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Sample records for clinical dna histogram

  1. Similarity Estimation Between DNA Sequences Based on Local Pattern Histograms of Binary Images.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Yusei; Mizuta, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Graphical representation of DNA sequences is one of the most popular techniques for alignment-free sequence comparison. Here, we propose a new method for the feature extraction of DNA sequences represented by binary images, by estimating the similarity between DNA sequences using the frequency histograms of local bitmap patterns of images. Our method shows linear time complexity for the length of DNA sequences, which is practical even when long sequences, such as whole genome sequences, are compared. We tested five distance measures for the estimation of sequence similarities, and found that the histogram intersection and Manhattan distance are the most appropriate ones for phylogenetic analyses.

  2. Improved DNA content histograms from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissue by proteinase K digestion.

    PubMed

    Albro, J; Bauer, K D; Hitchcock, C L; Wittwer, C T

    1993-01-01

    An improved method for the enzymatic digestion of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissue for DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is presented. Forty samples of histologically normal liver were alternately digested by the traditional pepsin method or a new method utilizing proteinase K and heat. Sixteen (40%) of the pepsin-digested samples had apparent DNA aneuploid peaks by flow cytometry. False DNA aneuploid peaks were not present in any of the histograms obtained after proteinase K digestion. Microscopy showed that the pepsin-digested samples had residual cytoplasmic remnants which contained fluorescent material. Samples digested with proteinase K had few cytoplasmic remnants. The average G0/G1 coefficient of variation after proteinase K treatment was lower (41%) and the fluorescent intensity higher (128%) than the pepsin-treated samples. The apparent mean S-phase (a combination of S-phase cells and underlying debris) after proteinase K digestion was 35% of the pepsin-treated samples. Primary and secondary tumors of the liver that were DNA aneuploid after pepsin treatment were also DNA aneuploid after proteinase K treatment. A modified digestion protocol utilizing proteinase K and heat can provide superior results for DNA content analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissue.

  3. Identification of column edges of DNA fragments by using K-means clustering and mean algorithm on lane histograms of DNA agarose gel electrophoresis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, Muhammed K.; Sehirli, Eftal; Elen, Abdullah; Karas, Ismail R.

    2015-07-01

    Gel electrophoresis (GE) is one of the most used method to separate DNA, RNA, protein molecules according to size, weight and quantity parameters in many areas such as genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology. The main way to separate each molecule is to find borders of each molecule fragment. This paper presents a software application that show columns edges of DNA fragments in 3 steps. In the first step the application obtains lane histograms of agarose gel electrophoresis images by doing projection based on x-axis. In the second step, it utilizes k-means clustering algorithm to classify point values of lane histogram such as left side values, right side values and undesired values. In the third step, column edges of DNA fragments is shown by using mean algorithm and mathematical processes to separate DNA fragments from the background in a fully automated way. In addition to this, the application presents locations of DNA fragments and how many DNA fragments exist on images captured by a scientific camera.

  4. Comparative study of old and new versions of treatment planning system using dose volume histogram indices of clinical plans.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Gangarapu Sri; Srinivas, Vuppu; Ayyangar, K M; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) version 8.8 was upgraded to the latest version 13.6. It is customary that the vendor gives training on how to upgrade the existing software to the new version. However, the customer is provided less inner details about changes in the new software version. According to manufacturer, accuracy of point dose calculations and irregular treatment planning is better in the new version (13.6) compared to the old version (8.8). Furthermore, the new version uses voxel-based calculations while the earlier version used point dose calculations. Major difference in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans was observed between the two versions after re-optimization and re-calculations. However, minor difference was observed for IMRT cases after performing only re-calculations. It is recommended TPS quality assurance to be performed after any major upgrade of software. This can be done by performing dose calculation comparisons in TPS. To assess the difference between the versions, 25 clinical cases from the old version were compared keeping all the patient data intact including the monitor units and comparing the differences in dose calculations using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Along with DVH analysis, uniformity index, conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose spillage index were also compared for both versions. The results of comparative study are presented in this paper. PMID:27651566

  5. Comparative study of old and new versions of treatment planning system using dose volume histogram indices of clinical plans

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Gangarapu Sri; Srinivas, Vuppu; Ayyangar, K. M.; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) version 8.8 was upgraded to the latest version 13.6. It is customary that the vendor gives training on how to upgrade the existing software to the new version. However, the customer is provided less inner details about changes in the new software version. According to manufacturer, accuracy of point dose calculations and irregular treatment planning is better in the new version (13.6) compared to the old version (8.8). Furthermore, the new version uses voxel-based calculations while the earlier version used point dose calculations. Major difference in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans was observed between the two versions after re-optimization and re-calculations. However, minor difference was observed for IMRT cases after performing only re-calculations. It is recommended TPS quality assurance to be performed after any major upgrade of software. This can be done by performing dose calculation comparisons in TPS. To assess the difference between the versions, 25 clinical cases from the old version were compared keeping all the patient data intact including the monitor units and comparing the differences in dose calculations using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Along with DVH analysis, uniformity index, conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose spillage index were also compared for both versions. The results of comparative study are presented in this paper. PMID:27651566

  6. Comparative study of old and new versions of treatment planning system using dose volume histogram indices of clinical plans

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Gangarapu Sri; Srinivas, Vuppu; Ayyangar, K. M.; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) version 8.8 was upgraded to the latest version 13.6. It is customary that the vendor gives training on how to upgrade the existing software to the new version. However, the customer is provided less inner details about changes in the new software version. According to manufacturer, accuracy of point dose calculations and irregular treatment planning is better in the new version (13.6) compared to the old version (8.8). Furthermore, the new version uses voxel-based calculations while the earlier version used point dose calculations. Major difference in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans was observed between the two versions after re-optimization and re-calculations. However, minor difference was observed for IMRT cases after performing only re-calculations. It is recommended TPS quality assurance to be performed after any major upgrade of software. This can be done by performing dose calculation comparisons in TPS. To assess the difference between the versions, 25 clinical cases from the old version were compared keeping all the patient data intact including the monitor units and comparing the differences in dose calculations using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Along with DVH analysis, uniformity index, conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose spillage index were also compared for both versions. The results of comparative study are presented in this paper.

  7. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Clinical Factors Associated With Pleural Effusion After Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Murata, Kazutoshi; Satoh, Yumi; Higuchi, Keiko; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical factors as predictors of pleural effusion in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-three esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT from January 2001 to March 2007 were reviewed retrospectively on the basis of the following criteria: pathologically confirmed esophageal cancer, available computed tomography scan for treatment planning, 6-month follow-up after CRT, and radiation dose {>=}50 Gy. Exclusion criteria were lung metastasis, malignant pleural effusion, and surgery. Mean heart dose, mean total lung dose, and percentages of heart or total lung volume receiving {>=}10-60 Gy (Heart-V{sub 10} to V{sub 60} and Lung-V{sub 10} to V{sub 60}, respectively) were analyzed in relation to pleural effusion. Results: The median follow-up time was 26.9 months (range, 6.7-70.2) after CRT. Of the 43 patients, 15 (35%) developed pleural effusion. By univariate analysis, mean heart dose, Heart-V{sub 10} to V{sub 60}, and Lung-V{sub 50} to V{sub 60} were significantly associated with pleural effusion. Poor performance status, primary tumor of the distal esophagus, and age {>=}65 years were significantly related with pleural effusion. Multivariate analysis identified Heart-V{sub 50} as the strongest predictive factor for pleural effusion (p = 0.01). Patients with Heart-V{sub 50} <20%, 20%{<=} Heart-V{sub 50} <40%, and Heart-V{sub 50} {>=}40% had 6%, 44%, and 64% of pleural effusion, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Heart-V{sub 50} is a useful parameter for assessing the risk of pleural effusion and should be reduced to avoid pleural effusion.

  8. Structure Size Enhanced Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Kirschner, Matthias

    Direct volume visualization requires the definition of transfer functions (TFs) for the assignment of opacity and color. Multi-dimensional TFs are based on at least two image properties, and are specified by means of 2D histograms. In this work we propose a new type of a 2D histogram which combines gray value with information about the size of the structures. This structure size enhanced (SSE) histogram is an intuitive approach for representing anatomical features. Clinicians — the users we are focusing on — are much more familiar with selecting features by their size than by their gradient magnitude value. As a proof of concept, we employ the SSE histogram for the definition of two-dimensional TFs for the visualization of 3D MRI and CT image data.

  9. Human clinical trials of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Margaret A; Ulmer, Jeffrey B

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of DNA vaccines with specific emphasis on the development of DNA vaccines for clinical trials and an overview of those trials. It describes the preclinical research that demonstrated the efficacy of DNA vaccines as well as an explication of the immunologic mechanisms of action. These include the induction of cognate immune responses, such as the generation of cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) as well as the effect of the plasmid DNA upon the innate immune system. Specific issues related to the development of DNA as a product candidate are then discussed, including the manufacture of plasmid, the qualification of the plasmid DNA product, and the safety testing necessary for initiating clinical trials. Various human clinical trials for infectious diseases and cancer have been initiated or completed, and an overview of these trials is given. Finally, because the early clinical trials have shown less than optimal immunogenicity, methods to increase the potency of the vaccines are described. PMID:16291211

  10. The Histogram-Area Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratzer, William; Carpenter, James E.

    2008-01-01

    This article demonstrates an alternative approach to the construction of histograms--one based on the notion of using area to represent relative density in intervals of unequal length. The resulting histograms illustrate the connection between the area of the rectangles associated with particular outcomes and the relative frequency (probability)…

  11. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  12. Recent advances towards the clinical application of DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bins, A D; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Haanen, J B A G

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccination is an attractive method for therapeutic vaccination against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This review provides an introduction into the DNA vaccination field and discusses the pre-clinical successes and most interesting clinical achievements thus far. Furthermore, general attributes, mechanism of action and safety of DNA vaccination will be discussed. Since clinical results with DNA vaccination so far show room for improvement, possibilities to improve the delivery and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are reviewed. In the coming years, these new developments should show whether DNA vaccination is able to induce clinically relevant responses in patients.

  13. Clinical implications of sperm DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sheena E M; Simon, Luke

    2010-12-01

    Traditionally, the diagnosis of male infertility has relied upon microscopic assessment and biochemical assays to determine human semen quality. These tests are essential to provide the fundamental information on which clinicians base their initial diagnosis. However, none of these parameters addresses sperm function and their clinical value in predicting fertility is questionable. The advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has further reduced the significance and perceived need for sperm quality tests since ICSI requires only one sperm for the procedure to be successful. Even the conventional measures of sperm quality in terms of normal morphology or motility are not necessary for successful ICSI. Funding of andrological research has been neglected and improvement in assisted reproductive technology (ART) success has suffered as a consequence. Testing of sperm DNA damage shows much promise both as a diagnostic test for male infertility and a prognostic test for ART outcomes. It has been shown to be closely associated with numerous fertility outcomes including negative relationships with fertilization, embryo quality, implantation and positive relationships with miscarriage and childhood diseases. Here we report the relationships between in vitro fertilisation, ICSI pregnancy rates and sperm DNA damage, using the Comet assay to measure DNA fragmentation and also a novel test to measure modified bases, as a indication of oxidative DNA injury.

  14. CHICOM: A code of tests for comparing unweighted and weighted histograms and two weighted histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagunashvili, N. D.

    2012-01-01

    A Fortran-77 program for calculating test statistics to compare weighted histogram with an unweighted histogram and two histograms with weighted entries is presented. The code calculates test statistics for cases of histograms with normalized weights of events and unnormalized weights of events.

  15. An Improved Model for Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis Incorporating Clinical and Dosimetric Variables;Lung cancer; Radiation pneumonitis; Dose-volume histogram; Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Watts, Joanne

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Single dose-volume metrics are of limited value for the prediction of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in day-to-day clinical practice. We investigated whether multiparametric models that incorporate clinical and physiologic factors might have improved accuracy. Methods and Materials: The records of 160 patients who received radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer were reviewed. All patients were treated to the same dose and with an identical technique. Dosimetric, pulmonary function, and clinical parameters were analyzed to determine their ability to predict for the subsequent development of RP. Results: Twenty-seven patients (17%) developed RP. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with the risk of pneumonitis: fractional volume of lung receiving >5-20 Gy, absolute volume of lung spared from receiving >5-15 Gy, mean lung dose, craniocaudal position of the isocenter, transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (KCOc), total lung capacity, coadministration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and coadministration of angiotensin receptor antagonists. By combining the absolute volume of lung spared from receiving >5 Gy with the KCOc, we defined a new parameter termed Transfer Factor Spared from receiving >5 Gy (TFS{sub 5}). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for TFS{sub 5} was 0.778, increasing to 0.846 if patients receiving modulators of the renin-angiotensin system were excluded from the analysis. Patients with a TFS{sub 5} <2.17 mmol/min/kPa had a risk of RP of 30% compared with 5% for the group with a TFS{sub 5} {>=}2.17. Conclusions: TFS{sub 5} represents a simple parameter that can be used in routine clinical practice to more accurately segregate patients into high- and low-risk groups for developing RP.

  16. Quantitative histogram analysis of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Oliver; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2006-11-01

    A routine for histogram analysis of images has been written in the object-oriented, graphical development environment LabVIEW. The program converts an RGB bitmap image into an intensity-linear greyscale image according to selectable conversion coefficients. This greyscale image is subsequently analysed by plots of the intensity histogram and probability distribution of brightness, and by calculation of various parameters, including average brightness, standard deviation, variance, minimal and maximal brightness, mode, skewness and kurtosis of the histogram and the median of the probability distribution. The program allows interactive selection of specific regions of interest (ROI) in the image and definition of lower and upper threshold levels (e.g., to permit the removal of a constant background signal). The results of the analysis of multiple images can be conveniently saved and exported for plotting in other programs, which allows fast analysis of relatively large sets of image data. The program file accompanies this manuscript together with a detailed description of two application examples: The analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, specifically of tau-immunofluorescence in primary cultures of rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and the quantification of protein bands by Western-blot. The possibilities and limitations of this kind of analysis are discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: HAWGC Catalogue identifier: ADXG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXG_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Mobile Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron Installations: No installation necessary—Executable file together with necessary files for LabVIEW Run-time engine Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: WindowsME/2000/XP Programming language used: LabVIEW 7.0 Memory required to execute with typical data:˜16MB for starting and ˜160MB used for

  17. Transposon leads to contamination of clinical pDNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, I; Gomez-Eerland, R; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2013-07-11

    We report an unexpected contamination during clinical manufacture of a Human Papilomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine, with a transposon originating from the Escherichia coli DH5 host cell genome. During processing, presence of this transposable element, insertion sequence 2 (IS2) in the plasmid vector was not noticed until quality control of the bulk pDNA vaccine when results of restriction digestion, sequencing, and CGE analysis were clearly indicative for the presence of a contaminant. Due to the very low level of contamination, only an insert-specific PCR method was capable of tracing back the presence of the transposon in the source pDNA and master cell bank (MCB). Based on the presence of an uncontrolled contamination with unknown clinical relevance, the product was rejected for clinical use. In order to prevent costly rejection of clinical material, both in-process controls and quality control methods must be sensitive enough to detect such a contamination as early as possible, i.e. preferably during plasmid DNA source generation, MCB production and ultimately during upstream processing. However, as we have shown that contamination early in the process development pipeline (source pDNA, MCB) can be present below limits of detection of generally applied analytical methods, the introduction of "engineered" or transposon-free host cells seems the only 100% effective solution to avoid contamination with movable elements and should be considered when searching for a suitable host cell-vector combination. PMID:23707695

  18. Interpreting Histograms. As Easy as It Seems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Histograms are widely used, but recent studies have shown that they are not as easy to interpret as it might seem. In this article, we report on three studies on the interpretation of histograms in which we investigated, namely, (1) whether the misinterpretation by university students can be considered to be the result of heuristic reasoning, (2)…

  19. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  20. Clinical potential of DNA methylation in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Fleur S; Manintveld, Olivier C; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Boer, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Identification of patients at risk for post-transplant complications is a major challenge, but it will improve clinical care and patient health after organ transplantation. The poor predictive value of the current biomarkers highlights the need to explore novel and innovative methods, such as epigenetics, for the discovery of new biomarkers. Cell differentiation and function of immune cells is dependent on epigenetic mechanisms, which regulate gene expression without altering the original DNA sequence. These epigenetic mechanisms are dynamic, potentially heritable, change with age, and can be regulated and influenced by environmental conditions. One of the most well-known epigenetic mechanisms is DNA methylation, which comprises the methylation of a cytosine (C) next to a guanine (G; CpG dinucleotides). Aberrant DNA methylation is increasingly associated with disease, including immune-mediated diseases, and these alterations precede the clinical phenotype. The impact of DNA methylation profiles on transplant acceptance and rejection as well as on other post-transplant complications is unknown. In this study we examine the current evidence of the functional role of recipient and donor DNA methylation on outcome after organ transplantation. Changes in DNA methylation may predict the risk of developing post-transplant complications, such as infections, malignancies and allograft rejection. We speculate that identification of these changes in DNA methylation contributes to earlier diagnosis and prevention of post-transplant complications, leading to improved patient care. PMID:27085975

  1. Clinical potential of DNA methylation in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Fleur S; Manintveld, Olivier C; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Boer, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Identification of patients at risk for post-transplant complications is a major challenge, but it will improve clinical care and patient health after organ transplantation. The poor predictive value of the current biomarkers highlights the need to explore novel and innovative methods, such as epigenetics, for the discovery of new biomarkers. Cell differentiation and function of immune cells is dependent on epigenetic mechanisms, which regulate gene expression without altering the original DNA sequence. These epigenetic mechanisms are dynamic, potentially heritable, change with age, and can be regulated and influenced by environmental conditions. One of the most well-known epigenetic mechanisms is DNA methylation, which comprises the methylation of a cytosine (C) next to a guanine (G; CpG dinucleotides). Aberrant DNA methylation is increasingly associated with disease, including immune-mediated diseases, and these alterations precede the clinical phenotype. The impact of DNA methylation profiles on transplant acceptance and rejection as well as on other post-transplant complications is unknown. In this study we examine the current evidence of the functional role of recipient and donor DNA methylation on outcome after organ transplantation. Changes in DNA methylation may predict the risk of developing post-transplant complications, such as infections, malignancies and allograft rejection. We speculate that identification of these changes in DNA methylation contributes to earlier diagnosis and prevention of post-transplant complications, leading to improved patient care.

  2. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  3. Pilot study in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma with 3D image-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using modified Heyman packing: Clinical experience and dose-volume histogram analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Weitmann, Hajo Dirk . E-mail: dirk.weitmann@akhwien.at; Poetter, Richard; Waldhaeusl, Claudia; Nechvile, Elisabeth; Kirisits, Christian; Knocke, Tomas Hendrik

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate dose distribution within uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]) and tumor (gross tumor volume [GTV]) and the resulting clinical outcome based on systematic three-dimensional treatment planning with dose-volume adaptation. Dose-volume assessment and adaptation in organs at risk and its impact on side effects were investigated in parallel. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with either locally confined endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) or adenocarcinoma of uterus and ovaries after bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n = 1) were included. Heyman packing was performed with mean 11 Norman-Simon applicators (3-18). Three-dimensional treatment planning based on computed tomography (n = 29) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 18) was done in all patients with contouring of CTV, GTV, and organs at risk. Dose-volume adaptation was achieved by dwell location and time variation (intensity modulation). Twelve patients treated with curative intent received five to seven fractions of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (7 Gy per fraction) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy per fraction and {alpha}/{beta} of 10 Gy) to the CTV. Four patients had additional external beam radiotherapy (range, 10-40 Gy). One patient had salvage brachytherapy and 3 patients were treated with palliative intent. A dose-volume histogram analysis was performed in all patients. On average, 68% of the CTV and 92% of the GTV were encompassed by the 60 Gy reference volume. Median minimum dose to 90% of CTV and GTV (D90) was 35.3 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. Results: All patients treated with curative intent had complete remission (12/12). After a median follow-up of 47 months, 5 patients are alive without tumor. Seven patients died without tumor from intercurrent disease after median 22 months. The patient with salvage treatment had a second local recurrence after 27 months and died of endometrial carcinoma after 57 months. In patients treated with palliative

  4. Network histograms and universality of blockmodel approximation

    PubMed Central

    Olhede, Sofia C.; Wolfe, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the network histogram, a statistical summary of network interactions to be used as a tool for exploratory data analysis. A network histogram is obtained by fitting a stochastic blockmodel to a single observation of a network dataset. Blocks of edges play the role of histogram bins and community sizes that of histogram bandwidths or bin sizes. Just as standard histograms allow for varying bandwidths, different blockmodel estimates can all be considered valid representations of an underlying probability model, subject to bandwidth constraints. Here we provide methods for automatic bandwidth selection, by which the network histogram approximates the generating mechanism that gives rise to exchangeable random graphs. This makes the blockmodel a universal network representation for unlabeled graphs. With this insight, we discuss the interpretation of network communities in light of the fact that many different community assignments can all give an equally valid representation of such a network. To demonstrate the fidelity-versus-interpretability tradeoff inherent in considering different numbers and sizes of communities, we analyze two publicly available networks—political weblogs and student friendships—and discuss how to interpret the network histogram when additional information related to node and edge labeling is present. PMID:25275010

  5. Efficient depletion of host DNA contamination in malaria clinical sequencing.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Samuel O; Gu, Yong; Manske, Magnus; Otto, Thomas D; O'Brien, John; Alcock, Daniel; Macinnis, Bronwyn; Berriman, Matthew; Newbold, Chris I; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Swerdlow, Harold P; Quail, Michael A

    2013-03-01

    The cost of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is decreasing rapidly as next-generation sequencing technology continues to advance, and the prospect of making WGS available for public health applications is becoming a reality. So far, a number of studies have demonstrated the use of WGS as an epidemiological tool for typing and controlling outbreaks of microbial pathogens. Success of these applications is hugely dependent on efficient generation of clean genetic material that is free from host DNA contamination for rapid preparation of sequencing libraries. The presence of large amounts of host DNA severely affects the efficiency of characterizing pathogens using WGS and is therefore a serious impediment to clinical and epidemiological sequencing for health care and public health applications. We have developed a simple enzymatic treatment method that takes advantage of the methylation of human DNA to selectively deplete host contamination from clinical samples prior to sequencing. Using malaria clinical samples with over 80% human host DNA contamination, we show that the enzymatic treatment enriches Plasmodium falciparum DNA up to ∼9-fold and generates high-quality, nonbiased sequence reads covering >98% of 86,158 catalogued typeable single-nucleotide polymorphism loci. PMID:23224084

  6. Color Histogram Diffusion for Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taemin

    2011-01-01

    Various color histogram equalization (CHE) methods have been proposed to extend grayscale histogram equalization (GHE) for color images. In this paper a new method called histogram diffusion that extends the GHE method to arbitrary dimensions is proposed. Ranges in a histogram are specified as overlapping bars of uniform heights and variable widths which are proportional to their frequencies. This diagram is called the vistogram. As an alternative approach to GHE, the squared error of the vistogram from the uniform distribution is minimized. Each bar in the vistogram is approximated by a Gaussian function. Gaussian particles in the vistoram diffuse as a nonlinear autonomous system of ordinary differential equations. CHE results of color images showed that the approach is effective.

  7. The Online Histogram Presenter for the ATLAS experiment: A modular system for histogram visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotti, Andrea; Adragna, Paolo; Vitillo, Roberto A.

    2010-04-01

    The Online Histogram Presenter (OHP) is the ATLAS tool to display histograms produced by the online monitoring system. In spite of the name, the Online Histogram Presenter is much more than just a histogram display. To cope with the large amount of data, the application has been designed to minimise the network traffic; sophisticated caching, hashing and filtering algorithms reduce memory and CPU usage. The system uses Qt and ROOT for histogram visualisation and manipulation. In addition, histogram visualisation can be extensively customised through configuration files. Finally, its very modular architecture features a lightweight plug-in system, allowing extensions to accommodate specific user needs. After an architectural overview of the application, the paper is going to present in detail the solutions adopted to increase the performance and a description of the plug-in system.

  8. Xenorhabdus luminescens (DNA hybridization group 5) from human clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, J J; Jorgensen, J H; Grimont, P A; Akhurst, R J; Poinar, G O; Ageron, E; Pierce, G V; Smith, J A; Carter, G P; Wilson, K L

    1989-01-01

    An unusual isolate from a human leg wound was identified as Xenorhabdus luminescens. This finding led to the discovery or isolation of four additional strains, two from blood and two from wounds. Three of the five strains were from patients in San Antonio, Tex. Three strains were studied by DNA-DNA hybridization (S1 nuclease-trichloroacetic acid method) and were 77 to 100% related to each other, 34% related to the type strain of X. luminescens, 35 to 40% related to three of Grimont's other DNA hybridization groups of X. luminescens, and 9% related to the type strain of Xenorhabdus nematophilus. The new group of five strains was designated X. luminescens DNA hybridization group 5. All five strains were very inactive biochemically and fermented only D-glucose and D-mannose. The key reactions for recognizing this new organism are yellow pigment production, negative test for nitrate reduction to nitrite, weak bioluminescence (10 to 15 min of dark adaptation is required to see the weak light produced), and a unique hemolytic reaction on sheep blood agar plates incubated at 25 degrees C. Two case histories of strains from wounds are given; these suggest that X. luminescens DNA hybridization group 5 may be a new bacterial agent that causes wound infections. The two cases of wound infection, along with the two blood isolates, suggest that the new organism is clinically significant. Images PMID:2768446

  9. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Quiniou, Eric; Deutsh, Eric; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D{sub 50%}) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies.

  10. Circle detection using scan lines and histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Feng; Du, Zhenhong; Liu, Renyi

    2013-11-01

    Circle detection is significant in image processing and pattern recognition. We present a new algorithm for detecting circles, which is based on the global geometric symmetry of circles. First, the horizontal and vertical midpoint histograms of the edge image are obtained by using scan lines. Then, we apply the peak-finding algorithm to the midpoint histograms to look for the center of the circle. The normalized radius histogram is finally used to verify the existence of the circle and extract its radius. Synthetic images with different levels of pepper noise and real images containing several circles have been taken to test the performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has the advantage of computational efficiency as compared with the randomized Hough transform and some other algorithms.

  11. Simple dynamics for broad histogram method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this text is: (1) to clarify the foundations of the broad histogram method, stressing the conceptual differences between it and reweighting procedures in general; (2) to propose a very simple microcanonical dynamic rule, yet to be tested by theoretical grounds, which could provide a good improvement to numerical simulations.

  12. Improving tumour heterogeneity MRI assessment with histograms

    PubMed Central

    Just, N

    2014-01-01

    By definition, tumours are heterogeneous. They are defined by marked differences in cells, microenvironmental factors (oxygenation levels, pH, VEGF, VPF and TGF-α) metabolism, vasculature, structure and function that in turn translate into heterogeneous drug delivery and therapeutic outcome. Ways to estimate quantitatively tumour heterogeneity can improve drug discovery, treatment planning and therapeutic responses. It is therefore of paramount importance to have reliable and reproducible biomarkers of cancerous lesions' heterogeneity. During the past decade, the number of studies using histogram approaches increased drastically with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques (DCE-MRI, DWI, SWI etc.) although information on tumour heterogeneity remains poorly exploited. This fact can be attributed to a poor knowledge of the available metrics and of their specific meaning as well as to the lack of literature references to standardised histogram methods with which surrogate markers of heterogeneity can be compared. This review highlights the current knowledge and critical advances needed to investigate and quantify tumour heterogeneity. The key role of imaging techniques and in particular the key role of MRI for an accurate investigation of tumour heterogeneity is reviewed with a particular emphasis on histogram approaches and derived methods. PMID:25268373

  13. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  14. Clinical experience with a recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Andre, F E

    1988-09-01

    The clinical testing of EngerixR-B, the hepatitis B vaccine produced by SmithKline Biologicals using recombinant DNA technology, started in February 1984. Since extensive pre-clinical laboratory work had established that the polypeptide (HBsAg) expressed in genetically engineered yeast cells was after purification--physically, chemically and antigenically similar to the viral surface antigen particles found in the blood of chronic carriers, the aims of the clinical trials were to compare the safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast-derived (YDV) and plasma-derived (PDV) vaccines. By September 1987, 89 studies had been initiated involving a total of 10,545 subjects aged from birth to 82 years. This extensive experience has established that the risk of hypersensitivity to yeast-derived contaminants is negligible since no hypersensitivity reaction has been observed in any vaccinee, the incidence and severity of local reactions have not increased after repeated inoculations and no anti-yeast antibodies were produced by vaccination. Reactogenicity has been comparable to that of PDV's consisting essentially of transient mild irritation at the site of injection presumably caused by the aluminium hydroxide used as adjuvant. The anti-HBs responses to YDV and PDV's were quantitatively (seroconversion rates, peak antibody levels and persistence) as well as qualitatively (epitope specificity and affinity) similar. The expected protective effect of the immune response to the vaccine was confirmed in a challenge study in chimpanzees and in vaccinated human populations (male homosexuals, institutionalized mentally retarded patients, neonates of carrier women) with historically a high infection rate. PMID:2464196

  15. Towards a rapid molecular diagnostic for melioidosis: Comparison of DNA extraction methods from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Leisha J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Bowers, Jolene R; Tuanyok, Apichai; Schupp, Jim; Engelthaler, David; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S; Currie, Bart J

    2012-01-01

    Optimising DNA extraction from clinical samples for Burkholderia pseudomallei Type III secretion system real-time PCR in suspected melioidosis patients confirmed that urine and sputum are useful diagnostic samples. Direct testing on blood remains problematic; testing DNA extracted from plasma was superior to DNA from whole blood or buffy coat.

  16. Unscheduled DNA Synthesis: The Clinical and Functional Assay for Global Genomic DNA Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Jean J.; Kelly, Crystal M.

    2016-01-01

    The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay measures the ability of a cell to perform global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER). This chapter provides instructions for the application of this technique by creating 6-4 photoproducts and pyrimidine dimers using UV-C irradiation. This procedure is designed specifically for quantification of the 6-4 photoproducts. Repair is quantified by the amount of radioactive thymidine incorporated during repair synthesis after this insult, and radioactivity is evaluated by grain counting after autoradiography. The results are used to clinically diagnose human DNA repair deficiency disorders and provide a basis for investigation of repair deficiency in human tissues or tumors. No other functional assay is available that directly measures the capacity to perform NER on the entire genome without the use of specific antibodies. Since live cells are required for this assay, explant culture techniques must be previously established. Host cell reactivation (HCR), as discussed in Chapter 37, is not an equivalent technique, as it measures only transcription-coupled repair (TCR) at active genes, a small subset of total NER. PMID:24623250

  17. Flow cytometric DNA analysis of corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Roberson, M C; Brown, M F; Shock, J P; Pipkin, J L; Hinson, W G; Anson, J F

    1990-03-01

    We have modified an existing technique in order to perform DNA analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) of corneal epithelium from the mouse, rat, chicken, rabbit, and human. This protocol permitted an investigation of human corneal scrapings from several categories: normal, aphakic bullous keratopathy (ABK), keratoconus (KC), Fuch's dystrophy, edema, epithelial dysplasia, and lipid degeneration. No abnormal characteristic cell-kinetic profile was detected when averaged DNA histograms were compared statistically between the normal and either ABK, KC, edema, or Fuch's dystrophy groups. Abnormal DNA histograms were recorded for cell samples that were taken 1) from three individuals who had epithelial dysplasia and 2) from one individual diagnosed with lipid degeneration. The former condition was characterized by histograms that had a subpopulation of cells with an aneuploid amount of DNA or had higher than normal percentages of cells in the S and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. Corneal cells from the patient who had lipid degeneration had an abnormally high percentage of cells in the G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. The availability of accurate DNA flow cytometric analysis of corneal epithelium allows further studies on this issue from both experimental and clinical situations.

  18. DNA damage in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA light used in clinical PUVA treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bredberg, A.

    1981-06-01

    Human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with a clinically used UVA light source. The doses (1.1 and 3 J/cm2) were similar to those reaching the dermis during clinical PUVA treatment of psoriasis. DNA strand breaks, as determined by alkaline elution, were formed in a dose-dependent way and disappeared within 1 hr of postincubation at 37 degrees C. These findings have clinical implications since UVA-induced DNA damage may be accompanied by mutagenic and tumor promoting effects.

  19. Potential clinical utility of ultrasensitive circulating tumor DNA detection with CAPP-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Bratman, Scott V.; Newman, Aaron M.; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Tumors continually shed DNA into the circulation, where it can be non-invasively accessed. The ability to accurately detect circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) could significantly impact the management of patients with nearly every cancer type. Quantitation of ctDNA could allow objective response assessment, detection of minimal residual disease, and non-invasive tumor genotyping. The latter application overcomes the barriers currently limiting repeated tumor tissue sampling during therapy. Recent technical advancements have improved upon the sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility of ctDNA detection and promise to enable innovative clinical applications. In this review, we focus on the potential clinical utility of ctDNA analysis using CAPP-Seq (CAncer Personalized Profiling by deep Sequencing), a novel next-generation sequencing-based approach for ultrasensitive ctDNA detection. Applications of CAPP-Seq for the personalization of cancer detection and therapy are discussed. PMID:25773944

  20. Interaction of clinically important human DNA topoisomerase I poison, topotecan, with double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Sergei; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Ermishov, Mikhail; Mochalov, Konstantin; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nechipurenko, Yuri; Grokhovsky, Sergei; Zhuze, Alexei; Pluot, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2003-01-01

    Topotecan (TPT), a water-soluble derivative of camptothecin, is a potent antitumor poison of human DNA topoisomerase I (top1) that stabilizes the cleavage complex between the enzyme and DNA. The role of the recently discovered TPT affinity to DNA remains to be defined. The aim of this work is to clarify the molecular mechanisms of the TPT-DNA interaction and to propose the models of TPT-DNA complexes in solution in the absence of top1. It is shown that TPT molecules form dimers with a dimerization constant of (4.0 +/- 0.7) x 10(3) M(-1) and the presence of DNA provokes more than a 400-fold increase of the effective dimerization constant. Flow linear dichroism spectroscopy accompanied by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering experiments provide evidence that TPT dimers are able to bind DNA by bridging different DNA molecules or distant DNA structural domains. This effect may provoke modification of the intrinsic geometry of the cruciform DNA structures, leading to the appearance of new crossover points that serve as the sites of the top1 loading position. The data presume the hypothesis of TPT-mediated modulation of top1-DNA recognition before ternary complex formation. PMID:14587067

  1. Clinical development of intramuscular electroporation: providing a "boost" for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines has helped to eradicate or control the spread of numerous infectious diseases. However, there are many more diseases that have proved more difficult to eliminate using conventional vaccines. The recent innovation of DNA vaccines may provide a "boost" to the development efforts. While the early efforts of DNA vaccines in the clinic were disappointing, the use of in vivo electroporation has helped to provide some basis for optimism. Now, there are several ongoing clinical studies of vaccines against such diseases as malaria, HIV, hepatitis C, and even various types of cancer. This review will highlight three recently published clinical studies using intramuscular DNA administration with electroporation.

  2. Contrast enhancement via texture region based histogram equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Vishwakarma, Dinesh K.; Singh Walia, Gurjit; Kapoor, Rajiv

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents two novel contrast enhancement approaches using texture regions-based histogram equalization (HE). In HE-based contrast enhancement methods, the enhanced image often contains undesirable artefacts because an excessive number of pixels in the non-textured areas heavily bias the histogram. The novel idea presented in this paper is to suppress the impact of pixels in non-textured areas and to exploit texture features for the computation of histogram in the process of HE. The first algorithm named as Dominant Orientation-based Texture Histogram Equalization (DOTHE), constructs the histogram of the image using only those image patches having dominant orientation. DOTHE categories image patches into smooth, dominant or non-dominant orientation patches by using the image variance and singular value decomposition algorithm and utilizes only dominant orientation patches in the process of HE. The second method termed as Edge-based Texture Histogram Equalization, calculates significant edges in the image and constructs the histogram using the grey levels present in the neighbourhood of edges. The cumulative density function of the histogram formed from texture features is mapped on the entire dynamic range of the input image to produce the contrast-enhanced image. Subjective as well as objective performance assessment of proposed methods is conducted and compared with other existing HE methods. The performance assessment in terms of visual quality, contrast improvement index, entropy and measure of enhancement reveals that the proposed methods outperform the existing HE methods.

  3. Empirical Histograms in Item Response Theory with Ordinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to describe, test, and illustrate a new implementation of the empirical histogram (EH) method for ordinal items. The EH method involves the estimation of item response model parameters simultaneously with the approximation of the distribution of the random latent variable (theta) as a histogram. Software for the EH…

  4. DNA methylation analysis in constitutional disorders: Clinical implications of the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Laila C; Rodenhiser, David I; Ainsworth, Peter J; Paré, Guillaume; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-01-01

    Genomic, chromosomal, and gene-specific changes in the DNA sequence underpin both phenotypic variations in populations as well as disease associations, and the application of genomic technologies for the identification of constitutional (inherited) or somatic (acquired) alterations in DNA sequence forms a cornerstone of clinical and molecular genetics. In addition to the disruption of primary DNA sequence, the modulation of DNA function by epigenetic phenomena, in particular by DNA methylation, has long been known to play a role in the regulation of gene expression and consequent pathogenesis. However, these epigenetic factors have been identified only in a handful of pediatric conditions, including imprinting disorders. Technological advances in the past decade that have revolutionized clinical genomics are now rapidly being applied to the emerging discipline of clinical epigenomics. Here, we present an overview of epigenetic mechanisms with a focus on DNA modifications, including the molecular mechanisms of DNA methylation and subtypes of DNA modifications, and we describe the classic and emerging genomic technologies that are being applied to this study. This review focuses primarily on constitutional epigenomic conditions associated with a spectrum of developmental and intellectual disabilities. Epigenomic disorders are discussed in the context of global genomic disorders, imprinting disorders, and single gene disorders. We include a section focused on integration of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms together with their effect on clinical phenotypes. Finally, we summarize emerging epigenomic technologies and their impact on diagnostic aspects of constitutional genetic and epigenetic disorders. PMID:26758403

  5. Size histograms of gold nanoparticles measured by gravitational sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Colleen M; Goodisman, Jerry

    2014-03-15

    Sedimentation curves of gold nanoparticles in water were obtained by measuring the optical density of a suspension over time. The results are not subject to sampling errors, and refer to the particles in situ. Curves obtained simultaneously at several wave lengths were analyzed together to derive the size histogram of the sedimenting particles. The bins in the histogram were 5 nm wide and centered at diameters 60, 65, …, 110 nm. To get the histogram, we weighted previously calculated solutions to the Mason-Weaver sedimentation-diffusion equation for various particle diameters with absorption/scattering coefficients and size (diameter) abundances {c(j)}, and found the {c(j)} which gave the best fit to all the theoretical sedimentation curves. The effects of changing the number of bins and the wave lengths used were studied. Going to smaller bins would mean determining more parameters and require more wave lengths. The histograms derived from sedimentation agreed quite well in general with the histogram derived from TEM. Differences found for the smallest particle diameters are partly due to statistical fluctuations (TEM found only 1-2 particles out of 103 with these diameters). More important is that the TEM histogram indicates 12% of the particles have diameters of 75±2.5 nm, and the sedimentation histogram shows none. We show that this reflects the difference between the particles in situ, which possess a low-density shell about 1 nm thick, and the bare particles on the TEM stage. Correcting for this makes agreement between the two histograms excellent. Comparing sedimentation-derived with TEM-derived histograms thus shows differences between the particles in situ and on the TEM stage.

  6. Environmental pollution and DNA methylation: carcinogenesis, clinical significance, and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the main causes of human cancer. Exposures to environmental carcinogens result in genetic and epigenetic alterations which induce cell transformation. Epigenetic changes caused by environmental pollution play important roles in the development and progression of environmental pollution-related cancers. Studies on DNA methylation are among the earliest and most conducted epigenetic research linked to cancer. In this review, the roles of DNA methylation in carcinogenesis and their significance in clinical medicine were summarized, and the effects of environmental pollutants, particularly air pollutants, on DNA methylation were introduced. Furthermore, prospective applications of DNA methylation to environmental pollution detection and cancer prevention were discussed.

  7. Clinical value of DNA fragmentation evaluation tests under ART treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tavukçuoğlu, İlkay Şafak; Al-Azawi, Tahani; Khaki, Amir Afshin; Khaki, Arash; Khalil, Ahmed; Al-Hasani, Safaa

    2012-01-01

    Male reproductive health has been under scrutiny recently. Many studies in the literature have concluded that semen quality is declining and that the incidence of testicular cancers is increasing. The reason for this change has been attributed to damage in sperm chromatin. During in vivo reproduction, the natural selection process ensures that only a spermatozoon with normal genomic material can fertilize an oocyte. However, the assisted reproduction technique (ART) is our selection process, leading to the possibility that abnormal spermatozoa could be used to fertilize an oocyte. We could avoid this by quantifying the amount and type of genomic damage in sperm using well-accepted laboratory methods. The sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) integrity is important for success of natural or assisted fertilization as well as normal development of the embryo, fetus and child. Intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is bypassing natural sperm selection mechanisms, which increases the risk of transmitting damaged DNA. The significance of required investigations and multiple techniques is that they could evaluate DNA defects in human spermatozoa. The ability of these techniques to accurately estimate sperm DNA damage depends on many technical and biological aspects. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most commonly used methods. PMID:24592055

  8. Oncocytic tumours of the salivary gland, kidney, and thyroid: nuclear DNA patterns studied by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, L M; Farrow, G M; Hay, I D; Lieber, M M

    1986-06-01

    Nuclear DNA ploidy studies were performed by flow cytometry on extracted nuclei from 12 oncocytic tumours of the salivary gland, 65 oncocytic tumours of the kidney, and 37 oncocytic tumours of the thyroid gland from the pathology archives of the Mayo Clinic. In order to provide an interesting clinical spectrum, three different classes of well-differentiated oncocytic tumours were selected for examination. Salivary gland oncocytic tumours were chosen for their generally benign behaviour. Oncocytic thyroid cancers exhibiting malignant potential because of local invasion, were thought to represent the opposite extreme of aggressiveness. Renal oncocytic tumours were known to demonstrate an intermediate degree of malignancy. All of the oncocytic salivary gland tumours showed a 'normal' DNA histogram and had a benign clinical course. For the oncocytic tumours of the kidney, 45% of DNA histograms were normal, 40% exhibited a significant increase in the DNA tetraploid/polyploid (4C) peak, and 15% showed a DNA aneuploid peak. Three patients with a DNA tetraploid pattern developed tumour metastasis and two have died from metastatic renal cancer. Among the oncocytic thyroid cancers, 27% were normal, 22% exhibited an increased DNA tetraploid peak, and 51% had a distinct DNA aneuploid peak. None of the thyroid tumour patients with a normal DNA pattern or with an increased DNA tetraploid peak died as a result of thyroid malignancy. In contrast, 58% of patients whose thyroid tumours showed a DNA aneuploid peak subsequently died from thyroid cancer.

  9. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  10. A comparison of five methods for extracting DNA from paucicellular clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Cler, Leslie; Bu, Dawei; Lewis, Cheryl; Euhus, David

    2006-01-01

    Translational protocols in cancer and carcinogenesis often require isolation of genomic DNA from paucicellular clinical samples. DNA extraction methods for PCR-based applications should optimize the recovery of amplifiable DNA. We compared five methods for DNA extraction in paucicellular epithelial and lymphocyte samples using proportion of extractions producing amplifiable DNA and mean real-time PCR Ct values for GAPDH as the endpoint measures. The methods included solid-phase DNA adsorption (QIAamp), sequential protein and DNA precipitation (Puregene), magnetic bead adsorption (Dynabeads), phenol-chloroform extraction, and single-step proteinase K digestion. In general, the performance of the three commercial kits was superior to either phenol-chloroform extraction or single-step proteinase K digestion. However, QIAamp and Puregene produced amplifiable DNA more frequently than Dynabeads for starting cell numbers <50,000. GAPDH Ct values for QIAamp extractions showed the greatest dynamic range and the best linearity across the range of starting cell numbers, but QIAamp was not statistically significantly superior to Puregene. Of the three commercial kits, Puregene is the least expensive. QIAamp and Puregene DNA extraction methods are well-suited for the preparation of paucicellular clinical samples for PCR-based assays.

  11. Principal component analysis of the CT density histogram to generate parametric response maps of COPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, N.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Pike, D.; McCormack, D. G.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomography (CT) may be used to characterize emphysema and airways disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One analysis approach - parametric response mapping (PMR) utilizes registered inspiratory and expiratory CT image volumes and CT-density-histogram thresholds, but there is no consensus regarding the threshold values used, or their clinical meaning. Principal-component-analysis (PCA) of the CT density histogram can be exploited to quantify emphysema using data-driven CT-density-histogram thresholds. Thus, the objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration was to develop a PRM approach using PCA-derived thresholds in COPD patients and ex-smokers without airflow limitation. Methods: Fifteen COPD ex-smokers and 5 normal ex-smokers were evaluated. Thoracic CT images were also acquired at full inspiration and full expiration and these images were non-rigidly co-registered. PCA was performed for the CT density histograms, from which the components with the highest eigenvalues greater than one were summed. Since the values of the principal component curve correlate directly with the variability in the sample, the maximum and minimum points on the curve were used as threshold values for the PCA-adjusted PRM technique. Results: A significant correlation was determined between conventional and PCA-adjusted PRM with 3He MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (p<0.001), with CT RA950 (p<0.0001), as well as with 3He MRI ventilation defect percent, a measurement of both small airways disease (p=0.049 and p=0.06, respectively) and emphysema (p=0.02). Conclusions: PRM generated using PCA thresholds of the CT density histogram showed significant correlations with CT and 3He MRI measurements of emphysema, but not airways disease.

  12. Photoprotection by topical DNA repair enzymes: molecular correlates of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, D B; O'Connor, A; Alas, L; Potten, C; Wolf, P

    1999-02-01

    A new approach to photoprotection is to repair DNA damage after UV exposure. This can be accomplished by delivery of a DNA repair enzyme with specificity to UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers into skin by means of specially engineered liposomes. Treatment of DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients or skin cancer patients with T4N5 liposome lotion containing such DNA repair liposomes increases the removal of DNA damage in the first few hours after treatment. In these studies, a DNA repair effect was observed in some patients treated with heat-inactivated enzyme. Unexpectedly, it was discovered that the heat-inactivated T4 endonuclease V enzyme refolds and recovers enzymatic activity. These studies demonstrate that measurements of molecular changes induced by biological drugs are useful adjuvants to clinical studies.

  13. Clinical application of forensic DNA analysis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Manasatienkij, Chairat; Ra-ngabpai, Chatchawin

    2012-10-01

    Polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) analysis after polymerase chain reaction amplification is presently the most important analytical method of forensic DNA laboratory. Beside the forensic-purpose application, STR analysis is also necessary for chimerism testing after bone marrow or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. To increase success rate of the treatment and avoid adverse effect of the transplantation procedure, serial chimerism study has to be closely monitored. Many analytical techniques have been therefore developed to improve the accuracy and sensitivity. STR-PCR is currently the most commonly used analytical method for chimerism testing. Sensitivity of the method is about 3% of the minor DNA in a specimen. The method consumes a short period of time and is convenient due to availability of the commercial kits. High discriminative ability and well-validated interpretation procedure are the attractive characteristics of the method.

  14. Clinical Radiation Sensitivity With DNA Repair Disorders: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Julianne M.; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-08-01

    Adverse reactions to radiotherapy represent a confounding phenomenon in radiation oncology. These reactions are rare, and many have been associated with individuals with DNA repair disorders such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen Breakage syndrome. A paucity of published data is available detailing such circumstances. This overview describes four exemplary situations, a comprehensive list of 32 additional cases, and some insights gleaned from this overall experience. Fanconi anemia was associated with more than one-half of the reports. The lowest dose given to a patient that resulted in a reaction was 3 Gy, given to an ataxia-telangiectasia patient. Most patients died within months of exposure. It is clear that the patients discussed in this report had complicated illnesses, in addition to cancer, and the radiotherapy administered was most likely their best option. However, the underlying DNA repair defects make conventional radiation doses dangerous. Our findings support previous wisdom that radiotherapy should either be avoided or the doses should be selected with great care in the case of these radiosensitive genotypes, which must be recognized by their characteristic phenotypes, until more rapid, reliable, and functional assays of DNA repair become available.

  15. Clinical Radiation Sensitivity with DNA Repair Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Julianne M.; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiation therapy represent a confounding phenomenon in Radiation Oncology. These reactions are rare, and many have been associated with individuals with DNA repair disorders such as Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS). There is a paucity of literature detailing such circumstances. This overview describes four exemplary situations, a comprehensive list of 32 additional cases, and some insights gleaned from this overall experience. Fanconi Anemia was associated with over half of the reports. The lowest dose given to a patient that resulted in a reaction was 3 Gy, given to an A-T patient. Most patients died within months of exposure. It is clear that the patients discussed in this paper had complicated illnesses in addition to cancer, and the radiation therapy that administered was most likely their best option. However, the underlying DNA repair defects make conventional radiation therapy doses dangerous. Our review supports prior wisdom that radiation therapy should either be avoided, or doses should be selected with great care in the case of these radiosensitive genotypes which must be recognized with their characteristic phenotypes, until more rapid, reliable and functional assays of DNA repair become available. PMID:19616740

  16. Approximate Splitting for Ensembles of Trees using Histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Cantu-Paz, E; Littau, D

    2001-09-28

    Recent work in classification indicates that significant improvements in accuracy can be obtained by growing an ensemble of classifiers and having them vote for the most popular class. Implicit in many of these techniques is the concept of randomization that generates different classifiers. In this paper, they focus on ensembles of decision trees that are created using a randomized procedure based on histograms. Techniques, such as histograms, that discretize continuous variables, have long been used in classification to convert the data into a form suitable for processing and to reduce the compute time. The approach combines the ideas behind discretization through histograms and randomization in ensembles to create decision trees by randomly selecting a split point in an interval around the best bin boundary in the histogram. The experimental results with public domain data show that ensembles generated using this approach are competitive in accuracy and superior in computational cost to other ensembles techniques such as boosting and bagging.

  17. Optimal DNA isolation method for detection of bacteria in clinical specimens by broad-range PCR.

    PubMed

    Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Jalava, Jari

    2002-11-01

    Broad-range amplification of bacterial DNA from clinical specimens has proved useful for the diagnosis of various bacterial infections, especially during antimicrobial treatment of the patient. Optimal sample processing protocols for diagnostic broad-range bacterial PCR should release DNA from an array of target organisms with equal efficiencies and wash out inhibitory factors from various sample types without introducing bacterial DNA contamination to the amplification reaction. In the present study, two physical cell wall disintegration methods, bead beating and sonication, for enhanced detection of organisms with difficult-to-lyse cell walls were studied. The analytical sensitivities of several commercially available DNA purification kits, which were used with and without additional cell disintegration steps, were compared by using dilution series of model bacteria. Selected purification methods were used to process routine clinical specimens in parallel with the standard phenol-ether DNA extraction, and the results obtained by bacterial PCR and sequencing with the two template preparations were compared. The method with the DNA isolation kit with the lowest detection limits from the bacterial suspensions (Masterpure) did not prove to be superior to the standard method when the two methods were applied to 69 clinical specimens. For another set of 68 clinical specimens, DNA purified with a glass fiber filter column (High Pure) with an additional sonication step yielded results well in accord with those obtained by the standard method. Furthermore, bacterial DNA was detected in four samples that remained PCR negative by the standard method, and three of these contained DNA from gram-positive pathogens. Three samples were positive by the standard method only, indicating the limitations of applying any single method to all samples.

  18. Using color histograms and SPA-LDA to classify bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Valber Elias; da Costa, Gean Bezerra; de Sousa Fernandes, David Douglas; Gonçalves Dias Diniz, Paulo Henrique; Brandão, Deysiane; de Medeiros, Ana Claudia Dantas; Véras, Germano

    2014-09-01

    In this work, a new approach is proposed to verify the differentiating characteristics of five bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus oralis, and Staphylococcus aureus) by using digital images obtained with a simple webcam and variable selection by the Successive Projections Algorithm associated with Linear Discriminant Analysis (SPA-LDA). In this sense, color histograms in the red-green-blue (RGB), hue-saturation-value (HSV), and grayscale channels and their combinations were used as input data, and statistically evaluated by using different multivariate classifiers (Soft Independent Modeling by Class Analogy (SIMCA), Principal Component Analysis-Linear Discriminant Analysis (PCA-LDA), Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Successive Projections Algorithm-Linear Discriminant Analysis (SPA-LDA)). The bacteria strains were cultivated in a nutritive blood agar base layer for 24 h by following the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia, maintaining the status of cell growth and the nature of nutrient solutions under the same conditions. The best result in classification was obtained by using RGB and SPA-LDA, which reached 94 and 100 % of classification accuracy in the training and test sets, respectively. This result is extremely positive from the viewpoint of routine clinical analyses, because it avoids bacterial identification based on phenotypic identification of the causative organism using Gram staining, culture, and biochemical proofs. Therefore, the proposed method presents inherent advantages, promoting a simpler, faster, and low-cost alternative for bacterial identification.

  19. Using color histograms and SPA-LDA to classify bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Valber Elias; da Costa, Gean Bezerra; de Sousa Fernandes, David Douglas; Gonçalves Dias Diniz, Paulo Henrique; Brandão, Deysiane; de Medeiros, Ana Claudia Dantas; Véras, Germano

    2014-09-01

    In this work, a new approach is proposed to verify the differentiating characteristics of five bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus oralis, and Staphylococcus aureus) by using digital images obtained with a simple webcam and variable selection by the Successive Projections Algorithm associated with Linear Discriminant Analysis (SPA-LDA). In this sense, color histograms in the red-green-blue (RGB), hue-saturation-value (HSV), and grayscale channels and their combinations were used as input data, and statistically evaluated by using different multivariate classifiers (Soft Independent Modeling by Class Analogy (SIMCA), Principal Component Analysis-Linear Discriminant Analysis (PCA-LDA), Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Successive Projections Algorithm-Linear Discriminant Analysis (SPA-LDA)). The bacteria strains were cultivated in a nutritive blood agar base layer for 24 h by following the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia, maintaining the status of cell growth and the nature of nutrient solutions under the same conditions. The best result in classification was obtained by using RGB and SPA-LDA, which reached 94 and 100 % of classification accuracy in the training and test sets, respectively. This result is extremely positive from the viewpoint of routine clinical analyses, because it avoids bacterial identification based on phenotypic identification of the causative organism using Gram staining, culture, and biochemical proofs. Therefore, the proposed method presents inherent advantages, promoting a simpler, faster, and low-cost alternative for bacterial identification. PMID:25023972

  20. Frequency distribution histograms for the rapid analysis of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, P. V.; Bullen, B. L.; Poff, K. L.

    1988-01-01

    The mean and standard error are good representations for the response of a population to an experimental parameter and are frequently used for this purpose. Frequency distribution histograms show, in addition, responses of individuals in the population. Both the statistics and a visual display of the distribution of the responses can be obtained easily using a microcomputer and available programs. The type of distribution shown by the histogram may suggest different mechanisms to be tested.

  1. Bin recycling strategy for improving the histogram precision on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-Montes, Miguel; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; Vega-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2016-07-01

    Histogram is an easily comprehensible way to present data and analyses. In the current scientific context with access to large volumes of data, the processing time for building histogram has dramatically increased. For this reason, parallel construction is necessary to alleviate the impact of the processing time in the analysis activities. In this scenario, GPU computing is becoming widely used for reducing until affordable levels the processing time of histogram construction. Associated to the increment of the processing time, the implementations are stressed on the bin-count accuracy. Accuracy aspects due to the particularities of the implementations are not usually taken into consideration when building histogram with very large data sets. In this work, a bin recycling strategy to create an accuracy-aware implementation for building histogram on GPU is presented. In order to evaluate the approach, this strategy was applied to the computation of the three-point angular correlation function, which is a relevant function in Cosmology for the study of the Large Scale Structure of Universe. As a consequence of the study a high-accuracy implementation for histogram construction on GPU is proposed.

  2. Mitochondria DNA Change and Oxidative Damage in Clinically Stable Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Chen; Jou, Shaw-Hwa; Lin, Ta-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare alterations of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) copy number, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and oxidative damage of mtDNA in clinically stable patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods Patients met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for MDD were recruited from the psychiatric outpatient clinic at Changhua Christian Hospital, Taiwan. They were clinically stable and their medications had not changed for at least the preceding two months. Exclusion criteria were substance-induced psychotic disorder, eating disorder, anxiety disorder or illicit substance abuse. Comparison subjects did not have any major psychiatric disorder and they were medically healthy. Peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed to compare copy number, SNPs and oxidative damage of mtDNA between the two groups. Results 40 MDD patients and 70 comparison subjects were collected. The median age of the subjects was 42 years and 38 years in MDD and comparison groups, respectively. Leukocyte mtDNA copy number of MDD patients was significantly lower than that of the comparison group (p = 0.037). MDD patients had significantly higher mitochondrial oxidative damage than the comparison group (6.44 vs. 3.90, p<0.001). After generalized linear model adjusted for age, sex, smoking, family history, and psychotropic use, mtDNA copy number was still significantly lower in the MDD group (p<0.001). MtDNA oxidative damage was positively correlated with age (p<0.001) and MDD (p<0.001). Antipsychotic use was negatively associated with mtDNA copy number (p = 0.036). Limitations The study is cross-sectional with no longitudinal follow up. The cohort is clinically stable and generalizability of our result to other cohort should be considered. Conclusions Our study suggests that oxidative stress and mitochondria may play a role in the pathophysiology of MDD. More large-scale studies are warranted to assess the interplay between oxidative stress, mitochondria dysfunction and MDD. PMID:25946463

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells and Circulating Tumor DNA: Challenges and Opportunities on the Path to Clinical Utility.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Lee, Mark; Jeffrey, Stefanie S

    2015-11-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the detection and detailed characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in blood samples from patients with cancer. Often referred to as a "liquid biopsy," CTCs and ctDNA are expected to provide real-time monitoring of tumor evolution and therapeutic efficacy, with the potential for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we focus on these opportunities as well as the challenges that should be addressed so that these tools may eventually be implemented into routine clinical care.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Heteroplasmy in Monozygotic Twins Clinically Discordant for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Souren, Nicole Y P; Gerdes, Lisa A; Kümpfel, Tania; Lutsik, Pavlo; Klopstock, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Walter, Jörn

    2016-08-01

    We examined the debated link between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation and multiple sclerosis (MS) using 49 monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs clinically discordant for MS, which enables to associate de novo mtDNA variants, skewed heteroplasmy, and mtDNA copy number with MS manifestation. Ultra-deep sequencing of blood-derived mtDNA revealed 25 heteroplasmic variants with potentially pathogenic features in 18 pairs. All variants were pair-specific and had low and/or similar heteroplasmy levels in both cotwins. In one pair, a confirmed pathogenic variant (m.11778G>A, heteroplasmy ∼50%) associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was detected. Detailed diagnostic investigation revealed subclinical MS signs in the prior nondiseased cotwin. Moreover, neither mtDNA deletions nor copy-number variations were involved. Furthermore, the majority of heteroplasmic variants were shared among MZ twins and exhibited more similar heteroplasmy levels in the same tissue of MZ twins as compared with different tissues of the same individual. Heteroplasmy levels were also more similar within MZ twins compared with nonidentical siblings. Our analysis excludes mtDNA variation as a major driver of the discordant clinical manifestation of MS in MZ twins, and provides valuable insights into the occurrence and distribution of heteroplasmic variants within MZ twins and nonidentical siblings, and across different tissues. PMID:27119776

  5. A comparison of ARMS and DNA sequencing for mutation analysis in clinical biopsy samples

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We have compared mutation analysis by DNA sequencing and Amplification Refractory Mutation System™ (ARMS™) for their ability to detect mutations in clinical biopsy specimens. Methods We have evaluated five real-time ARMS assays: BRAF 1799T>A, [this includes V600E and V600K] and NRAS 182A>G [Q61R] and 181C>A [Q61K] in melanoma, EGFR 2573T>G [L858R], 2235-2249del15 [E746-A750del] in non-small-cell lung cancer, and compared the results to DNA sequencing of the mutation 'hot-spots' in these genes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour (FF-PET) DNA. Results The ARMS assays maximised the number of samples that could be analysed when both the quality and quantity of DNA was low, and improved both the sensitivity and speed of analysis compared with sequencing. ARMS was more robust with fewer reaction failures compared with sequencing and was more sensitive as it was able to detect functional mutations that were not detected by DNA sequencing. DNA sequencing was able to detect a small number of lower frequency recurrent mutations across the exons screened that were not interrogated using the specific ARMS assays in these studies. Conclusions ARMS was more sensitive and robust at detecting defined somatic mutations than DNA sequencing on clinical samples where the predominant sample type was FF-PET. PMID:20925915

  6. Pneumocystis jirovecii multilocus genotyping in pooled DNA samples: a new approach for clinical and epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; de Sousa, B; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2012-06-01

    Specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are recognized as important DNA sequence variations influencing the pathogenesis of Pneumocystis jirovecii and the clinical outcome of Pneumocystis pneumonia, which is a major worldwide cause of illness among immunocompromised patients. Genotyping platforms for pooled DNA samples are promising methodologies for genetic characterization of infectious organisms. We have developed a new typing strategy for P. jirovecii, which consisted of DNA pools prepared according to clinical data (HIV diagnosis, microscopic and molecular detection of P. jirovecii, parasite burden, clinical diagnosis and follow-up of infection) from individual samples using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension (MPCR/SBE). The frequencies of multiple P. jirovecii SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215 and SOD110) encoded at three distinct loci, the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA) and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) loci, were estimated in seven DNA pooled samples, representing a total of 100 individual samples. The studied SNPs were confirmed to be associated with distinct clinical parameters of infection such as parasite burden and follow-up. The MPCR/SBE-DNA pooling methodology, described in the present study, was demonstrated to be a useful high-throughput procedure for large-scale P. jirovecii SNPs screening and a powerful tool for evaluation of clinically relevant SNPs potentially related to parasite burden, clinical diagnosis and follow-up of P. jirovecii infection. In further studies, the candidate SNPs mt85, SOD215 and SOD110 may be used as molecular markers in association with MPCR/SBE-DNA pooling to generate useful information for understanding the patterns and causes of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  7. Simple, Sensitive and Accurate Multiplex Detection of Clinically Important Melanoma DNA Mutations in Circulating Tumour DNA with SERS Nanotags

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Eugene J.H.; Wang, Yuling; Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and accurate identification of specific DNA mutations can influence clinical decisions. However accurate diagnosis from limiting samples such as circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is challenging. Current approaches based on fluorescence such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and more recently, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) have limitations in multiplex detection, sensitivity and the need for expensive specialized equipment. Herein we describe an assay capitalizing on the multiplexing and sensitivity benefits of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with the simplicity of standard PCR to address the limitations of current approaches. This proof-of-concept method could reproducibly detect as few as 0.1% (10 copies, CV < 9%) of target sequences thus demonstrating the high sensitivity of the method. The method was then applied to specifically detect three important melanoma mutations in multiplex. Finally, the PCR/SERS assay was used to genotype cell lines and ctDNA from serum samples where results subsequently validated with ddPCR. With ddPCR-like sensitivity and accuracy yet at the convenience of standard PCR, we believe this multiplex PCR/SERS method could find wide applications in both diagnostics and research. PMID:27446486

  8. Cardiac involvement in mitochondrial DNA disease: clinical spectrum, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Matthew G. D.; Bourke, John P.; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogenous group of genetic disorders that result from dysfunction of the final common pathway of energy metabolism. Mitochondrial DNA mutations affect key components of the respiratory chain and account for the majority of mitochondrial disease in adults. Owing to critical dependence of the heart on oxidative metabolism, cardiac involvement in mitochondrial disease is common and may occur as the principal clinical manifestation or part of multisystem disease. Recent advances in our understanding of the clinical spectrum and genetic aetiology of cardiac involvement in mitochondrial DNA disease have important implications for cardiologists in terms of the investigation and multi-disciplinary management of patients. PMID:22936362

  9. Clinical utility of circulating tumor DNA for molecular assessment in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Takai, Erina; Totoki, Yasushi; Nakamura, Hiromi; Morizane, Chigusa; Nara, Satoshi; Hama, Natsuko; Suzuki, Masami; Furukawa, Eisaku; Kato, Mamoru; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Kohno, Takashi; Ueno, Hideki; Shimada, Kazuaki; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Yachida, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. The genomic landscape of the PDAC genome features four frequently mutated genes (KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4) and dozens of candidate driver genes altered at low frequency, including potential clinical targets. Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a promising resource to detect and monitor molecular characteristics of tumors. In the present study, we determined the mutational status of KRAS in plasma cfDNA using multiplex picoliter-droplet digital PCR in 259 patients with PDAC. We constructed a novel modified SureSelect-KAPA-Illumina platform and an original panel of 60 genes. We then performed targeted deep sequencing of cfDNA and matched germline DNA samples in 48 patients who had ≥1% mutant allele frequencies of KRAS in plasma cfDNA. Importantly, potentially targetable somatic mutations were identified in 14 of 48 patients (29.2%) examined by targeted deep sequencing of cfDNA. We also analyzed somatic copy number alterations based on the targeted sequencing data using our in-house algorithm, and potentially targetable amplifications were detected. Assessment of mutations and copy number alterations in plasma cfDNA may provide a prognostic and diagnostic tool to assist decisions regarding optimal therapeutic strategies for PDAC patients. PMID:26669280

  10. Clinical utility of circulating tumor DNA for molecular assessment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Erina; Totoki, Yasushi; Nakamura, Hiromi; Morizane, Chigusa; Nara, Satoshi; Hama, Natsuko; Suzuki, Masami; Furukawa, Eisaku; Kato, Mamoru; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Kohno, Takashi; Ueno, Hideki; Shimada, Kazuaki; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Yachida, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. The genomic landscape of the PDAC genome features four frequently mutated genes (KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4) and dozens of candidate driver genes altered at low frequency, including potential clinical targets. Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a promising resource to detect and monitor molecular characteristics of tumors. In the present study, we determined the mutational status of KRAS in plasma cfDNA using multiplex picoliter-droplet digital PCR in 259 patients with PDAC. We constructed a novel modified SureSelect-KAPA-Illumina platform and an original panel of 60 genes. We then performed targeted deep sequencing of cfDNA and matched germline DNA samples in 48 patients who had ≥1% mutant allele frequencies of KRAS in plasma cfDNA. Importantly, potentially targetable somatic mutations were identified in 14 of 48 patients (29.2%) examined by targeted deep sequencing of cfDNA. We also analyzed somatic copy number alterations based on the targeted sequencing data using our in-house algorithm, and potentially targetable amplifications were detected. Assessment of mutations and copy number alterations in plasma cfDNA may provide a prognostic and diagnostic tool to assist decisions regarding optimal therapeutic strategies for PDAC patients. PMID:26669280

  11. Impact of sperm DNA chromatin in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Miller, David; Griffin, Darren K; Tempest, Helen G

    2016-02-01

    The paternal contribution to fertilization and embryogenesis is frequently overlooked as the spermatozoon is often considered to be a silent vessel whose only function is to safely deliver the paternal genome to the maternal oocyte. In this article, we hope to demonstrate that this perception is far from the truth. Typically, infertile men have been unable to conceive naturally (or through regular IVF), and therefore, a perturbation of the genetic integrity of sperm heads in infertile males has been under-considered. The advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) however has led to very successful treatment of male factor infertility and subsequent widespread use in IVF clinics worldwide. Until recently, little concern has been raised about the genetic quality of sperm in ICSI patients or the impact genetic aberrations could have on fertility and embryogenesis. This review highlights the importance of chromatin packaging in the sperm nucleus as essential for the establishment and maintenance of a viable pregnancy. PMID:26678492

  12. Regulators Associated with Clinical Outcomes Revealed by DNA Methylation Data in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Matthew H.; Varn, Frederick S.; Lou, Shaoke; Cheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory architecture of breast cancer is extraordinarily complex and gene misregulation can occur at many levels, with transcriptional malfunction being a major cause. This dysfunctional process typically involves additional regulatory modulators including DNA methylation. Thus, the interplay between transcription factor (TF) binding and DNA methylation are two components of a cancer regulatory interactome presumed to display correlated signals. As proof of concept, we performed a systematic motif-based in silico analysis to infer all potential TFs that are involved in breast cancer prognosis through an association with DNA methylation changes. Using breast cancer DNA methylation and clinical data derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we carried out a systematic inference of TFs whose misregulation underlie different clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Our analysis identified TFs known to be associated with clinical outcomes of p53 and ER (estrogen receptor) subtypes of breast cancer, while also predicting new TFs that may also be involved. Furthermore, our results suggest that misregulation in breast cancer can be caused by the binding of alternative factors to the binding sites of TFs whose activity has been ablated. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive analysis that links DNA methylation to TF binding to patient prognosis. PMID:25996148

  13. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2004-07-01

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  14. Face recognition with histograms of fractional differential gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Ma, Yan; Cao, Qi

    2014-05-01

    It has proved that fractional differentiation can enhance the edge information and nonlinearly preserve textural detailed information in an image. This paper investigates its ability for face recognition and presents a local descriptor called histograms of fractional differential gradients (HFDG) to extract facial visual features. HFDG encodes a face image into gradient patterns using multiorientation fractional differential masks, from which histograms of gradient directions are computed as the face representation. Experimental results on Yale, face recognition technology (FERET), Carnegie Mellon University pose, illumination, and expression (CMU PIE), and A. Martinez and R. Benavente (AR) databases validate the feasibility of the proposed method and show that HFDG outperforms local binary patterns (LBP), histograms of oriented gradients (HOG), enhanced local directional patterns (ELDP), and Gabor feature-based methods.

  15. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations - mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation - is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

  16. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations – mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation – is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27247325

  17. Evaluation of urinary metal concentrations and sperm DNA damage in infertile men from an infertility clinic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Fu, Xiao-Ming; He, Dong-Liang; Zou, Xue-Min; Wu, Cheng-Qiu; Guo, Wei-Zhen; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between urinary metal concentrations and sperm DNA damage. Thirteen metals [arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn)] were detected in urine samples of 207 infertile men from an infertility clinic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and also, sperm DNA damage (tail length, percent DNA tail, and tail distributed moment) were assessed using neutral comet assay. We found that urinary Hg and Ni were associated with increasing trends for tail length (both p for trend<0.05), and that urinary Mn was associated with increasing trend for tail distributed moment (p for trend=0.02). These associations did persist even when considering multiple metals. Our results suggest that environmental exposure to Hg, Mn, and Ni may be associated with increased sperm DNA damage. PMID:27262988

  18. Sequence Homology at the Breakpoint and Clinical Phenotype of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K.; Craigen, William J.; Schmitt, Eric S.; Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old) showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (<6 years old) carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and

  19. Evaluating Climate Models with MISR Joint Histograms of Cloud Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, T. P.; Marchand, R.; Hillman, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Following the approach pioneered by ISCCP, joint histograms of cloud optical depth and cloud top height (pressure) are being produced by MISR and MODIS for the evaluation of climate models. There are significant differences among the histogram due to the differences in sensors and retrieval algorithms. These differences provide insight into the properties of the observed cloud fields. MISR retrievals of stereo cloud height, in particular, provide a unique perspective on the distribution cloud heights. MISR, due to its stereo imaging, is more effective in identifying low clouds and retrieving their height, while MODIS is a more reliable detector of high clouds. In analogy to the ISCCP simulator, cloud fields generated in global climate models can be processed through a MISR simulator, which we have developed, to produce joint histograms of model clouds. Comparingf observed joint histograms with simulated joint histograms allows us to determine where the model is producing clouds well and where not. We have applied this technique to results from the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF; also called the “superparameterization” model) and are currently applying it to the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model and the GFDL AM2 model. The MMF computes cloud properties using an embedded 2D cloud resolving model (CRM) in each grid square of the large-scale climate model. We have run versions of the MMF with CRM horizontal resolution of 4 km and 1 km and with 26 and 52 vertical levels in order to explore the effect of resolution on model clouds. Comparison with MISR joint histograms shows that the model run with 52 levels and 1 km provides an improved simulation, but low cloud amounts are still considerably lower than observed. We discuss possible solutions to this problem. Evaluations of the CAM and AM2 model are in progress and evaluations of these models will be presented.

  20. Colorimetric detection of clinical DNA samples using an intercalator-conjugated polydiacetylene sensor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-10-15

    We herein developed a novel colorimetric polydiacetylene (PDA) sensor for very convenient detection of clinical DNA samples based on the interaction between an intercalator and dsDNA. We modified the terminal carboxyl group of a diacetylene monomer (10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid; PCDA) with the intercalator 9-aminoacridine (9AA) and prepared 9AA-modified PDA liposomes containing PCDA-9AA/PCDA/phospholipid (1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) at a molar ratio of 1.5:6.5:2.0. The PDA sensor underwent an obvious color transition from blue to red in the presence of dsDNA molecules that were PCR-amplified from genomic DNA due to the insertion of the 9AA head group of PDA into the dsDNA. DNA concentrations as low as 20 nM and relatively small molecules (around 100 base pairs) could be detected by the sensor within 1h without DNA electrophoresis. This novel colorimetric method is simple, does not require any instrument, and is therefore appropriate for POCT or portable molecular diagnostic kit. PMID:25978440

  1. Low Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number is Associated With Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Chang-Yun; Park, Jung Tak; Kee, Youn Kyung; Han, Seung Gyu; Han, In Mee; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Mi Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial dysfunction may play an important role in abnormal glucose metabolism and systemic inflammation. We aimed to investigate the relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We recruited 120 prevalent PD patients and determined mtDNA copy number by PCR. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality, whereas secondary outcomes included cardiovascular events, technical PD failure, and incident malignancy. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined the independent association of mtDNA copy number with outcomes. The mean patient age was 52.3 years; 42.5% were men. The mean log mtDNA copy number was 3.30 ± 0.50. During a follow-up period of 35.4 ± 19.3 months, all-cause mortality and secondary outcomes were observed in 20.0% and 59.2% of patients, respectively. Secondary outcomes were significantly lower in the highest mtDNA copy number group than in the lower groups. In multiple Cox analysis, the mtDNA copy number was not associated with all-cause mortality (lower two vs highest tertile: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.208, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.477–3.061). However, the highest tertile group was significantly associated with lower incidences of secondary outcomes (lower two vs highest tertile: HR [95% CI] = 0.494 [0.277–0.882]) after adjusting for confounding factors. The decreased mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with adverse clinical outcomes in PD patients. PMID:26886611

  2. Remote logo detection using angle-distance histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sungwook; Ok, Jiheon; Baek, Sangwook; Woo, Seongyoun; Lee, Chulhee

    2016-05-01

    Among all the various computer vision applications, automatic logo recognition has drawn great interest from industry as well as various academic institutions. In this paper, we propose an angle-distance map, which we used to develop a robust logo detection algorithm. The proposed angle-distance histogram is invariant against scale and rotation. The proposed method first used shape information and color characteristics to find the candidate regions and then applied the angle-distance histogram. Experiments show that the proposed method detected logos of various sizes and orientations.

  3. Serum DNA Motifs Predict Disease and Clinical Status in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Julia; Urnovitz, Howard B.; Saresella, Marina; Caputo, Domenico; Clerici, Mario; Mitchell, William M.; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    Using recently available mass sequencing and assembly technologies, we have been able to identify and quantify unique cell-free DNA motifs in the blood of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The most common MS clinical syndrome, relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), is accompanied by a unique fingerprint of both inter- and intragenic cell-free circulating nucleic acids as specific DNA sequences that provide significant clinical sensitivity and specificity. Coding genes that are differentially represented in MS serum encode cytoskeletal proteins, brain-expressed regulators of growth, and receptors involved in nervous system signal transduction. Although coding genes distinguish RRMS and its clinical activity, several repeat sequences, such as the L1M family of LINE elements, are consistently different in all MS patients and clinical status versus the normal database. These data demonstrate that DNA motifs observed in serum are characteristic of RRMS and disease activity and are promising as a clinical tool in monitoring patient responses to treatment modalities. PMID:20228264

  4. Electroporation for the Delivery of DNA-based Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics: Current Clinical Developments

    PubMed Central

    Bodles-Brakhop, Angela M; Heller, Richard; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2009-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) has been used in basic research for the past 25 years to aid in the transfer of DNA into cells in vitro. EP in vivo enhances transfer of DNA vaccines and therapeutic plasmids to the skin, muscle, tumors, and other tissues resulting in high levels of expression, often with serological and clinical benefits. The recent interest in nonviral gene transfer as treatment options for a vast array of conditions has resulted in the refinement and optimization of EP technology. Current research has revealed that EP can be successfully used in many species, including humans. Clinical trials are currently under way. Herein, the transition of EP from basic science to clinical trials will be discussed. PMID:19223870

  5. Anterior chamber angle classification using multiscale histograms of oriented gradients for glaucoma subtype identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanwu; Liu, Jiang; Tan, Ngan Meng; Lee, Beng Hai; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Baskaran, Mani; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma subtype can be identified according to the configuration of the anterior chamber angle(ACA). In this paper, we present an ACA classification approach based on histograms of oriented gradients at multiple scales. In digital optical coherence tomography (OCT) photographs, our method automatically localizes the ACA, and extracts histograms of oriented gradients (HOG) features from this region to classify the angle as an open angle (OA) or an angle-closure(AC). This proposed method has three major features that differs from existing methods. First, the ACA localization from OCT images is fully automated and efficient for different ACA configurations. Second, the ACA is directly classified as OA/AC by using multiscale HOG visual features only, which is different from previous ACA assessment approaches that on clinical features. Third, it demonstrates that visual features with higher dimensions outperform low dimensional clinical features in terms of angle closure classification accuracy. Testing was performed on a large clinical dataset, comprising of 2048 images. The proposed method achieves a 0.835±0.068 AUC value and 75.8% ± 6.4% balanced accuracy at a 85% specificity, which outperforms existing ACA classification approaches based on clinical features.

  6. Histogram-Based Calibration Method for Pipeline ADCs

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyeonuk; Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Heetae; Kang, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Measurement and calibration of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using a histogram-based method requires a large volume of data and a long test duration, especially for a high resolution ADC. A fast and accurate calibration method for pipelined ADCs is proposed in this research. The proposed calibration method composes histograms through the outputs of each stage and calculates error sources. The digitized outputs of a stage are influenced directly by the operation of the prior stage, so the results of the histogram provide the information of errors in the prior stage. The composed histograms reduce the required samples and thus calibration time being implemented by simple modules. For 14-bit resolution pipelined ADC, the measured maximum integral non-linearity (INL) is improved from 6.78 to 0.52 LSB, and the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) and signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR) are improved from 67.0 to 106.2dB and from 65.6 to 84.8dB, respectively. PMID:26070196

  7. Histogram-Based Calibration Method for Pipeline ADCs.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeonuk; Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Heetae; Kang, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Measurement and calibration of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using a histogram-based method requires a large volume of data and a long test duration, especially for a high resolution ADC. A fast and accurate calibration method for pipelined ADCs is proposed in this research. The proposed calibration method composes histograms through the outputs of each stage and calculates error sources. The digitized outputs of a stage are influenced directly by the operation of the prior stage, so the results of the histogram provide the information of errors in the prior stage. The composed histograms reduce the required samples and thus calibration time being implemented by simple modules. For 14-bit resolution pipelined ADC, the measured maximum integral non-linearity (INL) is improved from 6.78 to 0.52 LSB, and the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) and signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR) are improved from 67.0 to 106.2dB and from 65.6 to 84.8dB, respectively.

  8. Histogram-Based Calibration Method for Pipeline ADCs.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeonuk; Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Heetae; Kang, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Measurement and calibration of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using a histogram-based method requires a large volume of data and a long test duration, especially for a high resolution ADC. A fast and accurate calibration method for pipelined ADCs is proposed in this research. The proposed calibration method composes histograms through the outputs of each stage and calculates error sources. The digitized outputs of a stage are influenced directly by the operation of the prior stage, so the results of the histogram provide the information of errors in the prior stage. The composed histograms reduce the required samples and thus calibration time being implemented by simple modules. For 14-bit resolution pipelined ADC, the measured maximum integral non-linearity (INL) is improved from 6.78 to 0.52 LSB, and the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) and signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR) are improved from 67.0 to 106.2dB and from 65.6 to 84.8dB, respectively. PMID:26070196

  9. Cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy as a clinical service.

    PubMed

    Cuckle, Howard; Benn, Peter; Pergament, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) through the analysis of cell free (cf)DNA is revolutionizing prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy. Current methods used in clinical practice include shotgun massively parallel sequencing (s-MPS); targeted (t-MPS); and an approach that takes advantage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences between mother and fetus. Efficacy of cfDNA testing for the common autosomal trisomies far exceeds that of conventional screening. Depending on the methodology used, reasons for discordancy between cfDNA results and fetal karyotype can include true fetal mosaicism, confined placental mosaicism, presence of a maternal karyotype abnormality, insufficient counting due to low fetal fraction, and a vanishing twin. Among the possible cfDNA strategies a Primary test has the highest performance but is expensive, while a Contingent cfDNA test can achieve high performance at a relatively low cost. Practicalities to be considered in the provision of testing include pretest counseling about the scope and accuracy of the testing, the interpretation of results when there is a low fetal fraction and follow-up studies for positive test results. The role of first trimester nuchal translucency measurement and conventional biochemical testing needs to be reassessed in the context of the use of cfDNA. PMID:25732593

  10. DNA alterations in the tumor genome and their associations with clinical outcome in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wennuan

    2016-01-01

    Although most prostate cancer (PCa) cases are not life-threatening, approximately 293 000 men worldwide die annually due to PCa. These lethal cases are thought to be caused by coordinated genomic alterations that accumulate over time. Recent genome-wide analyses of DNA from subjects with PCa have revealed most, if not all, genetic changes in both germline and PCa tumor genomes. In this article, I first review the major, somatically acquired genomic characteristics of various subtypes of PCa. I then recap key findings on the relationships between genomic alterations and clinical parameters, such as biochemical recurrence or clinical relapse, metastasis and cancer-specific mortality. Finally, I outline the need for, and challenges with, validation of recent findings in prospective studies for clinical utility. It is clearer now than ever before that the landscape of somatically acquired aberrations in PCa is highlighted by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and TMPRSS2-ERG fusion derived from complex rearrangements, numerous single nucleotide variations or mutations, tremendous heterogeneity, and continuously punctuated evolution. Genome-wide CNAs, PTEN loss, MYC gain in primary tumors, and TP53 loss/mutation and AR amplification/mutation in advanced metastatic PCa have consistently been associated with worse cancer prognosis. With this recently gained knowledge, it is now an opportune time to develop DNA-based tests that provide more accurate patient stratification for prediction of clinical outcome, which will ultimately lead to more personalized cancer care than is possible at present. PMID:26975494

  11. Detection of Head-to-Tail DNA Sequences of Human Bocavirus in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tillmann, Ramona Liza; Wittleben, Felix; Böhmer, Anne; Müller, Andreas; Schildgen, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Parvoviruses are single stranded DNA viruses that replicate in a so called “rolling-hairpin” mechanism, a variant of the rolling circle replication known for bacteriophages like ϕX174. The replication intermediates of parvoviruses thus are concatemers of head-to-head or tail-to-tail structure. Surprisingly, in case of the novel human bocavirus, neither head-to-head nor tail-to-tail DNA sequences were detected in clinical isolates; in contrast head-to-tail DNA sequences were identified by PCR and sequencing. Thereby, the head-to-tail sequences were linked by a novel sequence of 54 bp of which 20 bp also occur as conserved structures of the palindromic ends of parvovirus MVC which in turn is a close relative to human bocavirus. PMID:21573237

  12. Decoding brain cancer dynamics: a quantitative histogram-based approach using temporal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Russo, Robin; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumor heterogeneity remains a challenge for probing brain cancer evolutionary dynamics. In light of evolution, it is a priority to inspect the cancer system from a time-domain perspective since it explicitly tracks the dynamics of cancer variations. In this paper, we study the problem of exploring brain tumor heterogeneity from temporal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Our goal is to discover evidence-based knowledge from such temporal imaging data, where multiple clinical MRI scans from Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients are generated during therapy. In particular, we propose a quantitative histogram-based approach that builds a prediction model to measure the difference in histograms obtained from pre- and post-treatment. The study could significantly assist radiologists by providing a metric to identify distinctive patterns within each tumor, which is crucial for the goal of providing patient-specific treatments. We examine the proposed approach for a practical application - clinical survival group prediction. Experimental results show that our approach achieved 90.91% accuracy.

  13. PARP1 impact on DNA repair of platinum adducts: preclinical and clinical read-outs.

    PubMed

    Olaussen, Ken A; Adam, Julien; Vanhecke, Elsa; Vielh, Philippe; Pirker, Robert; Friboulet, Luc; Popper, Helmut; Robin, Angélique; Commo, Fréderic; Thomale, Jürgen; Kayitalire, Louis; Filipits, Martin; Le Chevalier, Thierry; André, Fabrice; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of DNA repair proteins might provide meaningful information in relation to prognosis and chemotherapy efficacy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. The role of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) in DNA repair of platinum adducts has not been firmly established. We used a DNA repair functional test based on antibody recognition of cisplatin intrastrand platinum adducts on DNA. We evaluated the effect of PARP inhibition on DNA repair functionality in a panel of cisplatin cell lines treated by the clinical-grade pharmacological inhibitor CEP8983 (a 4-methoxy-carbazole derivate) and the commercially available inhibitor PJ34 (phenanthridinone). We determined PARP1 protein expression in whole tumor sections from the International Adjuvant Lung cancer Trial (IALT)-bio study and tested a 3-marker PARP1/MSH2/ERCC1 algorithm combining PARP1 tumor status with previously published data. Chemosensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cell lines was correlated with the accumulation of cisplatin DNA adducts (P=0.0004). Further, the pharmacological inhibition of PARP induced a 1.7 to 2.3-fold increase in platinum adduct accumulation (24h) in A549 cell line suggesting a slow-down of platinum DNA-adduct repair capacity. In parallel, PARP1 inhibition increased the sensitivity to cisplatin treatment. In patient samples, PARP1 expression levels did not influence patient survival or the effect of platinum-based post-operative chemotherapy in the global IALT-bio population (interaction P=0.79). Among cases with high expression of all three markers (triple positive), untreated patients had prolonged survival with a median DFS of 7.8 years, (HR=0.34, 95%CI [0.19-0.61], adjusted P=0.0003) compared to triple negative patients (1.4 years). Remarkably, triple positive patients suffered from a detrimental effect (4.9-year reduction of median DFS) by post-operative cisplatin-based chemotherapy (HR=1.79, 95%CI [1.01-3.17], adjusted P=0.04, chemotherapy vs. control). Combinatorial

  14. Depletion of Human DNA in Spiked Clinical Specimens for Improvement of Sensitivity of Pathogen Detection by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mohammad R; Rawat, Arun; Tang, Patrick; Jithesh, Puthen V; Thomas, Eva; Tan, Rusung; Tilley, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has shown promise for the detection of human pathogens from clinical samples. However, one of the major obstacles to the use of NGS in diagnostic microbiology is the low ratio of pathogen DNA to human DNA in most clinical specimens. In this study, we aimed to develop a specimen-processing protocol to remove human DNA and enrich specimens for bacterial and viral DNA for shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens, spiked with control bacterial and viral pathogens, were processed using either a commercially available kit (MolYsis) or various detergents followed by DNase prior to the extraction of DNA. Relative quantities of human DNA and pathogen DNA were determined by real-time PCR. The MolYsis kit did not improve the pathogen-to-human DNA ratio, but significant reductions (>95%;P< 0.001) in human DNA with minimal effect on pathogen DNA were achieved in samples that were treated with 0.025% saponin, a nonionic surfactant. Specimen preprocessing significantly decreased NGS reads mapped to the human genome (P< 0.05) and improved the sensitivity of pathogen detection (P< 0.01), with a 20- to 650-fold increase in the ratio of microbial reads to human reads. Preprocessing also permitted the detection of pathogens that were undetectable in the unprocessed samples. Our results demonstrate a simple method for the reduction of background human DNA for metagenomic detection for a broad range of pathogens in clinical samples.

  15. Design of a Clinical Information Management System to Support DNA Analysis Laboratory Operation

    PubMed Central

    Dubay, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, David; Popovich, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The LabDirector system has been developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University to support the operation of our clinical DNA analysis laboratory. Through an iterative design process which has spanned two years, we have produced a system that is both highly tailored to a clinical genetics production laboratory and flexible in its implementation, to support the rapid growth and change of protocols and methodologies in use in the field. The administrative aspects of the system are integrated with an enterprise schedule management system. The laboratory side of the system is driven by a protocol modeling and execution system. The close integration between these two aspects of the clinical laboratory facilitates smooth operations, and allows management to accurately measure costs and performance. The entire application has been designed and documented to provide utility to a wide range of clinical laboratory environments.

  16. Phylogeny and PCR Identification of Clinically Important Zygomycetes Based on Nuclear Ribosomal-DNA Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Kerstin; Cigelnik, Elizabeth; O'donnell, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    A molecular database for all clinically important Zygomycetes was constructed from nucleotide sequences from the nuclear small-subunit (18S) ribosomal DNA and domains D1 and D2 of the nuclear large-subunit (28S) ribosomal DNA. Parsimony analysis of the aligned 18S and 28S DNA sequences was used to investigate phylogenetic relationships among 42 isolates representing species of Zygomycetes reported to cause infections in humans and other animals, together with commonly cultured contaminants, with emphasis on members of the Mucorales. The molecular phylogeny provided strong support for the monophyly of the Mucorales, exclusive of Echinosporangium transversale and Mortierella spp., which are currently misclassified within the Mucorales. Micromucor ramannianus, traditionally classified within Mortierella, and Syncephalastrum racemosum represent the basal divergences within the Mucorales. Based on the 18S gene tree topology, Absidia corymbifera and Rhizomucor variabilis appear to be misplaced taxonomically. A. corymbifera is strongly supported as a sister group of the Rhizomucor miehei-Rhizomucor pusillus clade, while R. variabilis is nested within Mucor. The aligned 28S sequences were used to design 13 taxon-specific PCR primer pairs for those taxa most commonly implicated in infections. All of the primers specifically amplified DNA of the size predicted based on the DNA sequence data from the target taxa; however, they did not cross-react with phylogenetically related species. These primers have the potential to be used in a PCR assay for the rapid and accurate identification of the etiological agents of mucormycoses and entomophthoromycoses. PMID:10565914

  17. Total HIV-1 DNA, a Marker of Viral Reservoir Dynamics with Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Ghosn, Jade; Cheret, Antoine; Frange, Pierre; Melard, Adeline; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 DNA persists in infected cells despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), forming viral reservoirs. Recent trials of strategies targeting latent HIV reservoirs have rekindled hopes of curing HIV infection, and reliable markers are thus needed to evaluate viral reservoirs. Total HIV DNA quantification is simple, standardized, sensitive, and reproducible. Total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In particular, it is predictive of progression to AIDS and death, independently of HIV RNA load and the CD4 cell count. Baseline total HIV DNA load is predictive of the response to cART. It declines during cART but remains quantifiable, at a level that reflects both the history of infection (HIV RNA zenith, CD4 cell count nadir) and treatment efficacy (residual viremia, cumulative viremia, immune restoration, immune cell activation). Total HIV DNA load in blood is also predictive of the presence and severity of some HIV-1-associated end-organ disorders. It can be useful to guide individual treatment, notably, therapeutic de-escalation. Although it does not distinguish between replication-competent and -defective latent viruses, the total HIV DNA load in blood, tissues, and cells provides insights into HIV pathogenesis, probably because all viral forms participate in host cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Total HIV DNA is thus a biomarker of HIV reservoirs, which can be defined as all infected cells and tissues containing all forms of HIV persistence that participate in pathogenesis. This participation may occur through the production of new virions, creating new cycles of infection and disseminating infected cells; maintenance or amplification of reservoirs by homeostatic cell proliferation; and viral transcription and synthesis of viral proteins without new virion production. These proteins can induce immune activation, thus participating in the vicious circle of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27559075

  18. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA) Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Lowes, Lori E; Bratman, Scott V; Dittamore, Ryan; Done, Susan; Kelley, Shana O; Mai, Sabine; Morin, Ryan D; Wyatt, Alexander W; Allan, Alison L

    2016-01-01

    Despite the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as potential blood-based biomarkers capable of providing prognostic and predictive information in cancer, they have not been incorporated into routine clinical practice. This resistance is due in part to technological limitations hampering CTC and cfDNA analysis, as well as a limited understanding of precisely how to interpret emergent biomarkers across various disease stages and tumor types. In recognition of these challenges, a group of researchers and clinicians focused on blood-based biomarker development met at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Spring Meeting in Toronto, Canada on 29 April 2016 for a workshop discussing novel CTC/cfDNA technologies, interpretation of data obtained from CTCs versus cfDNA, challenges regarding disease evolution and heterogeneity, and logistical considerations for incorporation of CTCs/cfDNA into clinical trials, and ultimately into routine clinical use. The objectives of this workshop included discussion of the current barriers to clinical implementation and recent progress made in the field, as well as fueling meaningful collaborations and partnerships between researchers and clinicians. We anticipate that the considerations highlighted at this workshop will lead to advances in both basic and translational research and will ultimately impact patient management strategies and patient outcomes. PMID:27618023

  19. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA) Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, Lori E.; Bratman, Scott V.; Dittamore, Ryan; Done, Susan; Kelley, Shana O.; Mai, Sabine; Morin, Ryan D.; Wyatt, Alexander W.; Allan, Alison L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as potential blood-based biomarkers capable of providing prognostic and predictive information in cancer, they have not been incorporated into routine clinical practice. This resistance is due in part to technological limitations hampering CTC and cfDNA analysis, as well as a limited understanding of precisely how to interpret emergent biomarkers across various disease stages and tumor types. In recognition of these challenges, a group of researchers and clinicians focused on blood-based biomarker development met at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Spring Meeting in Toronto, Canada on 29 April 2016 for a workshop discussing novel CTC/cfDNA technologies, interpretation of data obtained from CTCs versus cfDNA, challenges regarding disease evolution and heterogeneity, and logistical considerations for incorporation of CTCs/cfDNA into clinical trials, and ultimately into routine clinical use. The objectives of this workshop included discussion of the current barriers to clinical implementation and recent progress made in the field, as well as fueling meaningful collaborations and partnerships between researchers and clinicians. We anticipate that the considerations highlighted at this workshop will lead to advances in both basic and translational research and will ultimately impact patient management strategies and patient outcomes. PMID:27618023

  20. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA) Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Lowes, Lori E; Bratman, Scott V; Dittamore, Ryan; Done, Susan; Kelley, Shana O; Mai, Sabine; Morin, Ryan D; Wyatt, Alexander W; Allan, Alison L

    2016-09-08

    Despite the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as potential blood-based biomarkers capable of providing prognostic and predictive information in cancer, they have not been incorporated into routine clinical practice. This resistance is due in part to technological limitations hampering CTC and cfDNA analysis, as well as a limited understanding of precisely how to interpret emergent biomarkers across various disease stages and tumor types. In recognition of these challenges, a group of researchers and clinicians focused on blood-based biomarker development met at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Spring Meeting in Toronto, Canada on 29 April 2016 for a workshop discussing novel CTC/cfDNA technologies, interpretation of data obtained from CTCs versus cfDNA, challenges regarding disease evolution and heterogeneity, and logistical considerations for incorporation of CTCs/cfDNA into clinical trials, and ultimately into routine clinical use. The objectives of this workshop included discussion of the current barriers to clinical implementation and recent progress made in the field, as well as fueling meaningful collaborations and partnerships between researchers and clinicians. We anticipate that the considerations highlighted at this workshop will lead to advances in both basic and translational research and will ultimately impact patient management strategies and patient outcomes.

  1. Fingerprint image segmentation based on multi-features histogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Youguang

    2007-11-01

    An effective fingerprint image segmentation based on multi-features histogram analysis is presented. We extract a new feature, together with three other features to segment fingerprints. Two of these four features, each of which is related to one of the other two, are reciprocals with each other, so features are divided into two groups. These two features' histograms are calculated respectively to determine which feature group is introduced to segment the aim-fingerprint. The features could also divide fingerprints into two classes with high and low quality. Experimental results show that our algorithm could classify foreground and background effectively with lower computational cost, and it can also reduce pseudo-minutiae detected and improve the performance of AFIS.

  2. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  3. Enhancing DNA electro-transformation efficiency on a clinical Staphylococcus capitis isolate.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bintao; Smooker, Peter M; Rouch, Duncan A; Deighton, Margaret A

    2015-02-01

    Clinical staphylococcus isolates possess a stronger restriction-modification (RM) barrier than laboratory strains. Clinical isolates are therefore more resistant to acceptance of foreign genetic material than laboratory strains, as their restriction systems more readily recognize and destroy foreign DNA. This stronger barrier consequently restricts genetic studies to a small number of domestic strains that are capable of accepting foreign DNA. In this study, an isolate of Staphylococcus capitis, obtained from the blood of a very low birth-weight baby, was transformed with a shuttle vector, pBT2. Optimal conditions for electro-transformation were as follows: cells were harvested at mid-log phase, electro-competent cells were prepared; cells were pre-treated at 55°C for 1min; 3μg of plasmid DNA was mixed with 70-80μL of competent cells (3-4×10(10)cells/mL) at 20°C in 0.5M sucrose, 10% glycerol; and electroporation was conducted using 2.1kV/cm field strength with a 0.1cm gap. Compared to the conventional method, which involves DNA electroporation of Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 as an intermediate strain to overcome the restriction barrier, our proposed approach exhibits a higher level (3 log10 units) of transformation efficiency. Heat treatment was used to temporarily inactivate the recipient RM barrier. Other important parameters contributing to improved electro-transformation efficiency were growth stage for cell harvesting, the quantity of DNA, the transformation temperature and field strength. The approach described here may facilitate genetic manipulations of this opportunistic pathogen.

  4. DNA methylation profiles delineate etiologic heterogeneity and clinically important subgroups of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm-Benartzi, C S; Koestler, D C; Houseman, E A; Christensen, B C; Wiencke, John K; Schned, A R; Karagas, M R; Kelsey, K T; Marsit, C J

    2010-11-01

    DNA methylation profiles can be used to define molecular cancer subtypes that may better inform disease etiology and clinical decision-making. This investigation aimed to create DNA methylation profiles of bladder cancer based on CpG methylation from almost 800 cancer-related genes and to then examine the relationship of those profiles with exposures related to risk and clinical characteristics. DNA, derived from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples obtained from incident cases involved in a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer in New Hampshire, was used for methylation profiling on the Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Bead Array. Unsupervised clustering of those loci with the greatest change in methylation between tumor and non-diseased tissue was performed to defined molecular subgroups of disease, and univariate tests of association followed by multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the association between these classes, bladder cancer risk factors and clinical phenotypes. Membership in the two most methylated classes was significantly associated with invasive disease (P < 0.001 for both class 3 and 4). Male gender (P = 0.04) and age >70 years (P = 0.05) was associated with membership in one of the most methylated classes. Finally, average water arsenic levels in the highest percentile predicted membership in an intermediately methylated class of tumors (P = 0.02 for both classes). Exposures and demographic associated with increased risk of bladder cancer specifically associate with particular subgroups of tumors defined by DNA methylation profiling and these subgroups may define more aggressive disease.

  5. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium: evidence and potential clinical use.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Elizabeth R; Shelling, Andrew N; Cree, Lynsey M

    2016-08-01

    The ability to screen embryos for aneuploidy or inherited disorders in a minimally invasive manner may represent a major advancement for the future of embryo viability assessment. Recent studies have demonstrated that both blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium contain genetic material, which can be isolated and subjected to downstream genetic analysis. The blastocoele fluid may represent an alternative source of nuclear DNA for aneuploidy testing, although the degree to which the isolated genetic material is solely representative of the developing embryo is currently unclear. In addition to nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be detected in the embryo culture medium. Currently, the origin of this nuclear and mtDNA has not been fully evaluated and there are several potential sources of contamination that may contribute to the genetic material detected in the culture medium. There is however evidence that the mtDNA content of the culture medium is related to embryo fragmentation levels and its presence is predictive of blastulation, indicating that embryo development may influence the levels of genetic material detected. If the levels of genetic material are strongly related to aspects of embryo quality, then this may be a novel biomarker of embryo viability. If the genetic material does have an embryo origin, the mechanisms by which DNA may be released into the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium are unknown, although apoptosis may play a role. While the presence of this genetic material is an exciting discovery, the DNA in the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium appears to be of low yield and integrity, which makes it challenging to study. Further research aimed at assessing the methodologies used for both isolating and analysing this genetic material, as well as tracing its origin, are needed in order to evaluate its potential for clinical use. Should such methodologies prove to be routinely successful and the DNA recovered

  6. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium: evidence and potential clinical use.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Elizabeth R; Shelling, Andrew N; Cree, Lynsey M

    2016-08-01

    The ability to screen embryos for aneuploidy or inherited disorders in a minimally invasive manner may represent a major advancement for the future of embryo viability assessment. Recent studies have demonstrated that both blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium contain genetic material, which can be isolated and subjected to downstream genetic analysis. The blastocoele fluid may represent an alternative source of nuclear DNA for aneuploidy testing, although the degree to which the isolated genetic material is solely representative of the developing embryo is currently unclear. In addition to nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be detected in the embryo culture medium. Currently, the origin of this nuclear and mtDNA has not been fully evaluated and there are several potential sources of contamination that may contribute to the genetic material detected in the culture medium. There is however evidence that the mtDNA content of the culture medium is related to embryo fragmentation levels and its presence is predictive of blastulation, indicating that embryo development may influence the levels of genetic material detected. If the levels of genetic material are strongly related to aspects of embryo quality, then this may be a novel biomarker of embryo viability. If the genetic material does have an embryo origin, the mechanisms by which DNA may be released into the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium are unknown, although apoptosis may play a role. While the presence of this genetic material is an exciting discovery, the DNA in the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium appears to be of low yield and integrity, which makes it challenging to study. Further research aimed at assessing the methodologies used for both isolating and analysing this genetic material, as well as tracing its origin, are needed in order to evaluate its potential for clinical use. Should such methodologies prove to be routinely successful and the DNA recovered

  7. New parachlamydial 16S rDNA phylotypes detected in human clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle; Valassina, Marcello

    2002-11-01

    Chlamydiales are important intracellular bacterial pathogens, causing a wide variety of diseases in vertebrates, including humans. Besides the well-known species in the family Chlamydiaceae, new chlamydial organisms have recently been discovered, forming three new families: Parachlamydiaceae, Simkaniaceae and Waddliaceae. Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis are currently investigated as emerging human respiratory pathogens. Additional chlamydial lineages have been discovered by 16S rDNA-based molecular studies, and their implication in human infections is poorly known. By using a pan-chlamydia 16S rDNA PCR, we have searched for the presence of chlamydiae in 228 clinical samples that all previously had been shown to be PCR-negative for Chlamydophila pneumoniae: 170 respiratory samples, 45 atheromatic plaques and 13 peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Nine respiratory samples tested positive. Sequence analysis has allowed us to assign four sequences to Chlamydophila psittaci, three sequences to Chlamydophila felis, and two sequences to two novel phylotypes belonging to the Parachlamydiaceae. These latter sequences showed similarity values of more than 93% with each other and with the P. acanthamoebae sequence, thus belonging to novel, unrecognized species. In conclusion, this report showed that a variety of non-C. pneumoniae chlamydial respiratory infection is present in humans, and that new parachlamydiae distinct from P. acanthamoebae may be detected in human clinical samples. Future studies will be of interest in order to estimate the diversity of these novel chlamydiae in both clinical and environmental samples, as well as their possible clinical implication in human and animal infections.

  8. Conformational thermodynamics of biomolecular complexes: The histogram-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Sikdar, Samapan; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarti, J.

    2015-09-01

    Conformational changes in biomacromolecules govern majority of biological processes. Complete characterization of conformational contributions to thermodynamics of complexation of biomacromolecules has been challenging. Although, advances in NMR relaxation experiments and several computational studies have revealed important aspects of conformational entropy changes, efficient and large-scale estimations still remain an intriguing facet. Recent histogram-based method (HBM) offers a simple yet rigorous route to estimate both conformational entropy and free energy changes from same set of histograms in an efficient manner. The HBM utilizes the power of histograms which can be generated as accurately as desired from an arbitrarily large sample space from atomistic simulation trajectories. Here we discuss some recent applications of the HBM, using dihedral angles of amino acid residues as conformational variables, which provide good measure of conformational thermodynamics of several protein-peptide complexes, obtained from NMR, metal-ion binding to an important metalloprotein, interfacial changes in protein-protein complex and insight to protein function, coupled with conformational changes. We conclude the paper with a few future directions worth pursuing.

  9. Slope histogram distribution-based parametrisation of Martian geomorphic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Zita; Székely, Balázs; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    The application of geomorphometric methods on the large Martian digital topographic datasets paves the way to analyse the Martian areomorphic processes in more detail. One of the numerous methods is the analysis is to analyse local slope distributions. To this implementation a visualization program code was developed that allows to calculate the local slope histograms and to compare them based on Kolmogorov distance criterion. As input data we used the digital elevation models (DTMs) derived from HRSC high-resolution stereo camera image from various Martian regions. The Kolmogorov-criterion based discrimination produces classes of slope histograms that displayed using coloration obtaining an image map. In this image map the distribution can be visualized by their different colours representing the various classes. Our goal is to create a local slope histogram based classification for large Martian areas in order to obtain information about general morphological characteristics of the region. This is a contribution of the TMIS.ascrea project, financed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). The present research is partly realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4.A/2-11-1-2012-0001 high priority "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and Operating an Inland Student and Researcher Personal Support System convergence program" project's scholarship support, using Hungarian state and European Union funds and cofinances from the European Social Fund.

  10. Finding significantly connected voxels based on histograms of connection strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasenburg, Niklas; Pedersen, Morten Vester; Darkner, Sune

    2016-03-01

    We explore a new approach for structural connectivity based segmentations of subcortical brain regions. Connectivity based segmentations are usually based on fibre connections from a seed region to predefined target regions. We present a method for finding significantly connected voxels based on the distribution of connection strengths. Paths from seed voxels to all voxels in a target region are obtained from a shortest-path tractography. For each seed voxel we approximate the distribution with a histogram of path scores. We hypothesise that the majority of estimated connections are false-positives and that their connection strength is distributed differently from true-positive connections. Therefore, an empirical null-distribution is defined for each target region as the average normalized histogram over all voxels in the seed region. Single histograms are then tested against the corresponding null-distribution and significance is determined using the false discovery rate (FDR). Segmentations are based on significantly connected voxels and their FDR. In this work we focus on the thalamus and the target regions were chosen by dividing the cortex into a prefrontal/temporal zone, motor zone, somatosensory zone and a parieto-occipital zone. The obtained segmentations consistently show a sparse number of significantly connected voxels that are located near the surface of the anterior thalamus over a population of 38 subjects.

  11. Local Histograms for Classifying H&E Stained Tissues.

    PubMed

    Massar, M L; Bhagavatula, R; Fickus, M; Kovačević, J

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a rigorous mathematical theory for the analysis of local histograms, and consider the appropriateness of their use in the automated classification of textures commonly encountered in images of H&E stained tissues. We first discuss some of the many image features that pathologists indicate they use when classifying tissues, focusing on simple, locally-defined features that essentially involve pixel counting: the number of cells in a region of given size, the size of the nuclei within these cells, and the distribution of color within both. We then introduce a probabilistic, occlusion-based model for textures that exhibit these features, in particular demonstrating how certain tissue-similar textures can be built up from simpler ones. After considering the basic notions and properties of local histogram transforms, we then formally demonstrate that such transforms are natural tools for analyzing the textures produced by our model. In particular, we discuss how local histogram transforms can be used to produce numerical features that, when fed into mainstream classification schemes, mimic the baser aspects of a pathologist's thought process. PMID:24839388

  12. Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gap Adjustment for Histogram Equalization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Ting, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement methods have been widely used to improve the visual effects of images. Owing to its simplicity and effectiveness histogram equalization (HE) is one of the methods used for enhancing image contrast. However, HE may result in over-enhancement and feature loss problems that lead to unnatural look and loss of details in the processed images. Researchers have proposed various HE-based methods to solve the over-enhancement problem; however, they have largely ignored the feature loss problem. Therefore, a contrast enhancement algorithm based on gap adjustment for histogram equalization (CegaHE) is proposed. It refers to a visual contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (VCEA), which generates visually pleasing enhanced images, and improves the enhancement effects of VCEA. CegaHE adjusts the gaps between two gray values based on the adjustment equation, which takes the properties of human visual perception into consideration, to solve the over-enhancement problem. Besides, it also alleviates the feature loss problem and further enhances the textures in the dark regions of the images to improve the quality of the processed images for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that CegaHE is a reliable method for contrast enhancement and that it significantly outperforms VCEA and other methods. PMID:27338412

  13. Implementing a 3D histogram version of the Energy-Test in ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E. O.; Reid, I. D.; Piasetzky, E.

    2016-08-01

    Comparing simulation and data histograms is of interest in nuclear and particle physics experiments; however, the leading three-dimensional histogram comparison tool available in ROOT, the 3D Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, exhibits shortcomings. Throughout the following, we present and discuss the implementation of an alternative comparison test for three-dimensional histograms, based on the Energy-Test by Aslan and Zech.

  14. Is mitochondrial DNA copy number associated with clinical characteristics and prognosis in gastric cancer?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunsu; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dong-Choon; Hwang, IlSeon; Kang, Yu-Na; Gwon, Gi-Jeong; Choi, In-Jang; Kim, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been studied in various cancers. However, the clinical value of mtDNA copy number (mtCN) alterations in gastric cancer (GC) is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether alterations in mtCNs might be associated with clinicopathological parameters in GC cases. mtCN was measured in 109 patients with GC by quantitative real-time PCR. Then, correlations with clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. mtCN was elevated in 64.2% of GC tissues compared with paired, adjacent, non-cancerous tissue. However, the observed alterations in mtCN were not associated with any clinicopathological characteristics, including age, gender, TN stage, Lauren classification, lymph node metastasis, and depth of invasion. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that mtCN was not significantly associated with the survival of GC patients. In this study, we demonstrated that mtCN was not a significant marker for predicting clinical characteristics or prognosis in GC. PMID:25640396

  15. Biofilm extracellular-DNA in 55 Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical isolates from implant infections.

    PubMed

    Ravaioli, Stefano; Campoccia, Davide; Visai, Livia; Pirini, Valter; Cangini, Ilaria; Corazzari, Tolmino; Maso, Alessandra; Poggio, Claudio; Pegreffi, Francesco; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2011-09-01

    Biofilm formation is broadly recognized as an important virulence factor in many bacterial species implicated in implant-related opportunistic infections. In spite of a long history of research and many investigative efforts aimed at elucidating their chemical composition, structure, and function, the nature of bacterial biofilms still remains only partly revealed. Over the years, different extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have been described that contribute functionally and structurally to the organization of biofilms. Recently extracellular DNA (eDNA) has emerged as a quantitatively conspicuous and potentially relevant structural component of microbial biofilms of many microbial species, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis among them. The present study aims at comparatively investigating the amount of eDNA present in the biofilm of 55 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis from postsurgical and biomaterial-related orthopedic infections. Quantification of eDNA was performed by a non-destructive method directly on bacterial biofilms formed under static conditions on the plastic surface of 96-well plates. PMID:22094564

  16. Clinical applications of maternal plasma fetal DNA analysis: translating the fruits of 15 years of research.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Rossa Wai Kwun; Lo, Yuk Ming Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The collection of fetal genetic materials is required for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal genetic diseases. The conventional methods for sampling fetal genetic materials, such as amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling, are invasive in nature and are associated with a risk of fetal miscarriage. For decades, scientists had been pursuing studies with goals to develop non-invasive methods for prenatal diagnosis. In 1997, the existence of fetal derived cell-free DNA molecules in plasma of pregnant women was first demonstrated. This finding provided a new source of fetal genetic material that could be obtained safely through the collection of a maternal blood sample and provided a new avenue for the development of non-invasive prenatal diagnostic tests. Now 15 years later, the diagnostic potential of circulating fetal DNA analysis has been realized. Fruitful research efforts have resulted in the clinical implementation of a number of non-invasive prenatal tests based on maternal plasma DNA analysis and included tests for fetal sex assessment, fetal rhesus D blood group genotyping and fetal chromosomal aneuploidy detection. Most recently, research groups have succeeded in decoding the entire fetal genome from maternal plasma DNA analysis which paved the way for the achievement of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of many single gene diseases. A paradigm shift in the practice of prenatal diagnosis has begun.

  17. Clinical and public health research using methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation (MeDIP): A comparison of commercially available kits to examine differential DNA methylation across the genome

    PubMed Central

    Brebi-Mieville, Priscilla; Ili-Gangas, Carmen; Leal-Rojas, Pamela; Noordhuis, Maartje; Soudry, Ethan; Perez, Jimena; Roa, Juan Carlos; Sidransky, David; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    The methylated DNA immunoprecipitation method (MeDIP) is a genome-wide, high-resolution approach that detects DNA methylation with oligonucleotide tiling arrays or high throughput sequencing platforms. A simplified high-throughput MeDIP assay will enable translational research studies in clinics and populations, which will greatly enhance our understanding of the human methylome. We compared three commercial kits, MagMeDIP Kit TM (Diagenode), Methylated-DNA IP Kit (Zymo Research) and Methylamp™ Methylated DNA Capture Kit (Epigentek), in order to identify which one has better reliability and sensitivity for genomic DNA enrichment. Each kit was used to enrich two samples, one from fresh tissue and one from a cell line, with two different DNA amounts. The enrichment efficiency of each kit was evaluated by agarose gel band intensity after Nco I digestion and by reaction yield of methylated DNA. A successful enrichment is expected to have a 1:4 to 10:1 conversion ratio and a yield of 80% or higher. We also evaluated the hybridization efficiency to genome-wide methylation arrays in a separate cohort of tissue samples. We observed that the MagMeDIP kit had the highest yield for the two DNA amounts and for both the tissue and cell line samples, as well as for the positive control. In addition, the DNA was successfully enriched from a 1:4 to 10:1 ratio. Therefore, the MagMeDIP kit is a useful research tool that will enable clinical and public health genome-wide DNA methylation studies. PMID:22207357

  18. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part II. Histogram-based analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Whyne, Cari; Hardisty, Michael; Wu, Florence; Skrinskas, Tomas; Clemons, Mark; Gordon, Lyle; Basran, Parminder S.

    2007-08-15

    Radiological imaging is essential to the appropriate management of patients with bone metastasis; however, there have been no widely accepted guidelines as to the optimal method for quantifying the potential impact of skeletal lesions or to evaluate response to treatment. The current inability to rapidly quantify the response of bone metastases excludes patients with cancer and bone disease from participating in clinical trials of many new treatments as these studies frequently require patients with so-called measurable disease. Computed tomography (CT) can provide excellent skeletal detail with a sensitivity for the diagnosis of bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to establish an objective method to quantitatively characterize disease in the bony spine using CT-based segmentations. It was hypothesized that histogram analysis of CT vertebral density distributions would enable standardized segmentation of tumor tissue and consequently allow quantification of disease in the metastatic spine. Thirty two healthy vertebral CT scans were first studied to establish a baseline characterization. The histograms of the trabecular centrums were found to be Gaussian distributions (average root-mean-square difference=30 voxel counts), as expected for a uniform material. Intrapatient vertebral level similarity was also observed as the means were not significantly different (p>0.8). Thus, a patient-specific healthy vertebral body histogram is able to characterize healthy trabecular bone throughout that individual's thoracolumbar spine. Eleven metastatically involved vertebrae were analyzed to determine the characteristics of the lytic and blastic bone voxels relative to the healthy bone. Lytic and blastic tumors were segmented as connected areas with voxel intensities between specified thresholds. The tested thresholds were {mu}-1.0{sigma}, {mu}-1.5{sigma}, and {mu}-2.0{sigma}, for lytic and {mu}+2.0{sigma}, {mu}+3.0{sigma}, and {mu}+3.5{sigma} for blastic tissue where

  19. Prediction of brain tumor progression using multiple histogram matched MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debrup; Tran, Loc; Li, Jiang; Shen, Yuzhong; McKenzie, Frederic; Wang, Jihong

    2011-03-01

    In a recent study [1], we investigated the feasibility of predicting brain tumor progression based on multiple MRI series and we tested our methods on seven patients' MRI images scanned at three consecutive visits A, B and C. Experimental results showed that it is feasible to predict tumor progression from visit A to visit C using a model trained by the information from visit A to visit B. However, the trained model failed when we tried to predict tumor progression from visit B to visit C, though it is clinically more important. Upon a closer look at the MRI scans revealed that histograms of MRI scans such as T1, T2, FLAIR etc taken at different times have slight shifts or different shapes. This is because those MRI scans are qualitative instead of quantitative so MRI scans taken at different times or by different scanners might have slightly different scales or have different homogeneities in the scanning region. In this paper, we proposed a method to overcome this difficulty. The overall goal of this study is to assess brain tumor progression by exploring seven patients' complete MRI records scanned during their visits in the past two years. There are ten MRI series in each visit, including FLAIR, T1-weighted, post-contrast T1-weighted, T2-weighted and five DTI derived MRI volumes: ADC, FA, Max, Min and Middle Eigen Values. After registering all series to the corresponding DTI scan at the first visit, we applied a histogram matching algorithm to non-DTI MRI scans to match their histograms to those of the corresponding MRI scans at the first visit. DTI derived series are quantitative and do not require the histogram matching procedure. A machine learning algorithm was then trained using the data containing information from visit A to visit B, and the trained model was used to predict tumor progression from visit B to visit C. An average of 72% pixel-wise accuracy was achieved for tumor progression prediction from visit B to visit C.

  20. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  1. Content based Image Retrieval based on Different Global and Local Color Histogram Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, Pallikonda Sarah; Sri Rama Krishna, K.; Murali Krishna, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    Different global and local color histogram methods for content based image retrieval (CBIR) are investigated in this paper. Color histogram is a widely used descriptor for CBIR. Conventional method of extracting color histogram is global, which misses the spatial content, is less invariant to deformation and viewpoint changes, and results in a very large three dimensional histogram corresponding to the color space used. To address the above deficiencies, different global and local histogram methods are proposed in recent research. Different ways of extracting local histograms to have spatial correspondence, invariant colour histogram to add deformation and viewpoint invariance and fuzzy linking method to reduce the size of the histogram are found in recent papers. The color space and the distance metric used are vital in obtaining color histogram. In this paper the performance of CBIR based on different global and local color histograms in three different color spaces, namely, RGB, HSV, L*a*b* and also with three distance measures Euclidean, Quadratic and Histogram intersection are surveyed, to choose appropriate method for future research.

  2. DNA Aptamer Selected against Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma for in vivo Imaging and Clinical Tissue Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Zhao, Zilong; Bai, Huarong; Fu, Ting; Yang, Chao; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Qiaoling; Champanhac, Carole; Teng, I-Ting; Ye, Mao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a truncated DNA aptamer, termed XQ-2d, with high affinity and specificity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Aptamer XQ-2d selectively binds to PL45 cells with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range, as determined by its recognition of PL45 tumor cells in mice. Moreover, XQ-2d shows better recognition ratio for 40 tissue sections of clinical PDAC samples (82.5%) compared to the initial cell-SELEX selection library (5%). Therefore, XQ-2d can be considered a promising candidate as a tool for PDAC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26155314

  3. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  4. Classification of CT-brain slices based on local histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Tymkovych, Maksym Y.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Timchik, Sergii V.; Kisała, Piotr; Orakbaev, Yerbol

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgical intervention is a very complicated process. Modern operating procedures based on data such as CT, MRI, etc. Automated analysis of these data is an important task for researchers. Some modern methods of brain-slice segmentation use additional data to process these images. Classification can be used to obtain this information. To classify the CT images of the brain, we suggest using local histogram and features extracted from them. The paper shows the process of feature extraction and classification CT-slices of the brain. The process of feature extraction is specialized for axial cross-section of the brain. The work can be applied to medical neurosurgical systems.

  5. Depletion of Human DNA in Spiked Clinical Specimens for Improvement of Sensitivity of Pathogen Detection by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Arun; Tang, Patrick; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Thomas, Eva; Tan, Rusung; Tilley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has shown promise for the detection of human pathogens from clinical samples. However, one of the major obstacles to the use of NGS in diagnostic microbiology is the low ratio of pathogen DNA to human DNA in most clinical specimens. In this study, we aimed to develop a specimen-processing protocol to remove human DNA and enrich specimens for bacterial and viral DNA for shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens, spiked with control bacterial and viral pathogens, were processed using either a commercially available kit (MolYsis) or various detergents followed by DNase prior to the extraction of DNA. Relative quantities of human DNA and pathogen DNA were determined by real-time PCR. The MolYsis kit did not improve the pathogen-to-human DNA ratio, but significant reductions (>95%; P < 0.001) in human DNA with minimal effect on pathogen DNA were achieved in samples that were treated with 0.025% saponin, a nonionic surfactant. Specimen preprocessing significantly decreased NGS reads mapped to the human genome (P < 0.05) and improved the sensitivity of pathogen detection (P < 0.01), with a 20- to 650-fold increase in the ratio of microbial reads to human reads. Preprocessing also permitted the detection of pathogens that were undetectable in the unprocessed samples. Our results demonstrate a simple method for the reduction of background human DNA for metagenomic detection for a broad range of pathogens in clinical samples. PMID:26763966

  6. A clinical measure of DNA methylation predicts outcome in de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luskin, Marlise R.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Smith, Catherine; Loren, Alison W.; Figueroa, Maria E.; Harrison, Jenna; Sun, Zhuoxin; Tallman, Martin S.; Paietta, Elisabeth M.; Litzow, Mark R.; Melnick, Ari M.; Levine, Ross L.; Fernandez, Hugo F.; Luger, Selina M.; Carroll, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Variable response to chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a major treatment challenge. Clinical and genetic features incompletely predict outcome. The value of clinical epigenetic assays for risk classification has not been extensively explored. We assess the prognostic implications of a clinical assay for multilocus DNA methylation on adult patients with de novo AML. METHODS We performed multilocus DNA methylation assessment using xMELP on samples and calculated a methylation statistic (M-score) for 166 patients from UPENN with de novo AML who received induction chemotherapy. The association of M-score with complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. The optimal M-score cut-point for identifying groups with differing survival was used to define a binary M-score classifier. This classifier was validated in an independent cohort of 383 patients from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Trial 1900 (E1900; NCT00049517). RESULTS A higher mean M-score was associated with death and failure to achieve CR. Multivariable analysis confirmed that a higher M-score was associated with death (P = 0.011) and failure to achieve CR (P = 0.034). Median survival was 26.6 months versus 10.6 months for low and high M-score groups. The ability of the M-score to perform as a classifier was confirmed in patients ≤ 60 years with intermediate cytogenetics and patients who achieved CR, as well as in the E1900 validation cohort. CONCLUSION The M-score represents a valid binary prognostic classifier for patients with de novo AML. The xMELP assay and associated M-score can be used for prognosis and should be further investigated for clinical decision making in AML patients. PMID:27446991

  7. Personalized Medicine in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST): Clinical Implications of the Somatic and Germline DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Sammarini, Giulia; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A.; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are characterized by gain of function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA tyrosine kinase receptors, with their consequent constitutive activation. The gold standard therapy is imatinib that offers a good and stable response for approximately 18–36 months. However, resistance is very common and it is vital to identify new biomarkers. Up until now, there have been two main approaches with focus to characterize novel targets. On the one hand, the focus is on the tumor genome, as the final clinical outcome depends mainly from the cancer specific mutations/alterations patterns. However, the germline DNA is important as well, and it is inconceivable to think the patients response to the drug is not related to it. Therefore the aim of this review is to outline the state of the art of the personalized medicine in GIST taking into account both the tumor DNA (somatic) and the patient DNA (germline). PMID:26184165

  8. The clinical utility of HPV DNA testing in cervical cancer screening strategies.

    PubMed

    Bhatla, Neerja; Moda, Nidhi

    2009-09-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be the commonest cause of death among women in developing countries, largely due to the failure to the inability to sustain effective cytology-based screening programs. While this burden may come down following implementation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, screening will still be required. HPV DNA testing is a promising new technology for cervical cancer prevention and is the most reproducible of all cervical cancer screening tests. Presently, the two assays most widely used for the detection of genital types are the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Hybrid Capture 2 assays (hc2). Rapid, affordable tests are expected to be available soon. HPV DNA testing can be used in a variety of clinical scenarios that include primary screening in women older than 30 yr; as an adjunctive test to cytology; in the triage of women with an equivocal cytologic report, e.g., ASC-US; or for follow-up post-treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). HPV DNA testing can also be performed on self-collected samples, which allows screening in remote areas and also in women who refuse gynecologic examination.

  9. Integration of clinical point-of-care requirements in a DNA microarray genotyping test.

    PubMed

    Van Dorst, Bieke; Cremers, Amelieke; Jans, Karolien; Van Domburg, Trees; Steegen, Kim; Huang, Chengjun; Dorrer, Christian; Lagae, Liesbet; Ferwerda, Gerben; Stuyver, Lieven J

    2014-11-15

    Various proof-of-concept studies have shown the potential of biosensors with a high multiplex detection capability for the readout of DNA microarrays in a lab-on-a-chip. This is particularly interesting for the development of point-of-care genotyping tests, to screen for multiple pathogens and/or antibiotic resistance patterns. In this paper, an assay workflow is presented, suited for the development of novel lab-on-a-chips with an integrated DNA microarray. Besides the description of the different assay steps (DNA purification, amplification and detection), a control strategy is presented according to recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To use a lab-on-a-chip for diagnostic applications, the optimization and evaluation of the assay performance with clinical samples is very important. Therefore, appropriate quantification methods are described, which allow optimization and evaluation of the separate assay steps, as well as total assay performance. In order to demonstrate and evaluate the total workflow, blood samples spiked with Streptococcus pneumoniae were tested. All blood samples with ≥ 10(3)CFU S. pneumoniae per ml of human blood were successfully detected by this genotyping assay.

  10. DNA Methylation Levels of Melanoma Risk Genes Are Associated with Clinical Characteristics of Melanoma Patients.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Érica S S; Pramio, Dimitrius T; Kashiwabara, André Y; Pennacchi, Paula C; Maria-Engler, Silvya S; Achatz, Maria I; Campos, Antonio H J F M; Duprat, João P; Rosenberg, Carla; Carraro, Dirce M; Krepischi, Ana C V

    2015-01-01

    In melanoma development, oncogenic process is mediated by genetic and epigenetic mutations, and few studies have so far explored the role of DNA methylation either as predisposition factor or biomarker. We tested patient samples for germline CDKN2A methylation status and found no evidence of inactivation by promoter hypermethylation. We have also investigated the association of clinical characteristics of samples with the DNA methylation pattern of twelve genes relevant for melanomagenesis. Five genes (BAP1, MGMT, MITF, PALB2, and POT1) presented statistical association between blood DNA methylation levels and either CDKN2A-mutation status, number of lesions, or Breslow thickness. In tumors, five genes (KIT, MGMT, MITF, TERT, and TNF) exhibited methylation levels significantly different between tumor groups including acral compared to nonacral melanomas and matched primary lesions and metastases. Our data pinpoint that the methylation level of eight melanoma-associated genes could potentially represent markers for this disease both in peripheral blood and in tumor samples. PMID:26106605

  11. Transfer of Plasmid DNA to Clinical Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Pathogens by Using a Unique Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Kühner, Petra; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of emerging bacterial pathogens, such as coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), is a major hurdle in clinical and basic microbiological research. Strong genetic barriers, such as restriction modification systems or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), usually interfere with available techniques for DNA transformation and therefore complicate manipulation of CoNS or render it impossible. Thus, current knowledge of pathogenicity and virulence determinants of CoNS is very limited. Here, a rapid, efficient, and highly reliable technique is presented to transfer plasmid DNA essential for genetic engineering to important CoNS pathogens from a unique Staphylococcus aureus strain via a specific S. aureus bacteriophage, Φ187. Even strains refractory to electroporation can be transduced by this technique once donor and recipient strains share similar Φ187 receptor properties. As a proof of principle, this technique was used to delete the alternative transcription factor sigma B (SigB) via allelic replacement in nasal and clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates at high efficiencies. The described approach will allow the genetic manipulation of a wide range of CoNS pathogens and might inspire research activities to manipulate other important pathogens in a similar fashion. PMID:25616805

  12. Transfer of plasmid DNA to clinical coagulase-negative staphylococcal pathogens by using a unique bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Winstel, Volker; Kühner, Petra; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas; Rohde, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Genetic manipulation of emerging bacterial pathogens, such as coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), is a major hurdle in clinical and basic microbiological research. Strong genetic barriers, such as restriction modification systems or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), usually interfere with available techniques for DNA transformation and therefore complicate manipulation of CoNS or render it impossible. Thus, current knowledge of pathogenicity and virulence determinants of CoNS is very limited. Here, a rapid, efficient, and highly reliable technique is presented to transfer plasmid DNA essential for genetic engineering to important CoNS pathogens from a unique Staphylococcus aureus strain via a specific S. aureus bacteriophage, Φ187. Even strains refractory to electroporation can be transduced by this technique once donor and recipient strains share similar Φ187 receptor properties. As a proof of principle, this technique was used to delete the alternative transcription factor sigma B (SigB) via allelic replacement in nasal and clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates at high efficiencies. The described approach will allow the genetic manipulation of a wide range of CoNS pathogens and might inspire research activities to manipulate other important pathogens in a similar fashion.

  13. Cell-Free DNA Screening: Complexities and Challenges of Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Grace, Matthew R; Hardisty, Emily; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Vora, Neeta L; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2016-08-01

    Screening for fetal aneuploidy in pregnant women using cell-free DNA has increased dramatically since the technology became commercially available in 2011. Since that time, numerous trials have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to screen for common aneuploidies in high-risk populations. Studies assessing the performance of these tests in low-risk populations have also demonstrated improved detection rates compared with traditional, serum-based screening strategies. Concurrent with the increased use of this technology has been a decrease in invasive procedures (amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling). As the technology becomes more widely understood, available, and utilized, challenges regarding its clinical implementation have become apparent. Some of these challenges include test failures, false-positive and false-negative results, limitations in positive predictive value in low-prevalence populations, and potential maternal health implications of abnormal results. In addition, commercial laboratories are expanding screening beyond common aneuploidies to include microdeletion screening and whole genome screening. This review article is intended to provide the practicing obstetrician with a summary of the complexities of cell-free DNA screening and the challenges of implementing it in the clinical setting. PMID:27526871

  14. Development of an Ammonium Sulfate DNA Extraction Method for Obtaining Amplifiable DNA in a Small Number of Cells and Its Application to Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seo Young; Kim, Wook Youn; Hwang, Tae Sook; Han, Hye Seung; Lim, So Dug; Kim, Wan Seop

    2013-01-01

    DNA extraction from microdissected cells has become essential for handling clinical specimens with advances in molecular pathology. Conventional methods have limitations for extracting amplifiable DNA from specimens containing a small number of cells. We developed an ammonium sulfate DNA extraction method (A) and compared it with two other methods (B and C). DNA quality and quantity, β-globin amplification, and detectability of two cancer associated gene mutations were evaluated. Method A showed the best DNA yield, particularly when the cell number was very low. Amplification of the β-globin gene using DNA from the SNU 790 cell line and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells extracted with Method A demonstrated the strongest band. BRAFV600E mutation analysis using ethanol-fixed PTC cells from a patient demonstrated both a “T” peak increase and an adjacent “A” peak decrease when 25 and 50 cells were extracted, whereas mutant peaks were too low to be analyzed using the other two methods. EGFR mutation analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues demonstrated a mutant peak with Method A, whereas the mutant peak was undetectable with Methods B or C. Method A yielded the best DNA quantity and quality with outstanding efficiency, particularly when paucicellular specimens were used. PMID:23691506

  15. DNA Methylation-Guided Prediction of Clinical Failure in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joniau, Steven; Lerut, Evelyne; Laenen, Annouschka; Gevaert, Thomas; Gevaert, Olivier; Spahn, Martin; Kneitz, Burkhard; Gramme, Pierre; Helleputte, Thibault; Isebaert, Sofie; Haustermans, Karin; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) is a very heterogeneous disease with respect to clinical outcome. This study explored differential DNA methylation in a priori selected genes to diagnose PCa and predict clinical failure (CF) in high-risk patients. Methods A quantitative multiplex, methylation-specific PCR assay was developed to assess promoter methylation of the APC, CCND2, GSTP1, PTGS2 and RARB genes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 42 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and radical prostatectomy specimens of patients with high-risk PCa, encompassing training and validation cohorts of 147 and 71 patients, respectively. Log-rank tests, univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to investigate the prognostic value of the DNA methylation. Results Hypermethylation of APC, CCND2, GSTP1, PTGS2 and RARB was highly cancer-specific. However, only GSTP1 methylation was significantly associated with CF in both independent high-risk PCa cohorts. Importantly, trichotomization into low, moderate and high GSTP1 methylation level subgroups was highly predictive for CF. Patients with either a low or high GSTP1 methylation level, as compared to the moderate methylation groups, were at a higher risk for CF in both the training (Hazard ratio [HR], 3.65; 95% CI, 1.65 to 8.07) and validation sets (HR, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.03 to 17.72) as well as in the combined cohort (HR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.42 to 5.27) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Classification of primary high-risk tumors into three subtypes based on DNA methylation can be combined with clinico-pathological parameters for a more informative risk-stratification of these PCa patients. PMID:26086362

  16. Characterization of eDNA from the clinical strain Acinetobacter baumannii AIIMS 7 and its role in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Praveen K; Iyer, Pavithra S; Oak, Amrita M; Pardesi, Karishma R; Chopade, Balu A

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was observed during in vitro growth of a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii. Membrane vesicles (MV) of varying diameter (20-200 nm) containing DNA were found to be released by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). An assessment of the characteristics of the eDNA with respect to size, digestion pattern by DNase I/restriction enzymes, and PCR-sequencing, indicates a high similarity with genomic DNA. Role of eDNA in static biofilm formed on polystyrene surface was evaluated by biofilm augmentation assay using eDNA available in different preparations, for example, whole cell lysate, cell-free supernatant, MV suspension, and purified eDNA. Biofilm augmentation was seen up to 224.64%, whereas biofilm inhibition was 59.41% after DNase I treatment: confirming that eDNA facilitates biofilm formation in A. baumannii. This is the first paper elucidating the characteristics and role of eDNA in A. baumannii biofilm, which may provide new insights into its pathogenesis. PMID:22593716

  17. Integrated genomic DNA/RNA profiling of hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Nahas, Michelle K; Wang, Kai; Rampal, Raajit K; Intlekofer, Andrew M; Patel, Jay; Krivstov, Andrei; Frampton, Garrett M; Young, Lauren E; Zhong, Shan; Bailey, Mark; White, Jared R; Roels, Steven; Deffenbaugh, Jason; Fichtenholtz, Alex; Brennan, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Mark; Pelak, Kimberly; Knapp, Kristina M; Brennan, Kristina W; Donahue, Amy L; Young, Geneva; Garcia, Lazaro; Beckstrom, Selmira T; Zhao, Mandy; White, Emily; Banning, Vera; Buell, Jamie; Iwanik, Kiel; Ross, Jeffrey S; Morosini, Deborah; Younes, Anas; Hanash, Alan M; Paietta, Elisabeth; Roberts, Kathryn; Mullighan, Charles; Dogan, Ahmet; Armstrong, Scott A; Mughal, Tariq; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Labrecque, Elaine; Erlich, Rachel; Vietz, Christine; Yelensky, Roman; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Otto, Geoff A; Lipson, Doron; Levine, Ross L

    2016-06-16

    The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes of genomic alterations using archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blood and bone marrow samples with high accuracy in a clinically relevant time frame, which is performed in our Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified College of American Pathologists-accredited laboratory. Targeted capture of DNA/RNA and next-generation sequencing reliably identifies substitutions, indels, CNAs, and gene fusions, with similar accuracy to lower-throughput assays that focus on specific genes and types of genomic alterations. Profiling of 3696 samples identified recurrent somatic alterations that impact diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. This comprehensive genomic profiling approach has proved effective in detecting all types of genomic alterations, including fusion transcripts, which increases the ability to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations with therapeutic relevance. PMID:26966091

  18. Integrated genomic DNA/RNA profiling of hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Nahas, Michelle K.; Wang, Kai; Rampal, Raajit K.; Intlekofer, Andrew M.; Patel, Jay; Krivstov, Andrei; Frampton, Garrett M.; Young, Lauren E.; Zhong, Shan; Bailey, Mark; White, Jared R.; Roels, Steven; Deffenbaugh, Jason; Fichtenholtz, Alex; Brennan, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Mark; Pelak, Kimberly; Knapp, Kristina M.; Brennan, Kristina W.; Donahue, Amy L.; Young, Geneva; Garcia, Lazaro; Beckstrom, Selmira T.; Zhao, Mandy; White, Emily; Banning, Vera; Buell, Jamie; Iwanik, Kiel; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Morosini, Deborah; Younes, Anas; Hanash, Alan M.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Roberts, Kathryn; Mullighan, Charles; Dogan, Ahmet; Armstrong, Scott A.; Mughal, Tariq; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Labrecque, Elaine; Erlich, Rachel; Vietz, Christine; Yelensky, Roman; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Otto, Geoff A.; Lipson, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes of genomic alterations using archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blood and bone marrow samples with high accuracy in a clinically relevant time frame, which is performed in our Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments–certified College of American Pathologists–accredited laboratory. Targeted capture of DNA/RNA and next-generation sequencing reliably identifies substitutions, indels, CNAs, and gene fusions, with similar accuracy to lower-throughput assays that focus on specific genes and types of genomic alterations. Profiling of 3696 samples identified recurrent somatic alterations that impact diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. This comprehensive genomic profiling approach has proved effective in detecting all types of genomic alterations, including fusion transcripts, which increases the ability to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations with therapeutic relevance. PMID:26966091

  19. Accelerated weight histogram method for exploring free energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindahl, V.; Lidmar, J.; Hess, B.

    2014-07-01

    Calculating free energies is an important and notoriously difficult task for molecular simulations. The rapid increase in computational power has made it possible to probe increasingly complex systems, yet extracting accurate free energies from these simulations remains a major challenge. Fully exploring the free energy landscape of, say, a biological macromolecule typically requires sampling large conformational changes and slow transitions. Often, the only feasible way to study such a system is to simulate it using an enhanced sampling method. The accelerated weight histogram (AWH) method is a new, efficient extended ensemble sampling technique which adaptively biases the simulation to promote exploration of the free energy landscape. The AWH method uses a probability weight histogram which allows for efficient free energy updates and results in an easy discretization procedure. A major advantage of the method is its general formulation, making it a powerful platform for developing further extensions and analyzing its relation to already existing methods. Here, we demonstrate its efficiency and general applicability by calculating the potential of mean force along a reaction coordinate for both a single dimension and multiple dimensions. We make use of a non-uniform, free energy dependent target distribution in reaction coordinate space so that computational efforts are not wasted on physically irrelevant regions. We present numerical results for molecular dynamics simulations of lithium acetate in solution and chignolin, a 10-residue long peptide that folds into a β-hairpin. We further present practical guidelines for setting up and running an AWH simulation.

  20. A preliminary evaluation of histogram-based binarization algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Junichi; Grover, K.

    1995-04-01

    To date, most Optical Character Recognition (OCR) systems process binary document images, and the quality of the input image strongly affects their performance. Since a binarization process is inherently lossy, different algorithms typically produce different binary images from the same gray scale image. The objective of this research is to study effects of global binarization algorithms on the performance of OCR systems. Several binarization methods were examined: the best fixed threshold value for the data set, the ideal histogram method, and Otsu`s algorithm. Four contemporary OCR systems and 50 hard copy pages containing 91,649 characters were used in the experiments. These pages were digitized at 300 dpi and 8 bits/pixel, and 36 different threshold values (ranging from 59 to 199 in increments of) 4 were used. The resulting 1,800 binary images were processed by all four OCR systems. All systems made approximately 40% more errors from images generated by Otsu`s method than those of the ideal histogram method. Two of the systems made approximately the same number of errors from images generated by the best fixed threshold value and Otsu`s method.

  1. Visual Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Histogram Equalization

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Chih-Chung; Wu, Bing-Fei; Chung, Meng-Liang; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Wu, Ya-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement techniques primarily improve the contrast of an image to lend it a better appearance. One of the popular enhancement methods is histogram equalization (HE) because of its simplicity and effectiveness. However, it is rarely applied to consumer electronics products because it can cause excessive contrast enhancement and feature loss problems. These problems make the images processed by HE look unnatural and introduce unwanted artifacts in them. In this study, a visual contrast enhancement algorithm (VCEA) based on HE is proposed. VCEA considers the requirements of the human visual perception in order to address the drawbacks of HE. It effectively solves the excessive contrast enhancement problem by adjusting the spaces between two adjacent gray values of the HE histogram. In addition, VCEA reduces the effects of the feature loss problem by using the obtained spaces. Furthermore, VCEA enhances the detailed textures of an image to generate an enhanced image with better visual quality. Experimental results show that images obtained by applying VCEA have higher contrast and are more suited to human visual perception than those processed by HE and other HE-based methods. PMID:26184219

  2. Lean histogram of oriented gradients features for effective eye detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Riti; Savakis, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Reliable object detection is very important in computer vision and robotics applications. The histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) is established as one of the most popular hand-crafted features, which along with support vector machine (SVM) classification provides excellent performance for object recognition. We investigate dimensionality deduction on HOG features in combination with SVM classifiers to obtain efficient feature representation and improved classification performance. In addition to lean HOG features, we explore descriptors resulting from dimensionality reduction on histograms of binary descriptors. We consider three-dimensionality reduction techniques: standard principal component analysis, random projections, a computationally efficient linear mapping that is data independent, and locality preserving projections (LPP), which learns the manifold structure of the data. Our methods focus on the application of eye detection and were tested on an eye database created using the BioID and FERET face databases. Our results indicate that manifold learning is beneficial to classification utilizing HOG features. To demonstrate the broader usefulness of lean HOG features for object class recognition, we evaluated our system's classification performance on the CalTech-101 dataset with favorable outcomes.

  3. Adaptive removal of show-through artifacts by histogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jin-Kyung; Kang, Ki-Min; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2010-01-01

    When scanning a document that is printed on both sides, the image on the reverse can show through with high luminance. We propose an adaptive method of removing show-through artifacts based on histogram analysis. Instead of attempting to measure the physical parameters of the paper and the scanning system, or making multiple scans, we analyze the color distribution to remove unwanted artifacts, using an image of the front of the document alone. First, we accumulate histogram information to find the lightness distribution of pixels in the scanned image. Using this data, we set thresholds on both luminance and chrominance to determine candidate regions of show-through. Finally, we classify these regions into foreground and background of the image on the front of the paper, and show-through from the back. The background and show-through regions become candidates for erasure, and they are adaptively updated as the process proceeds. This approach preserves the chrominance of the image on the front of the papers without introducing artifacts. It does not make the whole image brighter, which is what happens when a fixed threshold is used to remove show-through.

  4. Accelerated weight histogram method for exploring free energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lindahl, V.; Lidmar, J.; Hess, B.

    2014-07-28

    Calculating free energies is an important and notoriously difficult task for molecular simulations. The rapid increase in computational power has made it possible to probe increasingly complex systems, yet extracting accurate free energies from these simulations remains a major challenge. Fully exploring the free energy landscape of, say, a biological macromolecule typically requires sampling large conformational changes and slow transitions. Often, the only feasible way to study such a system is to simulate it using an enhanced sampling method. The accelerated weight histogram (AWH) method is a new, efficient extended ensemble sampling technique which adaptively biases the simulation to promote exploration of the free energy landscape. The AWH method uses a probability weight histogram which allows for efficient free energy updates and results in an easy discretization procedure. A major advantage of the method is its general formulation, making it a powerful platform for developing further extensions and analyzing its relation to already existing methods. Here, we demonstrate its efficiency and general applicability by calculating the potential of mean force along a reaction coordinate for both a single dimension and multiple dimensions. We make use of a non-uniform, free energy dependent target distribution in reaction coordinate space so that computational efforts are not wasted on physically irrelevant regions. We present numerical results for molecular dynamics simulations of lithium acetate in solution and chignolin, a 10-residue long peptide that folds into a β-hairpin. We further present practical guidelines for setting up and running an AWH simulation.

  5. Bin Ratio-Based Histogram Distances and Their Application to Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Xie, Nianhua; Hu, Ruiguang; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Qiang; Yan, Shuicheng; Maybank, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Large variations in image background may cause partial matching and normalization problems for histogram-based representations, i.e., the histograms of the same category may have bins which are significantly different, and normalization may produce large changes in the differences between corresponding bins. In this paper, we deal with this problem by using the ratios between bin values of histograms, rather than bin values' differences which are used in the traditional histogram distances. We propose a bin ratio-based histogram distance (BRD), which is an intra-cross-bin distance, in contrast with previous bin-to-bin distances and cross-bin distances. The BRD is robust to partial matching and histogram normalization, and captures correlations between bins with only a linear computational complexity. We combine the BRD with the ℓ1 histogram distance and the χ(2) histogram distance to generate the ℓ1 BRD and the χ(2) BRD, respectively. These combinations exploit and benefit from the robustness of the BRD under partial matching and the robustness of the ℓ1 and χ(2) distances to small noise. We propose a method for assessing the robustness of histogram distances to partial matching. The BRDs and logistic regression-based histogram fusion are applied to image classification. The experimental results on synthetic data sets show the robustness of the BRDs to partial matching, and the experiments on seven benchmark data sets demonstrate promising results of the BRDs for image classification. PMID:26353143

  6. Efficient local statistical analysis via integral histograms with discrete wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teng-Yok; Shen, Han-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Histograms computed from local regions are commonly used in many visualization applications, and allowing the user to query histograms interactively in regions of arbitrary locations and sizes plays an important role in feature identification and tracking. Computing histograms in regions with arbitrary location and size, nevertheless, can be time consuming for large data sets since it involves expensive I/O and scan of data elements. To achieve both performance- and storage-efficient query of local histograms, we present a new algorithm called WaveletSAT, which utilizes integral histograms, an extension of the summed area tables (SAT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Similar to SAT, an integral histogram is the histogram computed from the area between each grid point and the grid origin, which can be be pre-computed to support fast query. Nevertheless, because one histogram contains multiple bins, it will be very expensive to store one integral histogram at each grid point. To reduce the storage cost for large integral histograms, WaveletSAT treats the integral histograms of all grid points as multiple SATs, each of which can be converted into a sparse representation via DWT, allowing the reconstruction of axis-aligned region histograms of arbitrary sizes from a limited number of wavelet coefficients. Besides, we present an efficient wavelet transform algorithm for SATs that can operate on each grid point separately in logarithmic time complexity, which can be extended to parallel GPU-based implementation. With theoretical and empirical demonstration, we show that WaveletSAT can achieve fast preprocessing and smaller storage overhead than the conventional integral histogram approach with close query performance. PMID:24051836

  7. Clinical Potential of DNA Methylation in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Loh, Marie; Vaithilingam, Aparna; Soong, Richie

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates aberrant DNA methylation is involved in gastric tumourigenesis, suggesting it may be a useful clinical biomarker for the disease. The aim of this study was to consolidate and summarize published data on the potential of methylation in gastric cancer (GC) risk prediction, prognostication and prediction of treatment response. Methods Relevant studies were identified from PubMed using a systematic search approach. Results were summarized by meta-analysis. Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios were computed for each methylation event assuming the random-effects model. Results A review of 589 retrieved publications identified 415 relevant articles, including 143 case-control studies on gene methylation of 142 individual genes in GC clinical samples. A total of 77 genes were significantly differentially methylated between tumour and normal gastric tissue from GC subjects, of which data on 62 was derived from single studies. Methylation of 15, 4 and 7 genes in normal gastric tissue, plasma and serum respectively was significantly different in frequency between GC and non-cancer subjects. A prognostic significance was reported for 18 genes and predictive significance was reported for p16 methylation, although many inconsistent findings were also observed. No bias due to assay, use of fixed tissue or CpG sites analysed was detected, however a slight bias towards publication of positive findings was observed. Conclusions DNA methylation is a promising biomarker for GC risk prediction and prognostication. Further focused validation of candidate methylation markers in independent cohorts is required to develop its clinical potential. PMID:22558417

  8. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  9. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shia, Jinru

    2015-09-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined "Lynch-like syndrome" if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or "familial colorectal cancer type X" if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies.

  10. Overcoming the slowing down of flat-histogram Monte Carlo simulations: cluster updates and optimized broad-histogram ensembles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Körner, Mathias; Colonna-Romano, Louis; Trebst, Simon; Gould, Harvey; Machta, Jonathan; Troyer, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    We study the performance of Monte Carlo simulations that sample a broad histogram in energy by determining the mean first-passage time to span the entire energy space of d-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising/Potts models. We first show that flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods with single-spin flip updates such as the Wang-Landau algorithm or the multicanonical method perform suboptimally in comparison to an unbiased Markovian random walk in energy space. For the d = 1, 2, 3 Ising model, the mean first-passage time tau scales with the number of spins N = L(d) as tau proportional N2L(z). The exponent z is found to decrease as the dimensionality d is increased. In the mean-field limit of infinite dimensions we find that z vanishes up to logarithmic corrections. We then demonstrate how the slowdown characterized by z > 0 for finite d can be overcome by two complementary approaches--cluster dynamics in connection with Wang-Landau sampling and the recently developed ensemble optimization technique. Both approaches are found to improve the random walk in energy space so that tau proportional N2 up to logarithmic corrections for the d = 1, 2 Ising model.

  11. Development of a Quality Assurance Procedure for Dose Volume Histogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, David A.

    The role of the dose-volume histogram (DVH) is rapidly expanding in radiation oncology treatment planning. DVHs are already relied upon to differentiate between two similar plans and evaluate organ-at-risk dosage. Their role will become even more important as progress continues towards implementing biologically based treatment planning systems. Therefore it is imperative that the accuracy of DVHs is evaluated and reappraised after any major software or hardware upgrades, affecting a treatment planning system (TPS). The purpose of this work is to create and implement a comprehensive quality assurance procedure evaluating dose volume histograms to insure their accuracy while satisfying American College of Radiology guidelines. Virtual phantoms of known volumes were created in Pinnacle TPS and exposed to different beam arrangements. Variables including grid size and slice thickness were varied and their effects were analyzed. The resulting DVHs were evaluated by comparison to the commissioned percent depth dose values using a custom Excel spreadsheet. After determining the uncertainty of the DVH based on these variables, multiple second check calculations were performed using MIM Maestro and Matlab software packages. The uncertainties of the DVHs were shown to be less than +/- 3%. The average uncertainty was shown to be less than +/- 1%. The second check procedures resulted in mean percent differences less than 1% which confirms the accuracy of DVH calculation in Pinnacle and the effectiveness of the quality assurance template. The importance of knowing the limits of accuracy of the DVHs, which are routinely used to assess the quality of clinical treatment plans, cannot be overestimated. The developed comprehensive QA procedure evaluating the accuracy of the DVH statistical analysis will become a part of our clinical arsenal for periodic tests of the treatment planning system. It will also be performed at the time of commissioning and after any major software

  12. Implementing a 3D histogram version of the Energy-Test in ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E. O.; Reid, I. D.; Piasetzky, E.

    2016-08-01

    Comparing simulation and data histograms is of interest in nuclear and particle physics experiments; however, the leading three-dimensional histogram comparison tool available in ROOT, the 3D Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, exhibits shortcomings. Throughout the following, we present and discuss the implementation of an alternative comparison test for three-dimensional histograms, based on the Energy-Test by Aslan and Zech. The software package can be found at http://www-nuclear.tau.ac.il/ecohen/.

  13. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  14. Shot-Noise Limited Single-Molecule FRET Histograms: Comparison between Theory and Experiments†

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Eyal; Michalet, Xavier; Hamadani, Kambiz M.; Laurence, Ted A.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    We describe a simple approach and present a straightforward numerical algorithm to compute the best fit shot-noise limited proximity ratio histogram (PRH) in single-molecule fluorescence resonant energy transfer diffusion experiments. The key ingredient is the use of the experimental burst size distribution, as obtained after burst search through the photon data streams. We show how the use of an alternated laser excitation scheme and a correspondingly optimized burst search algorithm eliminates several potential artifacts affecting the calculation of the best fit shot-noise limited PRH. This algorithm is tested extensively on simulations and simple experimental systems. We find that dsDNA data exhibit a wider PRH than expected from shot noise only and hypothetically account for it by assuming a small Gaussian distribution of distances with an average standard deviation of 1.6 Å. Finally, we briefly mention the results of a future publication and illustrate them with a simple two-state model system (DNA hairpin), for which the kinetic transition rates between the open and closed conformations are extracted. PMID:17078646

  15. Clinically Relevant Mutant DNA Gyrase Alters Supercoiling, Changes the Transcriptome, and Confers Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mark A.; Ricci, Vito; Whitehead, Rebekah; Patel, Meha; Fookes, Maria; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial DNA is maintained in a supercoiled state controlled by the action of topoisomerases. Alterations in supercoiling affect fundamental cellular processes, including transcription. Here, we show that substitution at position 87 of GyrA of Salmonella influences sensitivity to antibiotics, including nonquinolone drugs, alters global supercoiling, and results in an altered transcriptome with increased expression of stress response pathways. Decreased susceptibility to multiple antibiotics seen with a GyrA Asp87Gly mutant was not a result of increased efflux activity or reduced reactive-oxygen production. These data show that a frequently observed and clinically relevant substitution within GyrA results in altered expression of numerous genes, including those important in bacterial survival of stress, suggesting that GyrA mutants may have a selective advantage under specific conditions. Our findings help contextualize the high rate of quinolone resistance in pathogenic strains of bacteria and may partly explain why such mutant strains are evolutionarily successful. PMID:23882012

  16. [Distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens and identified with DNA sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Özçolpan, O Olcay; Sürücüoğlu, Süheyla; Özkütük, Nuri; Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to perform the identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated from different clinical specimens in the Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University, Manisa (located at Aegean region of Turkey), by DNA sequence analysis, and to discuss the epidemiological aspects of the data obtained. Out of 5122 clinical specimens sent to the laboratory with the initial diagnosis of tuberculosis in the period April 2007 to July 2011, M.tuberculosis complex and NTM were identified in 225 (4.39%) and 126 (2.46%) samples, respectively. DNA sequence analysis by targeting hsp65 and 16S rDNA gene regions was performed on 101 of the NTM strains in Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Ege University, Izmir. DNA sequence analysis data was evaluated using RIDOM and GenBLAST data bases. NTM strains were identified as 40 M.porcinum (39.60%), 36 M.lentiflavum (35.65%), six M.abscessus (5.64%), five M.peregrinum (4.95%), four M.gordonae (3.96%), three M.fortuitum (2.97%), two M.chelonae (1.98%), and one for each M.alvei (0.99%), M.scrofulaceum (0.99%), M.kansasii (0.99%) species. Two strains which were both 95-98% compatible with other mycobacteria in the data bases could not be identified with certainty. Seventy-two (94.73%) strains of M.lentiflavum and M.porcinum, which were the most frequent (75.24%) species in the study, were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The remaining 99 strains examined could not be proven as the cause of the disease due to absence of patients' clinical data, whereas two M.abscessus strains isolated from the sputum were considered as the cause of the disease according to the ATS/IDSA criteria. The isolation rate of NTM in 2010 was found significantly higher (5.33%) than previous years. Review of the 2010 data showed that all strains of M.porcinum and M.lentiflavum, which were the most frequently identified strains were isolated from BAL specimens. This situation is in line with the start of using of an

  17. [Distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens and identified with DNA sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Özçolpan, O Olcay; Sürücüoğlu, Süheyla; Özkütük, Nuri; Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to perform the identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated from different clinical specimens in the Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University, Manisa (located at Aegean region of Turkey), by DNA sequence analysis, and to discuss the epidemiological aspects of the data obtained. Out of 5122 clinical specimens sent to the laboratory with the initial diagnosis of tuberculosis in the period April 2007 to July 2011, M.tuberculosis complex and NTM were identified in 225 (4.39%) and 126 (2.46%) samples, respectively. DNA sequence analysis by targeting hsp65 and 16S rDNA gene regions was performed on 101 of the NTM strains in Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Ege University, Izmir. DNA sequence analysis data was evaluated using RIDOM and GenBLAST data bases. NTM strains were identified as 40 M.porcinum (39.60%), 36 M.lentiflavum (35.65%), six M.abscessus (5.64%), five M.peregrinum (4.95%), four M.gordonae (3.96%), three M.fortuitum (2.97%), two M.chelonae (1.98%), and one for each M.alvei (0.99%), M.scrofulaceum (0.99%), M.kansasii (0.99%) species. Two strains which were both 95-98% compatible with other mycobacteria in the data bases could not be identified with certainty. Seventy-two (94.73%) strains of M.lentiflavum and M.porcinum, which were the most frequent (75.24%) species in the study, were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The remaining 99 strains examined could not be proven as the cause of the disease due to absence of patients' clinical data, whereas two M.abscessus strains isolated from the sputum were considered as the cause of the disease according to the ATS/IDSA criteria. The isolation rate of NTM in 2010 was found significantly higher (5.33%) than previous years. Review of the 2010 data showed that all strains of M.porcinum and M.lentiflavum, which were the most frequently identified strains were isolated from BAL specimens. This situation is in line with the start of using of an

  18. Using histograms to introduce randomization in the generation of ensembles of decision trees

    DOEpatents

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick; Littau, David

    2005-02-22

    A system for decision tree ensembles that includes a module to read the data, a module to create a histogram, a module to evaluate a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, a module to select a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, a module to split the data, and a module to combine multiple decision trees in ensembles. The decision tree method includes the steps of reading the data; creating a histogram; evaluating a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, selecting a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, splitting the data, and combining multiple decision trees in ensembles.

  19. Custom IC/Embedded IP design for histogram in video processing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj; Chaturvedi, Richa; Rai, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Histogram is an integral part of video processing applications. Either of the design methods ASIC or Embedded, histogram computation is an important functional block. This paper proposes the custom Integrated Circuit (IC) as an ASIC and an embedded IP to compute the colored histogram function. Histogram computation has two features: color and spatial. Color feature has been calculated using find_bin and spatial feature is calculated using kernel function. The design is verified using NCSIM Cadence tool, while it is synthesized using RTL compiler. Finally, the embedded IP has interfaced with Kernel based mean shift algorithm in tracking a moving object and implemented on Xilinx Spartan 6 LX150T FPGA.

  20. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Highly Sensitive DNA Microarray for Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Oh, TaeJeong; Kim, ChangJin; Woo, SukKyung; Kim, TaeSeung; Jeong, DongJun; Kim, MyungSoon; Lee, Sunwoo; Cho, HyunSill; An, Sungwhan

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found in cervical cancer, tonsillar cancer, and certain types of head and neck cancers. We report on a DNA microarray-based method for the simultaneous detection and typing of HPVs. The genotype spectrum discriminated by this HPV DNA microarray includes 15 high-risk HPV genotypes and 12 low-risk HPV genotypes. The HPV DNA microarray showed high degrees of specificity and reproducibility. We evaluated the performance of the HPV DNA microarray by application to three HPV-positive cell lines (HeLa, Caski, and SiHa cells) and two HPV-negative cell lines (C33A and A549 cells). The HPV DNA microarray successfully identified the known types of HPV present in the cell lines. The detection limit of the HPV DNA microarray was at least 100-fold higher than that of PCR. To assess the clinical applicability of the HPV DNA microarray, we performed the HPV genotyping assay with 73 nonmalignant and malignant samples from 39 tonsillar cancer patients. Twenty-five of the 39 (64.1%) malignant samples were positive for HPV, whereas 3 of 34 (8.8%) nonmalignant samples were positive for HPV. This result shows a preferential association of HPV with tonsillar carcinomas. The correlations of the presence of HPV with the grade of differentiation and risk factors were not significant. Our data show that the HPV DNA microarray may be useful for the diagnosis and typing of HPV in large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:15243092

  1. Effect of Sperm DNA Fragmentation on Clinical Outcome of Frozen-Thawed Embryo Transfer and on Blastocyst Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wuhua; Xiao, Shiquan; Qiu, Xiufang; Jin, Jianyuan; Pan, Chengshuang; Li, Yan; Fei, Qianjin; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Liya; Huang, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies have shown the possible influence of sperm DNA fragmentation on assisted reproductive technique outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of sperm DNA fragmentation on the clinical outcome of frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) from cycles of conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In the present study, the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) and FET clinical outcomes in IVF and ICSI cycles was analyzed. A total of 1082 FET cycles with cleavage stage embryos (C-FET) (855 from IVF and 227 from ICSI) and 653 frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer cycles (B-FET) (525 from IVF and 128 from ICSI) were included. There was no significant change in clinical pregnancy, biochemical pregnancy and miscarriage rates in the group with a SDF >30% compared with the group with a SDF ≤30% in IVF and ICSI cycles with C-FET or B-FET. Also, there was no significant impact on the FET clinic outcome in IVF and ICSI when different values of SDF (such as 10%, 20%, 25%, 35%, and 40%) were taken as proposed threshold levels. However, the blastulation rates were significantly higher in the SDF ≤30% group in ICSI cycle. Taken together, our data show that sperm DNA fragmentation measured by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion (SCD) test is not associated with clinical outcome of FET in IVF and ICSI. Nonetheless, SDF is related to the blastocyst formation in ICSI cycles. PMID:24733108

  2. Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of clinical course and survival

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Carlo; Falisi, Erika; Young, Ken H.; Pascarella, Michela; Perbellini, Omar; Carli, Giuseppe; Novella, Elisabetta; Rossi, Davide; Giaretta, Ilaria; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; De Rossi, Anita; D'Amore, Emanuele Stefano Giovanni; Rassu, Mario; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA load and clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unknown. We assessed EBV DNA load by quantitative PCR at CLL presentation in mononuclear cells (MNC) of 220 prospective patients that were enrolled and followed-up in two major Institutions. In 20 patients EBV DNA load was also assessed on plasma samples. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects were tested for EBV DNA load on MNC. Findings were validated in an independent retrospective cohort of 112 patients with CLL. EBV DNA load was detectable in 59%, and high (≥2000 copies/µg DNA) in 19% of patients, but it was negative in plasma samples. EBV DNA load was significantly higher in CLL patients than in healthy subjects (P < .0001). No relation was found between high EBV load and clinical stage or biological variables, except for 11q deletion (P = .004), CD38 expression (P = .003), and NOTCH1 mutations (P = .05). High EBV load led to a 3.14-fold increase in the hazard ratio of death and to a shorter overall survival (OS; P = .001). Poor OS was attributable, at least in part, to shorter time-to-first-treatment (P = .0008), with no higher risk of Richter's transformation or second cancer. Multivariate analysis selected high levels of EBV load as independent predictor of OS after controlling for confounding clinical and biological variables. EBV DNA load at presentation is an independent predictor of OS in patients with CLL. PMID:26087198

  3. Clinical significance of monitoring ESR1 mutations in circulating cell-free DNA in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Inao, Toko; Sueta, Aiko; Fujiwara, Saori; Omoto, Yoko; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Background The measurement of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) may transform the management of breast cancer patients. We aimed to investigate the clinical significance of sequential measurements of ESR1 mutations in primary breast cancer (PBC) and metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Results ESR1 mutations ratio in the PBC groups was used as the minimum cutoff for determining increases in cfDNA ESR1 mutation ratio. An increase in cfDNA ESR1 mutations was found in 13 samples of cfDNA from 12 (28.6%) out of 42 MBC patients. A total of 10 (83.3%) out of 12 MBC patients with increase cfDNA ESR1 mutations showed a poor response to treatment. In survival analysis, increase cfDNA ESR1 mutations may predict a shorter duration of post-endocrine-therapy effectiveness (P = 0.0033). Methods A total of 119 patients (253 plasma samples) with breast carcinoma were enrolled in this study. Cases were selected if archival plasma samples were available from PBC before and after treatment and from MBC gathered more than twice at the time of progression. cfDNA was isolated from the 77 PBC patients (154 plasma samples) and from the 42 MBC patients (99 plasma samples). To investigate any changes in each cfDNA ESR1 mutation before and after treatment, we analyzed the difference with cfDNA ESR1 mutations ratio in the first blood sample using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). Conclusions We demonstrate that ddPCR monitoring of the recurrent ESR1 mutation in cfDNA of MBC patients is a feasible and useful method of providing relevant predictive information. PMID:27102299

  4. Molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Moraxella catarrhalis by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Theoga Raj, Christol James; Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Rothan, Hussin A; Rao, Usha Anand

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis, a less virulent microorganism that colonizes the upper respiratory tract, has recently been associated with lower respiratory disease, especially in HIV-positive immunocompromised individuals and children. Here, we correlated the DNA clustering pattern of 24 clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis for β-lactamase production and drug resistance, from different disease groups using three different arbitrarily selected primers, P1 (5'-TCACGATGCA-3'), P14 (5'-GATCAAGTCC-3') and P17 (5'-GATCTGACAC-3'). M. catarrhalis revealed three distinct banding patterns with primer P1, four with P14 and P17. 71% (n = 17) of the isolates revealed pattern 2 with primer P1, which discriminated majority (12/21) of the isolates grouped under the major branch of the dendrogram. The minor branch had only three isolates. Separation of M. catarrhalis into two subpopulations (major and minor clusters) with primer P1 is suggestive of diverse genetic lineage. A high level of concordance between RAPD and antibiotic profile was observed. Clustering of M. catarrhalis recovered from different disease groups reflect the identical clinical background or the common geographical/temporal factors. The presence or absence of β-lactamase in a cluster confirmed their single source of origin.

  5. Clinical Factors Associated with Sperm DNA Fragmentation in Male Patients with Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Akira; Kato, Tomonori; Kawauchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Akihiko; Fuse, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The clinical factors associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) were investigated in male patients with infertility. Materials and Methods. Fifty-four ejaculates from infertile Japanese males were used. Thirty-three and twenty-one were from the patients with varicoceles and idiopathic causes of infertility, respectively. We performed blood tests, including the serum sex hormone levels, and conventional and computer-assisted semen analyses. The sperm nuclear vacuolization (SNV) was evaluated using a high-magnification microscope. The SDF was evaluated using the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCDt) to determine the SDF index (SDFI). The SDFI was compared with semen parameters and other clinical variables, including lifestyle factors. Results. The SDFI was 41.3 ± 22.2% (mean ± standard deviation) and did not depend on the cause of infertility. Chronic alcohol use increased the SDFI to 49.6 ± 23.3% compared with 33.9 ± 18.0% in nondrinkers. The SDFI was related to adverse conventional semen parameters and sperm motion characteristics and correlated with the serum FSH level. The SNV showed a tendency to increase with the SDFI. The multivariate analysis revealed that the sperm progressive motility and chronic alcohol use were significant predictors of the SDF. Conclusion. The SCDt should be offered to chronic alcohol users and those with decreased sperm progressive motility. PMID:25165747

  6. Clinical features of mitochondrial DNA m.3243A>G mutation in 47 Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yinan; Fang, Fang; Cao, Yanyan; Yang, Yanling; Zou, Liping; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Songtao; Zhu, Sainan; Xu, Yufeng; Pei, Pei; Qi, Yu

    2010-04-15

    m.3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA is the most common pathogenic point mutation, causing a variety of phenotypes. To further elucidate its clinical characteristics, we recruited 47 Chinese families carrying m.3243A>G mutation and analyzed their symptoms, disease history, inheritance, and mitochondria-related complications. In the probands, lactic acidosis, myopathy, seizures, short stature, weight loss and hirsutism were the most common clinical features. In their mothers, lactic acidosis, exercise intolerance, short stature and weight loss were the frequent manifestations, and normal phenotype was found in 59.6% mothers. m.3243A>G mutation was detected in 47 probands and 42 mothers. In the probands, the mutation ratio in blood was threefold higher and the ratio in urine was twofold higher than those of their mothers. m.3243A>G mutation ratio in mothers' urine and in their probands' blood were weakly correlated. In conclusion, (a) stroke-like episode induced by m.3243A>G mutation may be the symptom predominantly found in older patients; (b) m.3243A>G mutation ratio correlates with the severity of the disease; (c) m.3243A>G mutation ratio in mothers' urine may correlate to the ratio in blood in their offspring.

  7. Principles, organization, and operation of a DNA bank for clinical trials: a Department of Veterans Affairs cooperative study.

    PubMed

    Lavori, Philip W; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Brophy, Mary; Buxbaum, Joel; Cockroft, Jennifer; Cox, David R; Fiore, Louis; Greely, Henry T; Greenberg, Harry; Holmes, Edward W; Nelson, Lorene M; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2002-06-01

    The mapping and sequencing of the human genome promises rapid growth in understanding the genetically influenced mechanisms that underlie human disease. To realize this promise fully, it is necessary to relate genetic information to clinical phenotypes. Genetic tissue banking in clinical studies provides opportunities to analyze the genetic contribution to variation in response to treatments. The challenges to progress are likely to come from the complex organizational, social, political, and ethical issues that must be resolved in order to put clinical and DNA bank information together. Concerns about subjects' rights, informed consent, privacy, and ownership of genetic material require attention in the development of DNA banks. In this paper we describe one approach to the solution of these problems that was adopted by one clinical trials group, the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program.

  8. Histogram Analysis of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI for Quantitative Hepatic Fibrosis Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Park, Young Nyun; Park, Hae-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The diagnosis and monitoring of liver fibrosis is an important clinical issue; however, this is usually achieved by invasive methods such as biopsy. We aimed to determine whether histogram analysis of hepatobiliary phase images of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide non-invasive quantitative measurement of liver fibrosis. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee, and a waiver of informed consent was obtained. Hepatobiliary phase images of preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI studies of 105 patients (69 males, 36 females; age 56.1±12.2) with pathologically documented liver fibrosis grades were analyzed. Fibrosis staging was F0/F1/F2/F3/F4 (METAVIR system) for 11/20/13/15/46 patients, respectively. Four regions-of-interest (ROI, each about 2 cm2) were placed on predetermined locations of representative images. The measured signal intensity of pixels in each ROI was used to calculate corrected coefficient of variation (cCV), skewness, and kurtosis. An average value of each parameter was calculated for comparison. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and linear regression. Results The cCV showed statistically significant differences among pathological fibrosis grades (P<0.001) whereas skewness and kurtosis did not. Univariable linear regression analysis suggested cCV to be a meaningful parameter in predicting the fibrosis grade (P<0.001, β = 0.40 and standard error  = 0.06). For discriminating F0-3 from F4, the area under ROC score was 0.857, standard deviation 0.036, 95% confidence interval 0.785–0.928. Conclusion Histogram analysis of hepatobiliary phase images of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI can provide non-invasive quantitative measurements of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25460180

  9. CHIWEI: A code of goodness of fit tests for weighted and unweighted histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagunashvili, N. D.

    2012-02-01

    A Fortran-77 program for goodness of fit tests for histograms with weighted entries as well as with unweighted entries is presented. The code calculates test statistics for case of histogram with normalized weights of events and in case of unnormalized weights of events.

  10. Correlation between Reversal of DNA Methylation and Clinical Symptoms in Psoriatic Epidermis Following Narrow-Band UVB Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolian; Nylander, Elisabet; Coates, Philip J; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Epigenetic modifications by DNA methylation are associated with a wide range of diseases. Previous studies in psoriasis have concentrated on epigenetic changes in immune cells or in total skin biopsies that include stromal-associated changes. In order to improve our understanding of the role of DNA methylation in psoriasis, we sought to obtain a comprehensive DNA methylation signature specific for the epidermal component of psoriasis and to analyze methylation changes during therapy. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of epidermal cells from 12 patients undergoing narrow-band UVB phototherapy and 12 corresponding healthy controls revealed a distinct DNA methylation pattern in psoriasis compared with controls. A total of 3,665 methylation variable positions (MVPs) were identified with an overall hypomethylation in psoriasis patient samples. DNA methylation pattern was reversed at the end of phototherapy in patients showing excellent clinical improvement. Only 7% of phototherapy-affected MVPs (150 out of 2,108) correlate with nearby gene expression. Enrichment of MVPs in enhancers indicates tissue-specific modulation of the transcriptional regulatory machinery in psoriasis. Our study identified key epigenetic events associated with psoriasis pathogenesis and helps understand the dynamic DNA methylation landscape in the human genome.

  11. Do you need to compare two histograms not only by eye?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiel, N.

    2015-05-01

    Although the use of histograms implies loss of information due to the fact that the actual data are replaced by the central values of the considered intervals, this graphical representation is commonly employed in scientific communication, particularly in Astrophysics. Sometimes this kind of comparison is unavoidable when one needs to compare new results with already published data only available in histogram format. Unfortunately, it is not infrequent to find in the literature examples of histogram comparisons where the similarity between the histograms is not statistically quantified but simply justified or discarded ``by eye''. In this poster several methods to quantify the similarity between two histograms are discussed. The availability of statistical packages, such as R (R Core Team 2014, R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing, R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. URL http://www.R-project.org/), notably simplify the understanding of the different approaches through the use of numerical simulations.

  12. Time-cumulated visible and infrared radiance histograms used as descriptors of surface and cloud variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seze, Genevieve; Rossow, William B.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial and temporal stability of the distributions of satellite-measured visible and infrared radiances, caused by variations in clouds and surfaces, are investigated using bidimensional and monodimensional histograms and time-composite images. Similar analysis of the histograms of the original and time-composite images provides separation of the contributions of the space and time variations to the total variations. The variability of both the surfaces and clouds is found to be larger at scales much larger than the minimum resolved by satellite imagery. This study shows that the shapes of these histograms are distinctive characteristics of the different climate regimes and that particular attributes of these histograms can be related to several general, though not universal, properties of clouds and surface variations at regional and synoptic scales. There are also significant exceptions to these relationships in particular climate regimes. The characteristics of these radiance histograms provide a stable well defined descriptor of the cloud and surface properties.

  13. Approximate Algorithms for Computing Spatial Distance Histograms with Accuracy Guarantees

    PubMed Central

    Grupcev, Vladimir; Yuan, Yongke; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Jin; Chen, Shaoping; Pandit, Sagar; Weng, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Particle simulation has become an important research tool in many scientific and engineering fields. Data generated by such simulations impose great challenges to database storage and query processing. One of the queries against particle simulation data, the spatial distance histogram (SDH) query, is the building block of many high-level analytics, and requires quadratic time to compute using a straightforward algorithm. Previous work has developed efficient algorithms that compute exact SDHs. While beating the naive solution, such algorithms are still not practical in processing SDH queries against large-scale simulation data. In this paper, we take a different path to tackle this problem by focusing on approximate algorithms with provable error bounds. We first present a solution derived from the aforementioned exact SDH algorithm, and this solution has running time that is unrelated to the system size N. We also develop a mathematical model to analyze the mechanism that leads to errors in the basic approximate algorithm. Our model provides insights on how the algorithm can be improved to achieve higher accuracy and efficiency. Such insights give rise to a new approximate algorithm with improved time/accuracy tradeoff. Experimental results confirm our analysis. PMID:24693210

  14. Effects of voxelization on dose volume histogram accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Kyle; Pinter, Csaba; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: In radiotherapy treatment planning systems, structures of interest such as targets and organs at risk are stored as 2D contours on evenly spaced planes. In order to be used in various algorithms, contours must be converted into binary labelmap volumes using voxelization. The voxelization process results in lost information, which has little effect on the volume of large structures, but has significant impact on small structures, which contain few voxels. Volume differences for segmented structures affects metrics such as dose volume histograms (DVH), which are used for treatment planning. Our goal is to evaluate the impact of voxelization on segmented structures, as well as how factors like voxel size affects metrics, such as DVH. METHODS: We create a series of implicit functions, which represent simulated structures. These structures are sampled at varying resolutions, and compared to labelmaps with high sub-millimeter resolutions. We generate DVH and evaluate voxelization error for the same structures at different resolutions by calculating the agreement acceptance percentage between the DVH. RESULTS: We implemented tools for analysis as modules in the SlicerRT toolkit based on the 3D Slicer platform. We found that there were large DVH variation from the baseline for small structures or for structures located in regions with a high dose gradient, potentially leading to the creation of suboptimal treatment plans. CONCLUSION: This work demonstrates that labelmap and dose volume voxel size is an important factor in DVH accuracy, which must be accounted for in order to ensure the development of accurate treatment plans.

  15. Approximate Algorithms for Computing Spatial Distance Histograms with Accuracy Guarantees.

    PubMed

    Grupcev, Vladimir; Yuan, Yongke; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Jin; Chen, Shaoping; Pandit, Sagar; Weng, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Particle simulation has become an important research tool in many scientific and engineering fields. Data generated by such simulations impose great challenges to database storage and query processing. One of the queries against particle simulation data, the spatial distance histogram (SDH) query, is the building block of many high-level analytics, and requires quadratic time to compute using a straightforward algorithm. Previous work has developed efficient algorithms that compute exact SDHs. While beating the naive solution, such algorithms are still not practical in processing SDH queries against large-scale simulation data. In this paper, we take a different path to tackle this problem by focusing on approximate algorithms with provable error bounds. We first present a solution derived from the aforementioned exact SDH algorithm, and this solution has running time that is unrelated to the system size N. We also develop a mathematical model to analyze the mechanism that leads to errors in the basic approximate algorithm. Our model provides insights on how the algorithm can be improved to achieve higher accuracy and efficiency. Such insights give rise to a new approximate algorithm with improved time/accuracy tradeoff. Experimental results confirm our analysis.

  16. Lung cancer prediction using neural network ensemble with histogram of oriented gradient genomic features.

    PubMed

    Adetiba, Emmanuel; Olugbara, Oludayo O

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental comparison of artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) ensembles and their "nonensemble" variants for lung cancer prediction. These machine learning classifiers were trained to predict lung cancer using samples of patient nucleotides with mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor, Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene, and tumor suppressor p53 genomes collected as biomarkers from the IGDB.NSCLC corpus. The Voss DNA encoding was used to map the nucleotide sequences of mutated and normal genomes to obtain the equivalent numerical genomic sequences for training the selected classifiers. The histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) and local binary pattern (LBP) state-of-the-art feature extraction schemes were applied to extract representative genomic features from the encoded sequences of nucleotides. The ANN ensemble and HOG best fit the training dataset of this study with an accuracy of 95.90% and mean square error of 0.0159. The result of the ANN ensemble and HOG genomic features is promising for automated screening and early detection of lung cancer. This will hopefully assist pathologists in administering targeted molecular therapy and offering counsel to early stage lung cancer patients and persons in at risk populations. PMID:25802891

  17. Lung Cancer Prediction Using Neural Network Ensemble with Histogram of Oriented Gradient Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Adetiba, Emmanuel; Olugbara, Oludayo O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental comparison of artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) ensembles and their “nonensemble” variants for lung cancer prediction. These machine learning classifiers were trained to predict lung cancer using samples of patient nucleotides with mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor, Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene, and tumor suppressor p53 genomes collected as biomarkers from the IGDB.NSCLC corpus. The Voss DNA encoding was used to map the nucleotide sequences of mutated and normal genomes to obtain the equivalent numerical genomic sequences for training the selected classifiers. The histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) and local binary pattern (LBP) state-of-the-art feature extraction schemes were applied to extract representative genomic features from the encoded sequences of nucleotides. The ANN ensemble and HOG best fit the training dataset of this study with an accuracy of 95.90% and mean square error of 0.0159. The result of the ANN ensemble and HOG genomic features is promising for automated screening and early detection of lung cancer. This will hopefully assist pathologists in administering targeted molecular therapy and offering counsel to early stage lung cancer patients and persons in at risk populations. PMID:25802891

  18. DNA methylation profiling identifies two splenic marginal zone lymphoma subgroups with different clinical and genetic features.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Alberto J; Rinaldi, Andrea; Mensah, Afua A; Kwee, Ivo; Cascione, Luciano; Robles, Eloy F; Martinez-Climent, Jose A; Oscier, David; Arcaini, Luca; Baldini, Luca; Marasca, Roberto; Thieblemont, Catherine; Briere, Josette; Forconi, Francesco; Zamò, Alberto; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Mollejo, Manuela; Facchetti, Fabio; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bhagat, Govind; Piris, Miguel A; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zucca, Emanuele; Rossi, Davide; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a rare lymphoma. Loss of 7q31 and somatic mutations affecting the NOTCH2 and KLF2 genes are the commonest genomic aberrations. Epigenetic changes can be pharmacologically reverted; therefore, identification of groups of patients with specific epigenomic alterations might have therapeutic relevance. Here we integrated genome-wide DNA-promoter methylation profiling with gene expression profiling, and clinical and biological variables. An unsupervised clustering analysis of a test series of 98 samples identified 2 clusters with different degrees of promoter methylation. The cluster comprising samples with higher-promoter methylation (High-M) had a poorer overall survival compared with the lower (Low-M) cluster. The prognostic relevance of the High-M phenotype was confirmed in an independent validation set of 36 patients. In the whole series, the High-M phenotype was associated with IGHV1-02 usage, mutations of NOTCH2 gene, 7q31-32 loss, and histologic transformation. In the High-M set, a number of tumor-suppressor genes were methylated and repressed. PRC2 subunit genes and several prosurvival lymphoma genes were unmethylated and overexpressed. A model based on the methylation of 3 genes (CACNB2, HTRA1, KLF4) identified a poorer-outcome patient subset. Exposure of splenic marginal zone lymphoma cell lines to a demethylating agent caused partial reversion of the High-M phenotype and inhibition of proliferation.

  19. DNA methylation profiling identifies two splenic marginal zone lymphoma subgroups with different clinical and genetic features

    PubMed Central

    Arribas, Alberto J.; Rinaldi, Andrea; Mensah, Afua A.; Kwee, Ivo; Cascione, Luciano; Robles, Eloy F.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.; Oscier, David; Arcaini, Luca; Baldini, Luca; Marasca, Roberto; Thieblemont, Catherine; Briere, Josette; Forconi, Francesco; Zamò, Alberto; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Mollejo, Manuela; Facchetti, Fabio; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bhagat, Govind; Piris, Miguel A.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zucca, Emanuele; Rossi, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a rare lymphoma. Loss of 7q31 and somatic mutations affecting the NOTCH2 and KLF2 genes are the commonest genomic aberrations. Epigenetic changes can be pharmacologically reverted; therefore, identification of groups of patients with specific epigenomic alterations might have therapeutic relevance. Here we integrated genome-wide DNA-promoter methylation profiling with gene expression profiling, and clinical and biological variables. An unsupervised clustering analysis of a test series of 98 samples identified 2 clusters with different degrees of promoter methylation. The cluster comprising samples with higher-promoter methylation (High-M) had a poorer overall survival compared with the lower (Low-M) cluster. The prognostic relevance of the High-M phenotype was confirmed in an independent validation set of 36 patients. In the whole series, the High-M phenotype was associated with IGHV1-02 usage, mutations of NOTCH2 gene, 7q31-32 loss, and histologic transformation. In the High-M set, a number of tumor-suppressor genes were methylated and repressed. PRC2 subunit genes and several prosurvival lymphoma genes were unmethylated and overexpressed. A model based on the methylation of 3 genes (CACNB2, HTRA1, KLF4) identified a poorer-outcome patient subset. Exposure of splenic marginal zone lymphoma cell lines to a demethylating agent caused partial reversion of the High-M phenotype and inhibition of proliferation. PMID:25612624

  20. Variations in DNA subtype, antifungal susceptibility, and slime production among clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Hollis, R J

    1995-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important nosocomial pathogen that can proliferate in high concentrations of glucose and form biofilms on prosthetic materials. We investigated the genotypic diversity, slime production, and antifungal susceptibility among 60 isolates of C. parapsilosis from 44 patients and 10 patient care providers from five different medical centers. Molecular typing was performed using macrorestriction digest profiles with BssHII followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REAG) and by electrophoretic karyotyping (EK). Slime production was evaluated by growing the organisms in Sabouraud broth with 8% glucose and examining the walls of the tubes for the presence of an adherent slime layer. Antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, and itraconazole was determined using National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards proposed standard methods. Overall 28 different DNA types were identified by REAG and EK methods. MIC90 values ranged from 0.12 microgram/ml for itraconazole to 1.0 microgram/ml for fluconazole and amphotericin B. Sixty-five percent of the isolates produced slime: 37% were moderately to strongly positive, 28% were weakly positive, and 35% were negative. Overall, 83% of blood and catheter isolates were slime positive versus 53% of isolates from all other sites (P < 0.05). These data underscore the genetic diversity and susceptibility of C. parapsilosis to antifungal agents. Slime production may be important in enabling C. parapsilosis to cause catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:7789100

  1. DNA methylation profiling identifies two splenic marginal zone lymphoma subgroups with different clinical and genetic features.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Alberto J; Rinaldi, Andrea; Mensah, Afua A; Kwee, Ivo; Cascione, Luciano; Robles, Eloy F; Martinez-Climent, Jose A; Oscier, David; Arcaini, Luca; Baldini, Luca; Marasca, Roberto; Thieblemont, Catherine; Briere, Josette; Forconi, Francesco; Zamò, Alberto; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Mollejo, Manuela; Facchetti, Fabio; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bhagat, Govind; Piris, Miguel A; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zucca, Emanuele; Rossi, Davide; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a rare lymphoma. Loss of 7q31 and somatic mutations affecting the NOTCH2 and KLF2 genes are the commonest genomic aberrations. Epigenetic changes can be pharmacologically reverted; therefore, identification of groups of patients with specific epigenomic alterations might have therapeutic relevance. Here we integrated genome-wide DNA-promoter methylation profiling with gene expression profiling, and clinical and biological variables. An unsupervised clustering analysis of a test series of 98 samples identified 2 clusters with different degrees of promoter methylation. The cluster comprising samples with higher-promoter methylation (High-M) had a poorer overall survival compared with the lower (Low-M) cluster. The prognostic relevance of the High-M phenotype was confirmed in an independent validation set of 36 patients. In the whole series, the High-M phenotype was associated with IGHV1-02 usage, mutations of NOTCH2 gene, 7q31-32 loss, and histologic transformation. In the High-M set, a number of tumor-suppressor genes were methylated and repressed. PRC2 subunit genes and several prosurvival lymphoma genes were unmethylated and overexpressed. A model based on the methylation of 3 genes (CACNB2, HTRA1, KLF4) identified a poorer-outcome patient subset. Exposure of splenic marginal zone lymphoma cell lines to a demethylating agent caused partial reversion of the High-M phenotype and inhibition of proliferation. PMID:25612624

  2. Using the Bootstrap Method for a Statistical Significance Test of Differences between Summary Histograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-01-01

    A new method is proposed to compare statistical differences between summary histograms, which are the histograms summed over a large ensemble of individual histograms. It consists of choosing a distance statistic for measuring the difference between summary histograms and using a bootstrap procedure to calculate the statistical significance level. Bootstrapping is an approach to statistical inference that makes few assumptions about the underlying probability distribution that describes the data. Three distance statistics are compared in this study. They are the Euclidean distance, the Jeffries-Matusita distance and the Kuiper distance. The data used in testing the bootstrap method are satellite measurements of cloud systems called cloud objects. Each cloud object is defined as a contiguous region/patch composed of individual footprints or fields of view. A histogram of measured values over footprints is generated for each parameter of each cloud object and then summary histograms are accumulated over all individual histograms in a given cloud-object size category. The results of statistical hypothesis tests using all three distances as test statistics are generally similar, indicating the validity of the proposed method. The Euclidean distance is determined to be most suitable after comparing the statistical tests of several parameters with distinct probability distributions among three cloud-object size categories. Impacts on the statistical significance levels resulting from differences in the total lengths of satellite footprint data between two size categories are also discussed.

  3. Compressed histogram attribute profiles for the classification of VHR remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiti, Romano; Demir, Begüm; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel compressed histogram attribute profile (CHAP) for classification of very high resolution remote sensing images. The CHAP characterizes the marginal local distribution of attribute filter responses to model the texture information of each sample with a small number of image features. This is achieved based on a three steps algorithm. The first step is devoted to provide a complete characterization of spatial properties of objects in a scene. To this end, the attribute profile (AP) is initially built by the sequential application of attribute filters to the considered image. Then, to capture complete spatial characteristics of the structures in the scene a local histogram is calculated for each sample of each image in the AP. The local histograms of the same pixel location can contain redundant information since: i) adjacent histogram bins can provide similar information; and ii) the attributes obtained with similar attribute filter threshold values lead to redundant features. In the second step, to point out the redundancies the local histograms of the same pixel locations in the AP are organized into a 2D matrix representation, where columns are associated to the local histograms and rows represents a specific bin in all histograms of the considered sequence of filtered attributes in the profile. This representation results in the characterization of the texture information of each sample through a 2D texture descriptor. In the final step, a novel compression approach based on a uniform 2D quantization strategy is applied to remove the redundancy of the 2D texture descriptors. Finally the CHAP is classified by a Support Vector Machine classifier with histogram intersection kernel that is very effective for high dimensional histogram-based feature representations. Experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed CHAP in terms of computational complexity, storage requirements and classification accuracy when compared to the

  4. Real-time rotation estimation using histograms of oriented gradients.

    PubMed

    Bratanič, Blaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Tomaževič, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on real-time rotation estimation for model-based automated visual inspection. In the case of model-based inspection, spatial alignment is essential to distinguish visual defects from normal appearance variations. Defects are detected by comparing the inspected object with its spatially aligned ideal reference model. Rotation estimation is crucial for the inspection of rotationally symmetric objects where mechanical manipulation is unable to ensure the correct object rotation. We propose a novel method for in-plane rotation estimation. Rotation is estimated with an ensemble of nearest-neighbor estimators. Each estimator contains a spatially local representation of an object in a feature space for all rotation angles and is constructed with a semi-supervised self-training approach from a set of unlabeled training images. An individual representation in a feature space is obtained by calculating the Histograms of Oriented Gradients (HOG) over a spatially local region. Each estimator votes separately for the estimated angle; all votes are weighted and accumulated. The final estimation is the angle with the most votes. The method was evaluated on several datasets of pharmaceutical tablets varying in size, shape, and color. The results show that the proposed method is superior in robustness with comparable speed and accuracy to previously proposed methods for rotation estimation of pharmaceutical tablets. Furthermore, all evaluations were performed with the same set of parameters, which implies that the method requires minimal human intervention. Despite the evaluation focused on pharmaceutical tablets, we consider the method useful for any application that requires robust real-time in-plane rotation estimation.

  5. Histogram-driven cupping correction (HDCC) in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakou, Y.; Meyer, M.; Lapp, R.; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Typical cupping correction methods are pre-processing methods which require either pre-calibration measurements or simulations of standard objects to approximate and correct for beam hardening and scatter. Some of them require the knowledge of spectra, detector characteristics, etc. The aim of this work was to develop a practical histogram-driven cupping correction (HDCC) method to post-process the reconstructed images. We use a polynomial representation of the raw-data generated by forward projection of the reconstructed images; forward and backprojection are performed on graphics processing units (GPU). The coefficients of the polynomial are optimized using a simplex minimization of the joint entropy of the CT image and its gradient. The algorithm was evaluated using simulations and measurements of homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. For the measurements a C-arm flat-detector CT (FD-CT) system with a 30×40 cm2 detector, a kilovoltage on board imager (radiation therapy simulator) and a micro-CT system were used. The algorithm reduced cupping artifacts both in simulations and measurements using a fourth-order polynomial and was in good agreement to the reference. The minimization algorithm required less than 70 iterations to adjust the coefficients only performing a linear combination of basis images, thus executing without time consuming operations. HDCC reduced cupping artifacts without the necessity of pre-calibration or other scan information enabling a retrospective improvement of CT image homogeneity. However, the method can work with other cupping correction algorithms or in a calibration manner, as well.

  6. Preference for luminance histogram regularities in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Graham, Daniel; Schwarz, Bianca; Chatterjee, Anjan; Leder, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Natural scene luminance distributions typically have positive skew, and for single objects, there is evidence that higher skew is a correlate (but not a guarantee) of glossiness. Skewness is also relevant to aesthetics: preference for glossy single objects (with high skew) has been shown even in infants, and skewness is a good predictor of fruit freshness. Given that primate vision appears to efficiently encode natural scene luminance variation, and given evidence that natural scene regularities may be a prerequisite for aesthetic perception in the spatial domain, here we ask whether humans in general prefer natural scenes with more positively skewed luminance distributions. If humans generally prefer images with the higher-order regularities typical of natural scenes and/or shiny objects, we would expect this to be the case. By manipulating luminance distribution skewness (holding mean and variance constant) for individual natural images, we show that in fact preference varies inversely with increasing positive skewness. This finding holds for: artistic landscape images and calibrated natural scenes; scenes with and without glossy surfaces; landscape scenes and close-up objects; and noise images with natural luminance histograms. Across conditions, humans prefer images with skew near zero over higher skew images, and they prefer skew lower than that of the unmodified scenes. These results suggest that humans prefer images with luminances that are distributed relatively evenly about the mean luminance, i.e., images with similar amounts of light and dark. We propose that our results reflect an efficient processing advantage of low-skew images over high-skew images, following evidence from prior brain imaging results.

  7. Cell-free fetal DNA testing for fetal aneuploidy and beyond: clinical integration challenges in the US context.

    PubMed

    Allyse, Megan; Sayres, Lauren C; King, Jaime S; Norton, Mary E; Cho, Mildred K

    2012-11-01

    The recent release of new, non-invasive prenatal tests for fetal aneuploidy using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) has been hailed as a revolution in prenatal testing and has triggered significant commercial interest in the field. Ongoing research portends the arrival of a wide range of cffDNA tests. However, it is not yet clear how these tests will be integrated into well-established prenatal testing strategies in the USA, as the timing of such testing and the degree to which new non-invasive tests will supplement or replace existing screening and diagnostic tools remain uncertain. We argue that there is an urgent need for policy-makers, regulators and professional societies to provide guidance on the most efficient and ethical manner for such tests to be introduced into clinical practice in the USA.

  8. Cell-free fetal DNA testing for fetal aneuploidy and beyond: clinical integration challenges in the US context

    PubMed Central

    Allyse, Megan; Sayres, Lauren C.; King, Jaime S.; Norton, Mary E.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2012-01-01

    The recent release of new, non-invasive prenatal tests for fetal aneuploidy using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) has been hailed as a revolution in prenatal testing and has triggered significant commercial interest in the field. Ongoing research portends the arrival of a wide range of cffDNA tests. However, it is not yet clear how these tests will be integrated into well-established prenatal testing strategies in the USA, as the timing of such testing and the degree to which new non-invasive tests will supplement or replace existing screening and diagnostic tools remain uncertain. We argue that there is an urgent need for policy-makers, regulators and professional societies to provide guidance on the most efficient and ethical manner for such tests to be introduced into clinical practice in the USA. PMID:22863603

  9. Detection of primary DNA damage: applicability to biomonitoring of genotoxic occupational exposure and in clinical therapy.

    PubMed

    Oesch, F; Hengstler, J G; Arand, M; Fuchs, J

    1995-01-01

    The biological effect of putative genotoxic chemicals in the work place environment was monitored in peripheral mononuclear blood cells of exposed workers. DNA strand breaks, alkali-labile sites of DNA and DNA cross-links were measured using the alkaline filter elution method. A dose dependent increase in DNA damage was found in sterilization workers exposed to ethylene oxide and metal workers with exposure towards N-nitrosodiethanolamine. Two subpopulations with different response to the external exposure were found in nonsmoking sterilization workers. Nurses handling antineo-plastic agents without adequate safety provisions showed a statistically significantly higher rate of DNA strand breaks compared to other nurses handling cytostatic drugs with recommended safety equipment and also compared to not exposed controls. Also in several other occupational groups such as fire fighters possibly exposed to several genotoxic chemicals after an accident in a chemical plant, roofers and petrol pump attendants a significantly higher amount of DNA damage was found compared to controls. No statistically significant differences in the amount of DNA strand breaks were found in cabinet makers and car mechanics compared to controls. In peripheral mononuclear blood cells of ovarial carcinoma patients as well as of patients with Morbus Hodgkin an increased DNA strand break rate was found after application of cytostatic drugs. The individual patients showed a very different response after drug intake. The increase in DNA damage after drug application is possibly related to the success of the chemotherapy.

  10. Safety and Immunogenicity of DNA Vaccines Encoding Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Wild-Type Glycoproteins in a Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Costner, Pamela; Enama, Mary E.; Berkowitz, Nina; Hu, Zonghui; Hendel, Cynthia S.; Sitar, Sandra; Plummer, Sarah; Mulangu, Sabue; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Sullivan, Nancy J.; Graham, Barney S.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality and are potential bioterrorism agents. There are no available vaccines or therapeutic agents. Previous clinical trials evaluated transmembrane-deleted and point-mutation Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in candidate vaccines. Constructs evaluated in this trial encode wild-type (WT) GP from Ebolavirus Zaire and Sudan species and the Marburgvirus Angola strain expressed in a DNA vaccine. Methods The VRC 206 study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of these DNA vaccines (4 mg administered intramuscularly by Biojector) at weeks 0, 4, and 8, with a homologous boost at or after week 32. Safety evaluations included solicited reactogenicity and coagulation parameters. Primary immune assessment was done by means of GP-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The vaccines were well tolerated, with no serious adverse events; 80% of subjects had positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results (≥30) at week 12. The fourth DNA vaccination boosted the immune responses. Conclusions The investigational Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus WT GP DNA vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic in this phase I study. These results will further inform filovirus vaccine research toward a goal of inducing protective immunity by using WT GP antigens in candidate vaccine regimens. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00605514. PMID:25225676

  11. Methanol-based fixation is superior to buffered formalin for next-generation sequencing of DNA from clinical cancer samples

    PubMed Central

    Piskorz, A. M.; Ennis, D.; Macintyre, G.; Goranova, T. E.; Eldridge, M.; Segui-Gracia, N.; Valganon, M.; Hoyle, A.; Orange, C.; Moore, L.; Jimenez-Linan, M.; Millan, D.; McNeish, I. A.; Brenton, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of tumour samples is a critical component of personalised cancer treatment, but it requires high-quality DNA samples. Routine neutral-buffered formalin (NBF) fixation has detrimental effects on nucleic acids, causing low yields, as well as fragmentation and DNA base changes, leading to significant artefacts. Patients and methods We have carried out a detailed comparison of DNA quality from matched samples isolated from high-grade serous ovarian cancers from 16 patients fixed in methanol and NBF. These experiments use tumour fragments and mock biopsies to simulate routine practice, ensuring that results are applicable to standard clinical biopsies. Results Using matched snap-frozen tissue as gold standard comparator, we show that methanol-based fixation has significant benefits over NBF, with greater DNA yield, longer fragment size and more accurate copy-number calling using shallow whole-genome sequencing (WGS). These data also provide a new approach to understand and quantify artefactual effects of fixation using non-negative matrix factorisation to analyse mutational spectra from targeted and WGS data. Conclusion We strongly recommend the adoption of methanol fixation for sample collection strategies in new clinical trials. This approach is immediately available, is logistically simple and can offer cheaper and more reliable mutation calling than traditional NBF fixation. PMID:26681675

  12. Towards clinical application of pronuclear transfer to prevent mitochondrial DNA disease.

    PubMed

    Hyslop, Louise A; Blakeley, Paul; Craven, Lyndsey; Richardson, Jessica; Fogarty, Norah M E; Fragouli, Elpida; Lamb, Mahdi; Wamaitha, Sissy E; Prathalingam, Nilendran; Zhang, Qi; O'Keefe, Hannah; Takeda, Yuko; Arizzi, Lucia; Alfarawati, Samer; Tuppen, Helen A; Irving, Laura; Kalleas, Dimitrios; Choudhary, Meenakshi; Wells, Dagan; Murdoch, Alison P; Turnbull, Douglass M; Niakan, Kathy K; Herbert, Mary

    2016-06-16

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are maternally inherited and are associated with a broad range of debilitating and fatal diseases. Reproductive technologies designed to uncouple the inheritance of mtDNA from nuclear DNA may enable affected women to have a genetically related child with a greatly reduced risk of mtDNA disease. Here we report the first preclinical studies on pronuclear transplantation (PNT). Surprisingly, techniques used in proof-of-concept studies involving abnormally fertilized human zygotes were not well tolerated by normally fertilized zygotes. We have therefore developed an alternative approach based on transplanting pronuclei shortly after completion of meiosis rather than shortly before the first mitotic division. This promotes efficient development to the blastocyst stage with no detectable effect on aneuploidy or gene expression. After optimization, mtDNA carryover was reduced to <2% in the majority (79%) of PNT blastocysts. The importance of reducing carryover to the lowest possible levels is highlighted by a progressive increase in heteroplasmy in a stem cell line derived from a PNT blastocyst with 4% mtDNA carryover. We conclude that PNT has the potential to reduce the risk of mtDNA disease, but it may not guarantee prevention. PMID:27281217

  13. PCR synthesis of double stranded DNA labeled with 5-bromouridine. A step towards finding a bromonucleoside for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Barbara; Sobolewski, Ireneusz; Polska, Katarzyna; Zielonka, Justyna; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Skowron, Piotr; Rak, Janusz

    2011-12-01

    Incorporation of 5-bromouridine (5BrdU) into DNA makes it sensitive to UV and ionizing radiation, which opens up a prospective route for the clinical usage of 5-bromouridine and other halonucleosides. In the present work the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol, which enables a long DNA fragment (resembling DNA synthesized in the cell in the presence of halonucleosides) to be completely substituted with 5BrdU, was optimized. Using HPLC coupled to enzymatic digestion, it was demonstrated that the actual amounts of native nucleosides and 5BrdU correspond very well to those calculated from the sequence of PCR products. The synthesized DNA is photosensitive to photons of 300nm. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the photolysis of labeled PCR products leads to a significant decrease in the 5BrdU signal and the simultaneous occurrence of a uridine peak. Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggest that single strand breaks and cross-links are formed as a result of UV irradiation. The PCR protocol described in the current paper may be employed for labeling DNA not only with BrdU but also with other halonucleosides.

  14. Direct DNA amplification from crude clinical samples using a PCR enhancer cocktail and novel mutants of Taq.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhian; Kermekchiev, Milko B; Barnes, Wayne M

    2010-03-01

    PCR-based clinical and forensic tests often have low sensitivity or even false-negative results caused by potent PCR inhibitors found in blood and soil. It is widely accepted that purification of target DNA before PCR is necessary for successful amplification. In an attempt to overcome PCR inhibition, enhance PCR amplification, and simplify the PCR protocol, we demonstrate improved PCR-enhancing cocktails containing nonionic detergent, l-carnitine, d-(+)-trehalose, and heparin. These cocktails, in combination with two inhibitor-resistant Taq mutants, OmniTaq and Omni Klentaq, enabled efficient amplification of exogenous, endogenous, and high-GC content DNA targets directly from crude samples containing human plasma, serum, and whole blood without DNA purification. In the presence of these enhancer cocktails, the mutant enzymes were able to tolerate at least 25% plasma, serum, or whole blood and as high as 80% GC content templates in PCR reactions. These enhancer cocktails also improved the performance of the novel Taq mutants in real-time PCR amplification using crude samples, both in SYBR Green fluorescence detection and TaqMan assays. The novel enhancer mixes also facilitated DNA amplification from crude samples with various commercial Taq DNA polymerases.

  15. Translating the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements Project findings to the clinic: ENCODE's implications for eye disease.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Paul G; Hewitt, Alex W

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10 years after the Human Genome Project unravelled the sequence of our DNA, the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project sought to interpret it. Data from the recently completed project have shed new light on the proportion of biologically active human DNA, assigning a biochemical role to much of the sequence previously considered to be 'junk'. Many of these newly catalogued functional elements represent epigenetic mechanisms involved in regulation of gene expression. Analogous to an Ishihara plate, a gene-coding region of DNA (target dots) only comes into context when the non-coding DNA (surrounding dots) is appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the ENCODE project, discussing the significance of these data for ophthalmic research and eye disease. The novel insights afforded by the ENCODE project will in time allow for the development of new therapeutic strategies in the management of common blinding disorders.

  16. Preparation of Concentrated Chitosan/DNA Nanoparticle Formulations by Lyophilization for Gene Delivery at Clinically Relevant Dosages.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Daniel; Nelea, Monica; Biniecki, Kristof; Lavertu, Marc; Buschmann, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan/DNA polyplexes have been optimized for efficient and safe in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. Clinical application of this technology requires the development of formulations with higher concentrations to reach therapeutic dosages. Polyplexes were prepared using chitosan and EGFPLuc plasmids. Freeze-thawing and freeze-drying studies were performed to identify and optimize lyoprotectant and buffer contents in formulations. Freeze-dried samples were rehydrated in reduced volumes to increase their final DNA dose. Nanoparticle physicochemical properties were analyzed, and their transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity were measured in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Data showed that 3.5 mM histidine buffer (pH 6.5) combined with one of 0.5% wt/vol sucrose, dextran 5 kDa, or trehalose was required to prevent polyplex aggregation during freeze-drying. Optimal formulations could be concentrated 20-fold, to a clinically desired ∼1 mg of DNA/mL, while maintaining near physiological pH and tonicity. Polyplexes were predominantly spherical, with diameters below 200 nm, polydispersity indexes below 0.32, and zeta potentials above +19 mV. Rehydrated formulations had transfection efficiencies no less than 65% of fresh polyplexes without excipients and had no effect on viability and metabolic activity of human embryonic kidney 293 cells. These concentrated formulations represent an important step toward clinical use of chitosan-based gene delivery systems. PMID:26852843

  17. Histogram analysis of ADC in brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debrup; Wang, Jihong; Li, Jiang

    2011-03-01

    At various stage of progression, most brain tumors are not homogenous. In this presentation, we retrospectively studied the distribution of ADC values inside tumor volume during the course of tumor treatment and progression for a selective group of patients who underwent an anti-VEGF trial. Complete MRI studies were obtained for this selected group of patients including pre- and multiple follow-up, post-treatment imaging studies. In each MRI imaging study, multiple scan series were obtained as a standard protocol which includes T1, T2, T1-post contrast, FLAIR and DTI derived images (ADC, FA etc.) for each visit. All scan series (T1, T2, FLAIR, post-contrast T1) were registered to the corresponding DTI scan at patient's first visit. Conventionally, hyper-intensity regions on T1-post contrast images are believed to represent the core tumor region while regions highlighted by FLAIR may overestimate tumor size. Thus we annotated tumor regions on the T1-post contrast scans and ADC intensity values for pixels were extracted inside tumor regions as defined on T1-post scans. We fit a mixture Gaussian (MG) model for the extracted pixels using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm, which produced a set of parameters (mean, various and mixture coefficients) for the MG model. This procedure was performed for each visits resulting in a series of GM parameters. We studied the parameters fitted for ADC and see if they can be used as indicators for tumor progression. Additionally, we studied the ADC characteristics in the peri-tumoral region as identified by hyper-intensity on FLAIR scans. The results show that ADC histogram analysis of the tumor region supports the two compartment model that suggests the low ADC value subregion corresponding to densely packed cancer cell while the higher ADC value region corresponding to a mixture of viable and necrotic cells with superimposed edema. Careful studies of the composition and relative volume of the two compartments in tumor

  18. Application of Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-03-01

    A carcinoma is a malignant cancer that emerges from epithelial cells in structures through out the body.It invades the critical organs, could metastasize or spread to lymph nodes.IMRT is an advanced mode of radiation therapy treatment for cancer. It delivers more conformal doses to malignant tumors sparing the critical organs by modulating the intensity of radiation beam.An automated software, HART (S. Jang et al.,2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812) was used for efficient analysis of dose volume histograms (DVH) for multiple targets and critical organs in four IMRT treatment plans for each patient. IMRT data for ten head and neck cancer patients were exported as AAPM/RTOG format files from a commercial treatment planning system at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH).HART extracted DVH statistics were used to evaluate plan indices and to analyze dose tolerance of critical structures at prescription dose (PD) for each patient. Mean plan indices (n=10) were found to be in good agreement with published results for Linac based plans. The least irradiated volume at tolerance dose (TD50) was observed for brainstem and the highest volume for larynx in SIB treatment techniques. Thus HART, an open source platform, has extensive clinical implications in IMRT treatments.

  19. Region of Interest Detection Based on Histogram Segmentation for Satellite Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiadtikornthaweeyot, Warinthorn; Tatnall, Adrian R. L.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution satellite imaging is considered as the outstanding applicant to extract the Earth's surface information. Extraction of a feature of an image is very difficult due to having to find the appropriate image segmentation techniques and combine different methods to detect the Region of Interest (ROI) most effectively. This paper proposes techniques to classify objects in the satellite image by using image processing methods on high-resolution satellite images. The systems to identify the ROI focus on forests, urban and agriculture areas. The proposed system is based on histograms of the image to classify objects using thresholding. The thresholding is performed by considering the behaviour of the histogram mapping to a particular region in the satellite image. The proposed model is based on histogram segmentation and morphology techniques. There are five main steps supporting each other; Histogram classification, Histogram segmentation, Morphological dilation, Morphological fill image area and holes and ROI management. The methods to detect the ROI of the satellite images based on histogram classification have been studied, implemented and tested. The algorithm is be able to detect the area of forests, urban and agriculture separately. The image segmentation methods can detect the ROI and reduce the size of the original image by discarding the unnecessary parts.

  20. De-Striping for Tdiccd Remote Sensing Image Based on Statistical Features of Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui-ting; Liu, Wei; He, Hong-yan; Zhang, Bing-xian; Jiang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Aim to striping noise brought by non-uniform response of remote sensing TDI CCD, a novel de-striping method based on statistical features of image histogram is put forward. By analysing the distribution of histograms,the centroid of histogram is selected to be an eigenvalue representing uniformity of ground objects,histogrammic centroid of whole image and each pixels are calculated first,the differences between them are regard as rough correction coefficients, then in order to avoid the sensitivity caused by single parameter and considering the strong continuity and pertinence of ground objects between two adjacent pixels,correlation coefficient of the histograms is introduces to reflect the similarities between them,fine correction coefficient is obtained by searching around the rough correction coefficient,additionally,in view of the influence of bright cloud on histogram,an automatic cloud detection based on multi-feature including grey level,texture,fractal dimension and edge is used to pre-process image.Two 0-level panchromatic images of SJ-9A satellite with obvious strip noise are processed by proposed method to evaluate the performance, results show that the visual quality of images are improved because the strip noise is entirely removed,we quantitatively analyse the result by calculating the non-uniformity ,which has reached about 1% and is better than histogram matching method.

  1. Sperm DNA damage caused by oxidative stress: modifiable clinical, lifestyle and nutritional factors in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Wright, C; Milne, S; Leeson, H

    2014-06-01

    DNA fragmentation is an important factor in the aetiology of male infertility. However, it is still underevaluated and its inclusion in routine semen analysis is debated. DNA fragmentation has been shown to be a robust indicator of fertility potential, more so than conventional semen parameters. Men with high DNA fragmentation levels have significantly lower odds of conceiving, naturally or through procedures such as intrauterine insemination and IVF. Couples may be counselled to proceed directly to intracytoplasmic sperm injection as it is more successful in this group, avoiding costly procedures, recurrent failures or pregnancy losses; however, this treatment is not without limitations or risks. Ideally DNA fragmentation should be minimized where possible. Oxidative stress is the major cause of DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa. Endogenous and exogenous factors that contribute to oxidative stress are discussed, and in many cases are shown to be easily modifiable. Antioxidants play a protective role, although a delicate balance of reduction and oxidation is required for essential functions, including fertilization. Reducing oxidative stress may improve a couple's chances of conception either naturally or via assisted reproduction. Sources of oxidative stress therefore should be thoroughly examined in men with high levels of DNA fragmentation and modified where possible. DNA fragmentation is an important factor in the aetiology of male infertility. However it is still underevaluated and its inclusion in routine semen analysis is still debated. DNA fragmentation has been shown to be a robust indicator of fertility potential, more so than conventional semen parameters. Men with high levels of DNA fragmentation will have significantly lower odds of conceiving naturally or through procedures such as intrauterine insemination and IVF. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may be much more successful in this group, and couples may be counselled to proceed directly to

  2. Comparison of different algorithms for evaluation of respiratory sinus arrhytmia: cross-correlation function histogram analysis and regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, J M; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1995-01-01

    Three algorithms for assessment of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) have been evaluated: cross-correlation function, histogram analysis and regression plot. The algorithms were tested experimentally in a group of 11 subjects. A cross-correlation function with a high time resolution (1 ms) was used for investigation of the time lag between instantaneous heart rate and respiration (CTL). This time lag was not affected by the breathing rate in a range of 8 to 29 breaths per minute. A mathematical model of CTL compared with experimental results indicates that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is probably modulated directly by the respiratory network in the brainstem rather than by a baroreflex in the range of breathing rate investigated. Histogram analysis reflects the impact of inspiration and expiration on respiratory sinus arrhythmia. For this purpose heart rate changes were separated into two distributions (inspiration-expiration). The result value (U-VAL) of the Mann-Whitney U-test reflects the impact of respiration on heart rate variability. Regression analysis of heart rate versus respiration shows that the heart rate increase is more closely coupled to inspiration than the heart rate decrease to expiration. Both, CTL and U-VAL are thought to be useful parameters for clinical investigation of RSA.

  3. Validation for clinical use of, and initial clinical experience with, a novel approach to population-based carrier screening using high-throughput, next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Stephanie; Nelson, Heather; Greger, Valerie; Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Davie, Jocelyn; Faulkner, Nicole; Neitzel, Dana; Casey, Kristie; Umbarger, Mark A; Chennagiri, Niru; Kramer, Alexander C; Porreca, Gregory J; Kennedy, Caleb J

    2014-03-01

    Traditional carrier screening assays are designed to look for only the most common mutations within a gene owing to cost considerations. Although this can yield high detection rates in specific populations for specific genes (such as cystic fibrosis in Caucasians), they are suboptimal for other ethnicities or for patients of mixed or unknown ethnic background. Next-generation DNA sequencing provides an opportunity to provide carrier screening using more comprehensive mutation panels that are limited primarily by information about the clinical impact of detected sequence changes. We describe a next-generation DNA sequencing-based assay capable of reliably screening patient samples in a timely and comprehensive manner. The analytic accuracy in a research setting has been documented. Here, we describe the additional studies performed to ensure the accuracy (analytic validity) and robustness of our assay for use in clinical practice and provide data from our experience offering this testing. Our clinical experience using this approach to screen 11,691 in vitro fertilization patients has identified 449 mutant alleles: 447 in carriers and 2 in an affected individual. In total, we found 87 distinct mutations in 14 different genes. Approximately one quarter of the mutations found are not included in traditional, limited, mutation panels, including 16 known mutations unique to our panel, and novel truncating mutations in several genes. PMID:24374108

  4. Progression and survival in prostatic adenocarcinoma: a comparison of clinical stage, Gleason grade, S-phase fraction and DNA ploidy.

    PubMed

    Vesalainen, S; Nordling, S; Lipponen, P; Talja, M; Syrjänen, K

    1994-08-01

    Clinical data were reviewed in 325 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma followed up for a mean of 13 years. Paraffin-embedded tumour biopsy specimens from the primary tumours were available for flow cytometry (FCM) in 273 cases. Intra-tumour heterogeneity in DNA index (DI) was found in 4% of the tumours (54 cases were analysed). S-phase fraction (SPF) and DNA ploidy were significantly interrelated. Aneuploidy and high SPF were significantly related to both a high T category and high Gleason score. The progression in T1-2M0 tumours was related to Gleason score (P = 0.009), DNA ploidy (P = 0.006) and SPF (P = 0.007), while the Gleason score (P = 0.0013), DNA ploidy (P = 0.002) and SPF (P < 0.001) had prognostic value in univariate survival analysis. In the entire cohort, the T category (P < 0.001), M category (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), DNA ploidy (P < 0.001) and SPF (P < 0.001) were significant prognostic factors. In Cox's analysis, the M category (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), T category (P = 0.003), age (P = 0.001) and SPF (P = 0.087) were independently related to prognosis. In the T1-2M0 tumours, Gleason score (P < 0.001), T category (P = 0.022) and SPF (P = 0.058) were independent predictors. A novel classification system in which the DNA ploidy or SPF and the Gleason score were combined was found to be of significant prognostic value in all M0 tumours (P < 0.001). The results suggest that FCM can be used as an adjunct to conventional histological assessments for determination of the correct prognostic category in prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  5. Clinical application of DNA ploidy to cervical cancer screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Garner, David

    2014-01-01

    Screening for cervical cancer with DNA ploidy assessment by automated quantitative image cytometry has spread throughout China over the past decade and now an estimated 1 million tests per year are done there. Compared to conventional liquid based cytology, DNA ploidy has competitive accuracy with much higher throughput per technician. DNA ploidy has the enormous advantage that it is an objective technology that can be taught in typically 2 or 3 wk, unlike qualitative cytology, and so it can enable screening in places that lack sufficient qualified cytotechnologists and cytopathologists for conventional cytology. Most papers on experience with application of the technology to cervical cancer screening over the past decade were published in the Chinese language. This review aims to provide a consistent framework for analysis of screening data and to summarize some of the work published from 2005 to the end of 2013. Of particular interest are a few studies comparing DNA ploidy with testing for high risk human papilloma virus (hrHPV) which suggest that DNA ploidy is at least equivalent, easier and less expensive than hrHPV testing. There may also be patient management benefits to combining hrHPV testing with DNA ploidy. Some knowledge gaps are identified and some suggestions are made for future research directions. PMID:25493231

  6. A rapid DNA extraction method from culture and clinical samples. Suitable for the detection of human cytomegalovirus by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zandotti, C; De Lamballerie, X; Guignole-Vignoli, C; Bollet, C; De Micco, P

    1993-02-01

    We propose an one-step DNA extraction method suitable for the polymerase chain reaction. This procedure utilizes Chelex 100, a chelating in exchange resin. This technique was compared with a traditional technique (proteinase K lysis, phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation) for isolation of human cytomegalovirus DNA from clinical samples. The procedure using Chelex 100 appeared to be a simple and fast extraction method for human cytomegalovirus DNA.

  7. Intra-Gene DNA Methylation Variability Is a Clinically Independent Prognostic Marker in Women’s Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Thomas E.; Jones, Allison; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Berns, Els M. J. J.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Davidson, Ben; Trope, Claes G.; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Widschwendter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel per-gene measure of intra-gene DNA methylation variability (IGV) based on the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 platform, which is prognostic independently of well-known predictors of clinical outcome. Using IGV, we derive a robust gene-panel prognostic signature for ovarian cancer (OC, n = 221), which validates in two independent data sets from Mayo Clinic (n = 198) and TCGA (n = 358), with significance of p = 0.004 in both sets. The OC prognostic signature gene-panel is comprised of four gene groups, which represent distinct biological processes. We show the IGV measurements of these gene groups are most likely a reflection of a mixture of intra-tumour heterogeneity and transcription factor (TF) binding/activity. IGV can be used to predict clinical outcome in patients individually, providing a surrogate read-out of hard-to-measure disease processes. PMID:26629914

  8. Repair of oxidative DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation and neuronal death may influence the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aderbal R T; Santos, Ana Cecília Feio; Farfel, Jose M; Grinberg, Lea T; Ferretti, Renata E L; Campos, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques; Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Rocha, Rafael M; Carraro, Dirce M; de Bragança Pereira, Carlos Alberto; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Brentani, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline associated with a featured neuropathology (neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles). Several studies have implicated oxidative damage to DNA, DNA repair, and altered cell-cycle regulation in addition to cell death in AD post-mitotic neurons. However, there is a lack of studies that systematically assess those biological processes in patients with AD neuropathology but with no evidence of cognitive impairment. We evaluated markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG, H2AX), DNA repair (p53, BRCA1, PTEN), and cell-cycle (Cdk1, Cdk4, Cdk5, Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, p27Kip1, phospho-Rb and E2F1) through immunohistochemistry and cell death through TUNEL in autopsy hippocampal tissue samples arrayed in a tissue microarray (TMA) composed of three groups: I) "clinical-pathological AD" (CP-AD)--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C) and clinical dementia (CDR ≥ 2, IQCODE>3.8); II) "pathological AD" (P-AD)--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C) and without cognitive impairment (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2); and III) "normal aging" (N)--subjects without neuropathological AD (Braak ≤ II and CERAD 0 or A) and with normal cognitive function (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2). Our results show that high levels of oxidative DNA damage are present in all groups. However, significant reductions in DNA repair and cell-cycle inhibition markers and increases in cell-cycle progression and cell death markers in subjects with CP-AD were detected when compared to both P-AD and N groups, whereas there were no significant differences in the studied markers between P-AD individuals and N subjects. This study indicates that, even in the setting of pathological AD, healthy cognition may be associated with a preserved repair to DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation, and cell death in post-mitotic neurons. PMID:24936870

  9. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. PMID:27151293

  10. Chronic opioid use is associated with increased DNA methylation correlating with increased clinical pain.

    PubMed

    Doehring, Alexandra; Oertel, Bruno Georg; Sittl, Reinhard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Environmentally caused changes in chromosomes that do not alter the DNA sequence but cause phenotypic changes by altering gene transcription are summarized as epigenetics. A major epigenetic mechanism is methylation or demethylation at CpG-rich DNA islands. DNA methylation triggered by drugs has largely unexplored therapeutic consequences. Here we report increased methylation at a CpG rich island in the OPRM1 gene coding for μ-opioid receptors and at a global methylation site (LINE-1) in leukocytes of methadone-substituted former opiate addicts compared with matched healthy controls. Higher DNA methylation associated with chronic opioid exposure was reproduced in an independent cohort of opioid-treated as compared to non-opioid-treated pain patients. This suggests that opioids may stimulate DNA methylation. The OPRM1 methylation had no immediate effect on μ-opioid receptor transcription and was not associated with opioid dosing requirements. However, the global DNA methylation at LINE-1 was significantly correlated with increased chronic pain. This suggests inhibitory effects on the transcription of still unspecified nocifensive gene products. It further implies that opioids may be causally associated with increased genome-wide DNA methylation, although currently there is no direct evidence of this. This has phenotypic consequences for pain and may provide a new, epigenetics-associated mechanism of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The results indicate a potential influence of opioid analgesics on the patients' epigenome. They emphasize the need for reliable and cost-effective screening tools and may imply that high-throughput screening for lead compounds in artificial expression systems may not provide the best tools for identifying new pain medications.

  11. Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuriko; Walker, Jim; Loughrey, Anne; Millar, Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin; Rooney, Paul; Elborn, Stuart; Moore, John

    2009-06-01

    Universal or "broad-range" PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27/30 (90%) of total bacterial species, consisting of seven genera and included (in descending order of frequency) Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paenibacillus, Arthrobacter, Janibacter and Rothia. Gram-negative organisms were less frequently isolated 3/30 (10%) and comprised three genera, including Moraxella, Psychrobacter and Haloanella. Eight fungal genera were identified among the 28 fungal organisms isolated, including (in descending order of frequency) Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Thanatephorus, Absidia, Eurotium, Paraphaeosphaeria and Tritirachium, with Cladosporium accounting for 10/28 (35.7%) of the total fungal isolates. In conclusion, this study identified the presence of 10 bacterial and eight fungal genera in the air within the laboratory sampled. Although this reflected diversity of the microorganisms present, none of these organisms have been described previously as having an inhalational route of laboratory-acquired infection. Therefore, we believe that the species of organisms identified and the concentration levels of these airborne contaminants determined, do not pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompotent laboratory personnel and visitors. PMID:20183192

  12. Identification of uterine leiomyoma-specific marker genes based on DNA methylation and their clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shun; Maekawa, Ryo; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Isao; Lee, Lifa; Okada, Maki; Jozaki, Kosuke; Asada, Hiromi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas is needed to determine whether the uterus can be retained. Therefore, biomarkers for uterine leiomyomas, and reliable and objective diagnostic methods have been desired besides the pathological diagnosis. In the present study, we identified 12 genes specific to uterine leiomyomas based on DNA methylation. Using these marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, we established a hierarchical clustering system based on the DNA methylation level of the marker genes, which could completely differentiate between uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium. Furthermore, our hierarchical clustering system completely discriminated uterine cancers and differentiated between uterine leiomyosarcomas and leiomyomas with more than 70% accuracy. In conclusion, this study identified DNA methylation-based marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, and our hierarchical clustering system using these marker genes was useful for differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. PMID:27498619

  13. Identification of uterine leiomyoma-specific marker genes based on DNA methylation and their clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shun; Maekawa, Ryo; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Isao; Lee, Lifa; Okada, Maki; Jozaki, Kosuke; Asada, Hiromi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas is needed to determine whether the uterus can be retained. Therefore, biomarkers for uterine leiomyomas, and reliable and objective diagnostic methods have been desired besides the pathological diagnosis. In the present study, we identified 12 genes specific to uterine leiomyomas based on DNA methylation. Using these marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, we established a hierarchical clustering system based on the DNA methylation level of the marker genes, which could completely differentiate between uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium. Furthermore, our hierarchical clustering system completely discriminated uterine cancers and differentiated between uterine leiomyosarcomas and leiomyomas with more than 70% accuracy. In conclusion, this study identified DNA methylation-based marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, and our hierarchical clustering system using these marker genes was useful for differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. PMID:27498619

  14. Detection of DNA of Lymphotropic Herpesviruses in Plasma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients: Frequency and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Broccolo, Francesco; Bossolasco, Simona; Careddu, Anna M.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2002-01-01

    The frequency and clinical significance of detection of DNA of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), HHV-7, and HHV-8 in plasma were investigated by PCR. The plasma was obtained from 120 selected human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, of whom 75 had AIDS-related manifestations, 32 had primary HIV infection (PHI), and 13 had asymptomatic infections. Nested PCR analysis revealed that none of the lymphotropic herpesviruses tested were found in patients with PHI, in asymptomatic HIV-positive individuals, or in HIV-negative controls. By contrast, DNA of one or more of the viruses was found in 42 (56%) of 75 patients with AIDS-related manifestations, including CMV disease (CMV-D) or AIDS-related tumors. The presence of CMV DNA in plasma was significantly associated with CMV-D (P < 0.001). By contrast, EBV detection was not significantly associated with AIDS-related lymphomas (P = 0.31). Interestingly, the presence of HHV-8 DNA in plasma was significantly associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) disease (P < 0.001) and with the clinical status of KS patients (P < 0.001). CMV (primarily), EBV, and HHV-8 were the viruses most commonly reactivated in the context of severe immunosuppression (P < 0.05). In contrast, HHV-6 and HHV-7 infections were infrequent at any stage of disease. In conclusion, plasma PCR was confirmed to be useful in the diagnosis of CMV-D but not in that of tumors or other conditions possibly associated with EBV, HHV-6, and HHV-7. Our findings support the hypothesis of a direct involvement of HHV-8 replication in KS pathogenesis, thus emphasizing the usefulness of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests to monitor HHV-8 infection. PMID:12414753

  15. Sites of Retroviral DNA Integration: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of the viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with HIV-1 can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or AIDS patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  16. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  17. Evidence from clinical and animal model studies of the long-term and transgenerational impact of stress on DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Blaze, Jennifer; Roth, Tania L

    2015-07-01

    While it is well-known that stress during development and adulthood can confer long-term neurobiological and behavioral consequences, investigators have only recently begun to assess underlying epigenetic modifications. In this review, we highlight clinical research and work from animal models that provide evidence of the impact of stressful experiences either during the perinatal period or adulthood on DNA methylation and behavior. Additionally, we explore the more controversial concept of transgenerational inheritance, including that associated with preconception stress experienced by the mother or father. Finally, we discuss challenges associated with the idea of transgenerational epigenetics and for the field of epigenetics in general.

  18. Evidence from clinical and animal model studies of the long-term and transgenerational impact of stress on DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Blaze, Jennifer; Roth, Tania L.

    2015-01-01

    While it is well-known that stress during development and adulthood can confer long-term neurobiological and behavioral consequences, investigators have only recently begun to assess epigenetic modifications associated with these consequences. In this review, we highlight clinical research and work with animal models that provide evidence of the impact of stressful experiences either during the perinatal period or adulthood on DNA methylation and behavior. Additionally, we explore the more controversial concept of transgenerational inheritance, including that associated with preconception stress experienced by the mother or father. Finally, we discuss challenges associated with the idea of transgenerational epigenetics and for the field of epigenetics in general. PMID:25917771

  19. Value of MR histogram analyses for prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Qin; Liang, He-Yue; Yang, Zhao-Xia; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Meng-Su; Rao, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective is to explore the value of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) histogram analyses in predicting microvascular invasion (MVI) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fifty-one patients with histologically confirmed HCC who underwent diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced MR imaging were included. Histogram analyses were performed and mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles were derived. Quantitative histogram parameters were compared between HCCs with and without MVI. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses were generated to compare the diagnostic performance of tumor size, histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and MR enhancement. The mean, 1th, 10th, and 50th percentiles of ADC maps, and the mean, variance. 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles of the portal venous phase (PVP) images were significantly different between the groups with and without MVI (P <0.05), with area under the ROC curves (AUCs) of 0.66 to 0.74 for ADC and 0.76 to 0.88 for PVP. The largest AUC of PVP (1th percentile) showed significantly higher accuracy compared with that of arterial phase (AP) or tumor size (P <0.001). MR histogram analyses—in particular for 1th percentile for PVP images—held promise for prediction of MVI of HCC. PMID:27368028

  20. The L_infinity constrained global optimal histogram equalization technique for real time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiongwei; Niu, Yi; Liu, Lin; Jiao, Yang; Shi, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Although the current imaging sensors can achieve 12 or higher precision, the current display devices and the commonly used digital image formats are still only 8 bits. This mismatch causes significant waste of the sensor precision and loss of information when storing and displaying the images. For better usage of the precision-budget, tone mapping operators have to be used to map the high-precision data into low-precision digital images adaptively. In this paper, the classic histogram equalization tone mapping operator is reexamined in the sense of optimization. We point out that the traditional histogram equalization technique and its variants are fundamentally improper by suffering from local optimum problems. To overcome this drawback, we remodel the histogram equalization tone mapping task based on graphic theory which achieves the global optimal solutions. Another advantage of the graphic-based modeling is that the tone-continuity is also modeled as a vital constraint in our approach which suppress the annoying boundary artifacts of the traditional approaches. In addition, we propose a novel dynamic programming technique to solve the histogram equalization problem in real time. Experimental results shows that the proposed tone-preserved global optimal histogram equalization technique outperforms the traditional approaches by exhibiting more subtle details in the foreground while preserving the smoothness of the background.

  1. Genome-Wide DNA Copy Number Analysis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Identifies New Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Castro, Maribel; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Abáigar, María; África Martín, Ana; Arefi, Maryam; Fuster, José Luis; de las Heras, Natalia; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Quintero, Jonathan; Riesco, Susana; Hermosín, Lourdes; de la Fuente, Ignacio; Recio, Isabel; Ribera, Jordi; Labrador, Jorge; Alonso, José M.; Olivier, Carmen; Sierra, Magdalena; Megido, Marta; Corchete-Sánchez, Luis A.; Ciudad Pizarro, Juana; García, Juan Luis; Ribera, José M.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying additional genetic alterations associated with poor prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is still a challenge. Aims: To characterize the presence of additional DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) in children and adults with ALL by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (aCGH) analysis, and to identify their associations with clinical features and outcome. Array-CGH was carried out in 265 newly diagnosed ALLs (142 children and 123 adults). The NimbleGen CGH 12x135K array (Roche) was used to analyze genetic gains and losses. CNAs were analyzed with GISTIC and aCGHweb software. Clinical and biological variables were analyzed. Three of the patients showed chromothripsis (cth6, cth14q and cth15q). CNAs were associated with age, phenotype, genetic subtype and overall survival (OS). In the whole cohort of children, the losses on 14q32.33 (p = 0.019) and 15q13.2 (p = 0.04) were related to shorter OS. In the group of children without good- or poor-risk cytogenetics, the gain on 1p36.11 was a prognostic marker independently associated with shorter OS. In adults, the gains on 19q13.2 (p = 0.001) and Xp21.1 (p = 0.029), and the loss of 17p (p = 0.014) were independent markers of poor prognosis with respect to OS. In summary, CNAs are frequent in ALL and are associated with clinical parameters and survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis allows the identification of genetic markers that predict clinical outcome, suggesting that detection of these genetic lesions will be useful in the management of patients newly diagnosed with ALL. PMID:26872047

  2. Technical Note: Dose-volume histogram analysis in radiotherapy using the Gaussian error function

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Markel, Daniel; Jiang, Runqing

    2008-04-15

    A mathematical model based on the Gaussian error and complementary error functions was proposed to describe the cumulative dose-volume histogram (cDVH) for a region of interest in a radiotherapy plan. Parameters in the model (a, b, c) are related to different characteristics of the shape of a cDVH curve such as the maximum relative volume, slope and position of a curve drop off, respectively. A prostate phantom model containing a prostate, the seminal vesicle, bladder and rectum with cylindrical organ geometries was used to demonstrate the effect of interfraction prostate motion on the cDVH based on this error function model. The prostate phantom model was planned using a five-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and a four-field box (4FB), technique with the clinical target volume (CTV) shifted in different directions from the center. In the case of the CTV moving out of the planning target volume (PTV), that is, the margin between the CTV and PTV is underestimated, parameter c (related to position of curve drop off) in the 4FB plan and parameters b (related to the slope of curve) and c in the IMRT plan vary significantly with CTV displacement. This shows that variation of the cDVH is present in the 4FB plan and such variation is more serious in the IMRT plan. These variations of cDVHs for 4FB and IMRT are due to the different dose gradients at the CTV edges in the anterior and posterior directions for the 4FB and IMRT plan. It is believed that a mathematical representation of the dose-volume relationship provides another viewpoint from which to illustrate problems with radiotherapy delivery such as internal organ motion that affect the dose distribution in a treatment plan.

  3. Perceived quality of wood images influenced by the skewness of image histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Shigehito; Mizokami, Yoko; Yaguchi, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    The shape of image luminance histograms is related to material perception. We investigated how the luminance histogram contributed to improvements in the perceived quality of wood images by examining various natural wood and adhesive vinyl sheets with printed wood grain. In the first experiment, we visually evaluated the perceived quality of wood samples. In addition, we measured the colorimetric parameters of the wood samples and calculated statistics of image luminance. The relationship between visual evaluation scores and image statistics suggested that skewness and kurtosis affected the perceived quality of wood. In the second experiment, we evaluated the perceived quality of wood images with altered luminance skewness and kurtosis using a paired comparison method. Our result suggests that wood images are more realistic if the skewness of the luminance histogram is slightly negative.

  4. Adapting histogram for automatic noise data removal in building interior point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukor, S. A. Abdul; Rushforth, E. J.

    2015-05-01

    3D point cloud data is now preferred by researchers to generate 3D models. These models can be used throughout a variety of applications including 3D building interior models. The rise of Building Information Modeling (BIM) for Architectural, Engineering, Construction (AEC) applications has given 3D interior modelling more attention recently. To generate a 3D model representing the building interior, a laser scanner is used to collect the point cloud data. However, this data often comes with noise. This is due to several factors including the surrounding objects, lighting and specifications of the laser scanner. This paper highlights on the usage of the histogram to remove the noise data. Histograms, used in statistics and probability, are regularly being used in a number of applications like image processing, where a histogram can represent the total number of pixels in an image at each intensity level. Here, histograms represent the number of points recorded at range distance intervals in various projections. As unwanted noise data has a sparser cloud density compared to the required data and is usually situated at a notable distance from the required data, noise data will have lower frequencies in the histogram. By defining the acceptable range using the average frequency, points below this range can be removed. This research has shown that these histograms have the capabilities to remove unwanted data from 3D point cloud data representing building interiors automatically. This feature will aid the process of data preprocessing in producing an ideal 3D model from the point cloud data.

  5. The role and clinical significance of DNA damage response and repair pathways in primary brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Primary brain tumors, in particular, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), continue to have dismal survivability despite advances in treating other neoplasms. The goal of new anti-glioma therapy development is to increase their therapeutic ratios by enhancing tumor control and/or decreasing the severity and incidence of side effects. Because radiotherapy and most chemotherapy agents rely on DNA damage, the cell’s DNA damage repair and response (DRR) pathways may hold the key to new therapeutic strategies. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents are the most lethal form of damage, and are repaired via either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. Understanding and exploitation of the differences in the use of these repair pathways between tumor and normal brain cells will allow for an increase in tumor cell killing and decreased normal tissue damage. A literature review and discussion on new strategies which can improve the anti-glioma therapeutic ratio by differentially targeting HR and NHEJ function in tumor and normal neuronal tissues is the focus of this article. PMID:23388100

  6. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J.

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean or terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.

  7. Sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 1227 Felis catus cDNA sequences enriched for developmental, clinical and nutritional phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The feline genome is valuable to the veterinary and model organism genomics communities because the cat is an obligate carnivore and a model for endangered felids. The initial public release of the Felis catus genome assembly provided a framework for investigating the genomic basis of feline biology. However, the entire set of protein coding genes has not been elucidated. Results We identified and characterized 1227 protein coding feline sequences, of which 913 map to public sequences and 314 are novel. These sequences have been deposited into NCBI's genbank database and complement public genomic resources by providing additional protein coding sequences that fill in some of the gaps in the feline genome assembly. Through functional and comparative genomic analyses, we gained an understanding of the role of these sequences in feline development, nutrition and health. Specifically, we identified 104 orthologs of human genes associated with Mendelian disorders. We detected negative selection within sequences with gene ontology annotations associated with intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and muscle functions. We detected relatively less negative selection on protein sequences encoding extracellular networks, apoptotic pathways and mitochondrial gene ontology annotations. Additionally, we characterized feline cDNA sequences that have mouse orthologs associated with clinical, nutritional and developmental phenotypes. Together, this analysis provides an overview of the value of our cDNA sequences and enhances our understanding of how the feline genome is similar to, and different from other mammalian genomes. Conclusions The cDNA sequences reported here expand existing feline genomic resources by providing high-quality sequences annotated with comparative genomic information providing functional, clinical, nutritional and orthologous gene information. PMID:22257742

  8. Histogram approaches for lossy compression of digital holograms of three-dimensional objects.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Alison E; Naughton, Thomas J; Javidi, Bahram

    2007-06-01

    We present a novel nonuniform quantization compression technique-histogram quantization-for digital holograms of 3-D real-world objects. We exploit a priori knowledge of the distribution of the values in our data. We compare this technique to another histogram based approach: a modified version of Max's algorithm that has been adapted in a straight-forward manner to complex-valued 2-D signals. We conclude the compression procedure by applying lossless techniques to our quantized data. We demonstrate improvements over previous results obtained by applying uniform and nonuniform quantization techniques to the hologram data.

  9. Ear segmentation using histogram based K-means clustering and Hough transformation under CVL dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heng; Liu, Dekai

    2009-10-01

    Under CVL dataset, we provide an image segmentation approach based on adaptive histogram based K-means clustering and fast Hough transformation. This work firstly analyzes the characteristics of ear images in CVL face dataset. According to the analysis, we then use adaptive histogram based K-means clustering method to threshold ear images and then roughly segment the ear parts. After ear contour extraction, with boundary determination through vertical project, Hough transformation is utilized to locate the ear contour accurately. The experimental results and comparisons with other segmentation methods show our approach is effective.

  10. Development of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method for Detection of Histoplasma capsulatum DNA in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yitian; Theodoro, Raquel C.; Abrams, Bethany; Balajee, S. Arunmozhi; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.

    2014-01-01

    Improved methods for the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum are needed in regions with limited resources in which the organism is endemic, where delayed diagnosis of progressive disseminated histoplasmosis (PDH) results in high mortality rates. We have investigated the use of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay to facilitate rapid inexpensive molecular diagnosis of this disease. Primers for LAMP were designed to amplify the Hcp100 locus of H. capsulatum. The sensitivity and limit of detection were evaluated using DNA extracted from 91 clinical isolates of known geographic subspecies, while the assay specificity was determined using DNA extracted from 50 other fungi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Urine specimens (n = 6) collected from HIV-positive individuals with culture- and antigen-proven histoplasmosis were evaluated using the LAMP assay. Specimens from healthy persons (n = 10) without evidence of histoplasmosis were used as assay controls. The Hcp100 LAMP assay was 100% sensitive and specific when tested with DNA extracted from culture isolates. The median limit of detection was ≤6 genomes (range, 1 to 300 genomes) for all except one geographic subspecies. The LAMP assay detected Hcp100 in 67% of antigen-positive urine specimens (4/6 specimens), and results were negative for Hcp100 in all healthy control urine specimens. We have shown that the Hcp100 LAMP assay is a rapid affordable assay that can be used to expedite culture confirmation of H. capsulatum in regions in which PDH is endemic. Further, our results indicate proof of the concept that the assay can be used to detect Histoplasma DNA in urine. Further evaluation of this assay using body fluid samples from a larger patient population is warranted. PMID:24478477

  11. The effect of energy spectrum change on DNA damage in and out of field in 10-MV clinical photon beams.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, A O; Xiao, Y; Sohrabpour, M; Studenski, M T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the DNA damage induced in a clinical megavoltage photon beam at various depths in and out of the field. MCNPX was used to simulate 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2) 10-MV photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Photon and electron spectra were collected in a water phantom at depths of 2.5, 12.5 and 22.5 cm on the central axis and at off-axis points out to 10 cm. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo code, MCDS, to calculate the RBE of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field at three depths. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for photons and electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. In the out-of-field region, the mean energy for the photon and electron spectra decreased by a factor of about six and three from the in-field mean energy, respectively. Despite the differences in spectra and mean energy, the change in RBE was <1 % from the in-field region to the out-of-field region at any depth. There was no significant change in RBE regardless of the location in the phantom. Although there are differences in both the photon and electron spectra, these changes do not correlate with a change in RBE in a clinical MV photon beam as the electron spectra are dominated by electrons with energies >20 keV.

  12. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage: A Randomized, Double-Blind, and Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-11-01

    Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal.In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948.Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = -0.88 (-1.62, -0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = -2.68 (-3.42, -1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend < 0.001). Test of

  13. Large-Scale Merging of Histograms using Distributed In-Memory Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomer, Jakob; Ganis, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    Most high-energy physics analysis jobs are embarrassingly parallel except for the final merging of the output objects, which are typically histograms. Currently, the merging of output histograms scales badly. The running time for distributed merging depends not only on the overall number of bins but also on the number partial histogram output files. That means, while the time to analyze data decreases linearly with the number of worker nodes, the time to merge the histograms in fact increases with the number of worker nodes. On the grid, merging jobs that take a few hours are not unusual. In order to improve the situation, we present a distributed and decentral merging algorithm whose running time is independent of the number of worker nodes. We exploit full bisection bandwidth of local networks and we keep all intermediate results in memory. We present benchmarks from an implementation using the parallel ROOT facility (PROOF) and RAMCloud, a distributed key-value store that keeps all data in DRAM.

  14. DIF Testing with an Empirical-Histogram Approximation of the Latent Density for Each Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    This research introduces, illustrates, and tests a variation of IRT-LR-DIF, called EH-DIF-2, in which the latent density for each group is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters as an empirical histogram (EH). IRT-LR-DIF is used to evaluate the degree to which items have different measurement properties for one group of people versus…

  15. Pattern-histogram-based temporal change detection using personal chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugurlu, Yucel; Obi, Takashi; Hasegawa, Akira; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1999-05-01

    An accurate and reliable detection of temporal changes from a pair of images has considerable interest in the medical science. Traditional registration and subtraction techniques can be applied to extract temporal differences when,the object is rigid or corresponding points are obvious. However, in radiological imaging, loss of the depth information, the elasticity of object, the absence of clearly defined landmarks and three-dimensional positioning differences constraint the performance of conventional registration techniques. In this paper, we propose a new method in order to detect interval changes accurately without using an image registration technique. The method is based on construction of so-called pattern histogram and comparison procedure. The pattern histogram is a graphic representation of the frequency counts of all allowable patterns in the multi-dimensional pattern vector space. K-means algorithm is employed to partition pattern vector space successively. Any differences in the pattern histograms imply that different patterns are involved in the scenes. In our experiment, a pair of chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis is employed and the changing histogram bins are visualized on both of the images. We found that the method can be used as an alternative way of temporal change detection, particularly when the precise image registration is not available.

  16. Histogram of Gabor phase patterns (HGPP): a novel object representation approach for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baochang; Shan, Shiguang; Chen, Xilin; Gao, Wen

    2007-01-01

    A novel object descriptor, histogram of Gabor phase pattern (HGPP), is proposed for robust face recognition. In HGPP, the quadrant-bit codes are first extracted from faces based on the Gabor transformation. Global Gabor phase pattern (GGPP) and local Gabor phase pattern (LGPP) are then proposed to encode the phase variations. GGPP captures the variations derived from the orientation changing of Gabor wavelet at a given scale (frequency), while LGPP encodes the local neighborhood variations by using a novel local XOR pattern (LXP) operator. They are both divided into the nonoverlapping rectangular regions, from which spatial histograms are extracted and concatenated into an extended histogram feature to represent the original image. Finally, the recognition is performed by using the nearest-neighbor classifier with histogram intersection as the similarity measurement. The features of HGPP lie in two aspects: 1) HGPP can describe the general face images robustly without the training procedure; 2) HGPP encodes the Gabor phase information, while most previous face recognition methods exploit the Gabor magnitude information. In addition, Fisher separation criterion is further used to improve the performance of HGPP by weighing the subregions of the image according to their discriminative powers. The proposed methods are successfully applied to face recognition, and the experiment results on the large-scale FERET and CAS-PEAL databases show that the proposed algorithms significantly outperform other well-known systems in terms of recognition rate.

  17. Flat-histogram methods in quantum Monte Carlo simulations: Application to the t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantis, Nikolaos G.; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2016-09-01

    We discuss that flat-histogram techniques can be appropriately applied in the sampling of quantum Monte Carlo simulation in order to improve the statistical quality of the results at long imaginary time or low excitation energy. Typical imaginary-time correlation functions calculated in quantum Monte Carlo are subject to exponentially growing errors as the range of imaginary time grows and this smears the information on the low energy excitations. We show that we can extract the low energy physics by modifying the Monte Carlo sampling technique to one in which configurations which contribute to making the histogram of certain quantities flat are promoted. We apply the diagrammatic Monte Carlo (diag-MC) method to the motion of a single hole in the t-J model and we show that the implementation of flat-histogram techniques allows us to calculate the Green's function in a wide range of imaginary-time. In addition, we show that applying the flat-histogram technique alleviates the “sign”-problem associated with the simulation of the single-hole Green's function at long imaginary time.

  18. Effect of molecular organization on the image histograms of polarization SHG microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Artigas, David

    2012-01-01

    Based on its polarization dependency, second harmonic generation (PSHG) microscopy has been proven capable to structurally characterize molecular architectures in different biological samples. By exploiting this polarization dependency of the SHG signal in every pixel of the image, average quantitative structural information can be retrieved in the form of PSHG image histograms. In the present study we experimentally show how the PSHG image histograms can be affected by the organization of the SHG active molecules. Our experimental scenario grounds on two inherent properties of starch granules. Firstly, we take advantage of the radial organization of amylopectin molecules (the SHG source in starch) to attribute shifts of the image histograms to the existence of tilted off the plane molecules. Secondly, we use the property of starch to organize upon hydration to demonstrate that the degree of structural order at the molecular level affects the width of the PSHG image histograms. The shorter the width is the more organized the molecules in the sample are, resulting in a reliable method to measure order. The implication of this finding is crucial to the interpretation of PSHG images used for example in tissue diagnostics. PMID:23082306

  19. Human detection by quadratic classification on subspace of extended histogram of gradients.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Amit; Jiang, Xudong; Eng, How-Lung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a quadratic classification approach on the subspace of Extended Histogram of Gradients (ExHoG) for human detection. By investigating the limitations of Histogram of Gradients (HG) and Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG), ExHoG is proposed as a new feature for human detection. ExHoG alleviates the problem of discrimination between a dark object against a bright background and vice versa inherent in HG. It also resolves an issue of HOG whereby gradients of opposite directions in the same cell are mapped into the same histogram bin. We reduce the dimensionality of ExHoG using Asymmetric Principal Component Analysis (APCA) for improved quadratic classification. APCA also addresses the asymmetry issue in training sets of human detection where there are much fewer human samples than non-human samples. Our proposed approach is tested on three established benchmarking data sets--INRIA, Caltech, and Daimler--using a modified Minimum Mahalanobis distance classifier. Results indicate that the proposed approach outperforms current state-of-the-art human detection methods. PMID:23708804

  20. Three-dimensional histogram visualization in different color spaces and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Gabriel G.; Abe, Satoshi

    1995-10-01

    A visualization procedure for the 3D histogram of color images is presented. The procedure assumes that the histogram is available as a table that associates to a pixel color the number of its appearance in the image. The procedure runs for the RGB, YMC, HSV, HSL, L*a*b, and L*u*v color spaces and it is easily extendable to other color spaces if the analytical form of color transformations is available. Each histogram value is represented in the color space as a colored ball, in a position corresponding to the place of the color in the space. A simple drawing procedure is used instead of more complicated 3D rendering techniques. The 3D histogram visualization offers a clear and intuitive representation of the color distribution of the image. The procedure is applied to derive a clusterization technique for color classification and visualize its results, to display comparatively the gamut of different color devices, and to detect the misalignment of the RGB planes of a color image. Diagrams illustrating the visualization procedure are presented for each application.

  1. 3D histogram visualization in different color spaces with application in color clustering classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Gabriel G.; Abe, Satoshi

    1995-04-01

    The paper presents a dynamically visualization procedure for 3D histogram of color images. The procedure runs for RGB, YMC, HSV, HSL device dependent color spaces and for Lab, Luv device independent color spaces and it is easily extendable to other color spaces if the analytical form of color transformations is available. Each histogram value is represented in the color space as a colored ball, in a position corresponding to the place of color in the color space. The paper presents the procedures for nonlinear ball normalization, ordering of drawing, space edges drawing, translation, scaling and rotation of the histogram. The 3D histogram visualization procedure can be used in different applications described in the second part of the paper. It enables to get a clear representation of the range of colors of one image, to derive and compare the efficiency of different clusterization procedures for color classification, to display comparatively the gamut of different color devices, to select the color space for an optimal mapping procedure of the outside gamut colors for minimizing the hue error, to detect bad-alignment in RGB planes for a sequential process.

  2. Quantification and classification of neuronal responses in kernel-smoothed peristimulus time histograms.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael R H; Fried, Itzhak; Koch, Christof

    2015-02-15

    Peristimulus time histograms are a widespread form of visualizing neuronal responses. Kernel convolution methods transform these histograms into a smooth, continuous probability density function. This provides an improved estimate of a neuron's actual response envelope. We here develop a classifier, called the h-coefficient, to determine whether time-locked fluctuations in the firing rate of a neuron should be classified as a response or as random noise. Unlike previous approaches, the h-coefficient takes advantage of the more precise response envelope estimation provided by the kernel convolution method. The h-coefficient quantizes the smoothed response envelope and calculates the probability of a response of a given shape to occur by chance. We tested the efficacy of the h-coefficient in a large data set of Monte Carlo simulated smoothed peristimulus time histograms with varying response amplitudes, response durations, trial numbers, and baseline firing rates. Across all these conditions, the h-coefficient significantly outperformed more classical classifiers, with a mean false alarm rate of 0.004 and a mean hit rate of 0.494. We also tested the h-coefficient's performance in a set of neuronal responses recorded in humans. The algorithm behind the h-coefficient provides various opportunities for further adaptation and the flexibility to target specific parameters in a given data set. Our findings confirm that the h-coefficient can provide a conservative and powerful tool for the analysis of peristimulus time histograms with great potential for future development. PMID:25475352

  3. Clinical phenotype associations with various types of anti-dsDNA antibodies in patients with recent onset of rheumatic symptoms. Results from a multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Michele; Rekvig, Ole P; Bengtsson, Anders A; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jönsen, Andreas; Jacobsen, Rasmus Sleimann; Eilertsen, Gro Ø; Fenton, Christopher G; Truedsson, Lennart; Nossent, Johannes C; Jacobsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Despite anti-dsDNA antibodies constitute a wide range of specificities, they are considered as the hallmark for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objective To identify clinical phenotypes associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies, independently of any clinical diagnoses. Methods Patients with recent onset of any rheumatic symptoms were screened for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). All ANA-positive and matching ANA-negative patients were examined, and their clinical phenotypes were registered, using a systematic chart formulated after consensus between the participating centres. All patients were tested for different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities with assays habitually used in each participating laboratory. Crithidia Luciliae Immuno Fluorescence Test (CLIFT) was performed three times (with two different commercial kits); solid and solution phase ELISA were performed four times. Associations between clinical phenotypes and results of anti-dsDNA assays were evaluated by linear regression analysis (LRA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Results Totally, 292 ANA-positive and 292 matching ANA-negative patients were included in the study. A full dataset for statistical analysis was obtained in 547 patients. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were most frequently detected by ELISA. LRA showed that overall positivity of anti-dsDNA antibodies was associated with proteinuria and pleuritis. Alopecia was significantly associated only with CLIFT-positivity. Besides confirming the same findings, PCA showed that combined positivity of CLIFT and ELISA was also associated with lymphopenia. Conclusions Our results show that different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities are associated with nephropathy, pleuritis, alopecia and lymphopenia, regardless of the diagnosis. It may challenge the importance of anti-dsDNA antibodies as a diagnostic hallmark for SLE. PMID:25396058

  4. Efficient visibility-driven medical image visualisation via adaptive binned visibility histogram.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younhyun; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Feng, David Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2016-07-01

    'Visibility' is a fundamental optical property that represents the observable, by users, proportion of the voxels in a volume during interactive volume rendering. The manipulation of this 'visibility' improves the volume rendering processes; for instance by ensuring the visibility of regions of interest (ROIs) or by guiding the identification of an optimal rendering view-point. The construction of visibility histograms (VHs), which represent the distribution of all the visibility of all voxels in the rendered volume, enables users to explore the volume with real-time feedback about occlusion patterns among spatially related structures during volume rendering manipulations. Volume rendered medical images have been a primary beneficiary of VH given the need to ensure that specific ROIs are visible relative to the surrounding structures, e.g. the visualisation of tumours that may otherwise be occluded by neighbouring structures. VH construction and its subsequent manipulations, however, are computationally expensive due to the histogram binning of the visibilities. This limits the real-time application of VH to medical images that have large intensity ranges and volume dimensions and require a large number of histogram bins. In this study, we introduce an efficient adaptive binned visibility histogram (AB-VH) in which a smaller number of histogram bins are used to represent the visibility distribution of the full VH. We adaptively bin medical images by using a cluster analysis algorithm that groups the voxels according to their intensity similarities into a smaller subset of bins while preserving the distribution of the intensity range of the original images. We increase efficiency by exploiting the parallel computation and multiple render targets (MRT) extension of the modern graphical processing units (GPUs) and this enables efficient computation of the histogram. We show the application of our method to single-modality computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance

  5. Histograms of the unitary evoked potential of the mouse diaphragm show multiple peaks.

    PubMed

    Kriebel, M E; Llados, F; Matteson, D R

    1982-01-01

    1. Two classes of miniature end-plate potentials (m.e.p.p.s) were recorded from diaphragm neuromuscular junctions. Amplitude histograms of both classes had multiple peaks that were integral multiples of the smallest peak (s-m.e.p.p.s). The smaller m.e.p.p.s formed the first three or four peaks of histograms and the number of m.e.p.p.s (skew-m.e.p.p.s) in each peak decreased, forming an over-all skewed distribution. The larger m.e.p.p.s (bell-m.e.p.p.s) formed a more-or-less bell-shaped distribution. The distribution of m.e.p.p.s varied from mainly skew- to mainly bell-m.e.p.p.s. In young adult mice the number of subunits composing the classical m.e.p.p.s varied between ten and fifteen at room temperature; at higher temperatures the range was from three to ten subunits.2. End-plate potentials (e.p.p.s) were reduced with cobalt ions (ca. 4 mm) until most nerve impulses failed to release transmitter. The amplitudes of ;unitary evoked potentials' were of the bell-m.e.p.p. class and histograms show integral multiple peaks that correspond to the peaks in histograms of the bell-m.e.p.p.s.3. The peaks in both m.e.p.p. and unitary e.p.p. histograms remained in the same position throughout the recording period and became more distinct as the sample size increased.4. The variance of the s-m.e.p.p. was estimated from the noise and measurement error and the variance of all peaks in the histograms. Most variance of the first peak (s-m.e.p.p.) was due to noise and measurement error.5. The integral peaks in the m.e.p.p. and ;unitary evoked potential' histograms are predicted with a probability density model based on the estimated variance of the s-m.e.p.p. and the assumption that larger potentials are composed of subunits the size of s-m.e.p.p.s. The data and model support the hypothesis that m.e.p.p.s and unitary potentials are composed of subunits.

  6. A tissue fixative that protects macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and protein) and histomorphology in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Vincek, Vladimir; Nassiri, Mehdi; Nadji, Mehrdad; Morales, Azorides R

    2003-10-01

    Preservation of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) in tissue is traditionally achieved by immediate freezing of the sample. Although isolation of PCR-able RNA has been reported from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, the process has not been shown to be reproducible because high molecular weight RNA is usually degraded. We investigated the potential value of a new universal molecular fixative (UMFIX, Sakura Finetek USA, Inc., Torrance, California) in preservation of macromolecules in paraffin-embedded tissue. Mouse and human tissues were fixed in UMFIX from 1 hour to 8 weeks. They were then processed by a rapid tissue processing (RTP) system, embedded in paraffin, and evaluated for routine histology as well as for the quality and quantity of DNA, RNA, and proteins. Formalin-fixed tissues were processed by RTP and evaluated in a similar manner. Fresh-frozen samples were used as controls. The morphology of UMFIX-exposed tissue was comparable to that fixed in formalin. High molecular weight RNA was preserved in tissue that was immediately fixed in UMFIX and stored from 1 hour to 8 weeks at room temperature. There were no significant differences between UMFIX-exposed and frozen tissues on PCR, RT-PCR, real-time PCR, and expression microarrays. Similarly, physical and antigenic preservation of proteins in UMFIX tissue was similar to fresh state. Both RNA and proteins were substantially degraded in formalin-fixed and similarly processed specimens. We concluded that it is now possible to preserve histomorphology and intact macromolecules in the same archival paraffin-embedded tissue through the use of a novel fixative and a rapid processing system.

  7. Mate-Pair Sequencing as a Powerful Clinical Tool for the Characterization of Cancers with a DNA Viral Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ge; Smith, David I.

    2015-01-01

    DNA viruses are known to be associated with a variety of different cancers. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a family of viruses and several of its sub-types are classified as high-risk HPVs as they are found to be associated with the development of a number of different cancers. Almost all cervical cancers appear to be driven by HPV infection and HPV is also found in most cancers of the anus and at least half the cancers of the vulva, penis and vagina, and increasingly found in one sub-type of head and neck cancers namely oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Our understanding of HPVs role in cancer development comes from extensive studies done on cervical cancer and it has just been assumed that HPV plays an identical role in the development of all other cancers arising in the presence of HPV sequences, although this has not been proven. Most invasive cervical cancers have the HPV genome integrated into one or more sites within the human genome. One powerful tool to examine all the sites of HPV integration in a cancer but that also provides a comprehensive view of genomic alterations in that cancer is the use of next generation sequencing of mate-pair libraries produced from the DNA isolated. We will describe how this powerful technology can provide important information about the genomic organization within an individual cancer genome, and how this has demonstrated that HPVs role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is distinct from that in cervical cancer. We will also describe why the sequencing of mate-pair libraries could be a powerful clinical tool for the management of patients with a DNA viral etiology and how this could quickly transform the care of these patients. PMID:26262638

  8. Use of electrochemical DNA biosensors for rapid molecular identification of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Liao, Joseph C; Mastali, Mitra; Gau, Vincent; Suchard, Marc A; Møller, Annette K; Bruckner, David A; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Landaw, Elliot M; McCabe, Edward R B; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2006-02-01

    We describe the first species-specific detection of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples using a microfabricated electrochemical sensor array. Each of the 16 sensors in the array consisted of three single-layer gold electrodes-working, reference, and auxiliary. Each of the working electrodes contained one representative from a library of capture probes, each specific for a clinically relevant bacterial urinary pathogen. The library included probes for Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterocococcus spp., and the Klebsiella-Enterobacter group. A bacterial 16S rRNA target derived from single-step bacterial lysis was hybridized both to the biotin-modified capture probe on the sensor surface and to a second, fluorescein-modified detector probe. Detection of the target-probe hybrids was achieved through binding of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fluorescein antibody to the detector probe. Amperometric measurement of the catalyzed HRP reaction was obtained at a fixed potential of -200 mV between the working and reference electrodes. Species-specific detection of as few as 2,600 uropathogenic bacteria in culture, inoculated urine, and clinical urine samples was achieved within 45 min from the beginning of sample processing. In a feasibility study of this amperometric detection system using blinded clinical urine specimens, the sensor array had 100% sensitivity for direct detection of gram-negative bacteria without nucleic acid purification or amplification. Identification was demonstrated for 98% of gram-negative bacteria for which species-specific probes were available. When combined with a microfluidics-based sample preparation module, the integrated system could serve as a point-of-care device for rapid diagnosis of urinary tract infections.

  9. Further evidence of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) latency: high levels of ChHV5 DNA detected in clinically healthy marine turtles.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Bertelsen, Mads F; Wales, Nathan; Balazs, George H; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    The Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) has been consistently associated with fibropapillomatosis (FP), a transmissible neoplastic disease of marine turtles. Whether ChHV5 plays a causal role remains debated, partly because while FP tumours have been clearly documented to contain high concentrations of ChHV5 DNA, recent PCR-based studies have demonstrated that large proportions of asymptomatic marine turtles are also carriers of ChHV5. We used a real-time PCR assay to quantify the levels of ChHV5 Glycoprotein B (gB) DNA in both tumour and non-tumour skin tissues, from clinically affected and healthy turtles drawn from distant ocean basins across four species. In agreement with previous studies, higher ratios of viral to host DNA were consistently observed in tumour versus non-tumour tissues in turtles with FP. Unexpectedly however, the levels of ChHV5 gB DNA in clinically healthy turtles were significantly higher than in non-tumour tissues from FP positive turtles. Thus, a large proportion of clinically healthy sea turtle populations worldwide across species carry ChHV5 gB DNA presumably through persistent latent infections. ChHV5 appears to be ubiquitous regardless of the animals' clinical conditions. Hence, these results support the theory that ChHV5 is a near ubiquitous virus with latency characteristics requiring co-factors, possibly environmental or immune related, to induce FP. PMID:27547576

  10. Further evidence of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) latency: high levels of ChHV5 DNA detected in clinically healthy marine turtles

    PubMed Central

    Bojesen, Anders Miki; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Wales, Nathan; Balazs, George H.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) has been consistently associated with fibropapillomatosis (FP), a transmissible neoplastic disease of marine turtles. Whether ChHV5 plays a causal role remains debated, partly because while FP tumours have been clearly documented to contain high concentrations of ChHV5 DNA, recent PCR-based studies have demonstrated that large proportions of asymptomatic marine turtles are also carriers of ChHV5. We used a real-time PCR assay to quantify the levels of ChHV5 Glycoprotein B (gB) DNA in both tumour and non-tumour skin tissues, from clinically affected and healthy turtles drawn from distant ocean basins across four species. In agreement with previous studies, higher ratios of viral to host DNA were consistently observed in tumour versus non-tumour tissues in turtles with FP. Unexpectedly however, the levels of ChHV5 gB DNA in clinically healthy turtles were significantly higher than in non-tumour tissues from FP positive turtles. Thus, a large proportion of clinically healthy sea turtle populations worldwide across species carry ChHV5 gB DNA presumably through persistent latent infections. ChHV5 appears to be ubiquitous regardless of the animals’ clinical conditions. Hence, these results support the theory that ChHV5 is a near ubiquitous virus with latency characteristics requiring co-factors, possibly environmental or immune related, to induce FP. PMID:27547576

  11. Confocal 3D DNA Cytometry: Assessment of Required Coefficient of Variation by Computer Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Beliën, Jeroen A.M.; Poulin, Neal M.; Grizzle, William; van Diest, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) provides the opportunity to perform 3D DNA content measurements on intact cells in thick histological sections. So far, sample size has been limited by the time consuming nature of the technology. Since the power of DNA histograms to resolve different stemlines depends on both the sample size and the coefficient of variation (CV) of histogram peaks, interpretation of 3D CLSM DNA histograms might be hampered by both a small sample size and a large CV. The aim of this study was to analyze the required CV for 3D CLSM DNA histograms given a realistic sample size. Methods: By computer simulation, virtual histograms were composed for sample sizes of 20000, 10000, 5000, 1000, and 273 cells and CVs of 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and 5%. By visual inspection, the histogram quality with respect to resolution of G0/1 and G2/M peaks of a diploid stemline was assessed. Results: As expected, the interpretability of DNA histograms deteriorated with decreasing sample sizes and higher CVs. For CVs of 15% and lower, a clearly bimodal peak pattern with well distinguishable G0/1 and G2/M peaks were still seen at a sample size of 273 cells, which is our current average sample size with 3D CLSM DNA cytometry. Conclusions: For unambiguous interpretation of DNA histograms obtained using 3D CLSM, a CV of at most 15% is tolerable at currently achievable sample sizes. To resolve smaller near diploid stemlines, a CV of 10% or better should be aimed at. With currently available 3D imaging technology, this CV is achievable. PMID:15371645

  12. [Fractal dimension and histogram method: algorithm and some preliminary results of noise-like time series analysis].

    PubMed

    Pancheliuga, V A; Pancheliuga, M S

    2013-01-01

    In the present work a methodological background for the histogram method of time series analysis is developed. Connection between shapes of smoothed histograms constructed on the basis of short segments of time series of fluctuations and the fractal dimension of the segments is studied. It is shown that the fractal dimension possesses all main properties of the histogram method. Based on it a further development of fractal dimension determination algorithm is proposed. This algorithm allows more precision determination of the fractal dimension by using the "all possible combination" method. The application of the method to noise-like time series analysis leads to results, which could be obtained earlier only by means of the histogram method based on human expert comparisons of histograms shapes. PMID:23755565

  13. Downregulation of ADAMTS8 by DNA Hypermethylation in Gastric Cancer and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiakui; Li, Xin; Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Hongbin; Jin, Junzhe; Dai, Dongqiu

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metallopeptidase with thrombospondin motif type 8 (ADAMTS8), a member of the ADAMTS family, was discovered as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. We analyzed the expression and methylation of ADAMTS8 in primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines. We also examined the relationship between ADAMTS8 expression and methylation and clinicopathologic features. The results showed that the significant downregulation of ADAMTS8 mRNA expression was observed in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues, and its expression was related to invasive depth and lymph node metastasis. CpG was hypermethylated in gastric cancer cell lines MKN45, MGC803, and BGC823, as well as primary gastric cancer specimens. ADAMTS8 mRNA expression was significantly lower in methylated primary gastric tumors. A significant association was found between ADAMTS8 methylation status and lymph node metastasis in primary gastric cancer. Moreover, ADAMTS8 expression was upregulated in the gastric cancer cell lines MGC803, BGC823, and MKN45 after treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Thus, our results demonstrate that expression of ADAMTS8 mRNA is significantly decreased and DNA methylation is frequent in gastric cancer. ADAMTS8 hypermethylation is associated with decreased expression in gastric cancer and may play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer. PMID:27493958

  14. Molecular Identification of Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Polymerase Chain Reaction and ERIC PCR

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Farahani, Abbas; Jamali, Hooshang

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are of importance now-a-days due to their increasing virulence outbreaks and emerging antibiotic resistance. Since the most common NTM in Iran is reportedly Mycobacterium fortuitum, the present study was designed with the aim of molecular identification of clinical isolates of M. foruitum to analyse their heterogeneity. Materials and Methods A total of 81 isolates of NTM isolated from various samples were collected. The clinical isolates were assigned to species M. fortuitum by using conventional and molecular methods. The DNA banding patterns of ERIC- PCR and RAPD- PCR were analysed by using Bionumeric 7.5 software. Results Out of 81 tested NTM, 36 strains of M. fortuitum were identified. 33 isolates were selected for molecular typing in this study. Based on RAPD and ERIC analysis, M. fortuitum isolates were divided into 3 and 6 clusters, respectively. Most of the isolates were distributed into types of II RAPD (20 members/ 60.6 %) and V (14 members/ 42.4% with sub cluster I & II) of ERIC. In RAPD analysis, the major fragments were 300 bp, followed by fragment 1000. In ERIC analysis, the major fragments were 280 bp followed by fragment 1200 bp. Conclusion In conclusion, though the results from this study represented higher discriminatory power of ERIC, however the combination of RAPD and ERIC analysis were able to sufficiently discriminate the genotypic diversity, infection control, and gain useful epidemiological information regarding M. fortuitum isolates. PMID:26816886

  15. Clinical value of morphometric and DNA flow cytometric variables as independent predictors of survival in epithelial ovarian carcinoma: a 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Margot M; van der Wurff, Anneke A M; van de Water, Marije; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M; Feijen, Harrie W H; Vos, Maria Caroline

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this follow-up study is to validate the clinical significance of quantitative morphometric and DNA flow cytometric variables as independent prognostic factors of overall survival and progression-free survival in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Tumor samples were collected from 135 patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma at 3 hospitals in the Netherlands. Evaluated clinico-pathologic variables were age, histologic subtype, differentiation grade, clinical stage [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)], presence of ascites, serum CA-125, and the completeness of debulking surgery. Morphometry and DNA flow cytometric techniques were assessed on each tumor sample to determine the mitotic activity index (MAI), volume percentage epithelium, mean nuclear area (MNA), standard deviation of MNA (SD MNA), nuclear perimeter (NP), and DNA ploidy. Univariate analysis showed that differentiation grade, FIGO stage, presence of ascites, preoperative CA-125 levels, DNA ploidy, and MAI, NP, and MNA were of significant prognostic value. After multivariate analysis (using forward Cox proportional hazard analysis), only differentiation grade and FIGO stage remained significant. From this study, we can conclude that morphometry and DNA flow cytometry are not independent prognosticators and therefore have no clinical value in predicting prognosis in ovarian carcinoma.

  16. High capacity reversible watermarking for audio by histogram shifting and predicted error expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Xie, Zhaoxin; Chen, Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Being reversible, the watermarking information embedded in audio signals can be extracted while the original audio data can achieve lossless recovery. Currently, the few reversible audio watermarking algorithms are confronted with following problems: relatively low SNR (signal-to-noise) of embedded audio; a large amount of auxiliary embedded location information; and the absence of accurate capacity control capability. In this paper, we present a novel reversible audio watermarking scheme based on improved prediction error expansion and histogram shifting. First, we use differential evolution algorithm to optimize prediction coefficients and then apply prediction error expansion to output stego data. Second, in order to reduce location map bits length, we introduced histogram shifting scheme. Meanwhile, the prediction error modification threshold according to a given embedding capacity can be computed by our proposed scheme. Experiments show that this algorithm improves the SNR of embedded audio signals and embedding capacity, drastically reduces location map bits length, and enhances capacity control capability.

  17. Reversible watermarking based on invariant image classification and dynamical error histogram shifting.

    PubMed

    Pan, W; Coatrieux, G; Cuppens, N; Cuppens, F; Roux, Ch

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present a novel reversible watermarking scheme. Its originality stands in identifying parts of the image that can be watermarked additively with the most adapted lossless modulation between: Pixel Histogram Shifting (PHS) or Dynamical Error Histogram Shifting (DEHS). This classification process makes use of a reference image derived from the image itself, a prediction of it, which has the property to be invariant to the watermark addition. In that way, watermark embedded and reader remain synchronized through this image of reference. DEHS is also an original contribution of this work. It shifts predict-errors between the image and its reference image taking care of the local specificities of the image, thus dynamically. Conducted experiments, on different medical image test sets issued from different modalities and some natural images, show that our method can insert more data with lower distortion than the most recent and efficient methods of the literature.

  18. High Capacity Reversible Watermarking for Audio by Histogram Shifting and Predicted Error Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Chen, Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Being reversible, the watermarking information embedded in audio signals can be extracted while the original audio data can achieve lossless recovery. Currently, the few reversible audio watermarking algorithms are confronted with following problems: relatively low SNR (signal-to-noise) of embedded audio; a large amount of auxiliary embedded location information; and the absence of accurate capacity control capability. In this paper, we present a novel reversible audio watermarking scheme based on improved prediction error expansion and histogram shifting. First, we use differential evolution algorithm to optimize prediction coefficients and then apply prediction error expansion to output stego data. Second, in order to reduce location map bits length, we introduced histogram shifting scheme. Meanwhile, the prediction error modification threshold according to a given embedding capacity can be computed by our proposed scheme. Experiments show that this algorithm improves the SNR of embedded audio signals and embedding capacity, drastically reduces location map bits length, and enhances capacity control capability. PMID:25097883

  19. Liver fibrosis grading using multiresolution histogram information in real-time elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albouy-Kissi, A.; Sarry, L.; Massoulier, S.; Bonny, C.; Randl, K.; Abergel, A.

    2010-03-01

    Despites many limitations, liver biopsy remains the gold standard method for grading and staging liver biopsy. Several modalities have been developed for a non invasive assessment of liver diseases. Real-time elastography may constitute a true alternative to liver biopsy by providing an image of tissular elasticity distribution correlated to the fibrosis grade. In this paper, we investigate a new approach for the assessment of liver fibrosis by the classification of fibrosis morphometry. Multiresolution histogram, based on a combination of intensity and texture features, has been tested as feature space. Thus, the ability of such multiresolution histograms to discriminate fibrosis grade has been proven. The results have been tested on seventeen patients that underwent a real time elastography and FibroScan examination.

  20. Improving the convergence rate in affine registration of PET and SPECT brain images using histogram equalization.

    PubMed

    Salas-Gonzalez, D; Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Padilla, P; Illán, I A

    2013-01-01

    A procedure to improve the convergence rate for affine registration methods of medical brain images when the images differ greatly from the template is presented. The methodology is based on a histogram matching of the source images with respect to the reference brain template before proceeding with the affine registration. The preprocessed source brain images are spatially normalized to a template using a general affine model with 12 parameters. A sum of squared differences between the source images and the template is considered as objective function, and a Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm is used to find the minimum of the cost function. Using histogram equalization as a preprocessing step improves the convergence rate in the affine registration algorithm of brain images as we show in this work using SPECT and PET brain images.

  1. Sample training based wildfire segmentation by 2D histogram θ-division with minimum error.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhui; Dong, Erqian; Sun, Mingui; Jia, Wenyan; Zhang, Dengyi; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    A novel wildfire segmentation algorithm is proposed with the help of sample training based 2D histogram θ-division and minimum error. Based on minimum error principle and 2D color histogram, the θ-division methods were presented recently, but application of prior knowledge on them has not been explored. For the specific problem of wildfire segmentation, we collect sample images with manually labeled fire pixels. Then we define the probability function of error division to evaluate θ-division segmentations, and the optimal angle θ is determined by sample training. Performances in different color channels are compared, and the suitable channel is selected. To further improve the accuracy, the combination approach is presented with both θ-division and other segmentation methods such as GMM. Our approach is tested on real images, and the experiments prove its efficiency for wildfire segmentation.

  2. Accelerating atomic-level protein simulations by flat-histogram techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsson, Sigurður Ć.; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders

    2011-09-01

    Flat-histogram techniques provide a powerful approach to the simulation of first-order-like phase transitions and are potentially very useful for protein studies. Here, we test this approach by implicit solvent all-atom Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of peptide aggregation, for a 7-residue fragment (GIIFNEQ) of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 protein (SOD1). In simulations with 8 chains, we observe two distinct aggregated/non-aggregated phases. At the midpoint temperature, these phases coexist, separated by a free-energy barrier of height 2.7 kBT. We show that this system can be successfully studied by carefully implemented flat-histogram techniques. The frequency of barrier crossing, which is low in conventional canonical simulations, can be increased by turning to a two-step procedure based on the Wang-Landau and multicanonical algorithms.

  3. Clinical implications of the basic defects in Cockayne Syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum and the DNA lesions responsible for cancer, neurodegeneration and aging

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, J.E.; Revet, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer, aging, and neurodegeneration are all associated with DNA damage and repair in complex fashions. Aging appears to be a cell and tissue-wide process linked to the insulin-dependent pathway in several DNA repair deficient disorders, especially in mice. Cancer and neurodegeneration appear to have complementary relationships to DNA damage and repair. Cancer arises from surviving cells, or even stem cells, that have down-regulated many pathways, including apoptosis, that regulate genomic stability in a multi-step process. Neurodegeneration however occurs in nondividing neurones in which the persistence of apoptosis in response to reactive oxygen species is, itself, pathological. Questions that remain open concern: sources and chemical nature of naturally occurring DNA damaging agents, especially whether mitochondria are the true source; the target tissues for DNA damage and repair; do the human DNA repair deficient diseases delineate specific pathways of DNA damage relevant to clinical outcomes; if naturally occurring reactive oxygen species are pathological in human repair deficient disease, would anti-oxidants or anti-apoptotic agents be feasible therapeutic agent? PMID:18336867

  4. Antimicrobial activity of commonly used antibiotics and DNA fingerprint analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates and unchlorinated drinking water in Korea, 2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Rae; Lee, Do Kyung; An, Hyang Mi; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Si Won; Cha, Min Kyeong; Lee, Kang Oh; Ha, Nam Joo

    2011-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exists in various environments, and can cause mild or serious infections resulting in a wide range of symptoms. In this study, we collected bacterial isolates from hospitalized patients and unchlorinated drinking water, in Korea, 2010. The water-borne and clinical isolates were compared using colony morphology, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. We first compared morphological features of the water-borne and clinical isolates. The clearest difference in colony morphology was colony shape; five water-borne isolate colonies (83%) had a smooth, circular morphology, while nine (75%) clinical isolate colonies had a rough, irregular morphology. Minimum inhibitory concentrations analyses were performed to determine antimicrobial resistant patterns; using ceftazidime, gentamicin, tigecycline, chloramphenicol, meropenem, and tobramycin according to Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI, 2009) methodology. All waterborne isolates were not resistant to gentamicin, tobramycin, and meropenem. The clinical isolates were resistant to every antibiotic except chloramphenicol. Genotyping was performed using the repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase-chain-reaction. The DNA fingerprinting patterns did not reveal genetic similarity between the water-borne and clinical P. aeruginosa isolates. On the contrary, they showed that genetically distinct populations have been established in each of these environments. We have revealed significant morphological, clinical and genetic differences between water-borne and clinical isolates of the same bacterial species.

  5. Temporal evolution for the phase histogram of ECG during human ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Chya; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Watanabe, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2007-07-01

    A novel approach to momentary/instantaneous morphological assessment of phase histograms, extending phase statistics analysis, is used to investigate electrocardiograms during ventricular fibrillation (VF) in humans. By using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert transform, we calculate the instantaneous phase of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) in Holter data from 16 individuals, and construct the corresponding momentary phase histograms, enabling us to inspect the evolution of the waveform of the time series. A measure defined as the difference between the integrals of the probability distribution density of phase in different regions is then used to characterize the morphology of the momentary histograms and their temporal evolution. We find that the measure of morphology difference allows near perfect classification of the VF data into survivor and non-survivor groups. The technique offers a new possibility to improve the effectiveness of intervention in defibrillation treatment and limit the negative side effects of unnecessary interventions. The approach can be implemented in real time and should provide a useful method for early evaluation of (fatal) VF.

  6. Glioma grading using apparent diffusion coefficient map: application of histogram analysis based on automatic segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongwon; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Lee, Sooyeul; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2014-09-01

    The accurate diagnosis of glioma subtypes is critical for appropriate treatment, but conventional histopathologic diagnosis often exhibits significant intra-observer variability and sampling error. The aim of this study was to investigate whether histogram analysis using an automatically segmented region of interest (ROI), excluding cystic or necrotic portions, could improve the differentiation between low-grade and high-grade gliomas. Thirty-two patients (nine low-grade and 23 high-grade gliomas) were included in this retrospective investigation. The outer boundaries of the entire tumors were manually drawn in each section of the contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted MR images. We excluded cystic or necrotic portions from the entire tumor volume. The histogram analyses were performed within the ROI on normalized apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To evaluate the contribution of the proposed method to glioma grading, we compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. We found that an ROI excluding cystic or necrotic portions was more useful for glioma grading than was an entire tumor ROI. In the case of the fifth percentile values of the normalized ADC histogram, the area under the ROC curve for the tumor ROIs excluding cystic or necrotic portions was significantly higher than that for the entire tumor ROIs (p < 0.005). The automatic segmentation of a cystic or necrotic area probably improves the ability to differentiate between high- and low-grade gliomas on an ADC map. PMID:25042540

  7. A comparison of histogram distance metrics for content-based image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianwen; Canosa, Roxanne L.

    2014-03-01

    The type of histogram distance metric selected for a CBIR query varies greatly and will affect the accuracy of the retrieval results. This paper compares the retrieval results of a variety of commonly used CBIR distance metrics: the Euclidean distance, the Manhattan distance, the vector cosine angle distance, histogram intersection distance, χ2 distance, Jensen-Shannon divergence, and the Earth Mover's distance. A training set of ground-truth labeled images is used to build a classifier for the CBIR system, where the images were obtained from three commonly used benchmarking datasets: the WANG dataset (http://savvash.blogspot.com/2008/12/benchmark-databases-for-cbir.html), the Corel Subset dataset (http://vision.stanford.edu/resources_links.html), and the CalTech dataset (http://www.vision.caltech.edu/htmlfiles/). To implement the CBIR system, we use the Tamura texture features of coarseness, contrast, and directionality. We create texture histograms of the training set and the query images, and then measure the difference between a randomly selected query and the corresponding retrieved image using a k-nearest-neighbors approach. Precision and recall is used to evaluate the retrieval performance of the system, given a particular distance metric. Then, given the same query image, the distance metric is changed and performance of the system is evaluated once again.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Photopyroelectric Signals using Histogram and Kernel Density Estimation for differentiation of Maize Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Lima, J. E.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2016-09-01

    Considering the necessity of photothermal alternative approaches for characterizing nonhomogeneous materials like maize seeds, the objective of this research work was to analyze statistically the amplitude variations of photopyroelectric signals, by means of nonparametric techniques such as the histogram and the kernel density estimator, and the probability density function of the amplitude variations of two genotypes of maize seeds with different pigmentations and structural components: crystalline and floury. To determine if the probability density function had a known parametric form, the histogram was determined which did not present a known parametric form, so the kernel density estimator using the Gaussian kernel, with an efficiency of 95 % in density estimation, was used to obtain the probability density function. The results obtained indicated that maize seeds could be differentiated in terms of the statistical values for floury and crystalline seeds such as the mean (93.11, 159.21), variance (1.64× 103, 1.48× 103), and standard deviation (40.54, 38.47) obtained from the amplitude variations of photopyroelectric signals in the case of the histogram approach. For the case of the kernel density estimator, seeds can be differentiated in terms of kernel bandwidth or smoothing constant h of 9.85 and 6.09 for floury and crystalline seeds, respectively.

  9. Plastic Flowlike Deformation and Its Relation to Aperiodic Peaks in Conductance Histograms of Molybdenum Nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kohei; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2016-10-01

    We observed the tensile deformation of molybdenum (Mo) nanocontacts (NCs) and simultaneously measured their conductance by in situ transmission electron microscopy. During deformation, the contact width decreased from several nanometers to a single-atom size. Mo NCs were thinned via a plastic flowlike deformation process. The process differs from the slip on lattice planes, which is frequently observed in NCs made of noble metals. We plotted histograms of the time-conductance traces measured during the tensile deformation of Mo NCs. In the conductance histograms, we observed peaks at 1.8G0 (G0 = 2e2/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck's constant), 3.6G0, and 4.4G0. When the minimum conductance (1.8G0) was measured, the minimum cross-sectional widths of the NCs were 3-7 atoms. These NCs exhibited relaxed structures that formed irregularly after the plastic flowlike deformation occurred in the final stage of the tensile process. We inferred that the aperiodic peaks observed in the conductance histograms originated from irregular variations in the contact areas and atomic configurations of the NCs during the plastic flowlike deformation. Moreover, the conductance value of the single-atom contacts was less than 0.1G0.

  10. Digital image classification with the help of artificial neural network by simple histogram

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Pranab; Banerjee, Nirmalya; Kaur, Rajwant

    2016-01-01

    Background: Visual image classification is a great challenge to the cytopathologist in routine day-to-day work. Artificial neural network (ANN) may be helpful in this matter. Aims and Objectives: In this study, we have tried to classify digital images of malignant and benign cells in effusion cytology smear with the help of simple histogram data and ANN. Materials and Methods: A total of 404 digital images consisting of 168 benign cells and 236 malignant cells were selected for this study. The simple histogram data was extracted from these digital images and an ANN was constructed with the help of Neurointelligence software [Alyuda Neurointelligence 2.2 (577), Cupertino, California, USA]. The network architecture was 6-3-1. The images were classified as training set (281), validation set (63), and test set (60). The on-line backpropagation training algorithm was used for this study. Result: A total of 10,000 iterations were done to train the ANN system with the speed of 609.81/s. After the adequate training of this ANN model, the system was able to identify all 34 malignant cell images and 24 out of 26 benign cells. Conclusion: The ANN model can be used for the identification of the individual malignant cells with the help of simple histogram data. This study will be helpful in the future to identify malignant cells in unknown situations. PMID:27279679

  11. Adaptive local backlight dimming algorithm based on local histogram and image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Burini, Nino; Korhonen, Jari; Forchhammer, Søren; Mantel, Claire

    2013-02-01

    Liquid Crystal Display (LCDs) with Light Emitting Diode (LED) backlight is a very popular display technology, used for instance in television sets, monitors and mobile phones. This paper presents a new backlight dimming algorithm that exploits the characteristics of the target image, such as the local histograms and the average pixel intensity of each backlight segment, to reduce the power consumption of the backlight and enhance image quality. The local histogram of the pixels within each backlight segment is calculated and, based on this average, an adaptive quantile value is extracted. A classification into three classes based on the average luminance value is performed and, depending on the image luminance class, the extracted information on the local histogram determines the corresponding backlight value. The proposed method has been applied on two modeled screens: one with a high resolution direct-lit backlight, and the other screen with 16 edge-lit backlight segments placed in two columns and eight rows. We have compared the proposed algorithm against several known backlight dimming algorithms by simulations; and the results show that the proposed algorithm provides better trade-off between power consumption and image quality preservation than the other algorithms representing the state of the art among feature based backlight algorithms.

  12. LOR-OSEM: statistical PET reconstruction from raw line-of-response histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2004-10-01

    Iterative statistical reconstruction methods are becoming the standard in positron emission tomography (PET). Conventional maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) and ordered-subsets (OSEM) algorithms act on data which have been pre-processed into corrected, evenly-spaced histograms; however, such pre-processing corrupts the Poisson statistics. Recent advances have incorporated attenuation, scatter and randoms compensation into the iterative reconstruction. The objective of this work was to incorporate the remaining pre-processing steps, including arc correction, to reconstruct directly from raw unevenly-spaced line-of-response (LOR) histograms. This exactly preserves Poisson statistics and full spatial information in a manner closely related to listmode ML, making full use of the ML statistical model. The LOR-OSEM algorithm was implemented using a rotation-based projector which maps directly to the unevenly-spaced LOR grid. Simulation and phantom experiments were performed to characterize resolution, contrast and noise properties for 2D PET. LOR-OSEM provided a beneficial noise-resolution tradeoff, outperforming AW-OSEM by about the same margin that AW-OSEM outperformed pre-corrected OSEM. The relationship between LOR-ML and listmode ML algorithms was explored, and implementation differences are discussed. LOR-OSEM is a viable alternative to AW-OSEM for histogram-based reconstruction with improved spatial resolution and noise properties.

  13. LOR-OSEM: statistical PET reconstruction from raw line-of-response histograms.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, Dan J

    2004-10-21

    Iterative statistical reconstruction methods are becoming the standard in positron emission tomography (PET). Conventional maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) and ordered-subsets (OSEM) algorithms act on data which have been pre-processed into corrected, evenly-spaced histograms; however, such pre-processing corrupts the Poisson statistics. Recent advances have incorporated attenuation, scatter and randoms compensation into the iterative reconstruction. The objective of this work was to incorporate the remaining pre-processing steps, including arc correction, to reconstruct directly from raw unevenly-spaced line-of-response (LOR) histograms. This exactly preserves Poisson statistics and full spatial information in a manner closely related to listmode ML, making full use of the ML statistical model. The LOR-OSEM algorithm was implemented using a rotation-based projector which maps directly to the unevenly-spaced LOR grid. Simulation and phantom experiments were performed to characterize resolution, contrast and noise properties for 2D PET. LOR-OSEM provided a beneficial noise-resolution tradeoff, outperforming AW-OSEM by about the same margin that AW-OSEM outperformed pre-corrected OSEM. The relationship between LOR-ML and listmode ML algorithms was explored, and implementation differences are discussed. LOR-OSEM is a viable alternative to AW-OSEM for histogram-based reconstruction with improved spatial resolution and noise properties.

  14. Differentially Private Histogram Publication For Dynamic Datasets: An Adaptive Sampling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Xiong, Li; Liu, Jinfei

    2016-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently become a de facto standard for private statistical data release. Many algorithms have been proposed to generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data. However, most of them focus on “one-time” release of a static dataset and do not adequately address the increasing need of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time. A straightforward application of existing histogram methods on each snapshot of such dynamic datasets will incur high accumulated error due to the composibility of differential privacy and correlations or overlapping users between the snapshots. In this paper, we address the problem of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time with differential privacy, using a novel adaptive distance-based sampling approach. Our first method, DSFT, uses a fixed distance threshold and releases a differentially private histogram only when the current snapshot is sufficiently different from the previous one, i.e., with a distance greater than a predefined threshold. Our second method, DSAT, further improves DSFT and uses a dynamic threshold adaptively adjusted by a feedback control mechanism to capture the data dynamics. Extensive experiments on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our approach achieves better utility than baseline methods and existing state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26973795

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography strain histograms in the evaluation of patients with pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Opačić, Dalibor; Rustemović, Nadan; Kalauz, Mirjana; Markoš, Pave; Ostojić, Zvonimir; Majerović, Matea; Ledinsky, Iva; Višnjić, Ana; Krznarić, Juraj; Opačić, Milorad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy of the strain histogram endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-based method for the diagnostic differentiation of patients with pancreatic masses. METHODS: In a prospective single center study, 149 patients were analyzed, 105 with pancreatic masses and 44 controls. Elastography images were recorded using commercially available ultrasound equipment in combination with EUS linear probes. Strain histograms (SHs) were calculated by machine integrated software in regions of interest and mean values of the strain histograms were expressed as Mode 1 (over the mass) and Mode 2 (over an adjacent part of pancreatic tissue, representing the reference area). The ratio between Mode 2 and Mode 1 was calculated later, representing a new variable, the strain histogram ratio. After the final diagnosis was established, two groups of patients were formed: a pancreatic cancer group with positive cytology achieved by fine needle aspiration puncture or histology after surgery (58 patients), and a mass-forming pancreatitis group with negative cytology and follow-up after 3 and 6 mo (47 patients). All statistical analyses were conducted in SPSS 14.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, United States). RESULTS: Results were obtained with software for strain histograms with reversed hue scale (0 represents the hardest tissue structure and 255 the softest). Based on the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve coordinates, the cut-off point for Mode 1 was set at the value of 86. Values under the cut-off point indicated the presence of pancreatic malignancy. Mode 1 reached 100% sensitivity and 45% specificity with overall accuracy of 66% (95%CI: 61%-66%) in detection of pancreatic malignant tumors among the patients with pancreatic masses. The positive and negative predictive values were 54% and 100%, respectively. The cut-off for the new calculated variable, the SH ratio, was set at the value 1.153 based on the ROC curve coordinates. Values equal or above the cut-off value

  16. Expression and clinical significance of P53, O6-methylguanine-dna methyltransferase and epidermal growth factor receptor in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fu, X R; Sun, Z C; Chang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is a serious life-threatening disease, the pathogenesis of which remains to be investigated. The objective of the present investigation was to explore the expression and clinical significance of tumor suppressor gene (P53), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in glioma. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to study the clinical characteristics of 40 samples from glioma patients, detect the expression of and analyse the relationship between P53, MGMT and EGFR and glioma. The results demonstrated that the positive expression rate of P53 was 47.5% in 40 cases of glioma samples, of which the expression of P53 in the high grade glioma was higher than that of the low grade samples (P < 0.05); the positive expression rate of MGMT was 37.5%, but there was no significant significance of MGMT expression between the high grade glioma and the low grade glioma (P < 0.05); the positive expression rate of EGFR was 55%, of which the expression of EGFR of the high grade glioma was higher than that of the low grade glioma (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the expressions of P53, MGMT and EGFR in the glioma patients of different ages, gender and with different tumor sizes. The expressions of P53 and MGMT were negatively correlated (P < 0.05). The expressions of P53 and EGFR were positively correlated (P < 0.05). In conclusion, P53, EGFR and MGMT could play a role in the occurrence, development and deterioration of glioma. PMID:26753647

  17. Then and now: use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for bacterial identification and discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C Y; Lau, S K P; Teng, J L L; Tse, H; Yuen, K-Y

    2008-10-01

    In the last decade, as a result of the widespread use of PCR and DNA sequencing, 16S rDNA sequencing has played a pivotal role in the accurate identification of bacterial isolates and the discovery of novel bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories. For bacterial identification, 16S rDNA sequencing is particularly important in the case of bacteria with unusual phenotypic profiles, rare bacteria, slow-growing bacteria, uncultivable bacteria and culture-negative infections. Not only has it provided insights into aetiologies of infectious disease, but it also helps clinicians in choosing antibiotics and in determining the duration of treatment and infection control procedures. With the use of 16S rDNA sequencing, 215 novel bacterial species, 29 of which belong to novel genera, have been discovered from human specimens in the past 7 years of the 21st century (2001-2007). One hundred of the 215 novel species, 15 belonging to novel genera, have been found in four or more subjects. The largest number of novel species discovered were of the genera Mycobacterium (n = 12) and Nocardia (n = 6). The oral cavity/dental-related specimens (n = 19) and the gastrointestinal tract (n = 26) were the most important sites for discovery and/or reservoirs of novel species. Among the 100 novel species, Streptococcus sinensis, Laribacter hongkongensis, Clostridium hathewayi and Borrelia spielmanii have been most thoroughly characterized, with the reservoirs and routes of transmission documented, and S. sinensis, L. hongkongensis and C. hathewayi have been found globally. One of the greatest hurdles in putting 16S rDNA sequencing into routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories is automation of the technology. The only step that can be automated at the moment is input of the 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolate for identification into one of the software packages that will generate the result of the identity of the isolate on the basis of its sequence database. However

  18. Characterization of stroke lesions using a histogram-based data analysis including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzesik, Alexander; Bernarding, Johannes; Braun, Juergen; Koennecke, Hans-Christian; Wolf, Karl J.; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI, PWI) allows the diagnosis of ischemic brain injury at a time when ischemic lesions may not yet be detectable in computer tomography or T2-weighted (T2w) MRI. However, regions with pathologic apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) do not necessarily match with regions of prolonged mean transit times (MTT) or pathologic relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Mismatching parts are thought to correlate with tissues that can be saved by appropriate treatment. Ten patients with cerebral ischemia underwent standard T1w and T2w imaging as well as single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) DWI, and PWI. Multidimensional histograms were constructed from T2w images, DWI, ADC, rCBF, and MTT maps. After segmenting different tissues, signal changes of ischemic tissues relative to unaffected parenchyma were calculated. Combining different information allowed the segmentation of lesions and unaffected tissues. Acute infarcts exhibited decreased ADC values as well as hypo- and hyperperfused areas. Correlating ADC, T2w, and rCBF with clinical symptoms allowed the estimation of age and perfusion state of the lesions. Combining DWI, PWI, and standard imaging overcomes strongly fluctuating parameters such as ADC values. A multidimensional parameter-set characterizes unaffected and pathologic tissues which may help in the evaluation of new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Chemiluminescent DNA probes: a comparison of the acridinium ester and dioxetane detection systems and their use in clinical diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Nelson, N C; Kacian, D L

    1990-12-17

    Nucleic acid hybridization has the potential to markedly improve the diagnosis of infectious and genetic diseases. Recently, chemiluminescent hybridization assays using acridinium esters and stabilized dioxetanes have been described with sensitivities comparable to those obtained with radioactive labels. Acridinium esters are used as direct labels that are attached to the probe throughout the hybridization reaction. Methods have been developed for labeling DNA probes with acridinium esters at high specific activity and for stabilizing the label under the relatively harsh conditions of hybridization reactions. The label does not affect the kinetics of the hybridization reaction or the stability of the resulting hybrid. The label emits light upon exposure to alkaline peroxide; thus, the assay format can be an extremely simple one. The acridinium ester labels are stable in storage and exhibit extremely rapid light-off kinetics which permit reading large numbers of samples within a brief period as well as limiting the contribution of background signal. A special property of acridinium esters allows chemical destruction of the label when it is present on unhybridized probe, whereas the label is stable to this process when the probe is hybridized. This behavior forms the basis of techniques to minimize assay background signals and allows a homogeneous assay format which does not require physical separation of hybridized and unhybridized probe. The adamantyl-stabilized 1,2-dioxetanes have been used to produce high-sensitivity detection systems for clinical assays. The probe is labeled with enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase or beta-D-galactosidase that hydrolyze the dioxetane derivative to produce a chemiluminescent molecule. As with other enzyme-based labeling systems, the signal increases with time, allowing greater sensitivity to be achieved with longer incubations. The amount of light generated is sufficient to expose sensitive photographic film with extended

  20. Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid in 718 normal subjects using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Lowe, Val J.; Kemp, Bradley J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We have previously described an automated system for the co-registration of PiB and FDG PET images with structural MRI and a neurological anatomy atlas to produce region-specific quantization of cortical activity and amyloid burden. We also reported a global joint PiB/FDG histogram-based measure (FDG-Associated PiB Uptake Ratio - FAPUR) that performed as well as regional PiB ratio in stratifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) patients from normal subjects in an autopsy-verified cohort of 31. In this paper we examine results of this analysis on a clinically-verified cohort of 718 normal volunteers. We found that the global FDG ratio correlated negatively with age (r2 = 0.044) and global PiB ratio correlated positively with age (r2=0.038). FAPUR also correlated negatively with age (r2-.025), and in addition, we introduce a new metric - the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r2) of the joint PiB/FDG histogram which correlates positively (r2=0.014) with age. We then used these measurements to construct age-weighted Z-scores for all measurements made on the original autopsy cohort. We found similar stratification using Z-scores compared to raw values; however, the joint PiB/FDG r2 Z-score showed the greatest stratification ability.

  1. Optimized swimmer tracking system by a dynamic fusion of correlation and color histogram techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarab, D.; Napoléon, T.; Alfalou, A.; Verney, A.; Hellard, P.

    2015-12-01

    To design a robust swimmer tracking system, we took into account two well-known tracking techniques: the nonlinear joint transform correlation (NL-JTC) and the color histogram. The two techniques perform comparably well, yet they both have substantial limitations. Interestingly, they also seem to show some complementarity. The correlation technique yields accurate detection but is sensitive to rotation, scale and contour deformation, whereas the color histogram technique is robust for rotation and contour deformation but shows low accuracy and is highly sensitive to luminosity and confusing background colors. These observations suggested the possibility of a dynamic fusion of the correlation plane and the color scores map. Before this fusion, two steps are required. First is the extraction of a sub-plane of correlation that describes the similarity between the reference and target images. This sub-plane has the same size as the color scores map but they have different interval values. Thus, the second step is required which is the normalization of the planes in the same interval so they can be fused. In order to determine the benefits of this fusion technique, first, we tested it on a synthetic image containing different forms with different colors. We thus were able to optimize the correlation plane and color histogram techniques before applying our fusion technique to real videos of swimmers in international competitions. Last, a comparative study of the dynamic fusion technique and the two classical techniques was carried out to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique. The criteria of comparison were the tracking percentage, the peak to correlation energy (PCE), which evaluated the sharpness of the peak (accuracy), and the local standard deviation (Local-STD), which assessed the noise in the planes (robustness).

  2. A Novel Method for the Evaluation of Uncertainty in Dose-Volume Histogram Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriquez, Francisco Cutanda M.Sc. Castrillon, Silvia Vargas

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) are a useful tool in state-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning, and it is essential to recognize their limitations. Even after a specific dose-calculation model is optimized, dose distributions computed by using treatment-planning systems are affected by several sources of uncertainty, such as algorithm limitations, measurement uncertainty in the data used to model the beam, and residual differences between measured and computed dose. This report presents a novel method to take them into account. Methods and Materials: To take into account the effect of associated uncertainties, a probabilistic approach using a new kind of histogram, a dose-expected volume histogram, is introduced. The expected value of the volume in the region of interest receiving an absorbed dose equal to or greater than a certain value is found by using the probability distribution of the dose at each point. A rectangular probability distribution is assumed for this point dose, and a formulation that accounts for uncertainties associated with point dose is presented for practical computations. Results: This method is applied to a set of DVHs for different regions of interest, including 6 brain patients, 8 lung patients, 8 pelvis patients, and 6 prostate patients planned for intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Conclusions: Results show a greater effect on planning target volume coverage than in organs at risk. In cases of steep DVH gradients, such as planning target volumes, this new method shows the largest differences with the corresponding DVH; thus, the effect of the uncertainty is larger.

  3. Parameters of proteome evolution from histograms of amino-acid sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Maslov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    Background The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is mostly driven by gene duplications, deletions, and sequence modifications of existing proteins. Indirect information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the proteome-wide distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. Results We introduce a simple mathematical framework based on a stochastic birth-and-death model that allows one to extract some of this information and apply it to the set of all pairs of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and H. sapiens. It was found that the histogram of sequence identities p generated by an all-to-all alignment of all protein sequences encoded in a genome is well fitted with a power-law form ~ p-γ with the value of the exponent γ around 4 for the majority of organisms used in this study. This implies that the intra-protein variability of substitution rates is best described by the Gamma-distribution with the exponent α ≈ 0.33. Different features of the shape of such histograms allow us to quantify the ratio between the genome-wide average deletion/duplication rates and the amino-acid substitution rate. Conclusion We separately measure the short-term ("raw") duplication and deletion rates rdup∗, rdel∗ which include gene copies that will be removed soon after the duplication event and their dramatically reduced long-term counterparts rdup, rdel. High deletion rate among recently duplicated proteins is consistent with a scenario in which they didn't have enough time to significantly change their functional roles and thus are to a large degree disposable. Systematic trends of each of the four duplication/deletion rates with the total number of genes in the genome were analyzed. All but the deletion rate of recent duplicates rdel∗ were shown to systematically increase with Ngenes. Abnormally flat shapes

  4. Phase-unwrapping algorithm for images with high noise content based on a local histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present a robust algorithm of phase unwrapping that was designed for use on phase images with high noise content. We proceed with the algorithm by first identifying regions with continuous phase values placed between fringe boundaries in an image and then phase shifting the regions with respect to one another by multiples of 2pi to unwrap the phase. Image pixels are segmented between interfringe and fringe boundary areas by use of a local histogram of a wrapped phase. The algorithm has been used successfully to unwrap phase images generated in a three-dimensional shape measurement for noninvasive quantification of human skin structure in dermatology, cosmetology, and plastic surgery.

  5. Phase-unwrapping algorithm for images with high noise content based on a local histogram.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present a robust algorithm of phase unwrapping that was designed for use on phase images with high noise content. We proceed with the algorithm by first identifying regions with continuous phase values placed between fringe boundaries in an image and then phase shifting the regions with respect to one another by multiples of 2pi to unwrap the phase. Image pixels are segmented between interfringe and fringe boundary areas by use of a local histogram of a wrapped phase. The algorithm has been used successfully to unwrap phase images generated in a three-dimensional shape measurement for noninvasive quantification of human skin structure in dermatology, cosmetology, and plastic surgery.

  6. Reduced XPC DNA repair gene mRNA levels in clinically normal parents of xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sikandar G; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Shahlavi, Tala; Ueda, Takahiro; Busch, David B; Inui, Hiroki; Emmert, Steffen; Imoto, Kyoko; Muniz-Medina, Vanessa; Baker, Carl C; DiGiovanna, John J; Schmidt, Deborah; Khadavi, Arash; Metin, Ahmet; Gozukara, Engin; Slor, Hanoch; Sarasin, Alain; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Patients with two mutant alleles of the XPC DNA repair gene have sun sensitivity and a 1000-fold increase in skin cancers. Clinically normal parents of XP-C patients have one mutant allele and one normal allele. As a step toward evaluating cancer risk in these XPC heterozygotes we characterized cells from 16 XP families. We identified 15 causative mutations (5 frameshift, 6 nonsense and 4 splicing) in the XPC gene in cells from 16 XP probands. All had premature termination codons (PTC) and absence of normal XPC protein on western blotting. The cell lines from 26 parents were heterozygous for the same mutations. We employed a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR assay as a rapid and sensitive method to measure XPC mRNA levels. The mean XPC mRNA levels in the cell lines from the XP-C probands were 24% (P<10(-7)) of that in 10 normal controls. This reduced XPC mRNA level in cells from XP-C patients was caused by the PTC that induces nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The mean XPC mRNA levels in cell lines from the heterozygous XP-C carriers were intermediate (59%, P=10(-4)) between the values for the XP patients and the normal controls. This study demonstrates reduced XPC mRNA levels in XP-C patients and heterozygotes. Thus, XPC mRNA levels may be evaluated as a marker of cancer susceptibility in carriers of mutations in the XPC gene. PMID:16081512

  7. Random DNA fragmentation allows detection of single-copy, single-exon alterations of copy number by oligonucleotide array CGH in clinical FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Galen; Kim, Su Young; Savage, Stephanie; Gooden, Gerald C; Barrett, Michael; Zhang, Jian; Alla, Lalitamba; Watanabe, April; Einspahr, Janine; Prasad, Anil; Nickoloff, Brian J; Carpten, John; Trent, Jeffrey; Alberts, David; Bittner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Genomic technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), increasingly offer definitive gene dosage profiles in clinical samples. Historically, copy number profiling was limited to large fresh-frozen tumors where intact DNA could be readily extracted. Genomic analyses of pre-neoplastic tumors and diagnostic biopsies are often limited to DNA processed by formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedding (FFPE). We present specialized protocols for DNA extraction and processing from FFPE tissues utilizing DNase processing to generate randomly fragmented DNA. The protocols are applied to FFPE clinical samples of varied tumor types, from multiple institutions and of varied block age. Direct comparative analyses with regression coefficient were calculated on split-sample (portion fresh/portion FFPE) of colorectal tumor samples. We show equal detection of a homozygous loss of SMAD4 at the exon-level in the SW480 cell line and gene-specific alterations in the split tumor samples. aCGH application to a set of archival FFPE samples of skin squamous cell carcinomas detected a novel hemizygous deletion in INPP5A on 10q26.3. Finally we present data on derivative of log ratio, a particular sensitive detector of measurement variance, for 216 sequential hybridizations to assess protocol reliability over a wide range of FFPE samples.

  8. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Zill, Oliver A; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A; Divers, Stephen G; Hoon, Dave S B; Kopetz, E Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G; Baca, Arthur M; Kermani, Bahram G; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital Sequencing™ is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient's cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing.

  9. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Oliver A.; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A.; Divers, Stephen G.; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G.; Baca, Arthur M.; Kermani, Bahram G.; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital SequencingTM is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient’s cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  10. Profiling of Epstein-Barr virus latent RNA expression in clinical specimens by gene-specific multiprimed cDNA synthesis and PCR.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Servi J C; Brink, Antoinette A T P; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2005-01-01

    We describe a two-step RT-PCR method for simultaneous detection of EBNA-1 (QK and Y3K splice variants), EBNA-2, LMP-1, LMP-2a and -2b, ZEBRA, and BARTs RNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus. As a control for RNA integrity, the low-copy-number transcript derived from U1A snRNP, a cellular housekeeping gene, is coamplified. Copy DNA (cDNA) for these nine targets is simultaneously synthesized in a gene-specific, multiprimed cDNA reaction, which strongly reduces the amount of required clinical specimen and allows more sensitive detection than random hexamer or oligo-dT priming. For amplification, cDNA synthesis is followed by nine separate PCRs for the mentioned targets. Primers were designed either as intron-flanking, to avoid background DNA amplification, or in different exons, allowing identification of differentially spliced RNA molecules. To increase specificity, PCR products are detected by autoradiography after hybridization with radiolabeled internal oligonucleotide probes. The method described is highly suitable for profiling EBV latent RNA expression in tissue biopsies, cultured or isolated cells, and unfractionated whole blood and for definition of EBV latency type I, II, or III gene expression in these samples.

  11. Infrared image enhancement based on atmospheric scattering model and histogram equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Yunfeng; Geng, Aihui; Cao, Lihua; Chen, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Infrared images are fuzzy due to the special imaging technology of infrared sensor. In order to achieve contrast enhancement and gain clear edge details from a fuzzy infrared image, we propose an efficient enhancement method based on atmospheric scattering model and histogram equalization. The novel algorithm optimizes and improves the visual image haze remove method which combines the characteristics of the fuzzy infrared images. Firstly, an average filtering operation is presented to get the estimation of coarse transmission rate. Then we get the fuzzy free image through self-adaptive transmission rate calculated with the statistics information of original infrared image. Finally, to deal with low lighting problem of fuzzy free image, we propose a sectional plateau histogram equalization method which is capable of background suppression. Experimental results show that the performance and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are pleased, compared to four other algorithms in both subjective observation and objective quantitative evaluation. In addition, the proposed algorithm is competent to enhance infrared image for different applications under different circumstances.

  12. Stereo vision-based vehicle detection using a road feature and disparity histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Hee; Lim, Young-Chul; Kwon, Soon; Lee, Jong-Hun

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents stereo vision-based vehicle detection approach on the road using a road feature and disparity histogram. It is not easy to detect only vehicles robustly on the road in various traffic situations, for example, a nonflat road or a multiple-obstacle situation. This paper focuses on the improvement of vehicle detection performance in various real traffic situations. The approach consists of three steps, namely obstacle localization, obstacle segmentation, and vehicle verification. First, we extract a road feature from v-disparity maps binarized using the most frequent values in each row and column, and adopt the extracted road feature as an obstacle criterion in column detection. However, many obstacles still coexist in each localized obstacle area. Thus, we divide the localized obstacle area into multiple obstacles using a disparity histogram and remerge the divided obstacles using four criteria parameters, namely the obstacle size, distance, and angle between the divided obstacles, and the difference of disparity values. Finally, we verify the vehicles using a depth map and gray image to improve the performance. We verify the performance of our proposed method by conducting experiments in various real traffic situations. The average recall rate of vehicle detection is 95.5%.

  13. Rapid dynamic radial MRI via reference image enforced histogram constrained reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaass, Thomas; Bauman, Grzegorz; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noël, Peter B.; Haase, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Exploiting spatio-temporal redundancies in sub-Nyquist sampled dynamic MRI for the suppression of undersampling artifacts was shown to be of great success. However, temporally averaged and blurred structures in image space composite data poses the risk of false information in the reconstruction. Within this work we assess the possibility of employing the composite image histogram as a measure of undersampling artifacts and as basis of their suppression. The proposed algorithm utilizes a histogram, computed from a composite image within a dynamically acquired interleaved radial MRI measurement as reference to compensate for the impact of undersampling in temporally resolved data without the incorporation of temporal averaging. In addition an image space regularization utilizing a single frame low-resolution reconstruction is implemented to enforce overall contrast fidelity. The performance of the approach was evaluated on a simulated radial dynamic MRI acquisition and on two functional in vivo radial cardiac acquisitions. Results demonstrate that the algorithm maintained contrast properties, details and temporal resolution in the images, while effectively suppressing undersampling artifacts.

  14. 3D target tracking in infrared imagery by SIFT-based distance histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruicheng; Cao, Zhiguo

    2011-11-01

    SIFT tracking algorithm is an excellent point-based tracking algorithm, which has high tracking performance and accuracy due to its robust capability against rotation, scale change and occlusion. However, when tracking a huge 3D target in complicated real scenarios in a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) image sequence taken from an airborne moving platform, the tracked point locating in the vertical surface usually shifts away from the correct position. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for 3D target tracking in FLIR image sequences. Our approach uses SIFT keypoints detected in consecutive frames for point correspondence. The candidate position of the tracked point is firstly estimated by computing the affine transformation using local corresponding SIFT keypoints. Then the correct position is located via an optimal method. Euclidean distances between a candidate point and SIFT keypoints nearby are calculated and formed into a SIFT-based distance histogram. The distance histogram is defined a cost of associating each candidate point to a correct tracked point using the constraint based on the topology of each candidate point with its surrounding SIFT keypoints. Minimization of the cost is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm efficiently improves the tracking performance and accuracy.

  15. User Aligned Histogram Stacks for Visualization of Abdominal Organs via MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, M.; Akay, O.; Güzeliş, C.; Dicle, O.; Selver, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Multi-dimensional transfer functions (MDTF) are occasionally designed as two-step approaches. At the first step, the constructed domain is modelled coarsely using global volume statistics and an initial transfer function (TF) is designed. Then, a finer classification is performed using local information to refine the TF design. In this study, both a new TF domain and a novel two-step MDTF strategy are proposed for visualization of abdominal organs. The proposed domain is generated by aligning the histograms of the slices, which are reconstructed based on user aligned majority axis/regions through an interactive Multi-Planar Reconstruction graphical user interface. It is shown that these user aligned histogram stacks (UAHS) exploit more a priori information by providing tissue specific inter-slice spatial domain knowledge. For initial TF design, UAHS are approximated using a multi-scale hierarchical Gaussian mixture model, which is designed to work in quasi real time. Then, a finer classification step is carried out for refinement of the initial result. Applications to several MRI data sets acquired with various sequences demonstrate improved visualization of abdomen.

  16. An accurate skull stripping method based on simplex meshes and histogram analysis for magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Francisco J; Jaillet, Fabrice; Perez, Claudio A

    2012-01-01

    Skull stripping methods are designed to eliminate the non-brain tissue in magnetic resonance (MR) brain images. Removal of non-brain tissues is a fundamental step in enabling the processing of brain MR images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic accurate skull stripping method based on deformable models and histogram analysis. A rough-segmentation step is used to find the optimal starting point for the deformation and is based on thresholds and morphological operators. Thresholds are computed using comparisons with an atlas, and modeling by Gaussians. The deformable model is based on a simplex mesh and its deformation is controlled by the image local gray levels and the information obtained on the gray level modeling of the rough-segmentation. Our Simplex Mesh and Histogram Analysis Skull Stripping (SMHASS) method was tested on the following international databases commonly used in scientific articles: BrainWeb, Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR), and Segmentation Validation Engine (SVE). A comparison was performed against three of the best skull stripping methods previously published: Brain Extraction Tool (BET), Brain Surface Extractor (BSE), and Hybrid Watershed Algorithm (HWA). Performance was measured using the Jaccard index (J) and Dice coefficient (κ). Our method showed the best performance and differences were statistically significant (p<0.05): J=0.904 and κ=0.950 on BrainWeb; J=0.905 and κ=0.950 on IBSR; J=0.946 and κ=0.972 on SVE.

  17. Hand contour detection in wearable camera video using an adaptive histogram region of interest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Monitoring hand function at home is needed to better evaluate the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions. Our objective is to develop wearable computer vision systems for hand function monitoring. The specific aim of this study is to develop an algorithm that can identify hand contours in video from a wearable camera that records the user’s point of view, without the need for markers. Methods The two-step image processing approach for each frame consists of: (1) Detecting a hand in the image, and choosing one seed point that lies within the hand. This step is based on a priori models of skin colour. (2) Identifying the contour of the region containing the seed point. This is accomplished by adaptively determining, for each frame, the region within a colour histogram that corresponds to hand colours, and backprojecting the image using the reduced histogram. Results In four test videos relevant to activities of daily living, the hand detector classification accuracy was 88.3%. The contour detection results were compared to manually traced contours in 97 test frames, and the median F-score was 0.86. Conclusion This algorithm will form the basis for a wearable computer-vision system that can monitor and log the interactions of the hand with its environment. PMID:24354542

  18. Addendum to brachytherapy dose-volume histogram commissioning with multiple planning systems.

    PubMed

    Gossman, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The process for validating dose-volume histogram data in brachytherapy software is presented as a supplement to a previously published article. Included is the DVH accuracy evaluation of the Best NOMOS treatment planning system called "Best TPS VolumePlan." As done previously in other software, a rectangular cuboid was contoured in the treatment planning system. A single radioactive 125I source was positioned coplanar and concentric with one end. Calculations were performed to estimate dose deposition in partial volumes of the cuboid structure, using the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism defined in AAPM Task Group 43. Hand-calculated, dose-volume results were compared to TPS-generated, point-source-approximated dose-volume histogram data to establish acceptance. The required QA for commissioning was satisfied for the DVH as conducted previously for other software, using the criterion that the DVH %VolTPS "actual variance" calculations should differ by no more than 5% at any specific radial distance with respect to %VolTG-43, and the "average variance" DVH %VolTPS calculations should differ by no more than 2% over all radial distances with respect to %VolTG-43. The average disagreement observed between hand calculations and treatment planning system DVH was less than 0.5% on average for this treatment planning system and less than 1.1% maximally for 1 ≤ r ≤ 5 cm. PMID:27167288

  19. Detection of Basal Cell Carcinoma Using Color and Histogram Measures of Semitranslucent Areas

    PubMed Central

    Stoecker, William V.; Gupta, Kapil; Shrestha, Bijaya; Wronkiewiecz, Mark; Chowdhury, Raeed; Stanley, R. Joe; Xu, Jin; Moss, Randy H.; Celebi, M. Emre; Rabinovitz, Harold S.; Oliviero, Margaret; Malters, Joseph M.; Kolm, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Background Semitranslucency, defined as a smooth, jelly-like area with varied, near-skin-tone color, can indicate a diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with high specificity. This study sought to analyze potential areas of semitranslucency with histogram-derived texture and color measures to discriminate BCC from non-semitranslucent areas in non-BCC skin lesions. Methods For 210 dermoscopy images, the areas of semitranslucency in 42 BCCs and comparable areas of smoothness and color in 168 non-BCCs were selected manually. Six color measures and six texture measures were applied to the semitranslucent areas of the BCC and the comparable areas in the non-BCC images. Results Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that the texture measures alone provided greater separation of BCC from non-BCC than the color measures alone. Statistical analysis showed that the four most important measures of semitranslucency are three histogram measures: contrast, smoothness, and entropy, and one color measure: blue chromaticity. Smoothness is the single most important measure. The combined 12 measures achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 95.05% based on area under the ROC curve. Conclusion Texture and color analysis measures, especially smoothness, may afford automatic detection of basal cell carcinoma images with semitranslucency. PMID:19624424

  20. Radial polar histogram: obstacle avoidance and path planning for robotic cognition and motion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Jen; Keyawa, Nicholas R.; Euler, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate motion control and path planning for a mobile robot, an obstacle avoidance algorithm that provided a desired instantaneous turning radius and velocity was generated. This type of obstacle avoidance algorithm, which has been implemented in California State University Northridge's Intelligent Ground Vehicle (IGV), is known as Radial Polar Histogram (RPH). The RPH algorithm utilizes raw data in the form of a polar histogram that is read from a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and a camera. A desired open block is determined from the raw data utilizing a navigational heading and an elliptical approximation. The left and right most radii are determined from the calculated edges of the open block and provide the range of possible radial paths the IGV can travel through. In addition, the calculated obstacle edge positions allow the IGV to recognize complex obstacle arrangements and to slow down accordingly. A radial path optimization function calculates the best radial path between the left and right most radii and is sent to motion control for speed determination. Overall, the RPH algorithm allows the IGV to autonomously travel at average speeds of 3mph while avoiding all obstacles, with a processing time of approximately 10ms.

  1. Two non-parametric methods for derivation of constraints from radiotherapy dose-histogram data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Buettner, F.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Kennedy, A.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    Dose constraints based on histograms provide a convenient and widely-used method for informing and guiding radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods of derivation of such constraints are often poorly described. Two non-parametric methods for derivation of constraints are described and investigated in the context of determination of dose-specific cut-points—values of the free parameter (e.g., percentage volume of the irradiated organ) which best reflect resulting changes in complication incidence. A method based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and one based on a maximally-selected standardized rank sum are described and compared using rectal toxicity data from a prostate radiotherapy trial. Multiple test corrections are applied using a free step-down resampling algorithm, which accounts for the large number of tests undertaken to search for optimal cut-points and the inherent correlation between dose-histogram points. Both methods provide consistent significant cut-point values, with the rank sum method displaying some sensitivity to the underlying data. The ROC method is simple to implement and can utilize a complication atlas, though an advantage of the rank sum method is the ability to incorporate all complication grades without the need for grade dichotomization.

  2. Contrast enhancement based on layered difference representation of 2D histograms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chulwoo; Lee, Chul; Kim, Chang-Su

    2013-12-01

    A novel contrast enhancement algorithm based on the layered difference representation of 2D histograms is proposed in this paper. We attempt to enhance image contrast by amplifying the gray-level differences between adjacent pixels. To this end, we obtain the 2D histogram h(k, k + l ) from an input image, which counts the pairs of adjacent pixels with gray-levels k and k + l , and represent the gray-level differences in a tree-like layered structure. Then, we formulate a constrained optimization problem based on the observation that the gray-level differences, occurring more frequently in the input image, should be more emphasized in the output image. We first solve the optimization problem to derive the transformation function at each layer. We then combine the transformation functions at all layers into the unified transformation function, which is used to map input gray-levels to output gray-levels. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm enhances images efficiently in terms of both objective quality and subjective quality.

  3. Clinical evaluation of a new enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B virus core-related antigen; a marker distinct from viral DNA for monitoring lamivudine treatment.

    PubMed

    Rokuhara, A; Tanaka, E; Matsumoto, A; Kimura, T; Yamaura, T; Orii, K; Sun, X; Yagi, S; Maki, N; Kiyosawa, K

    2003-07-01

    We aimed to assess the clinical performance of a newly developed chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) in patients with chronic HBV infection. A total of 82 patients with chronic HBV infection and 167 HBV-negative controls were studied. HBcrAg was measured by CLEIA with monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV DNA was measured by transcription-mediated amplification assay (TMA) and in-house real-time detection polymerase chain reaction (RTD-PCR). The HBcrAg assay detected viremia in 189 of 216 samples (88%) collected from 72 patients whilst the TMA assay detected viremia in 178 of the 216 samples (82%) (P = 0.019). The HBcrAg concentration correlated linearly with the HBV DNA concentration (P < 0.001) over a range which varied 100 000-fold. The accuracy in the measurement of the patients' HBV load obtained using the HBcrAg assay was not affected by the absence of hepatitis B e antigen from the serum or the presence of precore mutations in the HBV genome. In patients without anti-viral drugs, changes in their serum HBcrAg concentration over time corresponded to their HBV DNA concentration. In six additional patients who were later treated with lamivudine, HBV DNA concentration declined more rapidly than their HBcrAg concentration. Three months after treatment commenced, the ratio of HBcrAg: HBV DNA had increased in all six patients (P = 0.031). The HBcrAg assay is a sensitive and useful test for the assessment of a patient's HBV load. When monitoring the anti-viral effect of lamivudine, HBcrAg provides a viral marker which is independent of HBV DNA.

  4. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  5. Flow cytometric titration of retroviral expression vectors: comparison of methods for analysis of immunofluorescence histograms derived from cells expressing low antigen levels.

    PubMed

    Sladek, T L; Jacobberger, J W

    1993-01-01

    Few quantitative studies addressing immunofluorescence histogram analysis have been published. One study by Overton (Cytometry 9:619-626, 1988) has shown threshold and histogram subtraction methods to be accurate for analysis of well-separated immunofluorescence distributions of positive and negative cells. An evaluation of methods to analyze immunofluorescence histograms when positive and negative immunofluorescence distributions overlap has not, to our knowledge, been reported. In this paper, data obtained from flow cytometry of immunofluorescently stained cells infected with recombinant retroviruses that produce a range of simian virus 40 large T antigen levels were analyzed by threshold, histogram subtraction, and distribution modeling methods. This analysis showed that as the separation between the immunofluorescence distributions of positive and negative cell populations decrease the best methods for histogram analysis are modeling followed, in order, by histogram subtraction, and threshold analysis.

  6. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of neuroblastic tumors reveals clinically relevant epigenetic events and large-scale epigenomic alterations localized to telomeric regions.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick G; Das, Sudipto; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Alcock, Leah; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-05-15

    The downregulation of specific genes through DNA hypermethylation is a major hallmark of cancer, although the extent and genomic distribution of hypermethylation occurring within cancer genomes is poorly understood. We report on the first genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation alterations in different neuroblastic tumor subtypes and cell lines, revealing higher order organization and clinically relevant alterations of the epigenome. The methylation status of 33,485 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and RefSeq gene promoters was assessed in primary neuroblastic tumors and cell lines. A comparison of genes that were hypermethylated exclusively in the clinically favorable ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma tumors revealed that nine genes were associated with poor clinical outcome when overexpressed in the unfavorable neuroblastoma (NB) tumors. Moreover, an integrated DNA methylation and copy number analysis identified 80 genes that were recurrently concomitantly deleted and hypermethylated in NB, with 37 reactivated by 5-aza-deoxycytidine. Lower expression of four of these genes was correlated with poor clinical outcome, further implicating their inactivation in aggressive disease pathogenesis. Analysis of genome-wide hypermethylation patterns revealed 70 recurrent large-scale blocks of contiguously hypermethylated promoters/CpG islands, up to 590 kb in length, with a distribution bias toward telomeric regions. Genome-wide hypermethylation events in neuroblastic tumors are extensive and frequently occur in large-scale blocks with a significant bias toward telomeric regions, indicating that some methylation alterations have occurred in a coordinated manner. Our results indicate that methylation contributes toward the clinicopathological features of neuroblastic tumors, revealing numerous genes associated with poor patient survival in NB.

  7. [DNA in koilocytotic dysplasia of the cervix uteri, cytophotometric studies].

    PubMed

    Christov, K; Karageosov, I; Makaveeva, V; Kristeva, K

    1987-01-01

    In koilocytotic dysplasia of the uterine cervix the DNA content in squamous cells was quantitated by cytophotometry in histological preparations stained according to Feulgen. Three patterns of DNA distribution in the squamous cells were found. In type one (21.4%) the cells had DNA content in the diploid and paradiploid zone of the histogram. In type two (35.7%) cells with triploid and tetraploid DNA values were found, but with a conspicuous modal class of cells. In type three no modal class cells were found (42.9%). The quantitative DNA changes in squamous cells show that some of the HPV induced alterations may be regarded as precancerous.

  8. Rapid detection of Candida albicans in clinical samples by DNA amplification of common regions from C. albicans-secreted aspartic proteinase genes.

    PubMed

    Flahaut, M; Sanglard, D; Monod, M; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1998-02-01

    Laboratory diagnosis based on genomic amplification methods such as PCR may provide an alternative and more sensitive method than conventional culture for the early detection of deep-seated candidiasis, an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. A novel method of DNA extraction from clinical samples based on treatment with proteinase K and isolation of DNA on a silica membrane was developed. The targets used for DNA amplification were the Candida albicans-secreted aspartic proteinase (SAP) genes, a multiple-gene family of at least seven members in C. albicans. A single pair of primers was designed in order to detect six of these SAP genes and, subsequently, to increase the sensitivity of the test. Detection of the PCR product by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was found to be as sensitive as Southern blotting with an SAP-labeled probe. The sensitivity of the assay was 1 cell/ml from serially diluted Candida cultures and 1 to 4 cells/ml from seeded blood specimens. The sensitivity and specificity of the present assay were tested in a retrospective study performed blindly with 156 clinical samples and were 100 and 98%, respectively, compared with the results of culture. For the subset of blood culture samples (n = 124), the sensitivity and the specificity were 100%. The two false-positive PCR samples came from patients treated with azole antifungal agents, indicating that PCR was probably able to detect damaged organisms that could not be recovered by culture.

  9. Association of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine with mitochondrial DNA content and clinical and biochemical parameters in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fan; Huang, Wei; Qi, Jia-Hui; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Huang, Jing-Tao; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Yu-Qi; Liu, Ying-Juan; Liu, Song-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence has indicated that inherited variations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number affect the genetic susceptibility of many malignancies in a tumour-specific manner and that DNA methylation also plays an important role in controlling gene expression during the differentiation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous study demonstrated that HCC tissues showed a lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) content when compared to tumour-adjacent tissues, but the relationship among 5-hmC, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and mtDNA content in HCC patients is still unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlation among mtDNA content, 5-mC and 5-hmC by quantitative real-time PCR and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrated that 5-hmC correlated with tumour size [odds ratio (OR) 0.847, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.746-0.962, P = 0.011], and HCC patients with a tumour size ≥ 5.0 cm showed a lower 5-hmC content and higher levels of fasting plasma aspartate aminotransferase, the ratio of alanine aminotransferase to aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, alpha-fetoprotein than those with a tumour size <5 cm (all P<0.05). We further revealed that the mtDNA content of HCC tumour tissues was 225.97(105.42, 430.54) [median (25th Percentile, 75th Percentile)] and was negatively correlated with 5-mC content (P = 0.035), but not 5-hmC content, in genomic DNA from HCC tumour tissues. PMID:24143196

  10. The Molecular Crosstalk between the MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and the DNA Damage Response — Biological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zimmer, Yitzhak

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains an imperative treatment modality for numerous malignancies. Enduring significant technical achievements both on the levels of treatment planning and radiation delivery have led to improvements in local control of tumor growth and reduction in healthy tissue toxicity. Nevertheless, resistance mechanisms, which presumably also involve activation of DNA damage response signaling pathways that eventually may account for loco-regional relapse and consequent tumor progression, still remain a critical problem. Accumulating data suggest that signaling via growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which are aberrantly expressed in many tumors, may interfere with the cytotoxic impact of ionizing radiation via the direct activation of the DNA damage response, leading eventually to so-called tumor radioresistance. The aim of this review is to overview the current known data that support a molecular crosstalk between the hepatocyte growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the DNA damage response. Apart of extending well established concepts over MET biology beyond its function as a growth factor receptor, these observations directly relate to the role of its aberrant activity in resistance to DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, which are routinely used in cancer therapy and advocate tumor sensitization towards DNA damaging agents in combination with MET targeting. PMID:24378750

  11. Wavelength-adaptive dehazing using histogram merging-based classification for UAV images.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Inhye; Jeong, Seokhwa; Jeong, Jaeheon; Seo, Doochun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-03-19

    Since incoming light to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform can be scattered by haze and dust in the atmosphere, the acquired image loses the original color and brightness of the subject. Enhancement of hazy images is an important task in improving the visibility of various UAV images. This paper presents a spatially-adaptive dehazing algorithm that merges color histograms with consideration of the wavelength-dependent atmospheric turbidity. Based on the wavelength-adaptive hazy image acquisition model, the proposed dehazing algorithm consists of three steps: (i) image segmentation based on geometric classes; (ii) generation of the context-adaptive transmission map; and (iii) intensity transformation for enhancing a hazy UAV image. The major contribution of the research is a novel hazy UAV image degradation model by considering the wavelength of light sources. In addition, the proposed transmission map provides a theoretical basis to differentiate visually important regions from others based on the turbidity and merged classification results.

  12. Wavelength-Adaptive Dehazing Using Histogram Merging-Based Classification for UAV Images

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Inhye; Jeong, Seokhwa; Jeong, Jaeheon; Seo, Doochun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    Since incoming light to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform can be scattered by haze and dust in the atmosphere, the acquired image loses the original color and brightness of the subject. Enhancement of hazy images is an important task in improving the visibility of various UAV images. This paper presents a spatially-adaptive dehazing algorithm that merges color histograms with consideration of the wavelength-dependent atmospheric turbidity. Based on the wavelength-adaptive hazy image acquisition model, the proposed dehazing algorithm consists of three steps: (i) image segmentation based on geometric classes; (ii) generation of the context-adaptive transmission map; and (iii) intensity transformation for enhancing a hazy UAV image. The major contribution of the research is a novel hazy UAV image degradation model by considering the wavelength of light sources. In addition, the proposed transmission map provides a theoretical basis to differentiate visually important regions from others based on the turbidity and merged classification results. PMID:25808767

  13. Wavelength-adaptive dehazing using histogram merging-based classification for UAV images.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Inhye; Jeong, Seokhwa; Jeong, Jaeheon; Seo, Doochun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    Since incoming light to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform can be scattered by haze and dust in the atmosphere, the acquired image loses the original color and brightness of the subject. Enhancement of hazy images is an important task in improving the visibility of various UAV images. This paper presents a spatially-adaptive dehazing algorithm that merges color histograms with consideration of the wavelength-dependent atmospheric turbidity. Based on the wavelength-adaptive hazy image acquisition model, the proposed dehazing algorithm consists of three steps: (i) image segmentation based on geometric classes; (ii) generation of the context-adaptive transmission map; and (iii) intensity transformation for enhancing a hazy UAV image. The major contribution of the research is a novel hazy UAV image degradation model by considering the wavelength of light sources. In addition, the proposed transmission map provides a theoretical basis to differentiate visually important regions from others based on the turbidity and merged classification results. PMID:25808767

  14. The characterization of radioaerosol deposition in the healthy lung by histogram distribution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, C.S.; Gerrity, T.R.; Schreiner, J.F.; Yeates, D.B.

    1981-12-01

    Thirteen healthy nonsmoking volunteers inhaled an 8.1 micrometers (MMAD) radioaerosol on two occasions. Aerosol deposition pattern within the right lung, as recorded by a gamma camera, was expressed as the 3rd and 4th moments of the distribution histogram (skew and kurtosis) of radioactivity during the first ten minutes after aerosol inhalation. Deposition pattern was also expressed as the percentage of deposited activity retained within the lung at 24 hr (24 hr % retention) and found to be significantly correlated with measures of skew (P less than 0.001). Tests of pulmonary function (FEV1, FVC, and MMFR) were significantly correlated with skew. Correlations were also demonstrated for these pulmonary function tests with 24 hr % retention but at lower levels of significance. Results indicate that changes in measures of forced expiratory airflow in healthy human volunteers influence deposition pattern and that the skew of the distribution of inhaled radioactivity may provide an acceptable index of deposition pattern.

  15. Communication: Iteration-free, weighted histogram analysis method in terms of intensive variables

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Thomas; Straub, John E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an iteration-free weighted histogram method in terms of intensive variables that directly determines the inverse statistical temperature, βS = ∂S/∂E, with S the microcanonical entropy. The method eliminates iterative evaluations of the partition functions intrinsic to the conventional approach and leads to a dramatic acceleration of the posterior analysis of combining statistically independent simulations with no loss in accuracy. The synergistic combination of the method with generalized ensemble weights provides insights into the nature of the underlying phase transitions via signatures in βS characteristic of finite size systems. The versatility and accuracy of the method is illustrated for the Ising and Potts models. PMID:21842919

  16. Accelerating the weighted histogram analysis method by direct inversion in the iterative subspace

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Lai, Chun-Liang; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) for free energy calculations is a valuable tool to produce free energy differences with the minimal errors. Given multiple simulations, WHAM obtains from the distribution overlaps the optimal statistical estimator of the density of states, from which the free energy differences can be computed. The WHAM equations are often solved by an iterative procedure. In this work, we use a well-known linear algebra algorithm which allows for more rapid convergence to the solution. We find that the computational complexity of the iterative solution to WHAM and the closely-related multiple Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method can be improved by using the method of direct inversion in the iterative subspace. We give examples from a lattice model, a simple liquid and an aqueous protein solution. PMID:27453632

  17. Scale and Orientation-Based Background Weighted Histogram for Human Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaroussi, Khadija; Saaidi, Abderrahim; Masrar, Mohamed; Satori, Khalid

    2016-09-01

    The Mean Shift procedure is a popular object tracking algorithm since it is fast, easy to implement and performs well in a range of conditions. However, classic Mean Shift tracking algorithm fixes the size and orientation of the tracking window, which limits the performance when the target's orientation and scale change. In this paper, we present a new human tracking algorithm based on Mean Shift technique in order to estimate the position, scale and orientation changes of the target. This work combines moment features of the weight image with background information to design a robust tracking algorithm entitled Scale and Orientation-based Background Weighted Histogram (SOBWH). The experimental results show that the proposed approach SOBWH presents a good compromise between tracking precision and calculation time, also they validate its robustness, especially to large background variation, scale and orientation changes and similar background scenes.

  18. Use of morphology index histograms to quantify populations of the fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, G; Padrón, R; Alamo, L; San-Blas, F

    1997-01-01

    To quantify the dimorphic process in wild and mutant strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, we defined a morphology index (Mi) in terms of the maximum cell length (l), maximum cell diameter (d), and septal diameter (s), according to the equation Mi = 2.13 + 1.13 log10 (ls/d2), whose intercept and slope were such that Mi was around 1 for yeast (spherical) cells or 4 for hyphal (elongated) cells. This discriminatory power was used to quantify morphological population mixtures through Mi histograms. During the temperature-induced dimorphic transition (either way), mean Mi (Mi) varied linearly with time, suggesting a continuity in the process. Also, in wild strains and mutants thereof we found an inverse relationship between Mi and content of both cell wall chitin and 1,3-alpha-glucan.

  19. Direct evaluation of multicomponent phase equilibria using flat-histogram methods.

    PubMed

    Errington, Jeffrey R; Shen, Vincent K

    2005-10-22

    We present a method for directly locating density-driven phase transitions in multicomponent systems. Phase coexistence conditions are determined through manipulation of a total density probability distribution evaluated over a density range that includes both coexisting phases. Saturation quantities are determined through appropriate averaging of density-dependent mean values of a given property of interest. We discuss how to implement the method in both the grand-canonical and isothermal-isobaric semigrand ensembles. Calculations can be conducted using any of the recently introduced flat-histogram techniques. Here, we combine the general algorithm with a transition-matrix approach to produce an efficient self-adaptive technique for determining multicomponent phase equilibrium properties. To assess the performance of the new method, we generate phase diagrams for a number of binary and ternary Lennard-Jones mixtures.

  20. A fracture enhancement method based on the histogram equalization of eigenstructure-based coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xi-Ying; Han, Li-Guo; Wang, En-Li; Dong, Xue-Hua; Yang, Qing; Yan, Gao-Han

    2014-06-01

    Eigenstructure-based coherence attributes are efficient and mature techniques for large-scale fracture detection. However, in horizontally bedded and continuous strata, buried fractures in high grayscale value zones are difficult to detect. Furthermore, middle- and small-scale fractures in fractured zones where migration image energies are usually not concentrated perfectly are also hard to detect because of the fuzzy, clouded shadows owing to low grayscale values. A new fracture enhancement method combined with histogram equalization is proposed to solve these problems. With this method, the contrast between discontinuities and background in coherence images is increased, linear structures are highlighted by stepwise adjustment of the threshold of the coherence image, and fractures are detected at different scales. Application of the method shows that it can also improve fracture cognition and accuracy.

  1. Testing for oncogenic molecular aberrations in cell-free DNA-based liquid biopsies in the clinic: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Polivka, Jiri; Pesta, Martin; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The optimal choice of cancer therapy depends upon analysis of the tumor genome for druggable molecular alterations. The spatial and temporal intratumor heterogeneity of cancers creates substantial challenges, as molecular profile depends on time and site of tumor tissue collection. To capture the entire molecular profile, multiple biopsies from primary and metastatic sites at different time points would be required, which is not feasible for ethical or economic reasons. Molecular analysis of circulating cell-free DNA offers a novel, minimally invasive method that can be performed at multiple time-points and plausibly better represents the prevailing molecular profile of the cancer. Molecular analysis of this cell-free DNA offers multiple clinically useful applications, such as identification of molecular targets for cancer therapy, monitoring of tumor molecular profile in real time, detection of emerging molecular aberrations associated with resistance to particular therapy, determination of cancer prognosis and diagnosis of cancer recurrence or progression.

  2. Performance analysis of a dual-tree algorithm for computing spatial distance histograms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaoping; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Xia, Yuni

    2011-01-01

    Many scientific and engineering fields produce large volume of spatiotemporal data. The storage, retrieval, and analysis of such data impose great challenges to database systems design. Analysis of scientific spatiotemporal data often involves computing functions of all point-to-point interactions. One such analytics, the Spatial Distance Histogram (SDH), is of vital importance to scientific discovery. Recently, algorithms for efficient SDH processing in large-scale scientific databases have been proposed. These algorithms adopt a recursive tree-traversing strategy to process point-to-point distances in the visited tree nodes in batches, thus require less time when compared to the brute-force approach where all pairwise distances have to be computed. Despite the promising experimental results, the complexity of such algorithms has not been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we present an analysis of such algorithms based on a geometric modeling approach. The main technique is to transform the analysis of point counts into a problem of quantifying the area of regions where pairwise distances can be processed in batches by the algorithm. From the analysis, we conclude that the number of pairwise distances that are left to be processed decreases exponentially with more levels of the tree visited. This leads to the proof of a time complexity lower than the quadratic time needed for a brute-force algorithm and builds the foundation for a constant-time approximate algorithm. Our model is also general in that it works for a wide range of point spatial distributions, histogram types, and space-partitioning options in building the tree. PMID:21804753

  3. Performance analysis of a dual-tree algorithm for computing spatial distance histograms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoping; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Xia, Yuni

    2011-08-01

    Many scientific and engineering fields produce large volume of spatiotemporal data. The storage, retrieval, and analysis of such data impose great challenges to database systems design. Analysis of scientific spatiotemporal data often involves computing functions of all point-to-point interactions. One such analytics, the Spatial Distance Histogram (SDH), is of vital importance to scientific discovery. Recently, algorithms for efficient SDH processing in large-scale scientific databases have been proposed. These algorithms adopt a recursive tree-traversing strategy to process point-to-point distances in the visited tree nodes in batches, thus require less time when compared to the brute-force approach where all pairwise distances have to be computed. Despite the promising experimental results, the complexity of such algorithms has not been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we present an analysis of such algorithms based on a geometric modeling approach. The main technique is to transform the analysis of point counts into a problem of quantifying the area of regions where pairwise distances can be processed in batches by the algorithm. From the analysis, we conclude that the number of pairwise distances that are left to be processed decreases exponentially with more levels of the tree visited. This leads to the proof of a time complexity lower than the quadratic time needed for a brute-force algorithm and builds the foundation for a constant-time approximate algorithm. Our model is also general in that it works for a wide range of point spatial distributions, histogram types, and space-partitioning options in building the tree.

  4. Seismic remote sensing image segmentation based on spectral histogram and dynamic region merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Genyun; Wang, Zhenjie

    2015-12-01

    Image segmentation is the foundation of seismic information extraction from high-resolution remote sensing images. While the complexity of the seismic image brings great challenges to its segmentation. Compared with the traditional pixel-level approaches, the region-level approaches are found prevailing in dealing with the complexity. This paper addresses the seismic image segmentation problem in a region-merging style. Starting from many over-segmented regions, the image segmentation is performed by iteratively merging the neighboring regions. In the proposed algorithm, the merging criterion and merging order are two essential issues to be emphatically considered. An effective merging criterion is largely depends on the region feature and neighbor homogeneity measure. The region's spectral histogram represents the global feature of each region and enhances the discriminability of neighboring regions. Therefore, we utilize it to solve the merging criterion. Under a certain the merging criterion, a better performance could be obtained if the most similar regions are always ensured to be merged first, which can be transformed into a least-cost problem. Rather than predefine an order queue, we solve the order problem with a dynamic scheme. The proposed approach mainly contains three parts. Firstly, starting from the over-segmented regions, the spectral histograms are constructed to represent each region. Then, we use the homogeneity that combines the distance and shape measure to conduct the merge criterion. Finally, neighbor regions are dynamically merged following the dynamic program (DP) theory and breadth-first strategy. Experiments are conducted using the earthquake images, including collapsed buildings and seismic secondary geological disaster. The experimental results show that, the proposed method segments the seismic image more correctly.

  5. Size distribution of linear and helical polymers in actin solution analyzed by photon counting histogram.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naofumi; Shimozawa, Togo; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2007-03-15

    Actin is a ubiquitous protein that is a major component of the cytoskeleton, playing an important role in muscle contraction and cell motility. At steady state, actin monomers and filaments (F-actin) coexist, and actin subunits continuously attach and detach at the filament ends. However, the size distribution of actin oligomers in F-actin solution has never been clarified. In this study, we investigated the size distribution of actin oligomers using photon-counting histograms. For this purpose, actin was labeled with a fluorescent dye, and the emitted photons were detected by confocal optics (the detection volume was of femtoliter (fL) order). Photon-counting histograms were analyzed to obtain the number distribution of actin oligomers in the detection area from their brightness, assuming that the brightness of an oligomer was proportional to the number of protomers. We found that the major populations at physiological ionic strength were 1-5mers. For data analysis, we successfully applied the theory of linear and helical aggregations of macromolecules. The model postulates three states of actin, i.e., monomers, linear polymers, and helical polymers. Here we obtained three parameters: the equilibrium constants for polymerization of linear polymers, K(l)=(5.2 +/- 1.1) x 10(6) M(-1), and helical polymers, K(h)=(1.6 +/- 0.5) x 10(7) M(-1); and the ratio of helical to linear trimers, gamma = (3.6 +/- 2.3) x 10(-2). The excess free energy of transforming a linear trimer to a helical trimer, which is assumed to be a nucleus for helical polymers, was calculated to be 2.0 kcal/mol. These analyses demonstrate that the oligomeric phase at steady state is predominantly composed of linear 1-5mers, and the transition from linear to helical polymers occurs on the level of 5-7mers. PMID:17172301

  6. Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units—Radial distribution function histogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Benjamin G.; Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-05-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 s per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  7. PCR assay based on DNA coding for 16S rRNA for detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Kox, L F; van Leeuwen, J; Knijper, S; Jansen, H M; Kolk, A H

    1995-01-01

    A PCR and a reverse cross blot hybridization assay were developed for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples. The PCR amplifies a part of the DNA coding for 16S rRNA with a set of primers that is specific for the genus Mycobacterium and that flanks species-specific sequences within the genes coding for 16S rRNA. The PCR product is analyzed in a reverse cross blot hybridization assay with probes specific for M. tuberculosis complex (pTub1), M. avium (pAvi3), M. intracellulare (pInt5 and pInt7), M. kansasii complex-M. scrofulaceum complex (pKan1), M. xenopi (pXen1), M. fortuitum (pFor1), M. smegmatis (pSme1), and Mycobacterium spp. (pMyc5a). The PCR assay can detect 10 fg of DNA, the equivalent of two mycobacteria. The specificities of the probes were tested with 108 mycobacterial strains (33 species) and 31 nonmycobacterial strains (of 17 genera). The probes pAvi3, pInt5, pInt7, pKan1, pXen1, and pMyc5a were specific. With probes pTub1, pFor1, and pSme1, slight cross hybridization occurred. However, the mycobacterial strains from which the cross-hybridizing PCR products were derived belonged to nonpathogenic or nonopportunistic species which do not occur in clinical samples. The test was used on 31 different clinical specimens obtained from patients suspected of having mycobacterial disease, including a patient with a double mycobacterial infection. The samples included sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, tissue biopsy samples, cerebrospinal fluid, pus, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, and blood. The results of the PCR assay agreed with those of conventional identification methods or with clinical data, showing that the test can be used for the direct and rapid detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical samples. PMID:8586707

  8. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Martin A.; Foo, Kerwyn; Haworth, Annette; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Kennedy, Angel; Joseph, David J.; Denham, James W.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  9. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Su, Zi-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Duan, Fei-Xue; Song, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-Wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-Tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K( trans) &Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  10. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  11. Students' Misconceptions in Interpreting Center and Variability of Data Represented via Histograms and Stem-and-Leaf Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Linda L.; Shore, Felice S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies and discusses misconceptions that students have in making judgments of center and variability when data are presented graphically. An assessment addressing interpreting center and variability in histograms and stem-and-leaf plots was administered to, and follow-up interviews were conducted with, undergraduates enrolled in…

  12. Studying the time histogram of a terrestrial electron beam detected from the opposite hemisphere of its associated TGF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarria, D.; Blelly, P.-L.; Briggs, M. S.; Forme, F.

    2016-05-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes are bursts of X/gamma photons, correlated to thunderstorms. By interacting with the atmosphere, the photons produce a substantial number of electrons and positrons. Some of these reach a sufficiently high altitude that their interactions with the atmosphere become negligible, and they are then guided by geomagnetic field lines, forming a Terrestrial Electron Beam. On 9 December 2009, the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument on board the Fermi Space Telescope made a particularly interesting measurement of such an event. To study this type of event in detail, we perform Monte-Carlo simulations and focus on the resulting time histograms. In agreement with previous work, we show that the histogram measured by Fermi GBM is reproducible from a simulation. We then show that the time histogram resulting from this simulation is only weakly dependent on the production altitude, duration, beaming angle, and spectral shape of the associated terrestrial gamma-ray flash. Finally, we show that the time histogram can be decomposed into three populations of leptons, coming from the opposite hemisphere, and mirroring back to the satellite with or without interacting with the atmosphere, and that these populations can be clearly distinguished by their pitch angles.

  13. European Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Metabolic Changes during Antiretroviral Therapy in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5142

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon A.; Tebas, Pablo; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; McComsey, Grace A.; Haas, David W.; Canter, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) influences metabolic diseases and perhaps antiretroviral therapy (ART) complications. We explored associations between European mtDNA haplogroups and metabolic changes among A5142 participants. Methods 757 ART-naïve subjects were randomized to one of three class-sparing ART regimens including efavirenz and/or lopinavir/ritonavir with or without nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Non-randomized NRTIs included stavudine, tenofovir, or zidovudine, each with lamivudine. Fasting lipid profiles and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) were performed. Nine European mtDNA haplogroups were determined for 231 self-identified non-Hispanic white subjects. Metabolic changes from baseline to 96 weeks were analyzed by haplogroup. Results Median age was 39 years, 9% were female, and 37%, 32%, and 30% were randomized to NRTI-containing regimens with either efavirenz or lopinavir/ritonavir, and an NRTI-sparing regimen respectively. Among NRTI-containing regimens, 51% included zidovudine, 28% tenofovir, and 21% stavudine. Compared with other haplogroups, mtDNA haplogroup I (N=10) had higher baseline non-HDL cholesterol (160 mg/dL [interquartile range 137–171] vs. 120 mg/dL [104–136]; p=0.005), a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol over 96 weeks (−14% [−20-+6] vs. +25% [+8-+51]; p<0.001), tended to have more baseline extremity fat, and had more extremity fat loss by DEXA (−13% [−31-+12] vs. +9% [−13-+26]; p=0.08) and lipoatrophy (50% vs. 20%; p=0.04). Haplogroup W (N=5; all randomized to NRTI-sparing regimens) had the greatest increase in extremity fat (+35.5% [+26.8 - +54.9]; P=0.02). Conclusions Lipids and extremity fat were associated with European mtDNA haplogroups in this HIV-infected population. These preliminary results suggest that mitochondrial genomics may influence metabolic parameters before and during ART. PMID:20871389

  14. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based method to detect a series of mutations in the C. albicans ERG11 gene using "reference" azole-resistant isolates with known mutations. The method was then used to estimate the frequency of ERG11 mutations and their type in 25 Australian clinical C. albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and in 23 fluconazole-susceptible isolates. RCA results were compared DNA sequencing. Results The RCA assay correctly identified all ERG11 mutations in eight "reference" C. albicans isolates. When applied to 48 test strains, the RCA method showed 100% agreement with DNA sequencing where an ERG11 mutation-specific probe was used. Of 20 different missense mutations detected by sequencing in 24 of 25 (96%) isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility, 16 were detected by RCA. Five missense mutations were detected by both methods in 18 of 23 (78%) fluconazole-susceptible strains. DNA sequencing revealed that mutations in non-susceptible isolates were all due to homozygous nucleotide changes. With the exception of the mutations leading to amino acid substitution E266D, those in fluconazole-susceptible strains were heterozygous. Amino acid substitutions common to both sets of isolates were D116E, E266D, K128T, V437I and V488I. Substitutions unique to isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility were G464 S (n = 4 isolates), G448E (n = 3), G307S (n = 3), K143R (n = 3) and Y123H, S405F and R467K (each n = 1). DNA sequencing revealed a novel substitution, G450V, in one isolate. Conclusion The sensitive RCA assay described here

  15. Fluorogenic Real-Time Reporters of DNA Repair by MGMT, a Clinical Predictor of Antitumor Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Beharry, Andrew A.; Nagel, Zachary D.; Samson, Leona D.; Kool, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Common alkylating antitumor drugs, such as temozolomide, trigger their cytotoxicity by methylating the O6-position of guanosine in DNA. However, the therapeutic effect of these drugs is dampened by elevated levels of the DNA repair enzyme, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which directly reverses this alkylation. As a result, assessing MGMT levels in patient samples provides an important predictor of therapeutic response; however, current methods available to measure this protein are indirect, complex and slow. Here we describe the design and synthesis of fluorescent chemosensors that report directly on MGMT activity in a single step within minutes. The chemosensors incorporate a fluorophore and quencher pair, which become separated by the MGMT dealkylation reaction, yielding light-up responses of up to 55-fold, directly reflecting repair activity. Experiments show that the best-performing probe retains near-native activity at mid-nanomolar concentrations. A nuclease-protected probe, NR-1, was prepared and tested in tumor cell lysates, demonstrating an ability to evaluate relative levels of MGMT repair activity in twenty minutes. In addition, a probe was employed to evaluate inhibitors of MGMT, suggesting utility for discovering new inhibitors in a high-throughput manner. Probe designs such as that of NR-1 may prove valuable to clinicians in selection of patients for alkylating drug therapies and in assessing resistance that arises during treatment. PMID:27035132

  16. PCR detection of ovine herpesvirus-2 DNA in Indonesian ruminants--normal sheep and clinical cases of malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Wiyono, A; Baxter, S I; Saepulloh, M; Damayanti, R; Daniels, P; Reid, H W

    1994-09-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), a fatal viral disease of cattle and other large ruminants, has a worldwide distribution. There are two forms of the disease, one of which, is caused by Alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AHV-1) and is derived from wildebeest. The other form is associated with domestic sheep and is caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OHV-2). The disease in Indonesia is sheep-associated with the preferred livestock of this area, Balinese cattle (Bos javanicus) and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), both highly susceptible to SA-MCF. The incidence in these species is thought to be high but the prevalence and economic losses attributable to SA-MCF have been difficult to assess. a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, based on a cloned OHV-2 gene sequence, was successfully applied to the detection of OHV-2 DNA in normal sheep and animals affected with SA-MCF. OHV-2 DNA was detected in eleven confirmed cases of SA-MCF and in the peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) fraction of six latently infected sheep. These findings have confirmed that the PCR can be of value in establishing a diagnosis of MCF and that the aetiological agent of MCF in Indonesia is OHV-2. The amplification of DNA from the PBL of goats suggests that they are infected with a similar or identical herpesvirus.

  17. RNA and DNA bacteriophages as molecular diagnosis controls in clinical virology: a comprehensive study of more than 45,000 routine PCR tests.

    PubMed

    Ninove, Laetitia; Nougairede, Antoine; Gazin, Celine; Thirion, Laurence; Delogu, Ilenia; Zandotti, Christine; Charrel, Remi N; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2011-02-09

    Real-time PCR techniques are now commonly used for the detection of viral genomes in various human specimens and require for validation both external and internal controls (ECs and ICs). In particular, ICs added to clinical samples are necessary to monitor the extraction, reverse transcription, and amplification steps in order to detect false-negative results resulting from PCR-inhibition or errors in the technical procedure. Here, we performed a large scale evaluation of the use of bacteriophages as ICs in routine molecular diagnosis. This allowed to propose simple standardized procedures (i) to design specific ECs for both DNA and RNA viruses and (ii) to use T4 (DNA) or MS2 (RNA) phages as ICs in routine diagnosis. Various technical formats for using phages as ICs were optimised and validated. Subsequently, T4 and MS2 ICs were evaluated in routine real-time PCR or RT-PCR virological diagnostic tests, using a series of 8,950 clinical samples (representing 36 distinct specimen types) sent to our laboratory for the detection of a variety of DNA and RNA viruses. The frequency of inefficient detection of ICs was analyzed according to the nature of the sample. Inhibitors of enzymatic reactions were detected at high frequency in specific sample types such as heparinized blood and bone marrow (>70%), broncho-alveolar liquid (41%) and stools (36%). The use of T4 and MS2 phages as ICs proved to be cost-effective, flexible and adaptable to various technical procedures of real-time PCR detection in virology. It represents a valuable strategy for enhancing the quality of routine molecular diagnosis in laboratories that use in-house designed diagnostic systems, which can conveniently be associated to the use of specific synthetic ECs. The high rate of inhibitors observed in a variety of specimen types should stimulate the elaboration of improved technical protocols for the extraction and amplification of nucleic acids.

  18. Quantification of feline herpesvirus 1 DNA in ocular fluid samples of clinically diseased cats by real-time TaqMan PCR.

    PubMed

    Vögtlin, A; Fraefel, C; Albini, S; Leutenegger, C M; Schraner, E; Spiess, B; Lutz, H; Ackermann, M

    2002-02-01

    A fluorogenic PCR was established for the quantification of feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) DNA in ocular fluid samples of clinically diseased cats. The new assay was specific for FeHV-1 and sensitive. The 100% detection rate ranged from 0.6 to 6 50% tissue culture infective doses per sample. When spiked samples with known quantities of virus were used, infectious virus titers and quantification of viral DNA by PCR correlated to each other in a linear fashion (R(2) = 0.9858) over a range of 4 orders of magnitude. Within this range, it was possible to calculate the FeHV-1 DNA content from a given infectious dose, and vice versa. The new diagnostic procedure was applied to ocular fluid samples from cats experimentally infected with FeHV-1 and specific FeHV-1-free cats. A good correlation between virus titer and quantitative PCR was observed, although only early in infection. In a second stage, the titer of infectious virus collapsed, while the PCR signal remained high. A constantly decreasing PCR signal accompanied by negative virus isolation was characteristic for a final stage of the infection. Finally, clinical samples from 20 cats that were suspected to suffer from FeHV-1 infection were analyzed. By comparing virus titers and quantitative PCR signals, it was possible to determine the current stage of the ongoing infection. Based on these findings, comparison of the results of consecutive samples allows the tracking of the course of the infection. Therefore, the new method combines the advantages of the two previously established conventional methods, qualitative PCR and virus isolation and titration.

  19. Automated geomorphometric classification of landforms in Transdanubian Region (Pannonian Basin) based on local slope histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, Balázs; Koma, Zsófia; Csorba, Kristóf; Ferenc Morovics, József

    2014-05-01

    The Transdanubian Region is a typically hilly, geologically manifold area of the Pannonian Basin. It is composed primarily of Permo-Mesozoic carbonates and siliciclastic sediments, however Pannonian sedimentary units and young volcanic forms are also characteristic, such as those in the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field. The geological diversity is reflected in the geomorphological setting: beside of the classic eroding volcanic edifices, carbonate plateaus, medium-relief, gently hilly, slowly eroding landforms are also frequent in the geomorphic mosaic of the area. Geomorphometric techniques are suitable to analyse and separate the various geomorphic units mosaicked and, in some cases, affected by (sub-)recent tectonic geomorphic processes. In our project we applied automated classification of local slope angle histograms derived of a 10-meter nominal resolution digital terrain model (DTM). Slope angle histrograms within a rectangular moving window of various sizes have been calculated in numerous experiments. The histograms then served as a multichannel input of for a k-means classification to achieve a geologically-geomorphologically sound categorization of the area. The experiments show good results in separating the very basic landforms, defined landscape boundaries can be reconstructed with high accuracy in case of larger window sizes (e.g. 5 km) and low number of categories. If the window size is smaller and the number of classes is higher, the tectonic geomorphic features are more prominently recognized, however often at the price of the clear separation boundaries: in these cases the horizontal change in the composition of various clusters matches the boundaries of the geological units. Volcanic forms are typically also put into some definite classes, however the flat plateaus of some volcanic edifices fall into another category also recognized in the experiments. In summary we can conclude that the area is suitable for such analyses, many

  20. Normal-reciprocal error models for quantitative ERT in permafrost environments: bin analysis versus histogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleysdonk, Sarah; Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Krautblatter, Michael; Kemna, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been used for the monitoring of permafrost-affected rock walls for some years now. To further enhance the interpretation of ERT measurements a deeper insight into error sources and the influence of error model parameters on the imaging results is necessary. Here, we present the effect of different statistical schemes for the determination of error parameters from the discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements - bin analysis and histogram analysis - using a smoothness-constrained inversion code (CRTomo) with an incorporated appropriate error model. The study site is located in galleries adjacent to the Zugspitze North Face (2800 m a.s.l.) at the border between Austria and Germany. A 20 m * 40 m rock permafrost body and its surroundings have been monitored along permanently installed transects - with electrode spacings of 1.5 m and 4.6 m - from 2007 to 2009. For data acquisition, a conventional Wenner survey was conducted as this array has proven to be the most robust array in frozen rock walls. Normal and reciprocal data were collected directly one after another to ensure identical conditions. The ERT inversion results depend strongly on the chosen parameters of the employed error model, i.e., the absolute resistance error and the relative resistance error. These parameters were derived (1) for large normal/reciprocal data sets by means of bin analyses and (2) for small normal/reciprocal data sets by means of histogram analyses. Error parameters were calculated independently for each data set of a monthly monitoring sequence to avoid the creation of artefacts (over-fitting of the data) or unnecessary loss of contrast (under-fitting of the data) in the images. The inversion results are assessed with respect to (1) raw data quality as described by the error model parameters, (2) validation via available (rock) temperature data and (3) the interpretation of the images from a geophysical as well as a

  1. Inhibition of DNA-repair genes Ercc1 and Mgmt enhances temozolomide efficacy in gliomas treatment: a pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Sandra G; Marand, Sandie V; Geraci, Sandra; Pycroft, Laurie; Berger, François R; Pelletier, Laurent A

    2015-10-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. To date, therapies do not allow curing patients, and glioblastomas (GBMs) are associated with remarkably poor prognosis. This situation is at least partly due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment, especially to chemotherapy. In 2005, temozolomide (TMZ) has become the first chemotherapeutic drug validated for GBM. Nevertheless TMZ efficacy depends on Mgmt status. While the methylation of Mgmt promoter was considered so far as a prognostic marker, its targeting is becoming an effective therapeutic opportunity. Thus, arrival of both TMZ and Mgmt illustrated that considerable progress can still be realized by optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy. A part of this progress could be accomplished in the future by overcoming residual resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of a set of other DNA-repair genes in glioma resistance to temozolomide. We focused on DNA-repair genes located in the commonly deleted chromosomal region in oligodendroglioma (1p/19q) highly correlated with patient response to chemotherapy. We measured effects of inhibition of ten DNA-repair genes expression using siRNAs on astrocytoma cell response to cisplatin (CDDP) and TMZ. SiRNAs targeting ercc1, ercc2, mutyh, and pnkp significantly sensitized cells to chemotherapy, increasing cell death by up to 25%. In vivo we observed a decrease of subcutaneous glioma tumor growth after injection of siRNA in conjunction with absorption of TMZ. We demonstrated in this pre-clinical study that targeting of DNA-repair genes such as Ercc1 could be used as an adjuvant chemosensitization treatment, similarly to Mgmt inhibition. PMID:26336131

  2. Inhibition of DNA-repair genes Ercc1 and Mgmt enhances temozolomide efficacy in gliomas treatment: a pre-clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Boccard, Sandra G.; Marand, Sandie V.; Geraci, Sandra; Pycroft, Laurie; Berger, François R.; Pelletier, Laurent A.

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. To date, therapies do not allow curing patients, and glioblastomas (GBMs) are associated with remarkably poor prognosis. This situation is at least partly due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment, especially to chemotherapy. In 2005, temozolomide (TMZ) has become the first chemotherapeutic drug validated for GBM. Nevertheless TMZ efficacy depends on Mgmt status. While the methylation of Mgmt promoter was considered so far as a prognostic marker, its targeting is becoming an effective therapeutic opportunity. Thus, arrival of both TMZ and Mgmt illustrated that considerable progress can still be realized by optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy. A part of this progress could be accomplished in the future by overcoming residual resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of a set of other DNA-repair genes in glioma resistance to temozolomide. We focused on DNA-repair genes located in the commonly deleted chromosomal region in oligodendroglioma (1p/19q) highly correlated with patient response to chemotherapy. We measured effects of inhibition of ten DNA-repair genes expression using siRNAs on astrocytoma cell response to cisplatin (CDDP) and TMZ. SiRNAs targeting ercc1, ercc2, mutyh, and pnkp significantly sensitized cells to chemotherapy, increasing cell death by up to 25%. In vivo we observed a decrease of subcutaneous glioma tumor growth after injection of siRNA in conjunction with absorption of TMZ. We demonstrated in this pre-clinical study that targeting of DNA-repair genes such as Ercc1 could be used as an adjuvant chemosensitization treatment, similarly to Mgmt inhibition. PMID:26336131

  3. [Real-time PCR detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Vacková, Z; Lžičařová, D; Stock, N K; Kozáková, J

    2015-10-01

    The study aim was to implement a molecular real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for the detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical (culture negative) specimens from patients with suspected invasive bacterial disease. Clinical specimens are referred to the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Meningococcal Infections, Unit for Airborne Bacterial Infections, Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Institute of Public Health from various regions of the Czech Republic. Clinical specimens are, in particular, cerebrospinal fluid, anti-coagulated blood or serum and, exceptionally, post-mortem specimens. The NRL has implemented molecular diagnosis of these bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis and sepsis from clinical specimens since 1999. The first diagnostic method was semi-nested PCR followed by electrophoretic analysis. In 2014, a molecular qualitative real-time PCR assay was implemented.

  4. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics in 100 Chinese Pediatric Patients with m.3243A>G Mutation in Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chang-Yu; Liu, Yu; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yan-Chun; Ma, Yi-Nan; Qi, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial diseases are a group of energy metabolic disorders with multisystem involvements. Variable clinical features present a major challenge in pediatric diagnoses. We summarized the clinical spectrum of m.3243A>G mutation in Chinese pediatric patients, to define the common clinical manifestations and study the correlation between heteroplasmic degree of the mutation and clinical severity of the disease. Methods: Clinical data of one-hundred pediatric patients with symptomatic mitochondrial disease harboring m.3243A>G mutation from 2007 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Detection of m.3243A>G mutation ratio was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Correlation between m.3243A>G mutation ratio and age was evaluated. The differences in clinical symptom frequency of patients with low, middle, and high levels of mutation ratio were analyzed by Chi-square test. Results: Sixty-six patients (66%) had suffered a delayed diagnosis for an average of 2 years. The most frequent symptoms were seizures (76%), short stature (73%), elevated plasma lactate (70%), abnormal magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography (MRI/CT) changes (68%), vomiting (55%), decreased vision (52%), headache (50%), and muscle weakness (48%). The mutation ratio was correlated negatively with onset age (r = −0.470, P < 0.001). Myopathy was more frequent in patients with a high level of mutation ratio. However, patients with a low or middle level of m.3243A>G mutation ratio were more likely to suffer hearing loss, decreased vision, and gastrointestinal disturbance than patients with a high level of mutation ratio. Conclusions: Our study showed that half of Chinese pediatric patients with m.3243A>G mutation presented seizures, short stature, abnormal MRI/CT changes, elevated plasma lactate, vomiting, and headache. Pediatric patients with these recurrent symptoms should be considered for screening m.3243A>G mutation. Clinical

  5. Nonlinear histogram binning for quantitative analysis of lung tissue fibrosis in high-resolution CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-03-01

    Diffuse lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), can be characterized and quantified by analysis of volumetric high resolution CT scans of the lungs. These data sets typically have dimensions of 512 x 512 x 400. It is too subjective and labor intensive for a radiologist to analyze each slice and quantify regional abnormalities manually. Thus, computer aided techniques are necessary, particularly texture analysis techniques which classify various lung tissue types. Second and higher order statistics which relate the spatial variation of the intensity values are good discriminatory features for various textures. The intensity values in lung CT scans range between [-1024, 1024]. Calculation of second order statistics on this range is too computationally intensive so the data is typically binned between 16 or 32 gray levels. There are more effective ways of binning the gray level range to improve classification. An optimal and very efficient way to nonlinearly bin the histogram is to use a dynamic programming algorithm. The objective of this paper is to show that nonlinear binning using dynamic programming is computationally efficient and improves the discriminatory power of the second and higher order statistics for more accurate quantification of diffuse lung disease.

  6. Fast and fully automatic phalanx segmentation using a grayscale-histogram morphology algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chi-Wen; Liu, Tzu-Chiang; Jong, Tai-Lang; Chen, Chih-Yen; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chan, Din-Yuen

    2011-08-01

    Bone age assessment is a common radiological examination used in pediatrics to diagnose the discrepancy between the skeletal and chronological age of a child; therefore, it is beneficial to develop a computer-based bone age assessment to help junior pediatricians estimate bone age easily. Unfortunately, the phalanx on radiograms is not easily separated from the background and soft tissue. Therefore, we proposed a new method, called the grayscale-histogram morphology algorithm, to segment the phalanges fast and precisely. The algorithm includes three parts: a tri-stage sieve algorithm used to eliminate the background of hand radiograms, a centroid-edge dual scanning algorithm to frame the phalanx region, and finally a segmentation algorithm based on disk traverse-subtraction filter to segment the phalanx. Moreover, two more segmentation methods: adaptive two-mean and adaptive two-mean clustering were performed, and their results were compared with the segmentation algorithm based on disk traverse-subtraction filter using five indices comprising misclassification error, relative foreground area error, modified Hausdorff distances, edge mismatch, and region nonuniformity. In addition, the CPU time of the three segmentation methods was discussed. The result showed that our method had a better performance than the other two methods. Furthermore, satisfactory segmentation results were obtained with a low standard error.

  7. A generic shape/texture descriptor over multiscale edge field: 2-D walking ant histogram.

    PubMed

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Ferreira, Miguel; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2008-03-01

    A novel shape descriptor, which can be extracted from the major object edges automatically and used for the multimedia content-based retrieval in multimedia databases, is presented. By adopting a multiscale approach over the edge field where the scale represents the amount of simplification, the most relevant edge segments, referred to as subsegments, which eventually represent the major object boundaries, are extracted from a scale-map. Similar to the process of a walking ant with a limited line of sight over the boundary of a particular object, we traverse through each subsegment and describe a certain line of sight, whether it is a continuous branch or a corner, using individual 2-D histograms. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be tuned to be an efficient texture descriptor, which achieves a superior performance especially for directional textures. Finally, integrating the whole process as feature extraction module into MUVIS framework allows us to test the mutual performance of the proposed shape descriptor in the context of multimedia indexing and retrieval. PMID:18270126

  8. 3D/2D image registration using weighted histogram of gradient directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafurian, Soheil; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Tan, Virak; Li, Kang

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) to two dimensional (2D) image registration is crucial in many medical applications such as image-guided evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders. One of the key problems is to estimate the 3D CT- reconstructed bone model positions (translation and rotation) which maximize the similarity between the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and the 2D fluoroscopic images using a registration method. This problem is computational-intensive due to a large search space and the complicated DRR generation process. Also, finding a similarity measure which converges to the global optimum instead of local optima adds to the challenge. To circumvent these issues, most existing registration methods need a manual initialization, which requires user interaction and is prone to human error. In this paper, we introduce a novel feature-based registration method using the weighted histogram of gradient directions of images. This method simplifies the computation by searching the parameter space (rotation and translation) sequentially rather than simultaneously. In our numeric simulation experiments, the proposed registration algorithm was able to achieve sub-millimeter and sub-degree accuracies. Moreover, our method is robust to the initial guess. It can tolerate up to +/-90°rotation offset from the global optimal solution, which minimizes the need for human interaction to initialize the algorithm.

  9. Image enhancement circuit using nonlinear processing curve and constrained histogram range equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Sascha D.; de With, Peter H. N.

    2004-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, image fidelity is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. The obtained image fidelity is a result from amongst others dynamic range expansion and video signal enhancement. The dynamic range of the signal needs adaptation, because the sensor signal has a much larger range than the standard CRT display. The signal enhancement should accommodate for the widely varying light and scene conditions and user scenarios of the equipment. This paper proposes a new system to combine dynamic range and enhancement processing, offering a strongly improved picture quality for surveillance applications. The key to our solution is that we use Non-Linear Processing (NLP) with a so-called Constrained Histogram Range Equalization (CHRE). The NLP transforms the digitized high-dynamic luminance sensor signal such that details of the low-luminance parts are enhanced, while avoiding detail losses in the high-luminance areas. The CHRE technique enhances visibility of the global contrast for the camera signal without significant information loss in the statistically less relevant areas. Evaluations of this proposal have shown clear improvements of the perceptual image quality. An additional advantage is that the new scheme is adaptable and allows the concatenation of further enhancement techniques without sacrificing the obtained picture quality improvement.

  10. Assessing the hydrologic alteration of the Yangtze River using the histogram matching approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Zhang, N.; Guo, L. D.; Xia, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrologic changes of the Yangtze River, an important river with abundant water resources in China, were investigated using the Histogram Matching Approach. Daily streamflow data spanning the time interval from 1955 to 2013 was collected from Yichang and Datong stations, which monitor the hydrologic processes of the upper and lower reach of the Yangtze River, respectively. The Gezhouba Dam, the first dam constructed at the main stream of the Yangtze River, started operations in 1981. 1981 was used to differentiate the pre-dam (1955-1980) and post-dam (1981-2013) hydrologic regimes. The hydrologic regime was quantified by the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration. The overall alteration degree of the upper Yangtze River was 31% and the alteration degree of every hydrologic indicator ranged from 10% to 81%. Only 1, 5 and 26 hydrologic indicators were altered at high, moderate and low degrees, respectively. The overall alteration degree of the lower Yangtze River was 30%, and the alteration degree of every hydrologic indicator ranged from 8% to 49%. No high alteration degree was detected at the Datong station. Ten hydrologic indicators were altered at moderate degrees and 22 hydrologic indicators were altered at low degrees. Significant increases could be observed for the low-flow relevant indicators, including the monthly flow from January-March, the annual minimum 1, 3, 7, 30 and 90-day flows, and the base flow index.

  11. Medical image classification using spatial adjacent histogram based on adaptive local binary patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shengsheng; Huang, Dezhi; Deng, Gang; Zeng, Fantao; Chen, Huiling

    2016-05-01

    Medical image recognition is an important task in both computer vision and computational biology. In the field of medical image classification, representing an image based on local binary patterns (LBP) descriptor has become popular. However, most existing LBP-based methods encode the binary patterns in a fixed neighborhood radius and ignore the spatial relationships among local patterns. The ignoring of the spatial relationships in the LBP will cause a poor performance in the process of capturing discriminative features for complex samples, such as medical images obtained by microscope. To address this problem, in this paper we propose a novel method to improve local binary patterns by assigning an adaptive neighborhood radius for each pixel. Based on these adaptive local binary patterns, we further propose a spatial adjacent histogram strategy to encode the micro-structures for image representation. An extensive set of evaluations are performed on four medical datasets which show that the proposed method significantly improves standard LBP and compares favorably with several other prevailing approaches. PMID:27058283

  12. Computing Spatial Distance Histograms for Large Scientific Datasets On-the-Fly

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Grupcev, Vladimir; Yuan, Yongke; Huang, Jin; Shen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on an important query in scientific simulation data analysis: the Spatial Distance Histogram (SDH). The computation time of an SDH query using brute force method is quadratic. Often, such queries are executed continuously over certain time periods, increasing the computation time. We propose highly efficient approximate algorithm to compute SDH over consecutive time periods with provable error bounds. The key idea of our algorithm is to derive statistical distribution of distances from the spatial and temporal characteristics of particles. Upon organizing the data into a Quad-tree based structure, the spatiotemporal characteristics of particles in each node of the tree are acquired to determine the particles’ spatial distribution as well as their temporal locality in consecutive time periods. We report our efforts in implementing and optimizing the above algorithm in Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) as means to further improve the efficiency. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm is backed by mathematical analysis and results of extensive experiments using data generated from real simulation studies. PMID:25264418

  13. Medical image classification using spatial adjacent histogram based on adaptive local binary patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shengsheng; Huang, Dezhi; Deng, Gang; Zeng, Fantao; Chen, Huiling

    2016-05-01

    Medical image recognition is an important task in both computer vision and computational biology. In the field of medical image classification, representing an image based on local binary patterns (LBP) descriptor has become popular. However, most existing LBP-based methods encode the binary patterns in a fixed neighborhood radius and ignore the spatial relationships among local patterns. The ignoring of the spatial relationships in the LBP will cause a poor performance in the process of capturing discriminative features for complex samples, such as medical images obtained by microscope. To address this problem, in this paper we propose a novel method to improve local binary patterns by assigning an adaptive neighborhood radius for each pixel. Based on these adaptive local binary patterns, we further propose a spatial adjacent histogram strategy to encode the micro-structures for image representation. An extensive set of evaluations are performed on four medical datasets which show that the proposed method significantly improves standard LBP and compares favorably with several other prevailing approaches.

  14. People re-identification in camera networks based on probabilistic color histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Angela; Dugelay, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    People tracking has to face many issues in video surveillance scenarios. One of the most challenging aspect is to re-identify people across different cameras. Humans, indeed, change appearance according to pose, clothes and illumination conditions and thus defining features that are able to robustly describe people moving in a camera network is a not trivial task. While color is widely exploited in the distinction and recognition of objects, most of the color descriptors proposed so far are not robust in complex applications such as video surveillance scenarios. A new color based feature is introduced in this paper to describe the color appearance of the subjects. For each target a probabilistic color histogram (PCH) is built by using a fuzzy K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) classifier trained on an ad-hoc dataset and is used to match two corresponding appearances of the same person in different cameras of the network. The experimental results show that the defined descriptor is effective at discriminating and re-identifying people across two different video cameras regardless of the viewpoint change between the two views and outperforms state of the art appearance based techniques.

  15. WE-A-17A-12: The Influence of Eye Plaque Design On Dose Distributions and Dose- Volume Histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, P; Molloy, JA; Rivard, MJ

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of slot design of the model EP917 plaque on dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Methods: The dimensions and orientation of the slots in EP917 plaques were measured. In the MCNP5 radiation simulation geometry, dose distributions on orthogonal planes and DVHs for a tumor and sclera were generated for comparisons. 27 slot designs and 13 plaques were evaluated and compared with the published literature and the Plaque Simulator clinical treatment planning system. Results: The dosimetric effect of the gold backing composition and mass density was < 3%. Slot depth, width, and length changed the central axis (CAX) dose distributions by < 1% per 0.1 mm in design variation. Seed shifts in the slot towards the eye and shifts of the {sup 125} I-coated Ag rod within the capsule had the greatest impact on CAX dose distribution, increasing by 14%, 9%, 4%, and 2.5% at 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm, respectively, from the inner sclera. Along the CAX, dose from the full plaque geometry using the measured slot design was 3.4% ± 2.3% higher than the manufacturer-provided geometry. D{sub 10} for the simulated tumor, inner sclera, and outer sclera for the measured plaque was also higher, but 9%, 10%, and 20%, respectively. In comparison to the measured plaque design, a theoretical plaque having narrow and deep slots delivered 30%, 37%, and 62% lower D{sub 10} doses to the tumor, inner sclera, and outer sclera, respectively. CAX doses at −1, 0, 1, and 2 mm were also lower by a factor of 2.6, 1.4, 1.23, and 1.13, respectively. Conclusion: The study identified substantial sensitivity of the EP917 plaque dose distributions to slot design. However, it did not identify substantial dosimetric variations based on radionuclide choice ({sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, or {sup 131}Cs). COMS plaques provided lower scleral doses with similar tumor dose coverage.

  16. Gliomas: Application of Cumulative Histogram Analysis of Normalized Cerebral Blood Volume on 3 T MRI to Tumor Grading

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Yeom, Jeong A.; Shin, Hwaseon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma grading assumes significant importance in that low- and high-grade gliomas display different prognoses and are treated with dissimilar therapeutic strategies. The objective of our study was to retrospectively assess the usefulness of a cumulative normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) histogram for glioma grading based on 3 T MRI. Methods From February 2010 to April 2012, 63 patients with astrocytic tumors underwent 3 T MRI with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging. Regions of interest containing the entire tumor volume were drawn on every section of the co-registered relative CBV (rCBV) maps and T2-weighted images. The percentile values from the cumulative nCBV histograms and the other histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grades. Cochran’s Q test and the McNemar test were used to compare the diagnostic accuracies of the histogram parameters after the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Using the parameter offering the highest diagnostic accuracy, a validation process was performed with an independent test set of nine patients. Results The 99th percentile of the cumulative nCBV histogram (nCBV C99), mean and peak height differed significantly between low- and high-grade gliomas (P = <0.001, 0.014 and <0.001, respectively) and between grade III and IV gliomas (P = <0.001, 0.001 and <0.001, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of nCBV C99 was significantly higher than that of the mean nCBV (P = 0.016) in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and was comparable to that of the peak height (P = 1.000). Validation using the two cutoff values of nCBV C99 achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 66.7% (6/9) for the separation of all three glioma grades. Conclusion Cumulative histogram analysis of nCBV using 3 T MRI can be a useful method for preoperative glioma grading. The nCBV C99 value is helpful in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and grade IV from III gliomas. PMID:23704910

  17. Whole Genome DNA Methylation Analysis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: IL1R2, NPR2, AR, SP140 Methylation and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Che; Chen, Ting-Wen; Su, Mao-Chang; Chen, Chung-Jen; Chen, Kuang-Den; Liou, Chia-Wei; Tang, Petrus; Wang, Ting-Ya; Chang, Jen-Chieh; Wang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Chin, Chien-Hung; Huang, Kuo-Tung; Lin, Meng-Chih; Hsiao, Chang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 723. Citation: Chen YC, Chen TW, Su MC, Chen CJ, Chen KD, Liou CW, Tang P, Wang TY, Chang JC, Wang CC, Lin HC, Chin CH, Huang KT, Lin MC, Hsiao CC. Whole genome DNA methylation analysis of obstructive sleep apnea: IL1R2, NPR2, AR, SP140 methylation and clinical phenotype. SLEEP 2016;39(4):743–755. PMID:26888452

  18. Male and Couple Fertility Impairment due to HPV-DNA Sperm Infection: Update on Molecular Mechanism and Clinical Impact—Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Ferrari, Bruno; Noventa, Marco; Ferrari, Emanuele; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Gangemi, Michele; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences identify Human Papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection as a possible cause of male and couple infertility. It acts through different mechanisms at various steps of human conception and early gestational development. We performed a systematic review to assess the role of HPV semen infection on male and couple infertility. Analysis of available and eligible data does not permit us to fund clear evidences about clinical impact of HPV infection on fertility, although sperm parameters impairment is the most widely recognized effect. Regarding biomolecular implications, the available data are often conflicting. More studies are required to define the role of HPV sperm infection in clinical practice. The great majority of evidences are obtained by in vitro studies and this fact represents a limitation for the clinical management of HPVDNA sperm infection. Understanding the biological significance of HPV-DNA semen infection could permit us to explain most of the idiopathic male and couple infertility, leading to a better management of infertile men and a better timing for sperm banking storage before ART cycles. PMID:24783196

  19. Detection of monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA as a malignant marker in two enzootic bovine leukosis cases with difficult clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    MIURA, Saori; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; MATSUMOTO, Kotaro; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; KAWAZU, Shin-ichiro; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral DNA into bovine genomes was detected in peripheral blood from two clinical cases of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) without enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. A BLV-specific probe hybridized with 1 to 3 EcoRI and HindIII fragments in these 2 atypical EBL cattle by Southern blotting and hybridization, as well as in 3 typical EBL cattle. The probe also hybridized to a large number of EcoRI and HindIII fragments in 5 cattle with persistent leukosis. These results suggest that the detection of monoclonal integration of BLV provirus into the host genome may serve as a marker of monoclonal proliferation and malignancy in difficult to diagnose EBL cattle. PMID:25766769

  20. Considerations for the clinical application of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: observations from a recombinant DNA Advisory Committee Symposium held June 15, 2010.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund C J; Zaia, John; Rosenberg, Steven A; June, Carl H; Dotti, Gianpietro; Kahn, Jeffrey; Cooper, Laurence J N; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline; Strome, Scott E

    2011-05-01

    T cells that are genetically modified to express single-chain chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) have shown promise in early cancer immunotherapy clinical trials. Unfortunately, 2 recent deaths in cancer patients treated with CAR T cells have created some uncertainty on how to best mitigate patient risk, while continuing to advance this very promising therapeutic avenue. In order to address these concerns, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) held a symposium, the objectives of which were to first review the reported treatment-associated toxicities and, second, to discuss methods for improving safety and efficacy. This report highlights the issues raised as part of this discussion, with a specific focus on protocols infusing CAR T cells. Because this was not a consensus conference, the opinions described should not be construed to represent those of any individual RAC member, the RAC as a body, conference participants, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  1. Variance of a potential of mean force obtained using the weighted histogram analysis method.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2013-11-27

    A potential of mean force (PMF) that provides the free energy of a thermally driven system along some chosen reaction coordinate (RC) is a useful descriptor of systems characterized by complex, high dimensional potential energy surfaces. Umbrella sampling window simulations use potential energy restraints to provide more uniform sampling along a RC so that potential energy barriers that would otherwise make equilibrium sampling computationally difficult can be overcome. Combining the results from the different biased window trajectories can be accomplished using the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). Here, we provide an analysis of the variance of a PMF along the reaction coordinate. We assume that the potential restraints used for each window lead to Gaussian distributions for the window reaction coordinate densities and that the data sampling in each window is from an equilibrium ensemble sampled so that successive points are statistically independent. Also, we assume that neighbor window densities overlap, as required in WHAM, and that further-than-neighbor window density overlap is negligible. Then, an analytic expression for the variance of the PMF along the reaction coordinate at a desired level of spatial resolution can be generated. The variance separates into a sum over all windows with two kinds of contributions: One from the variance of the biased window density normalized by the total biased window density and the other from the variance of the local (for each window's coordinate range) PMF. Based on the desired spatial resolution of the PMF, the former variance can be minimized relative to that from the latter. The method is applied to a model system that has features of a complex energy landscape evocative of a protein with two conformational states separated by a free energy barrier along a collective reaction coordinate. The variance can be constructed from data that is already available from the WHAM PMF construction.

  2. Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of the Safety of Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nakachi, Kohei; Nishio, Teiji; Mitsunaga, Shuichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Konishi, Masaru; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Arahira, Satoko; Zenda, Sadamoto; Ogino, Takashi; Kinoshita, Taira

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiotherapy using proton beam (PRT) for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients who underwent PRT between May 1999 and July 2007 were analyzed. There were 42 males and 18 females, with a median age of 70 years (48-92 years). All but 1 patient had a single lesion with a median diameter of 45 mm (20-100 mm). Total PRT dose/fractionation was 76-cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE)/20 fractions in 46 patients, 65 CGE/26 fractions in 11 patients, and 60 CGE/10 fractions in 3 patients. The risk of developing proton-induced hepatic insufficiency (PHI) was estimated using dose-volume histograms and an indocyanine-green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15). Results: None of the 20 patients with ICG R15 of less than 20% developed PHI, whereas 6 of 8 patients with ICG R15 values of 50% or higher developed PHI. Among 32 patients whose ICG R15 ranged from 20% to 49.9%, PHI was observed only in patients who had received 30 CGE (V30) to more than 25% of the noncancerous parts of the liver (n = 5) Local progression-free and overall survival rates at 3 years were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80-99%) and 56% (95% CI, 43-69%), respectively. A gastrointestinal toxicity of Grade {>=}2 was observed in 3 patients. Conclusions: ICG R15 and V30 are recommended as useful predictors for the risk of developing PHI, which should be incorporated into multidisciplinary treatment plans for patients with this disease.

  3. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basire, M.; Soudan, J.-M.; Angelié, C.

    2014-09-01

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the σ-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, gp(Ep) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called "corrected EAM" (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients Sij are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature Tm is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number Nat. The standard N_{at}^{-1/3} linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for Nat >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For Nat <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  4. Assessment of Autonomic Function by Phase Rectification of RRInterval Histogram Analysis in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasari-Junior, Olivassé; Benchimol-Barbosa, Paulo Roberto; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic Chagas disease (ChD), impairment of cardiac autonomic function bears prognostic implications. Phase‑rectification of RR-interval series isolates the sympathetic, acceleration phase (AC) and parasympathetic, deceleration phase (DC) influences on cardiac autonomic modulation. Objective This study investigated heart rate variability (HRV) as a function of RR-interval to assess autonomic function in healthy and ChD subjects. Methods Control (n = 20) and ChD (n = 20) groups were studied. All underwent 60-min head-up tilt table test under ECG recording. Histogram of RR-interval series was calculated, with 100 ms class, ranging from 600–1100 ms. In each class, mean RR-intervals (MNN) and root-mean-squared difference (RMSNN) of consecutive normal RR-intervals that suited a particular class were calculated. Average of all RMSNN values in each class was analyzed as function of MNN, in the whole series (RMSNNT), and in AC (RMSNNAC) and DC (RMSNNDC) phases. Slopes of linear regression lines were compared between groups using Student t-test. Correlation coefficients were tested before comparisons. RMSNN was log-transformed. (α < 0.05). Results Correlation coefficient was significant in all regressions (p < 0.05). In the control group, RMSNNT, RMSNNAC, and RMSNNDC significantly increased linearly with MNN (p < 0.05). In ChD, only RMSNNAC showed significant increase as a function of MNN, whereas RMSNNT and RMSNNDC did not. Conclusion HRV increases in proportion with the RR-interval in healthy subjects. This behavior is lost in ChD, particularly in the DC phase, indicating cardiac vagal incompetence. PMID:26131700

  5. Automatic detection of atrial fibrillation using the coefficient of variation and density histograms of RR and deltaRR intervals.

    PubMed

    Tateno, K; Glass, L

    2001-11-01

    The paper describes a method for the automatic detection of atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heart rhythm, based on the sequence of intervals between heartbeats. The RR interval is the interbeat interval, and deltaRR is the difference between two successive RR intervals. Standard density histograms of the RR and deltaRR intervals were prepared as templates for atrial fibrillation detection. As the coefficients of variation of the RR and deltaRR intervals were approximately constant during atrial fibrillation, the coefficients of variation in the test data could be compared with the standard coefficients of variation (CV test). Further, the similarities between the density histograms of the test data and the standard density histograms were estimated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The CV test based on the RR intervals showed a sensitivity of 86.6% and a specificity of 84.3%. The CV test based on the deltaRR intervals showed that the sensitivity and the specificity are both approximately 84%. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test based on the RR intervals did not improve on the result of the CV test. In contrast, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test based on the ARR intervals showed a sensitivity of 94.4% and a specificity of 97.2%.

  6. A computational tool for the efficient analysis of dose-volume histograms for radiation therapy treatment plans

    PubMed Central

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Myint, W. Kenji; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh; Jang, Sunyoung; Logemann, Jerilyn A.; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2010-01-01

    A Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) program was primarily developed to increase the efficiency and accuracy of dose–volume histogram (DVH) analysis of large quantities of patient data in radiation therapy research. The program was written in MATLAB to analyze patient plans exported from the treatment planning system (Pinnacle3) in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (AAPM/RTOG) format. HART-computed DVH data was validated against manually extracted data from the planning system for five head and neck cancer patients treated with the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. HART calculated over 4000 parameters from the differential DVH (dDVH) curves for each patient in approximately 10–15 minutes. Manual extraction of this amount of data required 5 to 6 hours. The normalized root mean square deviation (NRMSD) for the HART–extracted DVH outcomes was less than 1%, or within 0.5% distance-to-agreement (DTA). This tool is supported with various user-friendly options and graphical displays. Additional features include optimal polynomial modeling of DVH curves for organs, treatment plan indices (TPI) evaluation, plan-specific outcome analysis (POA), and spatial DVH (zDVH) and dose surface histogram (DSH) analyses, respectively. HART is freely available to the radiation oncology community. PMID:20160690

  7. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes offers adequate detection of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Waar, Karola; Degener, John E; van Luyn, Marja J; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2005-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium are among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. Reliable and quick identification of E. faecalis and E. faecium is important for accurate treatment and understanding their role in the pathogenesis of infections. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of whole bacterial cells with oligonucleotides targeted at the 16S rRNA molecule leads to a reduced time to identification. In clinical practice, FISH therefore can be used in situations in which quick identification is necessary for optimal treatment of the patient. Furthermore, the abundance, spatial distribution and bacterial cell morphology can be observed in situ. This report describes the design of two fluorescent-labelled oligonucleotides that, respectively, detect the 16S rRNA of E. faecalis and the 16S rRNA of E. faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus mundtii, Enterococcus villorum and Enterococcus saccharolyticus. Different protocols for the application of these oligonucleotides with FISH in different clinical samples such as faeces or blood cultures are given. Enterococci in a biofilm attached to a biomaterial were also visualized. Embedding of the biomaterial preserved the morphology and therefore the architecture of the biofilm could be observed. The usefulness of other studies describing FISH for detection of enterococci is generally hampered by the fact that they have only focused on one material and one protocol to detect the enterococci. However, the results of this study show that the probes can be used both in the routine laboratory to detect and determine the enterococcal species in different clinical samples and in a research setting to enumerate and detect the enterococci in their physical environment.

  8. Analysis of Mutations in the Gene Encoding Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Brincidofovir Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, E. Randall; Foster, Scott; Brundage, Tom; Chou, Sunwen; Prichard, Mark N.; Kleiboeker, Steven; Wilson, Chad; Colville, Donella; Mommeja-Marin, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Brincidofovir is an oral antiviral in development for prevention of cytomegalovirus disease. Cytomegalovirus genotyping results from a phase 2 trial comparing brincidofovir to placebo for prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients provided initial data on the clinical resistance profile for brincidofovir. In this study, no known resistance-associated mutations were detected in brincidofovir-treated subjects; identified genotypic substitutions did not confer resistance to cytomegalovirus antivirals in vitro, suggesting that these changes represent polymorphisms unrelated to brincidofovir resistance. Lack of evidence for genotypic resistance during prophylaxis suggests that first-line use of brincidofovir for prevention of cytomegalovirus infection may preserve downstream options for patients. PMID:26941282

  9. Reliable and sensitive detection of fragile X (expanded) alleles in clinical prenatal DNA samples with a fast turnaround time.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Lissens, Willy; Endels, Kristof; Caljon, Ben; Bonduelle, Maryse; Keymolen, Kathleen; De Rademaeker, Marjan; Ullmann, Urielle; Haentjens, Patrick; Van Berkel, Kim; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated a large set of blinded, previously analyzed prenatal DNA samples with a novel, CGG triplet-repeat primed (TP)-PCR assay (Amplidex FMR1 PCR Kit; Asuragen, Austin, TX). This cohort of 67 fetal DNAs contained 18 full mutations (270 to 1100 repeats, including 1 mosaic), 12 premutations (59 to 150 repeats), 9 intermediate mutations (54 to 58 repeats), and 28 normal samples (17 to 50 repeats, including 3 homozygous female samples). TP-PCR accurately identified FMR1 genotypes, ranging from normal to full- mutation alleles, with a 100% specificity (95% CI, 85.0% to 100%) and a 97.4% sensitivity (95% CI, 84.9% to 99.9%) in comparison with Southern blot analysis results. Exact sizing was possible for a spectrum of normal, intermediate, and premutation (up to 150 repeats) alleles, but CGG repeat numbers >200 are only identified as full mutations. All homozygous alleles were correctly resolved. The assay is also able to reproducibly detect a 2.5% premutation and a 3% full-mutation mosaicism in a normal male background, but a large premutation in a full male mutation background was masked when the amount of the latter was >5%. Implementation of this TP-PCR will significantly reduce reflex testing using Southern blot analyses. Additional testing with methylation-informative techniques might still be needed for a few cases with (large) premutations or full mutations.

  10. Genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori indexed with respect to clinical symptomatology, using a 16S rRNA and a species-specific DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Linton, D; Owen, R J; Cameron, H; Stanley, J

    1993-12-01

    DNA probes are described which identify group and fingerprint strains of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, on the basis of well-defined band homologies. A 544 bp internal fragment of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers derived from the Escherichia coli rRNA gene sequence. In genomic Southern blots this probe detected restriction site variation around these loci, generating simple but strain-specific molecular fingerprints. A small conserved chromosomal fragment of 1.2 kbp, Hps, species-specific for H. pylori, was obtained by cloning random HindIII fragments into pUC19. It was useful for dot-blot identification, and also separated isolates into one major and two minor groups. When results for these two probes were combined, a baseline characterization of genotype was obtained. A band-matching database of molecular fingerprints for the type strain and 63 clinical isolates of H. pylori from asymptomatic, ulcer and gastritis contexts is presented. No significant association between the genotypes at this level of definition and the associated clinical symptomatology of the isolates was detected.

  11. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  12. The influence of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on human sperm quality and DNA fragmentation: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Jalil; Mardi Mamaghani, Azar; Hosseinifar, Hani; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Dadkhah, Farid; Sepidarkish, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in infertile men. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group). Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02) in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5) in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39) was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13) after three month of treatment (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men. PMID:27679829

  13. The influence of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on human sperm quality and DNA fragmentation: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Jalil; Mardi Mamaghani, Azar; Hosseinifar, Hani; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Dadkhah, Farid; Sepidarkish, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in infertile men. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group). Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02) in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5) in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39) was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13) after three month of treatment (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men.

  14. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Basire, M; Soudan, J-M; Angelié, C

    2014-09-14

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the σ-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, gp(Ep) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called "corrected EAM" (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients S(ij) are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature T(m) is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number N(at). The standard N(at)(-1/3) linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for N(at) >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For N(at) <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  15. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Basire, M.; Soudan, J.-M.; Angelié, C.

    2014-09-14

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the σ-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, g{sub p}(E{sub p}) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called “corrected EAM” (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients S{sub ij} are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature T{sub m} is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number N{sub at}. The standard N{sub at}{sup −1/3} linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for N{sub at} >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For N{sub at} <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  16. Characterization of polybacterial clinical samples using a set of group-specific broad-range primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing and RipSeq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lekang, Katrine; Langeland, Nina; Wiker, Harald G.

    2011-01-01

    The standard use of a single universal broad-range PCR in direct 16S rDNA sequencing from polybacterial samples leaves the minor constituents at risk of remaining undetected because all bacterial DNA will be competing for the same reagents. In this article we introduce a set of three broad-range group-specific 16S rDNA PCRs that together cover the clinically relevant bacteria and apply them in the investigation of 25 polybacterial clinical samples. Mixed DNA chromatograms from samples containing more than one species per primer group were analysed using RipSeq Mixed (iSentio, Norway), a web-based application for the interpretation of chromatograms containing up to three different species. The group-specific PCRs reduced complexity in the resulting DNA chromatograms and made the assay more sensitive in situations with unequal species concentrations. Together this allowed for identification of a significantly higher number of bacterial species than did standard direct sequencing with a single universal primer pair and RipSeq analysis (95 vs 51). The method could improve microbiological diagnostics for important groups of patients and can be established in any laboratory with experience in direct 16S rDNA sequencing. PMID:21436365

  17. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  18. Plasmid DNA immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi genes induces cardiac and clinical protection against Chagas disease in the canine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The only existing preventive measure against American trypanosomosis, or Chagas disease, is the control of the transmitting insect, which has only been effective in a few South American regions. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. Here, we present the clinical and cardiac levels of protection induced by expression to Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 proteins in the canine model. Physical examination, diagnostic chagasic serology, and serial electrocardiograms were performed before and after immunization, as well as after experimental infection. We found that immunization with recombinant plasmids prevented hyperthermia in the acute phase of experimental infection and produced lymphadenomegaly as an immunological response against the parasite and additionally prevented heart rate elevation (tachycardia) in the acute and/or chronic stages of infection. Immunization with T. cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 antigens diminished the quality and quantity of the electrocardiographic abnormalities, thereby avoiding progression to more severe developments such as right bundle branch block or ventricular premature complexes in a greater number of dogs. PMID:23148870

  19. Plasmid DNA immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi genes induces cardiac and clinical protection against Chagas disease in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pérez-Leyva, M Magdalena; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Rosales-Encina, J Luis; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Reyes, Pedro A; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2012-01-01

    The only existing preventive measure against American trypanosomosis, or Chagas disease, is the control of the transmitting insect, which has only been effective in a few South American regions. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. Here, we present the clinical and cardiac levels of protection induced by expression to Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 proteins in the canine model. Physical examination, diagnostic chagasic serology, and serial electrocardiograms were performed before and after immunization, as well as after experimental infection. We found that immunization with recombinant plasmids prevented hyperthermia in the acute phase of experimental infection and produced lymphadenomegaly as an immunological response against the parasite and additionally prevented heart rate elevation (tachycardia) in the acute and/or chronic stages of infection. Immunization with T. cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 antigens diminished the quality and quantity of the electrocardiographic abnormalities, thereby avoiding progression to more severe developments such as right bundle branch block or ventricular premature complexes in a greater number of dogs. PMID:23148870

  20. Clinical Significance of an HPV DNA Chip Test with Emphasis on HPV-16 and/or HPV-18 Detection in Korean Gynecological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Min-Kyung; Lee, Ahwon; Hur, Soo Young; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for cervical cancer. Methods: We evaluated the clinical significance of the HPV DNA chip genotyping assay (MyHPV chip, Mygene Co.) compared with the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) chemiluminescent nucleic acid hybridization kit (Digene Corp.) in 867 patients. Results: The concordance rate between the MyHPV chip and HC2 was 79.4% (kappa coefficient, κ = 0.55). The sensitivity and specificity of both HPV tests were very similar (approximately 85% and 50%, respectively). The addition of HPV result (either MyHPV chip or HC2) to cytology improved the sensitivity (95%, each) but reduced the specificity (approximately 30%, each) compared with the HPV test or cytology alone. Based on the MyHPV chip results, the odds ratio (OR) for ≥ high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) was 9.9 in the HPV-16/18 (+) group and 3.7 in the non-16/18 high-risk (HR)-HPV (+) group. Based on the HC2 results, the OR for ≥ HSILs was 5.9 in the HR-HPV (+) group. When considering only patients with cytological diagnoses of “negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy” and “atypical squamous cell or atypical glandular cell,” based on the MyHPV chip results, the ORs for ≥ HSILs were 6.8 and 11.7, respectively, in the HPV-16/18 (+) group. Conclusions: The sensitivity and specificity of the MyHPV chip test are similar to the HC2. Detecting HPV-16/18 with an HPV DNA chip test, which is commonly used in many Asian countries, is useful in assessing the risk of high-grade cervical lesions. PMID:27345180

  1. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene from strain PAO1 and quinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kureishi, A; Diver, J M; Beckthold, B; Schollaardt, T; Bryan, L E

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene was cloned and sequenced from strain PAO1. An open reading frame of 2,769 bp was found; it coded for a protein of 923 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 103 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence shared 67% identity with Escherichia coli GyrA and 54% identity with Bacillus subtilis GyrA, although conserved regions were present throughout the sequences, particularly toward the N terminus. Complementation of an E. coli mutant with a temperature-sensitive gyrA gene with the PAO1 gyrA gene showed that the gene is expressed in E. coli and is able to functionally complement the E. coli DNA gyrase B subunit. Expression of PAO1 gyrA in E. coli or P. aeruginosa with mutationally altered gyrA genes caused a reversion to wild-type quinolone susceptibility, indicating that the intrinsic susceptibility of the PAO1 GyrA to quinolones is comparable to that of the E. coli enzyme. PCR was used to amplify 360 bp of P. aeruginosa gyrA encompassing the so-called quinolone resistance-determining region from ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. Mutations were found in three of nine isolates tested; these mutations caused the following alterations in the sequence of GyrA: Asp at position 87 (Asp-87) to Asn, Asp-87 to Tyr, and Thr-83 to Ile. The resistance mechanisms in the other six isolates are unknown. The results of the study suggested that mechanisms other than a mutational alteration in gyrA are the most common mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in P. aeruginosa from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7811002

  2. Development of Methods for Coordinate Measurement of Total Cell-Associated and Integrated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) DNA Forms in Routine Clinical Samples: Levels Are Not Associated with Clinical Parameters, but Low Levels of Integrated HIV-1 DNA May Be Prognostic for Continued Successful Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Carr, J. M.; Cheney, K. M.; Coolen, C.; Davis, A.; Shaw, D.; Ferguson, W.; Chang, G.; Higgins, G.; Burrell, C.; Li, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have adapted our established Alu PCR assay for proviral DNA and PCR for total cellular DNA to a real-time PCR format and applied these to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive specimens collected for routine determination of the plasma viral load (pVL). In a cohort of five patients, measurements of integrated viral load (iVL) and cell-associated viral load (cVL) in CD4+ cells isolated by a single positive selection step were not indicative of HIV DNA levels in the circulation, and further analysis was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In a cohort of 46 samples total cVL was quantitated in most samples, but iVL could be quantitated in only 47.8%, since in 26% iVL was undetectable and in 21.7% the results were invalid due to high levels of unintegrated HIV DNA. There was no correlation of cVL or iVL with pVL, CD4 count, or duration of successful antiretroviral treatment. Out of 26 patients with undetectable pVL, 4 patients failed therapy within the subsequent 12 months and had higher than average iVL, but this was not the case for cVL. Among nine patients with long-term undetectable pVL, no consistent decline in cVL or iVL was seen with time, and changes in cVL and iVL within a patient could be concordant or discordant. These results show that cVL and iVL can be coordinately measured in PBMC from clinical samples but do not correlate with pVL, CD4 counts, or length of suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Interestingly, a high iVL (but not a high cVL) in patients with undetectable pVL was associated with subsequent treatment failure. PMID:17314225

  3. Angiogenic response of locally advanced breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy evaluated with parametric histogram from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Lu, Yen-Shen; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate angiogenic compositions and tumour response in the course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Thirteen patients with LABC underwent serial DCE MRI during the course of chemotherapy. DCE MRI was quantified using a two-compartment model on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Analysis of parametric histograms of amplitude, exchange rate kout and peak enhancement over the whole tumour was performed. The distribution patterns of histograms were correlated with the tumour response. Initial kurtosis and standard deviation of amplitude before chemotherapy correlated with tumour response, r = 0.63 and r = 0.61, respectively. Comparing the initial values with the values after the first course of chemotherapy, tumour response was associated with a decrease in standard deviation of amplitude (r = 0.79), and an increase in kurtosis and a decrease in standard deviation of kout (r = 0.57 and 0.57, respectively). Comparing the initial values with the values after completing the chemotherapy, tumours with better response were associated with an increase in kurtosis (r = 0.62), a decrease in mean (r = 0.84) and standard deviation (r = 0.77) of amplitude, and a decrease in mean of peak enhancement (r = 0.71). Our results suggested that tumours with better response tended to alter their internal compositions from heterogeneous to homogeneous distributions and a decrease in peak enhancement after chemotherapy. Serial analyses of parametric histograms of DCE MRI-derived angiogenic parameters are potentially useful to monitor the response of angiogenic compositions of a tumour throughout the course of chemotherapy, and might predict tumour response early in the course.

  4. Method to improve the performance of the optical modulation format identification system based on asynchronous amplitude histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; He, Sheng; Shang, Jin; Ke, Changjian; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming

    2015-06-01

    A method to improve the performance of the asynchronous amplitude histogram (AAH) based optical modulation format identification system is proposed. It is demonstrated that with additional static dispersion compensation modules (SDCMs), polarization and non-polarization multiplexed (PM/NPM) signals can be distinguished simply from the AAH peak position difference, while the stringent chromatic dispersion limit imposed on the MFI method can be expanded up to desired values by selectively enabling the SDCMs to minimize the width to area ratio (WAR) of the AAH. Numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  5. Bennett's acceptance ratio and histogram analysis methods enhanced by umbrella sampling along a reaction coordinate in configurational space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilsoo; Allen, Toby W.

    2012-04-01

    Free energy perturbation, a method for computing the free energy difference between two states, is often combined with non-Boltzmann biased sampling techniques in order to accelerate the convergence of free energy calculations. Here we present a new extension of the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method by combining it with umbrella sampling (US) along a reaction coordinate in configurational space. In this approach, which we call Bennett acceptance ratio with umbrella sampling (BAR-US), the conditional histogram of energy difference (a mapping of the 3N-dimensional configurational space via a reaction coordinate onto 1D energy difference space) is weighted for marginalization with the associated population density along a reaction coordinate computed by US. This procedure produces marginal histograms of energy difference, from forward and backward simulations, with higher overlap in energy difference space, rendering free energy difference estimations using BAR statistically more reliable. In addition to BAR-US, two histogram analysis methods, termed Bennett overlapping histograms with US (BOH-US) and Bennett-Hummer (linear) least square with US (BHLS-US), are employed as consistency and convergence checks for free energy difference estimation by BAR-US. The proposed methods (BAR-US, BOH-US, and BHLS-US) are applied to a 1-dimensional asymmetric model potential, as has been used previously to test free energy calculations from non-equilibrium processes. We then consider the more stringent test of a 1-dimensional strongly (but linearly) shifted harmonic oscillator, which exhibits no overlap between two states when sampled using unbiased Brownian dynamics. We find that the efficiency of the proposed methods is enhanced over the original Bennett's methods (BAR, BOH, and BHLS) through fast uniform sampling of energy difference space via US in configurational space. We apply the proposed methods to the calculation of the electrostatic contribution to the absolute

  6. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  7. Comparison of the Accuracy of Two Conventional Phenotypic Methods and Two MALDI-TOF MS Systems with That of DNA Sequencing Analysis for Correctly Identifying Clinically Encountered Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Qiao-Ting; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Shih-Hua; Peng, Li-Yun; Chen, Ping-Hung; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of species-level identification of two commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS) and two conventional phenotypic methods (Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID) with that of rDNA gene sequencing analysis among 200 clinical isolates of commonly encountered yeasts. The correct identification rates of the 200 yeast isolates to species or complex (Candida parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex and C. rugosa complex) levels by the Bruker Biotyper, Vitek MS (using in vitro devices [IVD] database), Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID (Sabouraud's dextrose agar) systems were 92.5%, 79.5%, 89%, and 74%, respectively. An additional 72 isolates of C. parapsilosis complex and 18 from the above 200 isolates (30 in each of C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis) were also evaluated separately. Bruker Biotyper system could accurately identify all C. parapsilosis complex to species level. Using Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, all C. parapsilosis but none of C. metapsilosis, or C. orthopsilosis could be accurately identified. Among the 89 yeasts misidentified by the Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, 39 (43.8%), including 27 C. orthopsilosis isolates, could be correctly identified Using the Vitek MS Plus SARAMIS database for research use only. This resulted in an increase in the rate of correct identification of all yeast isolates (87.5%) by Vitek 2 MS. The two species in C. guilliermondii complex (C. guilliermondii and C. fermentati) isolates were correctly identified by cluster analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper system. Based on the results obtained in the current study, MALDI-TOF MS systems present a promising alternative for the routine identification of yeast species, including clinically commonly and rarely encountered yeast species and several species belonging to C. parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex

  8. The clinical significance of EBV DNA in the plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with or without EBV diseases.

    PubMed

    Kanakry, Jennifer A; Hegde, Aparna M; Durand, Christine M; Massie, Allan B; Greer, Amy E; Ambinder, Richard F; Valsamakis, Alexandra

    2016-04-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a latent infection within the host and in some cases can lead to the development of EBV-associated lymphomas, lymphoproliferative disorders, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, solid tumors, and other diseases. We studied the clinical significance of detecting EBV DNA in the plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 2146 patients who had blood specimens sent to the Johns Hopkins Hospital clinical laboratory for viral quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay over a 5-year period. Within this largely immunocompromised and hospitalized cohort, 535 patients (25%) had EBV detected in plasma or PBMCs. When EBV was detected in the absence of an EBV(+)disease (n = 402), it was present only in PBMCs in 69% of cases. Immunocompromised patients were less likely to have EBV in plasma than in PBMCs in the absence of EBV(+)disease. In patients with active, systemic EBV(+)diseases (n = 105), EBV was detected in plasma in 99% of cases but detected in PBMCs in only 54%. Across a range of copy number cutoffs, EBV in plasma had higher specificity and sensitivity for EBV(+)disease as compared with EBV in PBMCs. EBV copy number in plasma distinguished untreated, EBV(+)lymphoma from EBV(+)lymphoma in remission and EBV(-)lymphoma, and also distinguished untreated, EBV(+)posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) from EBV(+)PTLD in remission and EBV(-)PTLD. EBV copy number quantification is a useful diagnostic marker across the spectrum of EBV(+)diseases, even among immunocompromised patients, with plasma specimens more indicative of EBV(+)disease than PBMCs.

  9. Screening of Pleural Mesotheliomas for DNA-damage Repair Players by Digital Gene Expression Analysis Can Enhance Clinical Management of Patients Receiving Platin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Werner, Robert; Mairinger, Thomas; Schmeller, Jan; Flom, Elena; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Fotios; Adamidis, Vasilis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Trakada, Georgia; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Mairinger, Fabian Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, predominantly asbestos-related and biologically highly aggressive tumour leading to a dismal prognosis. Multimodality therapy consisting of platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. The reasons for the rather poor efficacy of platinum compounds remain largely unknown. Material and Methods: For this exploratory mRNA study, 24 FFPE tumour specimens were screened by digital gene expression analysis. Based on data from preliminary experiments and recent literature, a total of 366 mRNAs were investigated using a Custom CodeSet from NanoString. All statistical analyses were calculated with the R i386 statistical programming environment. Results: CDC25A and PARP1 gene expression were correlated with lymph node spread, BRCA1 and TP73 expression levels with higher IMIG stage. NTHL1 and XRCC3 expression was associated with TNM stage. CHECK1 as well as XRCC2 expression levels were correlated with tumour progression in the overall cohort of patients. CDKN2A and MLH1 gene expression influenced overall survival in this collective. In the adjuvant treated cohort only, CDKN2A, CHEK1 as well as ERCC1 were significantly associated with overall survival. Furthermore, TP73 expression was associated with progression in this subgroup. Conclusion: DNA-damage response plays a crucial role in response to platin-based chemotherapeutic regimes. In particular, CHEK1, XRCC2 and TP73 are strongly associated with tumour progression. ERCC1, MLH1, CDKN2A and most promising CHEK1 are prognostic markers for OS in MPM. TP73, CDKN2A, CHEK1 and ERCC1 seem to be also predictive markers in adjuvant treated MPMs. After a prospective validation, these markers may improve clinical and pathological practice, finally leading to a patients' benefit by an enhanced clinical management.

  10. Screening of Pleural Mesotheliomas for DNA-damage Repair Players by Digital Gene Expression Analysis Can Enhance Clinical Management of Patients Receiving Platin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Werner, Robert; Mairinger, Thomas; Schmeller, Jan; Flom, Elena; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Fotios; Adamidis, Vasilis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Trakada, Georgia; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Mairinger, Fabian Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, predominantly asbestos-related and biologically highly aggressive tumour leading to a dismal prognosis. Multimodality therapy consisting of platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. The reasons for the rather poor efficacy of platinum compounds remain largely unknown. Material and Methods: For this exploratory mRNA study, 24 FFPE tumour specimens were screened by digital gene expression analysis. Based on data from preliminary experiments and recent literature, a total of 366 mRNAs were investigated using a Custom CodeSet from NanoString. All statistical analyses were calculated with the R i386 statistical programming environment. Results: CDC25A and PARP1 gene expression were correlated with lymph node spread, BRCA1 and TP73 expression levels with higher IMIG stage. NTHL1 and XRCC3 expression was associated with TNM stage. CHECK1 as well as XRCC2 expression levels were correlated with tumour progression in the overall cohort of patients. CDKN2A and MLH1 gene expression influenced overall survival in this collective. In the adjuvant treated cohort only, CDKN2A, CHEK1 as well as ERCC1 were significantly associated with overall survival. Furthermore, TP73 expression was associated with progression in this subgroup. Conclusion: DNA-damage response plays a crucial role in response to platin-based chemotherapeutic regimes. In particular, CHEK1, XRCC2 and TP73 are strongly associated with tumour progression. ERCC1, MLH1, CDKN2A and most promising CHEK1 are prognostic markers for OS in MPM. TP73, CDKN2A, CHEK1 and ERCC1 seem to be also predictive markers in adjuvant treated MPMs. After a prospective validation, these markers may improve clinical and pathological practice, finally leading to a patients' benefit by an enhanced clinical management. PMID:27698933

  11. DNA methylation patterns in luminal breast cancers differ from non-luminal subtypes and can identify relapse risk independent of other clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Varadan, Vinay; Giercksky Russnes, Hege E; Levy, Dan; Kendall, Jude; Janevski, Angel; Riggs, Michael; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Synnestvedt, Marit; Schlichting, Ellen; Kåresen, Rolf; Shama Prasada, K; Rotti, Harish; Rao, Ramachandra; Rao, Laxmi; Eric Tang, Man-Hung; Satyamoorthy, K; Lucito, Robert; Wigler, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Naume, Bjorn; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hicks, James B

    2011-02-01

    The diversity of breast cancers reflects variations in underlying biology and affects the clinical implications for patients. Gene expression studies have identified five major subtypes- Luminal A, Luminal B, basal-like, ErbB2+ and Normal-Like. We set out to determine the role of DNA methylation in subtypes by performing genome-wide scans of CpG methylation in breast cancer samples with known expression-based subtypes. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using a set of most varying loci clustered the tumors into a Luminal A majority (82%) cluster, Basal-like/ErbB2+ majority (86%) cluster and a non-specific cluster with samples that were also inconclusive in their expression-based subtype correlations. Contributing methylation loci were both gene associated loci (30%) and non-gene associated (70%), suggesting subtype dependant genome-wide alterations in the methylation landscape. The methylation patterns of significant differentially methylated genes in luminal A tumors are similar to those identified in CD24 + luminal epithelial cells and the patterns in basal-like tumors similar to CD44 + breast progenitor cells. CpG islands in the HOXA cluster and other homeobox (IRX2, DLX2, NKX2-2) genes were significantly more methylated in Luminal A tumors. A significant number of genes (2853, p < 0.05) exhibited expression-methylation correlation, implying possible functional effects of methylation on gene expression. Furthermore, analysis of these tumors by using follow-up survival data identified differential methylation of islands proximal to genes involved in Cell Cycle and Proliferation (Ki-67, UBE2C, KIF2C, HDAC4), angiogenesis (VEGF, BTG1, KLF5), cell fate commitment (SPRY1, OLIG2, LHX2 and LHX5) as having prognostic value independent of subtypes and other clinical factors.

  12. In Vitro Activity of AZD0914, a Novel Bacterial DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase IV Inhibitor, against Clinically Relevant Gram-Positive and Fastidious Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Michael D.; Hackel, Meredith; de Jonge, Boudewijn L. M.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Bradford, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    AZD0914, a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase inhibitor with a novel mode of inhibition, has activity against bacterial species commonly cultured from patient infection specimens, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. This study assessed the in vitro activity of AZD0914 against key Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative clinical isolates collected globally in 2013. AZD0914 demonstrated potent activity, with MIC90s for AZD0914 of 0.25 mg/liter against Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11,680), coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 1,923), streptococci (n = 4,380), and Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 145), 0.5 mg/liter against Staphylococcus lugdunensis (n = 120) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 352), 1 mg/liter against Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1,241), and 2 mg/liter against Haemophilus parainfluenzae (n = 70). The activity against Enterococcus faecium was more limited (MIC90, 8 mg/liter). The spectrum and potency of AZD0914 included fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates in each species group, including methicillin-resistant staphylococci, penicillin-resistant streptococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus spp., and M. catarrhalis. Based on these in vitro findings, AZD0914 warrants further investigation for its utility against a variety of Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative bacterial species. PMID:26195518

  13. In Vitro Activity of AZD0914, a Novel Bacterial DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase IV Inhibitor, against Clinically Relevant Gram-Positive and Fastidious Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Biedenbach, Douglas J; Huband, Michael D; Hackel, Meredith; de Jonge, Boudewijn L M; Sahm, Daniel F; Bradford, Patricia A

    2015-10-01

    AZD0914, a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase inhibitor with a novel mode of inhibition, has activity against bacterial species commonly cultured from patient infection specimens, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. This study assessed the in vitro activity of AZD0914 against key Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative clinical isolates collected globally in 2013. AZD0914 demonstrated potent activity, with MIC90s for AZD0914 of 0.25 mg/liter against Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11,680), coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 1,923), streptococci (n = 4,380), and Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 145), 0.5 mg/liter against Staphylococcus lugdunensis (n = 120) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 352), 1 mg/liter against Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1,241), and 2 mg/liter against Haemophilus parainfluenzae (n = 70). The activity against Enterococcus faecium was more limited (MIC90, 8 mg/liter). The spectrum and potency of AZD0914 included fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates in each species group, including methicillin-resistant staphylococci, penicillin-resistant streptococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus spp., and M. catarrhalis. Based on these in vitro findings, AZD0914 warrants further investigation for its utility against a variety of Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative bacterial species.

  14. Carcinoma of the anal canal and flow cytometric DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N. A.; Beart, R. W.; Weiland, L. H.; Cha, S. S.; Lieber, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Using flow cytometric DNA analysis of paraffin embedded tissue, DNA histograms were successfully obtained from the anal cancers of 117 patients. DNA diploid patterns were given by 82 cancers (70%) and DNA non-diploid patterns by 35 cancers (30%): 15 DNA aneuploid, 20 DNA tetraploid. Well differentiated squamous cell cancers were mainly DNA diploid, while a larger proportion of poorly differentiated and small cell cancers were DNA non-diploid. The large majority of stage A cancers were DNA diploid. A greater proportion of tumours that had invaded through the anal sphincter or had lymph node metastases or distant spread were DNA non-diploid. Prognosis was slightly poorer for patients with DNA non-diploid cancers when compared to patients with DNA diploid tumours (P = 0.08) and significantly poorer for individuals with DNA aneuploid anal cancers (P = 0.037). However, in a multivariate analysis model, the DNA ploidy pattern of an anal cancer was not of independent prognostic significance alongside tumour histology and tumour stage. PMID:2803916

  15. [50 years after the discovery of the DNA structure its implications still have not reached clinical practice. Our genetic material is "a big tangle of nucleic acids and proteins"].

    PubMed

    Kahl, Ulrika

    2003-06-19

    It is now 50 years since the double helical structure of DNA was discovered. Even if the knowledge about the DNA structure has had great implications for many disciplines in medical and genetic research, the big breakthrough is still to come in clinical practice. Much research is now focusing on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms controlling the activity and behaviour of the genes of our genome. Many researchers and clinicians are hoping that the tangle of nucleic acids and proteins that fills the cellular nucleus harbours interesting and potential drug targets.

  16. Sequence Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Thymidine Kinase and DNA Polymerase Genes from over 300 Clinical Isolates from 1973 to 2014 Finds Novel Mutations That May Be Relevant for Development of Antiviral Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Schlattmann, Peter; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    A total of 302 clinical herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strains, collected over 4 decades from 1973 to 2014, were characterized retrospectively for drug resistance. All HSV-1 isolates were analyzed genotypically for nonsynonymous mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (Pol) genes. The resistance phenotype against acyclovir (ACV) and/or foscarnet (FOS) was examined in the case of novel, unclear, or resistance-related mutations. Twenty-six novel natural polymorphisms could be detected in the TK gene and 69 in the DNA Pol gene. Furthermore, three novel resistance-associated mutations (two in the TK gene and one in the DNA Pol gene) were analyzed, and eight known but hitherto unclear amino acid substitutions (two encoded in TK and six in the DNA Pol gene) could be clarified. Between 1973 and 2014, the distribution of amino acid changes related to the natural gene polymorphisms of TK and DNA Pol remained largely stable. Resistance to ACV was confirmed phenotypically for 16 isolates, and resistance to ACV plus FOS was confirmed for 1 isolate. Acyclovir-resistant strains were observed from the year 1995 onwards, predominantly in immunosuppressed patients, especially those with stem cell transplantation, and the number of ACV-resistant strains increased during the last 2 decades. The data confirm the strong genetic variability among HIV-1 isolates, which is more pronounced in the DNA Pol gene than in the TK gene, and will facilitate considerably the rapid genotypic diagnosis of HSV-1 resistance.

  17. Sequence Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Thymidine Kinase and DNA Polymerase Genes from over 300 Clinical Isolates from 1973 to 2014 Finds Novel Mutations That May Be Relevant for Development of Antiviral Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Schlattmann, Peter; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    A total of 302 clinical herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strains, collected over 4 decades from 1973 to 2014, were characterized retrospectively for drug resistance. All HSV-1 isolates were analyzed genotypically for nonsynonymous mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (Pol) genes. The resistance phenotype against acyclovir (ACV) and/or foscarnet (FOS) was examined in the case of novel, unclear, or resistance-related mutations. Twenty-six novel natural polymorphisms could be detected in the TK gene and 69 in the DNA Pol gene. Furthermore, three novel resistance-associated mutations (two in the TK gene and one in the DNA Pol gene) were analyzed, and eight known but hitherto unclear amino acid substitutions (two encoded in TK and six in the DNA Pol gene) could be clarified. Between 1973 and 2014, the distribution of amino acid changes related to the natural gene polymorphisms of TK and DNA Pol remained largely stable. Resistance to ACV was confirmed phenotypically for 16 isolates, and resistance to ACV plus FOS was confirmed for 1 isolate. Acyclovir-resistant strains were observed from the year 1995 onwards, predominantly in immunosuppressed patients, especially those with stem cell transplantation, and the number of ACV-resistant strains increased during the last 2 decades. The data confirm the strong genetic variability among HIV-1 isolates, which is more pronounced in the DNA Pol gene than in the TK gene, and will facilitate considerably the rapid genotypic diagnosis of HSV-1 resistance. PMID:26055375

  18. Experimental assessment of an automatic breast density classification algorithm based on principal component analysis applied to histogram data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Antonio; Ferrer, Jose; Pinto, Joseph; Lavarello, Roberto; Guerrero, Jorge; Castaneda, Benjamín.

    2015-01-01

    Breast parenchymal density is considered a strong indicator of cancer risk. However, measures of breast density are often qualitative and require the subjective judgment of radiologists. This work proposes a supervised algorithm to automatically assign a BI-RADS breast density score to a digital mammogram. The algorithm applies principal component analysis to the histograms of a training dataset of digital mammograms to create four different spaces, one for each BI-RADS category. Scoring is achieved by projecting the histogram of the image to be classified onto the four spaces and assigning it to the closest class. In order to validate the algorithm, a training set of 86 images and a separate testing database of 964 images were built. All mammograms were acquired in the craniocaudal view from female patients without any visible pathology. Eight experienced radiologists categorized the mammograms according to a BIRADS score and the mode of their evaluations was considered as ground truth. Results show better agreement between the algorithm and ground truth for the training set (kappa=0.74) than for the test set (kappa=0.44) which suggests the method may be used for BI-RADS classification but a better training is required.

  19. Modeling the dark current histogram induced by gold contamination in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domengie, F.; Morin, P.; Bauza, D.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a model for dark current induced by metallic contamination in a CMOS image sensor. Based on Shockley-Read-Hall kinetics, the expression of dark current proposed accounts for the electric field enhanced emission factor due to the Poole-Frenkel barrier lowering and phonon-assisted tunneling mechanisms. To that aim, we considered the distribution of the electric field magnitude and metal atoms in the depth of the pixel. Poisson statistics were used to estimate the random distribution of metal atoms in each pixel for a given contamination dose. Then, we performed a Monte-Carlo-based simulation for each pixel to set the number of metal atoms the pixel contained and the enhancement factor each atom underwent, and obtained a histogram of the number of pixels versus dark current for the full sensor. Excellent agreement with the dark current histogram measured on an ion-implanted gold-contaminated imager has been achieved, in particular, for the description of the distribution tails due to the pixel regions in which the contaminant atoms undergo a large electric field. The agreement remains very good when increasing the temperature by 15 °C. We demonstrated that the amplification of the dark current generated for the typical electric fields encountered in the CMOS image sensors, which depends on the nature of the metal contaminant, may become very large at high electric field. The electron and hole emissions and the resulting enhancement factor are described as a function of the trap characteristics, electric field, and temperature.

  20. Elucidating the effects of adsorbent flexibility on fluid adsorption using simple models and flat-histogram sampling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Vincent K. Siderius, Daniel W.

    2014-06-28

    Using flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods, we investigate the adsorptive behavior of the square-well fluid in two simple slit-pore-like models intended to capture fundamental characteristics of flexible adsorbent materials. Both models require as input thermodynamic information about the flexible adsorbent material itself. An important component of this work involves formulating the flexible pore models in the appropriate thermodynamic (statistical mechanical) ensembles, namely, the osmotic ensemble and a variant of the grand-canonical ensemble. Two-dimensional probability distributions, which are calculated using flat-histogram methods, provide the information necessary to determine adsorption thermodynamics. For example, we are able to determine precisely adsorption isotherms, (equilibrium) phase transition conditions, limits of stability, and free energies for a number of different flexible adsorbent materials, distinguishable as different inputs into the models. While the models used in this work are relatively simple from a geometric perspective, they yield non-trivial adsorptive behavior, including adsorption-desorption hysteresis solely due to material flexibility and so-called “breathing” of the adsorbent. The observed effects can in turn be tied to the inherent properties of the bare adsorbent. Some of the effects are expected on physical grounds while others arise from a subtle balance of thermodynamic and mechanical driving forces. In addition, the computational strategy presented here can be easily applied to more complex models for flexible adsorbents.

  1. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium africanum Clinical Isolates Based on IS6110-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis, Spoligotyping, and Variable Number of Tandem DNA Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Viana-Niero, Cristina; Gutierrez, Cristina; Sola, Christophe; Filliol, Ingrid; Boulahbal, Fadila; Vincent, Véronique; Rastogi, Nalin

    2001-01-01

    A collection of 105 clinical isolates originally identified as Mycobacterium africanum were characterized using both phenotypic and genotyping methods. The phenotypic methods included routine determination of cultural properties and biochemical tests used to discriminate among the members of the M. tuberculosis complex, whereas genotypic characterization was based on IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) analysis, IS1081-RFLP analysis, direct repeat-based spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping), variable number of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR), and the polymorphism of the oxyR, pncA, and mtp40 loci. The results obtained showed that a majority of M. africanum isolates were characterized by a specific spoligotyping pattern that was intermediate between those of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, which do not hybridize with spacers 33 to 36 and spacers 39 to 43, respectively. A tentative M. africanum-specific spoligotyping signature appeared to be absence of spacers 8, 9, and 39. Based on spoligotyping, as well as the polymorphism of oxyR and pncA, a total of 24 isolates were excluded from the final study (19 were identified as M. tuberculosis, 2 were identified as M. canetti, and 3 were identified as M. bovis). The remaining 81 M. africanum isolates were efficiently subtyped in three distinct subtypes (A1 to A3) by IS6110-RFLP analysis and spoligotyping. The A1 and A2 subgroups were relatively more homogeneous upon spoligotyping than A3. Further analysis of the three subtypes by VNTR corroborated the highly homogeneous nature of the A2 subtype but showed significant variations for subtypes A1 and A3. A phylogenetic tree based on a selection of isolates representing the three subtypes using VNTR and spoligotyping alone or in combination confirmed the subtypes described as well as the heterogeneity of subtype A3. PMID:11136749

  2. The detection of Felis catus papillomavirus 3 DNA in a feline bowenoid in situ carcinoma with novel histologic features and benign clinical behavior.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Fairley, Rob; Atkinson, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Bowenoid in situ carcinoma (BISC; papillomavirus-associated squamous cell carcinoma in situ) is an uncommon skin neoplasm of cats that can result in euthanasia because of the development of multiple lesions or because of progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. BISCs are currently thought to be caused by Felis catus papillomavirus 2 (FcaPV-2). The presently described cat developed a single 0.5 cm in diameter interscapular mass. Over the following 18 months, the mass doubled in size; no additional lesions developed. The mass was surgically excised and histologically diagnosed as a BISC. However, in contrast to previously reported BISCs, neither prominent thickening of the deep aspects of the follicular infundibula nor marked cell dysplasia were present. Furthermore, ~50% of the keratinocytes in the affected epidermis had prominent PV cytopathic changes that included shrunken angular nuclei and elongated basophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. As the histopathology was not typical for FcaPV-2 infection, polymerase chain reaction was performed and revealed only DNA sequences from Felis catus papillomavirus 3 (FcaPV-3). No further BISCs developed in this cat 6 months postremoval, hence surgical excision appeared to be curative. Results from this case suggest that, although FcaPV-2 appears to be the predominant cause of BISCs in cats, infection by FcaPV-3 can also cause these neoplasms. BISCs caused by FcaPV-3 appear to have unique histologic features that allow the causative PV type to be predicted. Results from this single case suggest that BISCs caused by FcaPV-3 may have a more benign clinical course than those caused by FcaPV-2. PMID:27423734

  3. Flow cytometric DNA analysis of ducks accumulating 137Cs on a reactor reservoir.

    PubMed

    George, L S; Dallas, C E; Brisbin, I L; Evans, D L

    1991-06-01

    The objective of this study was to detect red blood cell (rbc) DNA abnormalities in male, game-farm mallard ducks as they ranged freely and accumulated 137Cs (radiocesium) from an abandoned nuclear reactor cooling reservoir. Prior to release, the ducks were tamed to enable recapture at will. Flow cytometric measurements conducted at intervals during the first year of exposure yielded cell cycle percentages of DNA (G0/G1, S, G2 + M phases) of rbc, as well as coefficients of variation (CV) in the G0/G1 phase. DNA histograms of exposed ducks were compared with two sets of controls which were maintained 30 and 150 miles from the study site. 137Cs live wholebody burdens were also measured in these animals in a parallel kinetics study, and an approximate steady-state equilibrium was attained after about 8 months. DNA histograms from 2 of the 14 contaminated ducks revealed DNA aneuploid-like patterns after 9 months exposure. These two ducks were removed from the experiment at this time, and when sampled again 1 month later, one continued to exhibit DNA aneuploidy. None of the control DNA histograms demonstrated DNA aneuploid-like patterns. There were no significant differences in cell cycle percentages at any time point between control and exposed animals. A significant increase in CV was observed at 9 months exposure, but after removal of the two ducks with DNA aneuploidy, no significant difference was detected in the group monitored after 12 months exposure. An increased variation in the DNA and DNA aneuploidy could, therefore, be detected in duck rbc using flow cytometric analysis, with the onset of these effects being related to the attainment of maximal levels of 137Cs body burdens in the exposed animals.

  4. Comparison of adverse effects of proton and X-ray chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer using an adaptive dose–volume histogram analysis

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Yamanashi, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takao; Mizumoto, Masashi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary late toxicity is of concern in concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the benefit of proton beam therapy (PBT) using clinical data and adaptive dose–volume histogram (DVH) analysis. The subjects were 44 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent definitive CCRT using X-rays (n = 19) or protons (n = 25). Experimental recalculation using protons was performed for the patient actually treated with X-rays, and vice versa. Target coverage and dose constraints of normal tissues were conserved. Lung V5–V20, mean lung dose (MLD), and heart V30–V50 were compared for risk organ doses between experimental plans and actual treatment plans. Potential toxicity was estimated using protons in patients actually treated with X-rays, and vice versa. Pulmonary events of Grade ≥2 occurred in 8/44 cases (18%), and cardiac events were seen in 11 cases (25%). Risk organ doses in patients with events of Grade ≥2 were significantly higher than for those with events of Grade ≤1. Risk organ doses were lower in proton plans compared with X-ray plans. All patients suffering toxicity who were treated with X-rays (n = 13) had reduced predicted doses in lung and heart using protons, while doses in all patients treated with protons (n = 24) with toxicity of Grade ≤1 had worsened predicted toxicity with X-rays. Analysis of normal tissue complication probability showed a potential reduction in toxicity by using proton beams. Irradiation dose, volume and adverse effects on the heart and lung can be reduced using protons. Thus, PBT is a promising treatment modality for the management of esophageal cancer. PMID:25755255

  5. Comparison of adverse effects of proton and X-ray chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer using an adaptive dose-volume histogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Yamanashi, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takao; Mizumoto, Masashi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary late toxicity is of concern in concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the benefit of proton beam therapy (PBT) using clinical data and adaptive dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. The subjects were 44 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent definitive CCRT using X-rays (n = 19) or protons (n = 25). Experimental recalculation using protons was performed for the patient actually treated with X-rays, and vice versa. Target coverage and dose constraints of normal tissues were conserved. Lung V5-V20, mean lung dose (MLD), and heart V30-V50 were compared for risk organ doses between experimental plans and actual treatment plans. Potential toxicity was estimated using protons in patients actually treated with X-rays, and vice versa. Pulmonary events of Grade ≥2 occurred in 8/44 cases (18%), and cardiac events were seen in 11 cases (25%). Risk organ doses in patients with events of Grade ≥2 were significantly higher than for those with events of Grade ≤1. Risk organ doses were lower in proton plans compared with X-ray plans. All patients suffering toxicity who were treated with X-rays (n = 13) had reduced predicted doses in lung and heart using protons, while doses in all patients treated with protons (n = 24) with toxicity of Grade ≤1 had worsened predicted toxicity with X-rays. Analysis of normal tissue complication probability showed a potential reduction in toxicity by using proton beams. Irradiation dose, volume and adverse effects on the heart and lung can be reduced using protons. Thus, PBT is a promising treatment modality for the management of esophageal cancer.

  6. Comparison of dose–volume histograms between proton beam and X-ray conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Toshiki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Mizumoto, Masashi; Numajiri, Haruko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the parameters of the dose–volume histogram (DVH) between proton beam therapy (PBT) and X-ray conformal radiotherapy (XCRT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the tumor conditions. A total of 35 patients having NSCLC treated with PBT were enrolled in this analysis. The numbers of TNM stage and lymph node status were IIB (n = 3), IIIA (n = 15) and IIIB (n = 17), and N0 (n = 2), N1 (n = 4), N2 (n = 17) and N3 (n = 12), respectively. Plans for XCRT were simulated based on the same CT, and the same clinical target volume (CTV) was used based on the actual PBT plan. The treatment dose was 74 Gy-equivalent dose (GyE) for the primary site and 66 GyE for positive lymph nodes. The parameters were then calculated according to the normal lung dose, and the irradiation volumes of the doses (Vx) were compared. We also evaluated the feasibility of both plans according to criteria: V5 ≥ 42%, V20 ≥ 25%, mean lung dose ≥ 20 Gy. The mean normal lung dose and V5 to V50 were significantly lower in PBT than in XCRT. The differences were greater with the more advanced nodal status and with the larger CTV. Furthermore, 45.7% of the X-ray plans were classified as inadequate according to the criteria, whereas 17.1% of the proton plans were considered unsuitable. The number of inadequate X-ray plans increased in cases with advanced nodal stage. This study indicated that some patients who cannot receive photon radiotherapy may be able to be treated using PBT. PMID:25368341

  7. [Research on K-means clustering segmentation method for MRI brain image based on selecting multi-peaks in gray histogram].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoxue; Yu, Haizhong; Chen, Hao

    2013-12-01

    To solve the problem of traditional K-means clustering in which initial clustering centers are selected randomly, we proposed a new K-means segmentation algorithm based on robustly selecting 'peaks' standing for White Matter, Gray Matter and Cerebrospinal Fluid in multi-peaks gray histogram of MRI brain image. The new algorithm takes gray value of selected histogram 'peaks' as the initial K-means clustering center and can segment the MRI brain image into three parts of tissue more effectively, accurately, steadily and successfully. Massive experiments have proved that the proposed algorithm can overcome many shortcomings caused by traditional K-means clustering method such as low efficiency, veracity, robustness and time consuming. The histogram 'peak' selecting idea of the proposed segmentootion method is of more universal availability.

  8. Cytokine and iNOS profiles in lymph nodes of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum and their association with the parasitic DNA load and clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Tassia Cristina Bello; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Sávio Freire; de Campos, Monique Paiva; de Miranda, Luisa Helena Monteiro; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Belo, Vinícius Silva; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges

    2016-08-30

    In South America, visceral leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease with severe evolution characteristics in humans, and dogs are its main reservoir. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the clinical status of dogs from a Brazilian endemic area naturally, at Barra Mansa municipality, infected with Leishmania infantum, in conjunction with their histopathological profile and, in order to determine possible markers of susceptibility or resistance to the disease, parasitic DNA load, cytokine and iNOS mRNA expression profiles were investigated in lymph nodes. High levels of IFN-ɣ and IL-6 mRNA were detected. Both IFN-ɣ and IL-6 mRNA were associated with disorganization of the corticomedullary region. IFN-ɣ and TNF-α mRNA were associated with the absence of follicular hyperplasia. The regulatory pathway was remarkable with IL-10 mRNA detection and its significant association with the severity of the disease. Plasmacytosis and sinus histiocytosis were associated with high loads of parasitic DNA, but there was no significant association between the parasite DNA load and animal clinical alterations. Since high parasitic loads were found in animals with or without symptoms, clinical examination cannot be considered as a criterion for disease susceptibility assessment. PMID:27523930

  9. Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Lois Charlotte; Miller, Julie-Anne; Kumar, Shivani; Whelan, Brendan M.; Vinod, Shalini K.

    2012-10-01

    Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

  10. Modeling the dark current histogram induced by gold contamination in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor image sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Domengie, F. Morin, P.; Bauza, D.

    2015-07-14

    We propose a model for dark current induced by metallic contamination in a CMOS image sensor. Based on Shockley-Read-Hall kinetics, the expression of dark current proposed accounts for the electric field enhanced emission factor due to the Poole-Frenkel barrier lowering and phonon-assisted tunneling mechanisms. To that aim, we considered the distribution of the electric field magnitude and metal atoms in the depth of the pixel. Poisson statistics were used to estimate the random distribution of metal atoms in each pixel for a given contamination dose. Then, we performed a Monte-Carlo-based simulation for each pixel to set the number of metal atoms the pixel contained and the enhancement factor each atom underwent, and obtained a histogram of the number of pixels versus dark current for the full sensor. Excellent agreement with the dark current histogram measured on an ion-implanted gold-contaminated imager has been achieved, in particular, for the description of the distribution tails due to the pixel regions in which the contaminant atoms undergo a large electric field. The agreement remains very good when increasing the temperature by 15 °C. We demonstrated that the amplification of the dark current generated for the typical electric fields encountered in the CMOS image sensors, which depends on the nature of the metal contaminant, may become very large at high electric field. The electron and hole emissions and the resulting enhancement factor are described as a function of the trap characteristics, electric field, and temperature.

  11. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  12. Priming with a Simplified Intradermal HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Regimen followed by Boosting with Recombinant HIV-1 MVA Vaccine Is Safe and Immunogenic: A Phase IIa Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Joachim, Agricola; Geldmacher, Christof; Mann, Philipp; Moshiro, Candida; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius; Maboko, Leonard; Missanga, Marco; Kaluwa, Bahati; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Podola, Lilly; Bauer, Asli; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Marovich, Mary; Moss, Bernard; Hoelscher, Michael; Gotch, Frances; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Stout, Richard; McCormack, Sheena; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Robb, Merlin L.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Bakari, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Intradermal priming with HIV-1 DNA plasmids followed by HIV-1MVA boosting induces strong and broad cellular and humoral immune responses. In our previous HIVIS-03 trial, we used 5 injections with 2 pools of HIV-DNA at separate sites for each priming immunization. The present study explores whether HIV-DNA priming can be simplified by reducing the number of DNA injections and administration of combined versus separated plasmid pools. Methods In this phase IIa, randomized trial, priming was performed using 5 injections of HIV-DNA, 1000 μg total dose, (3 Env and 2 Gag encoding plasmids) compared to two “simplified” regimens of 2 injections of HIV-DNA, 600 μg total dose, of Env- and Gag-encoding plasmid pools with each pool either administered separately or combined. HIV-DNA immunizations were given intradermally at weeks 0, 4, and 12. Boosting was performed intramuscularly with 108 pfu HIV-MVA at weeks 30 and 46. Results 129 healthy Tanzanian participants were enrolled. There were no differences in adverse events between the groups. The proportion of IFN-γ ELISpot responders to Gag and/or Env peptides after the second HIV-MVA boost did not differ significantly between the groups primed with 2 injections of combined HIV-DNA pools, 2 injections with separated pools, and 5 injections with separated pools (90%, 97% and 97%). There were no significant differences in the magnitude of Gag and/or Env IFN-γ ELISpot responses, in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses measured as IFN-γ/IL-2 production by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) or in response rates and median titers for binding antibodies to Env gp160 between study groups. Conclusions A simplified intradermal vaccination regimen with 2 injections of a total of 600 μg with combined HIV-DNA plasmids primed cellular responses as efficiently as the standard regimen of 5 injections of a total of 1000 μg with separated plasmid pools after boosting twice with HIV-MVA. Trial Registration World Health

  13. DNA Methylation and Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Delpu, Yannick; Cordelier, Pierre; Cho, William C.; Torrisani, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in the physiological control of genome expression. DNA methylation patterns are largely modified in cancer cells and can therefore be used to distinguish cancer cells from normal tissues. This review describes the main technologies available for the detection and the discovery of aberrantly methylated DNA patterns. It also presents the different sources of biological samples suitable for DNA methylation studies. We discuss the interest and perspectives on the use of DNA methylation measurements for cancer diagnosis through examples of methylated genes commonly documented in the literature. The discussion leads to our consideration for why DNA methylation is not commonly used in clinical practice through an examination of the main requirements that constitute a reliable biomarker. Finally, we describe the main DNA methylation inhibitors currently used in clinical trials and those that exhibit promising results. PMID:23873296

  14. Diagnostic validation of a familial hypercholesterolaemia cohort provides a model for using targeted next generation DNA sequencing in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hinchcliffe, Marcus; Le, Huong; Fimmel, Anthony; Molloy, Laura; Freeman, Lucinda; Sullivan, David; Trent, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of a next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) platform using a capture based DNA library preparation method. Data and experience gained from this diagnostic validation can be used to progress the applications of NGS in the wider molecular diagnostic setting. A technical cross-validation comparing the current molecular diagnostic gold standard methods of Sanger DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependant probe amplification (MLPA) versus a customised capture based targeted re-sequencing method on a SOLiD 5500 sequencing platform was carried out using a cohort of 96 familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) samples. We compared a total of 595 DNA variations (488 common single nucleotide polymorphisms, 73 missense mutations, 9 nonsense mutations, 3 splice site point mutations, 13 small indels, 2 multi-exonic duplications and 7 multi-exonic deletions) found previously in the 96 FH samples. DNA variation detection sensitivity and specificity were both 100% for the SOLiD 5500 NGS platform compared with Sanger sequencing and MLPA only when both LifeScope and Integrative Genomics Viewer softwares were utilised. The methods described here offer a high-quality strategy for the detection of a wide range of DNA mutations in diseases with a moderate number of well described causative genes. However, there are important issues related to the bioinformatic algorithms employed to detect small indels.

  15. Evaluation of breast cancer using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) histogram analysis: comparison with malignant status, histological subtype, and molecular prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Gene Young; Moy, Linda; Kim, Sungheon G.; Baete, Steven H.; Moccaldi, Melanie; Babb, James S.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine heterogeneous breast cancer through intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) histogram analysis. Materials and methods This HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved retrospective study included 62 patients (age 48.44±11.14 years, 50 malignant lesions and 12 benign) who underwent contrast-enhanced 3 T breast MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and IVIM biomarkers of tissue diffusivity (Dt), perfusion fraction (fp), and pseudo-diffusivity (Dp) were calculated using voxel-based analysis for the whole lesion volume. Histogram analysis was performed to quantify tumour heterogeneity. Comparisons were made using Mann–Whitney tests between benign/malignant status, histological subtype, and molecular prognostic factor status while Spearman’s rank correlation was used to characterize the association between imaging biomarkers and prognostic factor expression. Results The average values of the ADC and IVIM biomarkers, Dt and fp, showed significant differences between benign and malignant lesions. Additional significant differences were found in the histogram parameters among tumour subtypes and molecular prognostic factor status. IVIM histogram metrics, particularly fp and Dp, showed significant correlation with hormonal factor expression. Conclusion Advanced diffusion imaging biomarkers show relationships with molecular prognostic factors and breast cancer malignancy. This analysis reveals novel diagnostic metrics that may explain some of the observed variability in treatment response among breast cancer patients. PMID:26615557

  16. Histogram analysis as a method for determining the line tension of a three-phase contact region by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Yuri

    2005-11-01

    A method is proposed for determining the line tension, which is the main physical characteristic of a three-phase contact region, by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The key idea of the proposed method is that if a three-phase equilibrium involves a three-phase contact region, the probability distribution of states of a system as a function of two order parameters depends not only on the surface tension, but also on the line tension. This probability distribution can be obtained as a normalized histogram by appropriate MC simulations, so one can use the combination of histogram analysis and finite-size scaling to study the properties of a three phase contact region. Every histogram and results extracted therefrom will depend on the size of the simulated system. Carrying out MC simulations for a series of system sizes and extrapolating the results, obtained from the corresponding series of histograms, to infinite size, one can determine the line tension of the three phase contact region and the interfacial tensions of all three interfaces (and hence the contact angles) in an infinite system. To illustrate the proposed method, it is applied to the three-dimensional ternary fluid mixture, in which molecular pairs of like species do not interact whereas those of unlike species interact as hard spheres. The simulated results are in agreement with expectations.

  17. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  18. Clinical trial in healthy malaria-naïve adults to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and efficacy of MuStDO5, a five-gene, sporozoite/hepatic stage Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine combined with escalating dose human GM-CSF DNA

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Thomas L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Wang, Ruobing; Epstein, Judith E.; Hedstrom, Richard C.; Kumar, Sanjai; Luke, Thomas C.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Sacci, Jr., John B.; Sedegah, Martha; Nosek, Jr., Ronald A.; De La Vega, Patricia; Berzins, Mara P.; Majam, Victoria F.; Abot, Esteban N.; Ganeshan, Harini; Richie, Nancy O.; Banania, Jo Glenna; Baraceros, Maria Fe B.; Geter, Tanya G.; Mere, Robin; Bebris, Lolita; Limbach, Keith; Hickey, Bradley W.; Lanar, David E.; Ng, Jennifer; Shi, Meng; Hobart, Peter M.; Norman, Jon A.; Soisson, Lorraine A.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    When introduced in the 1990s, immunization with DNA plasmids was considered potentially revolutionary for vaccine development, particularly for vaccines intended to induce protective CD8 T cell responses against multiple antigens. We conducted, in 1997−1998, the first clinical trial in healthy humans of a DNA vaccine, a single plasmid encoding Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), as an initial step toward developing a multi-antigen malaria vaccine targeting the liver stages of the parasite. As the next step, we conducted in 2000–2001 a clinical trial of a five-plasmid mixture called MuStDO5 encoding pre-erythrocytic antigens PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, PfEXP1, PfLSA1 and PfLSA3. Thirty-two, malaria-naïve, adult volunteers were enrolled sequentially into four cohorts receiving a mixture of 500 μg of each plasmid plus escalating doses (0, 20, 100 or 500 μg) of a sixth plasmid encoding human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF). Three doses of each formulation were administered intramuscularly by needle-less jet injection at 0, 4 and 8 weeks, and each cohort had controlled human malaria infection administered by five mosquito bites 18 d later. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, inducing moderate antigen-specific, MHC-restricted T cell interferon-γ responses but no antibodies. Although no volunteers were protected, T cell responses were boosted post malaria challenge. This trial demonstrated the MuStDO5 DNA and hGM-CSF plasmids to be safe and modestly immunogenic for T cell responses. It also laid the foundation for priming with DNA plasmids and boosting with recombinant viruses, an approach known for nearly 15 y to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:23151451

  19. BEDVH--A method for evaluating biologically effective dose volume histograms: Application to eye plaque brachytherapy implants

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Huber, Kathryn E.; Mignano, John E.; Duker, Jay S.; Laver, Nora V.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: A method is introduced to examine the influence of implant duration T, radionuclide, and radiobiological parameters on the biologically effective dose (BED) throughout the entire volume of regions of interest for episcleral brachytherapy using available radionuclides. This method is employed to evaluate a particular eye plaque brachytherapy implant in a radiobiological context. Methods: A reference eye geometry and 16 mm COMS eye plaque loaded with {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, or {sup 131}Cs sources were examined with dose distributions accounting for plaque heterogeneities. For a standardized 7 day implant, doses to 90% of the tumor volume ( {sub TUMOR}D{sub 90}) and 10% of the organ at risk volumes ( {sub OAR}D{sub 10}) were calculated. The BED equation from Dale and Jones and published {alpha}/{beta} and {mu} parameters were incorporated with dose volume histograms (DVHs) for various T values such as T = 7 days (i.e., {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} and {sub OAR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10}). By calculating BED throughout the volumes, biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs) were developed for tumor and OARs. Influence of T, radionuclide choice, and radiobiological parameters on {sub TUMOR}BEDVH and {sub OAR}BEDVH were examined. The nominal dose was scaled for shorter implants to achieve biological equivalence. Results: {sub TUMOR}D{sub 90} values were 102, 112, and 110 Gy for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively. Corresponding {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} values were 124, 140, and 138 Gy, respectively. As T decreased from 7 to 0.01 days, the isobiologically effective prescription dose decreased by a factor of three. As expected, {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BEDVH did not significantly change as a function of radionuclide half-life but varied by 10% due to radionuclide dose distribution. Variations in reported radiobiological parameters caused {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} to deviate by up to 46%. Over the range of {sub OAR

  20. Association of SOX2 and Nestin DNA amplification and protein expression with clinical features and overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingbao; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yuan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Cong; Chen, Xuan; Guan, Shanghui; Meng, Xiangjiao

    2016-06-01

    Up to now, the prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is poor. With progress of cancer biology, a number of genes have been investigated for predicting prognosis of NSCLC, such as cancer stem cell markers SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2) and Nestin. Recently, a series of studies have been performed to examine the associations of SOX2 and Nestin with clinical parameters and prognosis in NSCLC, however, the results were not consistent. In the present study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the associations. Four English databases (PubMed, ISI web of science, Embase, and Ovid) were used to search the relevant studies with the last date of November 10, 2015. The pooling analyses were stratified by DNA amplification and protein expression. The pooling ORs or HRs were used to assess the strength of the associations. Finally, we included 19 articles for SOX2 and six articles for Nestin according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pooling analyses revealed that there were significant associations between SOX2 DNA amplification and clinical features of NSCLC, gender, smoking status, squamous cell cancer (SCC) histology, and differentiations. And significant associations were also identified between SOX2 protein expression and clinical parameters, smoking status and SCC histology. For Nestin, its protein expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis and stage. Simultaneously, we found that high/positive SOX2 alterations, either DNA amplification or protein expression, were favorable for overall survival (OS) in NSCLC. On the contrary, high/positive Nestin protein expression was poor for OS. PMID:27150062

  1. Association of SOX2 and Nestin DNA amplification and protein expression with clinical features and overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingbao; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yuan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Cong; Chen, Xuan; Guan, Shanghui; Meng, Xiangjiao

    2016-01-01

    Up to now, the prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is poor. With progress of cancer biology, a number of genes have been investigated for predicting prognosis of NSCLC, such as cancer stem cell markers SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2) and Nestin. Recently, a series of studies have been performed to examine the associations of SOX2 and Nestin with clinical parameters and prognosis in NSCLC, however, the results were not consistent. In the present study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the associations. Four English databases (PubMed, ISI web of science, Embase, and Ovid) were used to search the relevant studies with the last date of November 10, 2015. The pooling analyses were stratified by DNA amplification and protein expression. The pooling ORs or HRs were used to assess the strength of the associations. Finally, we included 19 articles for SOX2 and six articles for Nestin according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pooling analyses revealed that there were significant associations between SOX2 DNA amplification and clinical features of NSCLC, gender, smoking status, squamous cell cancer (SCC) histology, and differentiations. And significant associations were also identified between SOX2 protein expression and clinical parameters, smoking status and SCC histology. For Nestin, its protein expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis and stage. Simultaneously, we found that high/positive SOX2 alterations, either DNA amplification or protein expression, were favorable for overall survival (OS) in NSCLC. On the contrary, high/positive Nestin protein expression was poor for OS. PMID:27150062

  2. Analytic treatment of the compound action potential: Estimating the summed post-stimulus time histogram and unit response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertoff, Mark E.

    2004-11-01

    The convolution of an equation representing a summed post-stimulus time histogram computed across auditory nerve fibers [P(t)] with an equation representing a single-unit wave form [U(t)], resulted in an analytic expression for the compound action potential (CAP). The solution was fit to CAPs recorded to low and high frequency stimuli at various signal levels. The correlation between the CAP and the analytic expression was generally greater than 0.90. At high levels the width of P(t) was broader for low frequency stimuli than for high frequency signals, but delays were comparable. This indicates that at high signal levels there is an overlap in the population of auditory nerve fibers contributing to the CAP for both low and high frequency stimuli but low frequencies include contributions from more apical regions. At low signal levels the width of P(t) decreased for most frequencies and delays increased. The frequency of oscillation of U(t) was largest for high frequency stimuli and decreased for low frequency stimuli. The decay of U(t) was largest at 8 kHz and smallest at 1 kHz. These results indicate that the hair cell or neural mechanisms involved in the generation of action potentials may differ along the cochlear partition. .

  3. Vision-based drone flight control and crowd or riot analysis with efficient color histogram based tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Markus

    2011-05-01

    Object tracking is a direct or indirect key issue in many different military applications like visual surveillance, automatic visual closed-loop control of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) and PTZ-cameras, or in the field of crowd evaluations in order to detect or analyse a riot emergence. Of course, a high robustness is the most important feature of the underlying tracker, but this is hindered significantly the more the tracker needs to have low calculation times. In the UAV application introduced in this paper the tracker has to be extraordinarily quick. In order to optimize the calculation time and the robustness in combination as far as possible, a highly efficient tracking procedure is presented for the above mentioned application fields which relies on well-known color histograms but uses them in a novel manner. This procedure bases on the calculation of a color weighting vector representing the significances of object colors like a kind of an object's color finger print. Several examples from the above mentioned military applications are shown to demonstrate the practical relevance and the performance of the presented tracking approach.

  4. Usefulness of histogram analysis of spatial frequency components for exploring the similarity and bilateral asymmetry in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsuki, Kenshi; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Morishita, Junji

    2015-03-01

    The right and left mammograms of a patient are assumed to be bilaterally symmetric for image readings. The detection of asymmetry in bilateral mammograms is a reliable indicator for detecting possible breast abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of a new method in terms of spatial frequency components for exploration of similarity and abnormality between the right and left mammograms. A total of 98 normal and 119 abnormal cases with calcifications were used for this study. Each case included two mediolateral oblique views. The spatial frequency components were determined from the symmetric regions in the right and left mammograms by Fourier transform. The degrees of conformity between the two spatial frequency components in the right and left mammograms were calculated for the same and different patients. The degrees of conformity were also examined for cases with and without calcifications for the same patient to show if the proposed method was useful for indicating the existence of calcifications or not. The average degrees of conformity and the standard deviations for the same and different patients were 0.911 +/- 0.0165 and 0.857 +/- 0.0328, respectively. The degrees of conformity calculated from abnormal cases (0.836 +/- 0.0906) showed statistically lower values compared with those measured from normal cases (0.911 +/- 0.0165). Our results indicated that histogram analysis of spatial frequency components could be useful as a similarity measure between bilateral mammograms for the same patient and abnormal signs in a mammogram.

  5. Prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy for prostate cancer with full and empty bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael . E-mail: mpinkawa@ukaachen.de; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in prostate radiotherapy with full bladder (FB) and empty bladder (EB). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients underwent planning computed tomography scans in a supine position with FB and EB before and after 4 and 8 weeks of radiation therapy. The scans were matched by alignment of pelvic bones. Displacements of the prostate/seminal vesicle organ borders and center of mass were determined. Treatment plans (FB vs. EB) were compared. Results: Compared with the primary scan, FB volume varied more than EB volume (standard deviation, 106 cm{sup 3} vs. 47 cm{sup 3}), but the prostate/seminal vesicle center of mass position variability was the same (>3 mm deviation in right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions in 0, 41%, and 33%, respectively, with FB vs. 0, 44%, and 33% with EB). The bladder volume treated with 90% of the prescription dose was significantly larger with EB (39% {+-} 14% vs. 22% {+-} 10%; p < 0.01). Bowel loops received {>=}90% of prescription dose in 37% (3% with FB; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the larger variability of bladder filling, prostate position stability was the same with FB compared with EB. An increased amount of bladder volume in the high-dose region and a higher dose to bowel loops result from treatment plans with EB.

  6. Adaptive block-wise alphabet reduction scheme for lossless compression of images with sparse and locally sparse histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Atef; Zouari, Sonia; Ghribi, Abdelaziz

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new adaptive block-wise lossless image compression algorithm, which is based on the so-called alphabet reduction scheme combined with an adaptive arithmetic coding (AC). This new encoding algorithm is particularly efficient for lossless compression of images with sparse and locally sparse histograms. AC is a very efficient technique for lossless data compression and produces a rate that is close to the entropy; however, a compression performance loss occurs when encoding images or blocks with a limited number of active symbols by comparison with the number of symbols in the nominal alphabet, which consists in the amplification of the zero frequency problem. Generally, most methods add one to the frequency count of each symbol from the nominal alphabet, which leads to a statistical model distortion, and therefore reduces the efficiency of the AC. The aim of this work is to overcome this drawback by assigning to each image block the smallest possible set including all the existing symbols called active symbols. This is an alternative of using the nominal alphabet when applying the conventional arithmetic encoders. We show experimentally that the proposed method outperforms several lossless image compression encoders and standards including the conventional arithmetic encoders, JPEG2000, and JPEG-LS.

  7. Safety surrogate histograms (SSH): A novel real-time safety assessment of dilemma zone related conflicts at signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Ghanipoor Machiani, Sahar; Abbas, Montasir

    2016-11-01

    Drivers' indecisiveness in dilemma zones (DZ) could result in crash-prone situations at signalized intersections. DZ is to the area ahead of an intersection in which drivers encounter a dilemma regarding whether to stop or proceed through the intersection when the signal turns yellow. An improper decision to stop by the leading driver, combined with the following driver deciding to go, can result in a rear-end collision, unless the following driver recognizes a collision is imminent and adjusts his or her behavior at or shortly after the onset of yellow. Considering the significance of DZ-related crashes, a comprehensive safety measure is needed to characterize the level of safety at signalized intersections. In this study, a novel safety surrogate measure was developed utilizing real-time radar field data. This new measure, called safety surrogate histogram (SSH), captures the degree and frequency of DZ-related conflicts at each intersection approach. SSH includes detailed information regarding the possibility of crashes, because it is calculated based on the vehicles conflicts. An example illustrating the application of the new methodology at two study sites in Virginia is presented and discussed, and a comparison is provided between SSH and other DZ-related safety surrogate measures mentioned in the literature. The results of the study reveal the efficacy of the SSH as complementary to existing surrogate measures.

  8. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2015-01-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices – a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529 nm/1416 nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health. PMID:26531782

  9. Novel brachytherapy treatment planning system utilizing dose rate dependent average cell survival, CT-simulator, and dose-volume histogram

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.; Fong, W.; Frankel, T.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes a new brachytherapy planning program that provides an evaluation of a given low or high dose rate treatment taking into account spatial dose heterogeneity and cell response to radiation. This brachytherapy scheme uses the images from a CT-Simulator (AcQSim, Picker International, Cleveland, Ohio) to simultaneously localize the seed positions and to axially scan the patient. This procedure helps to ensure accurate registration of the putative seed positions with the patient tissues and organs. The seed positions are determined by back-projecting positions of seeds or dummy seeds from the CT-Simulator setup scout images. Physicians delineate the tissues of interest on the axial slices. Dose is computed after assigning activity (low dose rate) of dwell times (high dose rate) to the Ir{sup 192} or I{sup 125} seed. The planar isodose distribution is superimposed onto axial cuts of the tissues and onto coronal or sagital views of the tissues following image reconstruction. Areal or volumetric calculations of the dose distribution within a given tissue are computed from the tissue outlines. The treatment plan computes (1) volume differential and cummulative dose histograms of the dose delivered to individual tissues, (2) the average, standard deviation, and coefficient of skewness of the dose distribution delivered to the individual tissues, (3) the average survival probability for a given radiation treatment.

  10. O(1) time algorithms for computing histogram and Hough transform on a cross-bridge reconfigurable array of processors

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, T.; Horng, S.; Wang, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Instead of using the base-2 number system, we use a base-m number system to represent the numbers used in the proposed algorithms. Such a strategy can be used to design an O(T) time, T = (log(sub m) N) + 1, prefix sum algorithm for a binary sequence with N-bit on a cross-bridge reconfigurable array of processors using N processors, where the data bus is m-bit wide. Then, this basic operation can be used to compute the histogram of an n x n image with G gray-level value in constant time using G x n x n processors, and compute the Hough transform of an image with N edge pixels and n x n parameter space in constant time using n x n x N processors, respectively. This result is better than the previously known results proposed in the literature. Also, the execution time of the proposed algorithms is tunable by the bus bandwidth. 43 refs.

  11. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  12. Comparative clinical sample preparation of DNA and RNA viral nucleic acids for a commercial deep sequencing system (Illumina MiSeq(®)).

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; de Camargo Tozato, Claudia; Malossi, Camila Dantas; da Cruz, Tais Fukuta; Cavalcante, Raíssa Vasconcelos; Kurissio, Jacqueline Kazue; Cagnini, Didier Quevedo; Rodrigues, Marianna Vaz; Biondo, Alexander Welker; Araujo, João Pessoa

    2015-08-01

    Sequence-independent methods for viral discovery have been widely used for whole genome sequencing of viruses. Different protocols for viral enrichment, library preparation and sequencing have increasingly been more available and at lower costs. However, no study to date has focused on optimization of viral sample preparation for commercial deep sequencing. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to evaluate an In-House enzymatic protocol for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) synthesis and also compare the use of a commercially available kit protocol (Nextera XT, Illumina Inc, San Diego, CA, USA) and its combination with a library quantitation kit (Kapa, Kapa Biosystems, Wilmington, MA, USA) for deep sequencing (Illumina Miseq). Two RNA viruses (canine distemper virus and dengue virus) and one ssDNA virus (porcine circovirus type 2) were tested with the optimized protocols. The tested method for dsDNA synthesis has shown satisfactory results and may be used in laboratory setting, particularly when enzymes are already available. Library preparation combining commercial kits (Nextera XT and Kapa) has yielded more reads and genome coverage, probably due to a lack of small fragment recovering at the normalization step of Nextera XT. In addition, libraries may be diluted or concentrated to provide increase on genome coverage with Kapa quantitation.

  13. Identification of invasive fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients by combining an Aspergillus specific PCR with a multifungal DNA-microarray from primary clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Boch, T; Reinwald, M; Postina, P; Cornely, O A; Vehreschild, J J; Heußel, C P; Heinz, W J; Hoenigl, M; Eigl, S; Lehrnbecher, T; Hahn, J; Claus, B; Lauten, M; Egerer, G; Müller, M C; Will, S; Merker, N; Hofmann, W-K; Buchheidt, D; Spiess, B

    2015-12-01

    The increasing incidence of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), most of all invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised patients emphasises the need to improve the diagnostic tools for detection of fungal pathogens. We investigated the diagnostic performance of a multifungal DNA-microarray detecting 15 different fungi [Aspergillus, Candida, Fusarium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Scedosporium and Trichosporon species (spp.)] in addition to an Aspergillus specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Biopsies, bronchoalveolar lavage and peripheral blood samples of 133 immunocompromised patients (pts) were investigated by a multifungal DNA-microarray as well as a nested Aspergillus specific PCR assay. Patients had proven (n = 18), probable (n = 29), possible (n = 48) and no IFD (n = 38) and were mostly under antifungal therapy at the time of sampling. The results were compared to culture, histopathology, imaging and serology, respectively. For the non-Aspergillus IFD the microarray analysis yielded in all samples a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80%. Best results for the detection of all IFD were achieved by combining DNA-microarray and Aspergillus specific PCR in biopsy samples (sensitivity 79%; specificity 71%). The molecular assays in combination identify genomic DNA of fungal pathogens and may improve identification of causative pathogens of IFD and help overcoming the diagnostic uncertainty of culture and/or histopathology findings, even during antifungal therapy.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  15. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  16. Clinical validation of the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV assay according to the guidelines for human papillomavirus DNA test requirements for cervical screening.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, A T; Meijer, C J L M; Poljak, M; Berkhof, J; van Kemenade, F J; van der Salm, M L; Bogaarts, M; Snijders, P J F; Heideman, D A M

    2013-07-01

    This study showed that the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV assay fulfilled cross-sectional clinical equivalence and reproducibility criteria of international consensus guidelines, which indicates that this assay can be considered clinically validated for cervical cancer screening purposes.

  17. DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, M A

    2003-04-01

    The DNA vaccines are simple rings of DNA containing a gene encoding an antigen, and a promoter/terminator to make the gene express in mammalian cells. They are a promising new approach for generating all types of desired immunity: cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL), T helper cells and antibodies, whilst being a technology that has the potential for global usage in terms of manufacturing ease, broad population administration and safety. This review gives an overview of the mechanisms, preclinical and clinical efficacy of DNA vaccines, and point out the limitations of the first generation of such vaccines, and some of the promising second-generation developments. This technology is also being utilized in the field of proteomics as a tool to elucidate the function of genes. The breadth of applications for DNA vaccines thus ranges from prophylactic vaccines to immunotherapy for infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:12653868

  18. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  19. Dynamics of interaction between complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes and erythrocytes. In vitro studies and potential general applications to clinical immune complex testing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Hooper, M.; Burge, J.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble antibody//sub 3/H-double-stranded PM2 DNA (dsDNA) immune complexes were briefly opsonized with complement and then allowed to bind to human erythrocytes (via complement receptors). The cells were washed and subsequently a volume of autologous blood in a variety of media was added, and the release of the bound immune complexes from the erythrocytes was studied as a function of temperature and time. After 1-2 h, the majority of the bound immune complexes were not released into the serum during blood clotting at either 37 degrees C or room temperature, but there was a considerably greater release of the immune complexes into the plasma of blood that was anticoagulated with EDTA. Similar results were obtained using various conditions of opsonization and also using complexes that contained lower molecular weight dsDNA. Thus, the kinetics of release of these antibody/dsDNA immune complexes differed substantially from the kinetics of release of antibody/bovine serum albumin complexes that was reported by others. Studies using the solution phase C1q immune complex binding assay confirmed that in approximately half of the SLE samples that were positive for immune complexes, there was a significantly higher level of detectable immune complexes in plasma vs. serum. Freshly drawn erythrocytes from some SLE patients exhibiting this plasma/serum discrepancy had IgG antigen on their surface that was released by incubation in EDTA plasma. Thus, the higher levels of immune complexes observed in EDTA plasma vs. serum using the C1q assay may often reflect the existence of immune complexes circulating in vivo bound to erythrocytes.

  20. Two New Nuclear Isolation Buffers for Plant DNA Flow Cytometry: A Test with 37 Species

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, João; Rodriguez, Eleazar; Doležel, Jaroslav; Santos, Conceição

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims After the initial boom in the application of flow cytometry in plant sciences in the late 1980s and early 1990s, which was accompanied by development of many nuclear isolation buffers, only a few efforts were made to develop new buffer formulas. In this work, recent data on the performance of nuclear isolation buffers are utilized in order to develop new buffers, general purpose buffer (GPB) and woody plant buffer (WPB), for plant DNA flow cytometry. Methods GPB and WPB were used to prepare samples for flow cytometric analysis of nuclear DNA content in a set of 37 plant species that included herbaceous and woody taxa with leaf tissues differing in structure and chemical composition. The following parameters of isolated nuclei were assessed: forward and side light scatter, propidium iodide fluorescence, coefficient of variation of DNA peaks, quantity of debris background, and the number of particles released from sample tissue. The nuclear genome size of 30 selected species was also estimated using the buffer that performed better for a given species. Key Results In unproblematic species, the use of both buffers resulted in high quality samples. The analysis of samples obtained with GPB usually resulted in histograms of DNA content with higher or similar resolution than those prepared with the WPB. In more recalcitrant tissues, such as those from woody plants, WPB performed better and GPB failed to provide acceptable results in some cases. Improved resolution of DNA content histograms in comparison with previously published buffers was achieved in most of the species analysed. Conclusions WPB is a reliable buffer which is also suitable for the analysis of problematic tissues/species. Although GPB failed with some plant species, it provided high-quality DNA histograms in species from which nuclear suspensions are easy to prepare. The results indicate that even with a broad range of species, either GPB or WPB is suitable for preparation of high

  1. Analysis of Performance of a PCR-Based Assay To Detect DNA of Aspergillus fumigatus in Whole Blood and Serum: a Comparative Study with Clinical Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Gago, Sara; Buitrago, María J.; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a real-time PCR-based assay was retrospectively analyzed (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group criteria) in the samples of patients with invasive aspergillosis. A total of 711 serial samples (356 whole-blood and 355 serum samples) from 38 adult patients were analyzed. The Aspergillus fumigatus PCR assay results were positive for 89 of 356 (25%) whole-blood samples and 90 of 355 (25.35%) serum samples. Positive PCR results were seen in 29 of 31 (93.5%) patients for which serum was analyzed and in 31 of 33 (93.9%) cases with whole-blood specimens. Both blood and serum samples were available in 26 cases, and significant differences were not observed in this subgroup of cases. The average number of threshold cycles (CT) for positive blood samples was 37.6, and the average CT for serum was 37.4. The DNA concentration ranged between 2 and 50 fg per μl of sample, with average DNA concentrations of 10.2 and 11.7 fg in positive blood and serum samples, respectively (P > 0.01). The performance of this PCR-based quantitative assay was similar for both serum and blood samples. We recommend serum samples as the most convenient hematological sample to use for Aspergillus DNA quantification when serial determinations are done. PMID:21849696

  2. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, Yasutaka; Mizuta, Masahiro; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L.; Date, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  3. Osteoarthritis Classification Using Self Organizing Map Based on Gabor Kernel and Contrast-Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization

    PubMed Central

    Anifah, Lilik; Purnama, I Ketut Eddy; Hariadi, Mochamad; Purnomo, Mauridhi Hery

    2013-01-01

    Localization is the first step in osteoarthritis (OA) classification. Manual classification, however, is time-consuming, tedious, and expensive. The proposed system is designed as decision support system for medical doctors to classify the severity of knee OA. A method has been proposed here to localize a joint space area for OA and then classify it in 4 steps to classify OA into KL-Grade 0, KL-Grade 1, KL-Grade 2, KL-Grade 3 and KL-Grade 4, which are preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction, and classification. In this proposed system, right and left knee detection was performed by employing the Contrast-Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and the template matching. The Gabor kernel, row sum graph and moment methods were used to localize the junction space area of knee. CLAHE is used for preprocessing step, i.e.to normalize the varied intensities. The segmentation process was conducted using the Gabor kernel, template matching, row sum graph and gray level center of mass method. Here GLCM (contrast, correlation, energy, and homogeinity) features were employed as training data. Overall, 50 data were evaluated for training and 258 data for testing. Experimental results showed the best performance by using gabor kernel with parameters α=8, θ=0, Ψ=[0 π/2], γ=0,8, N=4 and with number of iterations being 5000, momentum value 0.5 and α0=0.6 for the classification process. The run gave classification accuracy rate of 93.8% for KL-Grade 0, 70% for KL-Grade 1, 4% for KL-Grade 2, 10% for KL-Grade 3 and 88.9% for KL-Grade 4. PMID:23525188

  4. Principal Component Analysis-Based Pattern Analysis of Dose-Volume Histograms and Influence on Rectal Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Soehn, Matthias Alber, Markus; Yan Di

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: The variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) shapes in a patient population can be quantified using principal component analysis (PCA). We applied this to rectal DVHs of prostate cancer patients and investigated the correlation of the PCA parameters with late bleeding. Methods and Materials: PCA was applied to the rectal wall DVHs of 262 patients, who had been treated with a four-field box, conformal adaptive radiotherapy technique. The correlated changes in the DVH pattern were revealed as 'eigenmodes,' which were ordered by their importance to represent data set variability. Each DVH is uniquely characterized by its principal components (PCs). The correlation of the first three PCs and chronic rectal bleeding of Grade 2 or greater was investigated with uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Rectal wall DVHs in four-field conformal RT can primarily be represented by the first two or three PCs, which describe {approx}94% or 96% of the DVH shape variability, respectively. The first eigenmode models the total irradiated rectal volume; thus, PC1 correlates to the mean dose. Mode 2 describes the interpatient differences of the relative rectal volume in the two- or four-field overlap region. Mode 3 reveals correlations of volumes with intermediate doses ({approx}40-45 Gy) and volumes with doses >70 Gy; thus, PC3 is associated with the maximal dose. According to univariate logistic regression analysis, only PC2 correlated significantly with toxicity. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis with the first two or three PCs revealed an increased probability of bleeding for DVHs with more than one large PC. Conclusions: PCA can reveal the correlation structure of DVHs for a patient population as imposed by the treatment technique and provide information about its relationship to toxicity. It proves useful for augmenting normal tissue complication probability modeling approaches.

  5. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Azusa . E-mail: azusa@nirs.go.jp; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with <57 GyE (maximum dose [D{sub max}]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D{sub max}) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D{sub 2}) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON.

  6. Risk factors for neovascular glaucoma after carbon ion radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma using dose-volume histogram analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasawa, Naoki . E-mail: naoki_h@nirs.go.jp; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Koyama-Ito, Hiroko; Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors for neovascular glaucoma (NVG) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) of choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated between 2001 and 2005 with C-ion RT based on computed tomography treatment planning. All patients had a tumor of large size or one located close to the optic disk. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of NVG for the following parameters; gender, age, dose-volumes of the iris-ciliary body and the wall of eyeball, and irradiation of the optic disk (ODI). Results: Neovascular glaucoma occurred in 23 patients and the 3-year cumulative NVG rate was 42.6 {+-} 6.8% (standard error), but enucleation from NVG was performed in only three eyes. Multivariate analysis revealed that the significant risk factors for NVG were V50{sub IC} (volume irradiated {>=}50 GyE to iris-ciliary body) (p = 0.002) and ODI (p = 0.036). The 3-year NVG rate for patients with V50{sub IC} {>=}0.127 mL and those with V50{sub IC} <0.127 mL were 71.4 {+-} 8.5% and 11.5 {+-} 6.3%, respectively. The corresponding rate for the patients with and without ODI were 62.9 {+-} 10.4% and 28.4 {+-} 8.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analysis with computed tomography indicated that V50{sub IC} and ODI were independent risk factors for NVG. An irradiation system that can reduce the dose to both the anterior segment and the optic disk might be worth adopting to investigate whether or not incidence of NVG can be decreased with it.

  7. Postimplantation Analysis Enables Improvement of Dose-Volume Histograms and Reduction of Toxicity for Permanent Seed Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wust, Peter Postrach, Johanna; Kahmann, Frank; Henkel, Thomas; Graf, Reinhold; Cho, Chie Hee; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate how postimplantation analysis is useful for improving permanent seed implantation and reducing toxicity. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 197 questionnaires completed by patients after permanent seed implantation (monotherapy between 1999 and 2003). For 70% of these patients, a computed tomography was available to perform postimplantation analysis. The index doses and volumes of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were determined and categorized with respect to the date of implantation. Differences in symptom scores relative to pretherapeutic status were analyzed with regard to follow-up times and DVH descriptors. Acute and subacute toxicities in a control group of 117 patients from an earlier study (June 1999 to September 2001) by Wust et al. (2004) were compared with a matched subgroup from this study equaling 110 patients treated between October 2001 and August 2003. Results: Improved performance, identifying a characteristic time dependency of DVH parameters (after implantation) and toxicity scores, was demonstrated. Although coverage (volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose of the prostate) increased slightly, high-dose regions decreased with the growing experience of the users. Improvement in the DVH and a reduction of toxicities were found in the patient group implanted in the later period. A decline in symptoms with follow-up time counteracts this gain of experience and must be considered. Urinary and sexual discomfort was enhanced by dose heterogeneities (e.g., dose covering 10% of the prostate volume, volume covered by 200% of prescription dose). In contrast, rectal toxicities correlated with exposed rectal volumes, especially the rectal volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The typical side effects occurring after permanent seed implantation can be reduced by improving the dose distributions. An improvement in dose distributions and a reduction of toxicities were identified with elapsed time between

  8. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nisha; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Keam, Jennifer; Ballangrud, Ase; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying; McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N.; Ho, Alice Y.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  9. Locally weighted histogram analysis and stochastic solution for large-scale multi-state free energy estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhiqiang; Xia, Junchao; Zhang, Bin W.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) including its binless extension has been developed independently in several different contexts, and widely used in chemistry, physics, and statistics, for computing free energies and expectations from multiple ensembles. However, this method, while statistically efficient, is computationally costly or even infeasible when a large number, hundreds or more, of distributions are studied. We develop a locally WHAM (local WHAM) from the perspective of simulations of simulations (SOS), using generalized serial tempering (GST) to resample simulated data from multiple ensembles. The local WHAM equations based on one jump attempt per GST cycle can be solved by optimization algorithms orders of magnitude faster than standard implementations of global WHAM, but yield similarly accurate estimates of free energies to global WHAM estimates. Moreover, we propose an adaptive SOS procedure for solving local WHAM equations stochastically when multiple jump attempts are performed per GST cycle. Such a stochastic procedure can lead to more accurate estimates of equilibrium distributions than local WHAM with one jump attempt per cycle. The proposed methods are broadly applicable when the original data to be "WHAMMED" are obtained properly by any sampling algorithm including serial tempering and parallel tempering (replica exchange). To illustrate the methods, we estimated absolute binding free energies and binding energy distributions using the binding energy distribution analysis method from one and two dimensional replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations for the beta-cyclodextrin-heptanoate host-guest system. In addition to the computational advantage of handling large datasets, our two dimensional WHAM analysis also demonstrates that accurate results similar to those from well-converged data can be obtained from simulations for which sampling is limited and not fully equilibrated.

  10. Clinical performance of multiplex high-risk e6 mrna expression in comparison with hpv dna subtypes for the identification of women at risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Pan, Kui-You; Chen, Yun-Yuan; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Shwu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    We compared multiplex E6 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) tests using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA subtypes using a MY11/GP6+ PCR-based reverse-blot assay to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). In total, 684 women were studied, of whom 377 (55%) were diagnosed with CIN2+ histologically. The specificity of HPV mRNA to predict histological CIN2+ was higher than that of HPV DNA (81.3% vs. 44.2%). The odds ratios (ORs) to predict histological CIN2+ in women with positive for type 16, 18, 31, and 45 E6 mRNA or by HPV DNA detection were 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9-13.1) and 2.5 (95%CI 1.9-3.5), respectively, compared to those with negative for E6 mRNA or HPV DNA. The OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade DNA positive triage, the OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade

  11. A dominant-negative form of the major human abasic endonuclease enhances cellular sensitivity to laboratory and clinical DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Daniel R; Wilson, David M

    2007-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the primary enzyme in mammals for the repair of abasic sites in DNA, as well as a variety of 3' damages that arise upon oxidation or as products of enzymatic processing. If left unrepaired, APE1 substrates can promote mutagenic and cytotoxic outcomes. We describe herein a dominant-negative form of APE1 that lacks detectable nuclease activity and binds substrate DNA with a 13-fold higher affinity than the wild-type protein. This mutant form of APE1, termed ED, possesses two amino acid substitutions at active site residues Glu(96) (changed to Gln) and Asp(210) (changed to Asn). In vitro biochemical assays reveal that ED impedes wild-type APE1 AP site incision function, presumably by binding AP-DNA and blocking normal lesion processing. Moreover, tetracycline-regulated (tet-on) expression of ED in Chinese hamster ovary cells enhances the cytotoxic effects of the laboratory DNA-damaging agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; 5.4-fold) and hydrogen peroxide (1.5-fold). This MMS-induced, ED-dependent cell killing coincides with a hyperaccumulation of AP sites, implying that excessive DNA damage is the cause of cell death. Because an objective of the study was to identify a protein reagent that could be used in targeted gene therapy protocols, the effects of ED on cellular sensitivity to a number of chemotherapeutic compounds was tested. We show herein that ED expression sensitizes Chinese hamster ovary cells to the killing effects of the alkylating agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (also known as carmustine) and the chain terminating nucleoside analogue dideoxycytidine (also known as zalcitabine), but not to the radiomimetic bleomycin, the nucleoside analogue beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (also known as cytarabine), the topoisomerase inhibitors camptothecin and etoposide, or the cross-linking agents mitomycin C and cisplatin. Transient expression of ED in the human cancer cell line NCI-H1299 enhanced cellular

  12. Clinical performance of multiplex high-risk e6 mrna expression in comparison with hpv dna subtypes for the identification of women at risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Pan, Kui-You; Chen, Yun-Yuan; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Shwu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    We compared multiplex E6 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) tests using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA subtypes using a MY11/GP6+ PCR-based reverse-blot assay to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). In total, 684 women were studied, of whom 377 (55%) were diagnosed with CIN2+ histologically. The specificity of HPV mRNA to predict histological CIN2+ was higher than that of HPV DNA (81.3% vs. 44.2%). The odds ratios (ORs) to predict histological CIN2+ in women with positive for type 16, 18, 31, and 45 E6 mRNA or by HPV DNA detection were 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9-13.1) and 2.5 (95%CI 1.9-3.5), respectively, compared to those with negative for E6 mRNA or HPV DNA. The OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade DNA positive triage, the OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade

  13. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: characterizing the effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time using the histogram distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M.-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-03-01

    MRI-based multi-site trials now routinely include some form of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in their protocol. These studies can include data originating from scanners built by different vendors, each with their own set of unique protocol restrictions, including restrictions on the number of available gradient directions, whether an externally generated list of gradient directions can be used, and restrictions on the echo time (TE). One challenge of multi-site studies is to create a common imaging protocol that will result in a reliable and accurate set of diffusion metrics. The present study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two common metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA). We have shown in earlier work that ROI metrics and the mean of MD and FA histograms are not sufficiently sensitive for use in site characterization. Here we use the distance between whole brain histograms of FA and MD to investigate within- and between-site effects. We concluded that the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time could influence the results in multi-center trials and that histogram distance is sensitive metrics for each of these variables.

  14. The resolution of aneuploid DNA stem lines by flow cytometry: limitations imposed by the coefficient of variation and the percentage of aneuploid nuclei.

    PubMed

    Cusick, E L; Milton, J I; Ewen, S W

    1990-04-01

    Factors important in the resolution of cell sub-populations with differing DNA contents were investigated using an EPICS C flow cytometer. Software is available for the EPICS C which permits data from any two histograms to be superimposed or added together before display. Samples of fresh and archival thyroid tissue, stained with propidium iodide, were analysed on the flow cytometer and the peak channel number noted. The photomultiplier (PMT) voltage was increased and the sample analysed again producing a second histogram with a higher peak channel number. The two histograms were added together to simulate a cell suspension with two sub-populations with a different DNA content. By systematically altering the PMT voltage and the number of nuclei included in each analysis, it was possible to examine the importance of DNA index and the percentage of tumor cells with an aneuploid DNA content for both fresh and paraffin-embedded thyroid nuclei. The crucial importance of achieving a low coefficient of variation (CV) was demonstrated and consequently the reservations that pertain when archival material is studied, particularly in tumours where DNA aneuploidy is frequently expressed with a low DNA index.

  15. A survey of DNA diagnostic laboratories regarding DNA banking.

    PubMed

    McEwen, J E; Reilly, P R

    1995-06-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic labs regarding DNA banking (defined as the storage of individual DNA samples in some form with identifiers for later retrieval). The population surveyed consisted of all laboratories listed with HELIX, a national directory of DNA diagnostic labs that includes a fairly comprehensive listing of clinical service labs as well as a large number of research labs. The survey was concerned primarily with the legal and ethical issues that the long-term storage of DNA may raise. The survey inquired into the respondents' policies and procedures concerning (1) the extent of DNA banking and of interest in developing DNA banking in academia and industry and (2) the degree to which DNA banks had developed written internal policies and/or a written depositor's agreement (a signed document defining the rights and obligations of the person from whom the sample was taken and the bank) designed to anticipate or prevent some of the ethical and legal problems that can arise from the long-term retention of DNA. Our research suggests that (1) the activity of DNA banking is growing, particularly in the academic setting, and (2) most academically based DNA banks lack written internal policies, written depositor's agreements, or other relevant documentation regarding important aspects of this activity. PMID:7762571

  16. A survey of DNA diagnostic laboratories regarding DNA banking

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E.; Reilly, P.R.

    1995-06-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic labs regarding DNA banking (defined as the storage of individual DNA samples in some form with identifiers for later retrieval). The population surveyed consisted of all laboratories listed with HELIX, a national directory of DNA diagnostic labs that includes a fairly comprehensive listing of clinical service labs as well as a large number of research labs. The survey was concerned primarily with the legal and ethical issues that the long-term storage of DNA may raise. The survey inquired into the respondent`s policies and procedures concerning (1) the extent of DNA banking and of interest in developing DNA banking in academia and industry and (2) the degree to which DNA banks had developed written internal policies and/or a written depositor`s agreement (a signed document defining the rights and obligations of the person from whom the sample was taken and the bank) designed to anticipate or prevent some of the ethical and legal problems that can arise from the long-term retention of DNA. Our research suggests that (1) the activity of DNA banking is growing, particularly in the academic setting, and (2) most academically based DNA banks lack written internal policies, written depositor`s agreements, or other relevant documentation regarding important aspects of this activity. 10 refs., 10 tabs.

  17. Simultaneous occurrence of the 11778 (ND4) and the 9438 (COX III) mtDNA mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Molecular, biochemical, and clinical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, R.J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Zwart, R.

    1995-10-01

    Three mtDNA point mutations at nucleotide position (np) 3460, at np 11778 and at np 14484, are thought to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute central vision loss. These mutations are present in genes coding for subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the respiratory chain, occur exclusively in LHON maternal pedigrees, and have never been reported to occur together. Johns and Neufeld postulated that an mtDNA mutation at np 9438, in the gene coding for one of the subunits (COX III) of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), was also of primary importance. Johns and Neufeld (1993) found this mutation, which changed a conserved glycine to a serine, in 5 unrelated LHON probands who did not carry one of the presently known primary mutations, but they did not find it in 400 controls. However, the role of this sequence variant has been questioned in the Journal when it has been found to occur in apparently healthy African and Cuban individuals. Subsequently, Johns et al. described this mutation in two Cuban individuals presenting with optic and peripheral neuropathy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Automated DNA Base Pair Calling Algorithm

    1999-07-07

    The procedure solves the problem of calling the DNA base pair sequence from two channel electropherogram separations in an automated fashion. The core of the program involves a peak picking algorithm based upon first, second, and third derivative spectra for each electropherogram channel, signal levels as a function of time, peak spacing, base pair signal to noise sequence patterns, frequency vs ratio of the two channel histograms, and confidence levels generated during the run. Themore » ratios of the two channels at peak centers can be used to accurately and reproducibly determine the base pair sequence. A further enhancement is a novel Gaussian deconvolution used to determine the peak heights used in generating the ratio.« less

  19. HIV DNA Vaccine: Stepwise Improvements Make a Difference

    PubMed Central

    Felber, Barbara K.; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Pavlakis, George N.

    2014-01-01

    Inefficient DNA delivery methods and low expression of plasmid DNA have been major obstacles for the use of plasmid DNA as vaccine for HIV/AIDS. This review describes successful efforts to improve DNA vaccine methodology over the past ~30 years. DNA vaccination, either alone or in combination with other methods, has the potential to be a rapid, safe, and effective vaccine platform against AIDS. Recent clinical trials suggest the feasibility of its translation to the clinic. PMID:26344623

  20. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Late Side Effects in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Petra; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Sturdza, Alina E.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for late side effects of the rectum, sigmoid colon, and bladder in image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 141 patients received external-beam radiotherapy and image-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. The DVH parameters for the most exposed 2, 1, and 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cc}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}) of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder, as well as International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point doses (D{sub ICRU}) were computed. Total doses were converted to equivalent doses in 2 Gy by applying the linear-quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Late side effects were prospectively assessed using the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic score. The following patient groups were defined: Group 1: no side effects (Grade 0); Group 2: side effects (Grade 1-4); Group 3: minor side effects (Grade 0-1); and Group 4: major side effects (Grade 2-4). Results: The median follow-up was 51 months. The overall 5-year actuarial side effect rates were 12% for rectum, 3% for sigmoid, and 23% for bladder. The mean total D{sub 2cc} were 65 {+-} 12 Gy for rectum, 62 {+-} 12 Gy for sigmoid, and 95 {+-} 22 Gy for bladder. For rectum, statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2 in all DVH parameters and D{sub ICRU}. Between Groups 3 and 4, no difference was observed for D{sub 0.1cc.} For sigmoid, significant differences were observed for D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc}, but not for D{sub 0.1cc} in all groups. For bladder, significant differences were observed for all DVH parameters only comparing Groups 3 and 4. No differences were observed for D{sub ICRU}. Conclusions: The parameters D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} have a good predictive value for rectal toxicity. For sigmoid, no prediction could be postulated because of limited data. In bladder, DVH

  1. The expanding clinical phenotype of the tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation at np 3243 of mitochondrial DNA: Diabetic embryopathy associated with mitochondrial cytopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, A.; Chitayat, D.; Robinson, B.; MacGregor, D.; Myint, T.

    1996-04-24

    We describe a family which demonstrates and expands the extreme clinical variability now known to be associated with the A{r_arrow}G transition at nucleotide position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA. The propositus presented at birth with clinical manifestations consistent with diabetic embryopathy including anal atresia, caudal dysgenesis, and multicystic dysplastic kidneys. His co-twin was normal at birth, but at 3 months of life, presented with intractable seizures later associated with developmental delay. The twins` mother developed diabetes mellitus type I at the age of 20 years and gastrointestinal problems at 22 years. Since age 19 years, the maternal aunt has had recurrent strokes, seizures, mental deterioration and deafness, later diagnosed as MELAS syndrome due to the tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation. A maternal uncle had diabetes mellitus type I, deafness, and normal intellect, and died at 35 years after recurrent strokes. This pedigree expands the known clinical phenotype associated with tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation and raises the possibility that, in some cases, diabetic embryopathy may be due to a mitochondrial cytopathy that affects both the mother`s pancreas (and results in diabetes mellitus and the metabolic dysfunction associated with it) and the embryonic/fetal and placental tissues which make the embryo more vulnerable to this insult. 33 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Non-sebaceous lymphadenoma of the parotid gland: immunohistochemical study and DNA ploidy analysis.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Lorena; Junquera, Luis; Fresno, Manuel F

    2009-04-01

    Nonsebaceous lymphadenoma (NSL) is an unusual benign salivary gland tumor characterized by a predominant lymphoid background, dense lymphoid infiltrate, and absence of sebaceous differentiation. To our knowledge, only 10 previous cases have been reported in the literature. We report an additional case of NSL arising in the parotid gland in 58-year-old female patient. The extensive immunohistochemical investigation of the tumor revealed the presence of both luminal and myoepithelial cells. DNA analysis for flow cytometry was performed. The histogram presented a single peak in the G0-G1 area. The tumor was considered as being DNA diploid.

  3. Identification of Streptococcus parasanguinis DNA contamination in human buccal DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of buccal swabs in clinical and scientific studies is a very popular method of collecting DNA, due to its non-invasive nature of collection. However, contamination of the DNA sample may interfere with analysis. Findings Here we report the finding of Streptococcus parasanguinis bacterial DNA contamination in human buccal DNA samples, which led to preferential amplification of bacterial sequence with PCR primers designed against human sequence. Conclusion Contamination of buccal-derived DNA with bacterial DNA can be significant, and may influence downstream genetic analysis. One needs to be aware of possible bacterial contamination when interpreting abnormal findings following PCR amplification of buccal swab DNA samples. PMID:24266944

  4. Hepatitis B e Antigen Status and Hepatitis B DNA Levels in Women of Childbearing Age with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection Screening for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tram T.; Gordon, Stuart C.; Fung, Scott; Dinh, Phillip; Yee, Leland; Martins, Eduardo Bruno; Buti, Maria; Marcellin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Perinatal or mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in a high frequency of chronic infection. Risk of mother-to-child transmission is associated with maternal viral factors including hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity and viral load. Aim To investigate associations between age, HBeAg status, HBV DNA levels and genotype in female patients screened for inclusion into two contemporary, randomized HBV trials. Methods Retrospective analyses focused on differences between women of childbearing age (≤44 years) and older women. Female patients (N = 355; 18–69 years) were included in the analysis: 41.7% of patients were Asian. In total, 44.4% were HBeAg-positive. Results Significantly more women aged ≤44 years were HBeAg-positive compared to women ≥45 years (57.2% versus 27.5%, respectively, p<0.0001), this proportion declined with increasing age. Younger women were significantly more likely to have high HBV viral load (HBV DNA>108 copies mL: ≤44 years 46.0% vs ≥45 years 25.5%, respectively; p<0.0001), and this declined with increasing age. HBeAg positivity was slightly higher in Asian women, associated with a higher proportion of HBV genotypes B and C in this population. There was no obvious relationship between genotype and viral load. Conclusions Women of childbearing age with CHB are more likely to have high HBV viral load and HBeAg positivity than older women; this likelihood decreases with age. Maternal serological and virological status should therefore be established early in pregnancy, taking into account age and genotype, and a risk-reducing strategy implemented in any patient who is HBeAg positive and has a high viral load. PMID:25789483

  5. DNA nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    We are learning to build synthetic molecular machinery from DNA. This research is inspired by biological systems in which individual molecules act, singly and in concert, as specialized machines: our ambition is to create new technologies to perform tasks that are currently beyond our reach. DNA nanomachines are made by self-assembly, using techniques that rely on the sequence-specific interactions that bind complementary oligonucleotides together in a double helix. They can be activated by interactions with specific signalling molecules or by changes in their environment. Devices that change state in response to an external trigger might be used for molecular sensing, intelligent drug delivery or programmable chemical synthesis. Biological molecular motors that carry cargoes within cells have inspired the construction of rudimentary DNA walkers that run along self-assembled tracks. It has even proved possible to create DNA motors that move autonomously, obtaining energy by catalysing the reaction of DNA or RNA fuels.

  6. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the DNA gyrase gyrA gene from Serratia marcescens and characterization of mutations in gyrA of quinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Cho, E H; Kim, K S; Kim, H Y; Kim, Y M

    1998-01-01

    The sequence of the DNA gyrase gyrA gene of Serratia marcescens ATCC 14756 was determined. An open reading frame of 2,640 nucleotides coding for a polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 97,460 was found, and its sequence complemented the sequence of an Escherichia coli gyrA temperature-sensitive mutation. Analysis of the PCR products of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA genes from six quinolone-resistant clinical isolates revealed a single amino acid substitution, Ser-83 to Arg or Asp-87 to Tyr, in all six mutants, suggesting that a mutational alteration in gyrA is a common mechanism of quinolone resistance in S. marcescens.

  7. Evaluation of a clinically intuitive quality assurance method

    PubMed Central

    Norris, H; Thomas, A; Oldham, M

    2013-01-01

    There is a pressing need for clinically intuitive quality assurance methods that report metrics of relevance to the likely impact on tumor control of normal tissue injury. This paper presents a preliminary investigation into the accuracy of a novel “transform method” which enables a clinically relevant analysis through dose-volume-histograms (DVHs) and dose overlays on the patient’s CT data. The transform method was tested by inducing a series of known mechanical and delivery errors onto simu