hypomania, panic disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder; 6-month adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; and 30-day major depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and substance (alcohol or drug) use disorder (abuse or dependence). The sample (n=460) was weighted for over-sampling CIDI-SC/PCL screened positives. Diagnostic thresholds were set to equalize false positives and false negatives. Good individual-level concordance was found between CIDI-SC/PCL and SCID diagnoses at these thresholds (AUC = .69–.79). AUC was considerably higher for continuous than dichotomous screening scale scores (AUC = .80–.90), arguing for substantive analyses using not only dichotomous case designations but also continuous measures of predicted probabilities of clinical diagnoses. PMID:24318219

  8. Diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography in confirming clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy: comparison with B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Schneider, Michal Elisabeth; Malliaras, Peter; Chadwick, Martine; Connell, David Alister

    2015-01-01

    This primary aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography (ASE), B-mode ultrasound (US) and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy. The secondary aim was to establish the relationship between the strain ratio during sonoelastography and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores. The VISA-A questionnaire is a validated clinical rating scale that evaluates the symptoms and dysfunction of the Achilles tendon. One hundred twenty Achilles tendons of 120 consecutively registered patients with clinical symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy and another 120 gender- and age-matched, asymptomatic Achilles tendons of 120 healthy volunteers were assessed with B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US. Symptomatic patients had significantly higher strain ratio scores and softer Achilles tendon properties compared with controls (p < 0.001). The strain ratio was moderately correlated with VISA-A scores (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy was 94.7%, 97.8% and 82.5% respectively. There was excellent correlation between the clinical reference standard and the grade of tendon quality on ASE (κ = 0.91, p < 0.05), compared with B-mode US (κ = 0.74, p < 0.05) and color Doppler imaging (κ = 0.49, p < 0.05). ASE is an accurate clinical tool in the evaluation of Achilles tendinopathy, with results comparable to those of B-mode US and excellent correlation with clinical findings. The strain ratio may offer promise as a supplementary tool for the objective evaluation of Achilles tendon properties.

  9. ["Psychological employees" in psychiatry. The establishment of clinical psychology at the example of Lilo Süllwolds diagnostic efforts to incipient schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Rzesnitzek, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Lilo Süllwold (*1930) was the first psychologist in the German Federal Republic to acquire habilitation for Clinical Psychology at a Medical Faculty. However, she had already been appointed professor for Clinical Psychology following to a new University Act implementing the recommendations of the National Council of Science and Humanities. Her habilitation treatise to justify the initial professorship appointment centered on a self-made questionnaire as a diagnostic tool for beginning schizophrenia. The manner how the questionnaire together with the politico-scientific structural changes at the German Federal universities endowed the young psychologist with a carrier in psychiatry, is an illuminating example of psychology's way into psychiatry: the institutionalization and professionalization of Clinical Psychology in psychiatry since the end of the 1950s up to the end of the 1970s. In a comparative perspective on the developments of Clinical Psychology in the German Democratic Republic, the example demonstrates not only the role of new psychological theories und methods in research and clinic in enabling the entry of the new profession into psychiatry, but also the importance of initial socio-economic and socio-politic frame conditions and decisions. The negotiation of the scope or limits of competences between doctors and psychologists created more than a professional niche inside the clinic; it changed psychiatry and psychology as academic branches in their structures due to the establishment of new Clinical Psychology departments. The role of the psychologist turned from a doctor's "assistant" into a colleague at "eye level".

  10. [The potential of the modern methods for clinical diagnostics applied in the forensic medical assessment of functional disturbances of the ankle joint in the case of its injury].

    PubMed

    Khabova, Z S; Fetisov, V A

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is focused on the problems of clinical diagnostics of the functional disturbances in the locomotor apparatus as exemplified by the injuries to the ankle joint. The results of analysis of the entire range of up-to-date diagnostic tools for the purpose suggest the necessity of revision of obsolete methodological principles still adopted in forensic medicine as regards the problem being condidered. It is proposed based on the recent progress achieved by the specialists in traumatology, orthopedics, medicosocial expertise, and the related areas that a forensic medical expert should not confine oneself to the consideration of the sole criterion, such as "the range of articular movements", for the estimation of the severity of harm to health in the patients presenting with a joint injury.

  11. What kind of discipline is psychoanalysis?

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Current controversies involving clinical, conceptual and empirical research shed light on how psychoanalysis confronts its nature and its future. Some relevant debates in which Wallerstein, Green, Hoffman, Eagle and Wolitzky, Safran, Stern, Blass and Carmeli, and Panksepp have participated are examined regarding the characteristics of their argumentation. Agreements and disagreements are explored to find ways that could have allowed the discussion to progress. Two foci are highlighted in these debates: (a) whether a clinical common ground exists in psychoanalysis and what kind of procedure could contribute to further clarification; (b) complementation of in-clinical and extra-clinical evidence. Both aspects are scrutinized: the possibility of complementing diverse methodologies, and the nature of the shared clinical evidence examined in clinical discussion groups such as those promoted by the IPA Clinical Observation Committee. The importance of triangulation and consilience is brought to bear regarding their contribution to the robustness of psychoanalysis. So as to strengthen a critical perspective that enhances the discipline's argumentative field, psychoanalysis should take into account arguments from different sources according to their specific merits. By doing this, psychoanalysis increases its relevance within the current interdisciplinary dialogue. PMID:26173887

  12. What kind of discipline is psychoanalysis?

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Current controversies involving clinical, conceptual and empirical research shed light on how psychoanalysis confronts its nature and its future. Some relevant debates in which Wallerstein, Green, Hoffman, Eagle and Wolitzky, Safran, Stern, Blass and Carmeli, and Panksepp have participated are examined regarding the characteristics of their argumentation. Agreements and disagreements are explored to find ways that could have allowed the discussion to progress. Two foci are highlighted in these debates: (a) whether a clinical common ground exists in psychoanalysis and what kind of procedure could contribute to further clarification; (b) complementation of in-clinical and extra-clinical evidence. Both aspects are scrutinized: the possibility of complementing diverse methodologies, and the nature of the shared clinical evidence examined in clinical discussion groups such as those promoted by the IPA Clinical Observation Committee. The importance of triangulation and consilience is brought to bear regarding their contribution to the robustness of psychoanalysis. So as to strengthen a critical perspective that enhances the discipline's argumentative field, psychoanalysis should take into account arguments from different sources according to their specific merits. By doing this, psychoanalysis increases its relevance within the current interdisciplinary dialogue.

  13. Bayesian evaluation of clinical diagnostic test characteristics of visual observations and remote monitoring to diagnose bovine respiratory disease in beef calves.

    PubMed

    White, Brad J; Goehl, Dan R; Amrine, David E; Booker, Calvin; Wildman, Brian; Perrett, Tye

    2016-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle is a critical facet of therapeutic programs through promotion of prompt treatment of diseased calves in concert with judicious use of antimicrobials. Despite the known inaccuracies, visual observation (VO) of clinical signs is the conventional diagnostic modality for BRD diagnosis. Objective methods of remotely monitoring cattle wellness could improve diagnostic accuracy; however, little information exists describing the accuracy of this method compared to traditional techniques. The objective of this research is to employ Bayesian methodology to elicit diagnostic characteristics of conventional VO compared to remote early disease identification (REDI) to diagnose BRD. Data from previous literature on the accuracy of VO were combined with trial data consisting of direct comparison between VO and REDI for BRD in two populations. No true gold standard diagnostic test exists for BRD; therefore, estimates of diagnostic characteristics of each test were generated using Bayesian latent class analysis. Results indicate a 90.0% probability that the sensitivity of REDI (median 81.3%; 95% probability interval [PI]: 55.5, 95.8) was higher than VO sensitivity (64.5%; PI: 57.9, 70.8). The specificity of REDI (median 92.9%; PI: 88.2, 96.9) was also higher compared to VO (median 69.1%; PI: 66.3, 71.8). The differences in sensitivity and specificity resulted in REDI exhibiting higher positive and negative predictive values in both high (41.3%) and low (2.6%) prevalence situations. This research illustrates the potential of remote cattle monitoring to augment conventional methods of BRD diagnosis resulting in more accurate identification of diseased cattle. PMID:26879058

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Coronary Angiography in Symptomatic Patients Presenting to a Referral Cardiovascular Center During Daily Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Arash; Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Joodi, Golsa; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza; Sheikholeslami, Farhad; Motevalli, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background There are numerous studies that address the diagnostic value of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) as an alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA). However, the benefit of application of DSCT in a real world clinical setting should be evaluated. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of DSCT technique compared with CCA as the gold standard method in detection of coronary artery stenosis among symptomatic patients who are presented to a referral cardiovascular center during daily clinical practice. Patients and Methods Evaluating the medical records of a tertiary care referral cardiovascular center, 47 patients who had undergone DSCT and CCA, and also met the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study were selected. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and likelihood ratios (LRs) of the DSCT imaging technique were calculated. Results In total, 97.8% of the segments (628/642) could be visualized with diagnostic image quality via DSCT coronary angiography. The mean heart rate during DSCT was 69.2 ± 12.2 bpm (range: 39 - 83 bpm), and the mean Agatston score was 507.7 ± 590.5 (range: 0 - 2328). Per segment analysis of the findings revealed that the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, positive LR (PLR) and negative LR (NLR) of DSCT technique for evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease were 93.7%, 96.8%, 92.7%, 97.2%, 29.4, and 0.066, respectively. Also per vessel, analysis of the findings showed a sensitivity of 97.1%, a specificity of 94.0%, PPV of 95.3%, NPV of 96.3%, PLR of 16.1, and NLR of 0.030. Conclusion Our results indicate that DSCT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy for the evaluation of CAD patients during daily routine practice of a referral cardiovascular setting.

  15. Transformational leadership and the employee discipline process.

    PubMed

    Haddock, C C

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses what is meant by the term "transformational leadership" and suggests a method of employee discipline consistent with the transformational leadership concept. This nonpunitive method of employee discipline, called discipline without punishment, encourages worker commitment and facilitates transformational leadership. A description of the philosophy and procedures of discipline without punishment is presented, and potential advantages to employers are outlined.

  16. 28 CFR 541.5 - Discipline process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discipline process. 541.5 Section 541.5 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Inmate Discipline Program § 541.5 Discipline process. (a) Incident...

  17. 28 CFR 541.5 - Discipline process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discipline process. 541.5 Section 541.5 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Inmate Discipline Program § 541.5 Discipline process. (a) Incident...

  18. 28 CFR 541.5 - Discipline process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discipline process. 541.5 Section 541.5 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Inmate Discipline Program § 541.5 Discipline process. (a) Incident...

  19. 28 CFR 541.5 - Discipline process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discipline process. 541.5 Section 541.5 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Inmate Discipline Program § 541.5 Discipline process. (a) Incident...

  20. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: nursing discipline.

    PubMed

    Landier, Wendy; Leonard, Marcia; Ruccione, Kathleen S

    2013-06-01

    Integration of the nursing discipline within cooperative groups conducting pediatric oncology clinical trials provides unique opportunities to maximize nursing's contribution to clinical care, and to pursue research questions that extend beyond cure of disease to address important gaps in knowledge surrounding the illness experience. Key areas of importance to the advancement of the nursing discipline's scientific knowledge are understanding the effective delivery of patient/family education, and reducing illness-related distress, both of which are integral to facilitating parental/child coping with the diagnosis and treatment of childhood cancer, and to promoting resilience and well-being of pediatric oncology patients and their families.