Science.gov

Sample records for clinical effectiveness leadership

  1. Clinical leadership effectiveness, change and complexity.

    PubMed

    McKimm, Judy; Till, Alex

    2015-04-01

    This article explores how an understanding of approaches to leading and managing change and complexity science can help clinical leaders engage with and manage change in complex environments and systems more effectively.

  2. Learning for clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Cook, Michael J; Leathard, Helen L

    2004-11-01

    Clinical leadership has been acclaimed widely as a major factor influencing the quality of patient care but research has revealed a paucity of preparation for this significant role. Leadership literature has rarely addressed clinical leadership specifically or referred to the difficulties in characterizing effective clinical leaders. The research informing this paper focused on clinical leadership and identified five attributes of effective clinical leaders: creativity, highlighting, influencing, respecting, and supporting. Effective clinical leaders adopted a transformational leadership style and improved care, through others, by including transformational (soft) knowledge as an integral part of their effective practice repertoire. Phronesis is introduced as practical wisdom that is gained through immersion in relevant experience, and as an essential element of preparation for clinical nursing leadership practice. It is argued, that learning to transform care requires opportunities to work within an environment that engenders and supports aspiring leaders. The paper describes the research process, elucidates the attributes through illustrative examples from the research data, and discusses an emergent educational strategy for the development of these attributes by clinicians in their practice environments. The paper also describes the application of this research through an interdisciplinary programme for staff leading teams in both health and social services sectors.

  3. Developing clinical leadership capability.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Kristi A; Capuano, Terry A; Rosser, Gwendolyn D

    2007-01-01

    Nursing facilities must be committed to ongoing leadership development and to developing and retaining their staff in the increasingly competitive healthcare market. In this article, the authors share the processes involved in creating a focused small group approach to developing clinical leaders. Programmatic approaches to development, clarity of needs of those targeted for development, individual development plans, external expertise partnerships, and small group session dynamics are discussed. Applications of the process and lessons learned from the program will benefit others in their efforts to enhance organization succession planning, leadership development, group learning, and program administration.

  4. Clinical leadership project.

    PubMed

    Kling, Vera G

    2010-11-01

    Nurse educators seek innovative strategies to maximize student learning in the classroom and clinical settings. Students enrolled in a nursing leadership and management course often find they spend more clinical time observing leaders than practicing the necessary skills to lead others in the provision of nursing care. In addition, opportunities to explore the nurse educator role often do not exist in baccalaureate nursing education, despite the shortage of nurse educators. An experience was developed in a baccalaureate nursing program to give senior students, under supervision of faculty, the opportunity to lead and evaluate lower-level students providing patient care in the clinical setting and to experience the role of nursing faculty. Feedback from senior students was positive, and students noted increased proficiency in leadership ability and critical thinking. Student interest in the nurse educator role was also enhanced. Program expansion and evaluation with faculty, clinical staff, and patients are planned.

  5. The renaissance of clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Cook, M J

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore clinical nursing leadership. The research was based on a critical examination of the leadership themes derived from the nursing literature of the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Australia, between 1992 and 1997. The work was also influenced by the findings from semistructured interviews undertaken with five clinical leaders in nursing from the United Kingdom, and study tours to both the United States of America and Australia. The findings support a proposed leadership model as a basis for further exploration and as a framework for contemplating clinical leadership and leadership preparation. A model is presented that identifies factors which influence leadership styles, such as external environment, internal environment, experience and understanding. Four leadership styles are outlined: transactional, transformational, connective and renaissance. These leadership styles are linked to nursing care approaches. A second model provides a basis for considering power and its impact in the workplace. Based on these findings, the contents of a leadership preparation course are outlined.

  6. Leadership in anaesthesia teams: the most effective leadership is shared.

    PubMed

    Künzle, Barbara; Zala-Mezö, Enikö; Wacker, Johannes; Kolbe, Michaela; Spahn, Donat R; Grote, Gudela

    2010-12-01

    Leadership plays a crucial role in teams working in complex environments, and research has shown that shared leadership where all team members perform leadership functions is an effective strategy. The authors aimed to describe shared leadership patterns during anaesthesia induction and show how they are linked to team performance. 12 anaesthesia teams consisting of one resident and one nurse during a simulated anaesthesia induction including a non-routine event (asystole) were videotaped, and two kinds of leadership behaviour (content-oriented and structuring) were coded. Team performance was operationalised as the reaction time to the non-routine event. The amount of leadership sharedness was compared between low- and high-performing teams by performing a univariate analysis of variance. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyse the distribution of the two kinds of leadership behaviour among team members. Statistical analysis revealed that in high-performing teams, residents and nurses shared their leadership, while in low-performing teams, residents showed significantly higher levels of leadership behaviour than nurses. Further analyses revealed different distributions of leadership functions among team members. While residents of low-performing teams assumed both kinds of leadership behaviour, members of high-performing teams seemed to have distinct leadership roles: nurses mainly used content-oriented leadership behaviour, and residents tended to show structuring leadership behaviour. The study documents the effectiveness of shared leadership in situations with high task complexity and indicates that a clear distribution of content-oriented and structuring leadership among team members is an effective strategy. The findings have implications for training in shared leadership and also give rise to a number of recommendations for further research. ClinicalTrials (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) registration number is NCT00706108.

  7. Facilitation Skills: The Catalyst for Increased Effectiveness in Consultant Practice and Clinical Systems Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, Kim; Titchen, Angie

    2017-01-01

    Consultant practitioner is the pinnacle of the clinical career ladder for all health care disciplines in the United Kingdom. Consultant nurse, midwife and health visitor roles build on the clinical credibility and expertise characteristic of advanced level practice, but also possess expertise in: clinical systems leadership and the facilitation of…

  8. Does leadership style of modern matrons contribute to safer and more effective clinical services?

    PubMed

    Hill, Barry

    2017-03-30

    At the time of writing, the author was a modern matron in a surgical division of an NHS teaching hospital in London. This article considers the differences between leadership and management, and discusses the skills required by modern matrons to lead safe and successful clinical services. It also examines three leadership styles - transactional, transformational and situational - and their relevance to the role of modern matron.

  9. Promoting clinical involvement in hospital quality improvement efforts: the effects of top management, board, and physician leadership.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, B J; Shortell, S M; Alexander, J

    1997-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: An examination of the effects of top management, board, and physician leadership for quality on the extent of clinical involvement in hospital CQI/TQM efforts. DATA SOURCES: A sample of 2,193 acute care community hospitals, created by merging data from a 1989 national survey on hospital governance and a 1993 national survey on hospital quality improvement efforts. STUDY DESIGN: Hypotheses were tested using Heckman's two-stage modeling approach. Four dimensions of clinical involvement in CQI/TQM were examined: physician participation in formal QI training, physician participation in QI teams, clinical departments with formally organized QA/QI project teams, and clinical conditions and procedures for which quality of care data are used by formally organized QA/QI project teams. Leadership measures included CEO involvement in CQI/TQM, board quality monitoring, board activity in quality improvement, active-staff physician involvement in governance, and physician-at-large involvement in governance. Relevant control variables were included in the analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Measures of top management leadership for quality and board leadership for quality showed significant, positive relationships with measures of clinical involvement in CQI/TQM. Active-staff physician involvement in governance showed positive, significant relationships with clinical involvement measures, while physician-at-large involvement in governance showed significant, negative relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Study results suggest that leadership from the top promotes clinical involvement in CQI/TQM. Further, results indicate that leadership for quality in healthcare settings may issue from several sources, including managers, boards, and physician leaders. PMID:9327815

  10. Grace under fire: aesthetic leadership in clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an online descriptive survey that sought to determine nurses' perceptions of aesthetic leadership among clinical leaders in nursing. Clinical leadership has been identified as an essential component to ensuring the delivery of safe, high-quality health care. Leadership has been increasingly linked in the literature to aesthetics. However, little consideration has been given to aesthetics in relation to clinical leadership in nursing. A mixed-method, online descriptive survey. Participants were recruited via e-learning platforms and social media. A total of 66 surveys were completed, including 31 written accounts of aesthetic leadership in practice. Aesthetic leadership characteristics in clinical leaders most valued are support, communication and the approach taken to colleagues. Taking risks and challenging processes were least likely to be evident among effective clinical leaders. Aesthetic leadership is multi-dimensional and a style of leadership to positively influence the clinical workplace. Support, effective communication and taking into consideration the feelings of colleagues are important dimensions of aesthetic leadership. Aesthetic leadership represents a way for clinical leaders to create and sustain a calm and positive clinical workplace. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Attributes of clinical leadership in contemporary nursing: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2013-08-01

    Effective clinical leadership is offered as the key to healthy, functional and supportive work environments for nurses and other health professionals. However, as a concept it lacks a standard definition and is poorly understood. This paper reports on an integrative review undertaken to uncover current understandings of defining attributes of contemporary clinical leadership in nursing. Data collection involved a search of relevant electronic databases for a 10-year period. Keywords for the search were 'clinical leadership' and 'nursing'. Ten research papers met the inclusion criteria for the integrative review. Analysis of these studies indicated clinical leadership attributes had a clinical focus, a follower/team focus or a personal qualities focus; attributes necessary to sustain supportive workplaces and build the capacity and resilience of nursing workforces. The small number of research-based studies yielded for the review indicates the need for further research in the area of clinical leadership.

  12. Characteristics of leadership that influence clinical learning: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel; Cooke, Marie; Henderson, Amanda; Creedy, Debra K

    2011-11-01

    Leadership has been consistently implied in fostering clinical learning. However there is a lack of clarity about the form leadership should take. Limited quantitative research indicated a narrative approach to review literature from a broad perspective. A framework to guide the synthesis was developed to ensure a rigorous review process. Preliminary reading and review of papers using search terms nursing and leadership and clinical learning and learning culture narrowed the inclusion criteria to 245 papers published between 2000 and 2010. Given the diversity of the papers' focus, aim and context, a refined screening process justified the inclusion of twenty-six papers in the review. A critical appraisal of these peer-reviewed quantitative, qualitative and commentary papers identified factors/elements integral to effective leadership. Across the literature leadership was discussed in relation to two broad themes: influence of leadership on organisational learning and development and; influence of leadership on undergraduate clinical education. The factors central to leadership emerged as transformative principles, the role of the nurse unit/ward manager, collaboration and relationship building and role-modelling. The review has raised some suggestions for future research aimed at examining the impact of a leadership capacity building intervention that supports clinical learning.

  13. Physician leadership styles and effectiveness: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Stoskopf, Carleen H

    2005-12-01

    The authors study the association between physician leadership styles and leadership effectiveness. Executive directors of community health centers were surveyed (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9 percent) for their perceptions of the medical director's leadership behaviors and effectiveness, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items on a 0-4 point Likert-type scale), with additional questions on demographics and the center's clinical goals and achievements. The authors hypothesize that transformational leadership would be more positively associated with executive directors' ratings of effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, as well as the center's clinical goal achievement, than transactional or laissez-faire leadership. Separate ordinary least squares regressions were used to model each of the effectiveness measures, and general linear model regression was used to model clinical goal achievement. Results support the hypothesis and suggest that physician leadership development using the transformational leadership model may result in improved health care quality and cost control.

  14. Aesthetic Leadership: Its Place in the Clinical Nursing World.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-05-01

    Clinical leadership has been identified as crucial to positive patient/client outcomes, across all clinical settings. In the new millennium, transformational leadership has been the dominant leadership style and in more recent times, congruent leadership theory has emerged to explain clinical leadership in nursing. This article discusses these two leadership models and identifies some of the shortcomings of them as models for clinical leadership in nursing. As a way of overcoming some of these limitations, aesthetic leadership is proposed as a style of leadership that is not antithetical to either model and reflects nursing's recognition of the validity of art and aesthetics to nursing generally. Aesthetic leadership is also proposed as a way to identify an expert clinical leader from a less experienced clinical leader, taking a similar approach to the way Benner (1984) has theorised in her staging of novice to expert clinical nurse.

  15. Developing and testing a new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership: the clinical leadership survey.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Allison; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Wong, Carol; Finegan, Joan

    2011-05-01

    To test the psychometric properties of a newly developed measure of staff nurse clinical leadership derived from Kouzes and Posner's model of transformational leadership. While nurses have been recognized for their essential role in keeping patients safe, there has been little empirical research that has examined clinical leadership at the staff nurse level.   A non-experimental survey design was used to test the psychometric properties of the clinical leadership survey (CLS). Four hundred and eighty registered nurses (RNs) providing direct patient care in Ontario acute care hospitals returned useable questionnaires.   Confirmatory factor analysis provided preliminary evidence for the construct validity for the new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership. Structural empowerment fully mediated the relationship between nursing leadership and staff nurse clinical leadership. The results provide encouraging evidence for the construct validity of the CLS. Nursing administrators must create empowering work environments to ensure staff nurses have access to work structures which enable them to enact clinical leadership behaviours while providing direct patient care. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Enhancing frontline clinical leadership in an acute hospital trust.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Natasha; Byrne, Geraldine

    2013-09-01

    To report on a leadership programme for ward managers in one National Health Service Trust that aimed to enhance their contribution to the delivery of the organisation's key objectives to support excellent patient experience. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as vital to the quality of care, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that, at present, front-line nurse leaders are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. The project aimed to provide a tailored programme for ward managers to develop their portfolio of skills to perform this pivotal role. The course contained two key elements: an integrated teaching programme to enhance leadership knowledge and skills and action learning to facilitate application to individual's own leadership practice. Both were underpinned by a change project where each individual identified, undertook and evaluated an innovation in practice. Twenty-two ward managers completed the leadership programme. Participants completed semi-structured questionnaires after each taught module. Action learning was evaluated through a combined structured and semi-structured questionnaire. All participants evaluated the programme as increasing their repertoire of leadership skills. Following completion of the programme, ward managers continue to work together as an evolving community of practice. Ward managers' development is enhanced by a programme integrating theory, action learning and completion of a ward-based project. Ward managers cannot be effectively developed in isolation. Leadership development is best supported where the organisation is also committed to developing. A leadership development programme that incorporates knowledge from within the organisation with external expertise can be an effective method to enhance front-line clinical leadership. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Developing a nurse-led clinic using transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Gousy, Mamood; Green, Kim

    2015-03-25

    Nurses are at the forefront of implementing and managing change, given constantly changing healthcare services and the increase in demand for health care. Therefore, it is important to identify the best style of leadership to engage nurses in implementing service-led improvements. This article explores the effects of transformational leadership in bringing about service-led improvements in health care, using the example of setting up a nurse-led acupuncture clinic to optimise the care of patients with chronic pain. Transformational leadership was used throughout the project - from the initial local planning, training and development, through to liaising with the appropriate staff and deciding on an evaluation strategy. Transformational leadership proved to be an effective way to engage and empower nurses and other members of the chronic pain team to enable them to achieve the project aims.

  18. [Leadership Experience of Clinical Nurses: Applying Focus Group Interviews].

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung Sook; Eo, Yong Sook; Lee, Mi Aie

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand and describe the leadership experience of clinical nurses. During 2014, data were collected using focus group interviews. Three focus group interviews were held with a total of 20 clinical nurses participating. All interviews were recorded as they were spoken and transcribed and data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Fifteen categories emerged from the five main themes. 1) Thoughts on the leadership category: to lead others, to cope with problem situations adequately and to serve as a shield against difficulties. 2) Situations requiring leadership: situation that requires correct judgement, coping and situations that need coordination and cooperation. 3-1) Leadership behaviors: other-oriented approach and self-oriented approach. 3-2) Leadership behavior consequences: relevant compensation and unfair termination. 4-1) Facilitators of leadership: confidence and passion for nursing and external support and resources. 4-2) Barriers to leadership: non-supportive organization culture and deficiency in own leadership competencies. 5) Strategies of leadership development: strengthen leadership through self-development and organizational leadership development. In conclusion, the results indicate that it is necessary to enhance clinical nurses' leadership role in healthcare. Enhancement can be achieved through leadership programs focused on enlarging leadership experience, constant self-development, leadership training, and development of leadership competencies suited to the nursing environment.

  19. Key Elements of Clinical Physician Leadership at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dine, C. Jessica; Kahn, Jeremy M; Abella, Benjamin S; Asch, David A; Shea, Judy A

    2011-01-01

    Background A considerable body of literature in the management sciences has defined leadership and how leadership skills can be attained. There is considerably less literature about leadership within medical settings. Physicians-in-training are frequently placed in leadership positions ranging from running a clinical team or overseeing a resuscitation effort. However, physicians-in-training rarely receive such training. The objective of this study was to discover characteristics associated with effective physician leadership at an academic medical center for future development of such training. Methods We conducted focus groups with medical professionals (attending physicians, residents, and nurses) at an academic medical center. The focus group discussion script was designed to elicit participants' perceptions of qualities necessary for physician leadership. The lead question asked participants to imagine a scenario in which they either acted as or observed a physician leader. Two independent reviewers reviewed transcripts to identify key domains of physician leadership. Results Although the context was not specified, the focus group participants discussed leadership in the context of a clinical team. They identified 4 important themes: management of the team, establishing a vision, communication, and personal attributes. Conclusions Physician leadership exists in clinical settings. This study highlights the elements essential to that leadership. Understanding the physician attributes and behaviors that result in effective leadership and teamwork can lay the groundwork for more formal leadership education for physicians-in-training. PMID:22379520

  20. A Guide to Effective School Leadership Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Educational administrators know that leadership requires hundreds of judgments each day that require a sensitivity and understanding of various leadership strategies. Bridging the gap between the academic and practical world, "A Guide to Effective School Leadership Theories" provides an exploration of ten dominant leadership strategies to give…

  1. A Guide to Effective School Leadership Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Educational administrators know that leadership requires hundreds of judgments each day that require a sensitivity and understanding of various leadership strategies. Bridging the gap between the academic and practical world, "A Guide to Effective School Leadership Theories" provides an exploration of ten dominant leadership strategies to give…

  2. The need for strong clinical leaders - Transformational and transactional leadership as a framework for resident leadership training.

    PubMed

    Saravo, Barbara; Netzel, Janine; Kiesewetter, Jan

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of providing excellent patient care, residents need to be strong, effective leaders. The lack of clinical leadership is alarming given the detrimental effects on patient safety. The objective of the study was to assess whether a leadership training addressing transactional and transformational leadership enhances leadership skills in residents. A volunteer sample of 57 residents from postgraduate year one to four was recruited across a range of medical specialties. The residents took part in an interventional controlled trial. The four-week IMPACT leadership training provided specific strategies for leadership in the clinical environment, addressing transactional (e.g. active control, contingent reward) and transformational leadership skills (e.g. appreciation, inspirational motivation). Transactional and transformational leadership skill performance was rated (1) on the Performance Scale by an external evaluator blinded to the study design and (2) self-assessed transformational and transactional leadership skills. Both measures contained items of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, with higher scores indicating greater leadership skills. Both scores were significantly different between the IMPACT group and the control group. In the IMPACT group, the Performance Scale increased 15% in transactional leadership skill performance (2.10 to 2.86) (intervention effect, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.13; p < .001, eta2 = 0.31) and 14% in transformational leadership skill performance (2.26 to 2.94) (intervention effect, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.09; p < .001, eta2 = 0.22). The self-assessed transactional skills revealed a 4% increase (3.83 to 4.03) (intervention effect, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.33; p < .001, eta2 = 0.18) and a 6% increase in transformational leadership skills (3.54 to 3.86) (intervention effect, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.40; p< .001, eta2 = 0.53). These findings support the use of the transactional and transformational leadership framework for

  3. The need for strong clinical leaders – Transformational and transactional leadership as a framework for resident leadership training

    PubMed Central

    Saravo, Barbara; Netzel, Janine

    2017-01-01

    Background For the purpose of providing excellent patient care, residents need to be strong, effective leaders. The lack of clinical leadership is alarming given the detrimental effects on patient safety. The objective of the study was to assess whether a leadership training addressing transactional and transformational leadership enhances leadership skills in residents. Methods A volunteer sample of 57 residents from postgraduate year one to four was recruited across a range of medical specialties. The residents took part in an interventional controlled trial. The four-week IMPACT leadership training provided specific strategies for leadership in the clinical environment, addressing transactional (e.g. active control, contingent reward) and transformational leadership skills (e.g. appreciation, inspirational motivation). Transactional and transformational leadership skill performance was rated (1) on the Performance Scale by an external evaluator blinded to the study design and (2) self-assessed transformational and transactional leadership skills. Both measures contained items of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, with higher scores indicating greater leadership skills. Results Both scores were significantly different between the IMPACT group and the control group. In the IMPACT group, the Performance Scale increased 15% in transactional leadership skill performance (2.10 to 2.86) (intervention effect, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.13; p < .001, eta2 = 0.31) and 14% in transformational leadership skill performance (2.26 to 2.94) (intervention effect, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.09; p < .001, eta2 = 0.22). The self-assessed transactional skills revealed a 4% increase (3.83 to 4.03) (intervention effect, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.33; p < .001, eta2 = 0.18) and a 6% increase in transformational leadership skills (3.54 to 3.86) (intervention effect, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.40; p< .001, eta2 = 0.53). Discussion and conclusions These findings support the use of the

  4. Effectiveness of shared leadership in Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyi; Kraut, Robert E; Kittur, Aniket

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the paper is to understand leadership in an online community, specifically, Wikipedia. Wikipedia successfully aggregates millions of volunteers' efforts to create the largest encyclopedia in human history. Without formal employment contracts and monetary incentives, one significant question for Wikipedia is how it organizes individual members with differing goals, experience, and commitment to achieve a collective outcome. Rather than focusing on the role of the small set of people occupying a core leadership position, we propose a shared leadership model to explain the leadership in Wikipedia. Members mutually influence one another by exercising leadership behaviors, including rewarding, regulating, directing, and socializing one another. We conducted a two-phase study to investigate how distinct types of leadership behaviors (transactional, aversive, directive, and person-focused), the legitimacy of the people who deliver the leadership, and the experience of the people who receive the leadership influence the effectiveness of shared leadership in Wikipedia. Our results highlight the importance of shared leadership in Wikipedia and identify trade-offs in the effectiveness of different types of leadership behaviors. Aversive and directive leadership increased contribution to the focal task, whereas transactional and person-focused leadership increased general motivation. We also found important differences in how newcomers and experienced members responded to leadership behaviors from peers. These findings extend shared leadership theories, contribute new insight into the important underlying mechanisms in Wikipedia, and have implications for practitioners who wish to design more effective and successful online communities.

  5. Clinical Practice Guideline Adherence Before and After Implementation of the HEARTFELT (HEART Failure Effectiveness & Leadership Team) Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Acevedo, Kim; Boldrighini, Jodie; Boucher, Carole; Frumento, Katherine; Gray, Peggy; Hall, Danielle; Smith, Lisa; Swallow, Anne; Yarkoni, Alon; Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    HEART Failure Effectiveness & Leadership Team (HEARTFELT) is a multifaceted intervention designed to improve adherence with the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association practice guidelines for heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to assess differences in clinician adherence with clinical practice guidelines before and after implementation of HEARTFELT. A quasi-experimental, untreated control group design with separate pretest/posttest samples was employed at a community hospital in Connecticut. The untreated historical control group included patients aged 65 years or older with HF and a nonequivalent comparison group of patients with stroke. The posttest samples included patients with the diagnosis of HF and stroke admitted after implementation of the HEARTFELT intervention. The HEARTFELT intervention included automated pathway in electronic medical record (order sets, interdisciplinary plan of care, self-management plan), access to evidence for clinicians and patients, HF self-management education tools, and ongoing discipline-specific feedback regarding adherence. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric methods. The HEARTFELT intervention significantly improved clinician adherence with addressing all self-management categories in the electronic medical record (P = .000) and adherence with self-management education given to the patient in writing at discharge (P = .000). There were no significant differences in adherence with medical interventions (P = .39). While guideline adherence is associated with less practice variation and improved processes, methods of integration into practice in community hospital settings have been largely unexplored. The multifaceted HEARTFELT intervention is promising for its potential to integrate evidence at the point of care, to reduce unwarranted variation in practice, and ultimately to improve the outcomes of individuals with HF. PMID:16141775

  6. NHS Lanarkshire's leadership development programme's impact on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Angela M; Dodd, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of a clinical leadership programme on senior clinicians within National Health Service Lanarkshire, in terms of key constituents for fostering leadership development, specific skills developed and impact this has had on clinical practice. A qualitative research design was employed over several stages, involving 44 senior clinical managers, with member validation substantiating findings and thematic analysis used to analyse data collected. The programme's impact was evident in acknowledged change to participants' attitude, behaviour and performance with examples conveyed to demonstrate both the effect on clinical practice and perceived organisational benefits gained. The use of role play, scenario planning and enquiry-based learning approaches were deemed critical in achieving such change. Time constraints merited two different cohorts being examined simultaneously during the various stages of the programme. A longitudinal study is underway encompassing the evaluations of several cohorts through various stages of the programme to enable time-based comparisons to be made and enhance the rigour and scrutiny of the programme's impact on clinical practice. The paper is foremost in determining structure and processes employed on the programme, specific leadership skills developed, subsequent effect on clinical practice and perceived organisational benefits gained but not necessarily contemplated by staff prior to embarking on the programme, such as the emergence of communities of practice.

  7. A Leadership Education and Development Program for Clinical Nurses.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Modic, Mary Beth; Van Dyk, Jennifer; Hancock, K Kelly

    2016-11-01

    The Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Program was designed to transform care at the bedside by empowering clinical nurses as leaders. The heart of LEAD was enhancing communication skills of clinical nurses with clinical colleagues and, most importantly, patients and families. Key concepts of leadership/management were included: personal awareness, personal leadership skills/abilities, leading change, leading others individually and in teams, enhancing the patient/provider experience, and the leadership role in outcomes management. A quantitative, longitudinal, survey design was used with 2 cohorts. The program consisted of six 4-hour sessions for 3 to 6 months. Leadership practices were measured before program implementation, at the end of the program, and 3 months after program completion. There were significant increases in leadership practices sustained 3 months after program completion. A range of other outcome measures was included. There is a need for additional leadership development programs for clinical nurses.

  8. 'Watching an artist at work': aesthetic leadership in clinical nursing workplaces.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-12-01

    To explore how clinical leaders enact aesthetic leadership in clinical nursing workplaces. Clinical leadership is heralded as vital for safe and effective nursing. Different leadership styles have been applied to the clinical nursing workplace over recent years. Many of these styles lack an explicit moral dimension, instead focusing on leader qualities and developing leader competence around team building, quality and safety. Aesthetic leadership, with its explicit moral dimension, could enhance clinical leadership effectiveness and improve nursing workplaces. How aesthetic leadership is enacted in clinical nursing settings requires exploration. A qualitative design, employing conversation-style interviews with experienced registered nurses and written responses gathered from an online descriptive survey. Narrative data were gathered from interviews with 12 registered nurses and written accounts from 31 nurses who responded to an online survey. Together, transcribed interview data and the written accounts were subject to thematic analysis. Three main themes emerged: Leading by example: 'be seen in the clinical area'; Leading with composure: 'a sense of calm in a hideous shift'; and Leading through nursing values: 'create an environment just by your being'. Aesthetic leadership was shown to enhance clinical leadership activities in the nursing workplace. The capacity for clinical leaders to be self-reflective can positively influence the nursing workplace. It was apparent that clinical leader effectiveness can be enhanced with nursing values underpinning leadership activities and by being a visible, composed role model in the clinical workplace. Aesthetic leadership can enhance clinical nursing workplaces with its explicit moral purpose and strong link to nursing values. Clinical leaders who incorporate these attributes with being a visible, composed role model have the capacity to improve the working lives of nurses across a range of clinical settings. © 2015 John

  9. Clinical leadership and pre-registration nursing programmes: A model for clinical leadership and a prospective curriculum implementation and evaluation research strategy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    To present for wider debate a conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a proposed implementation plan. Globally, leadership in nursing has become a significant issue. Whilst there is continued support for leadership preparation in pre-registration nursing programmes, there have been very few published accounts of curriculum content and/or pedagogical approaches that foster clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing. A doctoral research study has resulted in the creation of an overarching model for clinical leadership. A multi-method research study using theoretical and empirical literature 1974-2015, a focus group, expert opinion and a national on-line survey. A conceptual model of clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programme is presented, including the infinity loop of clinical leadership, an integral curriculum thread and a conceptual model: a curriculum-pedagogy nexus for clinical leadership. In order to test out usability and evaluate effectiveness, a multi method programme of research in one school of nursing in Australia is outlined. Implementation of the proposed conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a programme of (post-doctoral) research will contribute to what is known about curriculum content and pedagogy for nurse academics. Importantly, for nursing students and the profession as a whole, there is a clearer expectation of what clinical leadership might look like in the novice registered nurse. For nurse academics a model is offered for consideration in curriculum design and implementation with an evaluation strategy that could be replicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A cognitive learning model of clinical nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Jacinthe; Dubois, Sylvie; Girard, Francine; Tardif, Jacques; Ha, Laurence

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive modeling of competencies is important to facilitate learning and evaluation. Clinical nursing leadership is considered a competency, as it is a "complex know-act" that students and nurses develop for the quality of care of patients and their families. Previous research on clinical leadership describes the attributes and characteristics of leaders and leadership, but, to our knowledge, a cognitive learning model (CLM) has yet to be developed. The purpose of our research was to develop a CLM of the clinical nursing leadership competency, from the beginning of a nursing program to expertise. An interpretative phenomenological study design was used 1) to document the experience of learning and practicing clinical leadership, and 2) to identify critical-learning turning points. Data was gathered from interviews with 32 baccalaureate students and 21 nurses from two clinical settings. An inductive analysis of data was conducted to determine the learning stages experienced: awareness of clinical leadership in nursing; integration of clinical leadership in actions; active leadership with patient/family; active leadership with the team; and, embedded clinical leadership extended to organizational level and beyond. The resulting CLM could have significant impact on both basic and continuing nursing education. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characteristics of Effective Leadership Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Azah, Vera Ndifor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to inquire about the characteristics of effective school leadership networks and the contribution of such networks to the development of individual leaders' professional capacities. Design/methodology/approach: The study used path-analytic techniques with survey data provided by 450 school and district leaders…

  12. Characteristics of Effective Leadership Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Azah, Vera Ndifor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to inquire about the characteristics of effective school leadership networks and the contribution of such networks to the development of individual leaders' professional capacities. Design/methodology/approach: The study used path-analytic techniques with survey data provided by 450 school and district leaders…

  13. Academic Administration: The Search for Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, John R.; Brownlee, Leonard J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches generally have been taken to explain effective leadership in educational administration: (1) The leader's personality traits are the key; (2) Success results from mastering modes of interpersonal behavior; and (3) Effectiveness depends on the situation in which leadership is exercised. Leadership is a reciprocal process--leader…

  14. Female College Athlete Leadership and Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galicinao, Brianne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study contributes to the research on athlete leadership and team effectiveness in college sports. Athletic departments and sports coaches could benefit from a study about athlete leadership and team effectiveness in order to assist their student-leaders with leadership development and explore additional means to help improve team…

  15. Female College Athlete Leadership and Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galicinao, Brianne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study contributes to the research on athlete leadership and team effectiveness in college sports. Athletic departments and sports coaches could benefit from a study about athlete leadership and team effectiveness in order to assist their student-leaders with leadership development and explore additional means to help improve team…

  16. Impact of clinical leadership development on the clinical leader, nursing team and care-giving process: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Willemse, An; Verschueren, Marc; Milisen, Koen

    2008-09-01

    This study explored the dynamics related to a leadership development programme and their impact on the clinical leader, the nursing team and the care-giving process. While there is a growing conviction about the need to invest in transformational leadership in nursing, further insight into the true complexity of leadership development and, more specifically, how leadership can make a difference in nursing and patient outcomes is essential. A single instrumental case study was conducted in a unit of a large academic hospital where a Clinical Leadership development Project (CLP) was implemented successfully. We used mixed methods with multiple sources of data to capture the complexity of leadership development. Data were collected through individual interviews, focus groups and observation of participants. A purposive sample of 17 participants representing a wide variety of team members has permitted data saturation. The data were categorized and conceptualized and finally organized into a framework describing leadership development on the unit and its impact on the leader, the nursing team and the care-giving process. Leadership development is an ongoing, interactive process between the clinical leader and the co-workers. The head nurse became more effective in areas of self-awareness, communication skills, performance and vision. The nursing team benefited because more effective leadership promoted effective communication, greater responsibility, empowerment and job clarity. Improved clinical leadership seemed also to influence patient-centred communication, continuity of care and interdisciplinary collaboration. The results of the study give more insight into the processes underlying the leader's progress towards attaining a transformational leadership style and its impact on the team members. The impact of leadership on the care-giving process, however, remains difficult to describe. The interactive nature of leadership development makes CLP a challenge for the

  17. Does leadership effectiveness correlates with leadership styles in healthcare executives of Iran University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Effective leadership is essential to passing through obstacles facing the health field.The current health care system in Iran has major problems and gaps in the field of effective leadership. The aim of this study was to evaluate hospital managers' leadership style through selfassessment and to determine the correlation between leadership styles with healthcare executives' leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness. In this cross-sectional study a self-administered questionnaire completed by all internal healthcare executives of all teaching and non-teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Questionnaire was composed to determine demographic information, leadership style questions, leadership effectiveness and leadership readiness. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. According to the findings, the dominant style of healthcare executives was transformational leadership style (with a score of 4.34). The leadership effectiveness was estimated at about 4.36 that shows the appropriate level of leadership effectiveness. There was a significant correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.244) between leadership readiness and transformational leadership style (p<0.05). Also, there was a significant correlation between leadership effectiveness with transformational (0.051) and transactional (0.216) styles. There was a correlation between leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness with leadership styles. Application of this research will be crucial to universities and healthcare executives. This study suggests that strengthening the scientific basis is essential for leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness in healthcare system.

  18. Effects of Leadership Style on Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucic, Tania; Robinson, Linda; Ramburuth, Prem

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore the effect of leadership style of a team leader on team-member learning in organizations, to conceptually extend an initial model of leadership and to empirically examine the new model of ambidextrous leadership in a team context. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative research utilizing the case study method…

  19. Ethical Leadership: A Prerequisite for Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    Ethical leadership is the moral component of instructional leadership. Ethical guidelines for principals include respect for all members of society, tolerance for divergent opinions and cultures, equality of persons, and equal distribution of resources. Specific guidelines are provided to help principals exercise effective ethical leadership.…

  20. Effects of Leadership Style on Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucic, Tania; Robinson, Linda; Ramburuth, Prem

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore the effect of leadership style of a team leader on team-member learning in organizations, to conceptually extend an initial model of leadership and to empirically examine the new model of ambidextrous leadership in a team context. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative research utilizing the case study method…

  1. Instructional Leadership and Schools Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Daisy Kee Mui; Ponnusamy, Premavathy

    With the influx of information technology through the Internet and the use of ICT in our daily lives, our future generation has traversed from a mere change of era to a dynamic era of change. Thus, the role of school leaders is becoming more challenging than ever. They need to make greater strides to ensure that they are able to make adjustments and readjustments in instructional practices to cater for the changing elements in their organization. In brief, the school leaders have to be creative, innovative with entrepreneurial drive in order to steer their subordinates (teachers) towards school excellence. Leadership of principal is therefore considered as a main criterion to create successful schools in country's educational advancement. Besides, the school effectiveness plays a crucial role in country's academic advancement. This paper focuses on a comprehensive review of literature on the relationship between instructional leadership and school effectiveness.

  2. Clinical Faculty in Educational Leadership Programs: A Growing Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackmann, Donald G.; McCarthy, Martha M.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a demographic profile of full-time educational leadership clinical faculty, to identify their professional responsibilities, and to compare their job satisfaction and perceptions of the educational leadership field with those of tenure-line faculty. Utilizing an online questionnaire, 140 clinical faculty and 755…

  3. Developing Canadian physician: the quest for leadership effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Comber, Scott; Wilson, Lisette; Crawford, Kyle C

    2016-07-04

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to discern the physicians' perception of leadership effectiveness in their clinical and non-clinical roles (leadership) by identifying their political skill levels. Design/methodology/approach A sample of 209 Canadian physicians was surveyed using the Political Skills Inventory (PSI) during the period 2012-2014. The PSI was chosen because it assesses leadership effectiveness on four dimensions: social astuteness, interpersonal influence, networking ability and apparent authenticity. Findings Physicians in clinical roles' PSI scores were significantly lower in all four PSI dimensions when compared to all other physicians in non-clinical roles, with the principal difference being in their networking abilities. Practical implications More emphasis is needed on educating and training physicians, specifically in the areas of political skills, in current clinical roles if they are to assume leadership roles and be effective. Originality/value Although this study is located in Canada, the study design and associated findings may have implications to other areas and countries wanting to increase physician leadership effectiveness. Further, replication of this study in other settings may provide insight into the future design of physician leadership training curriculum.

  4. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  5. Why clinical change leadership is essential for project success.

    PubMed

    Gocsik, Teresa K; Barton, Amy J

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a 4-part series where we will explore the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in the project lifecycle for effective technology adoption. The CNS is often called upon during major projects, such as the implementation of a new electronic health record, to play a key role in the project team. The CNS brings clinical knowledge and skills to the project team, with a particular focus on patient-centered workflows and the maintenance or improvement of the quality of care. However, CNSs may find it challenging to balance their role as members of the leadership group with the role they play in staff development and support.

  6. Facilitative Social Change Leadership Theory: 10 Recommendations toward Effective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Willis M.

    2009-01-01

    In the fast pace of the 21st century there is a demand for effective leaders capable of handling the internal and external changes occurring in our organizations. This paper seeks to inform the reader because change is natural; it is constant; it is inevitable. But, what constitutes effective leadership is the question. The main purpose of this…

  7. Preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model: a qualitative study from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Supamanee, Treeyaphan; Krairiksh, Marisa; Singhakhumfu, Laddawan; Turale, Sue

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical nursing leadership competency perspectives of Thai nurses working in a university hospital. To collect data, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 23 nurse administrators, and focus groups were used with 31 registered nurses. Data were analyzed using content analysis, and theory development was guided by the Iceberg model. Nurses' clinical leadership competencies emerged, comprising hidden characteristics and surface characteristics. The hidden characteristics composed three elements: motive (respect from the nursing and healthcare team and being secure in life), self-concept (representing positive attitudes and values), and traits (personal qualities necessary for leadership). The surface characteristics comprised specific knowledge of nurse leaders about clinical leadership, management and nursing informatics, and clinical skills, such as coordination, effective communication, problem solving, and clinical decision-making. The study findings help nursing to gain greater knowledge of the essence of clinical nursing leadership competencies, a matter critical for theory development in leadership. This study's results later led to the instigation of a training program for registered nurse leaders at the study site, and the formation of a preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model.

  8. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-04-30

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation.

  9. Factors Effecting Undergraduate Leadership Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Margie Lee; Marshall, Jeffrey C.; Pories, Mary Lisa; Daughety, Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Leadership behaviors of undergraduates (n = 1,103) were examined using the Student Leadership Practice Inventory (SLPI). The practice of leadership behaviors increased significantly from freshman to juniors and from juniors to seniors. However, each class was significantly less likely to practice the Challenge the Process behavior and…

  10. A comparative study of transformational leadership in nursing development units and conventional clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Bowles, A; Bowles, N B

    2000-03-01

    This is a comparative study of the leadership provided by nurse managers and leaders in Nursing Development Units and conventional clinical settings in England. Nursing development units (NDUs) were originally conceived as centres of nursing excellence, innovation and leadership development. This article describes the first published use of a leadership practices inventory (LPI) explicitly based upon a model of transformational leadership. This style of leadership has been commended as highly effective and suitable for nursing. The use of the LPI was piloted as a postal questionnaire and as a schedule for telephone interviewing, these pilots supported the use of telephone interviewing in the main study. Two matched samples of 70 nurses in total were recruited from across England, comprising 14 nurse leaders and 56 of their day to day colleagues. Data was collected by telephone interviewing over a 6-week period between February and April 1998. Six null hypotheses were developed to identify significant inter-group differences in leadership behaviour. Descriptive and inferential data analysis techniques were employed using SPSS for Windows. The leadership provided by NDU leaders was evaluated more highly than non-NDU leaders. A higher level of congruence between self and observer evaluations was shown by NDU leaders. Statistically significant inter-group differences were apparent in three of the five practices of exemplary leadership and in the overall leadership behaviour. NDU leaders show greater self awareness and are more transformational than their non-NDU counterparts. The limitations of the study design are discussed. NDU leaders provide leadership of a more transformational nature than their counterparts working in conventional settings. This finding suggests that NDU leaders have enhanced leadership potential and that formalizing nursing development within NDUs may promote the emergence of transformational leadership and provide a microculture in which it

  11. Public health nurses perception of clinical leadership in Ireland: narrative descriptions.

    PubMed

    Carney, Marie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to identify how clinical leadership skills are perceived by Public Health Nurses in the course of their everyday work and the effectiveness and consequences of such skills in primary care delivery. Public health nurses deliver primary care to children and adults as part of small teams or in individual situations. Leadership skills are needed to fulfil their many roles. Rigorous analysis of narrative interviews with public health nurses working in primary care environments in Ireland was undertaken. Narrative information was obtained by having conversations with 20 public health nurses relating to their perceptions on what clinical leadership meant to them and how their leadership skills influenced effective primary care delivery. Analysis of conversations identified the tensions existing between the various roles and responsibilities of the public health nurse and other primary care workers. This tension was perceived by the nurses as being the main barrier to effective primary care delivery from their perspective. Clinical leadership is viewed narrowly by public health nurses as management skills rather than leadership skills were mainly identified. Education for the role was identified as a critical success factor. RELEVANCE TO NURSE MANAGERS: Public health nurses are well placed to shape and influence health service culture through effective clinical leadership.

  12. Leadership Intelligence: Unlocking the Potential for School Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Timothy; Smith, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Top performing companies have long used intelligence tests in their selection procedures to predict who the best leaders are. However, no longer are the brightest favoured, or guaranteed success. A post-modern world demands a fresh outlook on leadership. How can school leaders judge their effectiveness? How can school leaders lead intelligently?…

  13. Leadership for Effective Evaluation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Fred A.; And Others

    This collection of articles is designed to enhance leadership for the promotion of effective evaluation and learning. The articles include an Introduction, by Fred Snyder; Exerting Leadership Toward Effective Evaluation of Pupil Performance, by T. L. Drake; The Elementary Principal as an Instructional Leader, by John Ourth; The Secondary Principal…

  14. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  15. Key Stakeholders' Perceptions of Effective School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odhiambo, George; Hii, Amy

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited research on how teachers, parents and students perceive effective school leadership in practice. The purpose of this article is to present some of the findings derived from a study of key stakeholders' perceptions of effective school leadership. Key stakeholders were identified as teachers, students and parents. Data were…

  16. Leadership for Effective Evaluation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Fred A.; And Others

    This collection of articles is designed to enhance leadership for the promotion of effective evaluation and learning. The articles include an Introduction, by Fred Snyder; Exerting Leadership Toward Effective Evaluation of Pupil Performance, by T. L. Drake; The Elementary Principal as an Instructional Leader, by John Ourth; The Secondary Principal…

  17. The Crucible simulation: Behavioral simulation improves clinical leadership skills and understanding of complex health policy change.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Daniel; Vlaev, Ivo; McMahon, Laurie; Harvey, Sarah; Mitchell, Andy; Borovoi, Leah; Darzi, Ara

    2017-05-11

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 represents the most complex National Health Service reforms in history. High-quality clinical leadership is important for successful implementation of health service reform. However, little is known about the effectiveness of current leadership training. This study describes the use of a behavioral simulation to improve the knowledge and leadership of a cohort of medical doctors expected to take leadership roles in the National Health Service. A day-long behavioral simulation (The Crucible) was developed and run based on a fictitious but realistic health economy. Participants completed pre- and postsimulation questionnaires generating qualitative and quantitative data. Leadership skills, knowledge, and behavior change processes described by the "theory of planned behavior" were self-assessed pre- and postsimulation. Sixty-nine medical doctors attended. Participants deemed the simulation immersive and relevant. Significant improvements were shown in perceived knowledge, capability, attitudes, subjective norms, intentions, and leadership competency following the program. Nearly one third of participants reported that they had implemented knowledge and skills from the simulation into practice within 4 weeks. This study systematically demonstrates the effectiveness of behavioral simulation for clinical management training and understanding of health policy reform. Potential future uses and strategies for analysis are discussed. High-quality care requires understanding of health systems and strong leadership. Policymakers should consider the use of behavioral simulation to improve understanding of health service reform and development of leadership skills in clinicians, who readily adopt skills from simulation into everyday practice.

  18. Curbing the urge to care: A Bourdieusian analysis of the effect of the caring disposition on nurse middle managers' clinical leadership in patient safety practices.

    PubMed

    Lalleman, P C B; Smid, G A C; Lagerwey, M D; Shortridge-Baggett, L M; Schuurmans, M J

    2016-11-01

    Nurse managers play an important role in implementing patient safety practices in hospitals. However, the influence of their professional background on their clinical leadership behaviour remains unclear. Research has demonstrated that concepts of Bourdieu (dispositions of habitus, capital and field) help to describe this influence. It revealed various configurations of dispositions of the habitus in which a caring disposition plays a crucial role. We explore how the caring disposition of nurse middle managers' habitus influences their clinical leadership behaviour in patient safety practices. Our paper reports the findings of a Bourdieusian, multi-site, ethnographic case study. Two Dutch and two American acute care, mid-sized, non-profit hospitals. A total of 16 nurse middle managers of adult care units. Observations were made over 560h of shadowing nurse middle managers, semi-structured interviews and member check meetings with the participants. We observed three distinct configurations of dispositions of the habitus which influenced the clinical leadership of nurse middle managers in patient safety practices; they all include a caring disposition: (1) a configuration with a dominant caring disposition that was helpful (via solving urgent matters) and hindering (via ad hoc and reactive actions, leading to quick fixes and 'compensatory modes'); (2) a configuration with an interaction of caring and collegial dispositions that led to an absence of clinical involvement and discouraged patient safety practices; and (3) a configuration with a dominant scientific disposition showing an investigative, non-judging, analytic stance, a focus on evidence-based practice that curbs the ad hoc repertoire of the caring disposition. The dispositions of the nurse middle managers' habitus influenced their clinical leadership in patient safety practices. A dominance of the caring disposition, which meant 'always' answering calls for help and reactive and ad hoc reactions, did not

  19. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Hess, Caryl A; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report, detail an expanded health care leadership development programme called the Cleveland Clinic Academy (CCA). CCA consists of a broad suite of offerings, including cohort-based learning and 'a la carte' half- or full-day courses addressing specific competencies to manage and to lead. Academy attendance is optional and is available to all physicians, nurses, and administrators with the requisite experience. Course selection is guided by competency matrices which map leadership competencies to specific courses. As of December 2012, a total of 285 course sessions have been offered to 6,050 attendees with uniformly high ratings of course quality and impact. During the past 10 years, Cleveland Clinic's leadership and management curriculum has successfully created a pipeline of health care leaders to fill executive positions, search committees, board openings, and various other organizational leadership positions. Health care leadership can be taught and learned.

  20. The Principal: Creative Leadership for Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubben, Gerald C.; Hughes, Larry W.

    Recent research points to a strong correlation between effective school practices and creative administrative leadership. This book focuses on the personal skills and attributes and the organizational conditions necessary for providing this kind of leadership. Principals' primary tasks of efficient building operation, personnel management, budget…

  1. The Language of Library Leadership: Effective Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Charles D.

    This paper examines the role of communication in library leadership. The discussion is organized into 14 sections: (1) multidimensional approaches to effective leadership communication and varying communication style to the situation; (2) the importance of conciseness; (3) streamlining library communication; (4) the vision being communicated by…

  2. Images of Leadership in Effective Schools Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Martin

    The literature of the effective schools movement argues for three very different images of what constitutes leadership, which are regarded in this paper as confused images of leadership. The first image is of a supremely pragmatic but rational actor, the second is of a leader who adheres to the norms typical of the local community culture, and the…

  3. Leadership, Equity, and School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays focuses on the intersection between equity and excellence in educational leadership and urges a reconceptualization that gives appropriate consideration to women and ethnic and racial minorities. The book begins with an introductory chapter, entitled "Equity and Excellence in Educational Leadership: A Necessary…

  4. Leadership, Equity, and School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays focuses on the intersection between equity and excellence in educational leadership and urges a reconceptualization that gives appropriate consideration to women and ethnic and racial minorities. The book begins with an introductory chapter, entitled "Equity and Excellence in Educational Leadership: A Necessary…

  5. Mentoring, coaching and action learning: interventions in a national clinical leadership development programme.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Martin S; Fealy, Gerard M; Casey, Mary; O'Connor, Tom; Patton, Declan; Doyle, Louise; Quinlan, Christina

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate mentoring, coaching and action learning interventions used to develop nurses' and midwives' clinical leadership competencies and to describe the programme participants' experiences of the interventions. Mentoring, coaching and action learning are effective interventions in clinical leadership development and were used in a new national clinical leadership development programme, introduced in Ireland in 2011. An evaluation of the programme focused on how participants experienced the interventions. A qualitative design, using multiple data sources and multiple data collection methods. Methods used to generate data on participant experiences of individual interventions included focus groups, individual interviews and nonparticipant observation. Seventy participants, including 50 programme participants and those providing the interventions, contributed to the data collection. Mentoring, coaching and action learning were positively experienced by participants and contributed to the development of clinical leadership competencies, as attested to by the programme participants and intervention facilitators. The use of interventions that are action-oriented and focused on service development, such as mentoring, coaching and action learning, should be supported in clinical leadership development programmes. Being quite different to short attendance courses, these interventions require longer-term commitment on the part of both individuals and their organisations. In using mentoring, coaching and action learning interventions, the focus should be on each participant's current role and everyday practice and on helping the participant to develop and demonstrate clinical leadership skills in these contexts. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Clinical leadership and hospital performance: assessing the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Sarto, F; Veronesi, G

    2016-05-24

    A widespread assumption across health systems suggests that greater clinicians' involvement in governance and management roles would have wider benefits for the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare organisations. However, despite growing interest around the topic, it is still poorly understood how managers with a clinical background might specifically affect healthcare performance outcomes. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to map out and critically appraise quantitatively-oriented studies investigating this phenomenon within the acute hospital sector. The review has focused on scientific papers published in English in international journals and conference proceedings. The articles have been extracted through a Boolean search strategy from ISI Web of Science citation and search source. No time constraints were imposed. A manual search by keywords and citation tracking was also conducted concentrating on highly ranked public sector governance and management journals. Nineteen papers were identified as a match for the research criteria and, subsequently, were classified on the basis of six items. Finally, a thematic mapping has been carried out leading to identify three main research sub-streams on the basis of the types of performance outcomes investigated. The analysis of the extant literature has revealed that research focusing on clinicians' involvement in leadership positions has explored its implications for the management of financial resources, the quality of care offered and the social performance of service providers. In general terms, the findings show a positive impact of clinical leadership on different types of outcome measures, with only a handful of studies highlighting a negative impact on financial and social performance. Therefore, this review lends support to the prevalent move across health systems towards increasing the presence of clinicians in leadership positions in healthcare organisations. Furthermore, we present an

  7. Leadership: Improving Its Effectiveness. Research Action Brief Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This brief summarizes the major findings of significant research studies dealing with different leadership behaviors and strategies for increasing leadership effectiveness. Fred Fiedler's Contingency Theory of Leadership Effectiveness emphasizes that a leader's effectiveness is determined by how well his leadership style fits the specific…

  8. Clinical leadership as an integral curriculum thread in pre-registration nursing programmes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in leadership development frameworks in health for the existing workforce. There has also been a related abundance of leadership programmes developed specifically for qualified nurses. There is a groundswell of opinion that clinical leadership preparation needs to extend to preparatory programmes leading to registration as a nurse. To this end a doctoral research study has been completed that focused specifically on the identification and verification of the antecedents of clinical leadership (leadership and management) so they can shape the curriculum content and the best way to deliver the curriculum content as a curriculum thread. To conceptualise how the curriculum content, identified and verified empirically, can be structured within a curriculum thread and to contribute to the discussion on effective pedagogical approaches and educational strategies for learning and teaching of clinical leadership. A multi-method design was utilised in the research in Australia. Drawing on core principles in critical social theory, an integral curriculum thread is proposed for pre-registration nursing programmes that identifies the antecedents of clinical leadership; the core concepts, together with the continuum of enlightenment, empowerment, and emancipation. The curriculum content, the effective pedagogical approaches and the educational strategies are supported theoretically and we believe this offers a design template for action and a way of thinking about this important aspect of preparatory nursing education. Moreover, we hope to have created a process contributing to a heighten sense of awareness in the nursing student (and other key stakeholders) of the what, how and when of clinical leadership for a novice registered nurse. The next stage is to further test through research the proposed integral curriculum thread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Workplace-based clinical leadership training increases willingness to lead.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Aleece; Young, Carmel; Ibrahim, Joseph Elias

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon a workplace-based, interdisciplinary clinical leadership training programme (CLP) to increase willingness to take on leadership roles in a large regional health-care centre in Victoria, Australia. Strengthening the leadership capacity of clinical staff is an advocated strategy for improving patient safety and quality of care. An interdisciplinary approach to leadership is increasingly emphasised in the literature; however, externally sourced training programmes are expensive and tend to target a single discipline. Appraisal of the first two years of CLP using multiple sourced feedback. A structured survey questionnaire with closed-ended questions graded using a five-point Likert scale was completed by participants of the 2012 programme. Participants from the 2011 programme were followed up for 18 months after completion of the programme to identify the uptake of new leadership roles. A reflective session was also completed by a senior executive staff that supported the implementation of the programme. Workplace-based CLP is a low-cost and multidisciplinary alternative to externally sourced leadership courses. The CLP significantly increased willingness to take on leadership roles. Most participants (93 per cent) reported that they were more willing to take on a leadership role within their team. Fewer were willing to lead at the level of department (79 per cent) or organisation (64 per cent). Five of the 11 participants from the 2011 programme had taken on a new leadership role 18 months later. Senior executive feedback was positive especially around the engagement and building of staff confidence. They considered that the CLP had sufficient merit to support continuation for at least another two years. Integrating health-care professionals into formal and informal leadership roles is essential to implement organisational change as part of the drive to improve the safety and quality of care for patients and service users

  10. Research leadership: should clinical directors be distinguished researchers?

    PubMed

    Allison, Stephen; Goodall, Amanda H; Bastiampillai, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Clinical directors established research-led healthcare by combining research, teaching and clinical excellence within the teaching hospitals. This research culture created high clinical standards, which benefited patients, the workforce and healthcare organisations. The current paper explores this research leadership role for clinical directors. It reviews studies arising from the theory of expert leadership, which focuses on the relationship between a leader's core knowledge and organisational performance. More specifically, we examine the expert leader's research track record, the associations with their organisation's performance, and the influence of research activity on clinical excellence. Distinguished researchers still lead the most prestigious teaching hospitals and the most trusted departments of psychiatry in the United States where the clinical directorate structure originated. It is also known that good scholars can improve research output when appointed to leadership positions. This suggests that the clinical director's research track record should be a consideration at a time when research is being embedded in Australia's local health networks. A clinical director's leadership may influence the research performance of their department and contribute to the quality of mental healthcare. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  11. Clinical program leadership: skill requirements for contemporary leaders.

    PubMed

    Spallina, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    With knowledge of these leadership requirements and a shrinking base of experienced managers, healthcare organizations and professional societies have little choice in their approach to prepare for the leadership development challenges of the future. Organizations will focus leadership development, training, and continuing management education on integrating business tools and skills into clinical program management. The management requirements for clinical programs will continue to grow in complexity and the number of qualified managers will continue to diminish, New approaches to solving this shortage will evolve. Professional, forprofit companies, healthcare provider organizations, and academic programs will develop clinical program management training tracks. Organizations that create solutions to this management imperative will maintain their competitive edge in the challenging times that will greet the industry in the future.

  12. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A meta-analysis of shared leadership and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danni; Waldman, David A; Zhang, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of studies have examined the "sharedness" of leadership processes in teams (i.e., shared leadership, collective leadership, and distributed leadership). We meta-analytically cumulated 42 independent samples of shared leadership and examined its relationship to team effectiveness. Our findings reveal an overall positive relationship (ρ = .34). But perhaps more important, what is actually shared among members appears to matter with regard to team effectiveness. That is, shared traditional forms of leadership (e.g., initiating structure and consideration) show a lower relationship (ρ = .18) than either shared new-genre leadership (e.g., charismatic and transformational leadership; ρ = .34) or cumulative, overall shared leadership (ρ = .35). In addition, shared leadership tends to be more strongly related to team attitudinal outcomes and behavioral processes and emergent team states, compared with team performance. Moreover, the effects of shared leadership are stronger when the work of team members is more complex. Our findings further suggest that the referent used in measuring shared leadership does not influence its relationship with team effectiveness and that compared with vertical leadership, shared leadership shows unique effects in relation to team performance. In total, our study not only cumulates extant research on shared leadership but also provides directions for future research to move forward in the study of plural forms of leadership.

  14. Formative Assessment as an Effective Leadership Learning Tool.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J Matthew; Camper, Jill M

    2015-01-01

    Formative assessment can be a critical and creative practice in leadership education and significantly enhance student learning, leader development, and leadership development. This chapter seeks to frame the use of assessment as both a best practice in leadership education and as an integral component to effective leadership learning pedagogy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  15. Interprofessional student experiences on the HAVEN free clinic leadership board.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elizabeth Anne; Swartz, Martha K

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the experiences of students serving on the leadership board of HAVEN - the student-run free clinic of the Yale University health professional schools. Open-ended responses were collected from 18 of the 28 members of the 2011-2012 leadership board through an online survey. Students reported an overall positive experience participating on the board and valued the opportunity to be part of a committed community creating change. The majority of students reported that their time as a board member had improved their attitude towards interprofessional collaboration (78%) and had also fostered their leadership skills (67%). Around two thirds (67%) reported that their experience had positively impacted their future career plans, either reinforcing their desire to work with underserved populations or encouraging them to pursue leadership roles. Based on these data, it is suggested that the HAVEN Free Clinic offers a useful opportunity for students to experience the demands of clinical care leadership while working together in an interprofessional context.

  16. Interprofessional clinical education: clinicians' views on the importance of leadership.

    PubMed

    Missen, Karen; Jacob, Elisabeth R; Barnett, Tony; Walker, Lorraine; Cross, Merylin

    2012-01-01

    The current shortage of health professionals necessitates new approaches to clinical education that can expand the number of undergraduate students undertaking clinical placements without increasing the burden on clinical staff or placing patients at risk. Interprofessional education has the potential to help increase clinical capacity whilst enriching students' clinical experience. This paper reports on a project which investigated the potential for interprofessional education to increase undergraduate clinical placement capacity in clinical settings. The project utilised an exploratory descriptive methodology to obtain the views of health care professionals about the use of interprofessional education in clinical education at three rural health facilities in Victoria, Australia. Participants (n = 57) had a key role with each health care facility in coordinating and facilitating undergraduate clinical placements. This paper examines the clinicians' views about the central role that leadership plays in actioning interprofessional education in the clinical setting. Whilst interprofessional education was regarded favourably by the majority of participants, data indicated that leadership from education providers, health services, and regulatory authorities was crucial to enable interprofessional education to be implemented and sustained within the clinical learning environment. Without leadership from each of these three spheres of influence, interprofessional education will continue to be difficult to implement for undergraduate students and compromise their exposure to an important aspect of the working life of health care professionals. Such a failure will limit graduates' readiness for collaborative and cross-disciplinary practice.

  17. Developing effective leadership competencies in military social workers.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Jennifer L; Howard, Reginald W

    2014-01-01

    Military social workers are facing transformative times in that demand for military social work has increased and become more complex, challenging, and diverse due to the last 13 years of combat experiences. Developing military social work leaders must be deliberate, continuous, and progressive in order to impact and improve organizational performance in the healthcare delivery system. The transformational leadership model has been proven to be effective in both the military and social service organizations. The strength of this leadership model coincides well with the values of the social work profession. Incorporating leadership development in a clinical Master of Social Work program has the potential to improve service provision and offer strategies for military social workers to effectively manage the ongoing challenges in the field of social work.

  18. Relations and effects of transformational leadership: a comparative analysis with traditional leadership styles.

    PubMed

    Molero, Fernando; Cuadrado, Isabel; Navas, Marisol; Morales, J Francisco

    2007-11-01

    This study has two main goals: (a) to compare the relationship between transformational leadership and other important leadership styles (i.e., democratic versus autocratic or relations- and task-oriented leadership) and (b) to compare the effects of transformational leadership and the other styles on some important organizational outcomes such as employees' satisfaction and performance. For this purpose, a sample of 147 participants, working in 35 various work-teams, was used. Results show high correlations between transformational leadership, relations-oriented, democratic, and task-oriented leadership. On the other hand, according to the literature, transformational leadership, especially high levels, significantly increases the percentage of variance accounted for by other leadership styles in relevant organizational outcome variables (subordinates' performance, satisfaction and extra effort).

  19. Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beycioglu, Kadir, Ed.; Pashiardis, Petros, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Exceptional management skills are crucial to success in educational environments. As school leaders, principals are expected to effectively supervise the school system while facing a multitude of issues and demands. "Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness" combines best practices and the latest approaches in…

  20. Effective Software Engineering Leadership for Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle West, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Software is a critical component of systems ranging from simple consumer appliances to complex health, nuclear, and flight control systems. The development of quality, reliable, and effective software solutions requires the incorporation of effective software engineering processes and leadership. Processes, approaches, and methodologies for…

  1. Effective Software Engineering Leadership for Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle West, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Software is a critical component of systems ranging from simple consumer appliances to complex health, nuclear, and flight control systems. The development of quality, reliable, and effective software solutions requires the incorporation of effective software engineering processes and leadership. Processes, approaches, and methodologies for…

  2. Highlights from "Research on Effective School Leadership."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, James

    1982-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Effective schools have effective leaders. Much of what the school does to promote achievement is within the principal's power to influence and control. Specifically, there are six leadership behaviors that have been consistently associated with schools that are well managed and whose students…

  3. Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beycioglu, Kadir, Ed.; Pashiardis, Petros, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Exceptional management skills are crucial to success in educational environments. As school leaders, principals are expected to effectively supervise the school system while facing a multitude of issues and demands. "Multidimensional Perspectives on Principal Leadership Effectiveness" combines best practices and the latest approaches in…

  4. The Role of Communication in Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolle, Joni R.

    Suggesting that the old saying "It's not what you say, it's how you say it" rings true for one educational leader, a Speech Pathologist, keenly aware of the necessity of effective communication and its impact on leadership. Possessing the quality of effective communication makes for a high quality leader because it enables one to express ideas…

  5. Studying the clinical encounter with the Adaptive Leadership framework

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Donald E; Docherty, Sharron L; Adams, Judith A; Carthron, Dana L; Corazzini, Kirsten; Day, Jennifer R; Neglia, Elizabeth; Thygeson, Marcus; Anderson, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the concept of leadership as a personal capability, not contingent on one's position in a hierarchy. This type of leadership allows us to reframe both the care-giving and organizational roles of nurses and other front-line clinical staff. Little research has been done to explore what leadership means at the point of care, particularly in reference to the relationship between health care practitioners and patients and their family caregivers. The Adaptive Leadership framework, based on complexity science theory, provides a useful lens to explore practitioners' leadership behaviors at the point of care. This framework proposes that there are two broad categories of challenges that patients face: technical and adaptive. Whereas technical challenges are addressed with technical solutions that are delivered by practitioners, adaptive challenges require the patient (or family member) to adjust to a new situation and to do the work of adapting, learning, and behavior change. Adaptive leadership is the work that practitioners do to mobilize and support patients to do the adaptive work. The purpose of this paper is to describe this framework and demonstrate its application to nursing research. We demonstrate the framework's utility with five exemplars of nursing research problems that range from the individual to the system levels. The framework has the potential to guide researchers to ask new questions and to gain new insights into how practitioners interact with patients at the point of care to increase the patient's ability to tackle challenging problems and improve their own health care outcomes. It is a potentially powerful framework for developing and testing a new generation of interventions to address complex issues by harnessing and learning about the adaptive capabilities of patients within their life contexts. PMID:24409083

  6. Studying the clinical encounter with the Adaptive Leadership framework.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Donald E; Docherty, Sharron L; Adams, Judith A; Carthron, Dana L; Corazzini, Kirsten; Day, Jennifer R; Neglia, Elizabeth; Thygeson, Marcus; Anderson, Ruth A

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the concept of leadership as a personal capability, not contingent on one's position in a hierarchy. This type of leadership allows us to reframe both the care-giving and organizational roles of nurses and other front-line clinical staff. Little research has been done to explore what leadership means at the point of care, particularly in reference to the relationship between health care practitioners and patients and their family caregivers. The Adaptive Leadership framework, based on complexity science theory, provides a useful lens to explore practitioners' leadership behaviors at the point of care. This framework proposes that there are two broad categories of challenges that patients face: technical and adaptive. Whereas technical challenges are addressed with technical solutions that are delivered by practitioners, adaptive challenges require the patient (or family member) to adjust to a new situation and to do the work of adapting, learning, and behavior change. Adaptive leadership is the work that practitioners do to mobilize and support patients to do the adaptive work. The purpose of this paper is to describe this framework and demonstrate its application to nursing research. We demonstrate the framework's utility with five exemplars of nursing research problems that range from the individual to the system levels. The framework has the potential to guide researchers to ask new questions and to gain new insights into how practitioners interact with patients at the point of care to increase the patient's ability to tackle challenging problems and improve their own health care outcomes. It is a potentially powerful framework for developing and testing a new generation of interventions to address complex issues by harnessing and learning about the adaptive capabilities of patients within their life contexts.

  7. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Cost Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, James A.

    Westinghouse Learning Corporation's (WLC) cost and effectiveness experiences for the preparation of instructional units in the United States Naval Academy leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the course development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) are reported in this document. The cost collection system is…

  8. Competencies for Effective Leadership in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spendlove, Marion

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to set out to investigate the role of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Rector, or Principal of a university, and the competencies (attitudes, knowledge and behaviour) that are needed for effective leadership in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were held with…

  9. Transformational School Leadership Effects on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jingping; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Based on a synthesis of unpublished transformational school leadership (TSL) research completed during the last 14 years, this study inquired into the nature of TSL and its effects on student achievement using review methods including standard meta-analysis and vote-counting techniques. Results identify a wider range of TSL practices than…

  10. The Effect from Coaching Based Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Frode; Federici, Roger Andre

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to implement an experiment to explore the effects from coaching based leadership on goal setting, self-efficacy, and causal attribution. The study comprised of 20 executives and 124 middle managers at a branch of a Norwegian Fortune 500 company who all voluntarily participated in an experiment over a…

  11. Relational Principles for Effective Church Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Willis M.

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, effective church leaders need to be prepared to emphasize and demonstrate ethical leadership, personal responsibility, and community service. The foundation for success in all those areas lies in the ability of church leaders to initiate, develop, and maintain positive functioning relationships. Based on over 40 year's…

  12. Effects of Leadership Styles in Technical and Vocational Students, UTHM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razak, Nur Afifah Binti Abdul; Hamidon, Nur Izeanty Binti

    2015-01-01

    Effective leadership helps our nation through times become a developed country. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of leadership style among students in Technical and Vocational at University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. Descriptive study carried out to evaluate student leadership. The study sample consisted of 319 Technical and…

  13. Improving Your Daily Practice: A Guide for Effective School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkey, Timothy B.

    2009-01-01

    This book will show principals how they can change daily practices to invest more time in the improvement of teaching and learning. It redirects leadership to effective practices in instructional leadership. Contents include an Introduction and the following chapters: (1) Why Change the Way I Lead?; (2) The Path to Effective School Leadership; (3)…

  14. Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group.

    PubMed

    Malling, Bente; Mortensen, Lene; Bonderup, Thomas; Scherpbier, Albert; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2009-12-10

    Leadership courses and multi-source feedback are widely used developmental tools for leaders in health care. On this background we aimed to study the additional effect of a leadership course following a multi-source feedback procedure compared to multi-source feedback alone especially regarding development of leadership skills over time. Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments. pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership course. Scores of multi-source feedback from the consultants responsible for education and respondents (heads of department, consultants and doctors in specialist training) were collected before and one year after the intervention and analysed using Mann-Whitney's U-test and Multivariate analysis of variances. There were no differences in multi-source feedback scores at one year follow up compared to baseline measurements, either in the intervention or in the control group (p = 0.149). The study indicates that a leadership course following a MSF procedure compared to MSF alone does not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed to investigate if other combination of initiatives to develop leadership might have more impact in the clinical setting.

  15. Medical Schools, Clinical Research, and Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makarushka, Julia L.; Lally, John J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent discussion of the ethical problems of biomedical human experimentation has drawn attention to the responsibility of the medical schools for training new clinical investigators and for safeguarding the rights and welfare of the subjects of clinical research conducted in the medical schools and their affiliated hospitals. (Author)

  16. Medical Schools, Clinical Research, and Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makarushka, Julia L.; Lally, John J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent discussion of the ethical problems of biomedical human experimentation has drawn attention to the responsibility of the medical schools for training new clinical investigators and for safeguarding the rights and welfare of the subjects of clinical research conducted in the medical schools and their affiliated hospitals. (Author)

  17. Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme: An Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miani, Celine; Marjanovic, Sonja; Jones, Molly Morgan; Marshall, Martin; Meikle, Samantha; Nolte, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is seen to be central to improving the quality of healthcare and existing research suggests that absence of leadership is related to poor quality and safety performance. Leadership training might therefore provide an important means through which to promote quality improvement and, more widely, performance within the healthcare environment. This article presents an evaluation of the Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme, which combines leadership training and quality improvement initiatives with the placement of temporary external clinical champions in Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. We assessed impacts of the Programme on individual and organisational change, alongside core enablers and barriers for Programme success. Analyses drew on the principles of a theory-of-change-led realist evaluation, using logic modelling to specify the underlying causal mechanisms of the Programme. Data collection involved a stakeholder workshop, online questionnaires of programme participants, senior managers and support staff (n=114), and follow-up in-depth semi-structured interviews with a subsample of survey participants (n=15). We observed that the Programme had notable impacts at individual and organisational levels. Examples of individual impact included enhanced communication and negotiation skills or increased confidence as a result of multi-modal leadership training. At the organisational level, participants reported indications of behaviour change among staff, with evidence of spill-over effects to non-participants towards a greater focus on patient-centred care. Our findings suggest that there is potential for combined leadership training and quality improvement programmes to contribute to strengthening a culture of care quality in healthcare organisations. Our study provides useful insights into strategies seeking to achieve sustainable improvement in NHS organisations.

  18. First and foremost, physicians: the clinical versus leadership identities of physician leaders.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Joann Farrell; Perelli, Sheri

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Physicians are commonly promoted into administrative and managerial roles in US hospitals on the basis of clinical expertise and often lack the skills, training or inclination to lead. Several studies have sought to identify factors associated with effective physician leadership, yet we know little about how physician leaders themselves construe their roles. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach - Phenomenological interviews were performed with 25 physicians at three organizational levels with physicians affiliated or employed by four hospitals within one health care organization in the USA between August and September 2010. A rigorous comparative methodology of data collection and analysis was employed, including the construction of analytic codes for the data and its categorization based on emergent ideas and themes that are not preconceived and logically deduced hypotheses, which is characteristic of grounded theory. Findings - These interviews reveal differences in how part- vs full-time physician leaders understand and value leadership roles vs clinical roles, claim leadership status, and identify as physician leaders on individual, relational and organizational basis. Research limitations/implications - Although the physicians in the sample were affiliated with four community hospitals, all of them were part of a single not-for-profit health care system in one geographical locale. Practical implications - These findings may be of interest to hospital administrators and boards seeking deeper commitment and higher performance from physician leaders, as well as assist physicians in transitioning into a leadership role. Social implications - This work points to a broader and more fundamental need - a modified mindset about the nature and value of physician leadership. Originality/value - This study is unique in the exploration of the nature of physician leadership from the perspective of the physician on an individual, peer

  19. The Role of Motivation to Lead for Leadership Training Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiehl, Sibylle K.; Felfe, Jörg; Elprana, Gwen; Gatzka, Magdalena B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the construct of motivation to lead (MtL) is considered as a predictor of leadership training effectiveness. MtL, the individual preference to take on leadership roles, is a motivation that specifically relates to the content of leadership training. A total of 132 managers participated in a longitudinal follow-up study. The…

  20. Effective Board Leadership: Factors Associated with Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the content, construct, and predictive validity of the Effective Board Leadership Practices Survey (EBLPS). The EBLPS was designed to measure the leadership practices of boards of education that support student achievement. A literature review identified 12 board leadership practices supportive of student…

  1. Secondary School Leadership Practice in Botswana: Implications for Effective Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheko, Bolelang

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the views of selected headteachers on the impact of the 10-year basic education policy on the leadership skills of secondary school headteachers in Botswana. Research literature on school leadership and management in Botswana is sparse. Despite this, demands for effective leadership in schools have continued as the education…

  2. 7 Steps to Effective Instructional Leadership. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Elaine K.

    This book was written for results-oriented administrators who daily face the pressures of accountability. The introduction sets forth the differences between leadership and instructional leadership, and defines the critical attributes of effective instructional leadership. The following seven chapters describe each of the seven steps to effective…

  3. Nursing leadership and management effects work environments.

    PubMed

    Tomey, Ann Marriner

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this literature search was to identify recent research related to nursing leadership and management effects on work environment using the 14 forces of magnetism. This article gives some historical perspective from the original 1983 American Academy of Nursing study through to the 2002 McClure and Hinshaw update to 2009 publications. Research publications were given a priority for references. The 14 forces of magnetism as identified by Unden and Monarch were: '1. Quality of leadership..., 2. Organizational structure..., 3. Management style..., 4. Personnel policies and programs..., 5. Professional models of care..., 6. Quality of care..., 7 Quality improvement..., 8. Consultation and resources..., 9. Autonomy..., 10. Community and the hospital..., 11. Nurse as teacher..., 12. Image of nursing..., 13. Interdisciplinary relationships... and 14. Professional development....'. Correlations have been found among positive workplace management initiatives, style of transformational leadership and participative management; patient-to-nurse ratios; education levels of nurses; quality of patient care, patient satisfaction, employee health and well-being programmes; nurse satisfaction and retention of nurses; healthy workplace environments and healthy patients and personnel. This article identifies some of the research that provides evidence for evidence-based nursing management and leadership practice.

  4. Finance leadership imperatives in clinical redesign.

    PubMed

    Harris, John; Holm, Craig E; Inniger, Meredith C

    2015-03-01

    As physicians embrace their roles in managing healthcare costs and quality, finance leaders should seize the opportunity to engage physicians in clinical care redesign to ensure both high-quality performance and efficient resource use. Finance leaders should strike a balance between risk and reward to achieve a portfolio of clinical initiatives that is organizationally sustainable and responsive to current external drivers of payment changes. Because these initiatives should be driven by physicians, the new skill set of finance leaders should include an emphasis on relationship building to achieve consensus and drive change across an organization.

  5. The Complexity in Defining Leadership: How Gifted Students' Backgrounds Influence Their Understanding of Effective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shawon; Sakuma, Satoe; DeVol, Purva

    2015-01-01

    There is no universally accepted definition of what it means to be an effective leader. Individuals understand leadership differently based on their own identities and lived experiences. The purpose of this investigation is to determine how one's ethnicity, class, and gender identities influence their understanding of effective leadership,…

  6. Developmental Readiness for Leadership: The Differential Effects of Leadership Courses on Creating "Ready, Willing, and Able" Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Kari; Rosch, David; Burgoon, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective leadership capacity involves multiple factors including increasing students' leadership self-efficacy, motivation to lead, and leadership skills. This study of 165 undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory leadership theory course explores the degree to which students report changes in these three areas of…

  7. Designing a physician leadership development program based on effective models of physician education.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Joseph; Fassiotto, Magali; Ku, Manwai Candy; Mammo, Dagem; Valantine, Hannah

    2017-02-02

    Because of modern challenges in quality, safety, patient centeredness, and cost, health care is evolving to adopt leadership practices of highly effective organizations. Traditional physician training includes little focus on developing leadership skills, which necessitates further training to achieve the potential of collaborative management. The aim of this study was to design a leadership program using established models for continuing medical education and to assess its impact on participants' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and performance. The program, delivered over 9 months, addressed leadership topics and was designed around a framework based on how physicians learn new clinical skills, using multiple experiential learning methods, including a leadership active learning project. The program was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's assessment levels: reaction to the program, learning, changes in behavior, and results. Four cohorts are evaluated (2008-2011). Reaction: The program was rated highly by participants (mean = 4.5 of 5). Learning: Significant improvements were reported in knowledge, skills, and attitudes surrounding leadership competencies. Behavior: The majority (80%-100%) of participants reported plans to use learned leadership skills in their work. Improved team leadership behaviors were shown by increased engagement of project team members. All participants completed a team project during the program, adding value to the institution. Results support the hypothesis that learning approaches known to be effective for other types of physician education are successful when applied to leadership development training. Across all four assessment levels, the program was effective in improving leadership competencies essential to meeting the complex needs of the changing health care system. Developing in-house programs that fit the framework established for continuing medical education can increase physician leadership competencies and add value to health care

  8. What do doctors and nurses think about development of clinical leadership?

    PubMed

    Lo, David; Till, Alex; McKimm, Judy

    2017-09-02

    Leadership development for health-care professionals is a priority within the NHS. Training is generally targeted at individual staff groups in isolation, even though contemporary leadership thinking recognizes the benefits of collaborative leadership between different clinical disciplines. Focussing on the attitudes and perceived training needs of undergraduate and qualified medical and nursing professionals, this article highlights the similarities and differences and will help to inform the design of existing and future leadership programmes.

  9. Effective Leadership Education: Developing a Core Curriculum for Leadership Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Willis M.

    2003-01-01

    Educators must develop leadership studies programs that prepare students to deal with the reality of a diverse world so they are able to handle constant change as they lead in the 21st century. The purpose of this paper is to consider a variety of questions that need to be answered when developing core curricula for college and university…

  10. 'Good ethics and moral standing': a qualitative study of aesthetic leadership in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-06-01

    To explore how aesthetic leadership is embodied by clinical leaders in the nursing workplace. A number of different leadership styles have been developed, theorised and applied to the nursing workforce over the years. Many of these styles lack an explicit moral dimension in their identified leader attributes, due to a shift in theorising of leadership to focus on the impact of leader traits on followers. It is timely to look at aesthetic leadership, with its explicit moral dimension, as a way of improving outcomes for nurses, patients and health care organisations. Qualitative design, using conversation-style interviews with experienced registered nurses in designated clinical leadership roles. Twelve experienced registered nurses who worked in designated clinical leadership roles participated in an individual, digitally recorded, semi-structured conversation-style interview. Narrative data were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Three main themes emerged: 'True to their beliefs': embodying principled practice; 'Not all policies fit every patient': ethical leadership in ambiguous situations; and 'Being open to people's concerns': providing fair and just solutions. A strong moral compass shaped and guided participants' day-to-day clinical leadership activities. Participants provided a rich narrative on how aesthetic leadership is embodied in the clinical nursing setting. It was evident that their clinical leadership is shaped and guided by a strong moral compass. By incorporating into their practice an aesthetic world-view with its strong moral purpose, participants in this study have shown how aesthetic leadership can enhance the clinical nursing workplace. Nurses in the clinical setting value clinical leaders who embrace and operate with a strong moral compass. Aesthetic leadership, with its explicit strong moral purpose, offers a way of incorporating morality into clinical leadership in the nursing workplace. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Achieving organisational competence for clinical leadership: the role of high performance work systems.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G; Balding, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    While there has been substantial discussion about the potential for clinical leadership in improving quality and safety in healthcare, there has been little robust study. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a qualitative study with clinicians and clinician managers to gather opinions on the appropriate content of an educational initiative being planned to improve clinical leadership in quality and safety among medical, nursing and allied health professionals working in primary, community and secondary care. In total, 28 clinicians and clinician managers throughout the state of Victoria, Australia, participated in focus groups to provide advice on the development of a clinical leadership program in quality and safety. An inductive, thematic analysis was completed to enable the themes to emerge from the data. Overwhelmingly the participants conceptualised clinical leadership in relation to organisational factors. Only four individual factors, comprising emotional intelligence, resilience, self-awareness and understanding of other clinical disciplines, were identified as being important for clinical leaders. Conversely seven organisational factors, comprising role clarity and accountability, security and sustainability for clinical leaders, selective recruitment into clinical leadership positions, teamwork and decentralised decision making, training, information sharing, and transformational leadership, were seen as essential, but the participants indicated they were rarely addressed. The human resource management literature includes these seven components, with contingent reward, reduced status distinctions and measurement of management practices, as the essential organisational underpinnings of high performance work systems. The results of this study propose that clinical leadership is an organisational property, suggesting that capability frameworks and educational programs for clinical leadership need a broader organisation focus. The paper

  12. Collaboration amongst clinical nursing leadership teams: a mixed-methods sequential explanatory study.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Lyons, Sarah; Foster, Karlie; Perry, Lin

    2015-11-01

    To explore intra-professional collaboration amongst nursing leadership teams at a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. Effective working within a wide network of alliances is critical to patient outcomes. An understanding of collaboration amongst nursing leadership teams is essential within this context. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design was used. The Collaborative Behaviour scale was sent to 106 Nurse Unit Managers, Nurse Educators and Clinical Nurse Consultants to measure pairwise collaborative behaviours; two follow-up focus groups with 15 participants were conducted. Data were collected between May 2012 and May 2013. A thematic analysis of focus group data provided a detailed explanation of the questionnaire findings. The findings identified high collaboration between dyad groups. Two themes emerged from the thematic analysis: (1) professional role and expectations; with sub-themes of transparency and clarity of individual roles; and intra/interpersonal aspects of role functioning; and (2) organisational infrastructure and governance. These leadership teams can be effective and powerful vehicles for change and are central to optimum patient outcomes. Organisational strategic planning and evaluation can benefit from understanding how to promote collaborative behaviours in these nurse leaders. To date, little research has explored collaboration amongst nursing leadership teams. Successful collaboration may contribute to the efficient use of nursing resources; improve patient outcomes, and ultimately, nurse satisfaction and retention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Crisis leadership in an acute clinical setting: christchurch hospital, new zealand ICU experience following the february 2011 earthquake.

    PubMed

    Zhuravsky, Lev

    2015-04-01

    On Tuesday, February 22, 2011, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch, New Zealand. This qualitative study explored the intensive care units (ICUs) staff experiences and adopted leadership approaches to manage a large-scale crisis resulting from the city-wide disaster. To date, there have been a very small number of research publications to provide a comprehensive overview of crisis leadership from the perspective of multi-level interactions among staff members in the acute clinical environment during the process of the crisis management. The research was qualitative in nature. Participants were recruited into the study through purposive sampling. A semi-structured, audio-taped, personal interview method was chosen as a single data collection method for this study. This study employed thematic analysis. Formal team leadership refers to the actions undertaken by a team leader to ensure the needs and goals of the team are met. Three core, formal, crisis-leadership themes were identified: decision making, ability to remain calm, and effective communication. Informal leaders are those individuals who exert significant influence over other members in the group to which they belong, although no formal authority has been assigned to them. Four core, informal, crisis-leadership themes were identified: motivation to lead, autonomy, emotional leadership, and crisis as opportunity. Shared leadership is a dynamic process among individuals in groups for which the objective is to lead one another to the achievement of group or organizational goals. Two core, shared-leadership themes were identified: shared leadership within formal medical and nursing leadership groups, and shared leadership between formal and informal leaders in the ICU. The capabilities of formal leaders all contributed to the overall management of a crisis. Informal leaders are a very cohesive group of motivated people who can make a substantial contribution and improve overall team performance in a

  14. Improving Organizational Effectiveness through Transformational Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Bernard M., Ed.; Avolio, Bruce J., Ed.

    This book shows how transformational leadership is expected to contribute to an organization's efforts to improve its operations and the best use of its human resources. The concepts of transactional and transformational leadership are introduced within the framework of a full-range model of leadership. This model is applied to research,…

  15. Collective Leadership Effects on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Mascall, Blair

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to estimate the impact of collective, or shared, leadership on key teacher variables and on student achievement. As well, it inquired about the relative contribution of different sources of such leadership and whether differences among patterns of collective leadership were related to differences in student achievement.…

  16. Using an executive coach to increase leadership effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Patricia Reid; Gross, Anne Harvey; Galante, Andrea; Glazer, Greer

    2006-06-01

    Senior executive nursing roles demand excellence and rigor in both the technical and interpersonal domains of leadership. Many nurse leaders have begun seeking innovative self-development programs and practices to assist them as they strive to improve their effectiveness as leaders in complex organizations. One practice that has gained in popularity is that of engaging a leadership "coach." To understand this relatively new trend in healthcare leadership, the authors interviewed 4 coaches and 4 nurse leaders who had been coached. In this article, they present their overall findings about the effectiveness of coaching as a leadership development tool and offer recommendations for leaders who are interested in engaging a coach.

  17. Improve Organizational Effectiveness, Culture, and Climate Through Servant Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    provides the existing conditions required for the model of servant leadership to be successful . The proper use of servant leader behavior empowers...Soldiers and improves the long-term success of the organization. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Servant Leadership; Organizational Effectiveness; Organizational...leadership to be successful . The proper use of servant leader behavior empowers Soldiers and improves the long-term success of the organization. v

  18. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  19. Do plastic surgery division heads and program directors have the necessary tools to provide effective leadership?

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, JS; McInnes, CW; Carr, NJ; Lennox, P; Hill, M; Petersen, R; Woodward, K; Skarlicki, D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effective leadership is imperative in a changing health care landscape driven by increasing expectations in a setting of rising fiscal pressures. Because evidence suggests that leadership abilities are not simply innate but, rather, effective leadership can be learned, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to evaluate the training and challenges of their leaders because there may be opportunities for further growth and support. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the practice profiles, education/training, responsibilities and challenges of leaders within academic plastic surgery. METHODS: Following research ethics board approval, an anonymous online survey was sent to division heads and program directors from all university-affiliated plastic surgery divisions in Canada. Survey themes included demographics, education/training, job responsibilities and challenges. RESULTS: A response rate of 74% was achieved. The majority of respondents were male (94%), promoted to their current position at a mean age of 48 years, did not have a leadership-focused degree (88%), directly manage 30 people (14 staff, 16 faculty) and were not provided with a job description (65%). Respondents worked an average of 65 h per week, of which 18% was devoted to their leadership role, 59% clinically and the remainder on teaching and research. A discrepancy existed between time spent on their leadership role (18%) and related compensation (10%). Time management (47%) and managing conflict (24%) were described as the greatest leadership challenges by respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Several gaps were identified among leaders in plastic surgery including predominance of male sex, limitations in formal leadership training and requisite skill set, as well as compensation and human resources management (emotional intelligence). Leadership and managerial skills are key core competencies, not only for trainees, but certainly for those in a position of leadership. The present study provides evidence that

  20. Do plastic surgery division heads and program directors have the necessary tools to provide effective leadership?

    PubMed

    Arneja, Js; McInnes, Cw; Carr, Nj; Lennox, P; Hill, M; Petersen, R; Woodward, K; Skarlicki, D

    2014-01-01

    Effective leadership is imperative in a changing health care landscape driven by increasing expectations in a setting of rising fiscal pressures. Because evidence suggests that leadership abilities are not simply innate but, rather, effective leadership can be learned, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to evaluate the training and challenges of their leaders because there may be opportunities for further growth and support. To investigate the practice profiles, education/training, responsibilities and challenges of leaders within academic plastic surgery. Following research ethics board approval, an anonymous online survey was sent to division heads and program directors from all university-affiliated plastic surgery divisions in Canada. Survey themes included demographics, education/training, job responsibilities and challenges. A response rate of 74% was achieved. The majority of respondents were male (94%), promoted to their current position at a mean age of 48 years, did not have a leadership-focused degree (88%), directly manage 30 people (14 staff, 16 faculty) and were not provided with a job description (65%). Respondents worked an average of 65 h per week, of which 18% was devoted to their leadership role, 59% clinically and the remainder on teaching and research. A discrepancy existed between time spent on their leadership role (18%) and related compensation (10%). Time management (47%) and managing conflict (24%) were described as the greatest leadership challenges by respondents. Several gaps were identified among leaders in plastic surgery including predominance of male sex, limitations in formal leadership training and requisite skill set, as well as compensation and human resources management (emotional intelligence). Leadership and managerial skills are key core competencies, not only for trainees, but certainly for those in a position of leadership. The present study provides evidence that academic departments, universities and medical centres may

  1. Contingent leadership and effectiveness of trauma resuscitation teams.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seokhwa; Faraj, Samer; Sims, Henry P

    2005-11-01

    This research investigated leadership and effectiveness of teams operating in a high-velocity environment, specifically trauma resuscitation teams. On the basis of the literature and their own ethnographic work, the authors proposed and tested a contingency model in which the influence of leadership on team effectiveness during trauma resuscitation differs according to the situation. Results indicated that empowering leadership was more effective when trauma severity was low and when team experience was high. Directive leadership was more effective when trauma severity was high or when the team was inexperienced. Findings also suggested that an empowering leader provided more learning opportunities than did a directive leader. The major contribution of this article is the linkage of leadership to team effectiveness, as moderated by relatively specific situational contingencies. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Transformational leadership: effect on the job satisfaction of Registered Nurses in a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Nantsupawat, Raymoul

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction among clinical Registered Nurses at a tertiary care hospital in China. The healthcare system is changing rapidly. Research in Western countries has shown that transformational leadership affects job satisfaction. However, very little research related to this subject has been conducted in healthcare settings in China. The sample consisted of 238 nurses who work at a tertiary care hospital in China. Data were collected from April to August 2006. Research instruments included a demographic data form, a Leadership Practice Inventory and a Job Satisfaction Scale for clinical registered nurses. Both the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction among clinical Registered Nurses were at a moderate level. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction (r = 0·556, P < 0·001). The findings indicate that the transformational leadership of nurse managers could have an effect on the job satisfaction of clinical Registered Nurses. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. SOME EFFECTS OF LEADERSHIP TRAINING OF INTERCULTURAL DISCUSSION GROUPS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, LYNN REESE

    THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO TRAINING PROGRAMS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF LEADERS OF INTERNATIONAL GROUPS WAS STUDIED. EIGHTEEN AMERICAN SUBJECTS WERE GIVEN LEADERSHIP TRAINING REDUNDANT TO THEIR PERSONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE AS MEASURED BY FIEDLER'S LEAST PREFERRED COWORKER SCORE (LPC), WHILE ANOTHER 18 SUBJECTS WERE GIVEN TRAINING COMPLEMENTARY TO THEIR…

  4. Leadership Effects on Student Achievement and Sustained School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of leadership on student achievement and sustained school success, especially in challenging, high-poverty schools. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a review of the leadership literature with findings drawn from longitudinal studies of the International Successful School…

  5. SOME EFFECTS OF LEADERSHIP TRAINING OF INTERCULTURAL DISCUSSION GROUPS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, LYNN REESE

    THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO TRAINING PROGRAMS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF LEADERS OF INTERNATIONAL GROUPS WAS STUDIED. EIGHTEEN AMERICAN SUBJECTS WERE GIVEN LEADERSHIP TRAINING REDUNDANT TO THEIR PERSONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE AS MEASURED BY FIEDLER'S LEAST PREFERRED COWORKER SCORE (LPC), WHILE ANOTHER 18 SUBJECTS WERE GIVEN TRAINING COMPLEMENTARY TO THEIR…

  6. Leadership Styles and Effectiveness among C-Level Healthcare Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mhoon-Walker, Etta J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is essential to circumnavigating the numerous obstacles confronting the healthcare industry. In addition, the current health system is suffering from a proficient leadership gap. However, identifying and developing executives with the greatest potential to become strong, up-and-coming healthcare C-level executive leaders can…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions of Leadership Effectiveness Based on Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alagbada-Ekekhomen, Gloria O.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined teachers' perceptions of effective leadership skills and any significant differences of teachers' views of an administrator's success based on the leader's gender. A review of studies examining differences in the leadership behaviors of men and women did not provide conclusive results. The three hypotheses based on the…

  8. Leadership Styles and Effectiveness among C-Level Healthcare Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mhoon-Walker, Etta J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is essential to circumnavigating the numerous obstacles confronting the healthcare industry. In addition, the current health system is suffering from a proficient leadership gap. However, identifying and developing executives with the greatest potential to become strong, up-and-coming healthcare C-level executive leaders can…

  9. Psychological Strengths as Predictors of Effective Student Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisner, Marie D.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the degree to which strengths ownership, psychological capital (PsyCap) qualities of hope, self-efficacy, optimism, and resiliency, and demographic characteristics of gender, college class level, leadership experience, and strengths experience are predictive of effective leadership practices as defined by the Leadership…

  10. Effective Leadership in Higher Education: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    This article is a review of the literature concerned with leadership effectiveness in higher education at departmental level. The literature derives from publications from three countries: the UK, the USA and Australia. Surprisingly little systematic research has been conducted on the question of which forms of leadership are associated with…

  11. Leadership Effects on Student Achievement and Sustained School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of leadership on student achievement and sustained school success, especially in challenging, high-poverty schools. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a review of the leadership literature with findings drawn from longitudinal studies of the International Successful School…

  12. Teachers' Perceptions of Leadership Effectiveness Based on Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alagbada-Ekekhomen, Gloria O.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined teachers' perceptions of effective leadership skills and any significant differences of teachers' views of an administrator's success based on the leader's gender. A review of studies examining differences in the leadership behaviors of men and women did not provide conclusive results. The three hypotheses based on the…

  13. Effective Leadership in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Leaders know how to achieve goals and inspire people along the way. While the terms and definitions may change with the times, it is important to understand the skills and abilities needed to lead in the 21st century. Most effective leaders have one element in common, and that is they are able to keep their teams engaged. If team members are not engaged, they may very well leave the organization. With four generations in the workplace, leaders must adapt and modify their leadership style in order to maintain employee engagement. The ability to lead effectively is based on a number of skills, including communication, motivation, vision, modeling, demonstrating empathy, confidence, persistence, and integrity.

  14. Preparing and Supporting Principals for Effective Leadership: Early Findings from Stanford's School Leadership Study. School Leadership Study: Developing Successful Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Michelle; Meyerson, Debra; Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2006-01-01

    The School Leadership Study was designed to contribute important data on how high quality pre- and in-service programs are structured, how they implement the effective strategies noted in the research literature, and the impact of program graduates in the schools they lead. The study examines whether program components triangulate with graduate…

  15. Clinical leadership development in a pre-registration nursing curriculum: What the profession has to say about it.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angela; Crookes, Patrick; Dewing, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade literature, inquiries and reports into the short comings in health services have highlighted the vital role of leadership in clinical practice and the impact on patient care and effective workplace culture. Whilst there is an abundance of literature on leadership and the registered nursing workforce, an international literature review revealed there is very little known on leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes. To identify what the profession's views are on proposed indicative curriculum content suggested for clinical leadership development in a pre-registration nursing degree in Australia. This is a multi-method research study. This paper presents the development and results of one aspect of the study, a national online survey. Nurses: clinicians, managers and academics. In the absence of a strong evidence base in the literature review, additional pre-requisite curriculum content was augmented from the work of two published frameworks of leadership and management. From this a 67-item survey was designed to ask the profession whether the aggregated content is a reasonable view of what should be included in a pre-registration programme to develop clinical leadership. The survey sought the views of nurses on whether the proposed content was relevant (yes/no) and their opinion on whether it is significant via a 5-point Likert scale. Descriptive and chi-square analyses were performed in SPSS v.19. A total of 418 nurses completed the survey; there was consensus amongst the profession on what is considered relevant and important in a pre-registration nursing programme. The content identified could be considered indicative and pre-requisite to include in a pre-registration nursing programme. Members of the nursing profession in Australia have clear views about this. The next step is to design and evaluate a purposeful pedagogical approach and curriculum, leading to the development of clinical leadership knowledge, skills and

  16. The effect of a nurse team leader on communication and leadership in major trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Clements, Alana; Curtis, Kate; Horvat, Leanne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and resuscitation of trauma patients requires an organised, multidisciplinary team. Literature evaluating leadership roles of nurses in trauma resuscitation and their effect on team performance is scarce. To assess the effect of allocating the most senior nurse as team leader of trauma patient assessment and resuscitation on communication, documentation and perceptions of leadership within an Australian emergency department. The study design was a pre-post-test survey of emergency nursing staff (working at resuscitation room level) perceptions of leadership, communication, and documentation before and after the implementation of a nurse leader role. Patient records were audited focussing on initial resuscitation assessment, treatment, and nursing clinical entry. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Communication trended towards improvement. All (100%) respondents post-test stated they had a good to excellent understanding of their role, compared to 93.2% pre-study. A decrease (58.1-12.5%) in 'intimidating personality' as a negative aspect of communication. Nursing leadership had a 6.7% increase in the proportion of those who reported nursing leadership to be good to excellent. Accuracy of clinical documentation improved (P = 0.025). Trauma nurse team leaders improve some aspects of communication and leadership. Development of trauma nurse leaders should be encouraged within trauma team training programmes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Leadership and organization development in health-care: lessons from the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Margaret M; O'Neil, Deborah A; FitzSimons, Kathleen; Bailin, Philip L; Stoller, James K

    2011-01-01

    Leaders in health-care today are faced with a wide array of complex issues. This chapter describes an innovative physician leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic intended to enhance the leadership capacities of individuals and the organization. Propositions regarding the program's impact on organizational innovation, organizational commitment, social capital, and the human element of physician practice are offered for future examination.

  18. Retaining Excellent Teachers through Effective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Connie

    2013-01-01

    School districts continue to face challenges in retaining talented teachers in their schools. There are many factors that contribute to teacher retention, including working conditions, a lack of leadership support, and poor leadership behavior. In a southeastern U.S. state, local school officials were seeking strategies to provide an excellent…

  19. Alternant Leadership: Increasing School System Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Robert; Wagner, James

    1986-01-01

    A model of "alternant leadership"--leading and succeeding one another by turn--is presented that proposes a democratic, collegial, multivoter, team approach to electing educational leaders. The rationale is based on contingency theories of administration and studies on leadership succession. Related articles are EA 519 583 and 584. (MLF)

  20. Service impact of a national clinical leadership development programme: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Fealy, Gerard M; McNamara, Martin S; Casey, Mary; O'Connor, Tom; Patton, Declan; Doyle, Louise; Quinlan, Christina

    2015-04-01

    The study reported here was part of a larger study, which evaluated a national clinical leadership development programme with reference to resources, participant experiences, participant outcomes and service impact. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the programme's service impact. Clinical leadership development develops competencies that are expressed in context. The outcomes of clinical leadership development occur at individual, departmental and organisational levels. The methods used to evaluate the service impact were focus groups, group interviews and individual interviews. Seventy participants provided data in 18 separate qualitative data collection events. The data contained numerous accounts of service development activities, initiated by programme participants, which improved service and/or improved the culture of the work setting. Clinical leadership development programmes that incorporate a deliberate service impact element can result in identifiable positive service outcomes. The nuanced relationship between leader development and service development warrants further investigation. This study demonstrates that clinical leadership development can impact on service in distinct and identifiable ways. Clinical leadership development programmes should focus on the setting in which the leadership competencies will be demonstrated. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of leadership characteristics on pediatric registered nurses' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Turner, Reneé; Hinds, Pamela S; Nelson, John; Pryor, Juanda; Robinson, Nellie C; Wang, Jichuan

    2014-01-01

    Job satisfaction levels among registered nurses (RNs) influence RN recruitment, retention, turnover, and patient outcomes. Researchers examining the relationship between characteristics of nursing leadership and RN job satisfaction have treated RNs as a monolithic group with little research on the satisfaction of hospital-based pediatric RNs. This study assessed the relationship of transformational and transactional nursing leadership characteristics and RN job satisfaction reported by pediatric RNs. This single site study included 935 hospital-based pediatric RNs who completed validated survey items regarding nursing leadership and job satisfaction. A structural equation model (SEM) was applied to assess how autonomy (transformational leadership) and distributive justice (transactional leadership) influence RN job satisfaction, and how RN socio-demographic characteristics influence job satisfaction via autonomy and distributive justice. Findings revealed that both autonomy and distributive justice had significant positive effects on RN job satisfaction but the largest source of influence was autonomy.

  2. Recognition of clinical deterioration: a clinical leadership opportunity for nurse executive.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Recognition and avoidance of further clinical deterioration can be termed a critical success factor in every care delivery model. As care resources become more constrained and allocated to the most critical of patients, some patients are being shifted to less intense and costly care settings where continuous physiologic monitoring may not be an option. Nurse executives are facing these complex issues as they work with clinical experts to develop systems of safety in the patient care arena. A systematic review of the literature related to the recognition of clinical deterioration is needed to identify areas for further leadership, research, and practice advancements.

  3. Leadership Styles and Organizational Learning in Community Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amitay, Mayan; Popper, Micha; Lipshitz, Raanan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The correlation between organizational unit managers' leadership styles and the level of organizational learning in their units was tested. Design/methodology/approach: A positive correlation was hypothesized between transformational leadership and organizational learning as manifested by organizational learning mechanisms--OLMs (the…

  4. Faculty Member Perceptions of Department Head Leadership Effectiveness at a State University in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbulut, Meltem; Nevra Seggie, Fatma; Börkan, Bengü

    2015-01-01

    This article examined the leadership effectiveness of department heads at a state university in Turkey using a model of leadership effectiveness that includes the use of multiple leadership roles to manage situations arising from internal and external university environments. Leadership effectiveness was measured by surveying 70 faculty members in…

  5. Faculty Member Perceptions of Department Head Leadership Effectiveness at a State University in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbulut, Meltem; Nevra Seggie, Fatma; Börkan, Bengü

    2015-01-01

    This article examined the leadership effectiveness of department heads at a state university in Turkey using a model of leadership effectiveness that includes the use of multiple leadership roles to manage situations arising from internal and external university environments. Leadership effectiveness was measured by surveying 70 faculty members in…

  6. Leading nurses: emotional intelligence and leadership development effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Crowne, Kerri Anne; Young, Thomas M; Goldman, Beryl; Patterson, Barbara; Krouse, Anne M; Proenca, Jose

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of an emotional intelligence (EI) and leadership development education program involving 20 nurse leaders at nursing homes. Also, it investigates the relationship between EI and transformational leadership. Design/methodology/approach Three research questions are posed. Correlation analysis and t-tests were conducted to answer the questions posed. Findings The findings of this paper indicate that the EI educational development was effective, while the personal leadership development was not. The data also showed a positive significant relationship between EI and transformational leadership. Research limitations/implications This paper is limited by the small sample size; thus, a causal relationship between EI and leadership could not be investigated. Additionally, the sample was not randomly selected because of the commitment needed from the participants. Furthermore, the paper was focused on nurse leaders in nursing homes, so it may not be generalizable to other populations. Practical implications With the increasing need for nursing home facilities and the limited training generally provided to nurses who move into managerial roles in these facilities, it is critical for organizations to understand the effectiveness of educational programs that exist. Moreover, the findings of this paper may provide information that would be useful to others who wish to develop EI and/or leadership education for nurses. Originality/value While much research exists on EI and transformational leadership, little of this research focuses on nurses in nursing home facilities. Thus, this paper fills a gap in the literature.

  7. 'Healthy gums do matter': A case study of clinical leadership within primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Saleem, S; Hawthorn, E; Pealing, R; Ashley, M; Bridgman, C

    2015-09-25

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 heralded wide reaching reforms intended to place clinicians at the heart of the health service. For NHS general dental practice, the conduits for this clinical leadership are the NHS England local professional networks. In Greater Manchester, the local professional network has developed and piloted a clinician led quality improvement project: 'Healthy Gums DO Matter, a Practitioner's Toolkit'. Used as a case study, the project highlighted the following facilitators to clinical leadership in dentistry: supportive environment; mentoring and transformational leadership; alignment of project goals with national policy; funding allowance; cross-boundary collaboration; determination; altruism; and support from wider academic and specialist colleagues. Barriers to clinical leadership identified were: the hierarchical nature of healthcare, territorialism and competing clinical commitments.

  8. Combinations of Effective Leadership Styles in Victorian State High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badcock, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The main finding of this investigation is that the effectiveness of the educational system could be increased through the provision of task-oriented leadership to schools having an unfavorable atmosphere. (Author/IRT)

  9. Leadership Effectiveness of University Deans in Lebanon and Egypt: A Study of Gender and Leadership Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhourani, Lina G.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that women managers in the United States were considered more effective when they were rated higher than men in factors related to transformational leadership. Given that culture and a woman's position within a culture are different in the Middle East, this study was designed to examine the impact of gender on the effectiveness…

  10. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Leadership Course; Phase I, Cost Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    Methods for accumulating detailed costs of the experimental leaderships course developed by Westinghouse Learning Corporation for the United States Naval Academy (the final report appears under EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484), as well as proposed methods of reporting cost-effectiveness, are described in this report. Related documents…

  11. Leadership Effectiveness of University Deans in Lebanon and Egypt: A Study of Gender and Leadership Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhourani, Lina G.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that women managers in the United States were considered more effective when they were rated higher than men in factors related to transformational leadership. Given that culture and a woman's position within a culture are different in the Middle East, this study was designed to examine the impact of gender on the effectiveness…

  12. Educational Leadership as a Causal Factor: Methodological Issues in Research on Leadership "Effects"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levacic, Rosalind

    2005-01-01

    There has been an increasing emphasis in educational policies, practices and professional development on the capacity of educational leadership to exert a causal impact on student cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes. If the strict criteria of counterfactual causality are adhered to no causal inference could be made about the effects of…

  13. Servant Leadership, Africanization, and Disruptive Innovation as Conditions for Effective Leadership at UNISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Clayton; Gardner, J. Clark

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses effective leadership in educational environments and in particular focuses on the current situation at the University of South Africa (UNISA). The end of Apartheid in South Africa has brought many opportunities but also some challenges especially in education. Three conditions that contribute to ensuring strong distance…

  14. Servant Leadership, Africanization, and Disruptive Innovation as Conditions for Effective Leadership at UNISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Clayton; Gardner, J. Clark

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses effective leadership in educational environments and in particular focuses on the current situation at the University of South Africa (UNISA). The end of Apartheid in South Africa has brought many opportunities but also some challenges especially in education. Three conditions that contribute to ensuring strong distance…

  15. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    PubMed

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Leading from the middle: Constrained realities of clinical leadership in healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham P; Waring, Justin

    2013-07-01

    In many developed-world countries, there have been efforts to increase the 'leadership capacity' of healthcare professionals, particularly lower-status staff without formal managerial power. Creating frontline 'leaders' is seen as a means of improving the quality of healthcare, but such efforts face considerable challenges in practice. This article reports on a qualitative, interview-based study of 23 staff in two UK operating theatre departments, mostly nurses by professional background, who were given formal leadership responsibilities by their hospitals and redesignated as 'team leaders' and 'theatre co-ordinators'. While participants were familiar with leadership theory and could offer clear accounts of good leadership in practice, they were often limited in their ability to enact their leadership roles. Professional and managerial hierarchies constrained participants' leadership capacity, and consequently the exercise of leadership rested on alignment with managerial relationships and mandates. The findings highlight difficulties with accounts of leadership as something to be distributed across organizations; in healthcare organizations, established institutional structures and norms render this approach problematic. Rather, if fostering leadership capacity is to have the transformational effect that policymakers desire, it may need to be accompanied by other, wider changes that attend to institutional, organizational and professional context.

  17. The Effect of School Principals' Leadership Styles on Teachers' Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Ayhan; Sarier, Yilmaz; Uysal, Sengul

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have conducted a number of studies in order to demonstrate the effects of leadership styles on school outcomes. In these research studies, particularly, the full range of leadership styles have been used. The impact of transformational leadership, transactional leadership and laissez faire stated in this model on job satisfaction and…

  18. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  19. Knowledge of Effective Educational Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Leigh T.

    2013-01-01

    This is the second part of a study conducted by Barton and Cox (2012) investigating administrative credential candidates' pre and post self-assessment results. Candidates who successfully complete principal preparation programs should possess the requisite knowledge and skills to assume leadership positions in P-12 schools. This study was designed…

  20. Managerial Leadership and the Effective Principal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yukl, Gary

    To help relate management ideas and knowledge to educational administration, the author reviews the major theories and findings from the last 20 years on managerial leadership and discusses their relevance for school principals. He first summarizes findings from three approaches: the traits approach, emphasizing managerial motivation and skills;…

  1. Bedside Manner and Effective Academic Administrative Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Daryl

    2003-01-01

    In this chapter, the author addresses one small aspect of the leadership algorithm: communication. As the title suggests, the aspect of communication he discusses is that nebulous part of the human interaction process that sets the stage--the one that results in creative problem solving and collegial relationships--the interpersonal aspects of…

  2. Authentic leadership and its effect on employees' organizational citizenship behaviours.

    PubMed

    Edú Valsania, Sergio; Moriano León, Juan A; Molero Alonso, Fernando; Topa Cantisano, Gabriela

    2012-11-01

    The studies that have verified the positive association of authentic leadership with organizational citizenship behaviours (OCBs), have used global measures of both constructs. Therefore, the goal of this work is to analyze the effect of authentic leadership on employees' OCBs, specifically focusing on the relations of the four components of authentic leadership with the individual and organizational dimensions of the OCBs. The participants of this study were 220 Spanish employees (30.9% men and 69.1% women) who completed a questionnaire that included the variables of interest in this study: Authentic Leadership, OCB and Sociobiographical control variables. The results, obtained with stepwise multiple regression analysis, show that two components of authentic leadership-moral perspective and relational transparency-present significant relationships with OCB. Moreover, authentic leadership is a better predictor of employees' OCB when these behaviors are impersonal and directed towards the organization than when they are directed towards other people. These results have practical implications for human resources management in organizations, especially in selection processes and when training top executives.

  3. Understanding Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-16

    situational leadership as it applies to traits . This approach appears to have more acceptability because it lists certain traits for certain...degree trait theory. It proposes that leadership is learned behavior and is not a born quality. It portends that leadership depends more on how...effective leader. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Trait Theory, Behavior Theory, Situation Theory, Transformational Leadership, Leader, Manager 16. SECURITY

  4. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups.

    PubMed

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders' activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with patient needs and brought the leaders closer to frontline stakeholders

  5. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups

    PubMed Central

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Design Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Setting Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Methods Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Main outcome measures Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Results Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders’ activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with

  6. Leadership effectiveness: a supervisor's approach to manage return to work.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, J A H; Groothoff, J W; Jongsma, D; van Zweeden, N F; van der Klink, J J L; Roelen, C A M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate adaptive leadership in relation to personnel sickness absence (SA). In situational leadership, supervisors are effective if they adapt their leadership style appropriately to a given situation. A managerial reorganization in a Dutch hospital with reassignment of supervisors provided the opportunity to compare SA in the same wards while under the leadership of different supervisors. Leadership effectiveness was measured with the Leader Effectiveness and Adaptability Description (LEAD). Personnel SA was retrieved from employer's records and cumulated at the individual level, distinguishing between short-term (1-7 day) and long-term (>7 days) SA. Cumulated SA days and mean SA lengths before and after managerial reorganization were compared at the individual level by using non-parametric paired statistical analyses. Employer's costs to compensate sick-listed employees' salaries before and after reorganization were cumulated and compared at ward level by using non-parametric statistics. 6 wards (N = 403) retained the same supervisor, 6 wards (N = 504) were assigned more effective supervisors, and 4 wards (N = 184) got less effective supervisors than the ones before reorganization. Cumulated short-term SA days and lengths did not change with leadership effectiveness. Employees who got more effective supervisors had fewer long-term SA days and shorter long-term SA lengths than before reorganization. More effective supervisors saved an average of 21,368 Euros per ward, particularly due to less long-term SA. Long-term SA was shorter after employees got more effective supervisors. Adaptive supervisors can facilitate return to work and save SA costs by providing the right type of support to sick-listed employees.

  7. Boundary matters: clinical leadership and the distinctive disciplinary contribution of nursing to multidisciplinary care.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Martin S; Fealy, Gerard M; Casey, Mary; Geraghty, Ruth; Johnson, Maree; Halligan, Phil; Treacy, Pearl; Butler, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    To describe Irish nurses' views of clinical leadership and to describe their clinical leadership development needs. Nurses are often unclear about the precise nature of clinical leadership and its impact on the processes and outcomes of care and little is known about their self-perceived clinical leadership development needs. Seventeen focus group interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 144 nurses from 13 practice settings. A conceptual lens was provided by the work of Bernstein and Young who emphasise the epistemological, practical and relational significance of boundaries and how they relate in fundamental ways to professionals' sense of their distinctive disciplinary identities and membership of specialised communities of practice. Focus group data were collected using semi-structured topic guides. Analysis was facilitated by NVivo 7© and interpretation was informed by a conceptual framework arising from the interplay of emerging themes and the literature review. The implications for clinical leadership development of two critical concepts, 'representing nursing' and 'compensatory action', are discussed in detail. Clinical leadership development should emphasise the development of all nurses as clinical leaders in the context of the delineation, clarification and articulation of their distinctive contribution in multidisciplinary care settings. Clinical leaders are recognised as practice experts and as leaders in their particular fields. Recognition and influence in and beyond the immediate context of care depends greatly on their ability to articulate the distinct nursing contribution to patient care. This ability provides an essential resource to resist the ongoing blurring, effacement and dilution of nurses' roles. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Using the patchwork text assessment as a vehicle for evaluating students' perceptions of their clinical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J A; Rutherford, J; Wild, J; Cappleman, J; Hynes, C

    2012-01-01

    A shift in universities world wide in providing theoretical post graduate programmes of study underpinned by traditional assessment strategies to work based learning programmes supported by innovative assessment strategies is required if Higher education institutions are to effectively educate contemporary healthcare leaders. Concurrently generating the evidence to evaluate the effectiveness of educational programmes is required by commissioners of healthcare education (DH, 2010). This paper reports on the perceptions of twelve post graduate students attending a clinical leadership masters programme of their leadership development through analysis of the critical commentary provided by students as part of assessment strategy that utilised the Patchwork Text Assessment. Following a thematic content analysis six themes emerged: programme philosophy and its impact on the success of the Patchwork Text Assessment; leadership development targeted against leadership frameworks; application and applicability of learning to the students own healthcare organisation; integrating theory to practice through theoretical development and work based activities; the value of networking; and the importance of multi-professional reflective groups. This study has clearly demonstrated how the success of the Patchwork Text Assessment in promoting deep learning is determined by its integration into the overall philosophy of the programme. Concurrently systems needed to be in place to ensure that Patchwork text Assessment is operationalised effectively and embedded within the day to day management of the programme.

  9. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments.

    PubMed

    Malling, Bente; Mortensen, Lene S; Scherpbier, Albert J J; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2010-09-21

    The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education. The study was a trans-sectional correlation study. The educational climate was investigated by a survey among all doctors (specialists and trainees) in the departments. Leadership skills of the consultants responsible for education were measured by multi-source feedback scores from heads of departments, peer consultants, and trainees. Doctors from 42 clinical departments representing 21 specialties participated. The response rate of the educational climate investigation was moderate 52% (420/811), Response rate was high in the multisource-feedback process 84.3% (420/498). The educational climate was scored quite high mean 3.9 (SD 0.3) on a five-point Likert scale. Likewise the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for education were considered good, mean 5.4 (SD 0.6) on a seven-point Likert scale. There was no significant correlation between the scores concerning the educational climate and the scores on leadership skills, r = 0.17 (p = 0.29). This study found no relation between the educational climate and the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education in clinical departments with the instruments used. Our results indicate that consultants responsible for education are in a weak position to influence the educational climate in the clinical department. Further studies are needed to explore, how heads of departments and other factors related to the clinical organisation could influence the educational climate.

  10. Leadership and Leadership Development in Highly Effective Further Education Providers. Is There a Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muijs, Daniel; Harris, Alma; Lumby, Jacky; Morrison, Marlene; Sood, Krishan

    2006-01-01

    There has been a strong increase in interest in leadership development in recent years, not least in the learning and skills sector. However, little research exists on the relationship between leadership development and actual leadership behaviours in the sector. This study is an attempt to help fill this gap by looking at leadership, leadership…

  11. The Effects of Band Director Leadership Style and Student Leadership Ability on Band Festival Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, P. Dru

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between band director leadership styles and the strength of student leadership within the bands. This study also examined the differences between leadership styles, student leadership strength, and band festival ratings (marching and concert). Subjects (N = 42) were band directors from Texas and Arkansas who…

  12. Creating effective leadership for improving patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Julie J; Abelson, Herbert T; Barach, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Leadership has emerged as a key theme in the rapidly growing movement to improve patient safety. Leading an organization that is committed to providing safer care requires overcoming the common traps in thinking about error, such as blaming individuals, ignoring the underlying systems factors, and blaming the bureaucracy of the organization. Leaders must address the system issues that are at work within their organizations to allow individual and organizational learning to occur.

  13. People, organizational, and leadership factors impacting informatics support for clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, there have been numerous initiatives undertaken to describe critical information needs related to the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of data in support of biomedical research (J Investig Med 54:327-333, 2006); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 16:316–327, 2009); (Physiol Genomics 39:131-140, 2009); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 18:354–357, 2011). A common theme spanning such reports has been the importance of understanding and optimizing people, organizational, and leadership factors in order to achieve the promise of efficient and timely research (J Am Med Inform Assoc 15:283–289, 2008). With the emergence of clinical and translational science (CTS) as a national priority in the United States, and the corresponding growth in the scale and scope of CTS research programs, the acuity of such information needs continues to increase (JAMA 289:1278–1287, 2003); (N Engl J Med 353:1621–1623, 2005); (Sci Transl Med 3:90, 2011). At the same time, systematic evaluations of optimal people, organizational, and leadership factors that influence the provision of data, information, and knowledge management technologies and methods are notably lacking. Methods In response to the preceding gap in knowledge, we have conducted both: 1) a structured survey of domain experts at Academic Health Centers (AHCs); and 2) a subsequent thematic analysis of public-domain documentation provided by those same organizations. The results of these approaches were then used to identify critical factors that may influence access to informatics expertise and resources relevant to the CTS domain. Results A total of 31 domain experts, spanning the Biomedical Informatics (BMI), Computer Science (CS), Information Science (IS), and Information Technology (IT) disciplines participated in a structured surveyprocess. At a high level, respondents identified notable differences in theaccess to BMI, CS, and IT expertise and services depending on the establishment of a

  14. Creativity: An Essential Component for Effective Leadership in Today's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goertz, Jeanie

    2000-01-01

    Four secondary school principals, identified as effective, completed a questionnaire concerning the role of creativity in their work and a self-evaluation. Analysis of responses indicates that effective principals perceive themselves as having indicators of leadership including passion for work, independence, goal setting, originality,…

  15. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  16. The effects of intervention based on supportive leadership behaviour on Iranian nursing leadership performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mandana; Emami, Amir Hossein; Mirmoosavi, Seyed Jamal; Alavinia, Seyed Mohammad; Zamanian, Hadi; Fathollahbeigi, Faezeh; Masiello, Italo

    2016-04-01

    To assess the effects of a workshop on supportive leadership behaviour (SLB) on the performance of head nurses, using a randomized controlled trial design. The effect of transformational leadership on SLB in nursing management is emphasised. A total of 110 head nurses working at university hospitals were included randomly in two control and intervention groups. The head nurses in the intervention group participated in supportive leadership training, but the control group did not. Performance in supportive leadership was assessed with a validated instrument, which six subordinates used to assess their head nurse (n = 731). There was a significant difference in SLB scores from baseline to the 3 month follow-up (P < 0.0001). Moreover, the post-intervention scores were significantly higher in the intervention group, compared with the control group (P < 0.0001). The results showed that in the intervention group, the effect sizes were greater for males (50%) than for females (36%) and greater for married participants (42%) than for single participants (37%). The workshop on supportive leadership behaviour, particularly the interactive multifaceted training, improved the leadership performance of the head nurses who participated in this study. Health policy decision makers should apply SLB, which is a significant leadership style, to improve the outcomes in other groups of health-care management, such as physicians. Future studies are needed to investigate the effects of such workshops in longer periods of follow up. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Principal: Creative Leadership for Effective Schools. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubben, Gerald C.; Hughes, Larry W.; Norris, Cynthia J.

    This fourth edition of this book is organized around the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium model standards developed specifically for school leaders. The six standards focus on the key issues that inform effective leadership. Attention is given to issues of learning and teaching, and the creation of powerful learning environments.…

  18. Effects of Masters in Governance Training and School Board Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Rocky

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine how the California School Board Association's (CSBA) Masters in Governance (MIG) training program leads to more effective school board leadership and governance. This study employed the framework of authors Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal, the CSBA, and the Lighthouse Inquiry of the Iowa Association of School…

  19. Building Effective Medical Missions with Servant Leadership Skills.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Linda

    Nurses are naturally drawn to service opportunities, such as short-term medical missions (STMM), which hold great potential to benefit health. But STMMs have been criticized as potentially being culturally insensitive, leading to dependency, inadvertently causing harm, or being unsustainable. Utilizing servant leadership skills, nurses can effectively build community, vision, and sustainability into STMM projects.

  20. The Moderating Role of Cultural Similarity in Leadership Training Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qiumei Jane; Jiang, Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the moderating role of cultural similarity between leaders and followers on leadership training effectiveness in terms of followers' fairness perception and organizational citizenship behavior. Design/methodology/approach: A quasi-experiment was conducted with 40 managers from international corporations as the…

  1. The Moderating Role of Cultural Similarity in Leadership Training Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qiumei Jane; Jiang, Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the moderating role of cultural similarity between leaders and followers on leadership training effectiveness in terms of followers' fairness perception and organizational citizenship behavior. Design/methodology/approach: A quasi-experiment was conducted with 40 managers from international corporations as the…

  2. The Effect of Leadership on Service Delivery in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvavahera, Promise

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing leadership effectiveness on service delivery at the University of Namibia and all its campuses throughout the country. The study was carried out during the month of February 2013. The methodology consisted of document analysis, interviews through face to face, video and tele-conferencing. Purposive sampling was…

  3. Leadership and management quality: key factors in effective health systems.

    PubMed

    Pfeffermann, Guy

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of health care systems in the developing world is related to the quality of their leadership and management, yet that factor has been neglected by academics and funders. Based on replicable existing models, the article proposes an approach to strengthening local management training institutions.

  4. Flexibility Principle 3: Supporting Effective Instruction and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition & Language Instruction Educational Programs, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Within the US Department of Education's new flexibility initiative, there are three key principles, each with areas of focus. The third of these is that State Education Agencies (SEAs) must develop and implement systems of determining and supporting effective instruction and leadership within schools. This brief looks at websites, documents, and…

  5. Organizational Storytelling for Librarians: Using Stories for Effective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Just as literature can be used for learning, the power of storytelling can be very effective when applied to leadership and management. Library expert and author Marek shows readers how they can use storytelling to communicate vision and values with: (1) A primer on how to develop storytelling skills; (2) Tips on how to use narratives to navigate…

  6. Leadership Training for Policy Advisory Committees. Conducting Business Meetings Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehm, Janet

    This learning module was developed for use by parents who make up the Policy Advisory Committee of the Florida Follow Through Project. Its purpose is to build parents' skills in areas that contribute to effective leadership. It is divided into three sections. The first part covers the order of business and how to make motions. Part two covers the…

  7. Effects of Masters in Governance Training and School Board Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Rocky

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine how the California School Board Association's (CSBA) Masters in Governance (MIG) training program leads to more effective school board leadership and governance. This study employed the framework of authors Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal, the CSBA, and the Lighthouse Inquiry of the Iowa Association of School…

  8. Organizational Storytelling for Librarians: Using Stories for Effective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Just as literature can be used for learning, the power of storytelling can be very effective when applied to leadership and management. Library expert and author Marek shows readers how they can use storytelling to communicate vision and values with: (1) A primer on how to develop storytelling skills; (2) Tips on how to use narratives to navigate…

  9. Evaluating an Organizational Protocol to Implement Effective Leadership Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Erika

    2009-01-01

    The problem on which this study focused was the need to organize and implement effective leadership meetings that led to improved professional collaboration. The purpose was to evaluate the use of a protocol in organizing and implementing such meetings. The research questions were framed around the four levels of the Kirkpatrick (1996) evaluation…

  10. Leadership in Effective Elementary Schools: A Synthesis of Five Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jim; Beauchamp, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Administrators in five highly effective elementary schools were studied. These leaders, through acts of will and insight, had given up iconic and heroic leadership status, so that school leadership might be shared. Leadership has a significant effect on student learning. Principals' influence is often indirect, works through others, and happens…

  11. Challenges Women Face in Leadership Positions and Organizational Effectiveness: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmuti, Dean; Jia, Heather; Davis, Henry H.

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to discover working public thoughts about roles of United States women in leadership positions and to test the relationship between managerial leadership styles and organizational effectiveness. A survey of perceptions of leadership roles and effectiveness distributed 700 randomly selected entities from industries in the…

  12. Directive Versus Participative Leadership: Two Complementary Approaches to Managing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The educational literature reflects the widely shared belief that participative leadership has an overwhelming advantage over the contrasting style of directive leadership in organizational and team effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effect of a directive leadership approach as compared with a…

  13. Directive Versus Participative Leadership: Two Complementary Approaches to Managing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The educational literature reflects the widely shared belief that participative leadership has an overwhelming advantage over the contrasting style of directive leadership in organizational and team effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effect of a directive leadership approach as compared with a…

  14. What is clinical leadership and why might it be important in dentistry?

    PubMed

    Brocklehurst, P; Ferguson, J; Taylor, N; Tickle, M

    2013-03-01

    The concept of leadership means different things to different people. At present there is no single definition of leadership nor an established theoretical approach. Despite this, leadership in the clinical environment is becoming increasingly cited as an important component in the transition of the National Health Service (NHS) and in the development of clinician led services. In medicine, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) will soon be operational and the Department of Health (DH) seeks to establish a similar approach in dentistry, where local clinicians drive forward a quality agenda with a focus on patient outcomes. To facilitate this, the NHS Commissioning Board (NHSCB) are in the process of developing Local Professional Networks (LPNs) for dentistry. Given this shift towards localism and clinician led services it would appear that leadership will have a significant role in both medicine and dentistry. This paper explores what leadership is, before determining why it might be important in providing a clinician-led, patient-based and outcomes-focused service.

  15. Valuing empathy and emotional intelligence in health leadership: a study of empathy, leadership behaviour and outcome effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Skinner, C; Spurgeon, P

    2005-02-01

    This article examines the relationship between health managers' self-assessed empathy, their leadership behaviours as rated by their staff, and staff's personal ratings on a range of work satisfaction and related outcome measures. Empathy was conceived of as four distinct but related individual dispositions, namely empathic concern (EC), perspective taking (PT), personal distress (PD) and empathic matching (EM). Results showed three empathy scales (EC, PT and EM) were, as postulated, positively related to transformational behaviour (inspiring followers to achieve more than expected). The same three measures, also as expected, showed no relationship to transactional behaviour (motivating followers to achieve expected results) and were negatively associated with laissez-faire leadership (an absence of leadership style). Relationships between empathy scales and outcome measures were selective and moderate in size. Strongest empathy association was evident between the PT scale and most outcome measures. Conversely, the extra effort outcome appeared most sensitive to the range of empathy scales. Where significant relationships did exist between empathy and outcome, leadership behaviour was in all cases a perfect mediator. Whilst not denying the smaller dispositional effects on leadership outcomes, leadership behaviour itself, rather than individual traits such as empathy, appear to be major influencing factors in leadership effectiveness.

  16. Building the capacity for evidence-based clinical nursing leadership: the role of executive co-coaching and group clinical supervision for quality patient services.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, Jo; Jumaa, Mansour Olawale

    2007-03-01

    The general aims of this article were to facilitate primary care nurses (District Nurse Team Leaders) to link management and leadership theories with clinical practice and to improve the quality of the service provided to their patients. The specific aim was to identify, create and evaluate effective processes for collaborative working so that the nurses' capacity for clinical decision-making could be improved. This article, part of a doctoral study on Clinical Leadership in Nursing, has wider application in the workplace of the future where professional standards based on collaboration will be more critical in a world of work that will be increasingly complex and uncertain. This article heralds the type of research and development activities that the nursing and midwifery professions should give premier attention to, particularly given the recent developments within the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. The implications of: Agenda for Change, the Knowledge and Skills Framework, 'Our Health, Our Care, Our Say' and the recent proposals from the article 'Modernising Nursing Career', to name but a few, are the key influences impacting on and demanding new ways of clinical supervision for nurses and midwives to improve the quality of patient management and services. The overall approach was based on an action research using a collaborative enquiry within a case study. This was facilitated by a process of executive co-coaching for focused group clinical supervision sessions involving six district nurses as co-researchers and two professional doctoral candidates as the main researchers. The enquiry conducted over a period of two and a half years used evidence-based management and leadership interventions to assist the participants to develop 'actionable knowledge'. Group clinical supervision was not practised in this study as a form of 'therapy' but as a focus for the development of actionable knowledge, knowledge needed for effective clinical management and

  17. Beyond Technology, an Analysis of the Perceived Impact of Transformational Leadership and Contingent Rewards as Extrinsic Motivation on Virtual Team Member Satisfaction and Leadership Effectiveness: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawanda, Haruna Juko

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this nonexperimental, correlational, and descriptive quantitative study research was to gain an empirical understanding of the effects of transformational leadership and contingent reward as extrinsic motivation on employee satisfaction with leadership and leadership effectiveness in virtual team workplace environments.…

  18. Beyond Technology, an Analysis of the Perceived Impact of Transformational Leadership and Contingent Rewards as Extrinsic Motivation on Virtual Team Member Satisfaction and Leadership Effectiveness: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawanda, Haruna Juko

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this nonexperimental, correlational, and descriptive quantitative study research was to gain an empirical understanding of the effects of transformational leadership and contingent reward as extrinsic motivation on employee satisfaction with leadership and leadership effectiveness in virtual team workplace environments.…

  19. Distributed Leadership and Relational Trust: Bridging Two Frameworks to Identify Effective Leadership Behaviors and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Jabbar, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how relational trust manifests within schools that have recently enacted the distributed leadership framework, a program implementation by the Penn Center for Educational Leadership. First, the dissertation highlights research that connects the distributed leadership and relational trust frameworks in the task of…

  20. Effects of a Leadership Development Program on Gifted and Non-Gifted Students' Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogurlu, Üzeyir; Serap, Emir

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: The presence of leaders who will lead societies to success is an important gain for a society. In the present time, leadership development has become a strategic requirement. Although there is a common agreement on the need for leadership education, there are few studies on the education process of leadership and the efficacy of…

  1. The Effects of an Introductory Leadership Course on Socially Responsible Leadership, Examined by Age and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschlen, Erin; Johnson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of age and gender on student leadership capacity during a 16-week, for-credit academic leadership course at a regional mid-western university. The course promoted the tenets of the Social Change Model of Leadership (SCM) through theoretical and application-based projects. Participants completed…

  2. Distributed Leadership and Relational Trust: Bridging Two Frameworks to Identify Effective Leadership Behaviors and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Jabbar, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how relational trust manifests within schools that have recently enacted the distributed leadership framework, a program implementation by the Penn Center for Educational Leadership. First, the dissertation highlights research that connects the distributed leadership and relational trust frameworks in the task of…

  3. Roles and Responsibilities of Clinical Faculty in Selected Educational Leadership Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackmann, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the full-time clinical faculty position in selected educational leadership programs. Due to a gap in the literature, the need exists to engage in research studies to gain a greater understanding of this position. Questions guiding this study included: What is the experiential background of individuals who assume full-time…

  4. Safety Culture and Senior Leadership Behavior: Using Negative Safety Ratings to Align Clinical Staff and Senior Leadership.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Shawn; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    This report describes how staff-designed behavior changes among senior leaders can have a positive impact on clinical nursing staff and enhance the culture of safety in a community hospital. A positive culture of safety in a hospital improves outcomes for patients and staff. Senior leaders are accountable for developing an environment that supports a culture of safety. At 1 community hospital, surveys demonstrated that staff members did not view senior leaders as supportive of or competent in creating a culture of safety. After approval from the hospital's institutional review board was obtained, clinical nurses generated and selected ideas for senior leader behavior change. The new behaviors were assessed by a convenience sample survey of clinical nurses. In addition, culture of safety survey results were compared. Risk reports and harm events were also measured before and after behavior changes. The volume of risk and near-miss reports increased, showing that clinical staff were more inclined to report events after senior leader communication, access, and visibility increased. Harm events went down. The culture of safety survey demonstrated an improvement in the senior leadership domain in 4 of 6 units. The anonymous convenience survey demonstrated that staff members recognized changes that senior leaders had made and felt that these changes positively impacted the culture of safety. By developing skills in communication, advocacy, visibility, and access, senior leaders can enhance a hospital's culture of safety and create stronger ties with clinical staff.

  5. Impact of critical thinking disposition, general self-efficacy, and leadership on clinical competence in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee Won; Kim, Chun Ja; Kim, Yong Soon; Yoo, Moon Sook; Yoo, Hyera; Chae, Sun Mi; Ahn, Jeong Ah

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships among critical thinking disposition, general self-efficacy, leadership and clinical competence, and identify the factors influencing clinical competence in nursing students. In this descriptive study, 153 nursing students (from 2nd to 4th school year) of a university in South Korea were enrolled in December 2010. The instruments for this study were the Korean versions of the Critical Thinking Disposition Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Leadership Inventory, and Clinical Competence Scale. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, MANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple linear regression with PASW 18.0 software. The mean scores (ranging from 1 to 5) in nursing students for critical thinking disposition, general self-efficacy, leadership, and clinical competence were 3.44, 3.51, 3.55, and 3.42, respectively. Positive correlations were found for clinical competence with critical thinking disposition, general self-efficacy, and leadership. The strongest predictor of clinical competence was leadership. In addition, leadership, nursing school year, and subjective academic achievement accounted for 34.5% of variance in clinical competence. This study revealed that developing leadership, critical thinking disposition, and self-efficacy in undergraduate nursing education is important to improve clinical competence of nursing students.

  6. Are Water-Related Leadership Development Programs Designed to Be Effective? An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbach, Mark E.; Floress, Kristin; Kaufman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Water resource professionals and others involved in managing water resources face increasingly complex challenges. Effective leadership development programs are needed to produce water leaders who can address these challenges. Leadership programs must be designed not simply to increase participants' environmental and leadership knowledge but to…

  7. The Effects of Servant Leadership on Teachers' Organizational Commitment in Primary Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerit, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effects of servant leadership behaviours of primary school principals on teachers' school commitment. The research data were collected from 563 teachers working in primary schools in Duzce. Servant leadership behaviours of principals were measured with a servent organizational leadership assessment scale, and the teachers'…

  8. A Grounded Theory Study of Effective Global Leadership Development Strategies: Perspectives from Brazil, India, and Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokkesmoe, Karen Jane

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, grounded theory study focuses on global leadership and global leadership development strategies from the perspective of people from three developing countries, Brazil, India, and Nigeria. The study explores conceptualizations of global leadership, the skills required to lead effectively in global contexts, and recommended…

  9. Gender Differences in Leadership Style: A Study of Leader Effectiveness in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonaros, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in leadership style and the influence of these differences on perceived leader effectiveness in higher education. Leadership style is defined in gendered terms, which include traditionally agentic styles for men and communal styles for women, and therefore transformational and transactional leadership styles…

  10. The Effect of Leadership Style on Student Achievement in Title I Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Fredrick Scott

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the different types of leadership styles of public school administrators of Title I elementary schools in order to determine how these different types of leadership styles may affect student academic achievement. Specifically, the leadership style behaviors of flexibility and effectiveness were considered.…

  11. Teachers' Organizational Commitment: Examining the Mediating Effects of Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devos, Geert; Tuytens, Melissa; Hulpia, Hester

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relation between principals' leadership and teachers' organizational commitment, mediated by distributed leadership. Data were collected from 1,495 teachers in 46 secondary schools. Structural equation modeling indicated that the effect of principals' leadership on teachers' organizational commitment is…

  12. Teachers' Organizational Commitment: Examining the Mediating Effects of Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devos, Geert; Tuytens, Melissa; Hulpia, Hester

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relation between principals' leadership and teachers' organizational commitment, mediated by distributed leadership. Data were collected from 1,495 teachers in 46 secondary schools. Structural equation modeling indicated that the effect of principals' leadership on teachers' organizational commitment is…

  13. The Effects of Servant Leadership on Teachers' Organizational Commitment in Primary Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerit, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effects of servant leadership behaviours of primary school principals on teachers' school commitment. The research data were collected from 563 teachers working in primary schools in Duzce. Servant leadership behaviours of principals were measured with a servent organizational leadership assessment scale, and the teachers'…

  14. A Grounded Theory Study of Effective Global Leadership Development Strategies: Perspectives from Brazil, India, and Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokkesmoe, Karen Jane

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, grounded theory study focuses on global leadership and global leadership development strategies from the perspective of people from three developing countries, Brazil, India, and Nigeria. The study explores conceptualizations of global leadership, the skills required to lead effectively in global contexts, and recommended…

  15. The Effect of Principal's Leadership Style on School Environment and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Safran, Eissa; Brown, David; Wiseman, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of principal's leadership style on school outcome. This study focused on the indirect relationship between the leadership style and the school environment. An additional objective was to investigate the impact of culture on leadership style as related to school environment and outcome.…

  16. Overcoming the four toughest management challenges. Increase your effectiveness by using situational leadership.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, S M

    1991-01-01

    The high-pressure work environment of the clinical laboratory presents significant challenges for managers. Often thrust into supervisory roles without formal management training, laboratory managers must find ways to delegate tasks, mediate conflict, minimize office politics, and build effective teams out of employees who may be quite diverse in their experience levels, motivation levels, and cultural backgrounds. This article explores the concept of situational leadership, which was developed by Ken Blanchard and Paul Hersey, and its applicability within the clinical laboratory. This practical paradigm involves matching one of four distinct management styles to the four development levels of employees. Each leadership style is explained, along with guidelines for giving performance feedback to employees, so that managers can evaluate their own supervisory styles. Finally, step-by-step recommendations for coping with the four management roles of delegator, referee, influencer, and team builder are presented.

  17. Leadership effectiveness and recorded sickness absence among nursing staff: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Jolanda A H; Roelen, Corné A M; Van Zweeden, Nely F; Jongsma, Dianne; Van der Klink, Jac J L; Groothoff, Johan W

    2011-07-01

    To investigate nurse managers' leadership behaviour in relation to the sickness absence records of nursing staff. Sickness absence is high in healthcare and interferes with nursing efficiency and quality. Nurse managers' leadership behaviour may be associated with nursing staff sickness absence. Six nurse managers completed the Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description (LEAD) questionnaire, which assesses leadership behaviour in terms of leadership flexibility (i.e. the range of leadership styles) and effectiveness (i.e. using the leadership style that is appropriate for a given situation). LEAD scores were linked to the number of recorded days of sickness absence and both short (1-7 days) and long (>7 days) episodes of sickness absence in the nursing teams. Leadership flexibility of nurse managers was not associated with sickness absence among nurses. High leadership effectiveness was associated with fewer days and fewer short episodes of sickness absence. Leadership effectiveness was unrelated to the number of long episodes of sickness absence. Effective nurse managers had less short-term sickness absence in their nursing teams. If these tentative cross-sectional associations are confirmed in longitudinal studies including more departments, then training effective leadership may improve the management of short-term sickness absence. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Relational Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Karen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the attributes and benefits of relational leadership. Also lists six competencies of relational leadership developed by the Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, North Carolina: Leading employees, interpersonal savvy, work-team orientation, conflict management, managing change in others, and effectively confronting problem…

  19. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Furler, John; Cleland, Jennifer; Del Mar, Chris; Hanratty, Barbara; Kadam, Umesh; Lasserson, Daniel; McCowan, Colin; Magin, Parker; Mitchell, Caroline; Qureshi, Nadeem; Rait, Greta; Steel, Nick; van Driel, Mieke; Ward, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment. PMID:18822178

  20. Leveraging Chinese Culture for Effective Organizational Leadership: The China Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jia

    2008-01-01

    This article examined organizational leadership in the context of China. Taking a cultural perspective, this literature review traced the cultural roots of Chinese leadership and analyzed the cultural impact on leadership practice in organizations. It further provided general guidelines for leadership development in China, followed by…

  1. What Makes an "Effective" Leader: The Application of Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Uline, Carol S.; Eady, Charlotte King

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on the premise that leadership is leadership, whatever the profession. A number of "leaders" from various enterprises are discussed to determine the basic tenets of leadership. The nine tenets of leadership are: (1) Think and Act Strategically. (2) Understand and Demonstrate the Elements of Teams and Teamwork. (3)…

  2. Board leadership development: the key to effective nursing leadership in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elizabeth A; Klakovich, Marilyn; Broscious, Sharon K; Delack, Sandi; Roche-Dean, Maria; Hittle, Kristin; Jumaa, Mansour Olawale; Stewart, Mary W; Alston, Prissana

    2011-03-01

    This article discusses the need for board leadership development of nurses. The authors provide an overview of the Sigma Theta Tau International Board Leadership Development program based on the experiences of nine Fellows who completed the program. Elements necessary for a self-developed board leadership development program are presented. Rationale is discussed as to why the Sigma Theta Tau Board Leadership Development program and future similar programs need to include the critical success factors in the development of nurses as board members. The authors discuss the variety of professional and personal benefits of a program of this importance.

  3. The role of personal mastery in clinical practice: how personal leadership can transform the workplace.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Melissa; Bird, Drew; Bonney, Christine

    2008-06-01

    In a climate of impending staff crisis related to looming retirements, challenging recruitment realities and the demographic realities of an aging population creating increased demand for services, the Interior Health Authority in British Columbia recognized the need for the creation of a workplace that would both attract and retain engaged employees. One of the identified ways of achieving this was to provide professional development that was also personal development for each individual in the organization. This personal /professional development involved the creation and implementation of a program in personal leadership for all front-line staff of the organization. This learning, it was believed, would lead to the transformation of the work environment and, subsequently, the culture of the workplace. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot program in personal leadership within Interior Health. Results to date demonstrate the promise of this program to effect profound cultural change through the development of personal mastery and personal leadership...for everyone.

  4. Personality Profiles of Effective Leadership Performance in Assessment Centers

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Alissa D.; Lanza, Stephanie T.; Bernthal, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most research examining the relationship between effective leadership and personality has focused on individual personality traits. However, profiles of personality traits more fully describe individuals, and these profiles may be important as they relate to leadership. This study used latent class analysis to examine how personality traits combine and interact to form subpopulations of leaders, and how these subpopulations relate to performance criteria. Using a sample of 2,461 executive-level leaders, six personality profiles were identified: Unpredictable Leaders with Low Diligence (7.3%); Conscientious, Backend Leaders (3.6%); Unpredictable Leaders (8.6%); Creative Communicators (20.8%); Power Players (32.4%); and Protocol Followers (27.1%). One profile performed well on all criteria in an assessment center; remaining profiles exhibited strengths and weaknesses across criteria. Implications and future directions for research are highlighted. PMID:27746587

  5. Personality Profiles of Effective Leadership Performance in Assessment Centers.

    PubMed

    Parr, Alissa D; Lanza, Stephanie T; Bernthal, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most research examining the relationship between effective leadership and personality has focused on individual personality traits. However, profiles of personality traits more fully describe individuals, and these profiles may be important as they relate to leadership. This study used latent class analysis to examine how personality traits combine and interact to form subpopulations of leaders, and how these subpopulations relate to performance criteria. Using a sample of 2,461 executive-level leaders, six personality profiles were identified: Unpredictable Leaders with Low Diligence (7.3%); Conscientious, Backend Leaders (3.6%); Unpredictable Leaders (8.6%); Creative Communicators (20.8%); Power Players (32.4%); and Protocol Followers (27.1%). One profile performed well on all criteria in an assessment center; remaining profiles exhibited strengths and weaknesses across criteria. Implications and future directions for research are highlighted.

  6. Spatially quantifying the leadership effectiveness in collective behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Ning; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Su, Ri-Qi; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Changsong

    2010-12-01

    Among natural biological flocks/swarms or mass social activities, when the collective behavior of the followers has been dominated by the direction or opinion of one leader group, it seems difficult for later-coming leaders to reverse the orientation of the mass followers, especially when they are in quantitative minority. This paper, however, reports a counter-intuitive phenomenon, i.e. Following the Later-coming Minority, provided that the later-comers obey a favorable distribution pattern that enables them to spread their influence to as many followers as possible within a given time and to be dense enough to govern these local followers they can influence directly from the beginning. We introduce a discriminant index to quantify the whole group's orientation under competing leaderships, with which the eventual orientation of the mass followers can be predicted before launching the real dynamical procedure. From the application point of view, this leadership effectiveness index also helps us to design an economical way for the minority later-coming leaders to defeat the dominating majority leaders solely by optimizing their spatial distribution pattern provided that the premeditated goal is available. Our investigation provides insights into effective leadership in biological systems with meaningful implications for social and industrial applications.

  7. Developing nurses' transformational leadership skills.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Shelly Ann

    2017-08-16

    Healthcare is a complex area with significant potential for service improvement despite the effects of increasing economic and social pressures on the quality and safety of patient care. As the largest group of healthcare professionals in direct contact with patients, nurses are well positioned to contribute to improvements in healthcare services and to the development of new policies. To influence healthcare improvements and policies effectively, nurses require leadership skills. Historically, it was thought that only nurses in management roles required leadership skills; however, the ability to influence change is a requirement at all levels of clinical practice. Transformational leadership competencies provide nurses with the skills to contribute to improvements in the quality and safety of patient care, while enhancing their career satisfaction. This article examines how nurses can apply transformational leadership to their practice. It also informs nurses how to conduct an initial self-assessment of their leadership skills and to formulate a transformational leadership development plan.

  8. The Effect of a Leadership Development Program on Students' Self-Perceptions of Leadership Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dayna Dunsmoor

    2013-01-01

    Equipping a healthcare workforce with leadership skills to drive change and innovation through the twenty-first century is imperative. This research measured outcomes of students' participation in a year-long leadership development program at a small, private, urban healthcare university in the northeastern United States. A mixed method approach…

  9. The Impact of Leadership on Student Outcomes: An Analysis of the Differential Effects of Leadership Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.; Lloyd, Claire A.; Rowe, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relative impact of different types of leadership on students' academic and nonacademic outcomes. Research Design: The methodology involved an analysis of findings from 27 published studies of the relationship between leadership and student outcomes. The first meta-analysis, including 22 of the…

  10. Effects of Leadership on Student Success through the Balanced Leadership Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Munevver; Kinik, F. Sehkar F.

    2016-01-01

    Attempts have been made to identify behavior patterns peculiar to leadership by many institutions and organizations; also numerous studies have been conducted in this area. Of all these organizations, The Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) identifies the definitive standards of school leadership. Examining these standards in…

  11. University Leadership in Crisis: The Need for Effective Leadership Positioning in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirat, Morshidi; Ahmad, Abdul Razak; Azman, Norzaini

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of the leadership crisis in Malaysia's public universities. Our main concern is about the leadership at the top levels of university management, and the administrative hierarchy as perceived by both outsiders and insiders. Critics have lamented that Malaysia lacks people with international stature to lead its public…

  12. The Impact of Leadership on Student Outcomes: An Analysis of the Differential Effects of Leadership Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.; Lloyd, Claire A.; Rowe, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relative impact of different types of leadership on students' academic and nonacademic outcomes. Research Design: The methodology involved an analysis of findings from 27 published studies of the relationship between leadership and student outcomes. The first meta-analysis, including 22 of the…

  13. The Effects of Principal's Transformational Leadership Behaviors on Teacher Leadership Development and Teacher Self Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Socorro M.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership has been identified as an essential ingredient of educational reform aiming to ensure that every student gets the education they need to succeed in an era of high accountability. Transformational leadership in the educational context is conceptualized as a process of building commitment to meet the challenges faced by professionals in…

  14. Campus-Based Community College Leadership Development Programs: Effective Leadership Competencies as Perceived by Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focht, Jeffrey William

    2010-01-01

    Due to the immense growth of community colleges since the 1960s and particularly over the last decade, a leadership gap now exists as presidents, provosts, and deans retire in record numbers. This diminished leadership pipeline can be attributed to two main factors: the obvious increase in retirement of senior executives completing their academic…

  15. The Effects of Principal's Transformational Leadership Behaviors on Teacher Leadership Development and Teacher Self Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Socorro M.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership has been identified as an essential ingredient of educational reform aiming to ensure that every student gets the education they need to succeed in an era of high accountability. Transformational leadership in the educational context is conceptualized as a process of building commitment to meet the challenges faced by professionals in…

  16. University Leadership in Crisis: The Need for Effective Leadership Positioning in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirat, Morshidi; Ahmad, Abdul Razak; Azman, Norzaini

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of the leadership crisis in Malaysia's public universities. Our main concern is about the leadership at the top levels of university management, and the administrative hierarchy as perceived by both outsiders and insiders. Critics have lamented that Malaysia lacks people with international stature to lead its public…

  17. Emotional Intelligence: The Sine Qua Non for a Clinical Leadership Toolbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that although IQ and technical skills are important, emotional intelligence is the Sine Qua Non of leadership. According to Goleman [Goleman, D. (1998). What makes a leader? "Harvard Business Review," 93-102] "effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of…

  18. Emotional Intelligence: The Sine Qua Non for a Clinical Leadership Toolbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that although IQ and technical skills are important, emotional intelligence is the Sine Qua Non of leadership. According to Goleman [Goleman, D. (1998). What makes a leader? "Harvard Business Review," 93-102] "effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of…

  19. Perceptions of Leadership Effectiveness in Schools for Children Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyinlade, A. Olu; Ajuwon, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    This study used the standard-based essential behavioural leadership qualities (EBLQ) method of leadership assessment, to determine leadership effectiveness of the principals of the schools for children who are blind and have low vision in Nigeria, from the perspective of the teachers of these schools. The four-stage method of leadership assessment…

  20. Perceptions of Leadership Effectiveness in Schools for Children Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyinlade, A. Olu; Ajuwon, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    This study used the standard-based essential behavioural leadership qualities (EBLQ) method of leadership assessment, to determine leadership effectiveness of the principals of the schools for children who are blind and have low vision in Nigeria, from the perspective of the teachers of these schools. The four-stage method of leadership assessment…

  1. Building a clinical leadership community to drive improvement: a multi-case educational study to inform 21st century clinical commissioning, professional capability and patient care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Marion; Verner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The new NHS requires transformational leadership; people with the knowledge and motivation to make effective change combined with an understanding of the system they work in. The aim of the Practice Leaders' Programme (PLP) is to generate the conditions needed to focus the energy and collaborative creativity required for innovation to enhance leadership skills across the health economy improving patient care. The PLP engaged 60 local leaders from central England in a new approach enabling them to influence others. It has informed educational policy and practice and helped change professional behaviours. Each participant implemented improvements in care and participated in six action learning sets (ALS) and up to six coaching sessions. Evidence of progress, learning and impact was identified in project reports, reflective diaries and evaluations. The ALS brought together key individuals from clinical and management disciplines across a diverse organisation to redesign a system by developing a shared vision for improving the quality of patient care. The links forged, the projects initiated, and the skills cultivated through the PLP produced ongoing benefits and outcomes beyond the course itself. Coaching sessions helped participants focus their efforts to achieve maximum impact and to become resilient in managing service change effectively. The programme has evolved over four years, building on recommendations from external evaluation which identified statistically significant increases in leadership competences. Further enhancement of this programme secured an International Health Improvement Award. Three key findings of positive impact have emerged; personal growth, service improvement, and legacy and sustainability.

  2. Leadership Effects: School Principals and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelli, Michael; Green, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We identify the effect of individual high school principals on graduation rates and English exam scores using an administrative data set of grade 12 students in BC Canada. Many principals were rotated across schools by districts, permitting isolation of the effect of principals from the effect of schools. We estimate the variance of the…

  3. Leadership Effects: School Principals and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelli, Michael; Green, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We identify the effect of individual high school principals on graduation rates and English exam scores using an administrative data set of grade 12 students in BC Canada. Many principals were rotated across schools by districts, permitting isolation of the effect of principals from the effect of schools. We estimate the variance of the…

  4. Requirements for effective academic leadership in Iran: a nominal group technique exercise.

    PubMed

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Sohrabi, Zohreh; Masiello, Italo

    2008-04-22

    During the last two decades, medical education in Iran has shifted from elite to mass education, with a considerable increase in number of schools, faculties, and programs. Because of this transformation, it is a good case now to explore academic leadership in a non-western country. The objective of this study was to explore the views on effective academic leadership requirements held by key informants in Iran's medical education system. A nominal group study was conducted by strategic sampling in which participants were requested to discuss and report on requirements for academic leadership, suggestions and barriers. Written notes from the discussions were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Six themes of effective academic leadership emerged: 1)shared vision, goal, and strategy, 2) teaching and research leadership, 3) fair and efficient management, 4) mutual trust and respect, 5) development and recognition, and 6) transformational leadership. Current Iranian academic leadership suffers from lack of meritocracy, conservative leaders, politicization, bureaucracy, and belief in misconceptions. The structure of the Iranian medical university system is not supportive of effective academic leadership. However, participants' views on effective academic leadership are in line with what is also found in the western literature, that is, if the managers could create the premises for a supportive and transformational leadership, they could generate mutual trust and respect in academia and increase scientific production.

  5. Requirements for effective academic leadership in Iran: A Nominal Group Technique exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Sohrabi, Zohreh; Masiello, Italo

    2008-01-01

    Background During the last two decades, medical education in Iran has shifted from elite to mass education, with a considerable increase in number of schools, faculties, and programs. Because of this transformation, it is a good case now to explore academic leadership in a non-western country. The objective of this study was to explore the views on effective academic leadership requirements held by key informants in Iran's medical education system. Methods A nominal group study was conducted by strategic sampling in which participants were requested to discuss and report on requirements for academic leadership, suggestions and barriers. Written notes from the discussions were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Results Six themes of effective academic leadership emerged: 1)shared vision, goal, and strategy, 2) teaching and research leadership, 3) fair and efficient management, 4) mutual trust and respect, 5) development and recognition, and 6) transformational leadership. Current Iranian academic leadership suffers from lack of meritocracy, conservative leaders, politicization, bureaucracy, and belief in misconceptions. Conclusion The structure of the Iranian medical university system is not supportive of effective academic leadership. However, participants' views on effective academic leadership are in line with what is also found in the western literature, that is, if the managers could create the premises for a supportive and transformational leadership, they could generate mutual trust and respect in academia and increase scientific production. PMID:18430241

  6. Perceived Managerial and Leadership Effectiveness in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Luis Eduardo; Ruiz, Carlos Enrique; Hamlin, Bob; Velez-Calle, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify what Colombians perceive as effective and least effective/ineffective managerial behavior. Design/methodology/approach: This study was conducted following a qualitative methodology based on the philosophical assumptions of pragmatism and the "pragmatic approach" (Morgan, 2007). The…

  7. Perceived Managerial and Leadership Effectiveness in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Luis Eduardo; Ruiz, Carlos Enrique; Hamlin, Bob; Velez-Calle, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify what Colombians perceive as effective and least effective/ineffective managerial behavior. Design/methodology/approach: This study was conducted following a qualitative methodology based on the philosophical assumptions of pragmatism and the "pragmatic approach" (Morgan, 2007). The…

  8. Assessing physician leadership styles: application of the situational leadership model to transitions in patient acuity.

    PubMed

    Skog, Alexander; Peyre, Sarah E; Pozner, Charles N; Thorndike, Mary; Hicks, Gloria; Dellaripa, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    The situational leadership model suggests that an effective leader adapts leadership style depending on the followers' level of competency. We assessed the applicability and reliability of the situational leadership model when observing residents in simulated hospital floor-based scenarios. Resident teams engaged in clinical simulated scenarios. Video recordings were divided into clips based on Emergency Severity Index v4 acuity scores. Situational leadership styles were identified in clips by two physicians. Interrater reliability was determined through descriptive statistical data analysis. There were 114 participants recorded in 20 sessions, and 109 clips were reviewed and scored. There was a high level of interrater reliability (weighted kappa r = .81) supporting situational leadership model's applicability to medical teams. A suggestive correlation was found between frequency of changes in leadership style and the ability to effectively lead a medical team. The situational leadership model represents a unique tool to assess medical leadership performance in the context of acuity changes.

  9. Developing leadership competencies among medical trainees: five-year experience at the Cleveland Clinic with a chief residents' training course.

    PubMed

    Farver, Carol F; Smalling, Susan; Stoller, James K

    2016-10-01

    Challenges in healthcare demand great leadership. In response, leadership training programs have been developed within academic medical centers, business schools, and healthcare organizations; however, we are unaware of any well-developed programs for physicians-in-training. To address this gap, we developed a two-day leadership development course for chief residents (CRs) at the Cleveland Clinic, framed around the concept of emotional intelligence. This paper describes our five-year experience with the CRs leadership program. Since inception, 105 CRs took the course; 81 (77%) completed before-and-after evaluations. Participants indicated that they had relatively little prior knowledge of the concepts that were presented and that the workshop greatly enhanced their familiarity with leadership competencies. Qualitative analysis of open-ended responses indicated that attendees valued the training, especially in conflict resolution and teamwork, and indicated specific action plans for applying these skills. Furthermore, the workshop spurred some participants to express plans to learn more about leadership competencies. This study extends prior experience in offering an emotional intelligence-based leadership workshop for CRs. Though the program is novel, further research is needed to more fully understand the impact of leadership training for CRs and for the institutions and patients they serve. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  10. Emotional intelligence: the Sine Qua Non for a clinical leadership toolbox.

    PubMed

    Rao, Paul R

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that although IQ and technical skills are important, emotional intelligence is the Sine Qua Non of leadership. According to Goleman [Goleman, D. (1998). What makes a leader? Harvard Business Review, 93-102] "effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of emotional intelligence...and can also be linked to strong performance." The original five dimensions of EIQ are described and applied to both supervisory and clinical scenarios. As a result of reading this work, you will be able to: (1) define and provide an illustration of each of the five components of emotional intelligence (EIQ); (2) outline the relationship of EIQ to success in your profession and your personal life; (3) create a strategic action plan to enhance each dimension of EIQ in your daily life; (4) list at least three real-life experiences that could have resulted a favorable outcome with an improved EIQ; (5) complete a self-evaluation of your EIQ.

  11. The impact of clinical leadership on health information technology adoption: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Georgiou, Andrew; Clay-Williams, Robyn; Magrabi, Farah; Hordern, Antonia; Prgomet, Mirela; Li, Julie; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    To conduct a systematic review to examine evidence of associations between clinical leadership and successful information technology (IT) adoption in healthcare organisations. We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and Business Source Premier for articles published between January 2000 to May 2013 with keywords and subject terms related to: (1) the setting--healthcare provider organisations; (2) the technology--health information technology; (3) the process--adoption; and (4) the intervention--leadership. We identified 3121 unique citations, of which 32 met our criteria and were included in the review. Data extracted from the included studies were assessed in light of two frameworks: Bassellier et al.'s IT competence framework; and Avgar et al.'s health IT adoption framework. The results demonstrate important associations between the attributes of clinical leaders and IT adoption. Clinical leaders who have technical informatics skills and prior experience with IT project management are likely to develop a vision that comprises a long-term commitment to the use of IT. Leaders who possess such a vision believe in the value of IT, are motivated to adopt it, and can maintain confidence and stability through the adversities that IT adoptions often entail. This leads to proactive leadership behaviours and partnerships with IT professionals that are associated with successful organisational and clinical outcomes. This review provides evidence that clinical leaders can positively contribute to successful IT adoption in healthcare organisations. Clinical leaders who aim for improvements in the processes and quality of care should cultivate the necessary IT competencies, establish mutual partnerships with IT professionals, and execute proactive IT behaviours to achieve successful IT adoption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effectiveness of an initial continuing education course in leadership for dentists.

    PubMed

    Roig Jornet, P; Kalenderian, E

    2017-07-20

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of a continuing education course in leadership presented to postdoctoral dentist-leaders. The authors developed a 3-day course on leadership and management with topics including self-awareness, leadership qualities, emotional intelligence, communication skills, social skills, conflict management, personal branding, quality improvement and team motivation. Twenty-two course participants with a median age of 37.5 years and an average of 13.7 years of professional experience were assessed using three different metrics: satisfaction with the course and presenters immediately following the course; pre-course and post-course tests on knowledge of leadership topics; and self-assessments of leadership competency skills prior to the course, immediately following the course and then 6 months after the course. Participant satisfaction with both instructors' effectiveness and the overall course design was very high. A survey 6 months following the course showed that participants were very positive regarding the practical use of the leadership skills they acquired in the course. The average of all participants' scores on the objectively assessed leadership knowledge test showed a statistically significant (P<.001) difference between pre-course and post-course scores. At 6-month follow-up, participant self-assessment of leadership competency significantly improved following the course. A well-designed course in leadership skills can have a positive impact on the leadership knowledge and competency of dentist-leaders. This unique leadership course was effective in increasing leadership knowledge and self-perceived leadership competency. The course and the skilled instructors were rated very highly by participants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Comparing the content of leadership theories and managers' shared perceptions of effective leadership: a Q-method study of trainee managers in the English NHS.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Tim

    2013-08-01

    Health service managers face potential conflicts between corporate and professional agendas, a tension sharpened for trainees by their junior status and relative inexperience. While academic leadership theory forms an integral part of contemporary management development programmes, relatively little is known of trainees' patterned subjectivities in relation to leadership theories. The objective of this study was to explore such subjectivities within a cohort of trainees on the National Health Service Graduate Management Training Scheme (NHS GMTS), a 'fast-track' programme which prepares graduate entrants for director-level health service management posts. A Q-method design was used and four shared subjectivities were identified: leadership as collaborative social process ('relational'); leadership as integrity ('moral'); leadership as effective support of subordinates ('team'); and leadership as construction of a credible leadership persona ('identity'). While the factors broadly map onto competencies indicated within the NHS Leadership Qualities Framework which underpin assessments of performance for this student group, it is important not to overstate the governance effect of the assessment regime. Rather, factors reflect tensions between required competencies, namely the mobilisation of diverse interest groups, the ethical base of decisions and the identity work required to convince others of leadership status. Indeed, factor 2 ('moral') effectively defines leadership as the embodiment of public service ethos.

  14. Effective Leadership of Online Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipple, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Post secondary education leaders and administrators are currently facing two separate but inter-related trends: the growth in online education, and the significant increase in adjunct (part-time) faculty. In order to maximize the educational quality and institutional effectiveness, education leaders must develop an approach that levers the…

  15. Effective Leadership of Online Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipple, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Post secondary education leaders and administrators are currently facing two separate but inter-related trends: the growth in online education, and the significant increase in adjunct (part-time) faculty. In order to maximize the educational quality and institutional effectiveness, education leaders must develop an approach that levers the…

  16. Effective Leadership Makes Schools Truly Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeskey, James; Waldron, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    There's been much commitment and extensive legislation intended to make schools inclusive for all students but not much real progress in improving student outcomes. The authors review and assess several schools that have succeeded at making schools inclusive and effective for all students, including those with disabilities and draw some inferences…

  17. Effective Public Relations. Leadership Pamphlet #13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education Association of U.S.A., Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet on effective public relations (p.r.) is the thirteenth of 16 in a series to provide leaders in adult activities with sound introductory material to give pratical help in using a method of adult education or working in a particular area. Its objective is to help leaders achieve better relations with all their publics. Twelve articles…

  18. Collaborative Leadership for Promoting Effective School Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Bennat; And Others

    1994-01-01

    When initiating major structural change in schools, collaboration among educators, community members, and business persons is vital. This publication describes the efforts of the Ysleta (Texas) Independent School District, which successfully used collaboration to promote effective school change. Within the district, the Del Valle High School has…

  19. Effective Leadership Makes Schools Truly Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeskey, James; Waldron, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    There's been much commitment and extensive legislation intended to make schools inclusive for all students but not much real progress in improving student outcomes. The authors review and assess several schools that have succeeded at making schools inclusive and effective for all students, including those with disabilities and draw some inferences…

  20. Effective Leadership: Finding a Formula for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Change is always difficult for people, even when they have a hand in directing the change and can see its benefits. The main reason is that the unknown is scarier than the known. Most changes, even ones with positive goals, are painful for those who must change. Implementing change effectively requires managing three elements of change, which the…

  1. Effective Leadership: Finding a Formula for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Change is always difficult for people, even when they have a hand in directing the change and can see its benefits. The main reason is that the unknown is scarier than the known. Most changes, even ones with positive goals, are painful for those who must change. Implementing change effectively requires managing three elements of change, which the…

  2. Effective Public Relations. Leadership Pamphlet #13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education Association of U.S.A., Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet on effective public relations (p.r.) is the thirteenth of 16 in a series to provide leaders in adult activities with sound introductory material to give pratical help in using a method of adult education or working in a particular area. Its objective is to help leaders achieve better relations with all their publics. Twelve articles…

  3. What Is Effective Research Leadership? a Research-Informed Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Drawing upon findings from a UK-based and -funded study of academic leadership provided by (full) professors, this article focuses on research leadership as perceived by those on the receiving end of it. Research leadership is defined as the influence of one or more people on the research-related behaviour, attitudes or intellectual capacity of…

  4. Leadership Styles of Effective Female Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, Mayra Alayon

    2010-01-01

    The increase number of females in leadership positions provides new opportunities to observe them as leaders. The purpose of this research was to study leadership and to identify the contextual, societal and cultural factors that determined and influenced the styles of leadership of female executives in higher education. The study profiled the…

  5. Using Both Head and Heart for Effective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Cathleen T.

    2005-01-01

    This article serves as a review of current literature on the topic of leadership. Leadership is a dynamic process of relationship building between individuals and groups. Leadership theory can guide practice, and integrating theory with thoughtful practice has always been critical to family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals in working…

  6. Principal Leadership Long-Term Indirect Effects on Learning Growth in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumay, Xavier; Boonen, Tinneke; Van Damme, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In both the school effectiveness and the educational administration literature, growing attention has been paid to the extent of principal leadership effects and the means by which they affect school performance. The main goal of this study is to estimate the effects of principal leadership on students' achievement growth in mathematics over a…

  7. The Public School Superintendency in the Twenty-First Century: The Quest To Define Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Janet Y.

    This study examines research on public school leadership effectiveness, focusing specifically on the superintendent. It begins with a discussion of the historical mission to define leadership effectiveness, followed by a review of existing research on effective school districts and superintendents. The report also analyzes how superintendent…

  8. Perspectives on clinical leadership: a qualitative study exploring the views of senior healthcare leaders in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Mohanna, Kay; Cowpe, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinicians are being asked to play a major role leading the NHS. While much is written on about clinical leadership, little research in the medical literature has examined perceptions of the term or mapped the perceived attributes required for success. Objective To capture the views of senior UK healthcare leaders regarding their perception of the term `clinical leadership' and the cultural backdrop in which it is being espoused. Setting UK Healthcare sector Participants Senior UK Healthcare leaders Methods Twenty senior healthcare leaders including a former Health Minister, NHS Executives, NHS Strategic Health Authority, PCT and Acute Trust chief executives and medical directors, Medical Deans and other key actors in the UK medical leadership arena were interviewed between 2010 and 2011 using a semi-structured interview technique. Using grounded theory, themes were identified and subsequently analysed in an attempt to answer the broad questions posed. Main outcome measures Not applicable for a qualitative research project Results A number of themes emerged from this qualitative study. First, there was evidence of changing attitudes among doctors, particularly trainees, towards becoming involved in clinical leadership. However, there was unease over the ambiguity of the term ‘clinical leadership’ and the implications for the future. There was, however, broad agreement as to the perceived attributes and skills required for success in healthcare leadership. Conclusions Clinical leadership is often perceived to be doctor centric and ‘Healthcare Leadership’ may be a more inclusive term. An understanding of the historical medico-political context of the leadership debate is required by all healthcare leaders to fully understand the challenges of changing healthcare culture. Whilst the broad attributes deemed essential for success as a healthcare leaders are not new, significant effort and investment, including a physical Healthcare Academy, are

  9. Military Leadership Evaluations: Effects of Sex, Leadership Style and Gender-Role Attitudes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    stereotype and transformational leadership in typical feminine work contexts. Sociedad Valenciana de Psicologia Social , 9(3), 53-71. Luthar, H. K. (1996...the “glass ceiling” barring women from the highest levels of leadership and management. Powell (1999) offered a summary of social -system centered...situation-centered, and person-centered explanations to account for the small proportion of women in the highest levels of management. Social -system

  10. Factors Related to Instructional Leadership Perception and Effect of Instructional Leadership on Organizational Variables: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, effects of teacher characteristics on instructional leadership perceptions and some organizational variables is tested. Findings of the total of 67 independent studies are gathered in the meta-analysis which represents a population of 36,756. According to the findings of this meta-analysis performed by using random effects…

  11. Virtual Team Leadership: The Effects of Leadership Style and Communication Medium on Team Interaction Styles and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambley, Laura A.; O'Neill, Thomas A.; Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformational and transactional leadership styles and communication media on team interaction styles and outcomes. Teams communicated through one of the following three ways: (a) face-to-face, (b) desktop videoconference, or (c) text-based chat. Results indicated that transformational and transactional…

  12. Virtual Team Leadership: The Effects of Leadership Style and Communication Medium on Team Interaction Styles and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambley, Laura A.; O'Neill, Thomas A.; Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformational and transactional leadership styles and communication media on team interaction styles and outcomes. Teams communicated through one of the following three ways: (a) face-to-face, (b) desktop videoconference, or (c) text-based chat. Results indicated that transformational and transactional…

  13. Leadership Strategies for Community College Effectiveness: Outcomes of the North Carolina Community College Presidents' Leadership Institute. A Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dale F.; And Others

    Developed as a result of the North Carolina Community College President's Leadership Institute, this volume discusses the successful use of selected adaptive strategies to enhance community college effectiveness. Following information on the Institute and an overview of the volume, most of the remaining chapters review the work of prominent…

  14. Leadership frames and perceptions of effectiveness among health information management program directors.

    PubMed

    Sasnett, Bonita; Ross, Thomas

    2007-10-04

    Leadership is important to health science education. For program effectiveness, directors should possess leadership skills to appropriately lead and manage their departments. Therefore, it is important to explore the leadership styles of programs' leaders as health science education is undergoing reform. Program directors of two and four-year health information management programs were surveyed to determine leadership styles. The study examined leadership styles or frames, the number of leadership frames employed by directors, and the relationship between leadership frames and their perceptions of their effectiveness as a manager and as a leader. The study shows that program directors are confident of their human resource and structural skills and less sure of the political and symbolic skills required of leaders. These skills in turn are correlated with their self-perceived effectiveness as managers and leaders. Findings from the study may assist program directors in their career development and expansion of health information management programs as a discipline within the health science field. As academic health centers receive greater pressure from the Institute of Medicine and accrediting agencies to reform health science education, the question of leadership arises. These centers have taken a leadership role in reforming health professional education by partnering with educational institutions to improve the health of communities. To achieve health education reform, health sciences educators must apply effective leadership skills.1 College and university leadership is challenged on how to best approach educational reform across health science fields. This article discusses leadership styles employed by program directors of one health science department, health information management, in directing programs for health science education reform.

  15. A THEORY OF LEADERSHIP EFFECTIVENESS. MCGRAW-HILL SERIES IN MANAGEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FIEDLER, FRED E.

    CENTRAL TO THE THEORY OF LEADERSHIP EFFECTIVENESS OUTLINED HERE IS A CONTINGENCY MODEL, ACCORDING TO WHICH GROUP EFFECTIVENESS DEPENDS ON INTERACTION BETWEEN LEADERSHIP STYLES AND THE DEGREE TO WHICH SITUATIONS ENABLE LEADERS TO EXERT INFLUENCE. THE THEORY PREDICTS THAT A TASK-ORIENTED STYLE WILL BE THE BEST STYLE IN FAVORABLE LEADERSHIP…

  16. Effective Leadership Practices of Catholic High School Principals That Support Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez, Denise

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effective leadership practices are employed by Catholic high school principals to cultivate a culture of academic success and foster Catholic identity. This study addressed and identified the following: 1) the effective leadership skills Catholic high school principals need to embody to be successful…

  17. Characteristics of School Leadership Teams in Highly Effective Elementary Schools in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to identify the task and relationship behaviors and processes used by school leadership teams identified as effective. In addition, the study will identify similar characteristics across effective teams. Methodology:The participants in the present study were 12 school leadership teams from highly effective…

  18. The Relationship between Elementary School Teachers' Perceptions of Principals' Leadership Effectiveness and Teacher Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Sallye Applewhite

    2013-01-01

    Burnout, an ever-present concern in the teaching profession, is arguably related to principals' leadership effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between elementary school teachers' levels of burnout and their perceptions of their principals' leadership effectiveness. Data were gathered using the Maslach Burnout…

  19. Effectiveness of the Use of Spiritual Intelligence in Women Academic Leadership Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramachandaran, Sharmila Devi; Krauss, Steven Eric; Hamzah, Azimi; Idris, Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of the use of spiritual intelligence into women academic leadership practices. The study designed to provide a clear understanding of the effectiveness of the use of spiritual intelligence practices within women academic leadership practices. In addition, the study will be an ideal…

  20. Characteristics of School Leadership Teams in Highly Effective Elementary Schools in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to identify the task and relationship behaviors and processes used by school leadership teams identified as effective. In addition, the study will identify similar characteristics across effective teams. Methodology:The participants in the present study were 12 school leadership teams from highly effective…

  1. Effective Leadership Practices of Catholic High School Principals That Support Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez, Denise

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effective leadership practices are employed by Catholic high school principals to cultivate a culture of academic success and foster Catholic identity. This study addressed and identified the following: 1) the effective leadership skills Catholic high school principals need to embody to be successful…

  2. Effectiveness of the Use of Spiritual Intelligence in Women Academic Leadership Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramachandaran, Sharmila Devi; Krauss, Steven Eric; Hamzah, Azimi; Idris, Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of the use of spiritual intelligence into women academic leadership practices. The study designed to provide a clear understanding of the effectiveness of the use of spiritual intelligence practices within women academic leadership practices. In addition, the study will be an ideal…

  3. The Role of Trust in Effective Instructional Leadership: Exploring the Perceptions of Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Tammie L.

    2016-01-01

    The current study explored the dimensions and roles of trust in effective instructional leadership through a triangulation of data gathered from 78 survey responders and 35 interview participants along with a review of pertinent literature. The interviews and written free-responses related effective instructional leadership to three clear…

  4. The Role of Trust in Effective Instructional Leadership: Exploring the Perceptions of Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Tammie L.

    2016-01-01

    The current study explored the dimensions and roles of trust in effective instructional leadership through a triangulation of data gathered from 78 survey responders and 35 interview participants along with a review of pertinent literature. The interviews and written free-responses related effective instructional leadership to three clear…

  5. A Study of Leadership Effectiveness in a Large VET Institution in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Don; Gamage, David T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on a study of the effectiveness of head teacher leadership within TAFE NSW. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to identify and measure the effective leadership attributes of the head teachers. The research sample consisted of head teachers and teachers. Findings: The…

  6. A Study of Leadership Effectiveness in a Large VET Institution in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Don; Gamage, David T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on a study of the effectiveness of head teacher leadership within TAFE NSW. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to identify and measure the effective leadership attributes of the head teachers. The research sample consisted of head teachers and teachers. Findings: The…

  7. Clinical leadership development in accelerated baccalaureate nursing students: an education innovation.

    PubMed

    Lekan, Deborah A; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Gilliss, Catherine L; Bailey, Donald E

    2011-01-01

    Nursing faculty members are responsible for assuring competence and safety in the preparation of prelicensure students who are preparing to deliver care in diverse settings. The growing complexity of care and the rapid expansion of knowledge have challenged the adequacy of traditional educational approaches. Proposed solutions have encouraged closer integration of classroom and clinical teaching. This article describes an integrated instructional approach to developing clinical leadership competencies in a cohort of accelerated, second-degree, baccalaureate nursing students. Fifty-six students completed an intensive clinical experience in long-term care settings in which they used evidence on improving care for persons with heart failure to practice the principles of delegation and supervision with nursing staff. The pre- and postassessments indicated improvement in heart failure knowledge and increased readiness for delegation and supervision of certified nursing assistants. As one component of the learning experience, the students completed reflection journals. The entries in the students' journals revealed five themes: (a) low leadership self-efficacy, (b) managing the credibility gap, (c) flexibility in communication strategies, (d) RN accountability in delegation and supervision, and (e) knowledge dissemination with diverse nursing staff. Students and faculty judged the learning experience to be successful and supported the experience for future cohorts of students. This report is one example of how innovative learning experiences could be developed to increase the "real-world" aspects of clinical care within a multidisciplinary team context for the entry-level learner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Review and Conceptual Framework for Integrating Leadership into Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutz, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The purpose of this review is to assess leadership education and practice in athletic training. Leadership is a critical component of athletic training and health care. Leadership research in athletic training is dramatically behind other health care professions. Objective: To develop a model for integrating leadership behavior and…

  9. A Review and Conceptual Framework for Integrating Leadership into Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutz, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The purpose of this review is to assess leadership education and practice in athletic training. Leadership is a critical component of athletic training and health care. Leadership research in athletic training is dramatically behind other health care professions. Objective: To develop a model for integrating leadership behavior and…

  10. Organizational Leadership For Building Effective Health Care Teams

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Foster, Mary K.; Shortell, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    The movement toward accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes will increase with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA will therefore give further impetus to the growing importance of teams in health care. Teams typically involve 2 or more people embedded in a larger social system who differentiate their roles, share common goals, interact with each other, and perform tasks affecting others. Multiple team types fit within this definition, and they all need support from leadership to succeed. Teams have been invoked as a necessary tool to address the needs of patients with multiple chronic conditions and to address medical workforce shortages. Invoking teams, however, is much easier than making them function effectively, so we need to consider the implications of the growing emphasis on teams. Although the ACA will spur team development, organizational leadership must use what we know now to train, support, and incentivize team function. Meanwhile, we must also advance research regarding teams in health care to give those leaders more evidence to guide their work. PMID:23690329

  11. Organizational leadership for building effective health care teams.

    PubMed

    Taplin, Stephen H; Foster, Mary K; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    The movement toward accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes will increase with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA will therefore give further impetus to the growing importance of teams in health care. Teams typically involve 2 or more people embedded in a larger social system who differentiate their roles, share common goals, interact with each other, and perform tasks affecting others. Multiple team types fit within this definition, and they all need support from leadership to succeed. Teams have been invoked as a necessary tool to address the needs of patients with multiple chronic conditions and to address medical workforce shortages. Invoking teams, however, is much easier than making them function effectively, so we need to consider the implications of the growing emphasis on teams. Although the ACA will spur team development, organizational leadership must use what we know now to train, support, and incentivize team function. Meanwhile, we must also advance research regarding teams in health care to give those leaders more evidence to guide their work.

  12. The effect of sleep deprivation on leadership behaviour in military officers: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Pallesen, Ståle; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Espevik, Roar

    2016-12-01

    While several studies show that leaders frequently lack sleep, little is known about how this influences leadership behaviour. The present study encompasses an experiment that investigated how three main types of leadership behaviour: transformational (four sub-facets); transactional (two sub-facets); and passive-avoidant (two sub-facets) leadership differed across a rested and a long-term, partially sleep-deprived condition. A total of 16 military naval officers participated. In both conditions, the leaders managed a team of three subordinates in a navy navigation simulator, instructed to complete a specific mission (A or B). Both sleep state (rested or sleep deprived) and mission were counterbalanced. Leadership behaviour was video recorded and subsequently rated on the three leadership behaviours. Overall, the scores on transformational leadership (and on two of four sub-facets) and transactional leadership (on both sub-facets) decreased from the rested to sleep-deprived condition, whereas scores on passive-avoidant leadership overall (and on both sub-facets) increased from the rested to sleep-deprived condition. This study underscores the importance of including sleep as a potentially important determinant when assessing leadership effectiveness.

  13. Effects of nursing position on transformational leadership practices.

    PubMed

    Herman, Susan; Gish, Mary; Rosenblum, Ruth

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to identify significant differences in nursing leadership strengths by position title. Recent reports show aspects of transformational leadership (TL) related to position, age, and educational level. This study focuses on differentiating the strength of leadership practices across the range of nursing management positions. The Leadership Practices Inventory-Self-assessment survey, and a variety of demographic questions, were used to anonymously poll voluntary members of the Association of California Nurse Leaders. Nursing positions of director level and above were strongest in leadership practices. Those at manager and below were identified as needing additional leadership development. LPI-S subscales Enable Others to Act and Model the Way were strongest. Those at the manager level and below will benefit most from additional education and training. Even upper levels of management would gain from enhancing the LPI practices of Challenge the Process and Inspire a Shared Vision.

  14. Clinical supervision for nurses in administrative and leadership positions: a systematic literature review of the studies focusing on administrative clinical supervision.

    PubMed

    Sirola-Karvinen, Pirjo; Hyrkäs, Kristiina

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to describe administrative clinical supervision from the nursing leaders', directors' and administrators' perspective. Administrative clinical supervision is a timely and important topic as organizational structures in health care and nursing leadership are changing in addition to the increasing number of complex challenges present in health care. The material in this review was drawn from national and international databases including doctoral dissertations, distinguished thesis and peer-reviewed articles. The material was analysed by means of content analysis. The theoretical framework for the analysis was based on the three main functions of clinical supervision: administrative, educational and supportive. The findings demonstrated that the experiences of the administrative clinical supervision and its supportiveness were varying. The intervention was seen to provide versatility of learning experiences and support in challenging work experiences. Administrative clinical supervision effects and assures the quality of care. The effects as a means of development were explained through its resemblance to a leading specialist community. The findings support earlier perceptions concerning the importance and significance of administrative clinical supervision for nursing managers and administrators. However, more research is needed to develop administrative clinical supervision and to increase understanding of theoretical assumptions and relationships of the concepts on the background.

  15. Effective Leadership Development in Higher Education: Individual and Group Level Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Susanne; Nazlic, Tanja; Weisweiler, Silke; Pawlowska, Beata; Peus, Claudia; Frey, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Research in commercial organizations has provided a multitude of examples on how leadership development can effectively foster employees' performance and work-related attitudes such as commitment or satisfaction. In contrast, to date systematic leadership development is largely lacking for employees in higher education. However, we suggest that…

  16. e-Leadership of School Principals: Increasing School Effectiveness by a School Data Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Ina; Presser, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, school management systems have become an important tool for effective e-leadership and data-based decision making. School management systems emphasize information flow and e-communication between teachers, students and parents. This study examines e-leadership by secondary-school principals through the Mashov school management…

  17. The Relationship between Principal Leadership Effectiveness and School Performance in South Carolina High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lempesis, Costa

    2009-01-01

    A critical component for successful schools is effective leadership. In the 1980's the concept of leadership emerged and the rules changed for school principals (Lashway, 2002). Previously, administrators were primarily evaluated based upon their abilities in managing school facilities and operations efficiently. Academics became the new focus.…

  18. The Effects of Leadership Training and Experience: A Contingency Model Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedler, Fred E.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes recent studies based on the contingency model of leadership effectiveness, which suggest why research has failed to show that leadership training and experience increase organizational performance. The contingency model postulated that group performance depends on the match between situational favorableness, i.e., the leader's control…

  19. Principal Leadership and School Capacity Effects on Teacher Learning in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lijuan; Hallinger, Philip; Ko, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Over the past decade, studies of school leadership effects have increasingly aimed at identifying and validating the paths through which principal leadership impacts key teaching and learning processes in schools. A recent meta-analysis by Robinson and colleagues identified principal practices that shape teacher professional development…

  20. An Examination of the Leadership Practices of Effective Rural Superintendents: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forner, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This research examined the leadership practices of rural superintendents who have led their districts to significant improvement in student academic achievement. The overall research goal was to examine how Waters' and Marzano's six correlates of effective superintendent leadership practice have been applied by school leaders who have successfully…

  1. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Effectiveness among Sponsored Research Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ventez Derrell

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of emotional intelligence, as perceived by senior level university sponsored research administration professionals and their perceived leadership effectiveness, as measured by the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory and the Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) for Self.…

  2. The Relationship between Principal Leadership Effectiveness and School Performance in South Carolina High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lempesis, Costa

    2009-01-01

    A critical component for successful schools is effective leadership. In the 1980's the concept of leadership emerged and the rules changed for school principals (Lashway, 2002). Previously, administrators were primarily evaluated based upon their abilities in managing school facilities and operations efficiently. Academics became the new focus.…

  3. Attachment Style, Leadership Behavior, and Perceptions of Leader Effectiveness in Academic Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Rehema; Mohr, David; Ross, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The quality of organizational leadership can have a significant impact on organizational success and employee well-being. Some research has shown that leaders with secure attachment styles are more effective leaders, but the connection between different attachment styles and different leadership styles is unclear. Relationships between attachment…

  4. Democratic Leadership by Managing Meetings for Effective Group Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mary; Forest, Robert

    Instrumental to successful democratic leadership is the use of committees to solve management problems. In democratic leadership, a leader encourages participation and uses a guidance approach to direct a group toward consensus. This document offers leaders guidelines in effective democratic management of meetings. The authors first discuss the…

  5. Effectively Using Discussion Boards to Engage Students in Introductory Leadership Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah N.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of online asynchronous discussion boards as a valuable tool for connecting students to leadership concepts, theories, and models in introductory leadership survey courses. Recommendations are given for designing effective discussion boards that engage students and enhance their learning. Student outcomes include…

  6. e-Leadership of School Principals: Increasing School Effectiveness by a School Data Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Ina; Presser, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, school management systems have become an important tool for effective e-leadership and data-based decision making. School management systems emphasize information flow and e-communication between teachers, students and parents. This study examines e-leadership by secondary-school principals through the Mashov school management…

  7. The effectiveness of a four-hour challenge course on leadership efficacy and work efficacy

    Treesearch

    Theresa Odello; Eddie Hill; Edwin Gomez

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the effects of participation in a 4-hour challenge course on leadership efficacy and work efficacy of college students. The findings of this research indicate that both leadership and work efficacy increased significantly after participation in a challenge course and that increased levels of the participants' self-efficacy remained 6 weeks...

  8. Effects of leadership and span of control on nurses' job satisfaction and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Amy Sanchez; Doran, Diane; Evans, Martin; Hall, Linda McGillis; Pringle, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    Hospital restructuring has resulted in nurse managers' having direct responsibility for a greatly expanded number of units and staff. However, very little research has examined the impact of these larger spans of control on nurse and patient outcomes. This study examined the relationships between leadership style, span of control, nurses' job satisfaction and patient satisfaction, as well as the moderating effect of span of control on the relationship between leadership style and the two outcomes. The study was conducted at seven teaching and community hospitals with a sample of 51 units, 41 nurse managers, 717 nurses and 680 patients. Data analyses included multiple regression and hierarchical linear modelling. The study findings provided support for the theoretical relationships among leadership style, span of control, nurse job satisfaction and patient satisfaction. In addition, the results showed that higher spans of control decreased the positive effects of transformational and transactional leadership styles on job satisfaction and patient satisfaction, and increased the negative effects of management by exception and laissez-faire leadership styles on job satisfaction. Leadership matters, and certain leadership styles, particularly transformational, are better than others. Span of control also matters: the wider the span, the lower the nurses' job satisfaction and patient satisfaction. However, as spans of control increase in size, no leadership style, even transformational, can overcome the negative effects.

  9. Leadership Behaviour and Effectiveness of Academic Program Directors in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilkinas, Tricia; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on leadership behaviour and effectiveness of university academic program directors who have responsibility for managing a program or course of study. The leadership capabilities were assessed using the Integrated Competing Values Framework as its theoretical foundation. Data from 90 academic program directors and 710…

  10. The Effects of Servant Leadership Behaviours of School Principals on Teachers' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerit, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the effects of servant leadership behaviours of primary school principals on teacher job satisfaction. The population of this study is 29 primary schools in Duzce, Turkey. Data were collected from 595 teachers working in primary schools in Duzce province of Turkey. Servant leadership behaviours of principals were determined…

  11. Attachment Style, Leadership Behavior, and Perceptions of Leader Effectiveness in Academic Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Rehema; Mohr, David; Ross, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The quality of organizational leadership can have a significant impact on organizational success and employee well-being. Some research has shown that leaders with secure attachment styles are more effective leaders, but the connection between different attachment styles and different leadership styles is unclear. Relationships between attachment…

  12. Principal Leadership and School Capacity Effects on Teacher Learning in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lijuan; Hallinger, Philip; Ko, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Over the past decade, studies of school leadership effects have increasingly aimed at identifying and validating the paths through which principal leadership impacts key teaching and learning processes in schools. A recent meta-analysis by Robinson and colleagues identified principal practices that shape teacher professional development…

  13. Democratic Leadership by Managing Meetings for Effective Group Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mary; Forest, Robert

    Instrumental to successful democratic leadership is the use of committees to solve management problems. In democratic leadership, a leader encourages participation and uses a guidance approach to direct a group toward consensus. This document offers leaders guidelines in effective democratic management of meetings. The authors first discuss the…

  14. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Effectiveness among Sponsored Research Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ventez Derrell

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of emotional intelligence, as perceived by senior level university sponsored research administration professionals and their perceived leadership effectiveness, as measured by the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory and the Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) for Self.…

  15. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  16. The Effectiveness of Student Leadership Development Programs at a Midwestern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Higher education student leadership development programs have grown exponentially since the 1990's. Over this time, research has indicated that student leadership development programs are beneficial; however, the research on what makes these programs effective has not kept pace. The subjects of this study included students enrolled in three…

  17. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  18. Understanding the Effects of Leadership Development on the Creation of Organizational Culture Change: A Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Keith W.; Goppelt, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Many leadership development programs are intended to improve individual leaders' skills and abilities to perform. Methods for measuring the effect of such programs range from simple metacognitive self-report surveys to 360-degree feedback, to instrumentation of psychological phenomena. However, the outcomes of some leadership development programs…

  19. The Effects of Systematic Human Relations Training on Leadership Roles in Extended Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisson, P. Joe; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Thirty graduate students were used to test the hypothesis that group members functioning at the highest levels in interpersonal relationship skills would fill leadership roles. This hypothesis was confirmed. It was also demonstrated that Carkhuff's Systematic Human Relations Training can be an effective vehicle for such leadership training.…

  20. An Examination of the Leadership Practices of Effective Rural Superintendents: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forner, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This research examined the leadership practices of rural superintendents who have led their districts to significant improvement in student academic achievement. The overall research goal was to examine how Waters' and Marzano's six correlates of effective superintendent leadership practice have been applied by school leaders who have successfully…

  1. The Effects of Different Leadership Styles on Group Performance: A Field Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Anthony Joseph, III

    This study tested Fiedler's contingency model of leadership effectiveness on 86 nursing students in a large midwestern hospital. Fourteen individuals representing the task oriented and relationship-oriented leadership styles and two levels of sociometric status were randomly designated as leaders for small groups. The groups worked on five…

  2. Differences between clinical specialist and advanced practitioner clinical practice, leadership, and research roles, responsibilities, and perceived outcomes (the SCAPE study).

    PubMed

    Begley, Cecily; Elliott, Naomi; Lalor, Joan; Coyne, Imelda; Higgins, Agnes; Comiskey, Catherine M

    2013-06-01

    To report a study designed comparing the roles, responsibilities, and perceived outcomes of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Clinical Midwife Specialists, and Advanced Nurse Practitioners in Ireland. A clinical career pathway that encompasses progression from staff nurse or midwife through clinical specialist to advanced practitioner level was introduced in Ireland in 2000. Such roles are common internationally, but little evaluation has been conducted and few comparisons have been made between roles. A mixed-method case-study design was used. Following Research Ethics Committee Approval, data were collected in 2009-2010, using non-participant observation (92 hours) of 23 Clinical Specialists and Advanced Practitioners, interviews with 21 clinicians and 13 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery. A survey was completed by 154 service-users. A clear difference was seen between Clinical Specialist and Advanced Practitioners, with advanced practice roles providing improved service delivery, greater clinical and professional leadership, increased research, and a clear governance and accreditation structure. Clinical Midwife Specialists were rated at a similar level to Advanced Nurse Practitioners for certain aspects and rated more highly for 'continuity of care and carer'. Advanced Practitioners do give a higher level of care, particularly at a strategic level. Existing Clinical Specialists should therefore be encouraged to develop their skills and education to achieve advanced practice level and more specialist and advanced practice posts should be instituted. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Developing a Leadership Brand: The Heart of Effective School Leadership in Turbulent Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Stephen H.; Leon, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Faced with scarce resources and high expectations, school principals must increasingly rely upon the power of persuasion to promote ongoing school improvement. We maintain that the development of a vibrant and tangible leadership brand constructed upon a principal's core values and noble character can motivate stakeholders and stimulate school…

  4. A Solution-Focused Leadership Model: Examining Perceptions of Effective Counselor Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froeschle, Janet G.; Nix, Susan

    2009-01-01

    As school leaders, counselors are in a unique position to form collaborative partnerships with principals and faculty while utilizing techniques that improve morale, school climate, and student development. In this qualitative study, school counselors, teachers, and principals were asked to reflect on counseling leadership styles perceived as…

  5. A Qualitative Analysis of Distributed Leadership and Teacher Perspective of Principal Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lizotte, Jane O'Connor

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, expectations for schools have increased to the point where they are now expected to ensure that "all" students are learning at high levels. This is a daunting, complex, and ambitious aspiration that requires leadership beyond that provided by the principal. The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyze teachers'…

  6. Leadership Practices of Effective Rural Superintendents: Connections to Waters and Marzano's Leadership Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forner, Mark; Bierlein-Palmer, Louann; Reeves, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the leadership practices of seven rural superintendents, selected via a sampling strategy which identified disadvantaged rural districts that had experienced marked increased in test scores during the superintendent's tenure. Researchers examined how the practices of these superintendents were linked to Waters and Marzano's…

  7. The relationship between hospital managers' leadership style and effectiveness with passing managerial training courses

    PubMed Central

    Saleh Ardestani, Abbas; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Abtahi, Seyyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership that rises from managerial training courses is highly constructive in managing hospitals more effectively. This study aims at investigating the relationship between leadership effectiveness with providing management training courses for hospital managers. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on top and middle managers of 16 hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences. As a sample, 96 participants were selected through census method. Data were collected using leadership effectiveness and style questionnaire, whose validity and reliability were certified in previous studies. Pearson correlation coefficient and linear regressions were used for data analysis. Results: Leadership effectiveness score was estimated to be 4.36, showing a suitable status for managers' leadership effectiveness compared to the set criteria. No significant difference was found between leadership effectiveness and styles among managers who had passed the training courses with those who had not (p>0.05). Conclusion: Passing managerial training courses may have no significant effect on managers' leadership effectiveness, but there may be some other variables which should be meticulously studied. PMID:28491840

  8. The relationship between hospital managers' leadership style and effectiveness with passing managerial training courses.

    PubMed

    Saleh Ardestani, Abbas; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Abtahi, Seyyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership that rises from managerial training courses is highly constructive in managing hospitals more effectively. This study aims at investigating the relationship between leadership effectiveness with providing management training courses for hospital managers. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on top and middle managers of 16 hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences. As a sample, 96 participants were selected through census method. Data were collected using leadership effectiveness and style questionnaire, whose validity and reliability were certified in previous studies. Pearson correlation coefficient and linear regressions were used for data analysis. Results: Leadership effectiveness score was estimated to be 4.36, showing a suitable status for managers' leadership effectiveness compared to the set criteria. No significant difference was found between leadership effectiveness and styles among managers who had passed the training courses with those who had not (p>0.05). Conclusion: Passing managerial training courses may have no significant effect on managers' leadership effectiveness, but there may be some other variables which should be meticulously studied.

  9. The Effect of a Strengths-Oriented Approach to Leadership Development on the Psychological Capital and Authentic Leadership Capacities of Leaders in Faith-Based Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Academic leaders in the 21st century are required to be both organizationally competent and intentionally collaborative with those they lead to be effective in a world of disruption, change, and complexity. Two current leadership constructs particularly relevant for meeting these needs are the focus of this study: "Authentic Leadership,"…

  10. Cultivating Engaged Leadership Through a Learning Collaborative: Lessons From Primary Care Renewal in Oregon Safety Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Carmit K.; Schneider, Jennifer; Firemark, Alison; Davis, James; Spofford, Mark

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to explore how learning collaboratives cultivate leadership skills that are essential for implementing patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). METHODS We conducted an ethnographic evaluation of a payor-incentivized PCMH implementation in Oregon safety net clinics, known as Primary Care Renewal. Analyses primarily drew on in-depth interviews with organizational leaders who were involved in the initiative. We solicited perspectives on the history, barriers, facilitators, and other noteworthy factors related to the implementation of PCMH. We reviewed and summarized transcripts and created and applied a coding dictionary to identify emergent leadership themes. We reviewed field notes from clinic site visits and observations of learning collaborative activities for additional information on the role of engaged leadership. RESULTS Interview data suggested that organizations followed a similar, sequential process of Primary Care Renewal implementation having 2 phases—inspiration and implementation—and that leaders needed and learned different leadership skills in each phase. Leaders reported that collaborative learning opportunities were critical for developing engaged leadership skills during the inspiration phase of transformation. Facilitative and modeling aspects of engaged leadership were most important for codesigning a vision and plan for change. Adaptive leadership skills became more important during the implementation phase, when specific operational and management skills were needed to foster standardization and spread of the Primary Care Renewal initiative throughout participating clinics. CONCLUSIONS The PCMH has received much attention as a way to reorganize and potentially improve primary care. Documenting steps and stages for cultivating leaders with the vision and skills to transform their organizations into PCMHs may offer a useful roadmap to other organizations considering a similar transformation. PMID:23690384

  11. Cultivating engaged leadership through a learning collaborative: lessons from primary care renewal in Oregon safety net clinics.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Carmit K; Schneider, Jennifer; Firemark, Alison; Davis, James; Spofford, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how learning collaboratives cultivate leadership skills that are essential for implementing patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). We conducted an ethnographic evaluation of a payor-incentivized PCMH implementation in Oregon safety net clinics, known as Primary Care Renewal. Analyses primarily drew on in-depth interviews with organizational leaders who were involved in the initiative. We solicited perspectives on the history, barriers, facilitators, and other noteworthy factors related to the implementation of PCMH. We reviewed and summarized transcripts and created and applied a coding dictionary to identify emergent leadership themes. We reviewed field notes from clinic site visits and observations of learning collaborative activities for additional information on the role of engaged leadership. Interview data suggested that organizations followed a similar, sequential process of Primary Care Renewal implementation having 2 phases-inspiration and implementation-and that leaders needed and learned different leadership skills in each phase. Leaders reported that collaborative learning opportunities were critical for developing engaged leadership skills during the inspiration phase of transformation. Facilitative and modeling aspects of engaged leadership were most important for codesigning a vision and plan for change. Adaptive leadership skills became more important during the implementation phase, when specific operational and management skills were needed to foster standardization and spread of the Primary Care Renewal initiative throughout participating clinics. The PCMH has received much attention as a way to reorganize and potentially improve primary care. Documenting steps and stages for cultivating leaders with the vision and skills to transform their organizations into PCMHs may offer a useful roadmap to other organizations considering a similar transformation.

  12. Is perceived athlete leadership quality related to team effectiveness? A comparison of three professional sports teams.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Katrien; Haslam, S Alexander; Mallett, Clifford J; Steffens, Niklas K; Peters, Kim; Boen, Filip

    2017-08-01

    Researchers have argued that leadership is one of the most important determinants of team effectiveness. The present study examined the extent to which the perceived quality of athlete leadership was related to the effectiveness of elite sports teams. Three professional football teams (N=135) participated in our study during the preparation phase for the Australian 2016 season. Players and coaching staff were asked to assess players' leadership quality in four leadership roles (as task, motivational, social, and external leader) via an online survey. The leadership quality in each of these roles was then calculated in a social network analysis by averaging the indegree centralities of the three best leaders in that particular role. Participants also rated their team's performance and its functioning on multiple indicators. As hypothesized, the team with the highest-quality athlete leadership on each of the four leadership roles excelled in all indicators of team effectiveness. More specifically, athletes in this team had a stronger shared sense of the team's purpose, they were more highly committed to realizing the team's goals, and they had a greater confidence in their team's abilities than athletes in the other teams. Moreover, this team demonstrated a higher task-involving and a lower ego-involving climate, and excelled on all measures of performance. High-quality athlete leadership is positively related to team effectiveness. Given the importance of high-quality athlete leadership, the study highlights the need for well-designed empirically-based leadership development programs. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. School Technology Leadership: An Empirical Investigation of Prevalence and Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ronald E.; Dexter, Sara

    2005-01-01

    The general question addressed is what technology leadership attributes make what kind of difference in the success of various technology-related programs. First, this article has integrated the prescriptive literature on technology leadership with the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators (NETS-A) and then has…

  14. Effective Leadership in Superior-Subordinate Dyads: Theory and Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes and experimentally demonstrates the main tenets of an operant theory of leadership. Leadership is characterized in the current paper as involving problem solving operant behavior (Cerutti, 1989; Skinner, 1969) in a social context (Skinner, 1953). The theory was assessed under two experimental analogs modeled from generic…

  15. Designing and Evaluating Library Leadership Programs: Improving Performance and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romaniuk, Mary-Jo; Haycock, Ken

    2011-01-01

    It has become accepted wisdom that there is a shortage of leaders in the library profession. A number of leader and leadership development programs have emerged in Australia, Canada and the United States that attract interested participants, yet what is the core purpose of these programs? Do they work? Review of leadership programs reveals that…

  16. Effective Leadership in Superior-Subordinate Dyads: Theory and Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes and experimentally demonstrates the main tenets of an operant theory of leadership. Leadership is characterized in the current paper as involving problem solving operant behavior (Cerutti, 1989; Skinner, 1969) in a social context (Skinner, 1953). The theory was assessed under two experimental analogs modeled from generic…

  17. The Effects of Integrated Transformational Leadership on Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, John Eric; Bourgeois, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Greater understanding about how variables mediate the relationship between leadership and achievement is essential to the success of reform efforts that hold leaders accountable for student learning. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of integrated transformational leadership including three important school mediators.…

  18. The Effects of Integrated Transformational Leadership on Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boberg, John Eric; Bourgeois, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Greater understanding about how variables mediate the relationship between leadership and achievement is essential to the success of reform efforts that hold leaders accountable for student learning. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of integrated transformational leadership including three important school mediators.…

  19. The Effectiveness of the Ohio School Leadership Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denecker, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Superintendents are the leaders of school districts across the nation, but very few states offer any type of formal leadership development once a person attains the superintendent position. During the 2014-2015 school year, 28 superintendents across the state of Ohio were chosen to participate in the Ohio School Leadership Institute (OSLI), which…

  20. Promoting Effective Program Leadership in Psychology: A Benchmarking Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halonen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Although scholars have scrutinized many aspects of academic life in psychology, the topic of leadership for psychology programs has remained elusive. This article describes the importance of high-quality leadership in the development of thriving psychology programs. The author offers a strategy for evaluating leaders to help provide developmental…

  1. Promoting Effective Program Leadership in Psychology: A Benchmarking Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halonen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Although scholars have scrutinized many aspects of academic life in psychology, the topic of leadership for psychology programs has remained elusive. This article describes the importance of high-quality leadership in the development of thriving psychology programs. The author offers a strategy for evaluating leaders to help provide developmental…

  2. Role-Taking Abilities of Nursing Education Administrators and Their Perceived Leadership Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansen, Thom J.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between role-taking abilities of nursing education administrators (n=30) and their perceived leadership effectiveness as rated by their faculty (n=176) was studied. Organization characteristics (formalization, centralization, job satisfaction) affected perceptions of effectiveness. (JOW)

  3. Character and Effective Leadership of the Knowledge Worker

    SciTech Connect

    Khoury, Anne E.

    2005-04-20

    Ulrich in the forward to the Zenger and Folkman (2002) book, ''The Extraordinary Leader'', wrote about the importance of character in leadership stating, ''Everything about great leaders radiates from character. Character improves the probability of exhibiting strong interpersonal skill. Some of this perceived character is innate . . . but more is driven by the leader's self-awareness and interactions with others'' (p. ix). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leadership effectiveness and character using leader-managers of knowledge workers as the subject sample. Findings indicated that character, particularly those factors associated with honesty, setting the example, and valuing and strengthening others, were what set the most effective leader-managers apart from their peers. Technical competence and self-efficacy were found to be common characteristics of the study sample as was a drive for results. Who a leader-manager is, his/her substance, was found in this study to differentiate the ''best'' leader-managers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. By their character, leader-managers establish the environment in which knowledge workers contribute and grow. As found by Pfeiffer (2000), Leaders of companies that experience smaller gaps between what they know and what they do (to turn knowledge into action), understand that their most important task is not necessarily to make strategic decisions, or, for that matter any decisions at all. Their task is to help build systems of practice that produce a more reliable transformation of knowledge into action. Leaders create environments, reinforce norms, and help set expectations through what they do. (p. 261) In other words, as confirmed by this research study, their task is to model the way. Study results also confirmed Ulrich's (1996) supposition that to create the ''air'' in which employees work, leaders have the personal characteristics that engender trust and commitment. In

  4. Leadership Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sferra, Bobbie A.; Paddock, Susan C.

    This booklet describes various theoretical aspects of leadership, including the proper exercise of authority, effective delegation, goal setting, exercise of control, assignment of responsibility, performance evaluation, and group process facilitation. It begins by describing the evolution of general theories of leadership from historic concepts…

  5. The Effects of Leadership Style on School Culture and Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Kristal Carey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between principal leadership style and school culture and to determine what effect both factors have on teacher effectiveness. This study was based on the perceptions of teachers and principals in Title I elementary schools (Grades 1-5), with high ESL populations in 10 schools within a West…

  6. The Effects of Leadership Style on School Culture and Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Kristal Carey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between principal leadership style and school culture and to determine what effect both factors have on teacher effectiveness. This study was based on the perceptions of teachers and principals in Title I elementary schools (Grades 1-5), with high ESL populations in 10 schools within a West…

  7. The effects of facial adiposity on attractiveness and perceived leadership ability.

    PubMed

    Re, Daniel E; Perrett, David I

    2014-01-01

    Facial attractiveness has a positive influence on electoral success both in experimental paradigms and in the real world. One parameter that influences facial attractiveness and social judgements is facial adiposity (a facial correlate to body mass index, BMI). Overweight people have high facial adiposity and are perceived to be less attractive and lower in leadership ability. Here, we used an interactive design in order to assess whether the most attractive level of facial adiposity is also perceived as most leader-like. We found that participants reduced facial adiposity more to maximize attractiveness than to maximize perceived leadership ability. These results indicate that facial appearance impacts leadership judgements beyond the effects of attractiveness. We suggest that the disparity between optimal facial adiposity in attractiveness and leadership judgements stems from social trends that have produced thin ideals for attractiveness, while leadership judgements are associated with perception of physical dominance.

  8. The effects of transformational and change leadership on employees' commitment to a change: a multilevel study.

    PubMed

    Herold, David M; Fedor, Donald B; Caldwell, Steven; Liu, Yi

    2008-03-01

    The effects of transformational leadership on the outcomes of specific change initiatives are not well understood. Conversely, organizational change studies have examined leader behaviors during specific change implementations yet have failed to link these to broader leadership theories. In this study, the authors investigate the relationship between transformational and change leadership and followers' commitment to a particular change initiative as a function of the personal impact of the changes. Transformational leadership was found to be more strongly related to followers' change commitment than change-specific leadership practices, especially when the change had significant personal impact. For leaders who were not viewed as transformational, good change-management practices were found to be associated with higher levels of change commitment.

  9. The Effects of Elementary School Principals' Leadership Styles and the Preferred Managerial Styles of Teachers on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pichon, Christopher, Sr.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify principal leadership styles and teacher preferred principal leadership styles, as well as to examine the independent and combined effects of these variables on the TAKS Mathematics achievement scores of elementary students. School leadership affects every aspect of an institution. Studies reveal that the…

  10. Professional Development of Principals: An Alignment Study of the Master Principal Institute's Curriculum with Effective Leadership Practices for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Brenda J.

    2010-01-01

    The two-fold purpose of the study was to determine whether or not the Arkansas Leadership Academy's Master Principal Institute's (MPI) five curriculum content standards were aligned with the literature of effective educational leadership practices, and to ascertain if there were significant relationships among the principals' leadership practices…

  11. The Effects of Elementary School Principals' Leadership Styles and the Preferred Managerial Styles of Teachers on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pichon, Christopher, Sr.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify principal leadership styles and teacher preferred principal leadership styles, as well as to examine the independent and combined effects of these variables on the TAKS Mathematics achievement scores of elementary students. School leadership affects every aspect of an institution. Studies reveal that the…

  12. Professional Development of Principals: An Alignment Study of the Master Principal Institute's Curriculum with Effective Leadership Practices for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Brenda J.

    2010-01-01

    The two-fold purpose of the study was to determine whether or not the Arkansas Leadership Academy's Master Principal Institute's (MPI) five curriculum content standards were aligned with the literature of effective educational leadership practices, and to ascertain if there were significant relationships among the principals' leadership practices…

  13. Effective Leadership of Surgical Teams: A Mixed Methods Study of Surgeon Behaviors and Functions.

    PubMed

    Stone, Juliana L; Aveling, Emma-Louise; Frean, Molly; Shields, Morgan C; Wright, Cameron; Gino, Francesca; Sundt, Thoralf M; Singer, Sara J

    2017-08-01

    The importance of effective team leadership for achieving surgical excellence is widely accepted, but we understand less about the behaviors that achieve this goal. We studied cardiac surgical teams to identify leadership behaviors that best support surgical teamwork. We observed, surveyed, and interviewed cardiac surgical teams, including 7 surgeons and 116 team members, from September 2013 to April 2015. We documented 1,926 surgeon/team member interactions during 22 cases, coded them by behavior type and valence (ie, positive/negative/neutral), and characterized them by leadership function (conductor, elucidator, delegator, engagement facilitator, tone setter, being human, and safe space maker) to create a novel framework of surgical leadership derived from direct observation. We surveyed nonsurgeon team members about their perceptions of individual surgeon's leadership effectiveness on a 7-point Likert scale and correlated survey measures with individual surgeon profiles created by calculating percentage of behavior types, leader functions, and valence. Surgeon leadership was rated by nonsurgeons from 4.2 to 6.2 (mean, 5.4). Among the 33 types of behaviors observed, most interactions constituted elucidating (24%) and tone setting (20%). Overall, 66% of interactions (range, 43%-84%) were positive and 11% (range, 1%-45%) were negative. The percentage of positive and negative behaviors correlated strongly (r = 0.85 for positive and r = 0.75 for negative, p < 0.05) with nonsurgeon evaluations of leadership. Facilitating engagement related most positively (r = 0.80; p = 0.03), and negative forms of elucidating, ie, criticism, related most negatively (r = -0.81; p = 0.03). We identified 7 surgeon leadership functions and related behaviors that impact perceptions of leadership. These observations suggest actionable opportunities to improve team leadership behavior. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Leadership and Learning: A Measurement-Based Approach for Analyzing School Effectiveness and Developing Effective School Leaders. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krug, Samuel E.

    Attending to the questions of how school leadership influences learning and achievement and what effective school leaders do, this document describes a measurement-based approach for studying and developing effective school leadership. The document details the conception, refinement, and psychometric properties of the Instructional Leadership…

  15. Leadership principles for developing a statewide public health and clinical laboratory system.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Steven A; Brokopp, Charles D; Size, Tim

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation established the national Laboratory Response Network (LRN) for bioterrorism readiness. A more broad application of the LRN is the National Laboratory System (NLS), an effort to promote the 10 Essential Public Health Services and the Core Functions and Capabilities of State Public Health Laboratories (hereafter, Core Functions). State public health laboratories (PHLs) are responsible for leading the development of both the LRN and the NLS in their jurisdictions. Based on the experience of creating a laboratory network in Wisconsin, leadership principles are provided for developing and strengthening statewide laboratory networks of PHLs and clinical laboratories, which can also include point-of-care testing sites. Each state PHL, in the context of these Core Functions and leadership principles, sets its priorities, budgets, and strategic plans. For a limited investment of personnel and funds that will yield a large benefit to public health, a robust state laboratory system can be established.

  16. Effects of RN Age and Experience on Transformational Leadership Practices.

    PubMed

    Herman, Susan; Gish, Mary; Rosenblum, Ruth; Herman, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This study reported the evolution of transformational leadership (TL) practices and behaviors across years of age, management experience, and professional nursing practice within a professional nursing leadership organization. Recent studies of CNO TL found valuations peak near age 60 years. This study reported on a wider range of management positions, correlating years of RN practice and management experience and age to TL metrics. This study used Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practices Inventory-Self-Assessment (LPI-S) to survey a nursing leadership organization, the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL). Anonymous responses were analyzed to identify leadership trends in age and years of professional service. On average, LPI-S metrics of leadership skills advance through years of management, RN experience, and age. The TL scores are statistically higher in most LPI-S categories for those with more than 30 years of RN or management experience. Decade-averaged LPI-S TL metrics in the ACNL survey evolve linearly throughout age before peaking in the decade from age 60 to 69 years. A similar evolution of TL metrics is seen in decades of either years of management experience or years of RN experience. Transformational leadership increased with nursing maturity particularly for LPI-S categories of "inspire a shared vision," "challenge the process," and "enable others to act." In the ACNL population studied, decade-averaged leadership metrics advanced. Leadership evolution with age in the broader RN population peaked in age bracket 60 to 69 years. The LPI-S averages declined when older than 70 years, coinciding with a shift from full-time work toward retirement and part-time employment.

  17. The importance of being ethical. Essential skills for effective leadership.

    PubMed

    Tamborini-Martin, S; Hanley, K V

    1989-06-01

    The healthcare industry today is in transition from a service industry subject to public regulation to one of self-regulation. The impact of deregulation is severe. Traditional values are being tested; new values are emerging. Can healthcare providers, particularly Catholic providers with their rich history and mission, afford to hang on to traditional values? How do administrators remain competent and compassionate at the same time? Perhaps the time is right to institute corporate ethics to serve as a lifeline for healthcare leaders much in the same way that clinical ethics has served clinicians. The mix of values to which a corporation is committed forms a foundation for practicing corporate ethics. For instance, a corporation can develop means for information gathering and ethical reflection that can shape policy and decisions. Six practical principles for exercising corporate ethics are (1) the chief executive officer is committed to corporate ethics as a management method, (2) the corporation's mission and values are continuously scrutinized to see that they are understood and owned, (3) those responsible for governance and management develop structures and leadership styles consistent with the corporation's value system, (4) the policy-making and decision-making processes include specific ways to ensure that the corporation carefully weighs values as part of business decisions, (5) the corporation evaluates and rewards all employees according to value-driven performance standards, and (6) corporate policy and performance are evaluated annually to determine where the corporation is consistent with its mission and values and where it needs improvement.

  18. Effect of Leadership Styles on Job Satisfaction Among Critical Care Nurses in Aseer, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    M Alshahrani, Fawaz Musaed; Baig, Lubna A

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of transformational and transactional leadership styles of head nurses on the job satisfaction of staff nurses in critical care units (CCU) of a tertiary care hospital. Cross-sectional study. Critical care units at Aseer Central Hospital (ACH), Abha, Saudi Arabia, from July to December 2012. The multifactor leadership questionnaire (MLQ-5X) and job satisfaction survey with demographics were used. Staff nurses (N=89) reporting to 8 nurse leaders responded as per the requirements of MLQ-5X and also filled the job satisfaction survey. ANOVA, correlation coefficient (Pearson r) and multiple linear regression were used for analyses. All nurse leaders demonstrated a combination of transactional (TA) and transformational (TF) style of leadership. Nurses working under leaders with a TF style demonstrated significantly (p < 0.05) higher job satisfaction. The operating conditions were related negatively to the style of leadership. Pay, fringe benefits and nature of work were not related to the style of leadership. The nurses were moderately satisfied with their work and 23% of the variation in nurses' job satisfaction could be explained by the head nurses 6 leadership facets with positive effect of professional support, intellectual motivation, management by correction and their laissez faire style. The study emphasized the importance of TF style of head nurses for increasing staff nurses' job satisfaction. It is suggested that nurse leaders should be trained in TF style of leadership and provided more support and training for effective management of CCU.

  19. Role of Transformational Leadership in Effective Organizational Knowledge Creation Practices: Mediating Effects of Employees' Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Ji Hoon; Kolb, Judith A.; Lee, Ung Hee; Kim, Hye Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Engagement as an area of increasing interest has been discussed in terms of a wide array of organizational policies, practices, and outcomes. This study focuses on a specific aspect of work engagement and its relationship with leadership practices and the outcome of knowledge creation. The mediating effect of employees' work engagement level was…

  20. Role of Transformational Leadership in Effective Organizational Knowledge Creation Practices: Mediating Effects of Employees' Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Ji Hoon; Kolb, Judith A.; Lee, Ung Hee; Kim, Hye Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Engagement as an area of increasing interest has been discussed in terms of a wide array of organizational policies, practices, and outcomes. This study focuses on a specific aspect of work engagement and its relationship with leadership practices and the outcome of knowledge creation. The mediating effect of employees' work engagement level was…

  1. The Effects of Career Broadening on Leadership Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    commander 6.6 11FX USAF Air Demonstration Pilot ( Thunderbirds ) 6.1 21XX Logistics Career Broadening Program 5.1 XXXX Re-Trained into another AFSC 3.9 XXXX...boards in 2004 and 2005, as well as, those officers who competed for selection to in-residence PME programs at the intermediate and senior development...development programs in which leaders will have to develop higher level leadership skills, develop new leadership competencies and refine old competencies

  2. Effective medical leadership in times of emergency: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Hershkovich, Oded; Gilad, David; Zimlichman, Eyal; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2016-01-01

    Leadership, and more specifically medical leadership, is an unmeasured potential that has the power to influence every aspect of a person's professional life and its challenges and is more evident in times of emergency. Medical leadership is receiving increasing recognition especially in discussing actions to be taken in times of stress and emergency. We propose a comprehensive conceptual model that examines the elements that build successful medical leadership, especially during emergency scenarios. The model is based on two sets of medical leadership capabilities and skills, while the first set is more relevant to everyday challenges, the second set represents abilities and characteristics that arise mostly during emergencies. The model gathers together the characteristics and abilities of the medical leader based on our unique personal experiences during conflicts, terror, civilian challenges and numerous humanitarian missions. This article suggests a framework for the foundations on which the medical leader's education should be built and describes our perception of how to establish medical leadership, its unique elements and the processes leading to outstanding performance in times of emergency.

  3. The ripple effect: why promoting female leadership in global health matters

    PubMed Central

    Downs, J. A.; Mathad, J. S.; McNairy, M. L.; Celum, C.; Boutin-Foster, C.; Deschamps, M. M.; Gupta, A.; Hokororo, A.; Katz, I. T.; Konopasek, L.; Nelson, R.; Riviere, C.; Glimcher, L. H.; Fitzgerald, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership positions in global health are greatly skewed toward men; the imbalance is more pronounced in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The under-representation of women in leadership is a threat to gender equality, and also impacts the improvement of women's health outcomes globally. In this perspectives piece, we assert that the promotion and retention of women in global health leadership has a ripple effect that can achieve improvement in global health outcomes. We present pragmatic, actionable solutions to promote and retain female global health leaders in this field. PMID:28123954

  4. The ripple effect: why promoting female leadership in global health matters.

    PubMed

    Downs, J A; Mathad, J S; Reif, L K; McNairy, M L; Celum, C; Boutin-Foster, C; Deschamps, M M; Gupta, A; Hokororo, A; Katz, I T; Konopasek, L; Nelson, R; Riviere, C; Glimcher, L H; Fitzgerald, D W

    2016-12-21

    Leadership positions in global health are greatly skewed toward men; the imbalance is more pronounced in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The under-representation of women in leadership is a threat to gender equality, and also impacts the improvement of women's health outcomes globally. In this perspectives piece, we assert that the promotion and retention of women in global health leadership has a ripple effect that can achieve improvement in global health outcomes. We present pragmatic, actionable solutions to promote and retain female global health leaders in this field.

  5. The effects of individual differences and charismatic leadership on workplace aggression.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Willie; Towler, Annette

    2004-04-01

    This study examined the effects of individual differences variables (trait anger, self-control, negative affectivity, attitudes toward revenge, and attributional style) and charismatic leadership on incidents of workplace aggression in a sample of 213 employees from a wide range of organizations. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that the individual differences variables accounted for 27% of the variance in workplace aggression and that charismatic leadership accounted for an additional 3% after controlling for individual differences. In addition, psychological empowerment partially mediated the relationship between charismatic leadership and workplace aggression.

  6. The effects of leadership and ward factors on job satisfaction in nursing homes: a multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    Havig, Anders K; Skogstad, Anders; Veenstra, Marijke; Romøren, Tor I

    2011-12-01

    To examine (1) the relationships between job satisfaction and task- and relationship-oriented leadership and (2) the direct and moderating effects on job satisfaction of three ward-level factors: workload, use of teams and staff stability. Job satisfaction in nursing homes is vital to meeting the challenges related to recruitment and turnover. Cross-sectional design. A multilevel analysis approach was used to recognise a hierarchal structure of determined factors and to capture variation in job satisfaction at the individual and ward level. A questionnaire was sent to 444 registered nurses, auxiliary nurses and unskilled nursing assistants. Structured interviews were administered to 40 ward managers and 13 directors, and 900 hours of field observations was conducted in 40 nursing home wards throughout Norway. We found a significant relationship between job satisfaction and task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership styles, with a stronger effect for task orientation. The effect of the two leadership styles varied significantly across wards. Furthermore, staff stability had both a significant positive direct effect and a moderating effect on job satisfaction, whereas the two other ward-level predictors yielded no significant contributions. The relatively stronger effect of task-oriented leadership on job satisfaction, particularly in wards with low staff stability, is in contrast to most previous studies and suggests that there may be specific conditions in nursing homes that favour the use of this leadership style. The varying effect of both leadership styles indicates that staff in different nursing home wards could benefit from the use of different leadership styles. The study highlights the importance of using different leadership behaviour and the importance of high staff stability to ensure job satisfaction among nursing home personnel. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Building Leadership among Laboratory-Based and Clinical and Translational Researchers: The University of California, San Francisco Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wides, Cynthia; Mertz, Elizabeth; Lindstaedt, Bill; Brown, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    In 2005 the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) implemented the Scientific Leadership and Management (SLM) course, a 2-day leadership training program to assist laboratory-based postdoctoral scholars in their transition to independent researchers managing their own research programs. In 2011, the course was expanded to clinical and translational junior faculty and fellows. The course enrollment was increased from approximate 100 to 123 participants at the same time. Based on course evaluations, the number and percent of women participants appears to have increased over time from 40% (n = 33) in 2007 to 53% (n = 58) in 2011. Course evaluations also indicated that participants found the course to be relevant and valuable in their transition to academic leadership. This paper describes the background, structure, and content of the SLM and reports on participant evaluations of the course offerings from 2007 through 2011. PMID:24405661

  8. The Effect of Implicit–Explicit Followership Congruence on Benevolent Leadership: Evidence from Chinese Family Firms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Benevolent leadership, a traditional Chinese leadership style generated under the influence of Confucianism, has been under growing discussion since its proposal. However, existing research has focused mainly on the consequences of benevolent leadership, and research probing into its antecedents is scarce. To fill such research gap, the current study aims to explore the effect of the congruence between implicit positive followership prototype (PFP) and explicit positive followership trait (PFT) on benevolent leadership. Polynomial regression combined with the response surface methodology was used to test the hypotheses herein. The results, based on a sample of 241 leader–follower dyads from four Chinese family firms, indicated the following: (1) benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP is congruent with follower PFT than when they are incongruent; (2) in cases of congruence, benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP and follower PFT are both high rather than low; (3) in the case of incongruence, there is no significant difference for the level of benevolent leadership in two scenarios: “low leader PFP – high follower PFT” and “high leader PFP – low follower PFT”. PMID:27375514

  9. The Effect of Implicit-Explicit Followership Congruence on Benevolent Leadership: Evidence from Chinese Family Firms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Benevolent leadership, a traditional Chinese leadership style generated under the influence of Confucianism, has been under growing discussion since its proposal. However, existing research has focused mainly on the consequences of benevolent leadership, and research probing into its antecedents is scarce. To fill such research gap, the current study aims to explore the effect of the congruence between implicit positive followership prototype (PFP) and explicit positive followership trait (PFT) on benevolent leadership. Polynomial regression combined with the response surface methodology was used to test the hypotheses herein. The results, based on a sample of 241 leader-follower dyads from four Chinese family firms, indicated the following: (1) benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP is congruent with follower PFT than when they are incongruent; (2) in cases of congruence, benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP and follower PFT are both high rather than low; (3) in the case of incongruence, there is no significant difference for the level of benevolent leadership in two scenarios: "low leader PFP - high follower PFT" and "high leader PFP - low follower PFT".

  10. Leading multiple teams: average and relative external leadership influences on team empowerment and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Margaret M; Mathieu, John E; Ruddy, Thomas M

    2014-03-01

    External leaders continue to be an important source of influence even when teams are empowered, but it is not always clear how they do so. Extending research on structurally empowered teams, we recognize that teams' external leaders are often responsible for multiple teams. We adopt a multilevel approach to model external leader influences at both the team level and the external leader level of analysis. In doing so, we distinguish the influence of general external leader behaviors (i.e., average external leadership) from those that are directed differently toward the teams that they lead (i.e., relative external leadership). Analysis of data collected from 451 individuals, in 101 teams, reporting to 25 external leaders, revealed that both relative and average external leadership related positively to team empowerment. In turn, team empowerment related positively to team performance and member job satisfaction. However, while the indirect effects were all positive, we found that relative external leadership was not directly related to team performance, and average external leadership evidenced a significant negative direct influence. Additionally, relative external leadership exhibited a significant direct positive influence on member job satisfaction as anticipated, whereas average external leadership did not. These findings attest to the value in distinguishing external leaders' behaviors that are exhibited consistently versus differentially across empowered teams. Implications and future directions for the study and management of external leaders overseeing multiple teams are discussed.

  11. Exploration of transformational and distributed leadership.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Throughout government policy in Scotland, a new emphasis has been placed on clinical leaders as a way to improve quality and restore the public's confidence in health care. This article reports on a study that explored the leadership styles of senior charge nurses and the effects these may have on clinical teams. Findings suggest that, where there is transformational leadership and sharing of leadership roles across teams, staff are more engaged and organisational goals are met. The findings also highlight the need for better communication between senior management and clinical teams to ensure sustainable, good services.

  12. Physiotherapy managers' perceptions of their leadership effectiveness: a multi-frame analysis.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Emer; Walsh, Cathal; Stokes, Emma

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the leadership frames of physiotherapy managers in Ireland. To be effective leaders in today's challenging healthcare environment physiotherapy managers must employ a comprehensive, adaptable and balanced leadership style. This was a purposive, cross-sectional study. Physiotherapy managers were surveyed using the Bolman and Deal Leadership Orientations Instrument. The survey was administered to members of the Chartered Physiotherapists in Management employment group (n=73) of the Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists via email. Forty-five physiotherapy managers responded to the survey to give a response rate of 62%. The human resource frame was the most frequently used (61%) and the political frame was the least (9%). The majority of respondents reported using only one or no frames at all (65%). When asked about their effectiveness as a manager 33% of respondents (n=14) gave themselves the top rating of 5, whereas 19% of respondents (n=8) gave themselves the top rating for their leadership effectiveness. There was a statistically significant trend between the number of leadership frames a physiotherapy manager used and their perceived effectiveness as a manager (TJT=380, z=1.975, p=0.048) and as a leader (TJT=431, z=3.245, p=0.001). The physiotherapy managers' use of the human resource frame demonstrates that they see the building of relationships as key to effective leadership. Development of physiotherapy managers' underused skills through appropriate leadership development training may enhance their leadership skill set and make them more confident as leaders. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-vs.-Teammate Assessment of Leadership Competence: The Effects of Gender, Leadership Self-Efficacy, and Motivation to Lead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosch, David M.; Collier, Daniel A.; Zehr, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    A sample (N = 81) of undergraduates participating in a semester-long team-project engineering course completed assessments of their leadership competence, motivation to lead, and leadership self-efficacy, as well as the leadership competence of their peers who served within their durable teams. Results indicated that peers scored students lower…

  14. New graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skills in novice RNs.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C; Barnett, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine predictors of clinical leadership skill (CLS) for RNs with 24 months of clinical experience or less. New graduate nurse transition programs (NGNTPs) have been proposed as a strategy to increase CLS. CLS is associated with positive patient outcomes. Method used was hierarchical regression modeling to evaluate predictors of CLS among individual characteristics of RNs and characteristics of NGNTPs. Perceived overall quality of an NGNTP was the strongest predictor of CLS (R = 0.041, P < .01). Clinical experience and NGNTP characteristics accounted for 6.9% of the variance in CLS and 12.6% of the variance among RNs with assigned mentors (P < .01). RNs participating in NGNTPs for more than 24 weeks were 21 times more likely to remain employed within the organization when compared with NGNTPs of 12 weeks or less, a significant cost-benefit to the organization. Although perceived overall quality of a NGNTP was the strongest predictor of CLS, much of the variance in CLS remains unexplained.

  15. Dental Students' Perceived Value of Peer-Mentoring Clinical Leadership Experiences.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Rachel A; Hammaker, Daniel J; de Peralta, Tracy L; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2016-03-01

    This pilot study compared second- and fourth-year dental students' perceived values of newly implemented clinical leadership experiences (CLEs) at one U.S. dental school during the 2012-13 academic year. In the CLEs, fourth-year (D4) students mentored second-year (D2) dental students during faculty-supervised patient treatment. The two cohorts' perceived value of the experiences was measured with questionnaires consisting of five-point Likert scale questions and open text responses. Out of a total of 114 D2 and 109 D4 students, 46 D2 students and 35 D4 students participated (response rates of 40.4% and 32.1%, respectively). While responses from both cohorts showed they highly valued the CLEs, the D2s perceived greater value: 4.07 (0.53) v. 3.51 (0.95), p<0.003. Both cohorts reported feeling that D4s were prepared to mentor D2s, that the CLEs had educational benefits, and that the CLEs increased their comfort with peer communication. Theme analysis of open text questions revealed that the respondents perceived the D4s were more accessible than faculty and provided guidance and individual attention; the CLEs increased student comfort; the CLEs reinforced D4 skills, knowledge, and confidence; and the CLEs provided management, leadership, and collaborative work experience. Theme analysis also highlighted student concerns about a lack of program structure. Overall, the majority of both groups valued CLEs in their dental education. Particular advantages they perceived were increased comfort, guidance, and attention. Further program development should address student concerns. These results suggest that similar programs should be considered and/or expanded in other dental schools' curricula.

  16. Effects of coach leadership and coach-athlete relationship on collective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hampson, R; Jowett, S

    2014-04-01

    The study examined the independent and combined effects of coach leadership and coaching relationships on team efficacy. A total of 150 sport performers from football teams across a range of competitive levels completed a multisection self-report instrument to assess their individual perceptions of the level of collective efficacy, the type of coach leadership, and the quality of the coach-athlete relationship. Multiple regression analyses revealed that perceptions of both coach leadership and the coach-athlete relationship predicted variance in team efficacy. Overall, the findings suggest that the quality of coach-athlete relationships added to the prediction of individuals' collective efficacy beyond what was predicted by coaches' behaviors of leadership alone. Limitations and future research directions are discussed.

  17. Development, implementation and evaluation of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a large Australian health care service.

    PubMed

    Misso, Marie L; Ilic, Dragan; Haines, Terry P; Hutchinson, Alison M; East, Christine E; Teede, Helena J

    2016-01-14

    Health professionals need to be integrated more effectively in clinical research to ensure that research addresses clinical needs and provides practical solutions at the coal face of care. In light of limited evidence on how best to achieve this, evaluation of strategies to introduce, adapt and sustain evidence-based practices across different populations and settings is required. This project aims to address this gap through the co-design, development, implementation, evaluation, refinement and ultimately scale-up of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a clinical setting with little to no co-ordinated approach to clinical research engagement and education. The protocol is based on principles of research capacity building and on a six-step framework, which have previously led to successful implementation and long-term sustainability. A mixed methods study design will be used. Methods will include: (1) a review of the literature about strategies that engage health professionals in research through capacity building and/or education in research methods; (2) a review of existing local research education and support elements; (3) a needs assessment in the local clinical setting, including an online cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews; (4) co-design and development of an educational and support program; (5) implementation of the program in the clinical environment; and (6) pre- and post-implementation evaluation and ultimately program scale-up. The evaluation focuses on research activity and knowledge, attitudes and preferences about clinical research, evidence-based practice and leadership and post implementation, about their satisfaction with the program. The investigators will evaluate the feasibility and effect of the program according to capacity building measures and will revise where appropriate prior to scale-up. It is anticipated that this clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building

  18. Regulatory focus and burnout in nurses: The mediating effect of perception of transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Xu, Hang; Liu, Xufeng; Miao, Danmin

    2015-12-01

    This correlation study investigated the relationship between nurses' regulatory focus and burnout, as mediated by their perceptions of transformational leadership, using a cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires. In July-August 2012, data were collected from 378 nurses from three hospitals in Shaanxi Province, China, using self-report questionnaires for measuring the nurses' regulatory focus, their level of burnout and their perception of whether the leadership of their supervisor was transformational. Structural equation modelling and bootstrapping procedures were used to identify the mediating effect of their perceptions of transformational leadership. The results supported our hypothesized model. The type of regulatory focus emerged as a significant predictor of burnout. Having a perception of transformational leadership partially mediated the relationship between regulatory focus and burnout. Having a promotion focus reduced burnout when the participants perceived transformational leadership, whereas having a prevention focus exhibited the opposite pattern. The mediating effect of the perception of transformational leadership suggests that a promotion focus may help diminish burnout, directly and indirectly. Nurse managers must be aware of the role of a regulatory focus and cultivate promotion focus in their followers.

  19. The Assistant Principal: Essentials for Effective School Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, L. David; Weller, Sylvia J.

    The role of assistant principal is one of the least researched and discussed topics in professional journals and books on educational leadership. The ambiguity of the role allows for the ineffective use of this position and makes it a particularly difficult role to fulfill. This book can be used as a guide for practicing assistant principals and…

  20. Leading for Learning: Leadership Practices of Effective Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Do school boards have a role in student achievement? Recent research suggests that they do. This article identifies 12 board of education leadership practices associated with higher levels of student achievement: creating a vision, using data, setting goals, monitoring progress and taking corrective action, creating awareness and urgency, engaging…

  1. Documenting the Effects of Transformational Leadership Behavior on Teacher Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, Kristine A.

    Principals play a unique role in school and student outcomes. This paper presents findings of a study that explored how principals' leadership behaviors influenced teachers' sense of efficacy. Specifically, the paper describes how principals in three middle schools influenced teachers' sense of efficacy and affected instructional and school…

  2. Meeting AYP: Affective or Effective on School Leadership?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genao, Soribel

    2013-01-01

    "The commander of our ship knows that the eyes and ears of the shipmates will provide valuable information; that when combined with the experience and knowledge of leadership will navigate the ship to clear waters and bountiful lands" (Intertech, 2011). This analogy is reflective of the critical issue of meeting AYP (Adequate Yearly…

  3. Classroom Leadership: The Effect of a School Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertesvag, Sigrun K.

    2009-01-01

    Using a cohort longitudinal design, this study examined pupils' perceptions of their teachers' classroom leadership, both before and after implementation of the Respect programme. Pupils in Grades 5-10 (age 11-16) in four Norwegian schools reported their perceptions of their teachers' emotional support, academic support, and monitoring five times…

  4. Changing Organizational Cultures in Libraries through Effective Leadership Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Gisela M.

    This paper begins by discussing the need for strong leadership in libraries to create adaptable organizations and to involve employees in the management process. The attributes of the new library leaders who can reach these goals are then discussed. It is suggested that they must: (1) be excellent communicators of values, goals, and new…

  5. Leading Every Day: 124 Actions for Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaser, Joyce; Mundry, Susan; Stiles, Katherine E.; Loucks-Horsley, Susan

    This book provides leaders and those who aspire to be leaders with information in four areas to help them lead reform efforts in their schools, districts, or other organizations. These areas are leadership, change management, lifelong learning, and group facilitation. There are four sub-books contained within this one document: "Leadership…

  6. Meeting AYP: Affective or Effective on School Leadership?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genao, Soribel

    2013-01-01

    "The commander of our ship knows that the eyes and ears of the shipmates will provide valuable information; that when combined with the experience and knowledge of leadership will navigate the ship to clear waters and bountiful lands" (Intertech, 2011). This analogy is reflective of the critical issue of meeting AYP (Adequate Yearly…

  7. Leadership for Effective Teacher Training Transfer in Kuwaiti Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winokur, Ilene K.; Sperandio, Jill

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a study undertaken to examine the links between leadership practices of a transformational nature and the transfer of teacher training in the public high schools in Kuwait. The participants in the study were teachers who had undergone mandated professional development (PD) aimed at improving teaching…

  8. Leadership for Effective Teacher Training Transfer in Kuwaiti Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winokur, Ilene K.; Sperandio, Jill

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a study undertaken to examine the links between leadership practices of a transformational nature and the transfer of teacher training in the public high schools in Kuwait. The participants in the study were teachers who had undergone mandated professional development (PD) aimed at improving teaching…

  9. Changing Organizational Cultures in Libraries through Effective Leadership Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Gisela M.

    This paper begins by discussing the need for strong leadership in libraries to create adaptable organizations and to involve employees in the management process. The attributes of the new library leaders who can reach these goals are then discussed. It is suggested that they must: (1) be excellent communicators of values, goals, and new…

  10. Principal Leadership Styles and Effectiveness as Perceived by Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utz, Robert T.

    This study provided information concerning existing and ideal leadership styles and assessed the relevancy of the Concern for "Production" and Concern for "People" grid concepts to a more global evaluation of principals. A sample consisted of 115 experienced teachers enrolled in graduate courses at two universities located in…

  11. Classroom Leadership: The Effect of a School Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertesvag, Sigrun K.

    2009-01-01

    Using a cohort longitudinal design, this study examined pupils' perceptions of their teachers' classroom leadership, both before and after implementation of the Respect programme. Pupils in Grades 5-10 (age 11-16) in four Norwegian schools reported their perceptions of their teachers' emotional support, academic support, and monitoring five times…

  12. Leadership and Decision Making for Effective Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipham, James M.

    1983-01-01

    To improve secondary school organization, operation, and outcomes, a research report presents major results from 13 studies of leadership, decision-making, and change conducted by Project on the Administration and Organization for Instruction staff at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in cooperation with over 100 schools. National and statewide…

  13. District Leadership for Effective Principal Evaluation and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Steven M.; Arrigoni, Jessica; Clifford, Matthew; Yoder, Maureen; Milanowski, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Research demonstrating principals' impact on student learning outcomes has fueled the shift from principals as facilities managers to an emphasis on instructional leadership (Hallinger & Heck, 1996; Leithwood, Louis, Anderson, & Wahlstrom, 2004; Marzano, Waters, & McNulty, 2005). Principals are under increasing pressure to carry out…

  14. Leadership styles in nursing.

    PubMed

    Cope, Vicki; Murray, Melanie

    2017-06-21

    Nurses are often asked to think about leadership, particularly in times of rapid change in healthcare, and where questions have been raised about whether leaders and managers have adequate insight into the requirements of care. This article discusses several leadership styles relevant to contemporary healthcare and nursing practice. Nurses who are aware of leadership styles may find this knowledge useful in maintaining a cohesive working environment. Leadership knowledge and skills can be improved through training, where, rather than having to undertake formal leadership roles without adequate preparation, nurses are able to learn, nurture, model and develop effective leadership behaviours, ultimately improving nursing staff retention and enhancing the delivery of safe and effective care.

  15. A study and comparative analysis of effective and ineffective leadership skills of physician and non-physician health care administrators.

    PubMed

    Shipper, F; Pearson, D A; Singer, D

    1998-05-01

    This paper explores and compares, at both micro and macro levels, the leadership skills of effective and ineffective managers in a health care setting. In addition, it compares the leadership skills of physician and non-physician health care administrators at both levels. The results indicate that effective managers have significantly different leadership skill profiles than ineffective managers. Furthermore, effective managers have a more complete set of skills and are not as likely to rely on one type of skills as the ineffective managers. In addition, no substantial evidence was found to support prior assertions that physician administrators would be deficient in leadership skills.

  16. Gender and perceptions of leadership effectiveness: a meta-analysis of contextual moderators.

    PubMed

    Paustian-Underdahl, Samantha C; Walker, Lisa Slattery; Woehr, David J

    2014-11-01

    Despite evidence that men are typically perceived as more appropriate and effective than women in leadership positions, a recent debate has emerged in the popular press and academic literature over the potential existence of a female leadership advantage. This meta-analysis addresses this debate by quantitatively summarizing gender differences in perceptions of leadership effectiveness across 99 independent samples from 95 studies. Results show that when all leadership contexts are considered, men and women do not differ in perceived leadership effectiveness. Yet, when other-ratings only are examined, women are rated as significantly more effective than men. In contrast, when self-ratings only are examined, men rate themselves as significantly more effective than women rate themselves. Additionally, this synthesis examines the influence of contextual moderators developed from role congruity theory (Eagly & Karau, 2002). Our findings help to extend role congruity theory by demonstrating how it can be supplemented based on other theories in the literature, as well as how the theory can be applied to both female and male leaders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Collaboration and Leadership: Are They in Conflict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keohane, Nannerl O.

    1985-01-01

    Good college leadership requires a kind of collaboration, it is argued, and creative collaborative work is the best route towards bold and effective leadership. Defining leadership, leadership models, leadership as problem solving, and leadership as taking a stand are discussed. (MLW)

  18. The core role of the nurse practitioner: practice, professionalism and clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Carryer, Jenny; Gardner, Glenn; Dunn, Sandra; Gardner, Anne

    2007-10-01

    To draw on empirical evidence to illustrate the core role of nurse practitioners in Australia and New Zealand. Enacted legislation provides for mutual recognition of qualifications, including nursing, between New Zealand and Australia. As the nurse practitioner role is relatively new in both countries, there is no consistency in role expectation and hence mutual recognition has not yet been applied to nurse practitioners. A study jointly commissioned by both countries' Regulatory Boards developed information on the core role of the nurse practitioner, to develop shared competency and educational standards. Reporting on this study's process and outcomes provides insights that are relevant both locally and internationally. This interpretive study used multiple data sources, including published and grey literature, policy documents, nurse practitioner program curricula and interviews with 15 nurse practitioners from the two countries. Data were analysed according to the appropriate standard for each data type and included both deductive and inductive methods. The data were aggregated thematically according to patterns within and across the interview and material data. The core role of the nurse practitioner was identified as having three components: dynamic practice, professional efficacy and clinical leadership. Nurse practitioner practice is dynamic and involves the application of high level clinical knowledge and skills in a wide range of contexts. The nurse practitioner demonstrates professional efficacy, enhanced by an extended range of autonomy that includes legislated privileges. The nurse practitioner is a clinical leader with a readiness and an obligation to advocate for their client base and their profession at the systems level of health care. A clearly articulated and research informed description of the core role of the nurse practitioner provides the basis for development of educational and practice competency standards. These research findings provide

  19. The effect of gender on transformational leadership and job satisfaction among Saudi nurses.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Mohammed G; Topp, Robert; AlYami, Mansour S

    2017-07-16

    To compare nurses' job satisfaction and perceptions of transformational leadership style of their manager among four different nurse/manager gender dyads in Saudi Arabia. Women and men differ on many behavioural characteristics and are influenced by the cultural environment. Understanding these differences may have an impact on leadership behaviours and job satisfaction. A descriptive analysis of one-time survey data collected in 2011 from Saudi nurses employed in six general public hospitals located in three cities. Three hundred and eight (51.3%) of 600 Saudi nurses solicited to participate completed anonymous questionnaires that measured their job satisfaction and perceptions of transformational leadership style of their manager. Factorial ANOVA tested the main effects of gender of the nurse, gender of the manager and the interaction term on the nurse's job satisfaction, and perceived transformational leadership style of their manager. These analyses indicated a main effect of gender of the manager on both job satisfaction and perceived transformational leadership style of the manager (p < .05) with no significant effect of the gender of the nurse or the interaction term on these variables. Post hoc analysis indicated that nurses regardless of their gender reported higher job satisfaction and perceived transformational leadership style of their manager when their manager was male. These findings contrast with what other researchers have reported that nurse job satisfaction and perceived leadership characteristics of their manager are independent of the gender of the manager. These perceptions of Saudi nurses may be a result of "sex-role spillover" in a male-dominated, gender-segregated society. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sources of motivation, interpersonal conflict management styles, and leadership effectiveness: a structural model.

    PubMed

    Barbuto, John E; Xu, Ye

    2006-02-01

    126 leaders and 624 employees were sampled to test the relationship between sources of motivation and conflict management styles of leaders and how these variables influence effectiveness of leadership. Five sources of motivation measured by the Motivation Sources Inventory were tested-intrinsic process, instrumental, self-concept external, self-concept internal, and goal internalization. These sources of work motivation were associated with Rahim's modes of interpersonal conflict management-dominating, avoiding, obliging, complying, and integrating-and to perceived leadership effectiveness. A structural equation model tested leaders' conflict management styles and leadership effectiveness based upon different sources of work motivation. The model explained variance for obliging (65%), dominating (79%), avoiding (76%), and compromising (68%), but explained little variance for integrating (7%). The model explained only 28% of the variance in leader effectiveness.

  1. Education leadership in the clinical health care setting: a framework for nursing education development.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Lynda; Horsfall, Janine; O'Callaghan, Wendy

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes how a new framework for clinical nursing education was introduced at Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB), New Zealand. The project was initiated in response to the significant legislative and post registration nursing education changes within New Zealand. The journey of change has been a significant undertaking, and has required clear management, strong leadership, perseverance and understanding of the organisation's culture. The approach taken to managing the change had four stages, and reflects various change management models. The first stage, the identification process, identified the impetus for change. Creating the vision is the second stage and identified what the change would look like within the organisation. To ensure success and to guide the process of change a realistic and sustainable vision was developed. Implementing the vision was the third stage, and discusses the communication and pilot phase of implementing the nursing education framework. Stage four, embedding the vision, explores the process and experiences of changing an education culture and embedding the vision into an organisation. The paper concludes by discussing the importance of implementing robust, consistent, strategic and collaborative processes--that reflect and evaluate best educational nursing practice.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Transformational School Leadership Effects on School Outcomes in Taiwan and the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Joseph Meng-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that transformational leadership is an important aspect of effective schools; however, whether the effects vary across related studies and the robustness of the overall effect size remain unclear. A meta-analysis technique was used to synthesize the results of 28 independent studies and to investigate the overall…

  3. Brain-Wise Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Carole; Ozturgut, Osman; French, Joan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to help leaders do their jobs more effectively by examining the components of brain-wise leadership. The article is divided into five parts: Part I is a general overview, defining brain-wise leadership, its traits, attributes and some of the styles of effective leadership. Part II begins with the strategies for…

  4. Effective nursing leadership of older persons in the community - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to increase the knowledge of developing effective nursing leadership and management in order to improve the outcomes of older persons in the community. There is a need for increased knowledge of nursing leadership and management in order to improve the outcomes of older persons in the community. A review of the literature published in different databases between January 2000 and May 2012 was conducted. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated by means of thematic content analysis. Six themes were identified: Ability to change the attitudes towards older persons; Building trust; Ensuring efficacy in management decisions; Lack of knowledge about how to overcome relational challenges; Health system collaboration to achieve goals and visions; and Staff members' experiences of the meaning of and possibility to influence their work, all of which are of importance for effective nursing leadership and management in the care of older persons. Advanced nursing knowledge is necessary in order to improve the work and vision involved in nursing leadership and management. Findings indicate that relational and organisational abilities are necessary components of effective nursing leadership and management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Clinical Nursing Leadership Education in Long-Term Care: Intervention Design and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Valerie; Luciani, Tracy; Hurtubise, Alyssa; Grant, Theresa L

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of the current case study was to investigate the perceived leadership learning needs and feasibility of delivering leadership education to registered staff involved in direct care in long-term care (LTC) homes. The study was conducted in Ontario, Canada, and participants included RNs, registered practical nurses, and nursing administrators. Phase 1 bilingual web-based survey and bilingual focus group needs assessment data supported a preference for external training along with in-house mentoring to support sustainability. An intervention designed using insights gained from Phase 1 data was delivered via a 2-day, in-person workshop. Phases 2 and 3 evaluation survey data identified aspects of leadership training for LTC that require ongoing refinement. Findings suggest that communication skills and managing day-to-day nursing demands in the context of regulatory frameworks were areas of particular interest for leadership training in the LTC setting. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(4), 49-56.].

  6. Multilevel Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness in Indian Technical Education: The Mediating Role of Communication, Power and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochhayat, Jyotiranjan; Giri, Vijai N.; Suar, Damodar

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a new conceptualization of educational leadership with a multilevel and integrative approach. It examines the impact of multilevel leadership (MLL) on the effectiveness of technical educational institutes through the mediating effects of organizational communication, bases of power and organizational culture. Data were…

  7. Team-oriented leadership: the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification.

    PubMed

    Giessner, Steffen R; van Knippenberg, Daan; van Ginkel, Wendy; Sleebos, Ed

    2013-07-01

    We examined the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification on team-oriented behavior of leaders, thus extending the social identity perspective on leadership to the study of leader behavior. An experimental study (N = 152) supported our hypothesis that leader accountability relates more strongly to team-oriented behavior for group nonprototypical leaders than for group prototypical leaders. A multisource field study with leaders (N = 64) and their followers (N = 209) indicated that this interactive effect is more pronounced for leaders who identify more strongly with their team. We discuss how these findings further develop the social identity analysis of leadership.

  8. Leadership development for clinicians: what are we trying to achieve?

    PubMed

    McKimm, Judy; Swanwick, Tim

    2011-09-01

    The role of all health practitioners is changing as a result of social, technological and demographic shifts, and clinicians are increasingly required to participate in leadership activities. Worldwide, there are emerging examples of policy agendas, professional standards and competency frameworks and approaches to leadership development for clinicians. This article looks at what leadership development programmes for clinicians are trying to achieve, the rationale behind them and the outcomes that are deemed to be important. It offers a critical description of competency frameworks and their use in practice. The UK, along with other Western countries, has embedded leadership and management learning outcomes into professional frameworks for students and qualified clinicians. There is increasing recognition that leadership development is best rooted in work-based activities, reflecting the realities of clinical life, with an emphasis on learning across the education and training continuum. If leadership is deemed to be relevant 'at all levels', then 'leadership development' must be addressed throughout the education and training undertaken by health professionals. Leadership as a topic is gathering momentum as a key curriculum area. But effective clinical leaders and managers need to be nurtured and supported by the organisations and health systems within which they work and learn. Although a wide range of leadership development activities exist for individuals, without system-wide change these initiatives may not produce the most effective 'leadership', nor the health improvements to which they aspire. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Public Health Leadership Training: The NEPHLI Experience

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Shadi S.; Williams, Dwight; Balougan, Modinat

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effect of public health leadership training on the capacity of public health leaders to perform competencies derived from the list of “Ten Essential Public Health Services” presented in 1994 by the steering committee of the Public Health Functions Project. Methods. Graduating scholars of the Northeast Public Health Leadership Institute were surveyed to determine differences in skill level in 15 competency areas before and after training. Surveys were completed after program completion. Results. The training program improved the skill levels of participants in all 15 competency areas. A relation also was detected between the frequency of use of the competency and the improvement experienced. Conclusions. Public health leadership training programs are effective in improving the skills of public health workers. PMID:15226150

  10. Effects of the Virtual Environment on Online Faculty Perceptions of Leadership: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how faculty members, teaching in the virtual environment of higher education, perceived the effectiveness of leader actions to understand how principles of existing leadership theory in critical areas such as communication effectiveness, development of trust, and ability to motivate faculty…

  11. Effects of the Virtual Environment on Online Faculty Perceptions of Leadership: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how faculty members, teaching in the virtual environment of higher education, perceived the effectiveness of leader actions to understand how principles of existing leadership theory in critical areas such as communication effectiveness, development of trust, and ability to motivate faculty…

  12. Effective Participatory School Administration, Leadership, and Management: Does It Affect the Trust Levels of Stakeholders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamage, David; San Antonio, Diosdado

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports upon a study on the effectiveness of participatory school administration, leadership and management (PSALM) as perceived by 282 stakeholders in one school division in the Philippines. The study also examined the correlation between the indicators of PSALM effectiveness and the trust levels of the stakeholders. Questionnaires…

  13. Gwinnett County Public Schools: A Systemic Approach to Scaling Effective School Leadership. Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George W. Bush Institute, Education Reform Initiative, 2015

    2015-01-01

    There is growing awareness among educators and policymakers that effective school leaders are critical to school success and student achievement. Many studies illustrate the important benefits of effective school leadership for teachers, pointing to the significant influence on teacher satisfaction, development, and retention. This case study…

  14. The Use of Leadership Standards in the Hiring Practices of Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strange, Martha A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Kracht, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a problem based learning project focusing on superintendent use of ISSLC standards in hiring practices for human resource management. Research notes student achievement is affected by effective leadership of principals. School district superintendents charged with hiring effective principals must determine the best candidate for that…

  15. The Use of Leadership Standards in the Hiring Practices of Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Melissa A.; Kracht, Ritchie E.; Strange, Martha A.

    2013-01-01

    This is a problem based learning project focusing on superintendent use of ISSLC standards in hiring practices for human resource management. Research notes student achievement is affected by effective leadership of principals. School district superintendents charged with hiring effective principals must determine the best candidate for that…

  16. Training of Leadership Skills in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Schmidt-Huber, Marion; Netzel, Janine; Krohn, Alexandra C.; Angstwurm, Matthias; Fischer, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians’ everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable. Objective: The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills in medicine and tries to integrate the findings to guide future research and training development. Method: The PubMED, ERIC, and PsycArticles, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX and Academic search complete of EBSCOhost were searched for training of leadership skills in medicine in German and English. Relevant articles were identified and findings were integrated and consolidated regarding the leadership principles, target group of training and number of participants, temporal resources of the training, training content and methods, the evaluation design and trainings effects. Results: Eight studies met all inclusion criteria and no exclusion criteria. The range of training programs is very broad and leadership skill components are diverse. Training designs implied theoretical reflections of leadership phenomena as well as discussions of case studies from practice. The duration of training ranged from several hours to years. Reactions of participants to trainings were positive, yet no behavioral changes through training were examined. Conclusions: More research is needed to understand the factors critical to success in the development of leadership skills in medical education and to adapt goal-oriented training methods. Requirements analysis might help to gain knowledge about the nature of leadership skills in medicine. The authors propose a stronger focus on behavioral training methods like simulation-based training for leadership skills in medical education. PMID:24282452

  17. Training of leadership skills in medical education.

    PubMed

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Schmidt-Huber, Marion; Netzel, Janine; Krohn, Alexandra C; Angstwurm, Matthias; Fischer, Martin R

    2013-01-01

    Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians' everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable. The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills in medicine and tries to integrate the findings to guide future research and training development. The PubMED, ERIC, and PsycArticles, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX and Academic search complete of EBSCOhost were searched for training of leadership skills in medicine in German and English. Relevant articles were identified and findings were integrated and consolidated regarding the leadership principles, target group of training and number of participants, temporal resources of the training, training content and methods, the evaluation design and trainings effects. Eight studies met all inclusion criteria and no exclusion criteria. The range of training programs is very broad and leadership skill components are diverse. Training designs implied theoretical reflections of leadership phenomena as well as discussions of case studies from practice. The duration of training ranged from several hours to years. Reactions of participants to trainings were positive, yet no behavioral changes through training were examined. More research is needed to understand the factors critical to success in the development of leadership skills in medical education and to adapt goal-oriented training methods. Requirements analysis might help to gain knowledge about the nature of leadership skills in medicine. The authors propose a stronger focus on behavioral training methods like simulation-based training for leadership skills in medical education.

  18. School Leadership Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between what is currently understood about skills for school leadership and the need for a greater understanding of those skills. The importance of developing leadership skills to improve school performance and effectiveness is great. In the field of school leadership, most leaders…

  19. School Leadership Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between what is currently understood about skills for school leadership and the need for a greater understanding of those skills. The importance of developing leadership skills to improve school performance and effectiveness is great. In the field of school leadership, most leaders…

  20. Leadership Is about You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Leadership remains an elusive, yet critical, component of a program's effectiveness. While most would suggest that leadership is easily recognized, this too often means that "managers" are simply supporting people's particular interests and priorities. There are many theories and models of leadership. Most people have probably personally witnessed…

  1. Leadership Is about You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Leadership remains an elusive, yet critical, component of a program's effectiveness. While most would suggest that leadership is easily recognized, this too often means that "managers" are simply supporting people's particular interests and priorities. There are many theories and models of leadership. Most people have probably personally witnessed…

  2. The League of Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Militello, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Effective leadership does not depend on a set of attributes that a single individual possesses. Instead, the search for one best heroic leader should be replaced with the search for and investment in a number of superheroes: a League of Leadership. Those who create a leadership league don't explore individual skills, but collective practices, such…

  3. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature, and decision making in flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Daniel J. G.; Giomi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Large collections of autonomously moving agents, such as animals or micro-organisms, are able to flock coherently in space even in the absence of a central control mechanism. While the direction of the flock resulting from this critical behavior is random, this can be controlled by a small subset of informed individuals acting as leaders of the group. In this article we use the Vicsek model to investigate how flocks respond to leadership and make decisions. Using a combination of numerical simulations and continuous modeling we demonstrate that flocks display a linear response to leadership that can be cast in the framework of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, identifying an effective temperature reflecting how promptly the flock reacts to the initiative of the leaders. The linear response to leadership also holds in the presence of two groups of informed individuals with competing interests, indicating that the flock's behavioral decision is determined by both the number of leaders and their degree of influence.

  4. Subtractive Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwin, K. H.; Thomas, Eugene M.; Larwin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new term and concept to the leadership discourse: Subtractive Leadership. As an extension of the distributive leadership model, the notion of subtractive leadership refers to a leadership style that detracts from organizational culture and productivity. Subtractive leadership fails to embrace and balance the characteristics…

  5. A Study of the Effect of Secondary School Leadership Styles on Student Achievement in Selected Secondary School in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Cydnie Ellen Smith

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the leadership style of the secondary school principal on student achievement in select public schools in Louisiana was examined in this study. The null hypothesis was that there was no statistically significant difference between principal leadership style and student academic achievement. The researcher submitted the LEAD-Self…

  6. Effective Instructional Leadership Act: Technical Assistance Manual for Instructional Leaders, and Training Program Providers. July 1, 2004 - June 30, 2006.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Kentucky Department of Education, Office of Leadership and School Improvement presents this revised and updated technical assistance manual for the 2004-2006 Effective Instructional Leadership Act (EILA) cycle to assist local educators as they implement EILA. The law was established to "encourage and require the maintenance and development of…

  7. A Study of the Effect of Secondary School Leadership Styles on Student Achievement in Selected Secondary School in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Cydnie Ellen Smith

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the leadership style of the secondary school principal on student achievement in select public schools in Louisiana was examined in this study. The null hypothesis was that there was no statistically significant difference between principal leadership style and student academic achievement. The researcher submitted the LEAD-Self…

  8. Leadership Strategies, Skills, and Professional Approaches Utilized by Effective Senior-Level Student Affairs Administrators at Urban Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Jinny

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the relationship between inspiring leadership behaviors and transforming leadership attributes among Senior Student Affairs Administrators in the student affairs divisions of urban universities and colleges in California. The primary purpose of this research study was to identify the effective leadership…

  9. Examining the Effect of Mentor Teachers' Leadership Practices and Interaction on Student Teaching Interns' Efficacy in Professional Development Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siers, Ron, Jr.; Gong, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate the effect of mentor teachers' leadership practices on student interns' efficacious beliefs in Professional Development Schools (PDSs) during the internship practicum. The study employed the Leadership Practices Inventory (Kouzes & Posner, 2003) to measure the transformational leadership…

  10. The Effects of Transformational Leadership and the Sense of Calling on Job Burnout among Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Tao; Zimmerli, Laurie; Hoffer, Harry E.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transformational leadership of supervisors and the sense of calling on job burnout among special education teachers. A total of 256 special education teachers completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and rated their supervisors on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. The results reveal that transformational…

  11. The Effects of Transformational Leadership and the Sense of Calling on Job Burnout among Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Tao; Zimmerli, Laurie; Hoffer, Harry E.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transformational leadership of supervisors and the sense of calling on job burnout among special education teachers. A total of 256 special education teachers completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and rated their supervisors on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. The results reveal that transformational…

  12. Female Leadership Capacity and Effectiveness: A Critical Analysis of the Literature on Higher Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alomair, Miznah O.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the progressive changes occurring in Saudi Arabia, developing female leadership capacity and effectiveness in the country's higher education is vital. This literature review examines the scholarship and research on female leadership in higher education in Saudi Arabia, describes the major barriers for female leaders, and provides a…

  13. A Grounded Theory Exploration of the North Carolina Educator Evaluation System and Its Effects on Teaching Practices and Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wydo, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the recently implemented North Carolina Educator Evaluator System (NCEES) on teaching practices and teacher leadership in a mostly rural county in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. NCEES is designed to improve teaching practices and teacher leadership through performance-based standards. This…

  14. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance.

  15. Integrating the Beliefs of Dewey, Lewin, and Rogers into a Rationale for Effective Group Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a rationale for effective group leadership grounded in John Withall's articulation of selected beliefs of John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, and Carl Rogers. Teachers and administrators need more and better preparation in collaborative inquiry. Knowledge and skills in collaborative inquiry should undergird the successful functioning of groups of…

  16. The Effects of the Project Champion's Leadership Style on Global Information Technology User Acceptance and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekiko, Mbong C.

    2014-01-01

    The research problem was the lack of knowledge about the effect of leadership style of the project champion on global information technology (IT) project outcomes, resulting in a high failure rate of IT projects accompanied by significant waste of resources. The purpose of this quantitative, nonexperimental study was to evaluate the relationship…

  17. The Effect of Organizational Trust on the Culture of Teacher Leadership in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of the level of trust of primary school teachers towards their organization in relation to their perceptions of the school having a culture of teacher leadership. Participants of the study consisted of 378 teachers working in Burdur public primary schools. The data collection tool used two…

  18. Effect of Principals' Leadership Style on Teachers' Attitude to Work in Ogun State Secondary Schools, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adegbesan, Sunday O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate why some principals prefer to embrace certain leadership styles and the effect of such styles on the teachers' attitude to work. The study adopted a descriptive research design. The random sampling technique was used to draw a sample of teachers and principals from the secondary schools in Abeokuta…

  19. The Effect of Leadership on the Delivery of Information Technology Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Edward William

    2012-01-01

    Effective leadership is an important factor contributing to the successful implementation and operation of information products and services. The quantitative study examined the thoughts of IT upper management and employees in the private, public, and nonprofits institutions. The study assessed the memberships of the Association of Information…

  20. Mindful Intuition: An Effective Leadership Response to the Community College Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryslinge, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    Despite evidence of widespread reliance on intuition by leaders and evidence that consequences of such reliance can be positive or negative, the effective integration of intuition in leadership is not well understood. This constructivist grounded theory study explored how some leaders in California community colleges (CC) experienced intuition and…

  1. Validity and Reliability of the Group Leadership Effectiveness Scale Assessing Group Leader Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demask, Michael P.; O'Mara, Eileen McCabe; Walker, Candice

    2009-01-01

    The authors present the results of a validity and reliability study for the Group Leadership Effectiveness Scale (GLES). Seven consecutive semesters of data were gathered for this investigation, with 1 semester of data being reported and analyzed here. The results of the data support both validity and reliability for this instrument. A…

  2. Effects of Leadership Practices on Professional Learning Communities: The Mediating Role of Trust in Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Xin; Yin, Hongbiao; Liu, Yuan; Ke, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The building of professional learning communities has been widely recognized as an effective strategy for schools wanting to improve student performance and enhance teachers' professional capacity. This study explored the relationship between leadership practices and professional learning communities, with a particular focus on the mediating role…

  3. The Relationship between Peer Coaching, Collaboration and Collegiality, Teacher Effectiveness and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Margaret-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Professional development allows teachers to create professional knowledge and increase collaboration and collegiality to promote quality teaching and leadership. Peer coaching is frequently overlooked as a form of professional development. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the effect of participation in a voluntary…

  4. The Influence of Values and Policy Vocabularies on Understandings of Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Bradley W.; Diem, Sarah; Young, Michelle D.

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades, shifting discourses have significantly altered professional expectations for educational leaders. Driven by a globalized reconfiguration of the values defining educational purpose, definitions of effective leadership, processes for evaluating them, and the very boundaries of educational policy have narrowed and…

  5. The Influence of Values and Policy Vocabularies on Understandings of Leadership Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Bradley W.; Diem, Sarah; Young, Michelle D.

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades, shifting discourses have significantly altered professional expectations for educational leaders. Driven by a globalized reconfiguration of the values defining educational purpose, definitions of effective leadership, processes for evaluating them, and the very boundaries of educational policy have narrowed and…

  6. The Effectiveness of an Embedded Approach to Practicum Experiences in Educational Leadership: Program Candidates' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Mary; Chan, Tak Cheung; Jiang, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how effective an embedded practicum experience in an educational leadership program in a Southeastern University is in serving the purpose of preparing educational leaders to meet future challenges. Findings of this study confirm practicum areas that met the educational demands and highlight areas that need improvement to…

  7. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Effectiveness in School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Elizabeth B.

    2010-01-01

    In the rapidly changing school environment effective principals are needed to make necessary changes while also developing a culture of shared responsibility and community (Hallinger & Heck, 1998; Leithwood & Jantzi, 1999). The correlation between transformational leadership and emotional intelligence was investigated in this quantitative…

  8. Effect of Leadership Experience on Agricultural Education Student Teacher Self-Efficacy in Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Foster, Daniel D.; Birkenholz, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning agriculture teachers often cite classroom management as the most important problem they face in their careers. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of leadership experience on self-perceived teacher efficacy among agricultural education student teachers. The three dimensions of teacher efficacy addressed in this study…

  9. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  10. Effects of the Leadership Roles of Administrators Who Work at Special Education Schools upon Organizational Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Üstün, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the effects of the leadership roles of administrators who work at special education schools upon organizational climate. This research has been conducted using the case study technique, which is a kind of qualitative research approach. The study group of this research consists of four administrators including three…

  11. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Commitment to Organizational Values: The Mediating Effects of Collective Teacher Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John A.; Gray, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Transformational leadership researchers have given little attention to teacher expectations that mediate between goals and actions. The most important of these expectations, teacher efficacy, refers to teacher beliefs that they will be able to bring about student learning. This study examined the mediating effects of teacher efficacy by comparing…

  12. Understanding Effective Program Improvement Schools through a Distributed Leadership Task Context Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipson, Frances Marie

    2012-01-01

    Federal, state, and local agencies face challenges organizing resources that create the conditions necessary to create, sustain, and replicate effective high performing schools. Knowing that leadership does impact achievement outcomes and that school districts tackle growing numbers of sanctioned Program Improvement schools, a distributed…

  13. Leadership and Emotional Intelligence: A Phenomenological Study on Developmental Experiences of Effective Federal Government Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the experiences of effective Federal Government leaders in developing their emotional intelligence (EI). Using a conceptual framework of adult learning, leadership, and leader development, this study focused on experiential and situated learning to discern how EI develops. The researcher in the context of this…

  14. Leadership and Emotional Intelligence: A Phenomenological Study on Developmental Experiences of Effective Federal Government Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the experiences of effective Federal Government leaders in developing their emotional intelligence (EI). Using a conceptual framework of adult learning, leadership, and leader development, this study focused on experiential and situated learning to discern how EI develops. The researcher in the context of this…

  15. The Effects of Family Leadership Orientation on Social Entrepreneurship, Generativity and Academic Success of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Nuri

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of family leadership orientation on social entrepreneurship, generativity and academic education success were examined with the views of college students. The study was conducted at a state university in Central Anatolia in Turkey. 402 college students who attending at three different colleges voluntarily participated in…

  16. Effect of Distributive Leadership Behaviours of Foreign Language Schools' Principals on the Job Satisfaction of Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanriögen, A.; Iscan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of distributive leadership behavior of foreign language schools' principals on the job satisfaction of instructors. Sample size of 416 instructors working in foreign language school for the academic year 2013 to 2014 was used in the study. The data was gathered using questionnaires tag…

  17. Moderating Effects of Employee Expectancies on the Relationship between Leadership Consideration and Job Performance of Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvey, Richard D.; Neel, C. Warren

    1974-01-01

    Ninety-four engineers were asked to describe their supervisors' leadership style, to indicate their expectancies whether performing effectively in their jobs would lead to job rewards and the valence of these rewards. Results indicated that leader consideration and employee expectancies operate in joint fashions to affect job performance. (Author)

  18. The Effect of Political Decentralization on School Leadership in German Vocational Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessler, Michael; Ashmawy, Iman K.

    2016-01-01

    In this explorative qualitative study the effect of political decentralization on vocational school leadership is investigated. Through conducting structural interviews with 15 school principals in the states of Bremen and Lower Saxony in Germany, the study was able to conclude that political decentralization entails the creation of elected bodies…

  19. Using Film to Elucidate Leadership Effectiveness Models: Reflection on Authentic Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajendran, Diana; Andrew, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how students in a third year management unit at a university of technology in Australia evaluate the usefulness of film as a tool for developing a deeper understanding of the theoretical leadership effectiveness model developed by Robbins (1997). The study reviews the range of studies describing the use of films in teaching…

  20. Charismatic Leadership and Its After-Effects in a Catholic School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Concerns about principals' demanding, crucial role may lead to assumptions that strong-minded, charismatic individuals are essential for a school's long-term well-being. A case study illustrates unintended consequences resulting from such archetypal leadership of a British Catholic secondary school, following an effective, unconventional…

  1. The Effects of the Project Champion's Leadership Style on Global Information Technology User Acceptance and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekiko, Mbong C.

    2014-01-01

    The research problem was the lack of knowledge about the effect of leadership style of the project champion on global information technology (IT) project outcomes, resulting in a high failure rate of IT projects accompanied by significant waste of resources. The purpose of this quantitative, nonexperimental study was to evaluate the relationship…

  2. The Effect of Political Decentralization on School Leadership in German Vocational Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessler, Michael; Ashmawy, Iman K.

    2016-01-01

    In this explorative qualitative study the effect of political decentralization on vocational school leadership is investigated. Through conducting structural interviews with 15 school principals in the states of Bremen and Lower Saxony in Germany, the study was able to conclude that political decentralization entails the creation of elected bodies…

  3. Effects of Leadership Practices on Professional Learning Communities: The Mediating Role of Trust in Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Xin; Yin, Hongbiao; Liu, Yuan; Ke, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The building of professional learning communities has been widely recognized as an effective strategy for schools wanting to improve student performance and enhance teachers' professional capacity. This study explored the relationship between leadership practices and professional learning communities, with a particular focus on the mediating role…

  4. Effect of Leadership Experience on Agricultural Education Student Teacher Self-Efficacy in Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Foster, Daniel D.; Birkenholz, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning agriculture teachers often cite classroom management as the most important problem they face in their careers. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of leadership experience on self-perceived teacher efficacy among agricultural education student teachers. The three dimensions of teacher efficacy addressed in this study…

  5. Behavioural Indicators of Perceived Managerial and Leadership Effectiveness within Romanian and British Public Sector Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Robert G.; Patel, Taran

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report the results of a replication study of perceived managerial and leadership effectiveness within a Romanian public sector hospital, and to discuss the extent to which they are similar to and different from findings from equivalent studies carried out in two British NHS Trust hospitals. Design/methodology/approach:…

  6. Female Leadership and School Effectiveness in Junior High Schools in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agezo, Clement Kwadzo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine female principal leadership practices that are considered crucial in the effectiveness and improvement of schools and school administration in Ghanaian junior high schools. Design/methodology/approach: The study was qualitative and interpretive. Five principals of junior high schools were…

  7. Intercultural Leadership Toolkit for Librarians: Building Awareness to Effectively Serve Diverse Multicultural Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, Suzie; Mehra, Bharat; Qayyum, M. Asim

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents five tools for librarians to use in building effective intercultural communication that reaches out to diverse populations. Librarians can more successfully cross intercultural boundaries if they are aware of the key tenets of intercultural communication and information provision, and then apply the five leadership tools in…

  8. The Unblocking Leadership for Effectiveness of Teachers as Knowledge Staff: A Theoretical Framework for School Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmusul, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    When investigating the literature, it seems that little attention has been paid to what kind of leadership is needed for improving teacher effectiveness in terms of focusing on the obstacles that teachers face. Therefore, this study aims mainly to explore the obstacles that hinder the teachers when they do best in terms of receiving autonomy,…

  9. The Effect of Institutional Leadership on Quality of Higher Education Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garwe, Evelyn Chiyevo

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out with the aim of examining the effect of institutional leadership on the quality of educational provision in higher education institutions in Zimbabwe. The study analysed the indicators determining provision of quality higher education in state and private universities and how they are influenced by institutional…

  10. The Effect of Leadership on the Delivery of Information Technology Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Edward William

    2012-01-01

    Effective leadership is an important factor contributing to the successful implementation and operation of information products and services. The quantitative study examined the thoughts of IT upper management and employees in the private, public, and nonprofits institutions. The study assessed the memberships of the Association of Information…

  11. Effectiveness of a Leadership Development Program That Incorporates Social and Emotional Intelligence for Aspiring School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez-Núñez, María Trinidad; Patti, Janet; Holzer, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Focus on social and emotional intelligence competencies to improve effective leadership has become commonplace in the corporate arena and is now considered by many a prerequisite to successful job performance and outcomes (Antonakis, Ashkanasy, & Dasborough, 2009; Grant, Curtayne, & Burton, 2009; Spence & Grant, 2007; Kampa-Kokesch…

  12. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  13. Leadership Effectiveness and Instructional Supervision: The Case of the Failing Twin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Collette Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    This case study examines the leadership practices of an effective versus an ineffective elementary school principal. The background of this case involves two fourth grade teachers, each teaching one of a set of identical twins. Discrepancies in teaching and grading practices result in one twin failing. The decision-making choices of the principal…

  14. Children's Learning Groups: A Study of Emergent Leadership, Dominance, and Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Ryoko

    This study explores the importance of the group context in the emergence of leadership, dominance, and group effectiveness in children's collaborative learning groups. Ten 3-person work groups performed a collaborative math activity. Using achievement goal orientation (Ames, 1992; Maehr and Midgley, 1996; Pintrich and Schunk, 1996) as a framework,…

  15. Integrating the Beliefs of Dewey, Lewin, and Rogers into a Rationale for Effective Group Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a rationale for effective group leadership grounded in John Withall's articulation of selected beliefs of John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, and Carl Rogers. Teachers and administrators need more and better preparation in collaborative inquiry. Knowledge and skills in collaborative inquiry should undergird the successful functioning of groups of…

  16. Leadership Summit to Effect Change in Teaching and Learning: Undergraduate Education in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagen, Adam P.; Schoen, Robin; Labov, Jay B.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on a convention held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on October 3-5, 2006, to discuss the current status and future of undergraduate education in agriculture. This "Leadership Summit to Effect Change in Teaching and Learning" was a first step in what is planned to be an ongoing conversation…

  17. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Effectiveness in School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Elizabeth B.

    2010-01-01

    In the rapidly changing school environment effective principals are needed to make necessary changes while also developing a culture of shared responsibility and community (Hallinger & Heck, 1998; Leithwood & Jantzi, 1999). The correlation between transformational leadership and emotional intelligence was investigated in this quantitative…

  18. Leadership, Planning and Resource Management in Four Very Effective Schools. Part I: Setting the Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Derek; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes a study probing the relationship among leadership, effective planning, and resource management in four British secondary schools, highlighting environmental and school culture influences. Headteachers work along a continuum balanced between systems organization and an integrative culture. Schools with rational planning approaches are…

  19. Female Leadership and School Effectiveness in Junior High Schools in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agezo, Clement Kwadzo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine female principal leadership practices that are considered crucial in the effectiveness and improvement of schools and school administration in Ghanaian junior high schools. Design/methodology/approach: The study was qualitative and interpretive. Five principals of junior high schools were…

  20. Mindful Intuition: An Effective Leadership Response to the Community College Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryslinge, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    Despite evidence of widespread reliance on intuition by leaders and evidence that consequences of such reliance can be positive or negative, the effective integration of intuition in leadership is not well understood. This constructivist grounded theory study explored how some leaders in California community colleges (CC) experienced intuition and…

  1. Effective Leadership Development for Undergraduates: How Important Is Active Participation in Collegiate Organizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, John C.; Bruce, Jacklyn A.; Ricketts, Kristina G.

    2009-01-01

    Leaders are needed in all areas of life. A question arises, "Where do leaders come from and how do they develop the skills necessary to be effective?" Colleges and universities have been developing leadership skills since their inception (Astin, 1996). This study examined students in a college of agriculture to determine if students'…

  2. Understanding Effective Program Improvement Schools through a Distributed Leadership Task Context Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipson, Frances Marie

    2012-01-01

    Federal, state, and local agencies face challenges organizing resources that create the conditions necessary to create, sustain, and replicate effective high performing schools. Knowing that leadership does impact achievement outcomes and that school districts tackle growing numbers of sanctioned Program Improvement schools, a distributed…

  3. How Graduate-Level Preparation Influences the Effectiveness of School Leaders: A Comparison of the Outcomes of Exemplary and Conventional Leadership Preparation Programs for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Margaret Terry; Orphanos, Stelios

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempted to determine the influence of exemplary leadership preparation on what principals learn about leadership, their use of effective leadership practices, and how their practices influence school improvement and the school's learning climate. The authors also investigated how the frequency of effective leadership…

  4. Leadership Development in China: How the Companies Develop Their Leaders and What Critical Factors Contribute to Enhancing the Effectiveness of Leadership Development Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiao, June Xuejun; Rothwell, William J.; Vicere, Albert A.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated how companies in China develop their leaders and what critical factors contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of leadership development practices. This study adopted a multiple-case study design. Four companies--ABB, BenQ, Lenovo and Motorola were studied. The findings suggest that the four companies in China develop…

  5. Confidence in delegation and leadership of registered nurses in long-term-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jungmin; Kim, Miyoung; Shin, Juhhyun

    2016-07-01

    Effective delegation improves job satisfaction, responsibility, productivity and development. The ageing population demands more nurses in long-term-care hospitals. Delegation and leadership promote cooperation among nursing staff. However, little research describes nursing delegation and leadership style. We investigated the relationship between registered nurses' delegation confidence and leadership in Korean long-term-care hospitals. Our descriptive correlational design sampled 199 registered nurses from 13 long-term-care hospitals in Korea. Instruments were the Confidence and Intent to Delegate Scale and Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Confidence in delegation significantly aligned with current-unit clinical experience, length of total clinical-nursing experience, delegation-training experience and leadership. Transformational leadership was the most statistically significant factor influencing delegation confidence. When effective delegation integrates with efficient leadership, staff can deliver optimal care to long-term-care patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australia. This paper describes the study design of the cluster randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of the program. Methods Twenty-four residential and community aged care sites were recruited as managers at each site agreed in writing to participate in the study and ensure that leaders allocated to the control arm would not be offered the intervention program. Sites undergoing major managerial or structural changes were excluded. The 24 sites were randomly allocated to receive the CLiAC program (intervention) or usual care (control), stratified by type (residential vs. community, six each for each arm). Treatment allocation was masked to assessors and staff of all participating sites. The objective is to establish the effectiveness of the CLiAC program in improving work environment, workforce retention, as well as care safety and quality, when compared to usual care. The primary outcomes are measures of work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes include manager leadership capacity, staff absenteeism, intention to leave, stress levels, and job satisfaction. Differences between intervention and control groups will be analysed by researchers blinded to treatment allocation using linear regression of individual results adjusted for stratification and clustering by site (primary analysis), and additionally for baseline values and potential confounders (secondary analysis). Outcomes measured at the site level will be

  7. Learning by Doing in Leadership Education: Experiencing Followership and Effective Leadership Communication through Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Filiz; Lebron, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a role-play exercise to illustrate the influence of followership styles and effective communication on leader-follower relationship formation and development. We provide the pedagogical theory and evidence behind using role-plays in classroom settings, followed by a literature review pertaining to…

  8. The Impact of a District Assistant Principal Leadership Preparation Program on Perceptions of Effective Leadership Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    A large, urban school district in the southeastern region of the United States found that leaders supplied by universities lacked skills needed to meet its accountability challenges. Because the school district demands highly effective leaders for its growing schools, an Aspiring Leader Program (ALP) was established to train its future assistant…

  9. Leadership experiences for baccalaureate nursing students: improving quality in a nurse-managed rural health clinic.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Roy Ann; Morrison, Ruby Shaw

    2008-01-01

    Nurse educators need practical, effective methods to help nursing students understand the importance of quality improvement activities and their relationship to the financial viability of organizations. This article describes a project designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply quality improvement principles in a rural, nurse-managed clinic with the ultimate goal of improving potential reimbursement for services through improved documentation. Implications for students, nurse educators, and rural clinics are provided.

  10. Commentary: Recommendations and remaining questions for health care leadership training programs.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is critical for optimizing cost, access, and quality in health care. Creating a pipeline of effective health care leaders requires developing leadership competencies that differ from the usual criteria of clinical and scientific excellence by which physicians have traditionally been promoted to leadership positions. Specific competencies that differentiate effective leaders from average leaders, especially emotional intelligence and its component abilities, are essential for effective leadership.Adopting a long-standing practice from successful corporations, some health care institutions, medical societies, and business schools now offer leadership programs that address these differentiating leadership competencies. The author draws on experience with such programs through the Cleveland Clinic Academy to provide recommendations for health care leadership training and to identify unanswered questions about such programs.The author recommends that such training should be broadly available to all health care leadership communities (i.e., nurses, administrators, and physicians). A progressive curriculum, starting with foundational concepts and extending to coaching and feedback opportunities through experiential learning, recognizes the challenge of becoming an effective leader and the long time line needed to do so. Linking leadership courses to continuing medical education and to graduate credit opportunities is appealing to participants. Other recommendations focus on the importance of current leaders' involvement in nominating emerging leaders for participation, embedding leadership development discussions in faculty's professional reviews, and blending discussion of frameworks and theory with practical, experiential lessons. The author identifies questions about the benefits of formal health care leadership training that remain to be answered.

  11. Antecedents of team potency and team effectiveness: an examination of goal and process clarity and servant leadership.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Liden, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    Integrating theories of self-regulation with team and leadership literatures, this study investigated goal and process clarity and servant leadership as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team effectiveness, operationalized as team performance and organizational citizenship behavior. Our sample of 304 employees represented 71 teams in 5 banks. Results showed that team-level goal and process clarity as well as team servant leadership served as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team performance and team organizational citizenship behavior. Furthermore, we found that servant leadership moderated the relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency, such that the positive relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency were stronger in the presence of servant leadership.

  12. Leadership Expectancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ray C.

    A review of theories of expectation as related to behavior shows a high correlation between educational leaders' perceptions of their faculties and the climate and quality of instructional programs. Thus, effective faculties and high quality educational programs could be linked to a particular type of leadership. Leaders who hold high expectations…

  13. [Influence of Nurse Managers' Authentic Leadership on Nurses' Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction: Focused on the Mediating Effects of Empowerment].

    PubMed

    Choi, Han Gyo; Ahn, Sung Hee

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the mediating effect of empowerment in the relationship of nurse managers' authentic leadership, with nurses' organizational commitment and job satisfaction. The participants in this study were 273 registered nurses working in five University hospitals located in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province. The measurements included the Authentic Leadership Questionnaire, Condition of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II, Organizational Commitment Questionnaire and Korea-Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using t-test, ANOVA, Scheffé test, Pearson correlation coefficients, simple and multiple regression techniques with the SPSS 18.0 program. Mediation analysis was performed according to the Baron and Kenny method and Sobel test. There were significant correlations among authentic leadership, empowerment, organizational commitment and job satisfaction. Empowerment showed perfect mediating effects in the relationship between authentic leadership and organizational commitment. It had partial mediating effects in the relationship between authentic leadership and job satisfaction. In this study, nurse managers' authentic leadership had significant influences on nurses organizational commitment and job satisfaction via empowerment. Therefore, to enhance nurses' organizational commitment and job satisfaction, it is necessary to build effective strategies to enhance nurse manager's authentic leadership and to develop empowering education programs for nurses.

  14. Dedicated Education Units: Partnerships for Building Leadership Competency.

    PubMed

    Galuska, Lee A

    2015-07-01

    To enable nurses to lead in health care transformation, nursing education must include opportunities for developing leadership, as well as clinical competencies. Dedicated education units (DEUs) provide supportive environments for competency development in undergraduate students. This study's aim was to explore the effects of a DEU experience on the leadership development of baccalaureate nursing students. A mixed-methods design included a quantitative strand, using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, multisite design with control groups and a qualitative strand using focus groups. Students in the DEUs demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.01) in leadership behaviors, as measured by the Student Leadership Practice Inventory. Focus group themes illuminate how the experiences of the students contributed to their leadership growth. Findings suggest that the DEU experience may promote enhanced undergraduate leadership competency development. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. The Impact of Participative and Directive Leadership on Teachers' Performance: The Intervening Effects of Job Structuring, Decision Domain, and Leader-Member Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit; Wenderow, Maayan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The contingency model theory suggests that the effects of a leadership style cannot be studied without explicit attention to the given situation. Accordingly, the authors propose a model that allows them to examine simultaneously the relative impact of participative leadership and directive leadership on teachers' performance through the…

  16. The Impact of Participative and Directive Leadership on Teachers' Performance: The Intervening Effects of Job Structuring, Decision Domain, and Leader-Member Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit; Wenderow, Maayan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The contingency model theory suggests that the effects of a leadership style cannot be studied without explicit attention to the given situation. Accordingly, the authors propose a model that allows them to examine simultaneously the relative impact of participative leadership and directive leadership on teachers' performance through the…

  17. Perspectives on nursing leadership in regulation.

    PubMed

    Shanta, Linda L; Kalanek, Constance B

    2008-01-01

    Effective leadership is essential to healthcare, and it is no less important to the leadership of healthcare regulatory agencies. This article describes and differentiates the 3 leadership styles: transactional, transformational, and strategic. The article further argues that the skills of strategic leadership are essential to regulatory leadership and, despite the bureaucracy, can be cultivated in the regulatory arena.

  18. The Effect of Principals' Technological Leadership on Teachers' Technological Literacy and Teaching Effectiveness in Taiwanese Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, I-Hua

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among principals' technological leadership, teachers' technological literacy, and teaching effectiveness. The survey target population consists of 1,000 teachers randomly selected from Taiwanese elementary schools. The survey asked teachers to measure the effectiveness of principals'…

  19. [The development of clinical reasoning skills and leadership: personal factors and organizational factors].

    PubMed

    Larue, Caroline; Dubois, Sylvie; Girard, Francine; Goudreau, Johanne; Dumont, Katia

    2013-03-01

    Continuing education of newly graduated nurses (NGN) depends on several factors related to the characteristics of skills to be developed, the target population and the organizational context. Few studies describe both how nurses develop their skills and how institutions promote this development. The objectives of this manuscript are to (1) describe the behaviors that the NGN use to develop their reasoning skills and leadership and (2) document the organizational elements that facilitate this development. Method. Individual interviews were conducted with nurses (n = 34) using a grid of semistructured interviews and two group interviews were conducted with nurses (n = 7) and managers (n = 19) in two teaching hospitals in eastern Canada. The results show that nurses develop mainly by reflecting on their professional practice in their workplace. However, the lack of time for reflection in the workspace is a considerable obstacle while managerial leadership is an important asset.

  20. Leadership wisdom.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a good leader starts with effectively leading yourself. Good leadership flows from good followership. While leaders need to be adaptive, they need to make sure that change is actually necessary and not merely the illusion of progress. Effective juggling of leadership responsibilities requires identifying the glass balls and making sure that they do not drop. Leaders need to be visible and be out front, especially when things get rough or when they are the most perilous. Anger should never be allowed to reign and cloud a leader's judgment. Leadership is not "one size fits all," those being led are unique and, consequently, different approaches will be necessary to properly motivate followers. When considering important leadership decisions, it is advisable to seek out your own Napoleon's Corporal to be sure that your plan is sound and those who will implement it do in fact fully understand it. Genuine belief in your Soldiers is the most powerful and lasting thing that you can express as a leader. Lastly, mentoring is a solemn responsibility of leaders that must never be eclipsed by the many literal and figurative battles of the day.