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Sample records for clinical features diagnosis

  1. [Mucopolysaccharidosis: clinical features, diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Suarez-Guerrero, Jorge Luis; Gómez Higuera, Pedro José Iván; Arias Flórez, Juan Sebastian; Contreras-García, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a group of rare (orphan) diseases, characterised by a deficiency of enzymes involved in the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at lysosomal level. When there is a deficiency of a particular enzyme there is an accumulation of GAGs in the cells resulting in progressive cellular damage, which can affect multiple organ systems and lead to organ failure. Diagnosis is based on knowledge of the clinical manifestations, performing biochemical analyses to identify the type of GAG that is accumulating, and confirm the type of disorder with the corresponding enzymatic determination. Their identification is essential to initiate early treatment, taking into account that multidisciplinary management and enzyme replacement therapy is available for MPS I (Hurler syndrome), MPS II (Hunter syndrome), MPS IV (Morquio syndrome), and MPS VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome. In this review, an analysis is made of each of these syndromes, as well as their diagnosis and treatment.

  2. The Amyloidoses: Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kelty R.; Rice, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disorder in which insoluble amyloid proteins are deposited in body organs, causing abnormal protein build-up in tissues and eventually leading to organ dysfunction and death. It affects less than 200,000 people in the United States, classifying it as a rare disease according to the National Institutes of Health. Definitive determination of the underlying protein is critical since prognosis and treatment of amyloidosis can vary widely depending on the responsible protein. The following paper describes the various types and clinical features of amyloidosis and provides an overview of current diagnostic tools and therapies. PMID:23227278

  3. [Narcolepsy: etiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zawilska, Jolanta B; Woldan-Tambor, Agata; Płocka, Anna; Kużajska, Katarzyna; Wojcieszak, Jakub

    2012-01-01

     Narcolepsy is a chronic hypersomnia characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and manifestations of disrupted rapid eye movement sleep stage (cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations). Mechanisms underlying narcolepsy are not fully understood. Experimental data indicate that the disease is caused by a loss of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus, likely due to an autoimmune process triggered by environmental factors in susceptible individuals. Most patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy have very low hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. An appropriate clinical history, polysomnogram, and multiple sleep latency test are necessary for diagnosis of the disease. Additionally, two biological markers, i.e., cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels and expression of the DQB1*0602 gene, are used. The treatment of narcolepsy is aimed at the different symptoms that the patient manifests. Excessive daytime sleepiness is treated with psychostimulants (amphetamine-like, modafinil and armodafinil). Cataplexy is treated with sodium oxybate (GHB), tricyclic antidepressants, or selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Sleep paralysis, hallucinations, and fragmented sleep may be treated with sodium oxybate. Patients with narcolepsy should follow proper sleep hygiene and avoid strong emotions. PMID:23175331

  4. Moyamoya Disease: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease characterized by progressive stenosis at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Although its etiology remains unknown, recent genetic studies identified RNF213 in the 17q25-ter region as an important susceptibility gene of MMD among East Asian populations. Possibly because of genetic differences, MMD is relatively common in people living in East Asian countries such as Korea and Japan, compared to those in the Western Hemisphere. The prevalence of MMD appears to be slightly lower among Chinese, compared to Koreans or Japanese. There are two peaks of incidence with different clinical presentations, at around 10 years and 30-40 years. The peak appears to occur later in women than men. In children, ischemic symptoms, especially transient ischemic attacks, are predominant. Intellectual decline, seizures, and involuntary movements are also more common in this age group. In contrast, adult patients present with intracranial hemorrhage more often than pediatric patients. In patients with MMD, intracerebral hemorrhage is more often accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage than in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. These different age peaks and different clinical presentations in each age group are also observed in MMD patients in the USA. Catheter angiography is the diagnostic method of choice. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomographic angiography are noninvasive diagnostic methods. High-resolution vessel wall MR imaging also helps diagnose MMD by revealing concentric vessel wall narrowing with basal collaterals. PMID:26846755

  5. Ebola in children: epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Olupot-Olupot, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Ebola virus disease is caused by a highly contagious and pathogenic threadlike RNA virus of the Filoviridae family. The index human case is usually a zoonosis that launches human-to-human transmission interface with varying levels of sustainability of the epidemic depending on the level of public health preparedness of the affected country and the Ebola virus strain. The disease affects all age groups in the population. Clinical diagnosis is challenging in index cases especially in the early stages of the disease when the presenting features are usually nonspecific and only similar to a flu-like illness. However, in the agonal stages, hemorrhage frequently occurs in a high proportion of cases. The diagnostic gold standard is by detecting the antigen using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mortality rates in the past 28 outbreaks since 1976 have ranged from 30% to 100% in different settings among adults, but lower mortality rates have been documented in children. This review aims to describe Ebola virus infection, clinical presentation, diagnosis and outcomes in children.

  6. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  7. Clinical features and genetic diagnosis of hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia 3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaoguang; Yang, Xiaokai; Ma, Weide; Li, Jinxin; Zhang, Qingyuan; Xia, Shuqi; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Chenghui; Xu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Jiayong

    2016-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a rare inherited autosomal dominant progressive neurological disorder, which results from a CAG‑repeat expansion in the gene encoding the deubiquitinating enzyme, ataxin‑3. At present, no effective treatment is available for this fatal disorder; however, certain studies have suggested that reducing the levels of mutant ataxin‑3 protein may reverse or halt the progression of disease in patients with SCA3. In the present study, clinical examinations were performed on a patient with SCA3 who exhibited disease features including coughing, expectoration and was bedridden with mobility limitation. CAG repetitions at SCA‑associated genes were detected in the patient's family by performing standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and triple‑repeat primed PCR. The numbers of CAG‑repeats within the two alleles of the gene of interest in the patient were 15 and 78. Notably, the patient's brother, who harbored 76 CAG‑repeats in one allele of the gene of interest, did not exhibit severe disease symptoms. These results suggest that the number of CAG‑repeats is a critical for determination of SCA3 disease severity and time of onset. In addition, the defined phenotypic characteristics of the patient in the present study provide useful insight for more accurate clinical diagnosis and genotyping of future patients. PMID:27600091

  8. Calibre Persistent Labial Artery: Clinical Features and Immunohistochemistry Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Santagata, M; Maglione, M; Colella, G; D'Amato, S

    2015-09-01

    Calibre persistent labial artery (CPLA) usually presents as an asymptomatic papule on the lower lip and can be easily misdiagnosed as a mucocele, haemangioma, venous lake, varix or fibroma. When it is ulcerated, squamous cell carcinoma is the most usual differential diagnosis. Here, we report a case of a 25-year-old woman with no previous relevant medical history who presented with a complaint of an asymptomatic, non-ulcerated, progressively growing nodule (over the last 5 months) on the upper lip. In this case, the diagnosis was made clinically and confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. We conclude that clinicians should be aware of CPLA and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of labial mucosal papules. Sometimes, the immunohistochemical analysis is necessary to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:26225087

  9. Calibre persistent labial artery: clinical features and noninvasive radiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, P; Kocyigit, D; Akay, B N; Ustuner, E; Kisnisci, R

    2006-07-01

    Calibre persistent labial artery (CPLA) is defined as a primary arterial branch that penetrates into the submucosal tissue without division or decrease in diameter. It usually presents as an asymptomatic papule on the lower lip and can be easily misdiagnosed as a varix, haemangioma, venous lake, mucocele or fibroma. When it is ulcerated, squamous cell carcinoma is the most usual differential diagnosis. The most frequently used method to confirm the diagnosis of CPLA has been excisional biopsy, which carries the risk of profuse bleeding. Angiography, another invasive method, has also been used. Here, we report a case of a 20-year-old woman with a 5-year history of multiple CPLA lesions involving both upper and lower lips. In this case, the diagnosis was made clinically and confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography, which is a noninvasive and simple diagnostic tool. PMID:16716155

  10. Diagnosis and clinical features of trigemino-autonomic headaches.

    PubMed

    May, Arne

    2013-10-01

    Although severe short-lasting headaches are rare, they can be considered disabling conditions with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. These headaches can divided broadly in to those associated with autonomic symptoms, so called trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs), and those with few or no autonomic symptoms. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicranias, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms as well as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing syndrome. In all of these syndromes, half-sided head pain and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms such as lacrimation or rhinorrhea are prominent. The paroxysmal hemicranias have, unlike cluster headaches, a very robust response to indomethacin, leading to a notion of indomethacin-sensitive headaches. The diagnosis of TACs is exclusively a clinical task. Because of the fact that cluster headache is strictly half-sided, typically involves the region around the eye and temple and often starts in the upper jaw, most patients first consult a dentist or ophthalmologist. No single instrumental examination has yet been able to define, or ensure, the correct diagnosis, or differentiate idiopathic headache syndromes. It is crucial that a trained neurologist sees these patients early so that management can be optimized and unnecessary procedures can be avoided. Although TACS are, in comparison to migraine, quite rare, they are nevertheless clinically very important for the neurologist to consider as they are easy to diagnose and the treatment is very effective in most patients.

  11. [Cutaneous radiation syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Gottlöber, P; Krähn, G; Peter, R U

    2000-08-01

    Accidental exposure to ionizing radiation may occur during such catastrophic events as the Chernobyl accident in 1986 or over days to weeks as in Goiania in 1987 and in the military camp during the training of soldiers in Lilo/Georgia in 1997, as well as in medical institutions. The cutaneous symptoms after radiation exposure are based on a combination of inflammatory processes and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of transcriptionally activated proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. They follow a time course consisting of prodromal erythema, latency period, acute stage, chronic stage and late stage. The entire complex is referred to as cutaneous radiation syndrome. The time course depends on several factors such as the radiation dose, radiation quality, individual radiation sensitivity, the extent of contamination and absorption and amount of skin exposed. For the diagnosis of the cutaneous radiation syndrome the following procedures are used: 7.5 MHz to 20 MHz-B-scan sonography, thermography, capillary microscopy, profilometry, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy and histology. Based on the results of experimental and clinical research, today treatment may include topical or systemic corticosteroids, gamma-interferon, pentoxifylline, vitamin E and superoxide dismutase. The treatment depends on the stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. Due to the complexity of the clinical manifestations of radiation disease, most patients require interdisciplinary treatment in specialized centres. Dermatologists are essential partners in the life-long follow-up and therapy of such patients.

  12. Mucocele and fibroma: treatment and clinical features for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Valério, Rodrigo Alexandre; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Romualdo, Priscila Coutinho; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme; de Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Mucocele is a benign lesion occurring in the buccal mucosa as a result of the rupture of a salivary gland duct and consequent outpouring of mucin into soft tissue. It is usually caused by a local trauma, although in many cases the etiology is uncertain. Mucocele is more commonly found in children and young adults, and the most frequent site is the lower inner portion of the lips. Fibroma, on the other hand, is a benign tumor of fibrous connective tissue that can be considered a reactionary connective tissue hyperplasia in response to trauma and irritation. They usually present hard consistency, are nodular and asymptomatic, with a similar color to the mucosa, sessile base, smooth surface, located in the buccal mucosa along the line of occlusion, tongue and lip mucosa. Conventional treatment for both lesions is conservative surgical excision. Recurrence rate is low for fibroma and high for oral mucoceles. This report presents a series of cases of mucocele and fibroma treated by surgical excision or enucleation and the respective follow-up routine in the dental clinic and discusses the features to be considered in order to distinguish these lesions from each other.

  13. Mucocele and fibroma: treatment and clinical features for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Valério, Rodrigo Alexandre; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Romualdo, Priscila Coutinho; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme; de Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Mucocele is a benign lesion occurring in the buccal mucosa as a result of the rupture of a salivary gland duct and consequent outpouring of mucin into soft tissue. It is usually caused by a local trauma, although in many cases the etiology is uncertain. Mucocele is more commonly found in children and young adults, and the most frequent site is the lower inner portion of the lips. Fibroma, on the other hand, is a benign tumor of fibrous connective tissue that can be considered a reactionary connective tissue hyperplasia in response to trauma and irritation. They usually present hard consistency, are nodular and asymptomatic, with a similar color to the mucosa, sessile base, smooth surface, located in the buccal mucosa along the line of occlusion, tongue and lip mucosa. Conventional treatment for both lesions is conservative surgical excision. Recurrence rate is low for fibroma and high for oral mucoceles. This report presents a series of cases of mucocele and fibroma treated by surgical excision or enucleation and the respective follow-up routine in the dental clinic and discusses the features to be considered in order to distinguish these lesions from each other. PMID:24474300

  14. Bacillary angiomatosis. Clinical and histologic features, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cotell, S L; Noskin, G A

    1994-03-14

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a relatively new infection affecting primarily patients with human immunodeficiency virus or others with impaired host defenses. It presents most commonly with multiple red skin lesions, but visceral involvement may also occur, including involvement of the liver and spleen. Because of the dermatologic manifestations, bacillary angiomatosis may be mistaken for Kaposi's sarcoma. The diagnosis is made by identification of the characteristic histologic findings or genetic amplification by means of polymerase chain reaction. The causative agent was recently identified as Rochalimaea henselae, although Rochalimaea quintana may also play a role. Therapy with erythromycin or doxycycline is usually effective.

  15. [Clinical features and diagnosis of bronchopulmonary infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Hoheisel, G; Winkler, J; Gessner, C; Hammerschmidt, S; Seyfarth, H-J; Rodloff, A C; Liebert, U-G; Wirtz, H; Gillissen, A

    2008-05-01

    Diseases of the lung are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The risk of respiratory infections is increased due to structural changes, malnutrition, co-morbidity, and a variety of other factors. Bacterial and viral pathogens cause acute bronchitis and exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB). Community acquired pneumonias (CAP) show a different spectrum of pathogens and clinical course in comparison to nosocomial pneumonias (hospital acquired pneumonia, HAP). Institutionalised patients are at risk of a health care associated pneumonia (HCAP), with often a different spectrum of pathogens in comparison to CAP and HAP. Elderly patients with cerebrovascular disease and impairment of swallowing or cough reflexes often suffer from aspiration pneumonias. The mortality is highest in the elderly, comorbid, and immunocompromised patient with nosocomial pneumonia. Important preventive measures include influenza and pneumococcal vaccination, avoidance of immobility, oral hygiene, and sufficient nutrition.

  16. Alternaria infections: laboratory diagnosis and relevant clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pastor, F J; Guarro, J

    2008-08-01

    The genus Alternaria contains several species of melanized hyphomycetes that cause opportunistic human infections. The published literature contains 210 reported cases of human alternarioses between 1933 and the present day. The most frequent clinical manifestations are cutaneous and subcutaneous infections (74.3%), followed by oculomycosis (9.5%), invasive and non-invasive rhinosinusitis (8.1%) and onychomycosis (8.1%). Immunosuppression is frequently associated with cutaneous and subcutaneous infections and rhinosinusitis. The most important risk factors for cutaneous and subcutaneous infections are solid organ transplantation and Cushing's syndrome, and those for rhinosinusitis are bone marrow transplants. Having been exposed to soil and garbage is common in all cases of oculomycosis, with corticotherapy being a risk factor in 50% of these cases. Previous contact with soil and/or trauma to the nails is associated with most cases of onychomycosis. In general, alternariosis shows a good response to conventional antifungal drugs. On some occasions, steroid suppression or reduction is sufficient to resolve an infection. Itraconazole is the antifungal drug used most frequently to successfully treat onychomycosis and cutaneous and subcutaneous infections. Posaconazole and voriconazole are promising therapeutic options, with the latter being especially so for oculomycosis.

  17. Influence of clinical and pathologic features on the pathologist's diagnosis of mycosis fungoides: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Rebecca; Smith, Hayden L; Katz, Peter J; Liu, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Although clinicopathologic correlation is critical in the diagnosis of early mycosis fungoides (MF), how clinical information directly affects the pathologist's interpretation is unknown. This pilot study aimed to assess the influence of provided clinical information and specific histopathologic features on the histopathologic diagnosis of MF vs. its inflammatory simulants. A computerized survey recorded diagnostic impressions by 24 dermatopathologists of 30 hematoxylin-eosin stained images, including 15 MF images and 15 dermatitis images. Images were accompanied by concordant clinical descriptions (33%), no clinical information (33%) or discordant clinical descriptions (33%). Percentage of correctly classified MF histopathologic images for the three scenarios of concordant clinical information, no clinical information or discordant clinical information were 32% (kappa 0.19), 56% (kappa 0.12) and 16% (kappa 0.33), respectively. The percentage of correctly classified slides presented with no clinical information was different from the other two groups (p < 0.0001). Pautrier collections were most associated with correct classification. Clinical information may play a significant role in the histopathologic diagnosis of MF, although there may be some value in initial blinded histopathologic interpretation. Specific histopathologic features differ in relative importance in the diagnosis of MF.

  18. Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Joana; Massano, João

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common, disabling, neurodegenerative disorder. In addition to classical motor symptoms, non-motor features are now widely accepted as part of the clinical picture, and cognitive decline is a very important aspect of the disease, as it brings an additional significant burden for the patient and caregivers. The diagnosis of cognitive decline in PD, namely mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, can be extremely challenging, remaining largely based on clinical and cognitive assessments. Diagnostic criteria and methods for PD dementia and MCI have been recently issued by expert work groups. This manuscript has synthesized relevant data in order to obtain a pragmatic and updated review regarding cognitive decline in PD, from milder stages to dementia. This text will summarize clinical features, diagnostic methodology, and therapeutic issues of clinical decline in PD. Relevant clinical genetic issues, including recent advances, will also be approached. PMID:22654785

  19. Histopathological features predictive of a clinical diagnosis of ophthalmic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA)

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hazlita; Lightman, Sue; Luthert, Philip J; Rose, Geoffrey E; Verity, David H; Taylor, Simon RJ

    2012-01-01

    Background The limited form of Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener’s Granulomatosis (WG) primarily involves the head and neck region, including the orbit, but is often a diagnostic challenge, particularly as it commonly lacks positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) titres or classical features on diagnostic orbital biopsies. The purpose of this study was to relate biopsy findings with clinical outcome and to determine which histopathological features are predictive of a clinical diagnosis of GPA. Methods Retrospective case series of 234 patients identified from the database of the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology Department of Eye Pathology as having had orbital biopsies of orbital inflammatory disorders performed between 1988 and 2009. Clinical records were obtained for the patients and analysed to see whether patients had GPA or not, according to a standard set of diagnostic criteria (excluding any histopathological findings). Biopsy features were then correlated with the clinical diagnosis in univariate and multivariate analyses to determine factors predictive of GPA. Results Of the 234 patients, 36 were diagnosed with GPA and 198 with other orbital pathologies. The majority of biopsies were from orbital masses (47%). Histology showed a range of acute and chronic inflammatory pictures in all biopsies, but the presence of neutrophils (P<0.001), vasculitis (P<0.001), necrosis (P<0.001), eosinophils (P<0.02) and macrophages (P=0.05) were significantly associated with a later clinical diagnosis of GPA. In a multivariate analysis, only tissue neutrophils (OR=3.6, P=0.01) and vasculitis (OR=2.6, P=0.02) were independently associated with GPA, in contrast to previous reports associating eosinophils and necrosis with the diagnosis. Conclusions Neutrophil, eosinophil and macrophage infiltration of orbital tissues, together with vasculitis and necrosis, are all associated with a clinical diagnosis of GPA, but only neutrophil

  20. Basal Cell Carcinoma: Pathogenesis, Epidemiology, Clinical Features, Diagnosis, Histopathology, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Marzuka, Alexander G.; Book, Samuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy. Exposure to sunlight is the most important risk factor. Most, if not all, cases of BCC demonstrate overactive Hedgehog signaling. A variety of treatment modalities exist and are selected based on recurrence risk, importance of tissue preservation, patient preference, and extent of disease. The pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, histopathology, and management of BCC will be discussed in this review. PMID:26029015

  1. Cardio-Facio-Cutaneous Syndrome: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Magoulas, Pilar L.; Adi, Saleh; Kavamura, Maria Ines; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Pierpont, Elizabeth I.; Reinker, Kent; Roberts, Amy E.; Shankar, Suma; Sullivan, Joseph; Wolford, Melinda; Conger, Brenda; Santa Cruz, Molly; Rauen, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) is one of the RASopathies that bears many clinical features in common with the other syndromes in this group, most notably Noonan syndrome and Costello syndrome. CFC is genetically heterogeneous and caused by gene mutations in the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. The major features of CFC include characteristic craniofacial dysmorphology, congenital heart disease, dermatologic abnormalities, growth retardation, and intellectual disability. It is essential that this condition be differentiated from other RASopathies, as a correct diagnosis is important for appropriate medical management and determining recurrence risk. Children and adults with CFC require multidisciplinary care from specialists, and the need for comprehensive management has been apparent to families and health care professionals caring for affected individuals. To address this need, CFC International, a nonprofit family support organization that provides a forum for information, support, and facilitation of research in basic medical and social issues affecting individuals with CFC, organized a consensus conference. Experts in multiple medical specialties provided clinical management guidelines for pediatricians and other care providers. These guidelines will assist in an accurate diagnosis of individuals with CFC, provide best practice recommendations, and facilitate long-term medical care. PMID:25180280

  2. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yepishin, Ilya V; Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG).

  3. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yepishin, Ilya V; Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  4. Miller Fisher Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Heterogeneity of Clinical Features and Focused Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Randall Z; Kaminskas, David A; Zagorski, Natalia M; Liow, Kore K

    2016-01-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) that has a geographically variable incidence. It is largely a clinical diagnosis based on the cardinal clinical features of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia, however, other neurological signs and symptoms may also be present. Serological confirmation with the anti-GQ1b antibody is available and allows for greater diagnostic certainty in the face of confounding symptoms. A self-limiting course is typical of MFS. The following case report is that of a patient who presented with generalized weakness, somatic pain, inability to walk, and diplopia following an upper respiratory illness. The patient exhibited the classic triad of ataxia, areflexia, and opthalmoplegia characteristic of MFS, but also had less typical signs and symptoms making for a more challenging diagnostic workup. Our suspected diagnosis of MFS was serologically confirmed with positive anti-GQ1b antibody titer and the patient was successfully treated with Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). PMID:27437164

  5. The clinical pathological features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of small intestine primary malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaochuan; Mao, Zhiyuan; Su, Dan; Jiang, Zhaocai; Bai, Li

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and analyze the clinicopathological features and diagnosis of Chinese patients with small intestine primary malignant tumors and to explore the best therapy to small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). More than 26,000 patients with digestive tract malignant tumors received treatment in PLA hospital from 2000 to 2011, and among them, there were 887 patients who had small intestine primary malignant tumors, and 666 of 887 patients had the completed basic clinical documents. We retrospectively analyzed the correlation between clinical and pathological features of the 666 patients and analyzed the survival and prognosis of 173 SBA patients with follow-up data. Both the number of patients with primary malignant tumors of the small intestine and the number of patients who received chemotherapy showed an increasing trend. The ratio of male to female was 1.58:1. The male patients significantly exceed the female patients with tumors of non-ampullary duodenum, jejunum and duodenal ampulla; and most of the patients are over 60 years of age. For patients burdened with either of the pathological types of tumors, the males exceeded the females, but there was no significant difference. Abdominal pain was the main clinical manifestation for patients with tumors of non-ampullary duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and the most common clinical manifestations were jaundice and abdominal pain for patients with ampullary duodenal tumors, adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and sarcoma. In addition, patients with stromal tumors were prone to gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal endoscopy was the most common examinational procedure. Patients under 60 years of age were prone to surgery and chemotherapy after surgery, and patients over 60 years of age were prone to supportive treatment and chemotherapy without surgery. The medium overall survival of patients who received surgery without chemotherapy, chemotherapy after surgery, chemotherapy without surgery

  6. Autistic spectrum disorders: A review of clinical features, theories and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a set of neurodevelopmental disorders that is among the most severe in terms of prevalence, morbidity and impact to the society. It is characterized by complex behavioral phenotype and deficits in both social and cognitive functions. Although the exact cause of ASD is still not known, the main findings emphasize the role of genetic and environmental factors in the development of autistic behavior. Environmental factors are also likely to interact with the genetic profile and cause aberrant changes in brain growth, neuronal development, and functional connectivity. The past few years have seen an increase in the prevalence of ASD, as a result of enhanced clinical tests and diagnostic tools. Despite growing evidence for the involvement of endogenous biomarkers in the pathophysiology of ASD, early detection of this disorder remains a big challenge. This paper describes the main behavioral and cognitive features of ASD, as well as the symptoms that differentiate autism from other developmental disorders. An attempt will be made to integrate all the available evidence which point to reduced brain connectivity, mirror neurons deficits, and inhibition-excitation imbalance in individuals with ASD. Finally, this review discusses the main factors involved in the pathophysiology of ASD, and illustrates some of the most important markers used for the diagnosis of this debilitating disorder.

  7. Uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphomas of childhood: pathological diagnosis, clinical features and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, John T; Perkins, Sherrie L

    2015-06-01

    We provide a review of the pathological and clinical features for uncommon B-cell and T-cell lymphomas of childhood with a specific focus on advances in treatment approaches and outcomes. There is clearly a need for prospective investigation of both the clinical and biological features of the uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes in childhood. These results should lead to more uniform and more effective treatment approaches. PMID:25851546

  8. Clinical features for diagnosis and management of patients with PRDM12 congenital insensitivity to pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Stella; Malik Sharif, Saghira; Chen, Ya-Chun; Valente, Enza-Maria; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bennett, Christopher; Woods, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare extreme phenotype characterised by an inability to perceive pain present from birth due to lack of, or malfunction of, nociceptors. PRDM12 has recently been identified as a new gene that can cause CIP. The full phenotype and natural history have not yet been reported. Methods We have ascertained five adult patients and report their clinical features. Results Based on our findings, and those of previous patients, we describe the natural history of the PRDM12-CIP disorder, and derive diagnostic and management features to guide the clinical management of patients. Conclusions PRDM12-CIP is a distinct and diagnosable disorder, and requires specific clinical management to minimise predictable complications. PMID:26975306

  9. The Clinical Features and Diagnosis of Adrenoleukodystrophy: A Case Series of Iranian Family

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; JAFARI, Narjes; NEJAD BIGLARI, Habibe; JABBEHDARI, Sayena; ALIZADEH, Mehdi; ALIZADEH, Ghazal; NEJAD BIGLARI, Hamid; SANII, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adrenoleukodystrophy disorder is one of the x-linked genetic disorders caused by the myelin sheath breakdown in the brain. In this study, we present 4 yr experience on this disorder. Materials & Methods The patients diagnosed as adrenoleukodystrophy in the Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2010 to 2014 were enrolled into the study. The disorder was confirmed by neuroimaging and clinical findings along with genetic and neurometabolic assessment at Reference Laboratory in Germany. We assessed age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, clinical manifestations, and neuroimaging findings of populous family with adrenoleukodystrophy. Results All of the patients were one populous family with high rate of consanguineous marriages. This disorder was confirmed by genetic assessment, VLCFA and brain MRI. c.253_254insC, p.R85Pfs112* was found in heterozygote state and the VLCFA assessment showed the typical pattern for adrenoleukodystrophy/ adrenomyeloneuropathy. This diagnosis was in agreement with the family history and the clinical history of the patient. Since there have been a number of cases in patient’s family in the past, so intensive follow-up on the family especially detection the female members of the family of childbearing age was recommended. The amount of C-26, C24/C22 and C26/C22 was elevated. All patients with the same genotype had wide ranges of clinical presentation. Conclusion Early diagnose of this disease might help us for early intervention and prenatal diagnosis for the disease in next siblings. PMID:27057190

  10. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-21

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS.

  11. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS. PMID:24574747

  12. The clinical features and diagnosis of Metachromatic leukodystrophy: A case series of Iranian Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    JABBEHDARI, Sayena; RAHIMIAN, Elham; JAFARI, Narjes; SANII, Sara; KHAYATZADEHKAKHKI, Simin; NEJAD BIGLARI, Habibe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metachromatic leukodystrophy disorder (MLD) is one of the rare neurometabolic diseases caused due to lack of saposin B and arylsulfatase A enzyme deficiency. Materials & Methods Eighteen patients diagnosed as metachromatic leukodystrophy in the Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran between 2010 and 2014 were included in our study. The disorder was confirmed by clinical, EMG-NCV, arylsulfatase A enzyme checking and neuroimaging findings along with neurometabolic and genetic assessment from reference laboratory in Iran. We assessed age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, clinical manifestations, and neuroimaging findings of 18 patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy. Results From 18 patients, 80% were offspring from consanguineous marriages. A family history of metachromatic leukodystrophy disease was positive for four patients. Twelve patients had late infantile form of this disorder and six patients had juvenile form. A history of tonic type seizure was positive in 20% of the patients and tonic spasm was confirmed with clinical information. Electromyographgraphy (EMG) in 96% of patients was abnormal with demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy pattern. MRI in all patients showed the leukodystrophic pattern as arcuate fibers sparing and subcortical rim in white matter and periventricular involvement. Our diagnosis was confirmed by EMG-NCV findings with sensorimotor neuropathy pattern and the assessment of arylsulfatase A enzyme function. Conclusion MLD is an inheritance metabolic disorder, which was confirmed by the assessment of arylsulfatase A enzyme function, peripheral blood leukocyte that assessed in a referral laboratory in Iran. PMID:26401154

  13. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of pituitary tumours with emphasis on acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, J V; Jackson, I M

    1995-04-01

    Pituitary adenomas are frequently encountered, benign intracranial tumours. Clinically classified according to their capacity to produce and secrete hormones, pituitary tumours are diagnosed from the clinical manifestations and biochemical findings of specific pituitary hormone overproduction or of impaired pituitary function due to pressure on normal pituitary cells, the pituitary stalk or the hypothalamus. Additionally, the tumour may result in neurological manifestations due to its effect as an intracranial space-occupying lesion. Pituitary adenomas may present acutely with pituitary apoplexy after intrapituitary haemorrhage or infarction. The subsequent hypofunction of the pituitary with concomitant neurological sequelae of an expanding intracranial mass are often associated with excruciating headache, diplopia and visual field defects. Gradually developing neurological deficits or secondary endocrine failure over several years may precede the recognition of non-secretory tumours (30-40% of pituitary adenomas) as well as some of the hormone-producing adenomas, especially when they expand beyond the confines of the sella turcica. Asymptomatic masses occur in the pituitary in 5-27% of unselected autopsy series. About 10-20% of pituitaries imaged as part of a brain study contain lesions 'consistent with a pituitary adenoma', with about half being pituitary adenomas ('incidentalomas'). Many advocate screening such cases for a wide spectrum of pituitary function abnormalities. Clinical judgement should be utilized to determine the extent of the work-up and the frequency of follow-up. Acromegaly, a clinical syndrome caused by excess growth hormone secretion, accounts for one-sixth of resected pituitary tumours. This disorder leads to chronic progressive disability and a shortened life span, with approximately 50% of untreated acromegalic patients experiencing premature death. The prevalence of acromegaly has been estimated to range from 50 to 70 per million, with the

  14. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of pituitary tumours with emphasis on acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, J V; Jackson, I M

    1995-04-01

    Pituitary adenomas are frequently encountered, benign intracranial tumours. Clinically classified according to their capacity to produce and secrete hormones, pituitary tumours are diagnosed from the clinical manifestations and biochemical findings of specific pituitary hormone overproduction or of impaired pituitary function due to pressure on normal pituitary cells, the pituitary stalk or the hypothalamus. Additionally, the tumour may result in neurological manifestations due to its effect as an intracranial space-occupying lesion. Pituitary adenomas may present acutely with pituitary apoplexy after intrapituitary haemorrhage or infarction. The subsequent hypofunction of the pituitary with concomitant neurological sequelae of an expanding intracranial mass are often associated with excruciating headache, diplopia and visual field defects. Gradually developing neurological deficits or secondary endocrine failure over several years may precede the recognition of non-secretory tumours (30-40% of pituitary adenomas) as well as some of the hormone-producing adenomas, especially when they expand beyond the confines of the sella turcica. Asymptomatic masses occur in the pituitary in 5-27% of unselected autopsy series. About 10-20% of pituitaries imaged as part of a brain study contain lesions 'consistent with a pituitary adenoma', with about half being pituitary adenomas ('incidentalomas'). Many advocate screening such cases for a wide spectrum of pituitary function abnormalities. Clinical judgement should be utilized to determine the extent of the work-up and the frequency of follow-up. Acromegaly, a clinical syndrome caused by excess growth hormone secretion, accounts for one-sixth of resected pituitary tumours. This disorder leads to chronic progressive disability and a shortened life span, with approximately 50% of untreated acromegalic patients experiencing premature death. The prevalence of acromegaly has been estimated to range from 50 to 70 per million, with the

  15. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy: a review of prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Naing, Zin W; Scott, Gillian M; Shand, Antonia; Hamilton, Stuart T; van Zuylen, Wendy J; Basha, James; Hall, Beverly; Craig, Maria E; Rawlinson, William D

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is under-recognised, despite being the leading infectious cause of congenital malformation, affecting ~0.3% of Australian live births. Approximately 11% of infants born with congenital CMV infection are symptomatic, resulting in clinical manifestations, including jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction and death. Congenital CMV infection may cause severe long-term sequelae, including progressive sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay in 40-58% of symptomatic neonates, and ~14% of initially asymptomatic infected neonates. Up to 50% of maternal CMV infections have nonspecific clinical manifestations, and most remain undetected unless specific serological testing is undertaken. The combination of serology tests for CMV-specific IgM, IgG and IgG avidity provide improved distinction between primary and secondary maternal infections. In pregnancies with confirmed primary maternal CMV infection, amniocentesis with CMV-PCR performed on amniotic fluid, undertaken after 21-22 weeks gestation, may determine whether maternofetal virus transmission has occurred. Ultrasound and, to a lesser extent, magnetic resonance imaging are valuable tools to assess fetal structural and growth abnormalities, although the absence of fetal abnormalities does not exclude fetal damage. Diagnosis of congenital CMV infection at birth or in the first 3 weeks of an infant's life is crucial, as this should prompt interventions for prevention of delayed-onset hearing loss and neurodevelopmental delay in affected infants. Prevention strategies should also target mothers because increased awareness and hygiene measures may reduce maternal infection. Recognition of the importance of CMV in pregnancy and in neonates is increasingly needed, particularly as therapeutic and preventive interventions expand for this serious problem.

  16. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy: a review of prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Naing, Zin W; Scott, Gillian M; Shand, Antonia; Hamilton, Stuart T; van Zuylen, Wendy J; Basha, James; Hall, Beverly; Craig, Maria E; Rawlinson, William D

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is under-recognised, despite being the leading infectious cause of congenital malformation, affecting ~0.3% of Australian live births. Approximately 11% of infants born with congenital CMV infection are symptomatic, resulting in clinical manifestations, including jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction and death. Congenital CMV infection may cause severe long-term sequelae, including progressive sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay in 40-58% of symptomatic neonates, and ~14% of initially asymptomatic infected neonates. Up to 50% of maternal CMV infections have nonspecific clinical manifestations, and most remain undetected unless specific serological testing is undertaken. The combination of serology tests for CMV-specific IgM, IgG and IgG avidity provide improved distinction between primary and secondary maternal infections. In pregnancies with confirmed primary maternal CMV infection, amniocentesis with CMV-PCR performed on amniotic fluid, undertaken after 21-22 weeks gestation, may determine whether maternofetal virus transmission has occurred. Ultrasound and, to a lesser extent, magnetic resonance imaging are valuable tools to assess fetal structural and growth abnormalities, although the absence of fetal abnormalities does not exclude fetal damage. Diagnosis of congenital CMV infection at birth or in the first 3 weeks of an infant's life is crucial, as this should prompt interventions for prevention of delayed-onset hearing loss and neurodevelopmental delay in affected infants. Prevention strategies should also target mothers because increased awareness and hygiene measures may reduce maternal infection. Recognition of the importance of CMV in pregnancy and in neonates is increasingly needed, particularly as therapeutic and preventive interventions expand for this serious problem. PMID:26391432

  17. Clinical features of actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Simon; Catroux, Mélanie; Melenotte, Cléa; Karkowski, Ludovic; Rolland, Ludivine; Trouillier, Sébastien; Raffray, Loic

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Actinomycosis is a rare heterogeneous anaerobic infection with misleading clinical presentations that delay diagnosis. A significant number of misdiagnosed cases have been reported in specific localizations, but studies including various forms of actinomycosis have rarely been published. We performed a multicenter retrospective chart review of laboratory-confirmed actinomycosis cases from January 2000 until January 2014. We described clinical characteristics, diagnostic procedures, differential diagnosis, and management of actinomycosis of clinical significance. Twenty-eight patients were included from 6 hospitals in France. Disease was diagnosed predominately in the abdomen/pelvis (n = 9), orocervicofacial (n = 5), cardiothoracic (n = 5), skeletal (n = 3), hematogenous (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 2), and intracranially (n = 1). Four patients (14%) were immunocompromised. In most cases (92 %), the diagnosis of actinomycosis was not suspected on admission, as clinical features were not specific. Diagnosis was obtained from either microbiology (50%, n = 14) or histopathology (42%, n = 12), or from both methods (7%, n = 2). Surgical biopsy was needed for definite diagnosis in 71% of cases (n = 20). Coinfection was found in 13 patients (46%), among which 3 patients were diagnosed from histologic criteria only. Two-thirds of patients were treated with amoxicillin. Median duration of antibiotics was 120 days (interquartile range 60–180), whereas the median follow-up time was 12 months (interquartile range 5.25–18). Two patients died. This study highlights the distinct and miscellaneous patterns of actinomycosis to prompt accurate diagnosis and earlier treatments, thus improving the outcome. Surgical biopsy should be performed when possible while raising histologist's and microbiologist's awareness of possible actinomycosis to enhance the chance of diagnosis and use specific molecular methods. PMID:27311002

  18. Atypical clinical features of children with central nervous system tumor: Delayed diagnosis and switch in handedness.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Kentaro; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Miyata, Ichiro; Nonaka, Yuichiro; Yuza, Yuki; Kawata, Shoko; Akiyama, Masaharu; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Herein is described the cases of three children with central nervous system (CNS) tumor, who had switch in handedness occurring before diagnostic confirmation. Although the onset, age, tumor location, and histology were heterogeneous, the diagnosis of CNS tumor was delayed in all three patients. The present experience indicates that switch in handedness should be recognized as a sign of CNS tumor in pediatric patients, and which might prevent delay in diagnosis. Pediatricians should carefully examine such patients who present with some suggestive symptoms of CNS tumor, even when they are unusual, in order to make a timely and appropriate diagnosis.

  19. Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Treatment Strategies of Gastrointestinal Diaphragm Disease Associated with Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Zhi; Sun, Gang; Cai, Feng-Chun; Yang, Yun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. To demonstrate the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug- (NSAID-) induced diaphragm disease (DD). Methods. A literature search between January 1973 and August 2015 was undertaken. The clinical data of patients with NSAID-induced DD were recorded and analyzed. Results. 159 patients were included. The ratio of male to female was 1 : 2.3; the mean age was 65 ± 11 years. The most common clinical manifestations were gastrointestinal bleeding and obstruction. 121 (84%) patients took traditional NSAIDs. The durations of NSAIDs use ranged from 2 to 300 months. A majority (59.7%) of DD were seen in the small bowel, were seen secondly in the colon (30.2%), and were mainly located in the ileum (57.9%) and right colon (91.7%), respectively. 80% of patients had multiple diaphragms. 41.5% of small bowel DD were diagnosed preoperatively by capsule endoscopy and/or double-balloon enteroscopy, 52.1% at laparotomy. Nearly 75% of patients underwent surgery, endoscopic balloon dilation was performed in 22 patients, and NSAIDs were withdrawn in 53 patients. Conclusions. NSAID-induced DD is relatively rare. The small bowel is most commonly involved. Preoperative diagnosis of small bowel DD is relatively difficult. Discontinuation of the NSAIDs is recommended, surgical resection is the main treatment presently, and endoscopic balloon dilation should be considered as an alternative therapy. PMID:27118967

  20. Epidemiology, clinical features, laboratory investigations and early diagnosis of dengue fever in adults: a descriptive study in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, S A M; Gawarammana, I B; Kumarasiri, P R V

    2005-05-01

    A descriptive observational study was conducted to identify the epidemiology, clinical features, laboratory investigations and markers for early diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection in adults. We enrolled 404 patients over a period of two years, beginning from 2001, at the Teaching Hospital Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Based on serology, 239 patients were grouped as: IgM 43 (18%), IgG and IgM 140 (58%), and IgG 28 (12%). The clinically diagnosed group without serology numbered 165 patients. Most of the parameters between groups showed a similar pattern: mean age of 30 years, mean duration of fever 7 days (range 1-19 days). Mean total white blood cell and platelet counts started to fall from the second day of fever, with the lowest counts on the 5th to 7th days. Packed cell volume (PCV) showed minimum fluctuation. One hundred and sixty (88%) patients showed elevated liver enzymes (ALT and AST), with 122 of them having a two-fold increase. Three patients died, and complications such as myocarditis, large effusions, encephalopathy, acute renal failure, acute liver failure and diarrhea were observed. These results suggest that a combination of clinical picture, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia and elevated liver enzymes could be used as markers for early diagnosis of dengue infection. Furthermore, evidence-based guidelines should be developed for managing dengue infection in adults.

  1. Insomnia, parasomnias, and narcolepsy in children: clinical features, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Maski, Kiran; Owens, Judith A

    2016-10-01

    Sleep problems are frequently encountered as presenting complaints in child neurology clinical practice. They can affect the functioning and quality of life of children, particularly those with primary neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders, since coexisting sleep problems can add substantially to neurocognitive and behavioural comorbidities. Additionally, symptoms of some sleep disorders such as parasomnias and narcolepsy can be confused with those of other neurological disorders (eg, epilepsy), posing diagnostic challenges for paediatric neurologists. The understanding of the neurophysiology of sleep disorders such as insomnia, parasomnias, and narcolepsy is still evolving. There is a complex relation between the sleeping brain and its waking function. The interplay among genetic factors, alterations in neurotransmitters, electrophysiological changes, and environmental factors potentially contribute to the genesis of these sleep disorders. PMID:27647645

  2. Batten disease: features to facilitate early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J; Holder, G E; Herbert, H; Adams, G G W

    2006-01-01

    Aims To ascertain the clinical and electrophysiological features in patients with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (jNCL/Batten disease) and to identify those features that facilitate early diagnosis. Methods Nine patients with jNCL were identified retrospectively and their case notes reviewed. All had undergone an extensive clinical examination, including electrophysiology. Blood and molecular genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Results Age at onset ranged from 4–8 years. At presentation, two of nine patients had normal fundi; only two of nine patients had a bull's eye maculopathy. The electroretinogram (ERG) findings in this series included undetectable rod specific ERGs, an electronegative maximal response, reduced and delayed cone flicker ERGs, reduction in the b:a ratio in the photopic single flash ERG, and an undetectable pattern ERG. Vacuolated lymphocytes on peripheral blood film testing were present in eight of nine patients. Five of eight patients were homozygous for the 1.02 kb deletion on the CLN3 gene on molecular genetic testing; two of eight patients were heterozygous for that deletion. Conclusion jNCL should be considered in children of 10 years and under presenting with visual loss and fundal changes ranging from normal through to pigmentary/atrophic changes or a bull's eye maculopathy. Electrophysiology may suggest jNCL. Although currently untreatable, early diagnosis is important to institute appropriate counselling and support. PMID:16754648

  3. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  4. [Clinical diagnosis of dyslexia].

    PubMed

    Martínez Hermosillo, A; Balderas Gil, A

    1980-01-01

    In 5 years of experience at the Instituto Nacional de la Comunicacion Humana, 302 clinical histories showed the diagnosis of dyslexia. The following parameters were studied: age, sex, heredofamilial history, gestation, psychomotor development, clinical picture, examination of the language (type, reading, spontaneous writing, dictation, mathematic concepts), laterality, scholarship, scholar failures, psychological study. The following results were obtained: Dyslexia was more important or frequent between 5 to 8.9 years of age. Males predominated 3:1. The heredofamilial history was important. Dyslexia prevailed in products of the first gestations. A high disturbance was found in the psychomotor development of a large percent of dyslexic patients. Examination of language was also important. Dyslexia was more frequent in right-handed patients. Scholar failures in one or more instances were found. The psychological study must be done. If dyslexia is diagnosed on time, it may be prevented and all unwanted sequelae may be avoided.

  5. [Dengue fever: clinical features].

    PubMed

    Dellamonica, P

    2009-10-01

    The vector for dengue fever and chikungunya, Aedes albopictus, was recently identified in Southeastern France, although the usual vector for dengue fever is Aedes aegypti, raising the possibility of cases occurring among the local population via viraemic individuals returning from endemic areas. Dengue fever is usually transmitted by Aedes aegypti. It is due to an arbovirus-flavivirus of which four different serotypes are known: Den 1 to 4. Each serotype is responsible for specific prolonged immunity but no cross-reactivity exists between serotypes. Clinically, the onset is abrupt with frontal headache, retro-orbital pain, myalgia, joint pain, prostration and, in many cases, a macular rash usually sparing the face and extremities. Haemorrhagic signs may occur, such as petechiae, purpura, epistaxis or bleeding gingivae. Two severe forms of dengue fever, particularly among children below 3 years of age, include dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and DHF with shock (dengue shock syndrome). If a case is suspected in metropolitan France, the diagnosis should be systematically confirmed by positive specific IgM, RT-PCR or viral isolation. Treatment of dengue fever, whether in its uncomplicated form or with hemorrhagic manifestations or shock, remains symptomatic. There is no specific anti-viral treatment. A case should be notified to allow French health authorities to take the appropriate measures for vector control.

  6. Plasmablastic Lymphoma: A Review of Clinicopathologic Features and Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Charles M; Smith, Lauren B

    2016-10-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a challenging diagnosis given its rarity and lack of expression of markers that are usually used by pathologists in establishing hematopoietic lineage. However, knowledge of the characteristic clinical setting, sites of involvement, and morphologic features of plasmablastic lymphoma can aid in the correct diagnosis of a suspected large cell lymphoma that is negative for B-cell- and T-cell-specific antigens. Herein, we review the clinical and pathologic features of plasmablastic lymphoma with an emphasis on the differential diagnosis of hematolymphoid neoplasms with immunoblastic morphology and/or evidence of plasmacytic differentiation by immunophenotype. PMID:27684979

  7. A new clinical feature associated with familial early-onset of dystonic-guttural tics: An unusual diagnosis of PANDAS.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Trifiletti, Rosario R; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Parano, Enrico; Spalice, Alberto; Pavone, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Until today there is a large debate about the existence of PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) or PANS (pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome). These children usually have dramatic, "overnight" onset of symptoms, including motor or vocal tics, obsessions, and/or compulsions. In addition to these symptoms, children may also have comorbid features of associated disorders. Herein, we report a family with an early onset of tics, with exclusively dystonic and guttural tics. All patients had a particularly strong excitement trigger. Two of the patients were shown to have signs suggestive of PANDAS and all family members were Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS) carriers. The PANDAS spectrum is probably a group of disorders. We have described a PANDAS variant, in which the family seems to share common autoimmune pattern and may be viewed in the large spectrum of PANDAS. PMID:24891915

  8. A new clinical feature associated with familial early-onset of dystonic-guttural tics: An unusual diagnosis of PANDAS.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Trifiletti, Rosario R; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Parano, Enrico; Spalice, Alberto; Pavone, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Until today there is a large debate about the existence of PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) or PANS (pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome). These children usually have dramatic, "overnight" onset of symptoms, including motor or vocal tics, obsessions, and/or compulsions. In addition to these symptoms, children may also have comorbid features of associated disorders. Herein, we report a family with an early onset of tics, with exclusively dystonic and guttural tics. All patients had a particularly strong excitement trigger. Two of the patients were shown to have signs suggestive of PANDAS and all family members were Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS) carriers. The PANDAS spectrum is probably a group of disorders. We have described a PANDAS variant, in which the family seems to share common autoimmune pattern and may be viewed in the large spectrum of PANDAS.

  9. Computerized system for clinical diagnosis of melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Mario; Barbieri, Fabio

    1991-07-01

    A computerized system was developed to carry out the clinical diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma. The main objective of the system is to produce a real-time first level diagnosis of skin lesion images acquired by a color TV camera. The algorithms are based on research activities started in 1985 at the National Cancer Institute of Milan. Color slides of skin lesions were used as a training field for studying and tuning the image analysis procedures. A prototype system was then developed to capture and analyze skin lesion images on a real-time basis. More than 200 images were acquired and the first level diagnosis output by the system was compared with the diagnosis of expert clinicians. The obtained results were judged very encouraging by the clinicians, and research is in progress to improve and refine the system. The diagnostic procedure is based on image processing and understanding techniques, automatic lesion contour recognition, feature extraction (feature components derived from lesion shape, color and texture) and computation of a malignancy index. The malignancy index depends on the lesion feature values and a thesaurus collecting the system knowledge; the histologic results of clinically diagnosed malignant lesions are used to upgrade the system knowledge.

  10. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome): part I. Diagnosis: clinical and histopathologic features and new molecular and biologic markers.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Sarah I; Myskowski, Patricia L; Horwitz, Steven; Moskowitz, Alison; Querfeld, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) comprise approximately 53% of cutaneous lymphomas. Both MF and SS may clinically and histologically mimic benign skin conditions, posing a diagnostic challenge to the dermatologist. Precise clinicopathologic correlation is necessary to support a diagnosis, especially in the early stages of disease. In addition to the identification of histopathologic criteria, ancillary studies, including the identification of CD4(+) T cells with aberrant immunophenotypes and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements within skin lesions and peripheral blood are used to support the diagnosis. Recent studies evaluating the pathogenesis of MF have found that the skin microenvironment, including immune cells, such as dendritic cells and reactive cytotoxic and regulatory T cells, plays a crucial supporting role in MF. The skin-homing ability of malignant T cells is the result of chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and defective apoptosis, and is believed to play a role in disease pathogenesis and progression. In addition, recent studies have also suggested that MF and SS arise from distinct memory T cell subsets and advanced/erythrodermic MF and SS may be distinguished by identification of certain molecules, including Programmed-Death-1.

  11. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal. PMID:22518126

  12. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal. PMID:22518126

  13. Clinical and radiographic maxillofacial features of pycnodysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Nilton; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review of the literature to determine the radiographic and clinical maxillofacial features of pycnodysostosis emphasizing the main aspects of interest to the dentist in order to make them fit for the proper treatment of this population. It is important to make the diagnosis as early as possible in order to plan the treatment more suitable to provide a better life’s quality to the patients. The most frequent clinical maxillofacial features were: grooved palate, midfacial hypoplasia, mandibular hypoplasia and enamel hypoplasia. The most common radiographic maxillofacial features were: obtuse mandibular angle, frontal/parietal/occiptal bossing, open fontanels and sutures, multiple impacted teeth. The earlier diagnostic of pycnodysostosis has a fundamental role in general health of the patients. We consider that is very important that the dentist know recognize the radiographic and clinical maxillofacial features of pycnodysostosis, which allows correct treatment planning avoiding risks and ensuring better life’s quality to the patients. PMID:24753741

  14. Neuromyelitis optica: clinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B; Paul, F

    2014-05-01

    The term 'neuromyelitis optica' ('Devic's syndrome', NMO) refers to a syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and myelitis. In recent years, the condition has raised enormous interest among scientists and clinical neurologists, fuelled by the detection of a specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G reactivity (NMO-IgG) in up to 80% of patients with NMO. These autoantibodies were later shown to target aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the most abundant water channel in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we give an up-to-date overview of the clinical and paraclinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment of NMO. We discuss the widening clinical spectrum of AQP4-related autoimmunity, the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and new diagnostic means such as optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of NMO, the role of NMO-IgG, T cells and granulocytes in the pathophysiology of NMO, and outline prospects for new and emerging therapies for this rare, but often devastating condition.

  15. Urological diagnosis using clinical PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephen F.; Spetz, Kevin S.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III

    1995-05-01

    Urological diagnosis using fluoroscopy images has traditionally been performed using radiographic films. Images are generally acquired in conjunction with the application of a contrast agent, processed to create analog films, and inspected to ensure satisfactory image quality prior to being provided to a radiologist for reading. In the case of errors the entire process must be repeated. In addition, the radiologist must then often go to a particular reading room, possibly in a remote part of the healthcare facility, to read the images. The integration of digital fluoroscopy modalities with clinical PACS has the potential to significantly improve the urological diagnosis process by providing high-speed access to images at a variety of locations within a healthcare facility without costly film processing. The PACS additionally provides a cost-effective and reliable means of long-term storage and allows several medical users to simultaneously view the same images at different locations. The installation of a digital data interface between the existing clinically operational PACS at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center and a digital urology fluoroscope is described. Preliminary user interviews that have been conducted to determine the clinical effectiveness of PACS workstations for urological diagnosis are discussed. The specific suitability of the workstation medium is discussed, as are overall advantages and disadvantages of the hardcopy and softcopy media in terms of efficiency, timeliness and cost. Throughput metrics and some specific parameters of gray-scale viewing stations and the expected system impacts resulting from the integration of a urology fluoroscope with PACS are also discussed.

  16. Neuromyelitis optica: clinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B; Paul, F

    2014-01-01

    The term ‘neuromyelitis optica’ (‘Devic's syndrome’, NMO) refers to a syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and myelitis. In recent years, the condition has raised enormous interest among scientists and clinical neurologists, fuelled by the detection of a specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G reactivity (NMO-IgG) in up to 80% of patients with NMO. These autoantibodies were later shown to target aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the most abundant water channel in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we give an up-to-date overview of the clinical and paraclinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment of NMO. We discuss the widening clinical spectrum of AQP4-related autoimmunity, the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and new diagnostic means such as optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of NMO, the role of NMO-IgG, T cells and granulocytes in the pathophysiology of NMO, and outline prospects for new and emerging therapies for this rare, but often devastating condition. Other Articles published in this series Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 336–48. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 359–72. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 373–84. CLIPPERS: chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids. Review of an increasingly recognized entity within the spectrum of inflammatory central nervous system disorders. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 385–96. Requirement for safety monitoring for approved multiple sclerosis therapies: an overview. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 397–407. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 408

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease affecting up to 40% of people in the Western world. Risk factors associated with GERD include age and lifestyle habits, although the clinically relevant contribution of many of these factors is unclear. In GERD, refluxed gastric acid damages the oesophageal mucosa, generally when the pH falls below 4. GERD patients present a variety of symptoms, most commonly heartburn and regurgitation. Oesophageal complications associated with GERD include erosions, ulcers, peptic strictures, and Barrett's oesophagus which is implicated in the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis of GERD is problematic due to the range of symptoms which may be presented to the physician and symptom severity is frequently unrelated to disease severity. While endoscopic monitoring may be used to assess the presence and severity of GERD, a lack of visible damage does not necessarily indicate an absence of GERD. Techniques used to diagnose GERD include addition of an acid solution into the oesophagus in order to replicate symptoms (Bernstein test) or 24-hour intra-oesophageal pH monitoring. Proton pump inhibitors are effective in the treatment of GERD, acting to reduce the acidity of the gastric juice and hence reduce oesophageal damage and symptoms associated with GERD. Symptoms most indicative of GERD are those associated with erosive oesophagitis, including heartburn and acid regurgitation. Less common GERD-associated symptoms include chest pain, a range of ear, nose and throat conditions, and asthma. In contrast to perceptions of the disease as 'merely' heartburn, the impact on patients' quality of life can be profound. Increasing awareness of GERD by health care professionals has led to improved diagnosis and a greater appreciation of the need for maintenance therapy.

  18. Clinical approach to the diagnosis of congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    North, Kathryn N

    2011-12-01

    In this issue of Seminars in Pediatric Neurology, each chapter will focus on the features and management of individual congenital myopathies. This introductory chapter will provide an overview of the clinical features that alert the clinician to the likely diagnosis of a congenital myopathy, and specific features on history and examination that are characteristic of a specific genetic subtype. Most congenital myopathies share a common pattern of clinical features, which makes it difficult to predict the genetic cause in a patient by clinical assessment alone. Although no single feature is specific for the congenital myopathies, the presence of this common pattern highlights patients in whom a muscle biopsy is likely to provide important diagnostic information. The diagnosis of a specific congenital myopathy should only be made when the defining morphologic feature is the predominant pathologic change, other possible causes have been excluded, and the clinical course is nonprogressive or only slowly progressive. PMID:22172416

  19. Feature++: Automatic Feature Construction for Clinical Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Hao, Bibo; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Jing; Hu, Gang; Xie, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid growth of clinical data and knowledge, feature construction for clinical analysis becomes increasingly important and challenging. Given a clinical dataset with up to hundreds or thousands of columns, the traditional manual feature construction process is usually too labour intensive to generate a full spectrum of features with potential values. As a result, advanced large-scale data analysis technologies, such as feature selection for predictive modelling, cannot be fully utilized for clinical data analysis. In this paper, we propose an automatic feature construction framework for clinical data analysis, namely, Feature++. It leverages available public knowledge to understand the semantics of the clinical data, and is able to integrate external data sources to automatically construct new features based on predefined rules and clinical knowledge. We demonstrate the effectiveness of Feature++ in a typical predictive modelling use case with a public clinical dataset, and the results suggest that the proposed approach is able to fulfil typical feature construction tasks with minimal dataset specific configurations, so that more accurate models can be obtained from various clinical datasets in a more efficient way. PMID:27577443

  20. Clinical features of neuromyelitis optica in children

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Jayne; Krupp, Lauren; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Hunt, Tyler; Olsen, Cody S.; Rodriguez, Moses; Lotze, Tim; Gorman, Mark; Benson, Leslie; Belman, Anita; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Aaen, Greg; Graves, Jennifer; Patterson, Marc; Rose, John W.; Casper, T. Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare clinical features of pediatric neuromyelitis optica (NMO) to other pediatric demyelinating diseases. Methods: Review of a prospective multicenter database on children with demyelinating diseases. Case summaries documenting clinical and laboratory features were reviewed by an adjudication panel. Diagnoses were assigned in the following categories: multiple sclerosis (MS), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, NMO, and recurrent demyelinating disease not otherwise specified. Results: Thirty-eight cases of NMO were identified by review panel, 97% of which met the revised International Panel on NMO Diagnosis NMO-SD 2014 criteria, but only 49% met 2006 Wingerchuk criteria. Serum or CSF NMO immunoglobulin G (IgG) was positive in 65% of NMO cases that were tested; however, some patients became seropositive more than 3 years after onset despite serial testing. No patient had positive CSF NMO IgG and negative serum NMO IgG in contemporaneous samples. Other than race (p = 0.02) and borderline findings for sex (p = 0.07), NMO IgG seropositive patients did not differ in demographic, clinical, or laboratory features from seronegatives. Visual, motor, and constitutional symptoms (including vomiting, fever, and seizures) were the most common presenting features of NMO. Initiation of disease-modifying treatment was delayed in NMO vs MS. Two years after onset, patients with NMO had higher attack rates, greater disability accrual measured by overall Expanded Disability Status Scale score, and visual scores than did patients with MS. Conclusion: The new criteria for NMO spectrum disorders apply well to the pediatric setting, and given significant delay in treatment of NMO compared to pediatric MS and worse short-term outcomes, it is imperative to apply these to improve access to treatment. PMID:26683648

  1. Clinical features of Bednar's aphthae in infants

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Ahn, Seol Hee; Shin, Son-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although Bednar's aphthae are common and regress spontaneously, these lesions may lead to feeding intolerance and are often misdiagnosed, rendering examinations useless. This study sheds new light on the clinical features of Bednar's aphthae. Methods Sixteen neonates and infants were newly diagnosed with Bednar's aphthae via routine health check-ups in an outpatient clinic. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and the following parameters were analyzed; sex, gestational age, birth weight, mode of delivery, and perinatal problems. A physical examination was carried out during the next outpatient visit to examine the healing process and check for the existence of scars or complications. Results Initial presentation included changes in feeding habits (n=10), longer feeding time, reduced intake, and increased irritability. In 6 patients, Bednar's aphthae were discovered incidentally, without prior symptoms. Feeding posture and method of feeding are important causes of Bednar's aphthae. Eleven patients were fed in a horizontal position, whereas 5 patients were fed in a semiseated position. Fifteen patients were bottle-fed, whereas 1 patient was exclusively breastfed. After correcting the feeding position, the ulcerative lesions disappeared within 1 month of diagnosis. During the follow-up period, lesions did not recur in any of the patients. Conclusion This study suggests that Bednar's aphthae are caused by mechanical pressure. A diagnosis of Bednar's aphthae should be considered when lesions are found on the palate of infants and when symptoms seem to be feeding related. Proper education of parents can both treat Bednar's aphthae and easily prevent its recurrence. PMID:26893601

  2. Recurrent corneal erosion: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Hope-Ross, M W; Chell, P B; Kervick, G N; McDonnell, P J

    1994-01-01

    The clinical features of a group of 30 patients with recalcitrant recurrent corneal erosions (i.e. those who failed to respond to conventional therapy) were evaluated. Associated ocular and facial abnormalities were documented. Meibomian gland dysfunction was present in all patients as manifest by dropout and inspissation of the meibomian glands, reduced tear film break-up time and debris in the tear film. Dropout of meibomian glands was present in 25 (83%) patients and was maximum in the medial half of the lid in 21 (84%) of these 25 patients. Tear film break-up time was reduced in all patients, being instant in 7 (23%), between 1 and 5 seconds in 22 (74%) and between 10 and 15 seconds in 1 (3%) patient. Superficial corneal abnormalities were present in 28 (93%) patients as manifest by maps, dots and fingerprints. Facial abnormalities such as telangiectasia, rhinophyma and acne rosacea were present in 22 (73%) patients. The findings of our study suggest an association between recalcitrant recurrent corneal erosions and meibomian gland dysfunction.

  3. Uterine sarcomas: clinical presentation and MRI features

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pedro; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are a rare heterogeneous group of tumors of mesenchymal origin, accounting for approximately 8% of uterine malignancies. They comprise leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma, and adenosarcoma. Compared with the more common endometrial carcinomas, uterine sarcomas behave more aggressively and are associated with a poorer prognosis. Due to their distinct clinical and biological behavior, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics introduced a new staging system for uterine sarcomas in 2009, categorizing uterine carcinosarcoma as a variant of endometrial carcinoma, rather than a pure sarcoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a developing role in the assessment of these malignancies. Features such as tumor localization, irregular or nodular margins, necrosis, rapid growth, intense contrast enhancement, and restriction at diffusion-weighted imaging can suggest the diagnosis and help differentiate from more common leiomyomas and endometrial carcinoma. MRI is therefore extremely useful in preoperative detection and staging and, consequently, in determination of appropriate management. This pictorial review aims to discuss the clinical features of uterine sarcomas, as well as their most common appearances and distinct characteristics in MRI. PMID:25347940

  4. The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, W; De Angelis, R; Lamanna, G; Cervini, C

    1998-05-01

    , proximal interphalangeal and wrist joints causes a characteristic tender swelling on palpation with early severe motion impairment and no radiologic evidence of bone damage. Fatigue, feveret, weight loss, and malaise are frequent clinical signs which can be associated with variable manifestations of extra-articular involvement such as rheumatoid nodules, vasculitis, hematologic abnormalities, Felty's syndrome, and visceral involvement. Although there is no laboratory test to exclude or prove the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, several laboratory abnormalities can be detected. Abnormal values of the tests for evaluation of systemic inflammation are the most typical humoral features of RA. These include: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins and plasma viscosity. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein provide the best information about the acute phase response. The C-reactive protein is strictly correlated with clinical assessment and radiographic changes. Plain film radiography is the standard investigation to assess the extent of anatomic changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The radiographic features of the hand joints in early disease are characterized by soft tissue swelling and mild juxtaarticular osteoporosis. In the the past 10 years, ultrasonography has gained acceptance for studying joint, tendon and bursal involvement in RA. It may improve the early clinical assessment and the follow-up of these patients, showing such details as synovial thickening even within finger joints. Other imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance, computed tomography and scintigraphy may provide useful information about both the features and the extent for anatomic damage in selected rheumatoid arthritis patients. The natural history of the disease is poorly defined; its clinical course is fluctuating and the prognosis unpredictable. RA is an epidemiologically relevant cause of disability. An adequate early treatment of RA may alter the diseas

  5. Rosacea: clinical features and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lavers, Isabel

    2016-03-30

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that predominantly affects the central face. It is characterised by a variable range of symptoms, including erythema, telangiectasia, papules, pustules and changes in skin texture. Rosacea may be transient, recurrent or persistent. Because it affects the most visible part of the body, the psychosocial effects of this condition can be significant. This article describes the features and management of the condition. PMID:27027198

  6. [Clinical features of spastic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Iu S; Golubev, V L; Debrianskaia, M B

    1995-01-01

    Clinical, neurological, endoscopic, psychological findings, questionnaire data on vegetative sphere, diaphragm x-ray, articulation test and Viene test system evidence obtained on 25 patients with phonic spasm confirm organic neurological nature of spastic dysphonia as focal muscular dystonia. This condition can be accompanied with tremor, rotatory, winking and writers' spasms, oromandibular dystonia. As indicated by positive treatment outcomes, combined treatment of phonic spasm with GABA-ergic drugs of clonazepam (antelepsin) and baclofen, orthophonic voice correction, physiotherapy is pathogenetically justified.

  7. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  8. Fatal familial insomnia: Clinical features and early identification.

    PubMed

    Krasnianski, Anna; Bartl, Mario; Sanchez Juan, Pascual J; Heinemann, Uta; Meissner, Bettina; Varges, Daniela; Schulze-Sturm, Ulf; Kretzschmar, Haus A; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Zerr, Inga

    2008-05-01

    Our aim was to develop a detailed clinical description of fatal familial insomnia in a large patient group with respect to the M129V genotype. Data on 41 German fatal familial insomnia patients were analyzed. Clinical features, 14-3-3 proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, polysomnography, and electroencephalography were studied. Age at disease onset, disease duration, and clinical syndrome varied depending on the codon 129 genotype. Because the sensitivity of the most diagnostic tests is low in fatal familial insomnia, detailed clinical investigation is extremely important. Polysomnography may help to support the diagnosis.

  9. LEOPARD syndrome: clinical dilemmas in differential diagnosis of RASopathies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis within RASopathies still represents a challenge. Nevertheless, many efforts have been made by clinicians to identify specific clinical features which might help in differentiating one disorder from another. Here, we describe a child initially diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. The follow-up of the proband, the clinical evaluation of his father together with a gene-by-gene testing approach led us to the proper diagnosis. Case presentation We report a 8-year-old male with multiple café-au-lait macules, several lentigines and dysmorphic features that suggest Noonan syndrome initially diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. However, after a few years of clinical and ophthalmological follow-up, the absence of typical features of Neurofibromatosis type 1 and the lack of NF1 mutation led us to reconsider the original diagnosis. A new examination of the patient and his similarly affected father, who was initially referred as healthy, led us to suspect LEOPARD syndrome, The diagnosis was then confirmed by the occurrence in both patients of a heterozygous mutation c.1403 C > T, p.(Thr468Met), of PTPN11. Subsequently, the proband was also found to have type-1 Arnold-Chiari malformation in association with syringomyelia. Conclusion Our experience suggests that differential clinical diagnosis among RASopathies remains ambiguous and raises doubts on the current diagnostic clinical criteria. In some cases, genetic tests represent the only conclusive proof for a correct diagnosis and, consequently, for establishing individual prognosis and providing adequate follow-up. Thus, molecular testing represents an essential tool in differential diagnosis of RASophaties. This view is further strengthened by the increasing accessibility of new sequencing techniques. Finally, to our knowledge, the described case represents the third report of the occurrence of Arnold Chiari malformation and the second description of syringomyelia with

  10. [Clinical features of Wei Yuheng].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhong-yuan

    2006-04-01

    Wei Yuheng held that the endogenous miscellaneous diseases are mostly caused by liver diseases, highly stressed the treating method of nourishing yin to generate liver. He claimed that liver deficiency is mostly caused by congenital factors, sexual strain or improper treatment. He criticized that the improper treatment by elder generations mainly was caused by their ignorance of tonifying the liver based on the saying of "no tonifying treatment for the liver". Wei Yuheng's medical theories and clinical experiences are scattered in his book Xu Mingyi Lei'an (Supplement to Classified Case Records of Celebrated Physicians). Wang Mengying collected part of his thoughts and experiences and wrote the book Liuzhou Yihua (Liuzhou Medical Talks). Although Wang Mengying's book could deduce part of the thoughts of Wei Yuheng, it didn't disclose his theories completely. It is known to all that the compound recipe Yiguan Jian is a representative formula of Wei Yuheng to tonify liver yin. Actually, it can be concluded from the analysis of Xu Mingyi Lei'an that he used Fructus Lycii (Gouqi) as a main herb to tonify liver yin in the method of nourishing yin to generate liver. Based on the idea that there are accept, restriction, generation and transformation relationship among the lung, kidney and liver yin, so he also always used Radix Glehniae (Beishashen), Radix Ophiopogonis (Maidong), Radix Rehmanniae Recens (Shengdihuang), and Radix Rehmanniae Preparata (Shudihuang) in his compound recipes. If the yin blood is insufficient, Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (Suanzaoren) should be added. In order to prepare a out way for phlegm-heat caused dy liver yin deficiency, a lubricative, Semen Trichosanthis (Gualouren) was always used and raw Semen Coicis Recens (Shengyiyiren) too. Sichuan Rhizoma Coptidis (Chuanhuanglian) can be used to clear fire-heat, and Fructus Meliae Toosendan (Chuanlianzi) for pain caused by fire-heat. PMID:17096983

  11. Fibromyalgia: clinical features, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2016-09-28

    Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic widespread pain, with associated symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance and memory problems. There are many therapies which may be helpful in managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia; however, these often require a process of trial and error to establish optimum management using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Nurses can support patients with fibromyalgia using a biopsychosocial approach to symptom management. Understanding the nature of fibromyalgia and management options will enable nurses to deliver holistic patient-centred care. PMID:27682568

  12. Fibromyalgia: clinical features, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2016-09-28

    Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic widespread pain, with associated symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance and memory problems. There are many therapies which may be helpful in managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia; however, these often require a process of trial and error to establish optimum management using a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Nurses can support patients with fibromyalgia using a biopsychosocial approach to symptom management. Understanding the nature of fibromyalgia and management options will enable nurses to deliver holistic patient-centred care.

  13. Pineal cyst: a review of clinical and radiological features.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Kim, Won; Spasic, Marko; Voth, Brittany; Yew, Andrew; Yang, Isaac

    2011-07-01

    Pineal cysts (PCs) are benign and often asymptomatic lesions of the pineal region that are typically small and do not change in size over time. PCs appear as small, well circumscribed, unilocular masses that either reside within or completely replace the pineal gland. This article reviews and discusses the characteristic features of PCs-clinical, histological, and identifiable by various imaging modalities-which assist clinicians in narrowing the differential diagnosis for pineal lesions. PMID:21801982

  14. Migraine diagnosis and clinical symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S

    1994-09-01

    Migraine is a very common phenomenon. Eighteen percent of women in this country and 6% of men have migraine. The old classification for headaches and diagnostic criteria were published in 1962, more than a quarter of a century ago. In 1988, the International Headache Society published a new classification and diagnostic criteria for all headache disorders, cranial neuralgias, and facial pain. The International Headache Society classification divides migraine, as it had been divided in the past, into two major categories: migraine without aura (formerly called common migraine) and migraine with aura (formerly called classical migraine). These criteria are rather complex and simpler criteria are proposed for clinical practice. The typical patient with migraine is a woman whose headaches began in adolescence or young adult life. There usually is a family history of migraine. Migraine is almost always more than just a headache. Virtually anything in the external environment and many things in the internal milieu may provoke migraine in a susceptible individual. There are many potential manifestations of the aura of migraine, but 90% are visual phenomena. Migraine in children is a little different than in adults. When the onset is below the age of puberty, the ratio of females to males is equal, but after puberty there is a striking predominance of women over men in a ratio of 3:1. Whenever the history of migraine is not typical or if something unexpected is found on examination, imaging studies are warranted. PMID:7960727

  15. Orofacial tuberculosis: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon form of extrapulmonary TB and is nonspecific in its clinical presentation. It can be misdiagnosed especially when oral lesions are present before systemic symptoms become apparent. Doctors especially attending dentist who generally is the first among clinicians to come across such pathological entity should be aware of the orofacial lesions of TB and consider them in the differential diagnosis of suspicious oral lesions to ensure early diagnosis of TB and its treatment. In this review, we have discussed in detail the clinical presentation of various forms of orofacial TB, diagnosis, and management of patients. Also, an update is provided about recent anti-TB drug development. PMID:26288770

  16. Clinical and dermatoscopic features of porokeratosis palmaris et plantaris

    PubMed Central

    Udare, Satish; Hemmady, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    A dermatoscope is an important tool in a dermatologist's armamentarium as it can eliminate the need for a biopsy in a wide array of conditions. Porokeratosis was described by Mibelli and Respighi in 1893, as a disorder of keratinization which on the basis of distribution patterns was described as five clinical variants that portrayed a coronoid lamella on histopathology. We describe a case of asymptomatic, long-standing palmar and plantar pits, which on dermatoscopy showed features suggestive of porokeratosis, which was later reconfirmed by histopathologic sections. This report depicts diagnostic features of porokeratosis and obviates the need for invasive procedures for its diagnosis. PMID:27559506

  17. Episodic Ataxias: Clinical and Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by recurrent spells of truncal ataxia and incoordination lasting minutes to hours. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. To date, 8 subtypes have been defined according to clinical and genetic characteristics, and five genes are known to be linked to EAs. Both EA1 and EA2, which are caused by mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A, account for the majority of EA, but many patients with no identified mutations still exhibit EA-like clinical features. Furthermore, genetically confirmed EAs have mostly been identified in Caucasian families. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the clinical and genetic characteristics of EAs. Additionally, we summarize the phenotypic features of the genetically confirmed EA2 families in Korea. PMID:27667184

  18. Episodic Ataxias: Clinical and Genetic Features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by recurrent spells of truncal ataxia and incoordination lasting minutes to hours. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. To date, 8 subtypes have been defined according to clinical and genetic characteristics, and five genes are known to be linked to EAs. Both EA1 and EA2, which are caused by mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A, account for the majority of EA, but many patients with no identified mutations still exhibit EA-like clinical features. Furthermore, genetically confirmed EAs have mostly been identified in Caucasian families. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the clinical and genetic characteristics of EAs. Additionally, we summarize the phenotypic features of the genetically confirmed EA2 families in Korea. PMID:27667184

  19. Clinical features of hepatopulmonary syndrome in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad; Fatemi, Seyed Reza; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khoshbaten, Manoochehr; Talebipour, Bahman; Sharifian, Afsaneh; Khoram, Ziba; Haj-sheikh-oleslami, Farhad; Gholamreza-shirazi, Masoomeh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the frequency, clinical and paraclinical features of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and to determine their predictive values in diagnosis of this syndrome in patients in Iran. METHODS: Fifty four cirrhotic patients underwent contrast enhanced echocardiography to detect intrapulmonary and intracardiac shunts by two cardiologists. Arterial blood oxygen, O2 gradient (A-a) and orthodoxy were measured by arterial blood gas (ABG) test. The patients positive for diagnostic criteria of HPS were defined as clinical HPS cases and those manifesting the intrapulmonary arterial dilation but no other criteria (arterial blood hypoxemia) were defined as lHPS cases. HPS frequency, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values of clinical and paraclinical features were studied. RESULTS: Ten (18.5%) and seven (13%) cases had clinical and subclinical HPS, respectively. The most common etiology was hepatitis B. Dyspnea (100%) and cyanosis (90%) were the most prevalent clinical features. Dyspnea and clubbing were the most sensitive and specific clinical features respectively. No significant relationship was found between HPS and splenomegaly, ascites, edema, jaundice, oliguria, and collateral veins. HPS was more prevalent in hepatitis B. PaO2 < 70 and arterial-alveolar gradient had the highest sensitivity in HPS patients. Orthodoxy specificity was 100%. CONCLUSION: Clubbing with positive predictive value (PPV) of 75% and dyspnea with negative predictive value (NPV) of 75% are the best clinical factors in diagnosis of HPS syndrome. PaO2 < 70 and P (A-a) O2 > 30 and their sum, are the most valuable negative and positive predictive values in HPS patients. PMID:16610006

  20. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Diagnosis and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a parenchymal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial fibrosis. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute exacerbations. Although much progress is being made in unraveling the mechanisms underlying IPF, effective therapy for improving survival remains elusive. Longitudinal disease profiling, especially in terms of clinical manifestations in a large cohort of patients, should lead to proper management of the patients and development of new treatments for IPF. Appropriate multidisciplinary assessment in ongoing registries is required to achieve this. This review summarizes the current status of the diagnosis and clinical manifestations of IPF. PMID:27625576

  1. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Diagnosis and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a parenchymal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial fibrosis. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute exacerbations. Although much progress is being made in unraveling the mechanisms underlying IPF, effective therapy for improving survival remains elusive. Longitudinal disease profiling, especially in terms of clinical manifestations in a large cohort of patients, should lead to proper management of the patients and development of new treatments for IPF. Appropriate multidisciplinary assessment in ongoing registries is required to achieve this. This review summarizes the current status of the diagnosis and clinical manifestations of IPF.

  2. [Clinical anatomical features of chronic dysfunction in the transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Tardanico, R; Sandrini, S

    2004-01-01

    Histopathological features of transplanted kidneys which gradually lose graft function have been traditionally reported with the term of chronic rejection (CR). In 1997 Banff's classification indicated the adoption of a new term for all these histological features, namely Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), recommending that the presence of morphological aspects suggestive of chronic rejection, such as chronic transplant glomerulopathy (CTG) and proliferative endoarteritis (PE), has to be specified. On the basis of these criteria we reviewed the renal biopsies of 92 patients who underwent kidney transplantation from 1999 to 2002. In all cases the biopsy had been performed 6 months after organ transplantation. In 30 of the 92 patients CTG and/or PE was evident supporting a diagnosis of CR; on the contrary, in 11 of the 92 patients the final diagnosis based on histological evidence was that of CAN. Clinical and laboratory tests revealed that the presence of proteinuria in patients with CR at the time of diagnosis was the single statistically significant difference between these two groups. In 7 of the 32 patients where the diagnosis of CR was based on the presence of early features of CTG, the treatment with ACE-I induced complete remission of the proteinuria. Cyclosporine-induced arteriolopathy (CSA) represents an additional histological finding which has been associated with graft loss in the transplanted kidney. The observation of arteriolopathy, similar to CSA in patients who did not receive calcineurine inhibitors, suggests some caution in the use of this diagnostic criteria.

  3. Consistency and distribution of reflectance confocal microscopy features for diagnosis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Babilli, Jasmin; Beyer, Marc; Ríus-Diaz, Francisca; González, Salvador; Stockfleth, Eggert; Ulrich, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) represents a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for characterization of mycosis fungoides (MF) in a pilot study. We aimed to test the applicability of RCM for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MF in a clinical study. A total of 39 test sites of 15 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of either MF, parapsoriasis, Sézary syndrome, or lymphomatoid papulosis were analyzed for presence and absence of RCM features of MF. Cochran and Chi2 analysis were applied to test the concordance between investigators and the distribution of RCM features, respectively. For selected parameters, the Cochran analysis showed good concordance between investigators. Inter-observer reproducibility was highest for junctional atypical lymphocytes, architectural disarray, and spongiosis. Similarly, Chi2 analysis demonstrated that selected features were present at particularly high frequency in individual skin diseases, with values ranging from 73% to 100% of all examined cases.

  4. Texture Feature Extraction and Classification for Iris Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Li, Naimin

    Appling computer aided techniques in iris image processing, and combining occidental iridology with the traditional Chinese medicine is a challenging research area in digital image processing and artificial intelligence. This paper proposes an iridology model that consists the iris image pre-processing, texture feature analysis and disease classification. To the pre-processing, a 2-step iris localization approach is proposed; a 2-D Gabor filter based texture analysis and a texture fractal dimension estimation method are proposed for pathological feature extraction; and at last support vector machines are constructed to recognize 2 typical diseases such as the alimentary canal disease and the nerve system disease. Experimental results show that the proposed iridology diagnosis model is quite effective and promising for medical diagnosis and health surveillance for both hospital and public use.

  5. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of influenza.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Carlos; Méndez, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of influenza can be very difficult or rather easy depending on the circumstances. It's easy when the epidemiological context is appropriate; the patient is a school kid or a teenager, and the symptoms are typical. On the other hand, it is hard when it fails to match any of the above premises, the more imformation that is missing, the more difficult it becomes. The symptomatology is correlated with age; therefore, typical clinical manifestations are only referred from 3-4 y old: rhinitis, fever with or without chills, cough, headache, joint and muscle pain and malaise. The patient often says he/she "feels sick" but his/her general condition is not at all serious. A rapid influenza diagnosis has been shown to reduce unnecessary test and antibiotics in pediatric patients and allows rational use of antivirals, early discharge from emergency departments and hospital wards, appropriate infection control measures and cohorting of infected patients. Tests that yield results in a timely manner that can influence clinical management are recommended to guide patient care. Results of testing should take into account the a priori likelihood of influenza infection based on the patient's signs and symptoms, the sensitivity and specificity of the test used, and information on circulation of influenza in the community. Failing to use the option of microbiological diagnosis when appropriate is a missed opportunity that can generate anxiety without justification, avoid unnecessarily antibiotics, omit antiviral therapy when convenient, and a teaching possibility. PMID:22251993

  6. Incidental Diagnosis in Healthy Clinical Trial Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher JA; Rowland, Rosalind; Lillie, Patrick J; Meyer, Joel; Sheehy, Susanne H; O'Hara, Geraldine A; Hamill, Matthew; Donaldson, Hannah; Dinsmore, Laura; Poulton, Ian D; Gilbert, Sarah C; McShane, Helen; Hill, Adrian VS

    2012-01-01

    Previously unrecognized medical conditions identified in volunteers for early phase clinical studies have significant clinical and ethical implications for the participant. It is therefore crucial that the potential for unexpected diagnosis is addressed during the informed consent process. But the frequency of incidental diagnosis in healthy volunteers who attend for clinical trial screening remains unclear. To assess this we retrospectively analyzed 1,131 independent screening visits for 990 volunteers at a single academic center over a 10-year period to describe the frequency and nature of new clinical findings. Overall 23 of 990 volunteers (2.3%) were excluded at screening for a newly diagnosed medical abnormality. Some clinically important conditions, such as nephrotic syndrome and familial hypercholesterolemia were identified. The frequency of abnormalities was associated with increasing age in males (p = 0.02 χ2 for trend) but not females (p = 0.82). These data will assist those planning and conducting phase I/II vaccine trials in healthy volunteers, and importantly should strengthen the informed consent of future trial participants. Clin Trans Sci 2012; Volume 5: 348–350 PMID:22883613

  7. Piriformis Syndrome in Fibromyalgia: Clinical Diagnosis and Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome. PMID:25328750

  8. Piriformis syndrome in fibromyalgia: clinical diagnosis and successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  9. Influence of Familiar Features on Diagnosis: Instantiated Features in an Applied Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dore, Kelly L.; Brooks, Lee R.; Weaver, Bruce; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Medical diagnosis can be viewed as a categorization task. There are two mechanisms whereby humans make categorical judgments: "analytical reasoning," based on explicit consideration of features and "nonanalytical reasoning," an unconscious holistic process of matching against prior exemplars. However, there is evidence that prior experience can…

  10. Parasomnias: clinical features and forensic implications.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Michel A Cramer; Mahowald, Mark W; Schenck, Carlos H

    2006-08-01

    Parasomnias are undesirable behavioral or experiential phenomena arising from the sleep period. Once felt to be a unitary phenomenon, it is now clear that a wide variety of sleep disorders are capable of resulting in complex behaviors arising during sleep. The most common are disorders of arousal and rapid eye movement sleep disorder. Less common conditions include nocturnal seizures and psychogenic dissociative states. Malingering and Munchausen syndrome by proxy, while they are not actually parasomnias, may masquerade as parasomnias. Careful clinical and sleep laboratory evaluation can usually provide an accurate diagnosis with effective therapeutic implications. Due to the potential forensic implications, sleep medicine specialists may be asked to participate in legal proceedings resulting from sleep-related violence. An awareness of the spectrum of such behaviors, and their clinical and legal evaluation, is becoming more important in the practice of sleep medicine.

  11. [Chronic cholecystitis and its clinical masks: diagnosis and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2006-01-01

    The author adduces modern data on the ethiology and pathogenesis of chronic cholecystitis and the stages of the development of biliary pathology (motorotonic disturbances of the gall bladder and the sphincter apparatus of the extrahepatic biliary tract - chronic acalculous cholecystitis - chronic calculous cholecystitis). He considers in detail the methods of diagnostics of chronic cholecystitis paying special attention to clinical (non-instrumental) methods. The author offers an original classification of physical symptoms of chronic cholecystitis, distinguishing three groups of symptoms according to their pathogenesis and clinical significance: segmentary reflectory symptoms ("exacerbation symptoms"); reflectory symptoms, localized in the right half of the body outside the segments of hepatobiliary system innervation ("severity symptoms"); irritative symptoms, observed during all the periods of chronic cholecystitis. The article contains a description of various clinical "masks" of chronic cholecystitis, which make the diagnosis more difficult: cardial, duodenal (gastrointestinal), rheumatic, solaralgic, allergic, pre-menstrual tension, and other masks, as well as a description of their differential diagnostic methods. PMID:16827271

  12. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  13. [Clinical diagnosis and treatment of allergic pharyngitis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Yan, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Mingxia

    2015-08-01

    Although the concept of united airway disease has been widely accepted, most scholars emphasize only the effect of rhino-sinusitis while ignoring the pharyngeal factors to the lower airway, especially to the allergic pharyngitis (AP), which still lacks enough awareness. First of all, absence of unified diagnostic standard leads to the lack of epidemiological data, which, results in doctors' personal experience but no guideline in treatments. In addition, it is still not clear that the role of AP in the allergic airway diseases and its relationship with asthma. However, the number of patients with AP has been increasing obviously in daily clinic practice. Combined with the previous observation, this paper does a systematic review about the clinical problems of AP, expecting to give a hand to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of AP. PMID:26685417

  14. Automatic Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Electroencephalogram Spectral Features

    PubMed Central

    Kashefpoor, Masoud; Rabbani, Hossein; Barekatain, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most expensive and fatal diseases in the elderly population. Up to now, no cure have been found for AD, so early stage diagnosis is the only way to control it. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) usually is the early stage of AD which is defined as decreasing in mental abilities such a cognition, memory, and speech not too severe to interfere daily activities. MCI diagnosis is rather hard and usually assumed as normal consequences of aging. This study proposes an accurate, mobile, and nonexpensive diagnostic approach based on electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. EEG signals were recorded using 19 electrodes positioned according to the 10–20 International system at resting eyes closed state from 16 normal and 11 MCI participants. Nineteen Spectral features are computed for each channel and examined using a correlation based algorithm to select the best discriminative features. Selected features are classified using a combination of neurofuzzy system and k-nearest neighbor classifier. Final results reach 88.89%, 100%, and 83.33% for accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively, which shows the potential of proposed method to be used as an MCI diagnostic tool, especially for screening a large population. PMID:27014609

  15. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Since the publication of the American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for Fibromyalgia 18 years ago, there have been an ever-increasing number of research articles and reviews. From the National Library of Medicine alone there are more than 10,000 articles related to fibromyalgia. The major clinical manifestations of fibromyalgia have not changed, but their prevalence, associations, relative importance to the patient, and scientific underpinnings are increasingly better understood. This article provides an update on fibromyalgia symptomatology and looks at issues that need to be considered in the development of updated diagnostic guidelines. There is still no gold standard for making a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, but there is an increasing consensus for the development of new guidelines for diagnosis that modifies the currently proscribed tender point evaluation.

  16. [Disseminated intravascular coagulation: clinical and biological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Touaoussa, Aziz; El Youssi, Hind; El Hassani, Imane; Hanouf, Daham; El Bergui, Imane; Zoulati, Ghizlane; Amrani Hassani, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by the systemic activation of blood coagulation. Its pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and dependent on the underlying pathology, making the clinical and biological expression of quite variable DIC. Among the various biological parameters disrupted, most are not specific, and none of them allows in itself to make the diagnosis. All this does not facilitate the task of the practitioner for diagnosis of overt DIC, much less that of the non-overt DIC, early stage whose treatment would improve the prognosis. These considerations have led to develop scores, combining several parameters depending on their availability in daily practice, as well as their diagnostic relevance. Of all the scores, the ISTH (International society of thrombosis and hemostasis) remains the most used.

  17. Clinical Features of Genetic Cardiac Diseases Related to Potassium Channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Adler, Arnon; Viskin, Sami

    2016-06-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases related to potassium channelopathies are a group of relatively rare syndromes that includes long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and early repolarization syndrome. Patients with these syndromes share a propensity for the development of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in the absence of significant cardiac structural abnormalities. Familial atrial fibrillation has also been associated with potassium channel dysfunction but differs from the other syndromes by being a rare cause of a common condition. This article focuses on the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes. PMID:27261827

  18. Primary Sjogren syndrome: clinical and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Fox, R I; Howell, F V; Bone, R C; Michelson, P

    1984-11-01

    Primary Sjogren syndrome is an autoimmune condition in which dry eyes (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) and dry mouth (xerostomia) result from lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal and salivary glands. Clinical and laboratory features of 60 primary Sjogren syndrome patients seen at our clinic during the past three years are presented. These patients illustrate the wide spectrum of extraglandular features that may occur as a result of lymphoid infiltration of lung, kidney, skin, stomach, liver, and muscle. They further emphasize the difficulty in classifying a patient as primary or secondary Sjogren syndrome (ie, sicca symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, or scleroderma), particularly early in the disease course. As an initial step in understanding the pathogenesis, the lymphocytes that infiltrate the salivary glands and lymph nodes were characterized by using monoclonal antibodies that recognize distinct lymphocyte subsets and by using in vitro functional assays. These studies have demonstrated that affected tissues have infiltrates of T cells with helper/inducer activity and with a high frequency of "activation antigens." The immunohistologic techniques are useful in differentiating "benign" and "pseudolymphoma" lesions (both due predominantly to T cells) from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (usually due to B-cell infiltrates). Although there is no "cure" for primary Sjogren syndrome patient's symptoms may be significantly improved by measures aimed at prevention of ocular and dental complications and by the recognition of extraglandular features that may be amenable to specific treatment.

  19. Automatic diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation with shape and appearance features from MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Raja'S.; Corso, Jason J.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2010-03-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is a major reason for lower back pain (LBP), which is the second most common neurological ailment in the United States. Automation of herniated disc diagnosis reduces the large burden on radiologists who have to diagnose hundreds of cases each day using clinical MRI. We present a method for automatic diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation using appearance and shape features. We jointly use the intensity signal for modeling the appearance of herniated disc and the active shape model for modeling the shape of herniated disc. We utilize a Gibbs distribution for classification of discs using appearance and shape features. We use 33 clinical MRI cases of the lumbar area for training and testing both appearance and shape models. We achieve over 91% accuracy in detection of herniation in a cross-validation experiment with specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 94%.

  20. Probabilistic and fuzzy logic in clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Licata, G

    2007-06-01

    In this study I have compared classic and fuzzy logic and their usefulness in clinical diagnosis. The theory of probability is often considered a device to protect the classical two-valued logic from the evidence of its inadequacy to understand and show the complexity of world [1]. This can be true, but it is not possible to discard the theory of probability. I will argue that the problems and the application fields of the theory of probability are very different from those of fuzzy logic. After the introduction on the theoretical bases of fuzzy approach to logic, I have reported some diagnostic argumentations employing fuzzy logic. The state of normality and the state of disease often fight their battle on scalar quantities of biological values and it is not hard to establish a correspondence between the biological values and the percent values of fuzzy logic. Accordingly, I have suggested some applications of fuzzy logic in clinical diagnosis and in particular I have utilised a fuzzy curve to recognise subjects with diabetes mellitus, renal failure and liver disease. The comparison between classic and fuzzy logic findings seems to indicate that fuzzy logic is more adequate to study the development of biological events. In fact, fuzzy logic is useful when we have a lot of pieces of information and when we dispose to scalar quantities. In conclusion, increasingly the development of technology offers new instruments to measure pathological parameters through scalar quantities, thus it is reasonable to think that in the future fuzzy logic will be employed more in clinical diagnosis.

  1. [Asperger syndrome. Diagnosis criteria and clinical picture].

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (A.S) is not a very well-known disorder due to its recent incorporation to the international nosography of mental disorders during the early 90s. The intention of this article is to describe the clinical picture with its symptomatic diversity. It will show how the diagnostic criteria were developed since the presentation by Asperger in 1944, to the classification consensed nowadays. It also presents the situations in which this diagnosis is most frequent to facilitate its detection and to permit a more extensive assessment leading to a more accurate treatment. PMID:16077869

  2. Kallmann's syndrome: clues to clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    John, H; Schmid, C

    2000-04-01

    Hypogonadotropic patients may visit pediatricians, general practitioners, endocrinologists or urologists, presenting with microphallus, cryptochidism or pubertas tarda and delayed bone maturation. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is characterized, apart from small testes, by the constellation of low serum levels of testosterone, LH and FSH. Kallman's syndrome is characterized by congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with midline defects such as anosmia (a deficiency of the sense of smell). The first case report dates back to 1856, and genetic defects causing the syndrome have been recently described. The diagnosis can be clinically suspected and is established by confirming hormonal studies. PMID:11052640

  3. Delusional infestations: clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Heller, Misha M; Wong, Jillian W; Lee, Eric S; Ladizinski, Barry; Grau, Manuel; Howard, Josephine L; Berger, Timothy G; Koo, John Y M; Murase, Jenny E

    2013-07-01

    Patients with delusional infestations (DI), previously named delusions of parasitosis, have a fixed, false belief that they are infested with living or non-living pathogens. Patients have abnormal cutaneous symptoms such as itching, biting, or crawling sensations. They often demonstrate self-destructive behavior in an effort to rid the pathogens from under their skin, leading to excoriations, ulcerations, and serious secondary infections. This review article aims to provide an overview of DI including its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. Strategies on how to establish a strong therapeutic alliance with DI patients are discussed. In addition, antipsychotic medications used in the treatment of DI are described.

  4. Clinical features and electrodiagnosis of ulnar neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark E; Campbell, William W

    2013-02-01

    In this review, we delineate clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic features of ulnar mononeuropathies. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is most commonly due to lesions at the level of the retroepicondylar groove (RTC), with approximately 25% at the humeroulnar arcade (HUA). The term 'cubital tunnel syndrome' should be reserved for the latter. The diagnostic accuracy of nerve conduction studies is limited by biological (e.g. low elbow temperature) and technical factors. Across-elbow distance measurements greater than 10 cm improve diagnostic specificity at the expense of decreased sensitivity. Short-segment incremental studies can differentiate lesions at the HUA from those at the RTC.

  5. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27591449

  6. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27590654

  7. Biochemical and clinical features of hereditary hyperprolinemia

    PubMed Central

    Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Endo, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    There are two classifications of hereditary hyperprolinemia: type I (HPI) and type II (HPII). Each type is caused by an autosomal recessive inborn error of the proline metabolic pathway. HPI is caused by an abnormality in the proline-oxidizing enzyme (POX). HPII is caused by a deficiency of Δ-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (P5CDh). The clinical features of HPI are unclear. Nephropathy, uncontrolled seizures, mental retardation or schizophrenia have been reported in HPI, but a benign phenotype without neurological problems has also been reported. The clinical features of HPII are also unclear. In addition, the precise incidences of HPI and HPII are unknown. Only two cases of HPI and one case of HPII have been identified in Japan through a questionnaire survey and by a study of previous reports. This suggests that hyperprolinemia is a very rare disease in Japan, consistent with earlier reports in Western countries. The one case of HPII found in Japan was diagnosed in an individual with influenza-associated encephalopathy. This suggests that HPII might reduce the threshold for convulsions, thereby increasing the sensitivity of individuals with influenza-associated encephalopathy. The current study presents diagnostic criteria for HPI and HPII, based on plasma proline level, with or without measurements of urinary P5C. In the future, screening for HPI and HPII in healthy individuals, or patients with relatively common diseases such as developmental disabilities, epilepsy, schizophrenia or behavioral problems will be important. PMID:24931297

  8. [Lung sarcoidosis: Clinical features and therapeutic issues].

    PubMed

    Uzunhan, Y; Jeny, F; Crockett, F; Piver, D; Kambouchner, M; Valeyre, D; Nunes, H

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause. This proteiform disease is characterized by an almost constant and often predominant lung involvement. The natural history of disease is difficult to predict at presentation. Diagnosis is based on a compatible clinical and radiological presentation and evidence of non-caseating granulomas. Exclusion of alternative diseases is also required according to clinical presentation. Biopsy samples of superficial lesions should be considered before other sites like per-endoscopic bronchial biopsies or endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Therapeutic strategy for lung disease has to take into account the possible spontaneous resolution observed in newly diagnosed patients. Corticosteroids are the first choice when a treatment is decided, which concerns half of patients. Second and third line therapy are based respectively on immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNFα drugs. Sarcoidosis mortality and morbidity are mainly linked to advanced pulmonary sarcoidosis - lung fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, bronchial stenosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. "Non anti-inflammatory" treatments have to be considered as well. Clinicians have an essential role in treatment indication, end-point targets and evaluation of response to treatment during follow-up and in finding the best benefice to risk balance. Progress made on pharmacogenetics may offer more personalized treatments for the patients. PMID:26897112

  9. [Lung sarcoidosis: Clinical features and therapeutic issues].

    PubMed

    Uzunhan, Y; Jeny, F; Crockett, F; Piver, D; Kambouchner, M; Valeyre, D; Nunes, H

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause. This proteiform disease is characterized by an almost constant and often predominant lung involvement. The natural history of disease is difficult to predict at presentation. Diagnosis is based on a compatible clinical and radiological presentation and evidence of non-caseating granulomas. Exclusion of alternative diseases is also required according to clinical presentation. Biopsy samples of superficial lesions should be considered before other sites like per-endoscopic bronchial biopsies or endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Therapeutic strategy for lung disease has to take into account the possible spontaneous resolution observed in newly diagnosed patients. Corticosteroids are the first choice when a treatment is decided, which concerns half of patients. Second and third line therapy are based respectively on immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNFα drugs. Sarcoidosis mortality and morbidity are mainly linked to advanced pulmonary sarcoidosis - lung fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, bronchial stenosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. "Non anti-inflammatory" treatments have to be considered as well. Clinicians have an essential role in treatment indication, end-point targets and evaluation of response to treatment during follow-up and in finding the best benefice to risk balance. Progress made on pharmacogenetics may offer more personalized treatments for the patients.

  10. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Feature Tracking: Concepts and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Andreas; Hor, Kan N; Kowallick, Johannes T; Beerbaum, Philipp; Kutty, Shelby

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure-induced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality constitute a major health problem worldwide and result from diverse pathogeneses, including coronary artery disease, nonischemic cardiomyopathies, and arrhythmias. Assessment of cardiovascular performance is important for early diagnosis and accurate management of patients at risk of heart failure. During the past decade, cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking has emerged as a useful tool for the quantitative evaluation of cardiovascular function. The method allows quantification of biatrial and biventricular mechanics from measures of deformation: strain, torsion, and dyssynchrony. The purpose of this article is to review the basic principles, clinical applications, accuracy, and reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking, highlighting the prognostic implications. It will also provide an outlook on how this field might evolve in the future. PMID:27009468

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) based on its atypical immunological features].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shigeki; Maeda, Takuma

    2016-03-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a prothrombotic side effect of heparin therapy caused by HIT antibodies, i.e., anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin IgG with platelet-activating properties. For serological diagnosis, antigen immunoassays are commonly used worldwide. However, such assays do not indicate their platelet-activating properties, leading to low specificity for the HIT diagnosis. Therefore, over-diagnosis is currently the most serious problem associated with HIT. The detection of platelet-activating antibodies using a washed platelet activation assay is crucial for appropriate HIT diagnosis. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIT include it having several clinical features atypical for an immune-mediated disease. Heparin-naïve patients can develop IgG antibodies as early as day 4, as in a secondary immune response. Evidence for an anamnestic response on heparin re-exposure is lacking. In addition, HIT antibodies are relatively short-lived, unlike those in a secondary immune response. These lines of evidence suggest that the mechanisms underlying HIT antibody formation may be compatible with a non-T cell-dependent immune reaction. These atypical clinical and serological features should be carefully considered while endeavoring to accurately diagnose HIT, which leads to appropriate therapies such as immediate administration of an alternative anticoagulant to prevent thromboembolic events and re-administration of heparin during surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass when HIT antibodies are no longer detectable.

  12. Clinical and therapeutic features of polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S D; Hammond, H L; Finkelstein, M W

    1994-01-01

    Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, also known as terminal duct or lobular carcinoma, was first described in two clinical case series in 1983. Before that time most of these neoplasms were diagnosed as benign salivary gland neoplasms including pleomorphic adenomas, variants of monomorphic adenomas, or salivary malignant conditions including malignant pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, and adenocarcinoma not otherwise stated. This neoplasm with few exceptions originates in minor salivary gland tissue of the posterior hard and soft palates or buccal mucosa. It is characteristically slow to enlarge; clinical reports show the neoplasm present for many years before diagnosis. We have evaluated the clinical and microscopic features of 15 cases from the archives of The University of Iowa Surgical Oral Pathology Laboratory and added these to published case reports. A total of 204 cases were evaluated with a female/male ratio of almost 2/1. Forty-nine percent originated in palatal mucosa. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas arising from pleomorphic adenomas or de novo have been reported within major salivary glands and outside the oral cavity. A 17% recurrence rate was found with a regional metastasis rate of 9%. Five cases had multiple recurrences, and 13 recurrences were at or beyond 5 years after the initial diagnosis. Regional node metastases were identified at the time of initial treatment or at the time of recurrence in 9% of cases in which follow-up data were specified.

  13. Delirium tremens. Some clinical features. Part I.

    PubMed

    Kramp, P; Hemmingsen, R

    1979-11-01

    Twenty patients with delirium tremens and related states were investigated from the time of admission until the acute state was over. Using strict diagnostic criteria the material was divided into two groups according to the severity of the clinical condition; nine patients had fully developed delirium tremens (grade 3), 11 patients had a less severe clinical state, known as "Predelirium" (grade 2). The material was found to be representative for the condition under discussion. Patients with grade 2 were admitted during the day and the evening, but not during the night; patients with fully developed delirium tremens (grade 3) were admitted during both the day and the night, and this difference is discussed. The two groups had the same pattern of alcohol abuse, but patients with proper delirium tremens had had a drinking bout preceding the acute state; this was not seen among patients with a less severe clinical state. Patients with grade 2 had had symptoms like sleep disturbances and gastro-intestinal disturbances for 12-24 hours before the admission, whereas grade 3 patients had had such symptoms for about 48 hours. Patients with grade 2 stopped drinking when the first symptoms of the acute state appeared, whereas patients with fully developed delirium tremens continued to drink in spite of their condition. These anamnestic were supported by the finding that significantly more patients with proper delirium tremens had alcohol in the blood--several even concentrations about 2 g/l--at the time of admission compared to patients with a less severe clinical state. This lack of "latency period", which previously has been described as a typical feature in the development of delirium tremens, is discussed. It is concluded that due to the methodology used, it has been possible to point out some of the differences between the milder, often harmless, conditions and the potentially serious, fully developed delirium tremens.

  14. Clinical features of sporadic fatal insomnia.

    PubMed

    Barash, Jed A

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in neuropathology, genotyping, and physiochemical characterization of proteins have allowed for the classification and verification of MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). CJD is a fatal neurodegenerative illness belonging to the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also known as prion diseases. Sporadic CJD is generally classified by the genotype at codon 129 of the prion protein gene and the distinct physiochemical features of the pathologic prion protein (PrP(sc)). The entity is characterized by methionine homozygosity at codon 129, type 2 PrP(sc), and, primarily, thalamic pathology (MM2-thalamic CJD). It shares clinical and pathologic similarities with the genetic prion disorder fatal familial insomnia; the MM2-thalamic phenotype has therefore been called sporadic fatal insomnia (SFI). SFI may also present like other neurodegenerative diseases, and common diagnostic findings that are seen in other forms of sporadic CJD may be absent.

  15. Surface osteosarcoma: Clinical features and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, H.; Ben Maitigue, M.; Abid, L.; Nouri, N.; Abdelkader, A.; Bouaziz, M.; Mestiri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surface osteosarcoma are rare variant of osteosarcoma that include parosteal osteosarcoma, periosteal osteosarcoma and high grade surface osteosarcoma. These lesions have different clinical presentation and biological behavior compared to conventional osteosarcoma, and hence need to be managed differently. Goal The aim of this study is to analyze the clinico-pathological features and outcome of a series of surface osteosarcoma in an attempt to define the adequate treatment of this rare entity. Patient and method It is a retrospective and bicentric study of 18 surface osteosarcoma that were seen at the KASSAB’s Institute and SAHLOUL Hospital from 2006 to 2013. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiologic features, histologic sections, treatments, and outcomes in this group of patients. Results Seven patients were male (38.9%) and 11 were female (61.1%) with mean age of 25 years (range from 16 to 55 years). Eleven lesions were in the femur and 7 in the tibia. We identified 11 parosteal osteosarcoma (six of them were dedifferentiated), 3 periosteal osteosarcoma and 4 high grade surface osteosarcoma. Six patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy and all lesions had surgical resection. Margins were wide in 15 cases and intra lesional in 3 cases. Histological response to chemotherapy was poor in all cases. The mean follow up was 34.5 months. Six patients (33.3%) presented local recurrence and 8 patients (44.4%) presented lung metastases. Six patients (33.3%) died from the disease after a mean follow up of 12 months (6–30 months); all of them had high grade lesions. Conclusion Histological grade of malignancy is the main point to assess in surface osteosarcoma since it determines treatment and prognosis. Low grade lesions should be treated by wide resection, while high grade lesions need more aggressive surgical approach associated to post operative chemotherapy. PMID:26730360

  16. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas.

  17. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: cytological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Greenstone, M; Rutman, A; Dewar, A; Mackay, I; Cole, P J

    1988-05-01

    Thirty patients with functional and/or morphological abnormalities of respiratory tract cilia were identified. The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia was based on observed abnormalities of ciliary ultrastructure or beating in vitro (beat pattern, beat frequency or percentage of motile cilia). Beat frequency and motility indices approached the normal range in some cases and suggests that the term 'immotile cilia syndrome' is not appropriate. Morphological abnormalities were most commonly due to deficiency of dynein arms, affecting the outer arms (n = 7), inner arms (n = 3) or both (n = 10). Examples of radial spoke and microtubular defects were also identified but in seven subjects ciliary ultrastructure was normal. In six patients paired samples of nasal and bronchial cilia were obtained and showed consistent abnormalities of motility and ultrastructure. Adenosine triphosphate and adenosine triphosphatase did not restore in vitro motility when added to dynein deficient cilia. The clinical picture was of life-long sinusitis and recurrent bronchial infection but the spectrum was broader than that encompassed by Kartagener's triad (dextrocardia, sinusitis and bronchiectasis). Fourteen patients had normal cardiac situs and definite or highly suggestive evidence of bronchiectasis was present in only 17 patients. Radiological evidence of sinusitis was common but absence of frontal sinuses was not universal. Chronic serous otitis media was a frequent finding but deafness was rarely profound. Fertility problems were common but were not universal in female subjects. Lung function testing revealed evidence of airflow obstruction but this was mild in most cases. PMID:2975807

  18. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009–June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  19. Spinal Cord in Multiple Sclerosis: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features and Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Alex; Auger, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an idiopathic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system that affects not only the brain but also the spinal cord. In the diagnostic and monitoring process of MS, spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not performed as commonly as brain MRI, mainly because of certain technical difficulties and the increase in total acquisition time. Nonetheless, spinal cord MRI findings are important to establish a prompt accurate diagnosis of MS, impart prognostic information, and provide valuable data for monitoring the disease course in certain cases. In this article, we discuss the technical aspects of spinal cord MRI, the typical MRI features of the spinal cord in MS, the clinical indications for this examination, and the differential diagnosis with other disorders that may produce similar clinical or MRI findings. PMID:27616313

  20. Clinical and pathological features of patients with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan Qiang; Wang, Qian; Liu, Jie Xiao; Mao, Yan Ling

    2014-07-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a rare congenital myopathy of great heterogeneity, characterized by the presence of rods in the cytoplasm of muscle fibers. This study aimed to summarize and analyze retrospectively the clinicopathological features of 28 patients with NM. Among the 28 patients, 15 were classified as of the typical congenital type, manifested as lower- or four-limb weakness as the first symptom and slowly progressive course. Six patients were classified as of childhood onset type, with lower-limb weakness and progressive course. Seven patients were classified as of the adult onset type, with rapidly progressive course and obvious muscle atrophy. Patient's 1, 16 and 23 had rapid clinical progression. On follow up, the three patients showed respiratory failure. Limb weakness in all patients was proximal‑dominant. Hypotonia was observed in most patients. High arched feet were also observed as dysmorfic features. In all patients, the creatine kinase (CK) level was normal or mildly elevated, and electromyography revealed myogenic changes. Nemaline bodies were observed under a light microscope in more than half of the patients' muscle fibers, and especially in type I fibers. All patients showed fiber type I predominance and atrophy. Modified Gömöri trichrome staining showed characteristic purple‑colored rods. Muscle electron microscopy revealed the presence of high electron‑dense nemaline bodies around the nucleus, and of a disorganized myofibrillar apparatus, with broken myofilaments and irregular myofibrils and Z lines. The 28 patients with NM shared a number of clinical features, such as proximal limb weakness, reduced deep tendon reflex and dysmorfic features. Differences were also observed between the three types of patients, with regards to course progression, disease severity and respiratory failure. In conclusion, patients with NM showed great clinical heterogeneity. The diagnosis of NM was mainly based on the muscle biopsy. PMID:24788569

  1. Matrix-Similarity Based Loss Function and Feature Selection for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Suk, Heung-Il; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on Alzheimer's Disease (AD) or its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), diagnosis presented that the tasks of identifying brain disease status and predicting clinical scores based on neuroimaging features were highly related to each other. However, these tasks were often conducted independently in the previous studies. Regarding the feature selection, to our best knowledge, most of the previous work considered a loss function defined as an element-wise difference between the target values and the predicted ones. In this paper, we consider the problems of joint regression and classification for AD/MCI diagnosis and propose a novel matrix-similarity based loss function that uses high-level information inherent in the target response matrix and imposes the information to be preserved in the predicted response matrix. The newly devised loss function is combined with a group lasso method for joint feature selection across tasks, i.e., clinical scores prediction and disease status identification. We conducted experiments on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, and showed that the newly devised loss function was effective to enhance the performances of both clinical score prediction and disease status identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26379415

  2. Clinical features of dysthymia and age: a clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Bellino, S; Patria, L; Ziero, S; Rocca, G; Bogetto, F

    2001-09-20

    A few authors have described the clinical picture of dysthymia in groups of elderly patients and pointed out differences from literature reports of dysthymia in younger adults. The present study, an attempt to analyze age effects on clinical characteristics of dysthymia throughout a lifetime, was performed in a sample of 106 patients, all aged > or =18 years, who were diagnosed according to DSM-IV. The patients were evaluated using: (1) a semistructured interview to assess clinical features, family history and previous treatments; (2) the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; (3) the Interview for Recent Life Events; and (4) the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Statistical analysis with stepwise logistic regression revealed that age was positively related to concomitant medical illnesses and to the total score of recent life events, but negatively related to the presence of avoidant or dependent personality disorders. The data suggested different etiologic pathways in older and younger patients. Dysthymia appeared to be associated in younger adults with abnormalities of personality; in the elderly, with a history of health problems and life losses.

  3. Clinical Features of Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Barbara K.; Deegan, Patrick B.; Enns, Gregory M.; Guardamagna, Ornella; Horslen, Simon; Hovingh, Gerard K.; Lobritto, Steve J.; Malinova, Vera; McLin, Valerie A.; Raiman, Julian; Di Rocco, Maja; Santra, Saikat; Sharma, Reena; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Whitley, Chester B.; Eckert, Stephen; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Quinn, Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to characterize key clinical manifestations of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL D) in children and adults. Methods: Investigators reviewed medical records of LAL D patients ages ≥5 years, extracted historical data, and obtained prospective laboratory and imaging data on living patients to develop a longitudinal dataset. Results: A total of 49 patients were enrolled; 48 had confirmed LAL D. Mean age at first disease-related abnormality was 9.0 years (range 0–42); mean age at diagnosis was 15.2 years (range 1–46). Twenty-nine (60%) were male patients, and 27 (56%) were <20 years of age at the time of consent/assent. Serum transaminases were elevated in most patients with 458 of 499 (92%) of alanine aminotransferase values and 265 of 448 (59%) of aspartate aminotransferase values above the upper limit of normal. Most patients had elevated low-density lipoprotein (64% patients) and total cholesterol (63%) at baseline despite most being on lipid-lowering therapies, and 44% had high-density lipoprotein levels below the lower limit of normal. More than half of the patients with liver biopsies (n = 31, mean age 13 years) had documented evidence of steatosis (87%) and/or fibrosis (52%). Imaging assessments revealed that the median liver volume was ∼1.15 multiples of normal (MN) and median spleen volume was ∼2.2 MN. Six (13%) patients had undergone a liver transplant (ages 9–43.5 years). Conclusion: This study provides the largest longitudinal case review of patients with LAL D and confirms that LAL D is predominantly a pediatric disease causing early and progressive hepatic dysfunction associated with dyslipidemia that often leads to liver failure and transplantation. PMID:26252914

  4. Clinical and neurophysiological features of tick paralysis.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Johnston, H M; Yiannikas, C; Malik, R; Russell, R; Ouvrier, R A

    1997-11-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological findings in six Australian children with generalized tick paralysis are described. Paralysis is usually caused by the mature female of the species Ixodes holocyclus. It most frequently occurs in the spring and summer months but can be seen at any time of year. Children aged 1-5 years are most commonly affected. The tick is usually found in the scalp, often behind the ear. The typical presentation is a prodrome followed by the development of an unsteady gait, and then ascending, symmetrical, flaccid paralysis. Early cranial nerve involvement is a feature, particularly the presence of both internal and external ophthalmoplegia. In contrast to the experience with North American ticks, worsening of paralysis in the 24-48 h following tick removal is common and the child must be carefully observed over this period. Death from respiratory failure was relatively common in the first half of the century and tick paralysis remains a potentially fatal condition. Respiratory support may be required for > 1 week but full recovery occurs. This is slow with several weeks passing before the child can walk unaided. Anti-toxin has a role in the treatment of seriously ill children but there is a high incidence of acute allergy and serum sickness. Neurophysiological studies reveal low-amplitude compound muscle action potentials with normal motor conduction velocities, normal sensory studies and normal response to repetitive stimulation. The biochemical structure of the toxin of I. holocyclus has not been fully characterized but there are many clinical, neurophysiological and experimental similarities to botulinum toxin. PMID:9397015

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  6. Clinical features of symptomatic Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Isono, M; Kamida, T; Kobayashi, H; Shimomura, T; Matsuyama, J

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the clinical features of Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs), we retrospectively analyzed 15 cases with histologically confirmed RCCs. All patients underwent formal testing of visual field, endocrinological evaluation and magnetic resonance imagings. As overall presenting symptoms, endocrine disturbance was the most common symptoms, followed by visual disturbance and headache. Among the endocrine disturbances based on adenohypophysial dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia was most common. Considering the size of RCCs, RCCs could induce hyperprolactinemia only when the cysts became large enough to compress the infundibular system. Our series showed relative high incidence of pituitary dwarfism and diabetes insipidus (DI). These facts indicated that RCCs could evoke hyposecretion of growth hormone in young patients and DI in aged patients by direct compression of the pituitary gland in the early stage of progression. All cases who had headache had no other symptoms. We could not prove the evidence that RCCs could induce headaches in these cases. This might be suggested that headache could not be a sole symptom in cases of RCCs. PMID:11516552

  7. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  8. Oral candidiasis: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Patton, Lauren L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a clinical fungal infection that is the most common opportunistic infection affecting the human oral cavity. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatmentstrategies for oral candidiasis.

  9. Clinical and microbiologic features of dacryocystitis-related orbital cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Wladis, Edward J; Shinder, Roman; LeFebvre, Daniel R; Sokol, Jason A; Boyce, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Dacryocystitis-related orbital cellulitis is a relatively rare condition, and large case series of this clinical entity have been reported. This study was undertaken to identify a larger cohort of patients with this ailment, with the intent of defining its clinical and microbiologic features. Case logs from four institutions were reviewed to identify patients that suffered from dacryocystitis-related orbital cellulitis. A retrospective chart review was then performed to identify clinical features, management strategies, microbiologic features, and outcomes. A dedicated statistical software package was utilized to identify correlations between these variables. 13 patients (7 females, 6 males; mean age = 57.2 years, range = 7-89 years) were identified. One patient carried a diagnosis of immunosuppressive disease. All patients underwent emergent surgical drainage and received intravenous antibiotics. Primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction was found to be the underlying etiology in nine cases (69.2%), whereas four patients suffered from specific causes of their obstructions. An average of 1.07 organisms/patient (standard deviation = 0.49 organisms/patient) were recovered from microbiologic cultures, and Gram-positive bacteria represented the majority of cultured organisms. All patients experienced either stable or improved vision upon discharge. The relationships between a specific etiology and the possibility of vision loss or the number of organisms cultured, between the number of organisms cultured and vision loss, and immunosuppression and vision loss or the number of organisms cultured were all not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Dacryocystitis-related orbital cellulitis most commonly occurs in adult patients who do not carry immunosuppressive diagnoses and suffer from primary obstructions. Multiple microbiologic species may cause this problem, although Gram-positive organisms are most common. With appropriate management, stable or improved vision

  10. Clinical features of allergic rhinitis in children of Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    He, S; Li, Y J; Chen, J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to assess the clinical features of allergic rhinitis (AR) in children in Shanghai. Serum-specific IgE (sIgE) tests were performed on samples from patients with AR symptoms from January 2011 to December 2014. A disease-related questionnaire was completed after AR diagnosis. The allergen profile and clinical features of AR were analyzed. In total, 2713 AR patients were enrolled in this study. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was found to be the most common offending allergen in the study population. With increasing age, the prevalence of sIgE against inhalant allergens was significantly increased; however, the opposite trend was observed for food allergens. Additionally, the proportion of children with high levels of sIgE against D. pteronyssinus increased with age. Of the AR cases, 8.6% were classified as intermittent mild, 4.2% as persistent mild, 40.5% as intermittent moderate-severe, and 46.7% as persistent moderate-severe. A family history of allergies and a patient history of allergies within 6 months of birth were significantly associated with the duration and severity of AR symptoms. The occurrence of co-morbidities, such as allergic conjunctivitis, cough, and asthma, gradually increased from intermittent mild, persistent mild, and intermittent moderate-severe to persistent moderate-severe. The most frequently used drugs were topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines, which were used by 86.7 and 79.0% of patients, respectively. These results confirm the adequacy of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines for classifying AR patients, and advance the understanding of clinical features of AR in children in Shanghai, China. PMID:27173334

  11. Barrett's oesophagus: epidemiology, diagnosis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, David C; Kendall, Bradley J

    2016-10-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is a condition characterised by partial replacement of the normal squamous epithelium of the lower oesophagus by a metaplastic columnar epithelium containing goblet cells (intestinal metaplasia). Barrett's oesophagus is important clinically because those afflicted are predisposed to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Prevalence surveys suggest that up to 2% of the population may be affected; most will be unaware of their diagnosis. Risk factors include age, male sex, gastro-oesophageal acid reflux, central obesity and smoking. Helicobacter pylori infection confers a reduced risk of Barrett's oesophagus. Risks of cancer progression are lower than originally reported and are now estimated at 1-3 per 1000 patient-years for patients with non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. Progression rates are higher for patients with long segment (≥ 3 cm) and dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. Australian guidelines have been developed to aid practitioners in managing patients with Barrett's oesophagus and early oesophageal adenocarcinoma. While generalised population screening for Barrett's oesophagus is not recommended, endoscopic surveillance of patients with confirmed Barrett's oesophagus is recommended, with surveillance intervals dependent on segment length and presence of dysplasia. New techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic radiofrequency ablation are now available to treat patients with dysplasia and early oesophageal adenocarcinoma. New screening and surveillance technologies are currently under investigation; these may prove cost-effective in identifying and managing patients in the community. PMID:27681974

  12. Brain SPECT quantitation in clinical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    Methods to quantitate SPECT data for clinical diagnosis should be chosen so that they take advantage of the lessons learned from PET data. This is particularly important because current SPECT high-resolution brain imaging systems now produce images that are similar in resolution to those generated by the last generation PET equipment (9 mm FWHM). These high-resolution SPECT systems make quantitation of SPECT more problematic than earlier. Methodology validated on low-resolution SPECT systems may no longer be valid for data obtained with the newer SPECT systems. For example, in patients with dementia, the ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity often was studied. However, with new instruments, the cerebellum appears very different: discrete regions are more apparent. The large cerebellar regions usually used with older instrumentation are of an inappropriate size for the new equipment. The normal range for any method of quantitation determined using older equipment probably changes for data obtained with new equipment. It is not surprising that Kim et al. in their simulations demonstrated that because of the finite resolution of imaging systems, the ability to measure pure function is limited, with {open_quotes}anatomy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}function{close_quotes} coupled in a {open_quotes}complex nonlinear way{close_quotes}. 11 refs.

  13. Barrett's oesophagus: epidemiology, diagnosis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, David C; Kendall, Bradley J

    2016-10-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is a condition characterised by partial replacement of the normal squamous epithelium of the lower oesophagus by a metaplastic columnar epithelium containing goblet cells (intestinal metaplasia). Barrett's oesophagus is important clinically because those afflicted are predisposed to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Prevalence surveys suggest that up to 2% of the population may be affected; most will be unaware of their diagnosis. Risk factors include age, male sex, gastro-oesophageal acid reflux, central obesity and smoking. Helicobacter pylori infection confers a reduced risk of Barrett's oesophagus. Risks of cancer progression are lower than originally reported and are now estimated at 1-3 per 1000 patient-years for patients with non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. Progression rates are higher for patients with long segment (≥ 3 cm) and dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. Australian guidelines have been developed to aid practitioners in managing patients with Barrett's oesophagus and early oesophageal adenocarcinoma. While generalised population screening for Barrett's oesophagus is not recommended, endoscopic surveillance of patients with confirmed Barrett's oesophagus is recommended, with surveillance intervals dependent on segment length and presence of dysplasia. New techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic radiofrequency ablation are now available to treat patients with dysplasia and early oesophageal adenocarcinoma. New screening and surveillance technologies are currently under investigation; these may prove cost-effective in identifying and managing patients in the community.

  14. Hairy cell leukemia: clinical features and therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Golomb, H M

    1987-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare chronic lymphoproliferative disorder which has been extensively studied over the past decade. Much has been learned regarding the diagnosis, natural history, biology, and treatment of this unique neoplasm. The disease most commonly affects middle aged men and characteristic clinical features include splenomegaly, cytopenias, and usually the presence in the peripheral blood of distinctive 'hairy cells' with irregular cytoplasmic projections. Diagnosis can usually be confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. Although the natural history can be extremely variable among patients, complications are usually referable to the cytopenias, with anemia and infection being most frequent. In addition to pyogenic infections, patients are susceptible to unusual organisms including atypical mycobacterium, legionella, and fungi. The requirement of red blood cell transfusion, severe granulocytopenia or thrombocytopenia, frequent infections, or painful splenomegaly are all indications for treatment. Splenectomy is the standard initial treatment of choice. However, in the past few years there have been exciting major advances in the therapeutic modalities for HCL. Recombinant alpha-interferon is highly effective, with beneficial responses occurring in close to 90% of patients. The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved the use of interferon for HCL. This represents the first time a biological response modifier has been approved for the treatment of human disease. In addition, preliminary results with the adenosine deaminase inhibitor, 2'deoxycoformycin (dcf), have been encouraging. Further clinical trials are required in order to determine the optimal sequential treatment strategy for HCL. The exact mechanisms of action of both interferon and dcf in HCL remain to be elucidated. A better understanding of the unusual features of the hairy cell and the underlying biological effect of these two agents in HCL may have important applications in other

  15. Wilson disease: pathogenesis and clinical considerations in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosencrantz, Richard; Schilsky, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Nearly a century after Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson composed his doctoral thesis on the pathologic findings of "lenticular degeneration" in the brain associated with cirrhosis of the liver we know that the underlying molecular basis for this autosomal recessive inherited disorder that now bears his name is mutation of a copper transporting ATPase, ATP7B, an intracellular copper transporter mainly expressed in hepatocytes. Loss of ATP7B function is the basis for reduced hepatic biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin. During the intervening years, there was recognition of the clinical signs, histologic, biochemical features, and mutation analysis of ATP7B that characterize and enable diagnosis of this disorder. These include the presence of signs of liver or neurologic disease and detection of Kayser-Fleischer rings, low ceruloplasmin, elevated urine and hepatic copper, and associated histologic changes in the liver. Medical therapies and liver transplantation can effectively treat patients with this once uniformly fatal disorder. The earlier detection of the disease led to the initiation of treatment to prevent disease progression and reverse pathologic findings if present, and family screening to detect the disorder in first-degree relatives is warranted. Gene therapy and hepatocyte cell transplantation for Wilson disease has only been tested in animal models but represent future areas for study. Despite all the advances we still have to consider the diagnosis of Wilson disease to test patients for this disorder and properly establish the diagnosis before committing to life-long treatment.

  16. Wilson disease: pathogenesis and clinical considerations in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosencrantz, Richard; Schilsky, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Nearly a century after Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson composed his doctoral thesis on the pathologic findings of "lenticular degeneration" in the brain associated with cirrhosis of the liver we know that the underlying molecular basis for this autosomal recessive inherited disorder that now bears his name is mutation of a copper transporting ATPase, ATP7B, an intracellular copper transporter mainly expressed in hepatocytes. Loss of ATP7B function is the basis for reduced hepatic biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin. During the intervening years, there was recognition of the clinical signs, histologic, biochemical features, and mutation analysis of ATP7B that characterize and enable diagnosis of this disorder. These include the presence of signs of liver or neurologic disease and detection of Kayser-Fleischer rings, low ceruloplasmin, elevated urine and hepatic copper, and associated histologic changes in the liver. Medical therapies and liver transplantation can effectively treat patients with this once uniformly fatal disorder. The earlier detection of the disease led to the initiation of treatment to prevent disease progression and reverse pathologic findings if present, and family screening to detect the disorder in first-degree relatives is warranted. Gene therapy and hepatocyte cell transplantation for Wilson disease has only been tested in animal models but represent future areas for study. Despite all the advances we still have to consider the diagnosis of Wilson disease to test patients for this disorder and properly establish the diagnosis before committing to life-long treatment. PMID:21901655

  17. Isolated cardiac sarcoidosis: clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Mitsuaki; Tezuka, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas in multiple organs. Despite extensive investigations over a long period of time, the etiology of this disease remains unknown. Cardiac involvement of this disease is the most ominous complication leading to fatal outcome. Recently, attention has been focused on isolated cardiac sarcoidosis, which exists without clinically apparent sarcoidosis elsewhere. One of the critical issues of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis is difficulty in diagnosis, since existence of the cardiac lesion should be detected from cardiac manifestations alone. Because specificity of biomarkers or sensitivity of histological examination of biopsied sample is very low, diagnosis of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis mainly depends on imaging modalities. In this review article we summarized current knowledge on the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis, clinical features of cardiac sarcoidosis especially that isolated to the heart by showing some typical cases. Utilities and problems of diagnostic imaging tests for this condition including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography are discussed. Advances in pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment for cardiac sarcoidosis have improved the prognosis of cardiac sarcoidosis to a great deal; however, there are many issues that remain to be solved in the management of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis.

  18. [How important is the clinical context for a histopathological diagnosis?].

    PubMed

    Bosman, Fred T

    2005-11-30

    A histopathological examination consists of two distinct phases: observation and interpretation. As a rule, macro- and microscopical examination give strong diagnostic indicators and the diagnosis is made instantaneously: the two phases are strongly interwoven. Also, the clinical context often provides essential clues as to the final diagnosis. A request for a pathology examination must hence come with clinical informations and a specific question. Yet, the pathologist has to keep in mind that the interpretation of what he sees might follow too enthusiastically the proposed clinical diagnosis. It is hence preferable for the pathologist to take note of the clinical context only after the microscopic examination has been accomplished.

  19. [Human leptospirosis in French Polynesia. Epidemiological, clinical and bacteriological features].

    PubMed

    Coudert, C; Beau, F; Berlioz-Arthaud, A; Melix, G; Devaud, F; Boyeau, E; Jaomeau, C; Lablee, P; Jarno, P

    2007-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a severe zoonotic disease that constitutes a major public health problem for the island populations of French Polynesia. Due to protean clinical manifestations and the risk of misdiagnosis with dengue fever, endemic viral disease, laboratory studies are necessary to confirm diagnosis of leptospirosis. At the request of the Pacific Public Health Surveillance Network, a prospective study was conducted in the population of Raieatea in the Windward Islands and the Marquis Islands to determine the epidemiological features of the disease and to define appropriate control measures. A total of 113 patients were enrolled in study between March 2004 and March 2005. Thirty-three cases were confirmed based on demonstration of serum DNA or seroconversion. The estimated annual incidence of leptospirosis was 1.7 per 1000 inhabitants. Cases involved mainly (75%) young men (mean age, 30.5 years) and occurred predominantly during the rainy season. Swimming in fresh water was the only factor showing significant correlation (p < 0.02) with positive diagnosis of leptospirosis. The most frequently identified serotype was Leptospira icterohemorrahgiae (43% of strains), thus suggesting that the rat was the most common human transmission vector. However other serotypes were found, underlining the presence of diverse reservoirs and casting doubt on the efficacy of immunization using a monovalent vaccine. These findings also indicate that enhancement of prevention and control measures for leptospirosis is needed.

  20. Clinical and serologic features of patients with polymyositis or dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Daniel J.; Brownell, A. Keith W.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and serologic features of 36 patients with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) were observed over a 5-year period. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 48.5 years, and 61% were female. According to widely accepted diagnostic criteria 50% had PM (group I), 14% DM (group II), 11% PM or DM associated with malignant disease (group III) and 25% PM or DM associated with a connective tissue disorder (group V). None of the patients had childhood PM or DM associated with vasculitis (group IV). All the patients had muscle weakness, and 94% of the patients tested had an elevated serum level of creatine kinase. The average delay from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 14 months overall but only 2.3 months for the DM patients. Of the 30 patients whose serum was tested, 73% had antinuclear antibodies, with antibodies to nuclear ribonucleoprotein being most common in group V patients and antibodies directed against the Jo-1 antigen being restricted to patients with PM alone (group I). ImagesFig. 1 PMID:3872156

  1. Pedobarography in Diagnosis and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Skopljak, Amira; Muftic, Mirsad; Sukalo, Aziz; Masic, Izet; Zunic, Lejla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pedobarography as a new diagnostic tool enables measuring the pressure between the foot and the floor during dynamic loading. Dynamic analysis of the foot shows advantage over static analysis due to its capabilities for detecting high load points in certain diseases and in certain phases of walking. Pedobarography as a new method in the context of rehabilitation include wide range of clinical entities. Goal: To show the advantages of pedobarography as new diagnostic and rehabilitation method in prevention programs. Material and methods: A prospective study included 100 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Research was conducted in the Primary Health Care Center of the Sarajevo Canton and the Center for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The test parameters were: Test of balance–symmetric load for the test, the number of comorbidity, clinical examination of foot deformity, test with 10 g monofilament, HbA1c. From the total sample 45 patients (Group I) were selected, aged 50-65 years, which underwent pedobarography (on the appliance Novel Inc., Munich with EMED™ platform) and robotic fabrication of individual orthopedic insoles, followed by control pedobarography. Plantar pressure was determined using standard pedobarography, computer recorded parameters: peak pressure (kPa), force (Ns), area (cm). Results: The average age of the respondents was 59.4±11.38 years; altered results on the balance test were present in 34% of patients; 61% of respondents have ≤2 comorbidity. In the total sample, the average number of foot deformity was 2.84. Flat feet have 66% of respondents, and valgus position 57%. The average HbA1c values were 7.783±1.58% (min.5–max.15.0). All subjects (45) after the first, and after the second measurement of peak pressure, have values above 200 kPa, or are in the designated zone of peak pressure that needs to be corrected. In a study was determined the correlation between the number of deformities and peak pressure, the

  2. Co-Existence of Various Clinical and Histopathological Features of Mycosis Fungoides in a Young Female

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Najafian, Jamshid; Rajabi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and a rare disorder that typically affects older adults with erythematous scaling patches and plaques. Hypopigmented patches are a rare clinical variant of the disease. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is also a rare type of CTCL. No particular clinical criteria are available for the diagnosis of GMF, because of its variable presentations, and so the detection of GMF is primarily considered as a histopathological diagnosis. Rarely, a co-existence of more than one clinical or histopathological feature of mycosis fungoides may be present. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of MF that shows the simultaneous co-existence of more than one clinical and histopathological variant of MF. We present a 29-year-old female with clinical presentations of both classic and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF), and also the histopathological features of the classic and granulomatous types of the disease. PMID:25814741

  3. Co-existence of various clinical and histopathological features of mycosis fungoides in a young female.

    PubMed

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Najafian, Jamshid; Rajabi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and a rare disorder that typically affects older adults with erythematous scaling patches and plaques. Hypopigmented patches are a rare clinical variant of the disease. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is also a rare type of CTCL. No particular clinical criteria are available for the diagnosis of GMF, because of its variable presentations, and so the detection of GMF is primarily considered as a histopathological diagnosis. Rarely, a co-existence of more than one clinical or histopathological feature of mycosis fungoides may be present. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of MF that shows the simultaneous co-existence of more than one clinical and histopathological variant of MF. We present a 29-year-old female with clinical presentations of both classic and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF), and also the histopathological features of the classic and granulomatous types of the disease.

  4. Primary cicatricial alopecia: clinical features and management.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elizabeth K

    2007-04-01

    The primary cicatricial alopecias are an uncommon, complex group of disorders that result in permanent destruction of the hair follicle, usually involving scalp hair alone. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are needed to help thwart continued hair loss and the distress that often accompanies this hair loss. Nurses can facilitate the diagnostic and treatment process and, through educational and emotionally supportive measures, have a meaningful, positive impact on the patient's well being.

  5. Pulmonary tuberculosis: clinical features and patient management.

    PubMed

    Gough, Andrea; Kaufman, Gerri

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common infectious disease and a major cause of illness and death throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. This article explores the difference between latent TB infection and active TB disease, and discusses the pharmacological management of TB and issues around adherence to medication. Although TB is usually managed by specialist teams it is essential that all practitioners have an understanding of the signs and symptoms of the disease to ensure early referral and accurate diagnosis. PMID:21888103

  6. Application of Multilabel Learning Using the Relevant Feature for Each Label in Chronic Gastritis Syndrome Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Ping; Yan, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yi-Qin; Fu, Jing-Jing; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Guo, Rui; Qian, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Background. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), most of the algorithms are used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis that only focus on one syndrome, that is, single label learning. However, in clinical practice, patients may simultaneously have more than one syndrome, which has its own symptoms (signs). Methods. We employed a multilabel learning using the relevant feature for each label (REAL) algorithm to construct a syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG) in TCM. REAL combines feature selection methods to select the significant symptoms (signs) of CG. The method was tested on 919 patients using the standard scale. Results. The highest prediction accuracy was achieved when 20 features were selected. The features selected with the information gain were more consistent with the TCM theory. The lowest average accuracy was 54% using multi-label neural networks (BP-MLL), whereas the highest was 82% using REAL for constructing the diagnostic model. For coverage, hamming loss, and ranking loss, the values obtained using the REAL algorithm were the lowest at 0.160, 0.142, and 0.177, respectively. Conclusion. REAL extracts the relevant symptoms (signs) for each syndrome and improves its recognition accuracy. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice. PMID:22719781

  7. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and clinical assessment of asthma in the adult.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Kathryn; Skora, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is characterized by 3 distinct responses in the airways: inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling. Clinical diagnosis of asthma is often based on the presence of symptoms, such as cough, wheeze, breathlessness, and chest tightness; but the presence of these symptoms is not exclusive to asthma, and clinical correlation with spirometry and other diagnostic testing is essential. Once a diagnosis of asthma is established, the focus of care should be toward control of the disease. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and clinical assessment of asthma in the adult patient population.

  8. Initial clinical manifestations of Parkinson's disease: features and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Krack, Paul; Litvan, Irene; Macias, Raúl; Bezard, Erwan; Obeso, José A

    2009-12-01

    A dopaminergic deficiency in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) causes abnormalities of movement, behaviour, learning, and emotions. The main motor features (ie, tremor, rigidity, and akinesia) are associated with a deficiency of dopamine in the posterior putamen and the motor circuit. Hypokinesia and bradykinesia might have a dual anatomo-functional basis: hypokinesia mediated by brainstem mechanisms and bradykinesia by cortical mechanisms. The classic pathophysiological model for PD (ie, hyperactivity in the globus pallidus pars interna and substantia nigra pars reticulata) does not explain rigidity and tremor, which might be caused by changes in primary motor cortex activity. Executive functions (ie, planning and problem solving) are also impaired in early PD, but are usually not clinically noticed. These impairments are associated with dopamine deficiency in the caudate nucleus and with dysfunction of the associative and other non-motor circuits. Apathy, anxiety, and depression are the main psychiatric manifestations in untreated PD, which might be caused by ventral striatum dopaminergic deficit and depletion of serotonin and norepinephrine. In this Review we discuss the motor, cognitive, and psychiatric manifestations associated with the dopaminergic deficiency in the early phase of the parkinsonian state and the different circuits implicated, and we propose distinct mechanisms to explain the wide clinical range of PD symptoms at the time of diagnosis. PMID:19909911

  9. Clinical Features and Prognosis of Herpetic Anterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kardeş, Esra; Bozkurt, Kansu; Sezgin Akçay, Betül İlkay; Ünlü, Cihan; Aydoğan Gezginaslan, Tuğba; Ergin, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical features, complications, visual outcomes and treatment modalities in patients clinically diagnosed with herpetic anterior uveitis (AU). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 67 patients seen at the Umraniye Training and Research Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinic, Uveitis and Cornea Department from January 2009 to June 2013. Results: Thirty-seven patients (55.2%) were female and 30 (44.7%) patients were male. The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 10.6 months (range: 1-45 months). The most common ocular findings were granulomatous keratic precipitates (KPs) (82.2%), corneal involvement (62.6%), iris atrophy (41.7%) and transient elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) (40.2%). Recurrences were observed in 46.2% of the eyes and the median recurrence rate was 1.0 during the follow-up period. Topical steroids and oral antiviral (acyclovir) therapy were applied to all patients during active episodes. Long-term oral acyclovir was used in 29.8% of the patients. Recurrence rates were significantly lower in patients who used oral acyclovir for more than 6 months, whereas complications rates and final visual acuity did not show any difference between groups. Final visual acuity was better than 20/40 in 61.1% of eyes, and visual impairment was due to corneal scarring or cataract formation. Conclusion: Herpetic AU can present with or without corneal involvement. Granulomatous KPs, iris atrophy and elevated IOP are important clinical findings for the diagnosis of cases without corneal involvement. Long-term oral acyclovir treatment (more than 6 months) and is important to decrease recurrence rates and possible complications. Visual prognosis is favorable in cases without corneal scarring. PMID:27800272

  10. Factors Associated with Clinical and Topographical Features of Laryngeal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis, João Gustavo Corrêa; Reis, Clarissa Souza Mota; da Costa, Daniel César Silva; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Rolla, Valéria Cavalcanti; Conceição-Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laryngeal tuberculosis (LTB) is the most frequent granulomatous disease of the larynx and represents less than 2% of extrapulmonary TB cases. There are no pathognomonic clinical and endoscopic features of this disease and studies on LTB that can assist in its diagnostic characterization are lacking. Objective To identify factors associated with clinical and topographical features of LTB. Method a retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the medical records of 36 patients with confirmed LTB diagnosis. Results Dysphonia and cough were the main symptoms presented by patients and the true vocal folds the most frequently affected site. The average of the duration of the disease evolution was significantly higher in patients with dysphonia than in patients without this symptom. We observed association between dysphonia and true vocal fold lesions and between odynophagia and lesions in the epiglottis, arytenoids and aryepiglottic folds. Odynophagia was more frequent in individuals with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites. Weight loss equal or above 10% of the body weight was more frequent in patients with odynophagia as first symptom and in patients with ulcerated lesion. Dyspnea on exertion was more frequent in individuals with more extensive laryngeal lesions. The percentage of smokers with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites was greater than that found in non-smokers. Laryngeal tissue fragment bacilloscopy and culture examinations were less positive than sputum ones. Conclusions Smoking appears to be associated with the development of more extensive LTB lesions, and LTB with dyspnea on exertion and odynophagia with consequent impairment of nutritional status. We emphasize the need for histopathologic confirmation, once positive sputum bacteriological examinations seem not to necessarily reflect laryngeal involvement. PMID:27077734

  11. Evaluating suspected work-related neurologic disorders (clinical diagnosis).

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marcello; Aminoff, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of work-related neurologic disorders is essentially one of exclusion because symptoms and signs are often nonspecific. The clinical reasoning requires a three-step approach: (1) establish the characteristics of the presenting disease; (2) ascertain that observed clinical features are consistent with those caused by the suspected agent(s); and (3) assess occupational exposures. A detailed history is of paramount importance in evaluating patients with suspected work-related neurologic disorders as it is in other clinical contexts, especially because in some circumstances it may represent the only criterion to establish causality. Thus, besides characterization of neurologic symptoms, including their location, quality, timecourse, and possible other associated symptoms, the work environment of the patient should be understood in full detail. In this respect, when a neurotoxin is suspected, then the history collection can be guided by the knowledge of the likely syndromes it produces. Similarly, physical examination should be directed to the target of toxicity/entrapment based on information from the work history. Although specific sites and elements of the nervous system may be affected depending on the offending agent, most neurotoxic disorders are characterized by generalized rather than focal neurologic abnormalities. Laboratory toxicologic tests have limited application for the etiologic diagnosis of neurotoxic disorders, except in cases of acute poisoning and in patients exposed to neurotoxic chemicals with prolonged half-life. In most cases examination takes place after the end of exposure, when the offending chemical is no longer detectable in body fluids. Electrophysiologic studies, in particular evoked potentials, electromyography, and conduction velocities, are important to confirm the organic basis of symptoms, particularly to detect subclinical or early neurologic involvement and to reduce the number of disorders to be considered in

  12. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Muhammad; Bermingham, Niamh; Keohane, Catherine; Harney, Sinead

    2012-04-01

    We report a patient who presented with clinical and MRI findings suggestive of polymyositis but, in whom, muscle biopsy disclosed a strikingly different diagnosis. A 65-year-old woman presented with 3-week history of bilateral proximal muscle pain and weakness. Laboratory investigations showed markedly elevated inflammatory markers and mildly elevated muscle enzymes. MRI scans of lower limbs showed features suggestive of polymyositis. However, muscle biopsy showed features of a polyarteritis-type vasculitis affecting an intramuscular blood vessel. Our reports highlight the critical role of muscle biopsy in establishing the correct diagnosis in patients with suspected myositis.

  13. Acute arsenic poisoning: clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, B; Córdoba, S; Nieto, S; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Díez, A

    1999-12-01

    We report a woman with acute arsenic poisoning, who developed an erythroderma with vesicles and pustules after the ingestion of 8-16 g of sodium arsenite. Simultaneously, she presented a herpes simplex virus infection. Skin biopsies showed unique features which included multiple small pigment granules inside and outside the histiocytes. In our opinion, these findings are consistent with acute arsenic poisoning, and constitute the first histological description of this entity in skin.

  14. Cachexia: clinical features when inflammation drives malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Laviano, Alessandro; Koverech, Angela; Mari, Alessia

    2015-11-01

    Cachexia is a clinically relevant syndrome which impacts on quality of life, morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from acute and chronic diseases. The hallmark of cachexia is muscle loss, which is triggered by disease-associated inflammatory response. Cachexia is a continuum and therefore a staging system is needed. Initially, a three-stage system (i.e. pre-cachexia, cachexia and refractory cachexia) was proposed. More recent evidence supports the use of a five-stage classification system, based on patient's BMI and severity of weight loss, to better predict clinical outcome. Also, large clinical trials in cancer patients demonstrated that cachexia emerging during chemotherapy has greater influence on survival than weight loss at baseline. Therefore, becoming widely accepted is the importance of routinely monitoring patients' nutritional status to detect early changes and diagnose cachexia in its early phases. Although cachexia is associated with the presence of anabolic resistance, it has been shown that sustained yet physiological hyperaminoacidaemia, as well as the use of specific nutrients, is able to overcome impaired protein synthesis and revert catabolism. More importantly, clinical evidence demonstrates that preservation of nutritional status during chemotherapy or improvement of body weight after weight loss is associated with longer survival in cancer patients.

  15. Antenatal diagnosis of chorioangioma of the placenta: MR features

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Takao; Imai, Michiko; Isoda, Haruo

    1996-05-01

    We report a case of chorioangioma of the placenta, in which MR findings were useful in establishing the antenatal diagnosis. Polyhydramnios and a placental tumor that was 5 cm in size were visualized. The tumor had relatively high signal intensities on proton density imaging and T2-weighted imaging and showed partially high intensity signal rims on T1-weighted imaging, especially when using a breath-holding technique. Magnetic resonance imaging has an important role in detection and diagnosis of these lesions, particularly the larger tumors, so that appropriate steps can be taken to deal with the complications that may accompany this tumor. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Superficial mucoceles: pitfall in clinical and microscopic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Eveson, J W

    1988-09-01

    Extravasation mucoceles can be so superficial that they are seen as subepithelial blisters. These may rupture and cause superficial painful ulcers, which usually heal quickly. Occasionally such lesions may be seen in association with other mucosal disorders, particularly lichen planus, and a biopsy is undertaken to establish the diagnosis. In addition, the reporting pathologist may make an erroneous diagnosis of a subepithelial vesiculating disorder such as mucous membrane pemphigoid, especially when the clinical history is vague. Eight cases are described that illustrate some of the pitfalls in clinical and microscopical diagnosis of superficial mucoceles.

  17. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  18. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  19. A clinical approach to the diagnosis of patients with leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leventer, Richard J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; van Hove, Johan; Pizzino, Amy; McNeill, Nathan H.; Helman, Guy; Simons, Cas; Schmidt, Johanna L.; Rizzo, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Leukodystrophies (LD) and genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLE) are disorders that result in white matter abnormalities in the central nervous system (CNS). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) has dramatically improved and systematized the diagnosis of LDs and gLEs, and in combination with specific clinical features, such as Addison's disease in Adrenoleukodystrophy or hypodontia in Pol-III related or 4H leukodystrophy, can often resolve a case with a minimum of testing. The diagnostic odyssey for the majority LD and gLE patients, however, remains extensive – many patients will wait nearly a decade for a definitive diagnosis and at least half will remain unresolved. The combination of MRI, careful clinical evaluation and next generation genetic sequencing holds promise for both expediting the diagnostic process and dramatically reducing the number of unresolved cases. Here we present a workflow detailing the Global Leukodystrophy Initiative (GLIA) consensus recommendations for an approach to clinical diagnosis, including salient clinical features suggesting a specific diagnosis, neuroim-aging features and molecular genetic testing. We also discuss recommendations on the use of broad-spectrum next-generation sequencing in instances of ambiguous MRI or clinical findings. We conclude with a proposal for systematic trials of genome-wide agnostic testing as a first line diagnostic in LDs and gLEs given the increasing number of genes associated with these disorders. PMID:25655951

  20. Benign Occipital Epilepsies of Childhood: Clinical Features and Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Isabella; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Kivity, Sara; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2008-01-01

    The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC) are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. Our aim was to explore the clinical features, classification and clinical genetics of these syndromes using twin and multiplex family studies to determine whether…

  1. [Clinical features and genetics of the ichthyosis vulgaris group].

    PubMed

    Traupe, H; Happle, R

    1980-12-11

    Combined application of clinical, genetic and histological criteria in general allows a definite diagnosis of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris and of X-linked recessive ichthyosis. For differential diagnosis, the following rare syndromes should be considered: ichthyosis bullosa: Refsum syndrome; Jung-Vogel syndrome; ichthyosis with corneal opacity, pili torti and alopecia; ichthyosis with deafness, pili torti and dental anomalies; and ichthyosis with hepatosplenomegaly and cerebellar degeneration.

  2. Cortical auditory disorders: clinical and psychoacoustic features.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, M F; Geehan, G R

    1988-01-01

    The symptoms of two patients with bilateral cortical auditory lesions evolved from cortical deafness to other auditory syndromes: generalised auditory agnosia, amusia and/or pure word deafness, and a residual impairment of temporal sequencing. On investigation, both had dysacusis, absent middle latency evoked responses, acoustic errors in sound recognition and matching, inconsistent auditory behaviours, and similarly disturbed psychoacoustic discrimination tasks. These findings indicate that the different clinical syndromes caused by cortical auditory lesions form a spectrum of related auditory processing disorders. Differences between syndromes may depend on the degree of involvement of a primary cortical processing system, the more diffuse accessory system, and possibly the efferent auditory system. Images PMID:2450968

  3. [Corneal neovascularization: epidemiological, physiopathological, and clinical features].

    PubMed

    Benayoun, Y; Casse, G; Forte, R; Dallaudière, B; Adenis, J-P; Robert, P-Y

    2013-09-01

    Corneal neovascularization is defined as the presence of vessels within the normally avascular corneal stroma. This physiopathological process is the consequence of local hyper-expression of pro-angiogenic factors in response to tissue damage. These new vessels (neovessels), initially immature and poorly developed, predispose the cornea to lipid exudation, inflammation, and scarring. Additionally, the influx of vascular cells into the stroma induces a loss of the cornea's immune privilege, resulting in a higher rate of graft rejection. In this literature review, we touch on epidemiological, physiopathological, and clinical aspects of corneal neovascularization, as well as secondary complications.

  4. Clinical features of Eosinophilic esophagitis in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Miehlke, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) may affect humans at any age with a predominance for Caucasian males. The clinical manifestation of EoE varies depending on the patient's age. Infants and young children may primarily present with unspecific symptoms such as feeding problems, vomiting and abdominal pain. In adolescents and adults, dysphagia and food impactation become the predominant symptoms. EoE should also be considered in cases of refractory heartburn in both children and adults. Concomitant allergic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis and eczema, as well as peripheral eosinophilia and elevated total serum IgE values are common in pediatric and adult EoE patients. EoE seems to be primarily a food antigen-driven disease, whereas in adults, aeroallergen sensitization may dominate. Endoscopic features of EoE include mucosal edema, furrows, exudates, corrugated rings, strictures, and the so-called crepe paper sign. There appears to be a shift from an inflammatory-predominant phenotype in young childhood towards a more fibrotic phenotype in adolescents and adults. Long-term follow studies suggest that EoE is a chronic and potentially progressive disease causing recurring dysphagia in the majority of cases. The prevalence of strictures significantly increases with the duration of untreated disease, stressing the importance of early diagnosis and consequent treatment of EoE. PMID:26552773

  5. Clinical features of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia expressed in the knee.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Noguchi, Y; Mitsuyasu, H; Nagamine, R; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of the knee affected by multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Thirty-one cases of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia were reviewed. Of the patients, 11 were male and 20 were female. The average age at onset of symptoms was 22.5 years. The average age at initial visit to the authors' hospital was 28.9 years. Radiographic findings showed epiphyseal abnormality of the knee in all but two (93%) cases. Irregularity, segmentation of the epiphysis, widening of the joint space, and genu valgum deformity were the dominant findings before epiphyseal closure. After epiphyseal closure, the most characteristic finding was a shallow femoral trochlear groove, which was observed in 56.5% of the cases. Other findings in adult patients included early onset osteoarthritic change, genu valgum, depression of the lateral tibial plateau, and multiple free bodies. However, there still is a possibility that multiple epiphyseal dysplasia exists, even if the patient lacks a shallow femoral trochlear groove. If genu valgum or varum, free bodies, and premature osteoarthritis are observed, one should evaluate other joints, keeping a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia in mind. Patients with knees that have a femoral trochlear groove of normal or near normal shape do exist, and premature osteoarthritic changes may develop in such patients. PMID:11064990

  6. [Clinical diagnosis progress and continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, N A; Svistunov, A A; Fomin, V V

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses current approaches to diagnosing in an internal medicine clinic and to improving diagnostic tactics. It gives prospects for training physicians in current diagnostic approaches in the framework of the continuing medical education system.

  7. [Food allergy: definition, diagnosis, epidemiology, clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1996-05-01

    Contrary to the lay and media perception, adverse reactions to foods (and food additives) occur less often than believed by the patients. The term food intolerance (FI) is widely misused as a cause of all sorts of symptoms and diseases. This diagnosis is often based on "alternative" techniques. Food allergy (FA) is the correct diagnosis if the symptoms resulting from the ingestion of a food (or an ingredient) are due to an immune mechanism. This diagnosis is seldom difficult in the case of a severe reaction immediately after ingestion of the food and when skin prick tests and/or IgE antibodies to the incriminated food are clearly positive. However, the best way to establish FA/FI is-apart from exclusion from the diet, which tends to have a marked placebo effect-the performance of proper double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC). Evidently, there are difficulties in conducting studies of this nature in a large population sample, and so far only three prevalence studies in Dutch and English adults have been based on DBPCFC. The reported prevalences of FA/FI (questionnaire answers) were 12% to 19%, whereas the confirmed prevalences varied from 0.8% to 2.4%. For additive intolerance the prevalence varied between 0.01 to 0.23%. The consequences of mistaken perception of FA/FI, which can have a major social impact in financial and health terms, require an information campaign for doctors, lay and media in connection with these problems.

  8. Amebic liver abscess: epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Seeto, R K; Rockey, D C

    1999-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is a serious, but readily treatable form of hepatic infection. In order to understand the clinical features of this condition in the United States, we reviewed the medical histories of 56 patients with ALA at two large San Francisco Hospitals from 1979 to 1994. Patients were divided into the following groups based on the presumed manner in which they had acquired ALA: those born or raised in the United States, with a history of travel to an endemic area (Tr-ALA); those from an endemic area, but living in the United States for less than one year (En-ALA); and those neither from nor having traveled to an endemic area (N-ALA). We found distinct clinical patterns in patients from different epidemiological groups. Patients with Tr-ALA were a decade older than those from endemic regions, were more likely to be male, and tended to have an insidious onset. Furthermore, compared to patients with En-ALA, those with Tr-ALA were more likely to have hepatomegaly (P < 0.0001) and large abscesses (ALA > 10 cm; P < 0.01). One third of the patients studied had no associated travel history or endemic origin as risk factors. Of these, 63% had a condition consistent with severe immunosuppression, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnourishment with severe hypoalbuminemia, or chronic infection. In patients with N-ALA, the presence of a presumed immunosuppressed state increased significantly, as compared to patients with endemic or travel risk factors for ALA. During the last five years of the study, one third of all patients diagnosed with ALA were HIV positive (including 2 with a new diagnosis of AIDS), many of whom were discovered to be HIV-infected only after presentation with ALA. We conclude that travel to and origin in an endemic area are important risk factors for the development of ALA, and patients in these different epidemiological groups appear to have distinct clinical features. Further, in the absence of recognized

  9. Diaper dermatitis: clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Carrie C; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Frieden, Ilona J

    2014-11-01

    A diverse group of diseases can cause skin conditions in the diaper area including those which are directly caused by diapers or the diaper environment, some which are not directly due to, but are worsened by, the wearing of diapers, and those which are independent of the presence of the diaper or its resulting environment. Many of these conditions are limited to this area of the skin, but others extend to skin outside this area, and some are signs of systemic disease. We review many of the important causes of eruptions in the diaper area and emphasize key points in the differential diagnosis.

  10. Systemic mastocytosis: clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Joseph H

    2006-08-01

    Mast cells produce symptoms by local and remote effects of mediator release and by their presence in increased numbers in normal tissue and bone marrow, where they damage and impair normal organ function. Moreover, mast cells are long-lived and heterogeneous in their response to secretagogues and to inhibitors of mediator release. Clinicians sorting out the diagnosis of SM on the basis of presenting signs and symptoms continue to have their diagnostic skills challenged because of the rarity of this disorder, the fact that many symptoms of SM are present in more common disorders, and the multiple guises that SM may assume at the time of presentation.

  11. Computer-Based Image Analysis for Plus Disease Diagnosis in Retinopathy of Prematurity: Performance of the “i-ROP” System and Image Features Associated With Expert Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ataer-Cansizoglu, Esra; Bolon-Canedo, Veronica; Campbell, J. Peter; Bozkurt, Alican; Erdogmus, Deniz; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Patel, Samir; Jonas, Karyn; Chan, R. V. Paul; Ostmo, Susan; Chiang, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We developed and evaluated the performance of a novel computer-based image analysis system for grading plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and identified the image features, shapes, and sizes that best correlate with expert diagnosis. Methods A dataset of 77 wide-angle retinal images from infants screened for ROP was collected. A reference standard diagnosis was determined for each image by combining image grading from 3 experts with the clinical diagnosis from ophthalmoscopic examination. Manually segmented images were cropped into a range of shapes and sizes, and a computer algorithm was developed to extract tortuosity and dilation features from arteries and veins. Each feature was fed into our system to identify the set of characteristics that yielded the highest-performing system compared to the reference standard, which we refer to as the “i-ROP” system. Results Among the tested crop shapes, sizes, and measured features, point-based measurements of arterial and venous tortuosity (combined), and a large circular cropped image (with radius 6 times the disc diameter), provided the highest diagnostic accuracy. The i-ROP system achieved 95% accuracy for classifying preplus and plus disease compared to the reference standard. This was comparable to the performance of the 3 individual experts (96%, 94%, 92%), and significantly higher than the mean performance of 31 nonexperts (81%). Conclusions This comprehensive analysis of computer-based plus disease suggests that it may be feasible to develop a fully-automated system based on wide-angle retinal images that performs comparably to expert graders at three-level plus disease discrimination. Translational Relevance Computer-based image analysis, using objective and quantitative retinal vascular features, has potential to complement clinical ROP diagnosis by ophthalmologists. PMID:26644965

  12. Clinical features of paediatric pulmonary hypertension: a registry study

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Rolf M F; Beghetti, Maurice; Humpl, Tilman; Raskob, Gary E; Ivy, D Dunbar; Jing, Zhi-Cheng; Bonnet, Damien; Schulze-Neick, Ingram; Barst, Robyn J

    2012-01-01

    occurred in 31% (57 of 182) of patients with IPAH or FPAH and in 18% (eight of 45) of those with repaired congenital heart disease; no children with unrepaired congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts had syncope. Despite severe pulmonary hypertension, functional class was I or II in 230 of 362 (64%) patients, which is consistent with preserved right-heart function. Interpretation TOPP identifies important clinical features specific to the care of paediatric pulmonary hypertension, which draw attention to the need for paediatric data rather than extrapolation from adult studies. Funding Actelion Pharmaceuticals. PMID:22240409

  13. Clinical value of mammography in diagnosis and identification of breast mass

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Zhang, Shanhua; Wang, Qingyuan; Zhu, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect and clinical value of mammography in the diagnosis of breast lump so as to improve the diagnosis level of breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out on clinical data of 110 patients with mammary lump confirmed by pathology to study the compliance of mammography diagnosis and Pathology diagnosis in breast lump, and the detection of microcalcifications, phyllode, and observe the image performance of mammography. Taking infitrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) as an example, the correlation of image performance and clinical pathological features of different types was studied so as to predict if mammography performance was effective in the treatment and prognosis in breast cancer. Results: Taking Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) grade 4A as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 90.80% (109/120), 84.60% (126/149) and 87.40% (235/269); taking BI-RADS grade 4B as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 85.00% (102/120), 93.30% (139/149) and 89.60% (241/269); the correlation analysis suggested that, there was some kind of correlation between the mammography performance and clinical features of breast cancer. Conclusion: Mammography is worth being promoted in clinic for its significant clinical value in diagnosing and identifying breast lump. PMID:27648060

  14. Clinical value of mammography in diagnosis and identification of breast mass

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Zhang, Shanhua; Wang, Qingyuan; Zhu, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect and clinical value of mammography in the diagnosis of breast lump so as to improve the diagnosis level of breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out on clinical data of 110 patients with mammary lump confirmed by pathology to study the compliance of mammography diagnosis and Pathology diagnosis in breast lump, and the detection of microcalcifications, phyllode, and observe the image performance of mammography. Taking infitrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) as an example, the correlation of image performance and clinical pathological features of different types was studied so as to predict if mammography performance was effective in the treatment and prognosis in breast cancer. Results: Taking Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) grade 4A as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 90.80% (109/120), 84.60% (126/149) and 87.40% (235/269); taking BI-RADS grade 4B as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 85.00% (102/120), 93.30% (139/149) and 89.60% (241/269); the correlation analysis suggested that, there was some kind of correlation between the mammography performance and clinical features of breast cancer. Conclusion: Mammography is worth being promoted in clinic for its significant clinical value in diagnosing and identifying breast lump.

  15. [Clinical importance and diagnosis of halitosis].

    PubMed

    Akos, Nagy; Zsolt, Brugoviczky; Péter, Novák; Gábor, Nagy

    2012-09-01

    The origin of halitosis comes from the Latin word "halitus" meaning 'breath, exhaled air', and in the Hungarian terminology it means bad and smelly breath. The human body emits a number of volatile molecules, which have a peculiar odour. Their presence is influenced by several factors, such as genetic, nutritional and psychological factors. Since bad breath belongs to taboo subjects, halitosis can often lead to social isolation. To determine the incidence of halitosis, an exact diagnosis is needed which sometimes predestinates the possible treatment as well. Investigators estimate the incidence about 50% in the whole population. The male/female ratio is the same and the incidence is growing with age. The diagnosis can be genuine halitosis, pseudo halitosis and halitophobia. We can divide the genuine type into physiological and pathophysiological subtypes. The cause of the halitosis usually can be found in the oral cavity. The volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) produced by some of the oral bacteria are responsible for its development. Only 10% of the causes are extraoral, mostly inflammation of airways or gastrointestinal disorders. The judgment of halitosis is based on three objective methods: the organoleptic, the sulphide monitoring and the gas cromatography methods. Since the origin of the halitosis is mainly the oral cavity, dentists should treat them. Beyond the dental treatments the enhancement of the oral hygiene, the continuous motivation and monitoring are also very important, such as the use of tongue cleansing and special anti-malodour rinses.

  16. Clinical features and pathophysiology of belching disorders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaomin; Ke, Meiyun; Wang, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    The symptomatic characteristics and psychosocial factors of belching were analyzed through questionnaire, and the pathophysiology of belch was studied with the combined methods of high-resolution manometry and impedance (HRM-IMP). 21 consecutively-enrolled patients with repeated belching, were conducted a questionnaire survey, and the data were analyzed with Pearson correlation analysis and exact propability method. 10 patients were performed HRM-IMP. 20 patients met the diagnostic criteria of belch, among who 17 cases had overlapped symptoms, and the functional dyspepsia was the most common, followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease; 16 patients experienced mental stimulation or negative events; 12 cases existed anxiety and (or) depression; 8 cases had neurotic personality. The number of the overlapped symptoms was associated with the anxiety status, while the belch severity had nothing to do with the anxiety/depression status. Among the 10 patients who accepted HRM-IMP, 9 existed the esophageal motility dysfunction, and 9 had supra-gastric belching. Belch had a variety of clinical manifestations, related to the mood changes and the environmental stress, and normally was combined with the abnormalities of psychology and personality traits. The belch patients normally experienced the esophageal motility disorders, among which the typical pattern was supra-gastric belching. PMID:26885161

  17. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended.

  18. LEOPARD Syndrome: Clinical Features and Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Quintana, E.; Rodríguez-González, F.

    2012-01-01

    The RAS/MAPK pathway proteins with germline mutations in their respective genes are associated with some disorders such as Noonan, LEOPARD (LS), neurofibromatosis type 1, Costello and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndromes. LEOPARD is an acronym, mnemonic for the major manifestations of this disorder, characterized by multiple lentigines, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonic stenosis, abnormal genitalia, retardation of growth, and sensorineural deafness. Though it is not included in the acronym, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequent cardiac anomaly observed, representing a potentially life-threatening problem in these patients. PTPN11, RAF1 and BRAF are the genes known to be associated with LS, identifying molecular genetic testing of the 3 gene mutations in about 95% of affected individuals. PTPN11 mutations are the most frequently found. Eleven different missense PTPN11 mutations (Tyr279Cys/Ser, Ala461Thr, Gly464Ala, Thr468Met/Pro, Arg498Trp/Leu, Gln506Pro, and Gln510Glu/Pro) have been reported so far in LS, 2 of which (Tyr279Cys and Thr468Met) occur in about 65% of the cases. Here, we provide an overview of clinical aspects of this disorder, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:23239957

  19. Clinical features and pathophysiology of belching disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaomin; Ke, Meiyun; Wang, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    The symptomatic characteristics and psychosocial factors of belching were analyzed through questionnaire, and the pathophysiology of belch was studied with the combined methods of high-resolution manometry and impedance (HRM-IMP). 21 consecutively-enrolled patients with repeated belching, were conducted a questionnaire survey, and the data were analyzed with Pearson correlation analysis and exact propability method. 10 patients were performed HRM-IMP. 20 patients met the diagnostic criteria of belch, among who 17 cases had overlapped symptoms, and the functional dyspepsia was the most common, followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease; 16 patients experienced mental stimulation or negative events; 12 cases existed anxiety and (or) depression; 8 cases had neurotic personality. The number of the overlapped symptoms was associated with the anxiety status, while the belch severity had nothing to do with the anxiety/depression status. Among the 10 patients who accepted HRM-IMP, 9 existed the esophageal motility dysfunction, and 9 had supra-gastric belching. Belch had a variety of clinical manifestations, related to the mood changes and the environmental stress, and normally was combined with the abnormalities of psychology and personality traits. The belch patients normally experienced the esophageal motility disorders, among which the typical pattern was supra-gastric belching. PMID:26885161

  20. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ness, Jayne; Pohl, Daniela; Simone, Isabella Laura; Anlar, Banu; Amato, Maria Pia; Ghezzi, Angelo

    2016-08-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children manifests with a relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease course. Acute relapses consist of new neurologic deficits persisting greater than 24 hours, in the absence of intercurrent illness, and occur with a higher frequency early in the disease as compared to adult-onset RRMS. Most pediatric patients with MS recover well from these early relapses, and cumulative physical disability is rare in the first 10 years of disease. Brainstem attacks, poor recovery from a single attack, and a higher frequency of attacks portend a greater likelihood of future disability. Although prospective pediatric-onset MS cohorts have been established in recent years, there remains very limited prospective data detailing the longer-term clinical outcome of pediatric-onset MS into adulthood. Whether the advent of MS therapies, and the largely off-label access to such therapies in pediatric MS, has improved prognosis is unknown. MS onset during the key formative academic years, concurrent with active cognitive maturation, is an important determinant of long-term outcome, and is discussed in detail in another article in this supplement. Finally, increasing recognition of pediatric MS worldwide, recent launch of phase III trials for new agents in the pediatric MS population, and the clear imperative to more fully appreciate health-related quality of life in pediatric MS through adulthood highlight the need for standardized, validated, and robust outcome measures. PMID:27572865

  1. Opportunistic invasive fungal infections: diagnosis & clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Parisa; Hashemizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a significant health problem in immunocompromised patients. The clinical manifestations vary and can range from colonization in allergic bronchopulmonary disease to active infection in local aetiologic agents. Many factors influence the virulence and pathogenic capacity of the microorganisms, such as enzymes including extracellular phospholipases, lipases and proteinases, dimorphic growth in some Candida species, melanin production, mannitol secretion, superoxide dismutase, rapid growth and affinity to the blood stream, heat tolerance and toxin production. Infection is confirmed when histopathologic examination with special stains demonstrates fungal tissue involvement or when the aetiologic agent is isolated from sterile clinical specimens by culture. Both acquired and congenital immunodeficiency may be associated with increased susceptibility to systemic infections. Fungal infection is difficult to treat because antifungal therapy for Candida infections is still controversial and based on clinical grounds, and for molds, the clinician must assume that the species isolated from the culture medium is the pathogen. Timely initiation of antifungal treatment is a critical component affecting the outcome. Disseminated infection requires the use of systemic agents with or without surgical debridement, and in some cases immunotherapy is also advisable. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown an association between drug dose and treatment outcome. Drug dose monitoring is necessary to ensure that therapeutic levels are achieved for optimal clinical efficacy. The objectives of this review are to discuss opportunistic fungal infections, diagnostic methods and the management of these infections. PMID:24718393

  2. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in parkinsonism--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rajput, A H; Rozdilsky, B; Rajput, A

    1991-08-01

    Clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's syndrome (PS) is reasonably easy in most cases but the distinction between different variants of PS may be difficult in early cases. The correct diagnosis is not only important for counselling and management of patients but also in conducting pharmacological and epidemiological studies. There is very little critical literature on the pathological verification of the clinical diagnosis in PS. We report our 22 years experience to address that issue. Between 1968 and 1990, 65 PS patients came to autopsy. Complete data are available in 59 (M-50, F-19) cases. The initial diagnosis made by a qualified neurologist was idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) in 43 cases. Of those 28 (65%) had Lewy body pathology. After a mean duration of 12 years the final diagnosis was IPD in 41 cases which was confirmed in 31 (76%). The IPD could not be clinically distinguished from cases with severe substantia nigra neuronal loss without inclusions or from those with neurofibrillary tangle inclusions and neuronal loss at the anatomical sites typically involved in IPD. All progressive supra-nuclear palsy, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, Jakob-Creutzfeldt's disease and the majority of the multiple system atrophy cases were diagnosed correctly during life. The correct clinical diagnosis in most non-IPD variants of PS was possible within 5 years of onset (range: 2 months to 18 years). We recommend that studies aimed at including only the IPD cases restrict the enrollment to those cases that have had PS motor manifestations for five years or longer duration. PMID:1913360

  3. Polymicrobial Infective Endocarditis: Clinical Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    García-Granja, Pablo Elpidio; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Olmos, Carmen; Sarriá, Cristina; Ferrera, Carlos; Gómez, Itziar; San Román, José Alberto

    2015-12-01

    To describe the profile of left-sided polymicrobial endocarditis (PE) and to compare it with monomicrobial endocarditis (ME).Among 1011 episodes of left-sided endocarditis consecutively diagnosed in 3 tertiary centers, between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2014, 60 were polymicrobial (5.9%), 821 monomicrobial (81.7%), and in 123 no microorganism was detected (12.2%). Seven patients (0.7%) were excluded from the analysis because contamination of biologic tissue could not be discarded. The authors described the clinical, microbiologic, echocardiographic, and outcome of patients with PE and compared it with ME.Mean age was 64 years SD 16 years, 67% were men and 30% nosocomial. Diabetes mellitus (35%) were the most frequent comorbidities, fever (67%) and heart failure (43%) the most common symptoms at admission. Prosthetic valves (50%) were the most frequent infection location and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (48%) and enterococci (37%) the leading etiologies. The most repeated combination was coagulase-negative Staphylococci with enterococci (n = 9). Polymicrobial endocarditis appeared more frequently in patients with underlying disease (70% versus 56%, P = 0.036), mostly diabetics (35% versus 24%, P = 0.044) with previous cardiac surgery (15% versus 8% P = 0.049) and prosthetic valves (50% versus 37%, P = 0.038). Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, enterococci, Gram-negative bacilli, anaerobes, and fungi were more frequent in PE. No differences on age, sex, symptoms, need of surgery, and in-hospital mortality were detected.Polymicrobial endocarditis represents 5.9% of episodes of left-sided endocarditis in our series. Despite relevant demographic and microbiologic differences between PE and ME, short-term outcome is similar. PMID:26656328

  4. Polymicrobial Infective Endocarditis: Clinical Features and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Granja, Pablo Elpidio; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Olmos, Carmen; Sarriá, Cristina; Ferrera, Carlos; Gómez, Itziar; Román, José Alberto San

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To describe the profile of left-sided polymicrobial endocarditis (PE) and to compare it with monomicrobial endocarditis (ME). Among 1011 episodes of left-sided endocarditis consecutively diagnosed in 3 tertiary centers, between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2014, 60 were polymicrobial (5.9%), 821 monomicrobial (81.7%), and in 123 no microorganism was detected (12.2%). Seven patients (0.7%) were excluded from the analysis because contamination of biologic tissue could not be discarded. The authors described the clinical, microbiologic, echocardiographic, and outcome of patients with PE and compared it with ME. Mean age was 64 years SD 16 years, 67% were men and 30% nosocomial. Diabetes mellitus (35%) were the most frequent comorbidities, fever (67%) and heart failure (43%) the most common symptoms at admission. Prosthetic valves (50%) were the most frequent infection location and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (48%) and enterococci (37%) the leading etiologies. The most repeated combination was coagulase-negative Staphylococci with enterococci (n = 9). Polymicrobial endocarditis appeared more frequently in patients with underlying disease (70% versus 56%, P = 0.036), mostly diabetics (35% versus 24%, P = 0.044) with previous cardiac surgery (15% versus 8% P = 0.049) and prosthetic valves (50% versus 37%, P = 0.038). Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, enterococci, Gram-negative bacilli, anaerobes, and fungi were more frequent in PE. No differences on age, sex, symptoms, need of surgery, and in-hospital mortality were detected. Polymicrobial endocarditis represents 5.9% of episodes of left-sided endocarditis in our series. Despite relevant demographic and microbiologic differences between PE and ME, short-term outcome is similar. PMID:26656328

  5. Predictive value of clinical and laboratory findings in the diagnosis of the enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Kuvandik, Ceren; Karaoglan, Ilkay; Namiduru, Mustafa; Baydar, Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    Although the definitive diagnosis of enteric fever requires the isolation of Salmonella enterica serotype typhi or paratyphi, the diagnosis is usually made according to clinical and laboratory findings. There is usually a diagnostic dilemma. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum required parameters that could be valuable in the diagnosis of enteric fever. A retrospective study was performed to compare the clinical and laboratory findings in 60 patients who proved to have enteric fever by cultures and 58 patients with non-enteric fever. Features independently predictive of enteric fever were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive and negative predictive values were estimated. Significant clinical features of enteric fever were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, relative bradycardia, rose spots, leucopenia, trombocytopenia, eosinopenia and elevated AST level. Five of these features were found to be predictive for the diagnosis of enteric fever; splenomegaly, relative bradycardia, rose spots and trombocytopenia and elevated AST level. In conclusion, clinical and laboratory findings can help the clinician to diagnose enteric fever in the absence of microbiological confirmation. PMID:19382666

  6. Using Comprehensive Feature Lists to Bias Medical Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga-Moruzi, Chan; Brooks, Lee R.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians routinely report fewer features in a case than they subsequently agree are present. The authors report studies that assess the effect of considering a more comprehensive description than physicians usually offer. These comprehensive descriptions were generated from photographs of dermatology and internal medicine and were complete and…

  7. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients. PMID:23120768

  8. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients.

  9. Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-12-01

    The infection of the nervous system by the cystic larvae of Taenia solium (neurocysticercosis) is a frequent cause of seizure disorders. Neurocysticercosis is endemic or presumed to be endemic in many low-income countries. The lifecycle of the worm and the clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis are well established, and CT and MRI have substantially improved knowledge of the disease course. Improvements in immunodiagnosis have further advanced comprehension of the pathophysiology of this disease. This knowledge has led to individualised treatment approaches that account for the involvement of parenchymal or extraparenchymal spaces, the number and form of parasites, and the extent of degeneration and associated inflammation. Clinical investigations are focused on development of effective treatments and reduction of side-effects induced by treatment, such as seizures, hydrocephalus, infarcts, and neuroinjury.

  10. Evidenced-based review of clinical studies on endodontic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    The practice of endodontics requires excellence in diagnostic skills. The importance of this topic has been underscored by a recent 2008 AAE-sponsored symposium on endodontic diagnosis, which will be highlighted in a special issue of the Journal of Endodontics. In this minireview, we focus on recent clinical studies that emphasize different aspects related to the diagnosis of disorders of the pulp-dentin complex. PMID:19631854

  11. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  12. Etiology, diagnosis, and clinical management of vulvodynia

    PubMed Central

    Sadownik, Leslie A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic vulvar pain or discomfort for which no obvious etiology can be found, ie, vulvodynia, can affect up to 16% of women. It may affect girls and women across all age groups and ethnicities. Vulvodynia is a significant burden to society, the health care system, the affected woman, and her intimate partner. The etiology is multifactorial and may involve local injury or inflammation, and peripheral and or central sensitization of the nervous system. An approach to the diagnosis and management of a woman presenting with chronic vulvar pain should address the biological, psychological, and social/interpersonal factors that contribute to her illness. The gynecologist has a key role in excluding other causes for vulvar pain, screening for psychosexual and pelvic floor dysfunction, and collaborating with other health care providers to manage a woman’s pain. An important component of treatment is patient education regarding the pathogenesis of the pain and the negative impact of experiencing pain on a woman’s overall quality of life. An individualized, holistic, and often multidisciplinary approach is needed to effectively manage the woman’s pain and pain-related distress. PMID:24833921

  13. Clinical, dermoscopic, and histopathologic features of body hair disorders.

    PubMed

    Panchaprateep, Ratchathorn; Tanus, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-05-01

    Dermoscopic examination of hair and scalp, also named "trichoscopy," is an essential tool in diagnosis of hair and scalp diseases. Trichoscopy is fast and noninvasive and can be used to evaluate hair disorders in all body areas. Body hair disorders are uncommon, and most publications on their dermoscopic features are limited to case reports or series. In this review we present the available information on the dermoscopic diagnosis of body hair disorders including keratosis pilaris, trichostasis spinulosa, pili multigemini, circle hairs, rolled hairs, eruptive vellus hair cyst, and ingrown hairs.

  14. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Vince, Adriana

    2003-01-01

    Viral hepatitides are common diseases of modern man in both industrialized and developing countries, with a varying prevalence of particular types and mode of transmission. In current medicine, viral hepatitides are classified in the A-E nomenclature, differentiating viruses that can be etiologically defined with certainty on the basis of serum markers and hepatitides exhibiting all clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral hepatitis but of as yet nondemonstrable causative agents, classified in the non-A, non-E hepatitis group. Two issues are of high relevance in the pathogenesis of viral hepatitides: route of transmission (fecal-oral or parenteral) and basic mechanism of hepatocyte lesion. Although all hepatitis viruses replicate within the hepatocyte, the exact mechanism of hepatocyte necrosis has not yet been fully elucidated, i.e. direct cytotoxicity or hepatoprogressive immune response mediated primarily by the specific cytotoxic CD8 lymphocytes. Depending on the site of entry, the virus replicates in the adjacent lymphatic tissue for some time, followed by primary viremia, virus replication in the lymphoreticular organs (lymph nodes, liver, spleen), and eventual entry in the target cells--hepatocytes, accompanied by a varying grade of necrosis and inflammatory reaction. The clinical and laboratory signs of the disease correspond to the degree of liver necrosis and are not specific for particular types of viral hepatitis. The most frequent symptoms common to all types of viral hepatitis of moderate severity include elevated body temperature persisting for days, fatigue, gradual loss of appetite, nausea, dull pain and discomfort on DRL, vomiting, multiple loose stools, dark urine, jaundice of the skin and mucosa, and light stools. Generally, the ultimate outcome of the disease is elimination of the virus and complete recovery, however, a fulminant course with lethal outcome or transition to chronic disease may also occur, making viral hepatitides a major

  15. [Age associated clinical features of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Nikitenko, V V; Balin, D V

    2013-01-01

    Detailed analysis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis clinical course allowed identifying clinical features of the disease specific for elderly and senile patients. The paper describes the peculiarities of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in elderly and senile patients including those having oroantral sinus tract.

  16. [Osteoma and exostosis of the external auditory meatus: a clinical diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Granell, J; Puig, A; Benito, E

    2003-03-01

    Proliferative osseous lesions usually found in the external ear are exostoses and osteomata. In other sites they are clearly different entities, but in this location histopathologic differential features are not so reliable in the study of the specimens. An occlusive osteomata is shown, with the typical clinical presentation demonstrated in a multiplanar CT. Microscopically, the lesion consisted of mature bone trabeculae, separated by medular spaces with fibrovascular tissue, characteristic features of osteomata. However, in the most superficial areas, lines of bone apposition, like those in exostoses, were found. A literature review confirms the lack of specificity of the histopathologic study, so diagnosis is based on clinical data.

  17. Automatic diagnosis of vocal fold paresis by employing phonovibrogram features and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Daniel; Döllinger, Michael; Yang, Anxiong; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Lohscheller, Jörg

    2010-09-01

    The clinical diagnosis of voice disorders is based on examination of the rapidly moving vocal folds during phonation (f0: 80-300Hz) with state-of-the-art endoscopic high-speed cameras. Commonly, analysis is performed in a subjective and time-consuming manner via slow-motion video playback and exhibits low inter- and intra-rater reliability. In this study an objective method to overcome this drawback is presented being based on Phonovibrography, a novel image analysis technique. For a collective of 45 normophonic and paralytic voices the laryngeal dynamics were captured by specialized Phonovibrogram features and analyzed with different machine learning algorithms. Classification accuracies reached 93% for 2-class and 73% for 3-class discrimination. The results were validated by subjective expert ratings given the same diagnostic criteria. The automatic Phonovibrogram analysis approach exceeded the experienced raters' classifications by 9%. The presented method holds a lot of potential for providing reliable vocal fold diagnosis support in the future. PMID:20138386

  18. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Veronica; Sokari, Telematé

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine physicians should be able to identify and treat patients whose clinical presentations, including key historical, physical examination, and laboratory findings are consistent with diagnoses of primary, secondary, and tertiary adrenal insufficiency, adrenal crisis, and pheochromocytoma. Failure to make a timely diagnosis leads to increased morbidity and mortality. As great mimickers, adrenal emergencies often present with a constellation of nonspecific signs and symptoms that can lead even the most diligent emergency physician astray. The emergency physician must include adrenal emergencies in the differential diagnosis when encountering such clinical pictures.

  19. Management of Two Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia Patients According to Clinical and Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Ören, Hale; Demir Yenigürbüz, Fatma; Gözmen, Salih; Karapınar, Tuba Hilkay; İrken, Gülersu

    2015-06-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare clonal myeloproliferative disorder of childhood. Major progress has been achieved in diagnosis and the understanding of the pathogenesis of JMML by identifying the genetic pathologies that occur in patients. Mutations of RAS, NF1, PTPN11, and CBL are found in approximately 80% of JMML patients. Distinct clinical features have been reported to be associated with specific gene mutations. The advent of genomic studies and recent identification of novel genetic mutations in JMML are important not only in diagnosis but also in the management and prognosis of the disease. Herein, we present 2 patients with JMML harboring different mutations, NRAS and c-CBL, respectively, with distinct clinical features and different therapeutic approaches.

  20. Visual Aggregate Analysis of Eligibility Features of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhe; Carini, Simona; Sim, Ida; Weng, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a method for profiling the collective populations targeted for recruitment by multiple clinical studies addressing the same medical condition using one eligibility feature each time. Methods Using a previously published database COMPACT as the backend, we designed a scalable method for visual aggregate analysis of clinical trial eligibility features. This method consists of four modules for eligibility feature frequency analysis, query builder, distribution analysis, and visualization, respectively. This method is capable of analyzing (1) frequently used qualitative and quantitative features for recruiting subjects for a selected medical condition, (2) distribution of study enrollment on consecutive value points or value intervals of each quantitative feature, and (3) distribution of studies on the boundary values, permissible value ranges, and value range widths of each feature. All analysis results were visualized using Google Charts API. Five recruited potential users assessed the usefulness of this method for identifying common patterns in any selected eligibility feature for clinical trial participant selection. Results We implemented this method as a Web-based analytical system called VITTA (Visual Analysis Tool of Clinical Study Target Populations). We illustrated the functionality of VITTA using two sample queries involving quantitative features BMI and HbA1c for conditions “hypertension” and “Type 2 diabetes”, respectively. The recruited potential users rated the user-perceived usefulness of VITTA with an average score of 86.4/100. Conclusions We contributed a novel aggregate analysis method to enable the interrogation of common patterns in quantitative eligibility criteria and the collective target populations of multiple related clinical studies. A larger-scale study is warranted to formally assess the usefulness of VITTA among clinical investigators and sponsors in various therapeutic areas. PMID:25615940

  1. Adult-Onset Familial Mediterranean Fever in Northwestern Iran; Clinical Feature and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, H; Zamani, F; Ajdarkosh, H; Mohamadzadeh, Z; Fereshtehnejad, SM; Nassaji, M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sporadic, paroxysmal attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. Although the disease usually begins before the age of 20 years, we aimed to evaluate the demography, clinical features and treatment outcome of familial Mediterranean fever in Iranian adult patients above 20 years old. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, adult patients (first attack at the age of >20 years) with a diagnosis of FMF who referred to the gastroenterology and rheumatology Clinics of Ardebil University of Medical Science (situated in north west of Iran) over the period of 2004-2009 were enrolled. FMF diagnosis was based on clinical criteria. RESULTS Forty four FMF patients (30 male and 14 female) with the mean [± Standard Deviation (SD)] age of first attack of 29 ± 7.8 years were enrolled. Abdominal pain (95.5%) and fever (91%) were the most common clinical findings. All of the patients had satisfactorily responded to therapy. Response was complete in 76.7% and partial in 23.3% of the patients. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of amyloidosis at the time of diagnosis or during follow-up. CONCLUSION Our findings demonstrated that adult-onset FMF in Iran has different characteristics (more common in males, lesser prevalence of arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema, less delay in diagnosis) and treatment outcome (favorable response even to low-dose colchicine) in comparison with the previous data on early onset patients. PMID:25197532

  2. Adult-onset familial mediterranean Fever in northwestern iran; clinical feature and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, H; Zamani, F; Ajdarkosh, H; Mohamadzadeh, Z; Fereshtehnejad, Sm; Nassaji, M

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sporadic, paroxysmal attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. Although the disease usually begins before the age of 20 years, we aimed to evaluate the demography, clinical features and treatment outcome of familial Mediterranean fever in Iranian adult patients above 20 years old. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, adult patients (first attack at the age of >20 years) with a diagnosis of FMF who referred to the gastroenterology and rheumatology Clinics of Ardebil University of Medical Science (situated in north west of Iran) over the period of 2004-2009 were enrolled. FMF diagnosis was based on clinical criteria. RESULTS Forty four FMF patients (30 male and 14 female) with the mean [± Standard Deviation (SD)] age of first attack of 29 ± 7.8 years were enrolled. Abdominal pain (95.5%) and fever (91%) were the most common clinical findings. All of the patients had satisfactorily responded to therapy. Response was complete in 76.7% and partial in 23.3% of the patients. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of amyloidosis at the time of diagnosis or during follow-up. CONCLUSION Our findings demonstrated that adult-onset FMF in Iran has different characteristics (more common in males, lesser prevalence of arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema, less delay in diagnosis) and treatment outcome (favorable response even to low-dose colchicine) in comparison with the previous data on early onset patients.

  3. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  4. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  5. The diagnosis and clinical significance of polyautoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are chronic and heterogeneous conditions that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. The chronic nature of these diseases places a significant burden on the utilization of medical care, direct and indirect economic costs, and quality of life. ADs are observed in genetically susceptible individuals in whom their clinical expression is modified by permissive and protective environments occurring over time. These are complex traits, meaning that their inheritance does not follow a single-gene dominant or single-gene recessive Mendelian law, and thus that they are polygenic. ADs are often diagnosed according to classification criteria, however they share similar subphenotypes including signs and symptoms, non-specific autoantibodies and other immune changes, which are prone to taxonomic problems. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one AD in a single patient. When three or more ADs coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS), which represents the best example of polyautoimmunity as well as the effect of a single genotype on diverse autoimmune phenotypes. Its study will provide important clues to elucidate the common mechanisms of ADs (i.e., the autoimmune tautology).

  6. A comparison of different feature extraction methods for diagnosis of valvular heart diseases using PCG signals.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, M; Abdoli, R

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel method for diagnosis of valvular heart disease (VHD) based on phonocardiography (PCG) signals. Application of the pattern classification and feature selection and reduction methods in analysing normal and pathological heart sound was investigated. After signal preprocessing using independent component analysis (ICA), 32 features are extracted. Those include carefully selected linear and nonlinear time domain, wavelet and entropy features. By examining different feature selection and feature reduction methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), genetic algorithms (GA), genetic programming (GP) and generalized discriminant analysis (GDA), the four most informative features are extracted. Furthermore, support vector machines (SVM) and neural network classifiers are compared for diagnosis of pathological heart sounds. Three valvular heart diseases are considered: aortic stenosis (AS), mitral stenosis (MS) and mitral regurgitation (MR). An overall accuracy of 99.47% was achieved by proposed algorithm.

  7. Rules for clinical diagnosis in babies with ambiguous genitalia.

    PubMed

    Low, Y; Hutson, J M

    2003-08-01

    Intersex disorders are rare and complex; yet, in each case of genital ambiguity, accurate and expeditious management is required of the clinician. This article reviews the embryology of sexual differentiation, from which some 'rules' of diagnosis are derived. A simplified approach to the interpretation of clinical signs in ambiguous genitalia is presented and discussed.

  8. Integrating Preclinical and Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodus, Nelson L.; Brand, John W.

    1988-01-01

    A program providing second-year dental students with early experience in direct patient contact in an oral diagnosis/oral radiology clinic was well received by both students and faculty and was found to develop desirable skills and qualities in the students participating. (MSE)

  9. [Relationship between the courses of clinical Features of patients with schizophrenia in adolescents and admission to psychiatric clinic].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Isao; Miyauchi, Toshiro

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve diagnosis of schizophrenia with onset in adolescents at an early stage, we investigated in detail the clinical features of 74 patients with schizophrenia, (23 males) at adolescents psychiatric clinic. Many of the subjects had been suffering from the illness about 14 years old but had not undergone their first psychiatric examination until a few years later. A high percentage (more than 80%) of our subjects presented psychiatric symptoms such as delusional remembrance, delusional moods, delusions of persecution and hypobulia. Additionally, more than 60% of our subjects presented auditory hallucinations. In general, teenage patients with schizophrenia onset show vague symptoms such as anxiety, embarrassment and strange moods rather than obvious hallucinations. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify certain clinical features of this disorder in adolescents: many patients suffer delusional remembrance, delusional moods and delusions of persecution immediately after the onset of the illness. Gradually, problematic behaviors such as anorexia, self injury, offences against their families, voluntary vomiting, etc., develop, but patients do not always receive psychiatric examination at this stage. After socially obvious problems such as school refusal, withdrawal from social activities and lowering of school record develop over a period of time, patients may be urged to undergo psychiatric examination. Our research again underlines the difficulty of achieving diagnosis of schizophrenia at an early stage. The key to early diagnosis appears to be the accurate identification of psychiatric symptoms in the early stages of the illness at school, or at home if possible, before socially problematic behaviors arise.

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): epidemiology and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Hui, D; Chan, M; Wu, A; Ng, P

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache, and dyspnoea. Older subjects may present without the typical febrile response. Common laboratory features include lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, raised alanine transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase. The constellation of compatible clinical and laboratory findings, together with certain characteristic radiological features and lack of clinical response to broad spectrum antibiotics, should arouse suspicion of SARS. Measurement of serum RNA by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique has a detection rate of 75%–80% in the first week of the illness. PMID:15254300

  11. Clinical and pathologic diagnosis and different diagnosis of syphilis cervical lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yufen; Zhang, Xinlian; Xu, Nan; Wang, Libo; Li, Fangchao; Zhang, Ping; Miao, Lanfang; Yang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical pathologic characteristics and differential diagnosis of syphilitic cervical lymphadenitis, and to improve the rate of its diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Retrospectively analyzed the clinical history, Trepone pallidum-ELISA (TP-ELISA), rapid plasma regain test (RPR) and routine pathological examination of the patient diagnosed as syphilis lymphadenitis. And review related literatures. Results: The main clinical presentation was multiple palpable cervical lymph nodes. The multiple nodes were hard, fixed, and the major diameter of the larger one was 2 cm. The main pathological changes included: the capsule was significantly thickened; reactive hyperplasia of lymphoid follicular with sky star phenomenon; occlusive endovasculitis; perivascular inflammation; the proliferation of epithelioid histiocytes can form granulomas with few multinucleated giant cells; few necrosis. TP-ELISA and RPR were positive. Conclusions: The pathological changes of syphilitic lymphadenitis have a variety of performance with relatively specific and suggestive alterations which requires a combination of clinical history and laboratory test before the diagnosis, and the clinicians can reduce misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis of the disease by increasing vigilance of it. PMID:26722588

  12. Opercular malformations: clinical and MRI features in 11 children.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Y; Adamsbaum, C; Sellier, N; Robain, O; Ponsot, G; Kalifa, G

    1995-11-01

    Opercular malformations are rare and complex brain malformations for which only very fragmented neuropathological descriptions have been reported. They are related to an abnormal development of both sylvian fissure and frontoparietal operculum. We report a retrospective clinical and MRI study of 11 patients presenting with opercular malformations. A congenital pseudobulbar syndrome was observed in six cases, various motor disorders in seven cases, mental retardation in six cases and epilepsy in four cases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the main features of opercular malformations in children and to try to characterise this entity on the basis of its clinical features and MRI pattern. PMID:8577527

  13. Ontology-Guided Feature Engineering for Clinical Text Classification

    PubMed Central

    Garla, Vijay N.; Brandt, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present novel feature engineering techniques that leverage the biomedical domain knowledge encoded in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) to improve machine-learning based clinical text classification. Critical steps in clinical text classification include identification of features and passages relevant to the classification task, and representation of clinical text to enable discrimination between documents of different classes. We developed novel information-theoretic techniques that utilize the taxonomical structure of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) to improve feature ranking, and we developed a semantic similarity measure that projects clinical text into a feature space that improves classification. We evaluated these methods on the 2008 Integrating Informatics with Biology and the Bedside (I2B2) obesity challenge. The methods we developed improve upon the results of this challenge’s top machine-learning based system, and may improve the performance of other machine-learning based clinical text classification systems. We have released all tools developed as part of this study as open source, available at http://code.google.com/p/ytex PMID:22580178

  14. Ontology-guided feature engineering for clinical text classification.

    PubMed

    Garla, Vijay N; Brandt, Cynthia

    2012-10-01

    In this study we present novel feature engineering techniques that leverage the biomedical domain knowledge encoded in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) to improve machine-learning based clinical text classification. Critical steps in clinical text classification include identification of features and passages relevant to the classification task, and representation of clinical text to enable discrimination between documents of different classes. We developed novel information-theoretic techniques that utilize the taxonomical structure of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) to improve feature ranking, and we developed a semantic similarity measure that projects clinical text into a feature space that improves classification. We evaluated these methods on the 2008 Integrating Informatics with Biology and the Bedside (I2B2) obesity challenge. The methods we developed improve upon the results of this challenge's top machine-learning based system, and may improve the performance of other machine-learning based clinical text classification systems. We have released all tools developed as part of this study as open source, available at http://code.google.com/p/ytex.

  15. Clinical features and diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). DKA also can occur children with type 2 DM, particularly in obese African-American adolescents. In recent years, the incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus have i...

  16. [Lactose intolerance: pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hutyra, Tomasz; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption and milk products intolerance symptoms are the most common alimentary tract disorders. Lactose intolerance is a result of lactase deficiency or lack of lactase and lactose malabsorption. Three types of lactase deficiency were distinguished: congenital, late-onset lactase deficiency and secondary lactase deficiency. Lactose intolerance means the appearance of clinical gastrointestinal symptoms after ingestion of lactose. To the clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance belongs: nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, cramps, flatulence, flatus, diarrhea and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lactose intolerance is based on the breath hydrogen test and analysis of lactase activity in the small intestine mucosa. Dietary treatment eliminates clinical symptoms.

  17. Clinical investigation of speech signal features among patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Jing; PAN, Zhongde; GUI, Chao; CUI, Donghong

    2016-01-01

    Background A new area of interest in the search for biomarkers for schizophrenia is the study of the acoustic parameters of speech called 'speech signal features'. Several of these features have been shown to be related to emotional responsiveness, a characteristic that is notably restricted in patients with schizophrenia, particularly those with prominent negative symptoms. Aim Assess the relationship of selected acoustic parameters of speech to the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia and compare these characteristics between patients and matched healthy controls. Methods Ten speech signal features-six prosody features, formant bandwidth and amplitude, and two spectral features-were assessed using 15-minute speech samples obtained by smartphone from 26 inpatients with chronic schizophrenia (at enrollment and 1 week later) and from 30 healthy controls (at enrollment only). Clinical symptoms of the patients were also assessed at baseline and 1 week later using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale. Results In the patient group the symptoms were stable over the 1-week interval and the 1-week test-retest reliability of the 10 speech features was good (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC] ranging from 0.55 to 0.88). Comparison of the speech features between patients and controls found no significant differences in the six prosody features or in the formant bandwidth and amplitude features, but the two spectral features were different: the Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC) scores were significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group, and the linear prediction coding (LPC) scores were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. Within the patient group, 10 of the 170 associations between the 10 speech features considered and the 17 clinical parameters considered were

  18. Clinical investigation of speech signal features among patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Jing; PAN, Zhongde; GUI, Chao; CUI, Donghong

    2016-01-01

    Background A new area of interest in the search for biomarkers for schizophrenia is the study of the acoustic parameters of speech called 'speech signal features'. Several of these features have been shown to be related to emotional responsiveness, a characteristic that is notably restricted in patients with schizophrenia, particularly those with prominent negative symptoms. Aim Assess the relationship of selected acoustic parameters of speech to the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia and compare these characteristics between patients and matched healthy controls. Methods Ten speech signal features-six prosody features, formant bandwidth and amplitude, and two spectral features-were assessed using 15-minute speech samples obtained by smartphone from 26 inpatients with chronic schizophrenia (at enrollment and 1 week later) and from 30 healthy controls (at enrollment only). Clinical symptoms of the patients were also assessed at baseline and 1 week later using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale. Results In the patient group the symptoms were stable over the 1-week interval and the 1-week test-retest reliability of the 10 speech features was good (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC] ranging from 0.55 to 0.88). Comparison of the speech features between patients and controls found no significant differences in the six prosody features or in the formant bandwidth and amplitude features, but the two spectral features were different: the Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC) scores were significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group, and the linear prediction coding (LPC) scores were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. Within the patient group, 10 of the 170 associations between the 10 speech features considered and the 17 clinical parameters considered were

  19. Clinical guideline for diagnosis and management of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Rolim, Dionne B; Rodriguez, Jorge L N

    2006-01-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging infection in Brazil and neighbouring South American countries. The wide range of clinical presentations include severe community-acquired pneumonia, septicaemia, central nervous system infection and less severe soft tissue infection. Diagnosis depends heavily on the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the bacterial cause of melioidosis, is easily cultured from blood, sputum and other clinical samples. However, B. pseudomallei can be difficult to identify reliably, and can be confused with closely related bacteria, some of which may be dismissed as insignificant culture contaminants. Serological tests can help to support a diagnosis of melioidosis, but by themselves do not provide a definitive diagnosis. The use of a laboratory discovery pathway can help reduce the risk of missing atypical B. pseudomallei isolates. Recommended antibiotic treatment for severe infection is either intravenous Ceftazidime or Meropenem for several weeks, followed by up to 20 weeks oral treatment with a combination of trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and doxycycline. Consistent use of diagnostic microbiology to confirm the diagnosis, and rigorous treatment of severe infection with the correct antibiotics in two stages; acute and eradication, will contribute to a reduction in mortality from melioidosis. PMID:16547571

  20. [Melanotic neurofibroma, clinical and histopathologic diagnosis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Zbranca, Anca; Stefan, Raluca; Grigorovici, Mirela; Cherciu, Mirela

    2004-01-01

    Melanotic neurofibroma is a rare benign tumor, derived from peripheral nerve sheath, whose originality consists in the presence of melanic pigment. The clinical diagnosis is difficult to establish, requiring the histopathological exam to make the difference between melanotic neurofibroma and the other pigmented tumors. Although, sometimes neither the anatomopathological exam can establish the final diagnosis, requiring supplementary studies. Melanotic neurofibroma has a good prognosis and the malignization is rare. The elective treatment is surgical, represented by the complete excision of the tumor. PMID:15832981

  1. Automatic extraction of retinal features from colour retinal images for glaucoma diagnosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Muhammad Salman; Han, Liangxiu; van Hemert, Jano; Li, Baihua

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that have common traits such as, high eye pressure, damage to the Optic Nerve Head and gradual vision loss. It affects peripheral vision and eventually leads to blindness if left untreated. The current common methods of pre-diagnosis of Glaucoma include measurement of Intra-Ocular Pressure (IOP) using Tonometer, Pachymetry, Gonioscopy; which are performed manually by the clinicians. These tests are usually followed by Optic Nerve Head (ONH) Appearance examination for the confirmed diagnosis of Glaucoma. The diagnoses require regular monitoring, which is costly and time consuming. The accuracy and reliability of diagnosis is limited by the domain knowledge of different ophthalmologists. Therefore automatic diagnosis of Glaucoma attracts a lot of attention. This paper surveys the state-of-the-art of automatic extraction of anatomical features from retinal images to assist early diagnosis of the Glaucoma. We have conducted critical evaluation of the existing automatic extraction methods based on features including Optic Cup to Disc Ratio (CDR), Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer (RNFL), Peripapillary Atrophy (PPA), Neuroretinal Rim Notching, Vasculature Shift, etc., which adds value on efficient feature extraction related to Glaucoma diagnosis.

  2. Unsupervised Pattern Classifier for Abnormality-Scaling of Vibration Features for Helicopter Gearbox Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jammu, Vinay B.; Danai, Kourosh; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    A new unsupervised pattern classifier is introduced for on-line detection of abnormality in features of vibration that are used for fault diagnosis of helicopter gearboxes. This classifier compares vibration features with their respective normal values and assigns them a value in (0, 1) to reflect their degree of abnormality. Therefore, the salient feature of this classifier is that it does not require feature values associated with faulty cases to identify abnormality. In order to cope with noise and changes in the operating conditions, an adaptation algorithm is incorporated that continually updates the normal values of the features. The proposed classifier is tested using experimental vibration features obtained from an OH-58A main rotor gearbox. The overall performance of this classifier is then evaluated by integrating the abnormality-scaled features for detection of faults. The fault detection results indicate that the performance of this classifier is comparable to the leading unsupervised neural networks: Kohonen's Feature Mapping and Adaptive Resonance Theory (AR72). This is significant considering that the independence of this classifier from fault-related features makes it uniquely suited to abnormality-scaling of vibration features for fault diagnosis.

  3. Repetitive Behaviors in Autism: Relationships with Associated Clinical Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Hill, Dina E.; Ivers, Bonnie J.; Goldson, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between repetitive behaviors (RBs) and associated clinical features (i.e., cognitive and adaptive functioning levels, sleep problems, medication use, and other behavioral problems) were examined in two groups (High nonverbal IQ greater than or equal to 97 versus Low nonverbal IQ less than or equal to 56) of children with autism…

  4. Update on Clinical Features and Brain Abnormalities in Neurogenetics Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Laureano, Maura Regina; Del'Aquilla, Marco Antonio; de Moura, Luciana Monteiro; Assuncao, Idaiane; Silva, Ivaldo; Schwartzman, Jose Salomao

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging methods represent a critical tool in efforts to join the study of the neurobiology of genes with the neurobiology of behaviour, and to understand the neurodevelopmental pathways that give rise to cognitive and behavioural impairments. This article reviews the clinical features and highlights studies with a focus on the relevant…

  5. Zika virus: epidemiology, clinical features and host-virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Liégeois, Florian; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Pompon, Julien; Diop, Fodé; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Desprès, Philippe; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) has gained a medical importance following the large-scale epidemics in South Pacific and Latin America. This paper reviews information on the epidemiology and clinical features of Zika disease with a particular emphasis on the host-virus interactions that contribute to the pathogenicity of ZIKV in humans.

  6. Psychiatric Illness in Mentally Retarded Adolescents: Clinical Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele

    1998-01-01

    Describes the clinical features of the most important psychiatric disorders in mentally retarded adolescents: mood disorders, psychotic disorders, severe behavioral disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, and attention-deficit The impact of mental retardation on personality development is confirmed by the high psychopathological…

  7. Turner Syndrome Genotype and phenotype and their effect on presenting features and timing of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Al Alwan, I; M, Khadora; Amir; G, Nasrat; A, Omair; L, Brown; M, Al Dubayee; M, Badri

    2014-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder caused by abnormalities of the X chromosome. We aimed to describe the phenotypic characteristics of TS patients and evaluate their association with presenting clinical characteristics and time at diagnosis. Methods We studied females diagnosed with TS at King Abdul Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh between 1983 and 2010. Patients were classified based upon karyotype into females with classical monosomy 45,X (group A) and females with other X chromosome abnormalities (mosaic 45,X/46,XX, Xqisochromosomes, Xp or Xq deletion) (group B). Clinical features of the two groups were analyzed. Results Of the 52 patients included in the study, 16(30.8%) were diagnosed with classical monosomy 45,X and the rest with other X chromosome abnormalities. Only 19(36.5%) patients were diagnosed in infancy and the remaining during childhood or later (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5,95%CI 1.27–15.90, p=0.02). Short stature was universal in group A versus 77.8% in group B. All patients in group A had primary amenorrhea compared with 63.2% of those in group B (P = 0.04); the rest of group B had secondary amenorrhea. Cardiovascular abnormalities were higher in group A (OR=3.50, 95%CI 0.99–12.29, p-value =0.05). Renal defects and recurrent otitis media were similar in both groups. Conclusion This study suggests that karyotype variations might affect the phenotype of TS; however, it may not reliably predict the clinical presentation. Chromosomal analysis for all suspected cases of TS should be promptly done at childhood in order to design an appropriate management plan early in life. PMID:25246887

  8. Sniffing out the truth: clinical diagnosis using the electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, A K; Turner, A P

    2000-02-01

    Recently the use of smell in clinical diagnosis has been rediscovered due to major advances in odour sensing technology and artificial intelligence (AI). It was well known in the past that a number of infectious or metabolic diseases could liberate specific odours characteristic of the disease stage. Later chromatographic techniques identified an enormous number of volatiles in human clinical specimens that might serve as potential disease markers. "Artificial nose" technology has been employed in several areas of medical diagnosis, including rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB), Helicobacter pylori (HP) and urinary tract infections (UTI). Preliminary results have demonstrated the possibility of identifying and characterising microbial pathogens in clinical specimens. A hybrid intelligent model of four interdependent "tools", odour generation "kits", rapid volatile delivery and recovery systems, consistent low drift sensor performance and a hybrid intelligent system of parallel neural networks (NN) and expert systems, have been applied in gastric, pulmonary and urine diagnosis. Initial clinical tests have shown that it may be possible in the near future to use electronic nose technology not only for the rapid detection of diseases such as peptic ulceration, UTI, and TB but also for the continuous dynamic monitoring of disease stages. Major advances in information and gas sensor technology could enhance the diagnostic power of future bio-electronic noses and facilitate global surveillance models of disease control and management. PMID:10834396

  9. Prediction models for solitary pulmonary nodules based on curvelet textural features and clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Wu, Hai-Feng; Sun, Tao; Li, Xia; Wang, Wei; Tao, Li-Xin; Huo, Da; Lv, Ping-Xin; He, Wen; Guo, Xiu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths, usually appears as solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) which are hard to diagnose using the naked eye. In this paper, curvelet-based textural features and clinical parameters are used with three prediction models [a multilevel model, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression method, and a support vector machine (SVM)] to improve the diagnosis of benign and malignant SPNs. Dimensionality reduction of the original curvelet-based textural features was achieved using principal component analysis. In addition, non-conditional logistical regression was used to find clinical predictors among demographic parameters and morphological features. The results showed that, combined with 11 clinical predictors, the accuracy rates using 12 principal components were higher than those using the original curvelet-based textural features. To evaluate the models, 10-fold cross validation and back substitution were applied. The results obtained, respectively, were 0.8549 and 0.9221 for the LASSO method, 0.9443 and 0.9831 for SVM, and 0.8722 and 0.9722 for the multilevel model. All in all, it was found that using curvelet-based textural features after dimensionality reduction and using clinical predictors, the highest accuracy rate was achieved with SVM. The method may be used as an auxiliary tool to differentiate between benign and malignant SPNs in CT images. PMID:24289618

  10. A hybrid fuzzy-neural system for computer-aided diagnosis of ultrasound kidney images using prominent features.

    PubMed

    Bommanna Raja, K; Madheswaran, M; Thyagarajah, K

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and implement a computer-aided decision support system for an automated diagnosis and classification of ultrasound kidney images. The proposed method distinguishes three kidney categories namely normal, medical renal diseases and cortical cyst. For the each pre-processed ultrasound kidney image, 36 features are extracted. Two types of decision support systems, optimized multi-layer back propagation network and hybrid fuzzy-neural system have been developed with these features for classifying the kidney categories. The performance of the hybrid fuzzy-neural system is compared with the optimized multi-layer back propagation network in terms of classification efficiency, training and testing time. The results obtained show that fuzzy-neural system provides higher classification efficiency with minimum training and testing time. It has also been found that instead of using all 36 features, ranking the features enhance classification efficiency. The outputs of the decision support systems are validated with medical expert to measure the actual efficiency. The overall discriminating capability of the systems is accessed with performance evaluation measure, f-score. It has been observed that the performance of fuzzy-neural system is superior compared to optimized multi-layer back propagation network. Such hybrid fuzzy-neural system with feature extraction algorithms and pre-processing scheme helps in developing computer-aided diagnosis system for ultrasound kidney images and can be used as a secondary observer in clinical decision making.

  11. Role of Gist and PHOG Features in Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Tuberculosis without Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Chauhan, Devesh; Rout, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Effective diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) relies on accurate interpretation of radiological patterns found in a chest radiograph (CXR). Lack of skilled radiologists and other resources, especially in developing countries, hinders its efficient diagnosis. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) methods provide second opinion to the radiologists for their findings and thereby assist in better diagnosis of cancer and other diseases including TB. However, existing CAD methods for TB are based on the extraction of textural features from manually or semi-automatically segmented CXRs. These methods are prone to errors and cannot be implemented in X-ray machines for automated classification. Methods Gabor, Gist, histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and pyramid histogram of oriented gradients (PHOG) features extracted from the whole image can be implemented into existing X-ray machines to discriminate between TB and non-TB CXRs in an automated manner. Localized features were extracted for the above methods using various parameters, such as frequency range, blocks and region of interest. The performance of these features was evaluated against textural features. Two digital CXR image datasets (8-bit DA and 14-bit DB) were used for evaluating the performance of these features. Results Gist (accuracy 94.2% for DA, 86.0% for DB) and PHOG (accuracy 92.3% for DA, 92.0% for DB) features provided better results for both the datasets. These features were implemented to develop a MATLAB toolbox, TB-Xpredict, which is freely available for academic use at http://sourceforge.net/projects/tbxpredict/. This toolbox provides both automated training and prediction modules and does not require expertise in image processing for operation. Conclusion Since the features used in TB-Xpredict do not require segmentation, the toolbox can easily be implemented in X-ray machines. This toolbox can effectively be used for the mass screening of TB in high-burden areas with improved efficiency. PMID

  12. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  13. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  14. Canonical feature selection for joint regression and multi-class identification in Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Suk, Heung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Fusing information from different imaging modalities is crucial for more accurate identification of the brain state because imaging data of different modalities can provide complementary perspectives on the complex nature of brain disorders. However, most existing fusion methods often extract features independently from each modality, and then simply concatenate them into a long vector for classification, without appropriate consideration of the correlation among modalities. In this paper, we propose a novel method to transform the original features from different modalities to a common space, where the transformed features become comparable and easy to find their relation, by canonical correlation analysis. We then perform the sparse multi-task learning for discriminative feature selection by using the canonical features as regressors and penalizing a loss function with a canonical regularizer. In our experiments on the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, we use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images to jointly predict clinical scores of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and also identify multi-class disease status for Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. The experimental results showed that the proposed canonical feature selection method helped enhance the performance of both clinical score prediction and disease status identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26254746

  15. Sex Differences in Clinical Features of Early, Treated Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Erika F.; Pérez, Adriana; Dhall, Rohit; Umeh, Chizoba C.; Videnovic, Aleksandar; Cambi, Franca; Wills, Anne-Marie A.; Elm, Jordan J.; Zweig, Richard M.; Shulman, Lisa M.; Nance, Martha A.; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Suchowersky, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To improve our understanding of sex differences in the clinical characteristics of Parkinson’s Disease, we sought to examine differences in the clinical features and disease severity of men and women with early treated Parkinson’s Disease (PD) enrolled in a large-scale clinical trial. Methods Analysis was performed of baseline data from the National Institutes of Health Exploratory Trials in Parkinson’s Disease (NET-PD) Long-term Study-1, a randomized, multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 10 grams of oral creatine/day in individuals with early, treated PD. We compared mean age at symptom onset, age at PD diagnosis, and age at randomization between men and women using t-test statistics. Sex differences in clinical features were evaluated, including: symptoms at diagnosis (motor) and symptoms at randomization (motor, non-motor, and daily functioning). Results 1,741 participants were enrolled (62.5% male). No differences were detected in mean age at PD onset, age at PD diagnosis, age at randomization, motor symptoms, or daily functioning between men and women. Differences in non-motor symptoms were observed, with women demonstrating better performance compared to men on SCOPA-COG (Z = 5.064, p<0.0001) and Symbol Digit Modality measures (Z = 5.221, p<0.0001). Conclusions Overall, men and women did not demonstrate differences in clinical motor features early in the course of PD. However, the differences observed in non-motor cognitive symptoms suggests further assessment of the influence of sex on non-motor symptoms in later stages of PD is warranted. PMID:26171861

  16. Overlap of clinical features of Smith-Magenis & Down Syndrome in newborns and infants

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, K.A.; Finucane, B.M.; Bauer, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) frequently goes unrecognized in newborns and infants as these patients do not yet demonstrate the characteristic behavioral phenotype and may only present with developmental delay and physical dysmorphism. Six of Hall`s ten cardinal features of trisomy 21 in the newborn are also frequently found in newborns with SMS, leading to an early presumptive diagnosis of DS in many of these patients. CASE No. 1: Based on clinical findings, a presumptive diagnosis of DS was given to the patient in the newborn period. Chromosome analysis of peripheral blood revealed a normal 46,XX karyotype. Given this result, the possibility of mosaic DS was raised, and a skin fibroblast study done. Again, the karyotype was reported as normal. Clinical features and cytogenetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of SMS when the patient was 8 years old. CASE No. 2: A presumptive diagnosis of DS was made in an infant with hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. A routine chromosome analysis was ordered, which revealed a 46,XY,del(17)(p11.2p11.2) karyotype. Indeed, approximately 38% of blood samples referred to our laboratory to rule out DS in an infant failed to demonstrate trisomy for chromosome 21. Given the high degree of clinical overlap with Down Syndrome, the diagnosis of SMS should be considered in all such patients. Additional analysis should be done to look for deletion 17p11.2 when faced with a {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} karyotype in an infant referred to rule out DS.

  17. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN) and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier) on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC), Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC), and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC). Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. PMID:27403253

  18. [Clinical symptomps, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Favrot, C; Rostaher, A; Fischer, N

    2014-07-01

    Allergies are often suspected in cats and they are mainly hypersensitivity reactions against insect bites, food- or environmental allergens. Cats, with non flea induced atopic dermatitis, normally present with one oft he following reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, eosinophilic dermatitis, selfinduced alopecia or head and neck excoriations. None of these reaction patterns is nevertheless pathognomonic for allergic dermatitis, therefore the diagnosis is based on the one hand on the exclusion of similar diseases on the other hand on the successful response on a certain therapy. Recently a study on the clinical presentation of cats with non flea induced atopic dermatitis was published. In this study certain criteria for diagnosing atopy in cats were proposed. For therapy of allergic cats cyclosporin, glucocorticoids, antihistamines, hypoallergenic diets and allergen specific immunotherapy are used. This article should provide a recent overview on the clinical symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis.

  19. Clinical features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangfa; Pu, Xin; Guo, Hongjuang; Huang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dong; Gan, Huili

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and highly malignant tumor of pulmonary artery origin. Since 1923, when the first case was reported, <300 cases have been reported worldwide. PAS has a poor prognosis, and early diagnosis with radical surgical resection offers patients with PAS the only chance of survival. However, due to its rarity and the non-specificity of its clinical manifestations and imaging presentation, PAS is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary thromboembolic disease, including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The present study reports three cases of PAS that were initially misdiagnosed as PTE or CTEPH, and were later shown to be PAS following surgery. In addition, the clinical features of these patients are examined in order to improve the differential diagnosis of PAS during the early stages of the disease, when the prognosis of patients with PAS is at its optimum. PMID:27446344

  20. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  1. [Differential diagnosis from hyperglycemic ketoacidosis: pesticide poisoning. Clinical case].

    PubMed

    Vélez, Paola; Paredes, Patricio; Fuenmayor, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis in children causes serious morbidity and mortality, especially if it is not recognized on time in the initial diagnosis. However, there are other diseases that can appear to be a metabolic disorder of this kind and be ignored if it is not suspected. We present a clinical case with hyperglycemic ketoacidosis due to the contact with organophosphate; we had to use a continuous infusion of insulin to control the metabolic disorder without repercussions after the girl came home.

  2. High retroperitoneal lymphocele: unusual clinical presentation and diagnosis by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fried, A M; Williams, C B; Litvak, A S

    1980-04-01

    A case of a mid lumbar lymphocele secondary to retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy for testicular carcinoma is described. The clinical picture was unusual and confusing in that the symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature. Ultrasound provided the diagnosis and guidance for aspiration. Although the most common operative source of lymphocele formation appears to be the pelvic lymphatics similar collections may arise from para-aortic and renal hilar dissections and produce unusual manifestations. Ultrasound is of established value in such cases.

  3. [Juvenil idiopathic arthritis. Part 1: diagnosis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations].

    PubMed

    Espada, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is not a single disease and constitutes an heterogeneous group of illnesses or inflammatory disorders. This new nomenclature encompasses different disease categories, each of which has different presentation, clinical signs, symptoms, and outcome. The cause of the disease is still unknown but both environmental and genetic factors seem to be related to its pathogenesis. Is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. In this article, clinical manifestation, new classification and approach to diagnosis are reviewed.

  4. [Discussion on Clinical and Diagnosis Program of Integrative Medicine].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi-di; Cao, Ze-biao; Du, Jia; Tao, Jing-jie; Zhou, Xiao-qing

    2016-05-01

    Facing current situation of integrative medicine (IM), authors put forward that clinical and diagnosis program of IM could be carried out from clinical path, pathogenesis, treatment theory and philosophy, and so on, but with different integration degrees. Meanwhile, formulation of concrete program should be disease-targetedly set up, and adjusted from person to person, from place to place, from time to time. As for settled IM program , authors could evaluate it from whether Chinese medicine and Western medicine have formed complementary, synergistic, excitatory actions, and toxicity attenuation; whether more problems could be solved in efficacy, safety, practicability, and economy than previous single mode. PMID:27386638

  5. [Artificial intelligence to assist clinical diagnosis in medicine].

    PubMed

    Lugo-Reyes, Saúl Oswaldo; Maldonado-Colín, Guadalupe; Murata, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is one of the fields of knowledge that would most benefit from a closer interaction with Computer studies and Mathematics by optimizing complex, imperfect processes such as differential diagnosis; this is the domain of Machine Learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence that builds and studies systems capable of learning from a set of training data, in order to optimize classification and prediction processes. In Mexico during the last few years, progress has been made on the implementation of electronic clinical records, so that the National Institutes of Health already have accumulated a wealth of stored data. For those data to become knowledge, they need to be processed and analyzed through complex statistical methods, as it is already being done in other countries, employing: case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian classifiers, multivariate logistic regression, or support vector machines, among other methodologies; to assist the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, breast cancer and chronic liver disease, among a wide array of maladies. In this review we shift through concepts, antecedents, current examples and methodologies of machine learning-assisted clinical diagnosis.

  6. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Clinical and laboratory criteria for its diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic granulomatous, and destructive inflammatory lesion of small intralobular and septal bile ducts, which is likely to be caused by an autoimmune mechanism with a the presence of serum antimitochondrial antibodies and a potential tendency to progress to cirrhosis. Despite the fact that the etiology of this disease has been unknown so far, there has been a considerable body of scientific evidence that can reveal the clinical and laboratory signs of PBC and the individual components of its pathogenesis and elaborate diagnostic criteria for the disease and its symptomatic therapy. Deficiencies in autoimmune tolerance are critical factors for the initiation and perpetuation of the disease. The purpose of this review is to summarize the data available in the literature and the author’s findings on clinical and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of PBC. This review describes the major clinical manifestations of the disease and the mechanisms of its development. It presents the immunological, biochemical, and morphological signs of PBC and their significance for its diagnosis. A great deal of novel scientific evidence for the problem of PBC has been accumulated. However, the inadequate efficiency of therapy for the disease lends impetus to the quest for its etiological factors and to further investigations of its pathogenetic mechanisms and, on this basis, to searches for new methods for its early diagnosis. PMID:26167070

  7. Clinical, laboratory and electrophysiological features of Morvan's fibrillary chorea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Will; Day, Timothy J; Williams, David R

    2013-09-01

    Morvan's Fibrillary Chorea (MFC) is a rare autoimmune disorder causally associated with auto-antibodies directed at the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC-Abs). It classically presents with sleep disturbances, neuromyotonia and dysautonomia. We aimed to systematically characterise the features of MFC by describing a patient and reviewing published literature. Case notes of 27 patients with MFC (one from our clinic and 26 from the literature) were reviewed and clinical data were extracted and analysed. We found that MFC mainly affects men (96%) and runs a subacute course over months. Neoplasia (56%), VGKC-Abs positivity (79%) and autoimmunity (41%) are frequent associations. Myokymia, insomnia and hyperhidrosis were almost universally described. Other autonomic features were present in 63% with the most common being cardiovascular and bowel disturbances. Clinical, radiological or electroencephalographical features of limbic encephalitis were present in 19% of patients. Outcome was fair with an overall recovery rate of 78%. All patients with malignancies underwent surgery. Immunotherapies including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasma exchange were instituted in 22 patients and 19 (86%) responded. Of all symptomatic treatments tried, carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, levetiracetam and niaprazine were found to be effective. The broad clinical spectrum of VGKC-Abs diseases can make early recognition of MFC difficult. Myokymia, insomnia and hyperhidrosis are invariably present. There may be abnormalities on cerebrospinal fluid testing and VGKC-Abs can occasionally be absent. Early initiation of immunotherapies and malignancy screening are important to prevent adverse outcomes in a condition that generally responds favourably to treatment.

  8. Demographic and clinical features of neuromyelitis optica: A review

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, N; Apiwattanakul, M; Palace, J; Paul, F; Leite, MI; Kleiter, I; Chitnis, T

    2015-01-01

    The comparative clinical and demographic features of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are not well known. In this review we analyzed peer-reviewed publications for incidence and prevalence, clinical phenotypes, and demographic features of NMO. Population-based studies from Europe, South East and Southern Asia, the Caribbean, and Cuba suggest that the incidence and prevalence of NMO ranges from 0.05–0.4 and 0.52–4.4 per 100,000, respectively. Mean age at onset (32.6–45.7) and median time to first relapse (8–12 months) was similar. Most studies reported an excess of disease in women and a relapsing course, particularly in anti-aquaporin 4 antibody (anti AQP4-IgG)-positive patients. Ethnicity may have a bearing on disease phenotype and clinical outcome. Despite limitations inherent to the review process, themes noted in clinical and demographic features of NMO among different populations promote a more global understanding of NMO and strategies to address it. PMID:25921037

  9. Early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder: Stability and change in clinical diagnosis and symptom presentation

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Whitney; Swineford, Lauren B.; Nottke, Charly; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appears to be stable in children as young as age three, few studies have explored stability of a diagnosis in younger children. Predictive value of diagnostic tools for toddlers and patterns of symptom change are important considerations for clinicians making early diagnoses. Most findings come from high-risk samples, but reports on children screened in community settings are also needed. Methods Stability of diagnosis and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule–Toddler Module (ADOS-T) classifications and scores was examined across two time points in a sample of 82 children identified through the FIRST WORDSR Project. Children received two comprehensive diagnostic evaluations at average ages of 19.39 (SD=2.12) and 36.89 (SD=3.85) months. Results Stability was 100% when confirming and ruling out a diagnosis of ASD based on a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation that included clinic and home observations, although diagnosis was initially deferred for 17% of the sample. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves revealed excellent sensitivity and acceptable specificity for the ADOS-T compared to concurrent diagnosis. Logistic regressions indicated good predictive value of initial ADOS-T scores for follow-up diagnosis. Finally, both ASD and Non-ASD children demonstrated a decrease in Social Affect scores (i.e., improvement), while children with ASD demonstrated an increase in Restricted and Repetitive Behavior scores (i.e., worsening), changes that were accounted for by nonverbal developmental level in mixed model analyses. Conclusions Short-term stability was documented for children diagnosed at 19 months on average, although a minority of children initially showed unclear diagnostic presentations. Findings highlight utility of the ADOS-T in making early diagnoses and predicting follow-up diagnoses. Children with ASD demonstrated improvement in social communication behaviors and unfolding of repetitive

  10. Oral myofibromas: report of two cases and review of clinical and histopathologic differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Rebeca de Souza; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; Della Coletta, Ricardo; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2008-06-01

    Myofibroma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm composed of myofibroblasts which has been described with different synonyms since the first report in 1951. It may show clinical and histologic features that may be misinterpreted as a malignancy. We describe 2 cases of oral myofibromas affecting infants; the first one showed a rapid growth with teeth displacement and ulceration; the second one presented a relatively slow growth with an indolent course. Differential diagnosis included benign and malignant mesenchymal neoplasms, salivary gland tumors, and reactive processes. Microscopic analysis of both lesions revealed a spindle cell tumor with immunoreactivity for vimentin, muscle-specific actin, and specific smooth muscle isoform alpha-actin, rendering the diagnoses of myofibroma. The patients were treated with surgical excision, and both are in follow-up without any signs of recurrence. Myofibroma presents a wide range of differential diagnosis, including benign and malignant neoplasms. Therefore, accurate diagnosis may avoid an unnecessary aggressive therapy.

  11. Clinical Features and Developing Risks of Saphenous Vein Thrombophlebitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical features and the risks of 14 patients with 14 limbs affected by saphenous vein thrombophlebitis from April 2007 to May 2013 and compared the results with patients undergoing operative repair of varicose veins (127 patients, 193 limbs) during the study period. The frequency of patients with a body mass index over 25 (78.6% vs. 35.3%, p = 0.0018), varicose change in the saphenous vein (78.6% vs. 6.2%, p <0.0001), and concurrent thrombosis in another vein (50.0% vs. 7.1%, p <0.0001) were all significantly higher than those of the patients under operative repair for varicose veins. These patients with clinical features above may be at an elevated risk of thrombophlebitis of the saphenous trunk. (This article is a translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2014; 54: 151–157). PMID:27375800

  12. Clinical features on nerve gas terrorism in Matsumoto.

    PubMed

    Okudera, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Clinical features on the first unexpected nerve gas terrorism using sarin (isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) on citizens in the city of Matsumoto is described. The nerve gas terrorism occurred at midnight on 27 June, 1994. About 600 people including residents and rescue staff were exposed to sarin gas. Fifty-eight victims were admitted to hospitals and seven died. Theoretically, sarin inhibits systemic acetylcholinesterase and damages all the autonomic transmission at the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Miosis was the most common finding in the affected people. In cases with severe poisoning, organophosphate may affect the central nervous system and cause cardiomyopathy. A few of the victims complained of arrhythmia and showed a decreased cardiac contraction. Abnormal electroencephalograms were recorded in two patients. The clinical features and follow-up studies are discussed with reference to the Tokyo subway terrorism and related articles.

  13. The balance beam metaphor: a perspective on clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Robert M; Beasley, William Howard

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the impact of clinical findings in discriminating between possible causes of a patient's presentation is essential in clinical judgment. A balance beam is a natural physical analogue that can accurately represent the combination of several pieces of evidence with varying ability to discriminate between disease hypotheses. Calculation of Bayes' theorem using log(posterior odds) as a function of log(prior odds) and the logarithms of the evidence's likelihood ratios maps onto the physical forces affecting objects placed on a balance beam. We describe the rules governing the functioning of tokens representing clinical findings in the comparison of 2 competing diseases. The likelihood ratios corresponding to positive (LR+) or negative (LR-) observations for each symptom determine the lateral position at which the symptom's token is placed on the beam, using a weight if the finding is present and a helium balloon if it is absent. We discuss how a balance beam could represent concepts of dynamic specificity (due to changes in competitor diseases' probabilities) and dynamic sensitivity (due to class-conditional independence). Utility-based thresholds for acting on a diagnosis could be represented by moving the balance beam's fulcrum. It is suggested that a balance beam can be a useful aid for students learning clinical diagnosis, allowing them to build on existing intuitive understanding to develop an appreciation of how evidence combines to influence degree of belief. The balance beam could also facilitate exploration of the potential impact of available questions or investigations.

  14. Malignant mesothelioma--clinical and epidemiological features. A report of 80 cases.

    PubMed

    Solomons, K

    1984-09-15

    The clinical and epidemiological features of 80 cases of malignant mesothelioma (as proved by examination of biopsy specimens) referred to the clinic at the National Centre for Occupational Health between January 1977 and June 1983 are reviewed. There was a positive history of asbestos exposure in 89% of cases. The mean survival time from diagnosis to death was 8,6 months and from the onset of symptoms to death 13,6 months. Survival time was unaffected by stage of the tumour, treatment, histological features, smoking status, presenting symptoms, presence or absence of effusion and asbestosis, side of the lesion, source of exposure and lag period from first exposure to diagnosis. The duration of survival was significantly affected by age at diagnosis, duration of asbestos exposure and the number, rather than the type, of treatment regimens used. Caution is advocated in interpreting these data since the number of cases was small and the study design was retrospective. A reference group of 546 cases notified over the same period was drawn from the records of the South African Asbestos Tumour Reference Panel. The incompleteness of national mesothelioma incidence data was noted, and an incidence figure of 7,2 per million per year was calculated from the best-available data for South Africa. This figure is an underestimate because not all diagnosed cases are reflected and, more important, significant numbers of cases are never diagnosed. The extent to which the compensation machinery functions is mentioned.

  15. Accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of recessive X-linked ichthyosis vs ichthyosis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Covarrubias, S A; Kofman-Alfaro, S H; Palencia, A B; Díaz-Zagoya, J C

    1996-09-01

    The present study analyzes the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) vs ichthyosis vulgaris (IV), in a sample of Mexican patients. The study was double blind, using steroid sulfatase (STS) activity as the golden standard. Twenty male patients were included; 16 corresponded to XLI and 4 to IV. The clinical diagnosis was correct in 9 of the 16 XLI cases (56%) and in 2 of the 4 IV cases (50%). Some clinical findings in XLI, such as cryptorchidism in patients and delayed labor in their mothers, were important features for diagnosis. Statistical analysis of the results showed: among physicians (n = 2) Kappa value 0.50, specific concordance 0.40, and absolute concordance 0.75; other values were sensibility 0.56, specificity 0.50, positive predictive value 0.82, negative predictive value 0.22, accuracy 0.55, prevalence 0.80. In conclusion, the differential diagnosis of XLI and IV is very difficult, and we consider that this is not explained either by personal skills or by other conditions. It could be attributed to the similarities in skin manifestations of these two diseases. The performance of the STS assay is imperative in order to correctly diagnose the disease and offer adequate genetic counseling.

  16. A retrospective cohort study identifying the principal pathological features useful in the diagnosis of inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Stefen; Squier, Waney; Sewry, Caroline; Hanna, Michael; Hilton-Jones, David; Holton, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current pathological diagnostic criteria for sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) lack sensitivity. Using immunohistochemical techniques abnormal protein aggregates have been identified in IBM, including some associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Our objective was to investigate the diagnostic utility of a number of markers of protein aggregates together with mitochondrial and inflammatory changes in IBM. Design Retrospective cohort study. The sensitivity of pathological features was evaluated in cases of Griggs definite IBM. The diagnostic potential of the most reliable features was then assessed in clinically typical IBM with rimmed vacuoles (n=15), clinically typical IBM without rimmed vacuoles (n=9) and IBM mimics—protein accumulation myopathies containing rimmed vacuoles (n=7) and steroid-responsive inflammatory myopathies (n=11). Setting Specialist muscle services at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London. Results Individual pathological features, in isolation, lacked sensitivity and specificity. However, the morphology and distribution of p62 aggregates in IBM were characteristic and in a myopathy with rimmed vacuoles, the combination of characteristic p62 aggregates and increased sarcolemmal and internal major histocompatibility complex class I expression or endomysial T cells were diagnostic for IBM with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100%. In an inflammatory myopathy lacking rimmed vacuoles, the presence of mitochondrial changes was 100% sensitive and 73% specific for IBM; characteristic p62 aggregates were specific (91%), but lacked sensitivity (44%). Conclusions We propose an easily applied diagnostic algorithm for the pathological diagnosis of IBM. Additionally our findings support the hypothesis that many of the pathological features considered typical of IBM develop later in the disease, explaining their poor sensitivity at disease presentation and

  17. Ocular Features in Alport Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Shivanand; Leys, Anita; Nicholson, Anjali; Mack, Heather G.; Colville, Deb

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by progressive renal failure, hearing loss, and ocular abnormalities. Mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked), or COL4A3 and COL4A4 (autosomal recessive) genes result in absence of the collagen IV α3α4α5 network from the basement membranes of the cornea, lens capsule, and retina and are associated with corneal opacities, anterior lenticonus, fleck retinopathy, and temporal retinal thinning. Typically, these features do not affect vision or, in the case of lenticonus, are correctable. In contrast, the rarer ophthalmic complications of posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy, giant macular hole, and maculopathy all produce visual loss. Many of the ocular features of Alport syndrome are common, easily recognizable, and thus, helpful diagnostically, and in identifying the likelihood of early-onset renal failure. Lenticonus and central fleck retinopathy strongly suggest the diagnosis of Alport syndrome and are associated with renal failure before the age of 30 years, in males with X-linked disease. Sometimes, ophthalmic features suggest the mode of inheritance. A peripheral retinopathy in the mother of a male with hematuria suggests X-linked inheritance, and central retinopathy or lenticonus in a female means that recessive disease is likely. Ocular examination, retinal photography, and optical coherence tomography are widely available, safe, fast, inexpensive, and acceptable to patients. Ocular examination is particularly helpful in the diagnosis of Alport syndrome when genetic testing is not readily available or the results are inconclusive. It also detects complications, such as macular hole, for which new treatments are emerging. PMID:25649157

  18. Clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zheng, Xing-Ju; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2015-10-07

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most common extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the lung. This study aimed to identify clinical features of RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD). Patients with RA were retrospectively enrolled and sub-classified as RA-ILD or RA without ILD based on high-resolution computed tomography imaging. Pulmonary function testing parameters and levels of RA-related biomarkers, tumour markers, and acute-phase proteins were compared between the two groups. Logistic regression model was used to assess the strength of association between RA-ILD and clinical features of interest. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to assess potential predictive value of clinical features for detecting RA-ILD. Comparison analysis indicated that the percentage of predicted value of total lung capacity, inspiratory capacity, and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were reduced in patients with RA-ILD. Tumour markers CA15-3 and CA125 were increased in patients with RA-ILD. Logistic regression analysis revealed that decreased DLCO was related to the increased likelihood of RA-ILD (OR = 0.94, 95%CI = [0.91, 0.98]). The cut-off point at 52.95 percent of predicted value could sensitively discriminate RA patients with or without ILD. Our study suggested that DLCO value could be a useful tool for detecting ILD in patients with RA.

  19. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, S A; Sastre, J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. Hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to ≥2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity. PMID:27108666

  20. Severe scrub typhus infection: Clinical features, diagnostic challenges and management

    PubMed Central

    Peter, John Victor; Sudarsan, Thomas I; Prakash, John Anthony J; Varghese, George M

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus infection is an important cause of acute undifferentiated fever in South East Asia. The clinical picture is characterized by sudden onset fever with chills and non-specific symptoms that include headache, myalgia, sweating and vomiting. The presence of an eschar, in about half the patients with proven scrub typhus infection and usually seen in the axilla, groin or inguinal region, is characteristic of scrub typhus. Common laboratory findings are elevated liver transaminases, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis. About a third of patients admitted to hospital with scrub typhus infection have evidence of organ dysfunction that may include respiratory failure, circulatory shock, mild renal or hepatic dysfunction, central nervous system involvement or hematological abnormalities. Since the symptoms and signs are non-specific and resemble other tropical infections like malaria, enteric fever, dengue or leptospirosis, appropriate laboratory tests are necessary to confirm diagnosis. Serological assays are the mainstay of diagnosis as they are easy to perform; the reference test is the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the detection of IgM antibodies. However in clinical practice, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay is done due to the ease of performing this test and a good sensitivity and sensitivity when compared with the IFA. Paired samples, obtained at least two weeks apart, demonstrating a ≥ 4 fold rise in titre, is necessary for confirmation of serologic diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is the tetracycline group of antibiotics or chloramphenicol although macrolides are used alternatively. In mild cases, recovery is complete. In severe cases with multi-organ failure, mortality may be as high as 24%. PMID:26261776

  1. Severe scrub typhus infection: Clinical features, diagnostic challenges and management.

    PubMed

    Peter, John Victor; Sudarsan, Thomas I; Prakash, John Anthony J; Varghese, George M

    2015-08-01

    Scrub typhus infection is an important cause of acute undifferentiated fever in South East Asia. The clinical picture is characterized by sudden onset fever with chills and non-specific symptoms that include headache, myalgia, sweating and vomiting. The presence of an eschar, in about half the patients with proven scrub typhus infection and usually seen in the axilla, groin or inguinal region, is characteristic of scrub typhus. Common laboratory findings are elevated liver transaminases, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis. About a third of patients admitted to hospital with scrub typhus infection have evidence of organ dysfunction that may include respiratory failure, circulatory shock, mild renal or hepatic dysfunction, central nervous system involvement or hematological abnormalities. Since the symptoms and signs are non-specific and resemble other tropical infections like malaria, enteric fever, dengue or leptospirosis, appropriate laboratory tests are necessary to confirm diagnosis. Serological assays are the mainstay of diagnosis as they are easy to perform; the reference test is the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the detection of IgM antibodies. However in clinical practice, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay is done due to the ease of performing this test and a good sensitivity and sensitivity when compared with the IFA. Paired samples, obtained at least two weeks apart, demonstrating a ≥ 4 fold rise in titre, is necessary for confirmation of serologic diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is the tetracycline group of antibiotics or chloramphenicol although macrolides are used alternatively. In mild cases, recovery is complete. In severe cases with multi-organ failure, mortality may be as high as 24%.

  2. Image processing based automatic diagnosis of glaucoma using wavelet features of segmented optic disc from fundus image.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anushikha; Dutta, Malay Kishore; ParthaSarathi, M; Uher, Vaclav; Burget, Radim

    2016-02-01

    Glaucoma is a disease of the retina which is one of the most common causes of permanent blindness worldwide. This paper presents an automatic image processing based method for glaucoma diagnosis from the digital fundus image. In this paper wavelet feature extraction has been followed by optimized genetic feature selection combined with several learning algorithms and various parameter settings. Unlike the existing research works where the features are considered from the complete fundus or a sub image of the fundus, this work is based on feature extraction from the segmented and blood vessel removed optic disc to improve the accuracy of identification. The experimental results presented in this paper indicate that the wavelet features of the segmented optic disc image are clinically more significant in comparison to features of the whole or sub fundus image in the detection of glaucoma from fundus image. Accuracy of glaucoma identification achieved in this work is 94.7% and a comparison with existing methods of glaucoma detection from fundus image indicates that the proposed approach has improved accuracy of classification.

  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome: a controversial clinical condition. Part 1: anatomy, and clinical examination/diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Troy L; Denton, Jeff; McGalliard, Michael K; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a frequently overlooked peripheral nerve compression or tension event that creates difficulties for the clinician regarding diagnosis and management. Investigators have categorized this condition as vascular versus neurogenic, where vascular TOS can be subcategorized as either arterial or venous and neurogenic TOS can subcategorized as either true or disputed. The thoracic outlet anatomical container presents with several key regional components, each capable of compromising the neurovascular structures coursing within. Bony and soft tissue abnormalities, along with mechanical dysfunctions, may contribute to neurovascular compromise. Diagnosing TOS can be challenging because the symptoms vary greatly amongst patients with the disorder, thus lending to other conditions including a double crush syndrome. A careful history and thorough clinical examination are the most important components in establishing the diagnosis of TOS. Specific clinical tests, whose accuracy has been documented, can be used to support a clinical diagnosis, especially when a cluster of positive tests are witnessed. PMID:21655389

  4. Clinical features of avian vacuolar myelinopathy in American coots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, R.S.; Nutter, F.B.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.; Tomlinson, L.; Thomas, N.J.; Stoskopf, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Objectivea??To characterize clinical features of avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) in American coots. Designa??Case-control study. Animalsa??26 AVM-affected American coots and 12 unaffected coots. Proceduresa??Complete physical, neurologic, hematologic, and plasma biochemical evaluations were performed. Affected coots received supportive care. All coots died or were euthanatized, and AVM status was confirmed via histopathologic findings. Resultsa??3 severely affected coots were euthanatized immediately after examination. Seventeen affected coots were found dead within 7 days of admission, but 5 affected coots survived > 21 days and had signs of clinical recovery. Abnormal physical examination findings appeared to be related to general debilitation. Ataxia (88%), decreased withdrawal reflexes (88%), proprioceptive deficits (81%), decreased vent responses (69%), beak or tongue weakness (42%), and head tremors (31%), as well as absent pupillary light responses (46%), anisocoria (15%), apparent blindness (4%), nystagmus (4%), and strabismus (4%) were detected. Few gross abnormalities were detected at necropsy, but histologically, all AVM-affected coots had severe vacuolation of white matter of the brain. None of the control coots had vacuolation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevancea??Although there was considerable variability in form and severity of clinical neurologic abnormalities, clinical signs common in AVM-affected birds were identified. Clinical recovery of some AVM-affected coots can occur when supportive care is administered. Until the etiology is identified, caution should be exercised when rehabilitating and releasing coots thought to be affected by AVM.

  5. Development and assessment of a clinically viable system for breast ultrasound computer-aided diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszauskas, Nicholas Peter

    The chances of surviving a breast cancer diagnosis as well as the effectiveness of any potential treatments increase significantly with early detection of the disease. As such, a considerable amount of research is being conducted to augment the breast cancer detection and diagnosis process. One such area of research involves the investigation and application of sophisticated computer algorithms to assist clinicians in detecting and diagnosing breast cancer on medical images (termed generally as "computer-aided diagnosis" or CAD). This study investigated a previously-developed breast ultrasound CAD system with the intent of translating it into a clinically-viable system. While past studies have demonstrated that breast ultrasound CAD may be a beneficial aid during the diagnosis of breast cancer on ultrasound, there are no investigations concerning its potential clinical translation and there are currently no commercially-available implementations of such systems. This study "bridges the gap" between the laboratory-developed system and the steps necessary for clinical implementation. A novel observer study was conducted that mimicked the clinical use of the breast ultrasound CAD system in order to assess the impact it had on the diagnostic performance of the user. Several robustness studies were also performed: the sonographic features used by the system were evaluated and the databases used for calibration and testing were characterized, the effect of the user's input was assessed by evaluating the performance of the system with variations in lesion identification and image selection, and the performance of the system on different patient populations was investigated by evaluating its performance on a database consisting solely of patients with Asian ethnicity. The analyses performed here indicate that the breast ultrasound CAD system under investigation is robust and demonstrates only minor variability when subjected to "real-world" use. All of these results are

  6. Combining Feature Extraction Methods to Assist the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Segovia, F; Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Phillips, C; For The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging data as (18)F-FDG PET is widely used to assist the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Looking for regions with hypoperfusion/ hypometabolism, clinicians may predict or corroborate the diagnosis of the patients. Modern computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems based on the statistical analysis of whole neuroimages are more accurate than classical systems based on quantifying the uptake of some predefined regions of interests (ROIs). In addition, these new systems allow determining new ROIs and take advantage of the huge amount of information comprised in neuroimaging data. A major branch of modern CAD systems for AD is based on multivariate techniques, which analyse a neuroimage as a whole, considering not only the voxel intensities but also the relations among them. In order to deal with the vast dimensionality of the data, a number of feature extraction methods have been successfully applied. In this work, we propose a CAD system based on the combination of several feature extraction techniques. First, some commonly used feature extraction methods based on the analysis of the variance (as principal component analysis), on the factorization of the data (as non-negative matrix factorization) and on classical magnitudes (as Haralick features) were simultaneously applied to the original data. These feature sets were then combined by means of two different combination approaches: i) using a single classifier and a multiple kernel learning approach and ii) using an ensemble of classifier and selecting the final decision by majority voting. The proposed approach was evaluated using a labelled neuroimaging database along with a cross validation scheme. As conclusion, the proposed CAD system performed better than approaches using only one feature extraction technique. We also provide a fair comparison (using the same database) of the selected feature extraction methods. PMID:26567734

  7. Deep sparse multi-task learning for feature selection in Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, neuroimaging-based Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnosis has attracted researchers in the field, due to the increasing prevalence of the diseases. Unfortunately, the unfavorable high-dimensional nature of neuroimaging data, but a limited small number of samples available, makes it challenging to build a robust computer-aided diagnosis system. Machine learning techniques have been considered as a useful tool in this respect and, among various methods, sparse regression has shown its validity in the literature. However, to our best knowledge, the existing sparse regression methods mostly try to select features based on the optimal regression coefficients in one step. We argue that since the training feature vectors are composed of both informative and uninformative or less informative features, the resulting optimal regression coefficients are inevidently affected by the uninformative or less informative features. To this end, we first propose a novel deep architecture to recursively discard uninformative features by performing sparse multi-task learning in a hierarchical fashion. We further hypothesize that the optimal regression coefficients reflect the relative importance of features in representing the target response variables. In this regard, we use the optimal regression co-efficients learned in one hierarchy as feature weighting factors in the following hierarchy, and formulate a weighted sparse multi-task learning method. Lastly, we also take into account the distributional characteristics of samples per class and use clustering-induced subclass label vectors as target response values in our sparse regression model. In our experiments on the ADNI cohort, we performed both binary and multi-class classification tasks in AD/MCI diagnosis and showed the superiority of the proposed method by comparing with the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25993900

  8. Deep sparse multi-task learning for feature selection in Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-06-01

    Recently, neuroimaging-based Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnosis has attracted researchers in the field, due to the increasing prevalence of the diseases. Unfortunately, the unfavorable high-dimensional nature of neuroimaging data, but a limited small number of samples available, makes it challenging to build a robust computer-aided diagnosis system. Machine learning techniques have been considered as a useful tool in this respect and, among various methods, sparse regression has shown its validity in the literature. However, to our best knowledge, the existing sparse regression methods mostly try to select features based on the optimal regression coefficients in one step. We argue that since the training feature vectors are composed of both informative and uninformative or less informative features, the resulting optimal regression coefficients are inevidently affected by the uninformative or less informative features. To this end, we first propose a novel deep architecture to recursively discard uninformative features by performing sparse multi-task learning in a hierarchical fashion. We further hypothesize that the optimal regression coefficients reflect the relative importance of features in representing the target response variables. In this regard, we use the optimal regression coefficients learned in one hierarchy as feature weighting factors in the following hierarchy, and formulate a weighted sparse multi-task learning method. Lastly, we also take into account the distributional characteristics of samples per class and use clustering-induced subclass label vectors as target response values in our sparse regression model. In our experiments on the ADNI cohort, we performed both binary and multi-class classification tasks in AD/MCI diagnosis and showed the superiority of the proposed method by comparing with the state-of-the-art methods.

  9. Clinical diagnosis of dental caries: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Pitts, N B

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a broad international perspective on aspects of the RTI/UNC systematic review, to introduce relevant literature not cited, and to make recommendations for clinical practice education and research suggested by the evidence. Clinical caries diagnosis represents the foundation on which the answers to most of the consensus questions will be based. This paper highlights needs for being clear about definitions and nomenclature; understanding the importance of the concepts underlying the D1 and D3 diagnostic thresholds used widely within the RTI/UNC Review; and appreciating that the diagnostic challenge now faced by clinicians is significant and is becoming more complex as the presentation and distribution of the disease changes over time and the range of preventive and operative treatment options expands. A series of recommendations informed by the evidence are made, including a rather contentious issue for many clinicians concerning the lack of evidence supporting the continued use of a sharp explorer as a diagnostic tool for primary caries diagnosis. This practice should be discontinued as it may cause some harm to the patient and yet fails to provide a significant balancing diagnostic benefit. Finally, it is suggested that dentistry should learn from the developing evidence base in medicine on how best to disseminate the findings of reviews and promote appropriate changes in clinical practice.

  10. [Advances in the research of clinical features and treatment of ammonia burns].

    PubMed

    Wu, Guosheng; Xiao, Shichu; Sun, Yu; Ji, Shizhao; Xia, Zhaofan

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia is commonly used in industry and agriculture. It is also one of the most frequently accidentally spilled chemicals. Exposure to ammonia can cause severe cutaneous burn or freezing injury, ocular injury, and inhalation injury, among them inhalation injury is the most lethal one. Although the diagnosis and treatment of ammonia burns have been improved, the long-term prognosis is not satisfactory. In this article, we reviewed the literature concerning ammonia burns, in order to summarize the clinical features and treatment of such injury.

  11. Intracapsular (in situ) carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma with unusual clinical and histological features.

    PubMed

    Logasundaram, Rajesh; Amarawickrama, Himan; Premachandra, Don; Hellquist, Henrik

    2008-12-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma poses a challenge to diagnosis and treatment. Herein we describe an extremely unusual case, which presented initially as an intracapsular carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma in the right parotid gland. The first recurrence, after an interval of 8 years, showed only recurrence of the benign component. Five years later, a myoepithelial carcinoma arose from the same site. No ductal carcinoma as seen in the initial intracapsular carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma was identified. This case report elucidates the atypical clinical behaviour and interesting histological features encountered within this group of salivary neoplasm.

  12. Review of clinical presentation and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, C J; Harmatz, P; Beck, M; Jones, S; Wood, T; Lachman, R; Gravance, C G; Orii, T; Tomatsu, S

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe "classical" phenotype to a mild "attenuated" phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed.

  13. Clinical evaluation of cytological diagnosis of nasopharyngeal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Molinari, R; Pilotti, S; Rilke, F

    1978-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1975 cytological examination was applied to the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal malignancies in a series of 216 consecutive patients who had either a tumour in the nasopharynx or clinical signs of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, or who were locally asymptomatic but had enlarged cervical lymph nodes. Smears were taken by introducing a small rough pad of compressed gauze through the mouth into the nasopharynx with an upward-angled forceps. In each case the cytological smear was taken immediately before biopsy; often, a lymph node was removed subsequently. When morphological diagnoses were doubtful and histological findings were at variance with positive cytological findings, the patients were reexamined clinically, and diagnosis was postponed. The case material was made up of 90 nasopharyngeal carcinomas, 24 lymphomas, one malignant melanoma, one adenoid cystic carcinoma and 100 patients without malignancies. Cytological findings from the first smear were positive in 77.8% of nasopharyngeal carcinomas, in 66.6% of lymphomas and in the cases of melanoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. There were no false-positive results. When the nasopharyngeal carcinomas were subdivided into undifferentiated carcinomas of the nasopharyngeal type and squamous-cell carcinomas, cytological findings were positive in ,0% and 73%, respectively. Positivity of histological findings was distributed as follows: 91.7% for malignant lymphomas, 86.6% for undifferentiated carcinomas and 86.6% for squamous-cell carcinomas. With respect to clinical suspicion of malignancy, positive cytological findings were obtained in 50% of clinically occult cases and in 84.6% of patients with obvious malignancies; intermediate figures were found for clinically doubtful (64.3%) and for highly suspicious (77.8%) cases. Cyto-histological concordance was shown in 70% of cases; false-negative histological results were obtained in 7.8% and false-negative cytological results in 16.6% of cases. Combined cyto

  14. Clinical Approach to Diagnosis of Pre-Dementia Alzheimer's Disease (CAD-PAD)

    PubMed Central

    Alom, J.; Llinares, I.; Fajardo, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to evaluate clinical and neuropsychological features to identify pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease (PAD) among mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients. Methods A longitudinal prospective study of 89 consecutive patients affected with MCI was conducted. Clinical evaluation consisted of a clinical interview protocol, neuropsychological evaluation, standard laboratory tests, and CT scan. A 6-month clinical check-up was made to determine whether patients remained in MCI, improved or progressed to AD or another dementia. Results At 3-year follow-up, 47% patients developed AD dementia. Seventeen variables were significant and were evaluated by logistic regression analysis to identify the remaining optimal diagnostic criteria: age, gender, repeating comments, difficulties in understanding explanations, time of symptom evolution, history of depression, and word fluency (with animals) were identified with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93%. A computer application was developed with all these variables which we have named Clinical Approach to Diagnosis of PAD (CAD-PAD). Conclusions These results suggest that CAD-PAD can help in the clinical diagnosis of PAD. PMID:22962557

  15. A hybrid feature selection approach for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Jutglà, Esteve; Solé-Casals, Jordi; Vialatte, François-Benoît; Elgendi, Mohamed; Cichocki, Andrzej; Dauwels, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Recently, significant advances have been made in the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from electroencephalography (EEG). However, choosing suitable measures is a challenging task. Among other measures, frequency relative power (RP) and loss of complexity have been used with promising results. In the present study we investigate the early diagnosis of AD using synchrony measures and frequency RP on EEG signals, examining the changes found in different frequency ranges. Approach. We first explore the use of a single feature for computing the classification rate (CR), looking for the best frequency range. Then, we present a multiple feature classification system that outperforms all previous results using a feature selection strategy. These two approaches are tested in two different databases, one containing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy subjects (patients age: 71.9 ± 10.2, healthy subjects age: 71.7 ± 8.3), and the other containing Mild AD and healthy subjects (patients age: 77.6 ± 10.0 healthy subjects age: 69.4 ± 11.5). Main results. Using a single feature to compute CRs we achieve a performance of 78.33% for the MCI data set and of 97.56% for Mild AD. Results are clearly improved using the multiple feature classification, where a CR of 95% is found for the MCI data set using 11 features, and 100% for the Mild AD data set using four features. Significance. The new features selection method described in this work may be a reliable tool that could help to design a realistic system that does not require prior knowledge of a patient's status. With that aim, we explore the standardization of features for MCI and Mild AD data sets with promising results.

  16. [Confusing clinical presentations and differential diagnosis of bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Gorwood, P

    2004-01-01

    euthymia periods may also increase the risk to shift from bipolar to schizophrenia diagnosis. Schizophreniform disorder ("bouffée délirante" aiguë in France) is a frequent form of bipolar disorder onset when major dissociative features are not obvious. The borderline personality is also a problem for the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, some Authors proposing that bipolar disorder is a mood-related personality disorder, sometimes improved by mood-stabilizers. Phasic instead of reactional, weeks and not days-length, clearcut onset and recovery versus non-easy to delimit mood-episodes may help to adjust the diagnosis. Organic disorders may lead to diagnostic confusion, but it is generally proposed that bipolar disorder should be treated the same way, whether or not an organic condition is detected (with special focus on treatment tolerance). Addictive disorders are frequent comorbid conditions in bipolar disorders. Psychostimulants (such as amphetamins or cocaine) intoxications sometimes mimic manic episodes. As these drugs are preferentially chosen by subjects with bipolar disorder, the later diagnosis should be systematically assessed. Puerperal psychosis is a frequent type of onset in female bipolar disorder. The systematic prescription of mood-stabilizers for and after such episode, when mood elation is a major symptom, is generally proposed. Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder also has unclear border with bipolar disorder, as a quarter of child hyperactivity may be latterly associated with bipolar disorder. The assessment of mood cycling and their follow-up in adulthood may thus be particularly important. Lastly, presence of some anxious disorders may delay the diagnosis of comorbid bipolar disorder.

  17. [Epidemiological, clinical and biological features of infantile visceral leishmaniasis at Kairouan hospital (Tunisia): about 240 cases].

    PubMed

    Aissi, W; Ben Hellel, K; Habboul, Z; Ben Sghaier, I; Harrat, Z; Bouratbine, A; Aoun, K

    2015-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an important health problem in Tunisia. It is most common in children under five years of age. The governorate of Kairouan (central Tunisia) is one of the most affected foci. The aim of this study was to update the epidemiological, clinical and biological features of the disease. The study concerned all VL cases admitted in the pediatric department of Kairouan hospital during 10 years (from 2004 to 2013). For every patient included in this study and when available, data such as sex, age, geographical origin and the condition of the patient at admission (clinical and biological findings) were collected. The myelogram results were also exploited as well as results of serology, culture, Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isoenzymatic typing of Leishmania isolates. Two hundred and forty cases were recorded. Rural cases (87.1%) were more prevalent than urban ones (12.9%). Age ranged from 2 months to 13 years (median, 18 months). The female/male sex ratio was 1.03. The diagnosis delays ranged from 1 day to 8 months (median, 15 days). The most common clinical symptoms at admission were splenomegaly (97.9%), fever (79.9%) and hepatomegaly (47.3%). The principal biological disturbances were anemia (91.7%), thrombocytopenia (83.9%) and leucopenia (56.1%). Among the different biological tools used for diagnosis confirmation, PCR was the most sensitive (100%). All 43 typed stocks corresponded to Leishmania (L.) infantum species. Although zymodeme MON-1 was predictably the most frequent (27 cases), L. infantum MON-24 and MON-80 were responsible of no negligible numbers of cases (11 and 5 cases respectively). The present study gave an updated epidemiological, clinical and biological profile of infantile VL in Tunisia. The diagnosis delays were considerably shortened compared to previous reports. However, an even earlier diagnosis of cases is needed to improve the disease prognosis. Real-Time PCR showed to be helpful in VL management.

  18. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  19. Hemicrania continua: functional imaging and clinical features with diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Sahler, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on summarizing 2 pivotal articles in the clinical and pathophysiologic understanding of hemicrania continua (HC). The first article, a functional imaging project,identifies both the dorsal rostral pons (a region associated with the generation of migraines) and the posterior hypothalamus(a region associated with the generation of cluster and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing [SUNCT]) as active during HC. The second article is a summary of the clinical features seen in a prospective cohort of HC patients that carry significant diagnostic implications. In particular, they identify a wider range of autonomic signs than what is currently included in the International Headache Society criteria (including an absence of autonomic signs in a small percentage of patients), a high frequency of migrainous features, and the presence of aggravation and/or restlessness during attacks. Wide variations in exacerbation length, frequency, pain description, and pain location (including side-switching pain) are also noted. Thus, a case is made for widening and modifying the clinical diagnostic criteria used to identify patients with HC.

  20. Hemicrania Continua: Functional Imaging and Clinical Features With Diagnostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Sahler, Kristen

    2013-04-10

    This review focuses on summarizing 2 pivotal articles in the clinical and pathophysiologic understanding of hemicrania continua (HC). The first article, a functional imaging project, identifies both the dorsal rostral pons (a region associated with the generation of migraines) and the posterior hypothalamus (a region associated with the generation of cluster and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing [SUNCT]) as active during HC. The second article is a summary of the clinical features seen in a prospective cohort of HC patients that carry significant diagnostic implications. In particular, they identify a wider range of autonomic signs than what is currently included in the International Headache Society criteria (including an absence of autonomic signs in a small percentage of patients), a high frequency of migrainous features, and the presence of aggravation and/or restlessness during attacks. Wide variations in exacerbation length, frequency, pain description, and pain location (including side-switching pain) are also noted. Thus, a case is made for widening and modifying the clinical diagnostic criteria used to identify patients with HC.

  1. The clinical recognition and differential diagnosis of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trevathan, E; Naidu, S

    1988-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is characterized by progressive loss of intellectual functioning and fine and gross motor skills as well as development of stereotypic hand movement abnormalities, occurring after 6 to 18 months of normal development. Rett syndrome has been previously reported only in girls, but the possibility of the syndrome existing in male children cannot be currently excluded. Although the syndrome is thought to be relatively common, it was only described in the English literature 5 years ago. There is currently no marker for the syndrome; diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. The newly developed diagnostic criteria for RS are reviewed, with special attention given to the historical aspects of the diagnosis in the prenatal, perinatal, neonatal, and early childhood periods. Rett syndrome is characterized by a predictable, orderly progression of signs and symptoms. Four stages of RS have been described; each stage has special characteristics and offers different diagnostic challenges for the neurologist. Infantile autism is the most common incorrect diagnosis made for children with RS. The simultaneous regression of both motor and language skills, as well as the stereotypic hand movements, hyperventilation, bruxism, and seizures in early childhood are all typical in RS and help distinguish RS from infantile autism.

  2. Clinical advances in molecular biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Seema; Ali, Shadan; Philip, Philip A; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2013-07-16

    Cancer diagnosis is currently undergoing a paradigm shift with the incorporation of molecular biomarkers as part of routine diagnostic panel. The molecular alteration ranges from those involving the DNA, RNA, microRNAs (miRNAs) and proteins. The miRNAs are recently discovered small non-coding endogenous single-stranded RNAs that critically regulates the development, invasion and metastasis of cancers. They are altered in cancers and have the potential to serve as diagnostic markers for cancer. Moreover, deregulating their activity offers novel cancer therapeutic approaches. The availability of high throughput techniques for the identification of altered cellular molecules allowed their use in cancer diagnosis. Their application to a variety of body specimens from blood to tissues has been helpful for appreciating their use in the clinical context. The development of innovative antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of proteins also assists in diagnosis and risk stratification. Overall, the novel cancer diagnostic tools have extended their application as prognostic risk factors and can be used as targets for personalized medicine.

  3. Lymphoscintigraphy to confirm the clinical diagnosis of lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Golueke, P.J.; Montgomery, R.A.; Petronis, J.D.; Minken, S.L.; Perler, B.A.; Williams, G.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Confirmation of the diagnosis of lymphedema often requires lymphangiography, a procedure that is painful for the patient and technically demanding. Radioisotope lymphoscintigraphy is a relatively new technique that uses technetium 99 m antimony trisulfide colloid to produce a diagnostic image similar to a lymphangiogram. The procedure requires a single subcutaneous injection in the involved extremity, and images are obtained 3 hours later. It is technically easy to perform, produces minimal discomfort for the patient, and has no adverse effects. We have recently used radioisotope lymphoscintigraphy to evaluate 17 patients with extremity edema. These patients initially had a presumed diagnosis of lymphedema involving the upper or lower extremity. Lymphoscintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of lymphedema in 12 (70.6%) patients. In five of the 17 patients (29.4%) the clinical impression of lymphedema was not supported by lymphoscintigraphy, leading to alternative diagnoses such as lipomatosis, venous insufficiency (two patients), congestive heart failure, and disuse edema. In all patients with secondary lymphedema the lymphatic system in the involved extremity could be partially visualized. Conversely, three of four patients with primary lymphedema had no ascent of the tracer from the foot and no lymphatic channels could be visualized. Lymphoscintigraphy is relatively easy to perform, safe, minimally invasive, and not uncomfortable for the patient. It is useful in differentiating lymphedema from other causes of extremity edema, allowing institution of appropriate therapy.

  4. Role of organic volatile profiles in clinical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zlatkis, A.; Brazell, R.S.; Poole, C.F.

    1981-06-01

    The organic volatile constituents of biological fluids contain clinically useful diagnostic information for the recognition of metabolic disorders in man. To gain access to this information, it was necessary to develop the methodology for reproducibly stripping the trace concentrations of volatiles from biological fluids (dynamic headspace, gas phase-stripping, solvent extraction, and the transevaporator technique), to separate the complex extracts by high-resolution capillary column gas chromatography, and to develop computer-aided data-handling and pattern-recognition techniques for analyzing the immense amount of information generated. The normal and pathological organic volatiles identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in urine, serum, and breast milk are tabulated. Clinical applications of the above techniques to the study and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, respiratory virus infection, renal insufficiency, and cancer are described.

  5. Environmental enteric dysfunction: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Keusch, Gerald T; Denno, Donna M; Black, Robert E; Duggan, Christopher; Guerrant, Richard L; Lavery, James V; Nataro, James P; Rosenberg, Irwin H; Ryan, Edward T; Tarr, Phillip I; Ward, Honorine; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Coovadia, Hoosen; Lima, Aldo; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan; Zaidi, Anita K M; Hay Burgess, Deborah C; Brewer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Stunting is common in young children in developing countries, and is associated with increased morbidity, developmental delays, and mortality. Its complex pathogenesis likely involves poor intrauterine and postnatal nutrition, exposure to microbes, and the metabolic consequences of repeated infections. Acquired enteropathy affecting both gut structure and function likely plays a significant role in this outcome, especially in the first few months of life, and serve as a precursor to later interactions of infection and malnutrition. However, the lack of validated clinical diagnostic criteria has limited the ability to study its role, identify causative factors, and determine cost-effective interventions. This review addresses these issues through a historical approach, and provides recommendations to define and validate a working clinical diagnosis and to guide critical research in this area to effectively proceed. Prevention of early gut functional changes and inflammation may preclude or mitigate the later adverse vicious cycle of malnutrition and infection.

  6. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Clinical Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Keusch, Gerald T.; Denno, Donna M.; Black, Robert E.; Duggan, Christopher; Guerrant, Richard L.; Lavery, James V.; Nataro, James P.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Ryan, Edward T.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Ward, Honorine; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Coovadia, Hoosen; Lima, Aldo; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Hay Burgess, Deborah C.; Brewer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Stunting is common in young children in developing countries, and is associated with increased morbidity, developmental delays, and mortality. Its complex pathogenesis likely involves poor intrauterine and postnatal nutrition, exposure to microbes, and the metabolic consequences of repeated infections. Acquired enteropathy affecting both gut structure and function likely plays a significant role in this outcome, especially in the first few months of life, and serve as a precursor to later interactions of infection and malnutrition. However, the lack of validated clinical diagnostic criteria has limited the ability to study its role, identify causative factors, and determine cost-effective interventions. This review addresses these issues through a historical approach, and provides recommendations to define and validate a working clinical diagnosis and to guide critical research in this area to effectively proceed. Prevention of early gut functional changes and inflammation may preclude or mitigate the later adverse vicious cycle of malnutrition and infection. PMID:25305288

  7. Clinical Features of Spinal Cord Hemangioblastoma in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Jennifer; Thomas, William; Ferguson, Sylvia; Hecht, Silke

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year-old male, intact Yorkshire terrier presented with a 1-month history of progressive paraparesis. Neurological examination revealed paraplegia with absent deep pain perception, decreased right pelvic limb withdrawal reflex, and lumbar pain consistent with an L4-S2 neurolocalization. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a single, well-demarcated, intramedullary mass centered over the L3-4 disk space. A hemilaminectomy was performed, and the mass was removed en bloc. Histopathological evaluation was consistent with a hemangioblastoma. Follow-up MRI 9 months after surgery showed no evidence of tumor recurrence, and the dog was ambulatory paraparetic at that time. This case is consistent with a previous histopathological report of spinal cord hemangioblastoma in a dog and provides additional clinical information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and outcome associated with this tumor type.

  8. Clinical Features of Spinal Cord Hemangioblastoma in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Jennifer; Thomas, William; Ferguson, Sylvia; Hecht, Silke

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year-old male, intact Yorkshire terrier presented with a 1-month history of progressive paraparesis. Neurological examination revealed paraplegia with absent deep pain perception, decreased right pelvic limb withdrawal reflex, and lumbar pain consistent with an L4–S2 neurolocalization. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a single, well-demarcated, intramedullary mass centered over the L3–4 disk space. A hemilaminectomy was performed, and the mass was removed en bloc. Histopathological evaluation was consistent with a hemangioblastoma. Follow-up MRI 9 months after surgery showed no evidence of tumor recurrence, and the dog was ambulatory paraparetic at that time. This case is consistent with a previous histopathological report of spinal cord hemangioblastoma in a dog and provides additional clinical information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and outcome associated with this tumor type. PMID:26664967

  9. [Plasmodium falciparum malaria: epidemiology and clinical features at Tarapoto Hospital].

    PubMed

    Calderon, J; Rodriguez, J; Romero, D

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted of the clinical records of 41 patients discharged from a hospital in Tarapoto, Peru, between August 1992 and June 1996 following treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 65 years; 25 were male. The cases were uniformly distributed throughout the year. The duration of illness averaged 11 days. At admission, 40 patients had fever, 36 had shaking chills, 29 had headache, 21 had nausea and vomiting, 21 had hyporexia, 15 had pallor, and 13 had splenomegaly. 3 of the 16 women were pregnant. 7 patients reported a history of malaria. The admission diagnosis was malaria in 33 cases. 31 patients were treated with chloroquine; 18 were subsequently treated with pyrimethamine-sulfadoxin and 1 received doxycycline. No cases of grave illness or death occurred. The increasing presence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Peruvian lowlands should promote review of the adequacy of control programs.

  10. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs) are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM). The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults. PMID:27322273

  11. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-06-17

    Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs) are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM). The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults.

  12. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs) are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM). The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults. PMID:27322273

  13. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  14. Congenital toxoplasmosis: Clinical features, outcomes, treatment, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by a coccidian parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The parasite is highly prevalent both in humans and in warm-blooded animals. Cat family animals are definitive host, and these animals excrete the infective oocysts in their feces. Humans, though not definitive host, get infection by consuming water or food contaminated with cat feces. Rarely, infection can also take place through transfusing the infected blood, through transplantation of infected organs, or transplacentally from infected mother to fetus. Transplacental infection can cause congenital infection with varied degree of clinical manifestations, which depend on the age of fetus when infection took place. Diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis is difficult to establish until it is suspected and laboratory investigations are carried out. In more than 75% of cases, acute infection is missed due to very mild or unnoticeable clinical symptoms and signs. In India, a prevalence rate of 22.4% (8.8-37.3%) has been reported with an overall IgM positivity of 1.43%. It is estimated that approximately between 56,737 and 176,882 children per year are born in India with a possible risk of congenital toxoplasmosis. The diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis can be made by serological methods which are most commonly used. The other methods are parasite isolation by culture and molecular methods. Toxoplasmosis is treatable and transplacental transmission can be prevented by spiramycin, which concentrates in the placenta. However, if infection has done any damage to the fetus or the parasite has passed the placenta, spiramycin cannot reverse the damage. Prevention remains the best remedy. PMID:27722099

  15. Skeletal Muscle Laminopathies: A Review of Clinical and Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Lorenzo; Carboni, Nicola; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-related disorders are caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes for the nuclear envelope proteins, lamin A and C, via alternative splicing. Laminopathies are associated with a wide range of disease phenotypes, including neuromuscular, cardiac, metabolic disorders and premature aging syndromes. The most frequent diseases associated with mutations in the LMNA gene are characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement. This review will focus on genetics and clinical features of laminopathies affecting primarily skeletal muscle. Although only symptomatic treatment is available for these patients, many achievements have been made in clarifying the pathogenesis and improving the management of these diseases. PMID:27529282

  16. Skeletal Muscle Laminopathies: A Review of Clinical and Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Lorenzo; Carboni, Nicola; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-related disorders are caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes for the nuclear envelope proteins, lamin A and C, via alternative splicing. Laminopathies are associated with a wide range of disease phenotypes, including neuromuscular, cardiac, metabolic disorders and premature aging syndromes. The most frequent diseases associated with mutations in the LMNA gene are characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement. This review will focus on genetics and clinical features of laminopathies affecting primarily skeletal muscle. Although only symptomatic treatment is available for these patients, many achievements have been made in clarifying the pathogenesis and improving the management of these diseases. PMID:27529282

  17. Small Renal Masses: Incidental Diagnosis, Clinical Symptoms, and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martín, F. M.; Millán-Rodríguez, F.; Urdaneta-Pignalosa, G.; Rubio-Briones, J.; Villavicencio-Mavrich, H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. The small renal masses (SRMs) have increased over the past two decades due to more liberal use of imaging techniques. SRMs have allowed discussions regarding their prognostic, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach. Materials and methods. Clinical presentation, incidental diagnosis, and prognosis factors of SRMs are discussed in this review. Results. SRMs are defined as lesions less than 4 cm in diameter. SRM could be benign, and most malignant SMRs are low stage and low grade. Clinical symptoms like hematuria are very rare, being diagnosed by chance (incidental) in most cases. Size, stage, and grade are still the most consistent prognosis factors in (RCC). An enhanced contrast SRM that grows during active surveillance is clearly malignant, and its aggressive potential increases in those greater than 3 cm. Clear cell carcinoma is the most frequent cellular type of malign SRM. Conclusions. Only some SRMs are benign. The great majority of malign SRMs have good prognosis (low stage and grade, no metastasis) with open or laparoscopic surgical treatment (nephron sparing techniques). Active surveillance is an accepted attitude in selected cases. PMID:19165347

  18. Disk hernia and spondylolisthesis diagnosis using biomechanical features and neural network.

    PubMed

    Oyedotun, Oyebade K; Olaniyi, Ebenezer O; Khashman, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have found applications in various areas of medical diagnosis. The capability of neural networks to learn medical data, mining useful and complex relationships that exist between attributes has earned it a major domain in decision support systems. This paper proposes a fast automatic system for the diagnosis of disk hernia and spondylolisthesis using biomechanical features and neural network. Such systems as described within this work allow the diagnosis of new cases using trained neural networks; patients are classified as either having disk hernia, spondylolisthesis, or normal. Generally, both disk hernia and spondylolisthesis present similar symptoms; hence, diagnosis is prone to inter-misclassification error. This work is significant in that the proposed systems are capable of making fast decisions on such somewhat difficult diagnoses with reasonable accuracies. Feedforward neural network and radial basis function networks are trained on data obtained from a public database. The results obtained within this research are promising and show that neural networks can find applications as efficient and effective expert systems for the diagnosis of disk hernia and spondylolisthesis.

  19. [The clinical features of migraine-associated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomoko; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2013-08-01

    Migraine-associated vertigo (MAV) is proposed as a new clinical entity on the basis of the assumption that the typical migraine and vertigo or dizziness have a common pathophysiology. Some of the patients with recurrent vertigo syndromes with unknown pathology may have MAV. We performed a retrospective study to clarify the clinical characteristics of MAV in the Japanese population. The following were considered as diagnostic criteria: (1) recurrent vestibular symptoms, (2) migraine headache as defined by the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria, (3) at least one instance of synchronization of a vertiginous attack with a migraine headache, (4) no associated unilateral hearing loss, and (5) absence of other diseases that may have caused vertiginous attacks. Of 552 patients with dizziness or vertigo, 46 (8.3%) were diagnosed as having MAV. A typical feature of this clinical entity is that migraine occurs before the onset of vertigo in women aged 30-40 years. Usually the attacks occur once in a year for 1 to 10 years. An attack lasts for 1-24 h and presents as vertigo and unsteadiness with simultaneous headache. The presence of hearing loss presents an important clinical dilemma. Whether the condition in patients experiencing hearing loss should be defined as MAV or not is still a matter for discussion.

  20. Marked overlap of four genetic syndromes with dyskeratosis congenita confounds clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Walne, Amanda J.; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Plagnol, Vincent; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Patıroglu, Turkan; Akar, Haluk; Godfrey, Keith; Carter, Tina; Marafie, Makia; Vora, Ajay; Sundin, Mikael; Vulliamy, Thomas; Tummala, Hemanth; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a highly pleotropic genetic disorder. This heterogeneity can lead to difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis and delays in appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the underlying genetic basis in patients presenting with features of dyskeratosis congenita and who were negative for mutations in the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes. By whole exome and targeted sequencing, we identified biallelic variants in genes that are not associated with dyskeratosis congenita in 17 individuals from 12 families. Specifically, these were homozygous variants in USB1 (8 families), homozygous missense variants in GRHL2 (2 families) and identical compound heterozygous variants in LIG4 (2 families). All patients had multiple somatic features of dyskeratosis congenita but not the characteristic short telomeres. Our case series shows that biallelic variants in USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2, the genes mutated in poikiloderma with neutropenia, LIG4/Dubowitz syndrome and the recently recognized ectodermal dysplasia/short stature syndrome, respectively, cause features that overlap with dyskeratosis congenita. Strikingly, these genes also overlap in their biological function with the known dyskeratosis congenita genes that are implicated in telomere maintenance and DNA repair pathways. Collectively, these observations demonstrate the marked overlap of dyskeratosis congenita with four other genetic syndromes, confounding accurate diagnosis and subsequent management. This has important implications for establishing a genetic diagnosis when a new patient presents in the clinic. Patients with clinical features of dyskeratosis congenita need to have genetic analysis of USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2 in addition to the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes and telomere length measurements. PMID:27612988

  1. Biology, clinical, and hematologic features of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Romero-Guzman, Lina; Lopez-Santiago, Norma; Trejo, Rosa Arana

    2003-06-01

    To assess the incidence, clinical features at presentation, hematologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic characteristics of AMKL in children we prospectively studied 834 consecutive non selected children with newly diagnosed acute leukemia (AL) admitted to the Hematology Department at the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (INP), Mexico, D.F. We found 682 cases (81.8%) with a typical ALL immunophenotype, and the remaining 152 (18.2%) were considered to have AML. In 29 of the 152 patients with AML studied, a diagnosis of AMKL was established. These 29 cases represented 19.1% of the cases of AML and 3.48% of the total cases of AL during the time span covered by the study. Twenty-four percent of the cases occurred in infants 2 years old or younger and 41.4% occurred in children 41 months of age or younger. In contrast, in only 18.6% of the patients with AML (M0-M6), the diagnosis was established before 42 months of age and in 17% before their second year of life. Clinical presentation was not strikingly different than that observed in patients with other types of AML, and the time interval from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was also similar, though in a small subset of patients, the clinical course was characterized by a chronic slowly progressive disorder extending over weeks or months resembling smoldering leukemia or chronic myelofibrosis with agnogenic myeloid metaplasia. Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis was a constant features in our patients; 75% of the patients studied showed this complication at the time of diagnosis. Some rather unusual findings in this study were intense skeletal pains from multiple osteolytic lesions, the presence of soft-tissue tumor, and the presence of cohesive scanty clusters of primitive-looking blast cells in BM aspirates. Several interesting cytogenetic findings in our study were t(1;22)(p13;q13) in a 14-year-old boy, t(9;22)(q34;q11) in one patient, and monosomy 7 in two patients. Another important finding in our study was the clinical

  2. Infantile nystagmus syndrome: clinical characteristics, current theories of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael D; Wong, Agnes

    2015-12-01

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is an important clinical diagnosis because it is a common presenting sign of many ocular, neurologic, and systemic diseases. Although INS has been studied for more than a century, its diagnosis and treatment remains a challenge to clinicians because of its varied manifestations and multiple associations, and its pathogenesis continues to rouse considerable scientific debate. Fueled by these challenges, recent basic research and clinical investigations have provided new insights into INS. New genetic discoveries and technological advances in ocular imaging have refined our understanding of INS subtypes and offer new diagnostic possibilities. Unexpected surgical outcomes have led to new understanding of its pathogenesis based on novel hypothesized pathways of ocular motor control. Comparative studies on nonhuman visual systems have also informed models of the neural substrate of INS in humans. This review brings together the classic profile of this disorder with recent research to provide an update on the clinical features of INS, an overview of the current theories on how and why INS develops, and a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of INS.

  3. The Clinical Diagnosis and Management of Kawasaki Disease: a Review and Update.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Frank H; Ang, Jocelyn Y

    2016-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of childhood and has become the leading cause of acquired pediatric heart disease in the USA. Prompt treatment is essential in reducing cardiac-related morbidity and mortality. The underlying etiology remains unknown. The disease itself may be the characteristic manifestation of a common pathway of immune-mediated vascular inflammation in susceptible hosts. The characteristic clinical features of fever for at least 5 days with bilateral nonpurulent conjunctivitis, rash, changes in lips and oral cavity, changes in peripheral extremities, and cervical lymphadenopathy remain the mainstay of diagnosis. Supplementary laboratory criteria can aid in the diagnosis, particularly in cases of incomplete clinical presentation. Diagnosis of Kawasaki disease can be challenging as the clinical presentation can be mistaken for a variety of other pediatric illnesses. Standard of care consists of intravenous immune globulin and aspirin. Corticosteroids, infliximab, and cyclosporine A have been used as adjunct therapy for Kawasaki disease refractory to initial treatment. There is ongoing research into the use of these agents in the initial therapy of Kawasaki disease. PMID:27681743

  4. Chromoblastomycosis: an overview of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Esterre, Phillippe; Perez-Blanco, Maigualida; Vitale, Roxana G; Salgado, Claudio Guedes; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2009-02-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is one of the most frequent infections caused by melanized fungi. It is a subcutaneous fungal infection, usually an occupational related disease, mainly affecting individuals in tropical and temperate regions. Although several species are etiologic agents, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cladophialophora carrionii are prevalent in the endemic areas. Chromoblastomycosis lesions are polymorphic and must be differentiated from those associated with many clinical conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed by the observation of muriform cells in tissue and the isolation and the identification of the causal agent in culture. Chromoblastomycosis still is a therapeutic challenge for clinicians due to the recalcitrant nature of the disease, especially in the severe clinical forms. There are three treatment modalities, i.e., physical treatment, chemotherapy and combination therapy but their success is related to the causative agent, the clinical form and severity of the chromoblastomycosis lesions. There is no treatment of choice for this neglected mycosis, but rather several treatment options. Most of the patients can be treated with itraconazole, terbinafine or a combination of both. It is also important to evaluate the patient's individual tolerance of the drugs and whether the antifungal will be provided for free or purchased, since antifungal therapy must be maintained in long-term regimens. In general, treatment should be guided according to clinical, mycological and histopathological criteria.

  5. Clinical, radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Martínez-Elizondo, Olga; del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples, in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OTB) in a setting where only clinical and imaging diagnoses determine the treatment. Methods A total of 44 consecutive serum specimens were collected from clinically suspected OTB patients, based on clinical and radiological [X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography] features. They were screened by in-house nested PCR. In addition, a few specimens were examined by Gram stain, acid-fast bacilli stain, histopathology and routine bacterial culture. A total of 39 specimens were collected from patients suffering from other bone diseases of nontuberculous origin and included as negative controls. Results Of the 44 clinically suspected OTB patients, in-house nested PCR was positive in 40 (91%) cases; PCR was negative in 38 (97%) negative controls. Sensitivity and specificity of our in-house nested PCR was 90.9% and 97.4%, respectively. The PCR report was available within 48 h. It was possible to standardize serum PCR technique and in positive cases, a good correlation was observed in terms of an adequate treatment response. Conclusions Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection. PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation, imaging studies, acid-fast bacilli staining, culture and histopathology diagnosis, if possible. PMID:25183281

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Predictors of Distinct Histopathogical Features of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Clio P.; Fragoulis, George E.; Somarakis, George; Drosos, Alexandros; Tzioufas, Athanasios G.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The authors aimed to explore whether distinct clinical, serological, and urinalysis findings are associated with specific histological classes of lupus nephritis. Clinical and laboratory features were recorded at the time of clinical diagnosis from 297 consecutive patients with biopsy-confirmed lupus nephritis. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed and a risk score was developed to estimate the risk for developing different classes of lupus nephritis. Variables independently associated with class II included absence of malar rash, negative anti-dsDNA, and ≤5 urine leucocytes/high power field (hpf); with III/IV: age at nephritis diagnosis ≤32 years old, presence of musculoskeletal features, new-onset hypertension, positive anti-dsDNA, >5 urine leucocytes/hpf, creatinine >1.2 mg/dL, cellular casts >1/hpf, and absence of nephrotic range proteinuria; with V: age at nephritis diagnosis >32 years, malar rash, absence of musculoskeletal complaints or serum C3 hypocomplementemia, nephrotic range proteinuria, and ≤9 urine erythrocytes/hpf. A risk predictive score of specific histological classes was calculated for each patient. Associations between 2, 3 or more risk factors with specific histological classes were also revealed [Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) (≥2 risk factors) was 6.7 (2.8–17.4) for class II nephritis, 15.6 (5.1–47.8), and 8.2 (3.6–19.0) for classes III/IV and for class V, respectively (≥3 risk factors)]. The identification of independent factors associated with specific classes of lupus nephritis can provide guidance in selecting specific therapeutic modalities, particularly in cases in which renal biopsy is contraindicated. PMID:26020385

  7. Livedoid vasculopathy: clinical features and treatment in 24 Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Suiying; Su, Wei; Jin, Peiying; Shao, Changgeng

    2014-09-01

    Livedo vasculopathy (LV) is a chronic cutaneous disorder characterised by recurrent, painful ulceration ending in stellate scars. We have conducted a retrospective study of clinical features and treatment response of LV in 24 Chinese patients. LV occurred more frequently in women (male:female ratio  1:3). The peak age at onset of disease ranged from 14 to 20 years, younger than previously published data. 87.5% of the patients (21/24) showed significant summer exacerbation with ulcer formation. Out of 24 patients tested, 14 (58.3%) had positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Ten out of 14 patients (71.4%) were tested to be hypersensitive to multivalent insect antigens. Combinative anti-inflammatory therapy with steroids, tetracycline and Tripterygium glycosides plus antiplatelet/profibrinolytic drugs promoted quick healing of ulcer and reduce recurrence. The younger age of disease presentation and significant summer exacerbation are 2 novel clinical features observed in this study. These findings suggest that apart from procoagulation other risk factors may contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of LV. Although antiplatelet/profibrinolytic drugs are deemed as a first line therapy for LV, anti-inflammatory medications such as steroids, tetracycline and Tripterygium glycosides, from our experiences, are indispensable, especially for acute, ulcerative stage of disease.

  8. Evolution of clinical features in possible DLB depending on FP-CIT SPECT result

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Emilio; Thomas, Alan; Inglis, Fraser; Tabet, Naji; Stevens, Tim; Whitfield, Tim; Aarsland, Dag; Rainer, Michael; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that core and suggestive features in possible dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) would vary in their ability to predict an abnormal dopamine transporter scan and therefore a follow-up diagnosis of probable DLB. A further objective was to assess the evolution of core and suggestive features in patients with possible DLB over time depending on the 123I-FP-CIT SPECT scan result. Methods: A total of 187 patients with possible DLB (dementia plus one core or one suggestive feature) were randomized to have dopamine transporter imaging or to follow-up without scan. DLB features were compared at baseline and at 6-month follow-up according to imaging results and follow-up diagnosis. Results: For the whole cohort, the baseline frequency of parkinsonism was 30%, fluctuations 29%, visual hallucinations 24%, and REM sleep behavior disorder 17%. Clinician-rated presence of parkinsonism at baseline was significantly (p = 0.001) more frequent and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score at baseline was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in patients with abnormal imaging. There was a significant increase in UPDRS score in the abnormal scan group over time (p < 0.01). There was relatively little evolution of the rest of the DLB features regardless of the imaging result. Conclusions: In patients with possible DLB, apart from UPDRS score, there was no difference in the evolution of DLB clinical features over 6 months between cases with normal and abnormal imaging. Only parkinsonism and dopamine transporter imaging helped to differentiate DLB from non-DLB dementia. PMID:27511183

  9. Prader-Willi Syndrome: A spectrum of anatomical and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Hurren, Bradley J; Flack, Natasha A M S

    2016-07-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is estimated to affect 400,000 people worldwide. First described clinically in 1956, PWS is now known to be a result of a genetic mutation, involving Chromosome 15. The phenotypical appearance of individuals with the syndrome follows a similar developmental course. During infancy, universal hypotonia accompanied by feeding problems, hypogonadism, and dolichocephaly are evident. Characteristic facial features such as narrow bifrontal diameter, almond-shaped eyes, and small mouth (with downturned corners and thin upper lip) may also be evident at this stage. In early childhood, the craniofacial features become more obvious and a global developmental delay is observed. Simultaneously, individuals develop hyperphagia that leads to excessive or rapid weight gain, which, if untreated, exists throughout their lifespan and may predispose them to numerous, serious health issues. The standard tool for differential diagnosis of PWS is genetic screening; however, clinicians also need to be aware of the characteristic features of this disorder, including differences between the genetic subtypes. As the clinical manifestations of the syndrome vary between individuals and become evident at different developmental time points, early assessment is hindered. This article focuses on the clinical and anatomical manifestations of the syndrome and highlights the areas of discrepancy and limitations within the existing literature. Clin. Anat. 29:590-605, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26749552

  10. Bacillary angiomatosis: microbiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Ramírez, C R; Saavedra, S; Ramírez Ronda, C

    1995-01-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is known to be caused by a rickettsial organism; Rochalimaea henselae. This causative agent has been compared with different microorganisms and clinical conditions that appear in similar settings buy have been clearly differentiated from them; e.i. Cat-scratch disease (Afipia felis), Bartonella bacilliformis, other Rochalimaea sp., Kaposi's sarcoma, Lobular capillary hemangioma, Angiosarcoma, and Epithelioid hemangioma. Clinically the bacillary angiomatosis (BA) skin lesions vary from a single lesion to thousands. The cutaneous lesion appears as a bright-red round papule, subcutaneous nodule, or as a cellulitic plaque. When the lesion is biopsied it tends to blanch-out, bleed, and cause pain. The patient might present with signs and symptoms of chills, headaches, fever, malaise, and anorexia with or without weight loss. The extracutaneous lesions found in BA tend to be from multiple organs affecting from the oral lesions to anal mucosal lesions to widespread visceral lesions. The sites of preference for BA lesion manifestation tend to be the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and bone. To diagnose bacillary angiomatosis the physician should prepare a differential diagnosis based primarily on its histopathological and clinical characteristics. To confirm the results from the stain, electron microscopy can identify the bacillus and pin-point the diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis. The lesions presented by BA respond well to therapy with erythromycin 500 mg four times daily for a duration of 2 weeks to 2 months. In case of intolerance to erythromycin the second line of drug that successfully treats the BA bacillus is doxycyline. If relapses of the BA lesion recur, then a prolonged antibiotic therapy is necessary and in AIDS patients the duration may be extended as life-long suppressive therapy.

  11. Bacillary angiomatosis: microbiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Ramírez, C R; Saavedra, S; Ramírez Ronda, C H

    1996-01-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is known to be caused by a rickettsial organism; Rochalimaea henselae. This causative agent has been compared with different microorganisms and clinical conditions that appear in similar settings but that have been clearly differentiated from them; e.i. Cat-scratch disease (Afipia felis), Bartonella bacilliformis, other Rochalimaea sp., Kaposi;s sarcoma, Lobular capillary hemangioma, Angiosarcoma, and Epithelioid hemangioma. Clinically the bacillary angiomatosis (BA) skin lesions vary from a single lesion to thousands. The cutaneous lesion appears as a bright-red round papule, subcutaneous nodule, or as a cellulitic plaque. When the lesion is biopsied it tends to blanch-out, bleed, and cause pain. The patient might present with signs and symptoms of chills, headaches, fever, malaise, and anorexia with or without weight loss. The extracutaneous lesions found in BA tend to be from multiple organs affecting from the oral lesions to anal mucosal lesions to widespread visceral lesions. The sites of preferences for BA lesion manifestation tend to be the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and bone. To diagnose bacillary angiomatosis the physician should prepare a differential diagnosis based primarily on its histopathological and clinical characteristics. To confirm the results from the stain, electron microscopy can identify the bacillus and pin-point the diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis. The lesions presented by BA respond well to therapy with erythromycin 500mg four times daily for a duration of 2 weeks to 2 months. In case of intolerance to erythromycin the second line of drug that successfully treats the BA bacillus is doxycycline. If relapses of the BA lesion recur, then a prolonged antibiotic therapy is necessary and in AIDS patients the duration may be extended as life-long suppressive therapy.

  12. The Clinical Features and Bacteriological Characterizations of Bone and Joint Tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ting; Zhao, Li-Ping; Dong, Wei-Jie; Gu, Yun-Ting; Li, Yun-Xu; Dong, Ling-Ling; Ma, Yi-Feng; Qin, Shi-Bing; Huang, Hai-Rong

    2015-06-08

    Bone and Joint tuberculosis (BJTB) constitutes about 10% of total extra-pulmonary TB cases. Since the BJTB is a paucibacillary condition, there has been no systematic study on the bacterial characterization, especially the epidemiological feature. Here we collected the mycobacterial clinical isolates, analyzed the clinical features and the bacteriological characteristics from 113 BJTB cases reported in China. The mean age of the cases was 40.33 years while most of the patients fell into the 20-29 year age group; local pain was the most common onset symptom of BJTB cases; mean time from symptom onset to BJTB diagnosis was 13.16 months. 31 isolates were defined as drug resistant, including 15 multidrug resistant (MDR) and 2 extensively drug resistant (XDR) isolates according to the drug susceptibility test outcomes; after spoligotyping, 87.6% (99/113) isolates were categorized as Beijing family. In contrast to the isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis patients, here the MIRU-VNTR assay did not find anything significant. A prolonged time span for BJTB diagnosis highlights the requirement of paying further attention to BJTB infection in China. This study provides essential insights into the demographic and microbial characteristics of BJTB cases in China.

  13. Diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children and adolescents: clinical picture limitations☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Aurelino Rocha; Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; Fontes, Maria Jussara Fernandes; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Bezário Facury; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the utility of clinical features for diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in pediatrics. METHODS: A total of 335 children aged 1-18 years old and presenting clinical manifestations of acute pharyngotonsillitis (APT) were subjected to clinical interviews, physical examinations, and throat swab specimen collection to perform cultures and latex particle agglutination tests (LPATs) for group A streptococcus (GAS) detection. Signs and symptoms of patients were compared to their throat cultures and LPATs results. A clinical score was designed based on the multivariate logistic regression analysis and also was compared to throat cultures and LPATs results. Positive throat cultures and/or LPATs results were used as a reference standard to establish definitive streptococcal APT diagnosis. RESULTS: 78 children (23.4%) showed positivity for GAS in at least one of the two diagnostic tests. Coryza absence (odds ratio [OR]=1.80; p=0.040), conjunctivitis absence (OR=2.47; p=0.029), pharyngeal erythema (OR=3.99; p=0.006), pharyngeal exudate (OR=2.02; p=0.011), and tonsillar swelling (OR=2.60; p=0.007) were significantly associated with streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. The highest clinical score, characterized by coryza absense, pharyngeal exudate, and pharyngeal erythema had a 45.6% sensitivity, a 74.5% especificity, and a likelihood ratio of 1.79 for streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical presentation should not be used to confirm streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis, because its performance as a diagnostic test is low. Thus, it is necessary to enhance laboratory test availability, especially of LPATs that allow an acurate and fast diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. PMID:25510990

  14. Combining Model-Based and Feature-Driven Diagnosis Approaches - A Case Study on Electromechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimhan, Sriram; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Balaban, Edward; Saxena, Abhinav

    2010-01-01

    Model-based diagnosis typically uses analytical redundancy to compare predictions from a model against observations from the system being diagnosed. However this approach does not work very well when it is not feasible to create analytic relations describing all the observed data, e.g., for vibration data which is usually sampled at very high rates and requires very detailed finite element models to describe its behavior. In such cases, features (in time and frequency domains) that contain diagnostic information are extracted from the data. Since this is a computationally intensive process, it is not efficient to extract all the features all the time. In this paper we present an approach that combines the analytic model-based and feature-driven diagnosis approaches. The analytic approach is used to reduce the set of possible faults and then features are chosen to best distinguish among the remaining faults. We describe an implementation of this approach on the Flyable Electro-mechanical Actuator (FLEA) test bed.

  15. Clinical Features and Management of a Median Cleft Lip

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Tae Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background Median cleft lip is a rare anomaly consisting of a midline vertical cleft through the upper lip. It can also involve the premaxillary bone, the nasal septum, and the central nervous system. In our current report, we present the clinical features of 6 patients with a median cleft lip and their surgical management according to the accompanying anomalies. Methods From December 2010 to January 2014, 6 patients with a median cleft lip were reviewed. Five of these cases underwent surgical correction; alveolar bone grafting was performed in a patient with a median alveolar cleft. The surgical technique included inverted-U excision of the upper lip and repair of the orbicularis oris muscle. The mean follow-up period was 20.4 months (range, 7.4–44.0 months). Results The study patients presented various anomalous features. Five patients received surgical correction, 4 with repair of the median cleft lip, and one with iliac bone grafting for median alveolar cleft. A patient with basal sphenoethmoidal meningocele was managed with transoral endoscopic surgery for repair of the meningocele. Successful surgical repair was achieved in all cases with no postoperative complications. Conclusions Relatively mild forms of median cleft lip can be corrected with inverted-U excision with good aesthetic outcomes. In addition, there is a broad spectrum of clinical features and various anomalies, such as nasal deformity, alveolar cleft, and short upper frenulum, which require close evaluation. The timing of the operation should be decided considering the presence of other anomalies that can threaten patient survival. PMID:27218021

  16. Clinical features of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in children in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vithayasai, Niyada; Rampengan, Novie Homenta; Hattasingh, Weerawan; Jennuvat, Siriluck; Sirivichayakul, Chukiat

    2011-07-01

    This retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (QSNICH), Bangkok, Thailand to describe the clinical features of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in children. The medical records of 134 patients admitted to QSNICH in 2009 who had a positive stool culture for Salmonella spp were reviewed. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, treatment, culture and antimicrobial sensitivity data were collected and analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 22.9 months (range 0.5 to 158 months); 76.9% were < 2 years old. The male to female ratio was 1.5:1. Salmonella B was most commonly found serogroup (47%). The common clinical manifestations included diarrhea (99.3%), fever (93.3%), dehydration (64.9%) and nausea/vomiting (48.5%). Most of the Salmonella isolates were sensitive to a fluoroquinolone and many were sensitive to Cotrimoxazole, but few were sensitive to ampicillin. There were no significant differences in the clinical manifestations and drug sensitivities of the different Salmonella serogroups, except convulsions were more common in Salmonella E infected patients (p = 0.04) and more Salmonella C isolates were sensitive to ampicillin (p = 0.04). There was no significant correlation between clinical course and antimicrobial treatment, except the duration of diarrhea was significantly longer in patients who received antimicrobial treatment (mean 6.1, SD 4.7 days vs mean 4.2, SD 2.1 days) (p = 0.03). Three patients had Salmonella bacteremia. Three patients died but not directly due to Salmonella infection.

  17. Clinical correlates of the gross, radiographic, and histologic features of urinary matrix calculi.

    PubMed

    Stoller, M L; Gupta, M; Bolton, D; Irby, P B

    1994-10-01

    We present five patients with urinary matrix calculi, which, in contrast to the normally brittle calcigerous calculi, are soft, pliable, and amorphous. Common clinical features include a history of calcigerous stone disease, renal surgery, urinary obstruction or stasis, and chronic infection with Proteus species or coliforms. The diagnosis is usually made at surgery, but certain preoperative radiographic findings may be suggestive. Matrix calculi are radiolucent on plain abdominal films, although their appearance on nonenhanced CT scans is similar to that of calcigerous calculi despite their small mineral content. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is ineffective; open or percutaneous techniques are necessary. Histologic inspection reveals laminar concentric rings of organized matrix with an orderly, layered deposition of minerals. Histochemical investigation can provide insight into the possible sequence of events in normal calculogenesis. The successful management of urinary matrix calculi depends on a high index of suspicion and a thorough knowledge of their clinicopathologic features.

  18. An Overview of Rare and Unusual Clinical Features of Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Osman Saatci, Ali; Can Doruk, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is a rare disease presenting with the appearance of intraretinal crystalline deposits and varying degrees of chorioretinal atrophy commencing at the posterior pole. Within time, intraretinal crystals gradually disappear and chorioretinal atrophy extends beyond the macula even resulting in complete chorioretinal atrophy. Concomitant corneal crystals can be noted in 1/2 - 1/3 of the patients, and the presence of corneal crystals is not a must for establishing the diagnosis. For the past decade, genetic evaluations and newer imaging modalities expand our knowledge about the disease. CYP4V2 gene is found to be the gene responsible for the disease process and new mutations are still being described. Modern imaging modalities, such as a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) shed light on the anatomic features of the disease. By this, we reiterate the rare and unusual clinical features of BCD. PMID:25738160

  19. The hermansky-pudlak syndrome: clinical features and imperatives from an ophthalmic perspective.

    PubMed

    Schneier, Andrew J; Fulton, Anne B

    2013-01-01

    The Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a rare, autosomal recessive condition comprising nine genetically heterogeneous entities that feature oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and bleeding tendency as their principal clinical manifestations. The pathogenesis of HPS involves disturbances in the biogenesis and trafficking of lysosome-related organelles. While the ophthalmologist is trained to address the ocular manifestations of OCA, it is critical for the provider to consider HPS when examining OCA patients as its systemic sequelae may be associated with morbidity and mortality. If there is suspicion of HPS in a patient with albinism, the ophthalmologist should enlist the aid of consultants to confirm the diagnosis and monitor for systemic features. As the nine HPS subtypes explored in this article vary widely in the character and severity of their associated systemic manifestations, some authors advocate determining the specific gene defect in each HPS patient in order to optimize care and provide anticipatory guidance. PMID:24138047

  20. Childhood Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Libya: Epidemiological and Clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Ahmaida, AI; Al-Shaikhi, SA

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be rare in Libya. The aim is to determine the prevalence of juvenile onset inflammatory bowel disease in Libya. Setting: Al-Fateh childrens' hospital, Benghazi, Libya. Methods: This is a retrospective study of all cases diagnosed over 10 years (1997–2006) with either ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease or indeterminate colitis. Inclusion criteria were age <15 years at time of presentation who were resident in the eastern part of the country and who diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical features were outlined using a proforma. Results: Sixteen cases were diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, of whom 11 were males (M:F ratio of 1.5:1). The prevalence and incidence rates in the year 2006 were 3.6 and 0.9 per 100,000 children, respectively. The incidence rate increased from 0.2 in 2002 to 0.9 in 2006 (Z score of 39.87, p= 0.00). The age at presentation ranged from 5 months to 14 years. Nine had Crohn's disease (6 males) and 6 had ulcerative colitis (4 males). One patient had indeterminate colitis. The most common clinical features were diarrhea in 10 (62.5%), abdominal pain, anorexia and weight loss in 9 (56.2%), anemia in 7 (43.75%) and vomiting in 6 (37%). Ileopancolitis was found in 3 patients whereas 6 patients had ileocecal disease. Conclusions: Childhood inflammatory bowel disease in this population is not so rare and it is increasing. The clinical pattern is similar to that reported by others. PMID:21483512

  1. Cardioembolic Stroke: Clinical Features, Specific Cardiac Disorders and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of cardioembolic stroke. Cardioembolic stroke accounts for 14-30% of ischemic strokes and, in general, is a severe condition; patients with cardioembolic infarction are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of cardioembolic infarction, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The more common high risk cardioembolic conditions are atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy, and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. In our experience, in-hospital mortality in patients with early embolic recurrence (within the first 7 days) was 77%. Patients with alcohol abuse, hypertension, valvular heart disease, nausea and vomiting, and previous cerebral infarction are at increased risk of early recurrent systemic embolization. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in which contraindications, such as falls, poor compliance, uncontrolled epilepsy or gastrointestinal bleeding are absent. PMID:21804774

  2. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  3. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  4. Twenty-one years to the right diagnosis - clinical overlap of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knopp, C; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Zerres, K; Gencik, M; Spengler, S; Eggermann, T

    2015-01-01

    Clinical overlap makes the diagnosis of overgrowth syndromes challenging. Clinical overlap exists between Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) which share pre- and postnatal overgrowth, macroglossia, umbilical hernia, organomegaly, ear lobe creases, and occurrence of embryonal tumors as characteristic features. Based on the clinical history of a patient, who was diagnosed with BWS shortly after birth and reassessed and rediagnosed with SGBS at age 21 years, particular attention should be paid to developing facial dysmorphia. In addition, we delineate further clinical findings that may allow differentiation between both conditions. PMID:25339544

  5. Twenty-one years to the right diagnosis - clinical overlap of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knopp, C; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Zerres, K; Gencik, M; Spengler, S; Eggermann, T

    2015-01-01

    Clinical overlap makes the diagnosis of overgrowth syndromes challenging. Clinical overlap exists between Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) which share pre- and postnatal overgrowth, macroglossia, umbilical hernia, organomegaly, ear lobe creases, and occurrence of embryonal tumors as characteristic features. Based on the clinical history of a patient, who was diagnosed with BWS shortly after birth and reassessed and rediagnosed with SGBS at age 21 years, particular attention should be paid to developing facial dysmorphia. In addition, we delineate further clinical findings that may allow differentiation between both conditions.

  6. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Differential Diagnosis of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Birmaher, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past 20 years, the evidence regarding pediatric bipolar disorder (BP) has increased substantially. As a result, recent concerns have focused primarily on prevalence and differential diagnosis. Method Selective review of the literature. Results BP as defined by rigorously applying diagnostic criteria has been observed among children and especially adolescents in numerous countries. In contrast to increasing diagnoses in clinical settings, prevalence in epidemiologic studies has not recently changed. BP-spectrum conditions among youth are highly impairing and confer high risk for conversion to BP-I and BP-II. Compared to adults, youth with BP have more mixed symptoms, more changes in mood polarity, are more often symptomatic and seem to have worse prognosis. The course, clinical characteristics, and comorbidities of BP among children and adolescents are in many ways otherwise similar to those of adults with BP. Nonetheless, many youth with BP receive no treatment and most do not receive BP-specific treatment. Conclusion Despite increased evidence supporting the validity of pediatric BP, discrepancies between clinical and epidemiologic findings suggest that diagnostic misapplication may be common. Simultaneously, low rates of treatment of youth with BP suggest that withholding of BP diagnoses may also be common. Clinicians should apply diagnostic criteria rigorously in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy and ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:22652925

  7. A ROC-based feature selection method for computer-aided detection and diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songyuan; Zhang, Guopeng; Liao, Qimei; Zhang, Junying; Jiao, Chun; Lu, Hongbing

    2014-03-01

    Image-based computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) has been a very active research topic aiming to assist physicians to detect lesions and distinguish them from benign to malignant. However, the datasets fed into a classifier usually suffer from small number of samples, as well as significantly less samples available in one class (have a disease) than the other, resulting in the classifier's suboptimal performance. How to identifying the most characterizing features of the observed data for lesion detection is critical to improve the sensitivity and minimize false positives of a CAD system. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method mR-FAST that combines the minimal-redundancymaximal relevance (mRMR) framework with a selection metric FAST (feature assessment by sliding thresholds) based on the area under a ROC curve (AUC) generated on optimal simple linear discriminants. With three feature datasets extracted from CAD systems for colon polyps and bladder cancer, we show that the space of candidate features selected by mR-FAST is more characterizing for lesion detection with higher AUC, enabling to find a compact subset of superior features at low cost.

  8. Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part 1: feature extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingfei; Kim, Hyun K.; Netz, Uwe J.; Blaschke, Sabine; Müller, Gerhard A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. This is the first part of a two-part paper on the application of computer-aided diagnosis to diffuse optical tomography (DOT). An approach for extracting heuristic features from DOT images and a method for using these features to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are presented. Feature extraction is the focus of Part 1, while the utility of five classification algorithms is evaluated in Part 2. The framework is validated on a set of 219 DOT images of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. Overall, 594 features are extracted from the absorption and scattering images of each joint. Three major findings are deduced. First, DOT images of subjects with RA are statistically different (p<0.05) from images of subjects without RA for over 90% of the features investigated. Second, DOT images of subjects with RA that do not have detectable effusion, erosion, or synovitis (as determined by MRI and ultrasound) are statistically indistinguishable from DOT images of subjects with RA that do exhibit effusion, erosion, or synovitis. Thus, this subset of subjects may be diagnosed with RA from DOT images while they would go undetected by reviews of MRI or ultrasound images. Third, scattering coefficient images yield better one-dimensional classifiers. A total of three features yield a Youden index greater than 0.8. These findings suggest that DOT may be capable of distinguishing between PIP joints that are healthy and those affected by RA with or without effusion, erosion, or synovitis. PMID:23856915

  9. [Features of Clinical Register of Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy Based on ClinicalTrials.gov. (USA)].

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng-fei; Liao, Xing; Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Zhi-guo

    2015-11-01

    In recent 10 years, clinical trials of Chinese medicine and pharmacy (cMP) at clinicalTrials.gov.(USA) are gradually increasing. In order to analyze features of CMP clinical register, ClinicalTrials.gov register database were comprehensively retrieved in this study. Included clinical trials were input one item after another using EXCEL. A final of 348 CMP clinical trials were included. Results showed that China occupied the first place in CMP clinical register, followed by USA. CMP clinical trials, sponsored mainly by colleges/universities and hospitals, mostly covered interventional studies on evaluating safety/effectiveness of CMP. The proportions of studies, sponsored by mainland China and companies, recruitment trials and multi-center clinical trials in interventional trials were increasing. The proportions of studies sponsored by Hong Kong and Taiwan, research completed trials, unclear research status, phase III clinical trials, and published research trials in interventional trials were decreasing. Published ratios of CMP clinical trials were quite low. There were more missing types and higher proportions in trial register information.

  10. AB129. Osteogenesis imperfecta: clinical features and bisphosphonate treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Vu, Dung Chi; Bui, Thao Phuong; Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of disorders principally affecting type I collagen which result in increased bone fragility. Children with severe OI suffer recurrent fractures, resulting in severe deformity and growth stunting in many cases, with loss of independent ambulation by the teenage years in over 50% of cases. Recently, cyclical intravenous treatment with pamidronate has proven of benefit to children with severe forms of OI. This article aims to describle clinical features and laboratory manifestations of patient with OI and evaluate outcome of bisphosphonate management. Methods Clinical features, biochemical finding, and management outcome of 104 cases were study. The patients were classified into four major subtypes of Sillience et al. 1979. Patients with severe types were treatment with pamidronate (Aredia) used Rauch protocol 2003. Results Now we have 196 patients (87 females and 109 males) but we studied focus on 104 patients from 98 families (60 males, 44 females) onset at 2.1±3.0 years (median 0.35) with the average fracture bone of 5.9±4.4 times. In there, 17% type I, 8% type II, 63% type III, and 12% type IV. Clinical features include of intrauterine fracture visible on ultrasound 35%, bone deformation after birth 68%, triangle face 76%, long bone deformation 91%, chest deformation 46%, scoliosis 27%, short status 90%, blue sclera 83%, dentinogenesis imperfecta 20%, hearing loss 6%. Thirty patients have been treated with pamidronate at 3.2±3.7 years (4 months to 8 years) during 13±0.8 months (6-30 months). Fourteen patients had fracture bone after 6 months of treatment but no patients had fracture bone after 12 months. Seven patients had been treatment after 1.6±0.5 years, BMD increase from 0.39±0.311 to 0.79±0.105 g/cm2 (P<0.05). One patient had fever reaction after first pamidronate infusion but controlled with standard antipyretic therapy, and do not recur in later treatments. Conclusions OI has

  11. Transplant renal artery stenosis: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Kayler, Liise K.; Zand, Martin S.; Muttana, Renu; Chernyak, Victoria; DeBoccardo, Graciela O.

    2015-01-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a well-recognized vascular complication after kidney transplant. It occurs most frequently in the first 6 months after kidney transplant, and is one of the major causes of graft loss and premature death in transplant recipients. Renal hypoperfusion occurring in TRAS results in activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system; patients usually present with worsening or refractory hypertension, fluid retention and often allograft dysfunction. Flash pulmonary edema can develop in patients with critical bilateral renal artery stenosis or renal artery stenosis in a solitary kidney, and this unique clinical entity has been named Pickering Syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of TRAS can prevent allograft damage and systemic sequelae. Duplex sonography is the most commonly used screening tool, whereas angiography provides the definitive diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement can be performed during angiography if a lesion is identified, and it is generally the first-line therapy for TRAS. However, there is no randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty compared with medical therapy alone or surgical intervention. PMID:25713713

  12. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  13. Clinical presentation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peyrol, Michael; Lévy, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a syndrome characterized by a sinus tachycardia not related to a medical condition, to a physiological response, or to medication or drugs and associated with symptoms, often invalidating and altering the quality of life of affected patients. It occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults, and in the female sex. The diagnosis requires a complete work-up in order to exclude other causes of sinus tachycardia and one or several additional tests: 24-h ECG ambulatory recordings, echocardiogram, exercise testing, and autonomous nervous system assessment. It should be differentiated from the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, with which it shares a number of symptoms, and other supraventricular tachycardias originating in the high right atrium. An electrophysiological study should be considered in selected cases in order to differentiate IST from other supraventricular tachycardias. The mechanism is still unclear, and possible etiologies may include intrinsic abnormality of the sinus node, autonomic dysfunction, hypersensitivity of the sinus node to catecholamines, blunted vagal system, or a combination of the above. The authors emphasize the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and the need to better define the IST and the criteria required to ascertain its diagnosis. PMID:26329720

  14. Diagnosis and clinical course of canine oral papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bredal, W P; Thoresen, S I; Rimstad, E; Aleksandersen, M; Nafstad, P H

    1996-03-01

    A six-month-old intact male rottweiler presented with papillomatous growths protruding from the oral mucous membranes. A tentative diagnosis of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) infection was made based on the gross appearance of the numerous lesions and the young age of the patient. Two warts from the oral mucosa were removed surgically for further diagnostic investigations. The viral aetiology of the diseases was confirmed by histopathological and electron microscopic findings, and by the identification of specific COPV DNA is removed oral papillomatous tissue. The patient was followed clinically and complete regression of the oral lesions occurred after four weeks. Neither the route of transmission nor the source of infection was found. Immunodeficiency as a contributing aetiological factor to the development of COPV-induced lesions as discussed. PMID:8683957

  15. X linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    van Geel, B. M; Assies, J.; Wanders, R.; Barth, P.

    1997-01-01

    X linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited disorder of peroxisomal metabolism, biochemically characterised by accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids. Accumulation of these fatty acids is associated with cerebral demyelination, peripheral nerve abnormalities, and adrenocortical and testicular insufficiency. The lowest estimated birth incidence is one per 100 000. At least six phenotypes can be distinguished, of which the two most frequent are childhood cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The X-ALD gene has been identified, but thus far no relation between genotype and phenotype has been found. Diagnosis is relatively easy and can be confirmed reliably, and prenatal testing is possible in affected families. Several therapeutic options, some with promising perspectives, are available. Neurologists and other physicians seem not to be familiar with the many facets of X-ALD. In this review, the clinical presentation, the relative frequencies of the different phenotypes, and the diagnostic and therapeutic options are presented.

 PMID:9221959

  16. MUSCLE INJURY – PHYSIOPATHOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue has the largest mass in the human body, accounting for 45% of the total weight. Muscle injuries can be caused by bruising, stretching or laceration. The current classification divides such injuries into mild, moderate and severe. The signs and symptoms of grade I lesions are edema and discomfort; grade II, loss of function, gaps and possible ecchymosis; and grade III, complete rupture, severe pain and extensive hematoma. The diagnosis can be confirmed by: ultrasound, which is dynamic and cheap, but examiner dependent; and tomography or magnetic resonance, which gives better anatomical definition, but is static. Initial phase of the treatment can be summarized as the “PRICE” protocol. NSAIDs, ultrasound therapy, strengthening and stretching after the initial phase and range of motion without pain are used in clinical treatment. On the other hand, surgery has precise indications: hematoma drainage and muscle-tendon reinsertion and reinforcement. PMID:27047816

  17. From the nephrologist's point of view: diversity of causes and clinical features of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Bienholz, Anja; Wilde, Benjamin; Kribben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome with multiple entities. Although AKI implies renal damage, functional impairment or both, diagnosis is solely based on the functional parameters of serum creatinine and urine output. The latest definition was provided by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group in 2012. Independent of the underlying disease, and even in the case of full recovery, AKI is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the patient's individual risk profile and the diversity of causes and clinical features of AKI is pivotal for optimization of prophylaxes, diagnosis and therapy of each form of AKI. A differentiated and individualized approach is required to improve patient mortality, morbidity, long-term kidney function and eventually the quality of life. In this review, we provide an overview of the different clinical settings in which specific forms of AKI may occur and point out possible diagnostic as well as therapeutic approaches. Secifically AKI is discussed in the context of non-kidney organ failure, organ transplantation, sepsis, malignancy and autoimmune disease. PMID:26251707

  18. Relapsing Polychondritis: an Update on Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, Diagnostic Tools, and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Sota, Jurgen; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare multisystemic disease widely accepted as a complex autoimmune disorder affecting proteoglycan-rich structures and cartilaginous tissues, especially the auricular pinna, cartilage of the nose, tracheobronchial tree, eyes, and heart's connective components. The clinical spectrum may vary from intermittent inflammatory episodes leading to unesthetic structural deformities to life-threatening cardiopulmonary manifestations, such as airway collapse and valvular regurgitation. The frequent association with other rheumatologic and hematologic disorders has been extensively reported over time, contributing to define its complexity at a diagnostic and also therapeutic level. Diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis is mainly based on clinical clues, while laboratory data have only a supportive contribution. Conversely, radiology is showing a relevant role in estimating the rate of systemic involvement as well as disease activity. The present review is aimed at providing an update on scientific data reported during the last 3 years about relapsing polychondritis in terms of pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and new treatment options. PMID:26711694

  19. [The clinical immunology laboratory in diagnosis and monitoring of systemic lupus erythematosus and connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Sinico, R A; Radice, A

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory and particularly clinical immunology laboratories have an essential role in diagnosing and monitoring systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as other connective tissue diseases. The role of the clinical immunology laboratory in these diseases is to confirm or exclude diagnosis, to monitor disease activity, and to identify subgroup of patients. To obtain the best results in terms of diagnostic performance and clinical usefulness, the following recommendations should be fulfilled: anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) determination by indirect immunofluorescence on Hep-2 cells is an effective screening assay in patients with clinical features of SLE. A negative ANA test makes the diagnosis of SLE unlikely. Anti-dsDNA antibodies are highly specific for SLE and are associated with renal involvement. The method of choice for anti-dsDNA is the Farr assay; however, the necessity of using radioactive materials reduces its applicability. As an alternative, immunofluorescence on Crithidia Luciliae can be used in the diagnostic phase due to its high specificity. The detection of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) and to phospholipids (lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin antibodies) is useful in identifying subgroups of patients at risk for some clinical manifestations. Anti-dsDNA measurement with a quantitative assay (the Farr assay or ELISA) is currently the best method to monitor disease activity along with complement levels. New assays (anti-C1q and anti-nucleosome antibodies) have been recently proposed for the diagnosis (anti-nucleosome) and monitoring of SLE patients (anti-C1q and anti-nucleosome antibodies), with promising results.

  20. [Clinical features of sleep disorders in older adults].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shigeru; Tamura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    There are three major neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the sleep-waking cycle: the sleep system, the waking system, and the system that determines sleep-waking timing. Sleep dlisorders of older adults seem to be caused by functional or organic changes in one or more of the three systems, and are roughly classified into two categories: (i) normal age-related, and (ii) pathological. The former includes decreased amplitude and advanced phase of circadian rhythms (body temperature, melatonin secretion, and sleep-waking), as well as reduced sleep duration, sleep fragmentation, and a decrease of slow-wave sleep in sleep architecture. Pathological sleep disorders include medical and psychiatric diseases (e.g., lifestyle-related diseases, dementia, delirium, and depression) and primary age-related sleep disorders (e.g., REM sleep behavior disorder and periodic limb move- ment disorders). This mini-review delineates the clinical features of sleep disorders in older adults.

  1. The clinical features and optimal treatment of anorectal malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soomin; Kim, Chang Woo; Baek, Se Jin; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal malignant melanoma (AMM) is a very rare and aggressive disease. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features of AMM, to understand treatment options, and optimal therapy by reviewing pertinent literature. Traditionally an abdominoperineal resection (APR) sacrificing the anal sphincter has been performed for radical resection of cancer, but recently, wide excision of AMM is attempted since quality of life after surgery is an important issue. Some authors reported that there was no difference in five-year survival between the patient who underwent an APR and wide excision. The goal of both APR and wide excision was to improve survival with R0 resection. Adjuvant chemoradiation therapy can be performed to achieve an R0 resection. AMM shows very poor prognosis. At this time, research on AMM is insufficient to suggest a treatment guideline. Thus, treatment options, and a therapeutic method should be selected carefully. PMID:25247163

  2. Neuropathy in Navajo children: clinical and epidemiologic features.

    PubMed

    Singleton, R; Helgerson, S D; Snyder, R D; O'Conner, P J; Nelson, S; Johnsen, S D; Allanson, J E

    1990-02-01

    We describe a rare and apparently unique neuropathic syndrome among Navajo children living on the Navajo Reservation. Clinical features include sensorimotor neuropathy, corneal ulcerations, acral mutilation, poor weight gain, short stature, sexual infantilism, serious systemic infections, and liver derangement including Reye's syndrome-like episodes. Progressive CNS white matter lesions were diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging. We identified 20 definite and 4 probable cases occurring between 1959 and 1986. Mean age at the time of 1st recognized symptom was 13 months (range, 1 month to 4 years 6 months). Ten individuals have died; 6 of the deaths occurred before 5 years of age. The incidence of this syndrome on the western Navajo reservation is 5 times higher than that on the eastern reservation (38 compared with 7 cases per 100,000 births). Although the etiology is unknown, this syndrome is consistent with an inborn error of metabolism, inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. PMID:2300261

  3. [Clinical features and pathophysiology of acute esophageal mucosal lesion].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yutaro; Hizawa, Kazuoki; Fujita, Kouhei; Matsuno, Yuichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Esaki, Motohiro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Acute esophageal mucosal lesions (AEMLs) are categorized into black esophagitis (type B) and non-black esophagitis (type NB) on endoscopy. To clarify the distinct pathophysiology, we compared the clinical features and hematological findings at onset among 17 patients with type B esophagitis and 6 patients with type NB esophagitis. In type B esophagitis, time to endoscopy after onset was significantly shorter, and blood levels of lactate, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and glucose were higher than in type NB esophagitis. However, there were no significant intergroup differences in the incidences of other predisposing factors, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or esophageal hernias. These findings suggest that AEMLs are caused by acid reflux and peripheral vascular insufficiency, the latter being more associated with type B esophagitis by its etiology. In addition, blood lactate may indicate the severity of AEML, leading to black esophagitis. PMID:27052393

  4. Classification, clinical features, and genetics of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide), and remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal, and infant death, or significant lifelong handicaps. The malformations result from failure of the neural folds to fuse in the midline, and form the neural tube between the third and the fourth week of embryonic development. This review article discusses their classification, clinical features, and genetics. Most NTDs are sporadic and both genetic, and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in its etiology. Consanguinity was suggested to contribute to the high incidence of NTDs in several countries, including Saudi Arabia. Syndromes, often associated with chromosomal anomalies, account for <10% of all NTDs; but a higher proportion (20%) has been documented in Saudi Arabia. Genetic predisposition constitutes the major underlying risk factor, with a strong implication of genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity. PMID:25551113

  5. Features at diagnosis of 324 patients with acromegaly did not change from 1981 to 2006; Acromegaly remains under-recognized and under-diagnosed

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Tirissa J.; Post, Kalmon D.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Kanibir, M. Nabi; Reyes-Vidal, Carlos M.; Freda, Pamela U.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traditionally, acromegaly evaded diagnosis until in its clinically obvious later stages when treatment is more difficult. Over the last 25 years diagnostic tests have improved, but whether clinical disease detection also improved was unknown so we tested if disease severity at diagnosis had changed from 1981 to 2006. METHODS Data on 324 consecutive acromegaly patients presenting from 1981–2006 at two New York City hospitals were collected by retrospective review (n=324) and by interview (n=200). The main complaint, acromegaly-associated co-morbidities, signs, symptoms, healthcare providers visited, pre-operative growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and pituitary tumor size at diagnosis were compared in patients presenting in the earlier vs. later halves of the time period. RESULTS Times from symptom onset to diagnosis were 5.9 yr. (early) vs. 5.2 yr. (late)(p=ns). At diagnosis, 96% of early and late groups had facial feature changes and/or hand/foot enlargement. Co-morbidities included hypertension (HTN) 37 % (early) vs. 36% (late), carpal tunnel syndrome (24 vs. 24%), sleep apnea (13 vs. 29%)(p <0.01), osteoarthritis (25 vs. 23%), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (18 vs.15%); each patient had 1.2 (early) vs. 1.3 (late) (p=0.53) co-morbidities. Groups were similar in signs, symptoms, tumor size, GH and IGF-I. CONCLUSIONS Clinical, biochemical and tumor size characteristics at diagnosis of acromegaly patients were unchanged from 1981–2006. Most patients still have marked manifestations of acromegaly at diagnosis suggesting that acromegaly remains clinically under-recognized. Healthcare professionals should more commonly consider acromegaly, which can lead to earlier diagnosis and better treatment outcome. PMID:19473180

  6. Clinical Features and Awareness of Hand Eczema in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Beom; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Kea Jeung; Lee, Ga-Young; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kim, Do Won; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Cheol Heon; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Kyu Han; Eun, Hee Chul; Chang, Sung Eun; Moon, Kee Chan; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Seong Jin; Kim, Byung-Soo; Lee, Jun Young; Kim, Hyung-Ok; Kang, Hoon; Lee, Min Geol; Kim, Soo-Chan; Ro, Young Suck; Ko, Joo Yeon; Park, Mi Youn; Kim, Myung Hwa; Shin, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Hae Young; Hong, Chang Kwun; Lee, Sung Yul; Bak, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background Hand eczema is one of the most common skin disorders and negatively affects quality of life. However, a large-scale multicenter study investigating the clinical features of patients with hand eczema has not yet been conducted in Korea. Objective To identify the prevalence of various hand diseases, which is defined as all cutaneous disease occurring in hands, and to investigate the clinical features of patients with hand eczema and the awareness about hand eczema in the general population and to compare the prevalence of hand eczema between health care providers and non-health care providers. Methods To estimate the prevalence of hand diseases, we analyzed the medical records of patients from 24 medical centers. Patients were assessed by online and offline questionnaires. A 1,000 from general population and 913 hand eczema patients answered the questionnaire, for a total of 1,913 subjects. Results The most common hand disease was irritant contact dermatitis. In an online survey, the lifetime prevalence of hand eczema was 31.2%. Hand eczema was more likely to occur in females (66.0%) and younger (20~39 years, 53.9%). Health care providers and housewives were the occupations most frequently associated with hand eczema. Winter (33.6%) was the most common season which people experienced aggravation. The 63.0% and 67.0% answered that hand eczema hinders their personal relationship and negatively affects daily living activities, respectively. Conclusion Hand eczema is a very common disease and hinders the quality of life. The appropriate identification of hand eczema is necessary to implement effective and efficient treatment. PMID:27274632

  7. [Clinical features of tetanus: a review with case reports].

    PubMed

    Fukutake, Toshio; Miyamoto, Ryosuke

    2011-10-01

    Tetanus is a CNS disorder characterized by muscle spasms that is caused by the exotoxin of an anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium tetani. This disease is killing tens of thousands of neonates in developing countries. Although the incidence and mortality of tetanus has dramatically dropped in developed countries due to effective vaccination, appropriate wound management, and recent advances in intensive care, treatments remain difficult. From among developed countries, Japan has had a relatively high incidence of tetanus, and prevention is the problem especially in the elderly. We analyzed the data from 12 patients admitted to our hospital during 1997-2010. Their age ranged from 50-82 years; median 72 years with male to female ratio 5: 7, and all patients lacked a reliable history of toxoid immunization. Five patients out of 12 had history of cancer and one each had diabetes mellitus, pulmonary emphysema and Sjogren syndrome. In some cases, the patients had been initially misdiagnosed with ENT disorders, dental problems, or psychosis. Therefore to date, observation of clinical symptoms such as difficulty in mouth opening is considered the most crucial for diagnosis. The shorter was a period from onset to generalized convulsion (onset time), the longer was a duration of hospital stay. A notable complication was intramuscular hemorrhage in the lumbar muscles, which occurred in 2 patients. No patients died due to ICU managements, in which the most useful were propofol for spasm control and sedation, and magnesium sulfate for autonomic overactivity. Retrospectively, the Tetanus Severity Score (TSS) for mortality proposed by Thwaites et al (2006) is considered a useful tool also for predicting the clinical outcome at discharge. Although tetanus has been traditionally classified into the generalized, local, and cephalic types, a simpler severity-based classification into "severe", "moderate", and "mild" types may be more practical with regard to disease management.

  8. [Genomic diagnosis of thrombophilia in women: clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, B; Lindhoff-Last, E

    2007-02-01

    The detection of the DNA-sequence of human coagulation factors and inhibitors has introduced the possibility of differentiated mutation analysis in patients with venous thrombosis. Since venous thromboembolism is a multifactorial disease, women are at an increased risk to develop venous thrombosis due to hormonal contraception, during pregnancy and the puerperium. In addition, pregnancy complications like early or late fetal loss, pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders and very recently recurrent embryo implantation failure have been suspected to be associated with thrombophilia. Therefore, it is of major importance to define inherited thrombophilic disorders, in which genetic diagnosis is of clinical relevance. While most of the genetic defects described so far represent a risk factor for venous thrombosis, only a minority of these defects actually needs DNA analysis to be detected: mutation analysis is clinically relevant, when factor V Leiden mutation is suspected, because relative risks concerning venous thrombosis as well as pregnancy complications clearly differ between homozygote and heterozygote forms of this frequently observed mutation. Similarly detection of the prothrombin mutation G20210A is of clinical relevance, although data for the very rarely observed homozygote variant are not sufficiently available. In contrast, detection of the homozygote variant of the MTHFR-mutation C677T is not useful, since clinical relevance could not be proven in a majority of studies concerning women specific risk situations. Inherited deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C and protein S are rare with high rates of different mutations. Genetic analysis seems only useful in patients with wide intraindividual variations of coagulation inhibitor activities. Genetic analysis concerning the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism or the factor XIII Val34Leu polymorphism can not be recommended in women specific risk situations because of insufficient data. PMID:17279273

  9. Latent feature representation with stacked auto-encoder for AD/MCI diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there have been great interests for computer-aided diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Unlike the previous methods that considered simple low-level features such as gray matter tissue volumes from MRI, and mean signal intensities from PET, in this paper, we propose a deep learning-based latent feature representation with a stacked auto-encoder (SAE). We believe that there exist latent non-linear complicated patterns inherent in the low-level features such as relations among features. Combining the latent information with the original features helps build a robust model in AD/MCI classification, with high diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore, thanks to the unsupervised characteristic of the pre-training in deep learning, we can benefit from the target-unrelated samples to initialize parameters of SAE, thus finding optimal parameters in fine-tuning with the target-related samples, and further enhancing the classification performances across four binary classification problems: AD vs. healthy normal control (HC), MCI vs. HC, AD vs. MCI, and MCI converter (MCI-C) vs. MCI non-converter (MCI-NC). In our experiments on ADNI dataset, we validated the effectiveness of the proposed method, showing the accuracies of 98.8, 90.7, 83.7, and 83.3 % for AD/HC, MCI/HC, AD/MCI, and MCI-C/MCI-NC classification, respectively. We believe that deep learning can shed new light on the neuroimaging data analysis, and our work presented the applicability of this method to brain disease diagnosis.

  10. Automated diagnosis of Age-related Macular Degeneration using greyscale features from digital fundus images.

    PubMed

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Koh, Joel E W; Chandran, Vinod; Chua, Chua Kuang; Tan, Jen Hong; Lim, Choo Min; Ng, E Y K; Noronha, Kevin; Tong, Louis; Laude, Augustinus

    2014-10-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of vision loss and blindness in ageing population. Currently, there is no cure for AMD, however early detection and subsequent treatment may prevent the severe vision loss or slow the progression of the disease. AMD can be classified into two types: dry and wet AMDs. The people with macular degeneration are mostly affected by dry AMD. Early symptoms of AMD are formation of drusen and yellow pigmentation. These lesions are identified by manual inspection of fundus images by the ophthalmologists. It is a time consuming, tiresome process, and hence an automated diagnosis of AMD screening tool can aid clinicians in their diagnosis significantly. This study proposes an automated dry AMD detection system using various entropies (Shannon, Kapur, Renyi and Yager), Higher Order Spectra (HOS) bispectra features, Fractional Dimension (FD), and Gabor wavelet features extracted from greyscale fundus images. The features are ranked using t-test, Kullback-Lieber Divergence (KLD), Chernoff Bound and Bhattacharyya Distance (CBBD), Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve-based and Wilcoxon ranking methods in order to select optimum features and classified into normal and AMD classes using Naive Bayes (NB), k-Nearest Neighbour (k-NN), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), Decision Tree (DT) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using private (Kasturba Medical Hospital, Manipal, India), Automated Retinal Image Analysis (ARIA) and STructured Analysis of the Retina (STARE) datasets. The proposed system yielded the highest average classification accuracies of 90.19%, 95.07% and 95% with 42, 54 and 38 optimal ranked features using SVM classifier for private, ARIA and STARE datasets respectively. This automated AMD detection system can be used for mass fundus image screening and aid clinicians by making better use of their expertise on selected images that

  11. Clinical features of pedophilia and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Galynker, Igor I

    2002-09-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic criteria for pedophilia and review the literature on its clinical features, including data on prevalence, gender, age of onset, number of victims, frequency and type of acts, violence, impulsivity, and insight. Findings concerning the characteristics of victims (e.g., sex, age, relationship to the pedophile) and research on pedophilic subtypes-exclusive versus nonexclusive; incestuous versus nonincestuous; heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual-are reviewed. Studies have shown that pedophiles may share many psychiatric features beyond deviant sexual desire, including high rates of comorbid axis I disorders (affective disorders, substance use disorders, impulse control disorders, other paraphilias) as well as severe axis II psychopathology (especially antisocial and Cluster C personality disorders). The authors present several possible etiological models for pedophilia and conclude that further research is needed concerning the etiological role of a childhood history of sexual abuse as well as the underlying neurobiology of deviant sexual arousal and decreased erotic differentiation. Finally, findings concerning pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral treatments for pedophilia are briefly reviewed. Recidivism, drop-out, and noncompliance are significant problems in the treatment of pedophilia. The authors review predictors of treatment outcome and conclude that pedophilia is extremely difficult to treat and that effective treatment needs to be intensive, long-term, and comprehensive, possibly with lifetime follow-up.

  12. Ocular toxoplasmosis II: clinical features, pathology and management

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Nicholas J; Furtado, João M; Winthrop, Kevin L; Smith, Justine R

    2014-01-01

    The term, ocular toxoplasmosis, refers to eye disease related to infection with the parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Recurrent posterior uveitis is the typical form of this disease, characterized by unilateral, necrotizing retinitis with secondary choroiditis, occurring adjacent to a pigmented retinochoroidal scar and associated with retinal vasculitis and vitritis. Multiple atypical presentations are also described, and severe inflammation is observed in immunocompromised patients. Histopathological correlations demonstrate focal coagulative retinal necrosis, and early in the course of the disease, this inflammation is based in the inner retina. For typical ocular toxoplasmosis, a diagnosis is easily made on clinical examination. In atypical cases, ocular fluid testing to detect parasite DNA by polymerase chain reaction or to determine intraocular production of specific antibody may be extremely helpful for establishing aetiology. Given the high seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in most communities, serological testing for T. gondii antibodies is generally not useful. Despite a lack of published evidence for effectiveness of current therapies, most ophthalmologists elect to treat patients with ocular toxoplasmosis that reduces or threatens to impact vision. Classic therapy consists of oral pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine, plus systemic corticosteroid. Substantial toxicity of this drug combination has spurred interest in alternative antimicrobials, as well as local forms of drug delivery. At this time, however, no therapeutic approach is curative of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:22712598

  13. Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides: Clinical and Histologic Features in Five Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Azizpour, Arghavan; Noormohammadpoor, Pedram; Seirafi, Hasan; Farnaghi, Farshad; Kamyab-Hesari, Kambiz; Sharifi, Mehdi; Nasimi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia can be a manifestation of mycosis fungoides (MF); however, the prevalence is unknown. Aims: We sought to describe the clinicopathologic presentation of alopecia in patients with diagnosis of MF. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients with biopsy-proven MF, who were evaluated at our cancer center from 2002 to 2012, was performed to identify patients with alopecia. Results: Five patients with alopecia were identified from reviewing of 157 patients with MF. The male:female ratio was 3:2, and the mean age of patients was 42.8 years. Two of these patients showed patchy hair loss on scalp which was clinically identical to alopecia areata. In remaining three patients, hair loss was seen in areas of MF lesions, and epidermal changes consisted of patch- and plaque-type lesions of MF, tumors, and follicular lesions (follicular MF) were also present. In two of these patients, lymphadenopathy without any visceral involvement was detected. Conclusions: Alopecia was observed in 5 (3.18%) patients with MF, which makes it a rare finding, which included alopecia areata-like patchy loss in 2 and alopecia within MF lesions in 3. PMID:27688448

  14. Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides: Clinical and Histologic Features in Five Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Azizpour, Arghavan; Noormohammadpoor, Pedram; Seirafi, Hasan; Farnaghi, Farshad; Kamyab-Hesari, Kambiz; Sharifi, Mehdi; Nasimi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia can be a manifestation of mycosis fungoides (MF); however, the prevalence is unknown. Aims: We sought to describe the clinicopathologic presentation of alopecia in patients with diagnosis of MF. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients with biopsy-proven MF, who were evaluated at our cancer center from 2002 to 2012, was performed to identify patients with alopecia. Results: Five patients with alopecia were identified from reviewing of 157 patients with MF. The male:female ratio was 3:2, and the mean age of patients was 42.8 years. Two of these patients showed patchy hair loss on scalp which was clinically identical to alopecia areata. In remaining three patients, hair loss was seen in areas of MF lesions, and epidermal changes consisted of patch- and plaque-type lesions of MF, tumors, and follicular lesions (follicular MF) were also present. In two of these patients, lymphadenopathy without any visceral involvement was detected. Conclusions: Alopecia was observed in 5 (3.18%) patients with MF, which makes it a rare finding, which included alopecia areata-like patchy loss in 2 and alopecia within MF lesions in 3.

  15. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases.

  16. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: validity of clinical and radiological features.

    PubMed

    Haim, Amir; Yaniv, Moshe; Dekel, Samuel; Amir, Hagay

    2006-10-01

    Data regarding validity of clinical and radiographic findings in diagnosing patellofemoral pain syndrome are inconclusive. We prospectively assessed how sensitive and specific key patellofemoral physical examination tests are, and evaluated the prevalence of physical examination and radiographic findings. Sixty-one infantry soldiers with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 25 control subjects were evaluated. The sensitivity of the patellar tilt, active instability, patella alta, and apprehension tests was low (less than 50%); specificity ranged between 72% and 100%. Although the prevalence of positive patellar tilt and active instability tests was significantly greater in subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome, there were no significant differences between the groups in the results of the other two tests. Soldiers with patellofemoral pain syndrome presented with increased quadriceps angle, lateral and medial retinacular tenderness, patellofemoral crepitation, squinting patella, and reduced mobility of the patella. There were no differences between the groups in the prevalence of lower limb and foot posture alignment and knee effusion. Plain radiography showed increased patellar subluxation in soldiers with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Other radiographic measures (sulcus angle, Laurin angle, Merchant angle, and Insall-Salvati index) were similar in both groups. We provide evidence regarding the validity of clinical and radiographic features commonly used for diagnosing patellofemoral pain syndrome. Physical examinations were more useful than plain radiography. PMID:16788411

  17. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases. PMID:9142784

  18. Clinical features and treatment of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, Z H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and treatment results of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Five patients with endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation were enrolled in this study. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and surgical outcomes of 5 patients were compared. Three patients were surgically treated with anterior chamber irrigation and vitrectomy with intravitreal injection. The remaining two patients were medically treated with an intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime. Treatment results of the five patients were analyzed. Four patients had positive cultures for bacteria (two cases Staphylococcus epidermidis, one case Enterococcus faecalis, and one case head-like Staphylococcus). The culture of the fifth patient did not have bacterial growth. One year following treatment, four patients had restored visual acuity and a clear vitreous cavity. Retinal detachment and other complications were not observed. The remaining patient had a visual acuity of index at 30 cm one year following treatment. For patients with endophthalmitis after cataract surgery, a biochemical laboratory examination should be promptly performed and should include a bacterial culture and drug sensitivity test. When necessary, vitrectomy combined with an intravitreal injection of vancomycin should be performed to treat the infection early and to help retain useful vision. PMID:26125869

  19. Contourlet Textual Features: Improving the Diagnosis of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules in Two Dimensional CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Sun, Tao; Gao, Ni; Menon, Desmond Dev; Luo, Yanxia; Gao, Qi; Li, Xia; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Huiping; Lv, Pingxin; Liang, Zhigang; Tao, Lixin; Liu, Xiangtong; Guo, Xiuhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the value of contourlet textural features obtained from solitary pulmonary nodules in two dimensional CT images used in diagnoses of lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 6,299 CT images were acquired from 336 patients, with 1,454 benign pulmonary nodule images from 84 patients (50 male, 34 female) and 4,845 malignant from 252 patients (150 male, 102 female). Further to this, nineteen patient information categories, which included seven demographic parameters and twelve morphological features, were also collected. A contourlet was used to extract fourteen types of textural features. These were then used to establish three support vector machine models. One comprised a database constructed of nineteen collected patient information categories, another included contourlet textural features and the third one contained both sets of information. Ten-fold cross-validation was used to evaluate the diagnosis results for the three databases, with sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, the area under the curve (AUC), precision, Youden index, and F-measure were used as the assessment criteria. In addition, the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE) was used to preprocess the unbalanced data. Results Using a database containing textural features and patient information, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, AUC, precision, Youden index, and F-measure were: 0.95, 0.71, 0.89, 0.89, 0.92, 0.66, and 0.93 respectively. These results were higher than results derived using the database without textural features (0.82, 0.47, 0.74, 0.67, 0.84, 0.29, and 0.83 respectively) as well as the database comprising only textural features (0.81, 0.64, 0.67, 0.72, 0.88, 0.44, and 0.85 respectively). Using the SMOTE as a pre-processing procedure, new balanced database generated, including observations of 5,816 benign ROIs and 5,815 malignant ROIs, and accuracy was 0.93. Conclusion Our results indicate that the combined contourlet textural features of solitary

  20. Clinical Features of Alzheimer Disease With and Without Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Joo; Babulal, Ganesh M.; Monsell, Sarah E.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Roe, Catherine M.; Morris, John C.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Lewy bodies are a frequent coexisting pathology in late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous studies have examined the contribution of Lewy bodies to the clinical phenotype of late-onset AD with variable findings. OBJECTIVE To determine whether the presence of Lewy body pathology influences the clinical phenotype and progression of symptoms in longitudinally assessed participants with AD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective clinical and pathological cohort study of 531 deceased participants who met the neuropathologic criteria for intermediate or high likelihood of AD according to the National Institute on Aging–Ronald Reagan Institute guidelines for the neuropathologic diagnosis of AD. All participants had a clinical assessment within 2 years of death. The data were obtained from 34 AD centers maintained by the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center and spanned from September 12, 2005, to April 30, 2013. EXPOSURES Standardized neuropathologic assessment and then brain autopsy after death. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinical and neuropsychiatric test scores. RESULTS The mean (SD) age at death was statistically significantly younger for participants who had AD with Lewy bodies (77.9 [9.5] years) than for participants who had AD without Lewy bodies (80.2 [11.1] years) (P = .01). The mean (SD) age at onset of dementia symptoms was also younger for participants who had AD with Lewy bodies (70.0 [9.9] years) than for participants who had AD without Lewy bodies (72.2 [12.3] years) (P = .03). More men than women had AD with Lewy bodies (P = .01). The frequency of having at least 1 APOE ε4 allele was higher for participants who had AD with Lewy bodies than for participants who had AD without Lewy bodies (P = .03). After adjusting for age, sex, education, frequency of plaques (neuritic and diffuse), and tangle stage, we found that participants who had AD with Lewy bodies had a statistically significantly higher mean (SD) Neuropsychiatric

  1. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  2. [Clinical practice guideline. Diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal and perinemopausia].

    PubMed

    Alvarado-García, Alberto; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Negrín-Pérez, Miriam Concepción; Ríos-Castillo, Brendha; Valencia-Pérez, Gregorio Urbano; Vital-Reyes, Víctor Saúl; Basavilvazo-Rodríguez, María Antonia; Torres-Arreola, Laura Pilar; Ortiz-Luna, Guillermo Federico; Sánchez-Aguirre, Fernando; Montaño-Uscanga, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Post-menopause is the period of life where a deep decline occurs in circulating estrogen levels, inducing the appearance of psycho and somatic symptoms. The classification to understand the chronology of reproductive aging in women (known as STRAW) determines the clinical and endocrine changes contemplating menstrual cycles, symptoms, measurements of FSH, LH, inhibin B, anti-Mullerian hormone , and follicular account. The diagnosis of menopause is established by the absence of menstruation for 12 months or more. The most frequent clinical manifestations of the climacteric syndrome transition to menopause are menstrual disorders, vasomotor symptoms (flushes and/or sweats) and genitourinary manifestations. The assessment of women in the peri- or postmenopause aims to develop: cervicovaginal cytology , lipid profile , serum glucose, basal Mammography at least a year before, pelvic ultrasound, urinalysis, serum TSH, Densitometry in patients older than 60 years if there is no recourse can be applied and FRAX. Drug therapy for the treatment of disorders of the transition to menopause or menopause is divided into: hormone therapy (HT) based estrogens and progestin hormone not being the most recommended the serotonin reuptake inhibitors and norepinephrine, clonidine, gabapentin or veralipride.

  3. Evaluation of electronic biopsy for clinical diagnosis in virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Joseph; Du, Wei; Barish, Matthew; Li, Ellen; Zhu, Wei; Kaufman, Arie

    2011-03-01

    Virtual colonoscopy provides techniques not available in optical colonoscopy, an exciting one being the ability to perform an electronic biopsy. An electronic biopsy image is created using ray-casting volume rendering of the CT data with a translucent transfer function mapping higher densities to red and lower densities to blue. The resulting image allows the physician to gain insight into the internal structure of polyps. Benign tissue and adenomas can be differentiated; the former will appear as homogeneously blue and the latter as irregular red structures. Although this technique is now common, is included with clinical systems, and has been used successfully for computer aided detection, there has so far been no study to evaluate the effectiveness of a physician using electronic biopsy in determining the pathological state of a polyp. We present here such a study, wherein an experienced radiologist ranked polyps based on electronic biopsy alone per scan (supine and prone), as well as both combined. Our results show a correct identification 77% of the time using prone or supine images alone, and 80% accuracy using both. Using ROC analysis based on this study with one reader and a modest sample size, the combined score is not significantly higher than using a single electronic biopsy image alone. However, our analysis indicates a trend of superiority for the combined ranking that deserves a follow-up confirmatory study with a larger sample and more readers. This study yields hope that an improved electronic biopsy technique could become a primary clinical diagnosis method.

  4. [Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy: clinical, hereditary and histological features: study of a family (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pennisi, G; Russo, S; Ammatuna, A; Falsaperla, A

    1982-01-01

    The family of an "affected" subject with limb girdle dystrophy has been studied in order to assess the clinical-hereditary characteristics of the disease and to contribute to its definite genetic features (phenotypical expressiveness of the pathologic gene). The diagnosis of certitude was based on the anamnestic-clinical criteria and instrumental investigations, supported by histological and histochemical studies of the muscles. The clinical, electromyographic and biochemical data made it possible to distinguish the "affected" from the "subclinical" and the healthy subjects. The subjects that, without noticeable symptoms of neuromuscular disorders, showed a slight clinical expressiveness which didn't alter the normal social and working activities, have been defined "subclinical". The modalities of hereditary transmission of this form of muscular dystrophy are considered in the light of the genetics most present trends that are tending to overcome the dominant-recessive dualism. The possibility of a modality of transmission definable as "intermediate inheritance" is proposed. In the case of the examined family the hypothesis that a pathologic recessive autosomic gene gives rise to a clinical expressiveness in heterozygote subjects seems tenable. This situation definable as "incomplete recessive" is rarely found in the limb girdle dystrophy.

  5. Duplication 2p25 in a child with clinical features of CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sperry, Ethan D; Schuette, Jane L; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Green, Glenn E; Martin, Donna M

    2016-05-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a dominant disorder characterized by ocular colobomata, heart defects, choanal atresia, retardation of growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear abnormalities including deafness and vestibular disorders. The majority of individuals with CHARGE have pathogenic variants in the gene encoding CHD7, a chromatin remodeling protein. Here, we present a 15-year-old girl with clinical features of CHARGE syndrome and a de novo 6.5 Mb gain of genomic material at 2p25.3-p25.2. The duplicated region contained 24 genes, including the early and broadly expressed transcription factor gene SOX11. Analysis of 28 other patients with CHARGE showed no SOX11 copy number changes or pathogenic sequence variants. To our knowledge, this child's chromosomal abnormality is unique and represents the first co-occurrence of duplication 2p25 and clinical features of CHARGE syndrome. We compare our patient's phenotype to ten previously published patients with isolated terminal duplication 2p, and elaborate on the clinical diagnosis of CHARGE in the context of atypical genetic findings. PMID:26850571

  6. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on time-frequency domain synchronous averaging and feature extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Gearbox is one of the most vulnerable subsystems in wind turbines. Its healthy status significantly affects the efficiency and function of the entire system. Vibration based fault diagnosis methods are prevalently applied nowadays. However, vibration signals are always contaminated by noise that comes from data acquisition errors, structure geometric errors, operation errors, etc. As a result, it is difficult to identify potential gear failures directly from vibration signals, especially for the early stage faults. This paper utilizes synchronous averaging technique in time-frequency domain to remove the non-synchronous noise and enhance the fault related time-frequency features. The enhanced time-frequency information is further employed in gear fault classification and identification through feature extraction algorithms including Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA), Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE). Results show that the LLE approach is the most effective to classify and identify different gear faults.

  7. Feature extraction using adaptive multiwavelets and synthetic detection index for rotor fault diagnosis of rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na; Xiao, Zhihuai; Malik, O. P.

    2015-02-01

    State identification to diagnose the condition of rotating machinery is often converted to a classification problem of values of non-dimensional symptom parameters (NSPs). To improve the sensitivity of the NSPs to the changes in machine condition, a novel feature extraction method based on adaptive multiwavelets and the synthetic detection index (SDI) is proposed in this paper. Based on the SDI maximization principle, optimal multiwavelets are searched by genetic algorithms (GAs) from an adaptive multiwavelets library and used for extracting fault features from vibration signals. By the optimal multiwavelets, more sensitive NSPs can be extracted. To examine the effectiveness of the optimal multiwavelets, conventional methods are used for comparison study. The obtained NSPs are fed into K-means classifier to diagnose rotor faults. The results show that the proposed method can effectively improve the sensitivity of the NSPs and achieve a higher discrimination rate for rotor fault diagnosis than the conventional methods.

  8. Clinical Features for Mild Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyan; Luo, Lin; Yan, Shiyan; Wen, Tiancai; Bai, Wenjing; Li, Hongjiao; Zhang, Guoliang; Lu, Xiaoying; Liu, Yan; He, Liyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Mild hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is at a critical stage owing to its ease of communicability and a higher risk of developing severe complications and death. Clinical diagnosis of mild HFMD was made by the presenting symptoms and signs (symptoms in brief) alone. We aim to evaluate the frequencies of symptoms in a retrospective case series study. Methods We collected epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from outpatient and inpatient settings on the clinical data warehouse system. We principally described the frequencies of symptoms of mild HFMD. Correlations between symptoms with laboratory-confirmed cases were then analyzed. Results The clinical data warehouse system included 3649 probable cases, between 2010 and 2012, of which 956 (26.20%) were laboratory confirmed. The peak incidence was identified in children 2 years of age. A total of 370 of the 956 laboratory confirmed cases (38.70%) were associated with enterovirus 71 (EV71). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for geographical variables, age, sex, month of onset, and time from onset to diagnosis showed that the clinical features constipation (P<0.0001; adjusted OR, 95%CI (2.99, 2.28–3.91)), and blisters (P<0.0001; adjusted OR, 95%CI (2.16, 1.82–2.56)) were positively correlated with the confirmed cases. Conclusions This is the largest case series study, including all the guideline-mentioned symptoms of mild HFMD. Our findings suggest that blisters and constipation should be considered as potential warning signs while front-line clinicians manage surges of children diagnosed with mild HFMD during a pandemic. PMID:26302092

  9. Molecular diagnosis in clinical parasitology: when and why?

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Fung, Kitty S C; Chau, Sandy; Poon, Rosana W S; Wong, Sally C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-11-01

    Microscopic detection and morphological identification of parasites from clinical specimens are the gold standards for the laboratory diagnosis of parasitic infections. The limitations of such diagnostic assays include insufficient sensitivity and operator dependence. Immunoassays for parasitic antigens are not available for most parasitic infections and have not significantly improved the sensitivity of laboratory detection. Advances in molecular detection by nucleic acid amplification may improve the detection in asymptomatic infections with low parasitic burden. Rapidly accumulating genomic data on parasites allow the design of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers directed towards multi-copy gene targets, such as the ribosomal and mitochondrial genes, which further improve the sensitivity. Parasitic cell or its free circulating parasitic DNA can be shed from parasites into blood and excreta which may allow its detection without the whole parasite being present within the portion of clinical sample used for DNA extraction. Multiplex nucleic acid amplification technology allows the simultaneous detection of many parasitic species within a single clinical specimen. In addition to improved sensitivity, nucleic acid amplification with sequencing can help to differentiate different parasitic species at different stages with similar morphology, detect and speciate parasites from fixed histopathological sections and identify anti-parasitic drug resistance. The use of consensus primer and PCR sequencing may even help to identify novel parasitic species. The key limitation of molecular detection is the technological expertise and expense which are usually lacking in the field setting at highly endemic areas. However, such tests can be useful for screening important parasitic infections in asymptomatic patients, donors or recipients coming from endemic areas in the settings of transfusion service or tertiary institutions with transplantation service. Such tests can also

  10. Molecular diagnosis in clinical parasitology: when and why?

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Fung, Kitty S C; Chau, Sandy; Poon, Rosana W S; Wong, Sally C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-11-01

    Microscopic detection and morphological identification of parasites from clinical specimens are the gold standards for the laboratory diagnosis of parasitic infections. The limitations of such diagnostic assays include insufficient sensitivity and operator dependence. Immunoassays for parasitic antigens are not available for most parasitic infections and have not significantly improved the sensitivity of laboratory detection. Advances in molecular detection by nucleic acid amplification may improve the detection in asymptomatic infections with low parasitic burden. Rapidly accumulating genomic data on parasites allow the design of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers directed towards multi-copy gene targets, such as the ribosomal and mitochondrial genes, which further improve the sensitivity. Parasitic cell or its free circulating parasitic DNA can be shed from parasites into blood and excreta which may allow its detection without the whole parasite being present within the portion of clinical sample used for DNA extraction. Multiplex nucleic acid amplification technology allows the simultaneous detection of many parasitic species within a single clinical specimen. In addition to improved sensitivity, nucleic acid amplification with sequencing can help to differentiate different parasitic species at different stages with similar morphology, detect and speciate parasites from fixed histopathological sections and identify anti-parasitic drug resistance. The use of consensus primer and PCR sequencing may even help to identify novel parasitic species. The key limitation of molecular detection is the technological expertise and expense which are usually lacking in the field setting at highly endemic areas. However, such tests can be useful for screening important parasitic infections in asymptomatic patients, donors or recipients coming from endemic areas in the settings of transfusion service or tertiary institutions with transplantation service. Such tests can also

  11. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of Turkish patients with late onset ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Hatice; Aycan, Hakan; Orman, Mehmet; Kobak, Senol

    2015-07-22

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which typically begins in early decades of life with primarily axial joints involvement. This disease rarely affects patients older than 50 years of age. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of late onset and early onset AS patients who were followed up in a single rheumatology center. A total of 339 patients who have been diagnosed with AS according to modified New York criteria were included in the study. The patients whose initial symptoms were observed after 50 years of age were accepted as late onset AS. Out of 339 patients, 27 (7.9%) were diagnosed as late onset AS and 312 (92.3%) patients were evaluated as early onset AS. Of 27 late onset patients, 10 were male and 17 were female. Delay in the diagnosis was 5.8 years for early onset AS, while it was 3.8 years for late onset AS (p = 0.001). Higher levels of acute phase reactants and more methotrexate (MTX) use were detected in early onset AS patients compared to late onset AS (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). Statistically, there was no difference between these two groups, with regard to disease clinical activity indexes, anthropometric measurement parameters, uveitis and peripheral joint involvement. In this study, we showed that early and late onset AS patients may present with different clinical, genetic, and laboratory features. Late onset AS patients are characterized with lower human leukocyte antigen-B27 sequence, less inflammatory sign, delayed diagnosis, and less MTX and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha drug usage.

  12. Cognition, Language, and Clinical Pathological Features of Non-Alzheimer’s Dementias: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Jamie; Rodriguez, Amy; Lamy, Martine; Neils-Strunjas, Jean

    2010-01-01

    There are many distinct forms of dementia whose pharmacological and behavioral management differ. Differential diagnosis among the dementia variants currently relies upon a weighted combination of genetic and protein biomarkers, neuroanatomical integrity, and behavior. Diagnostic specificity is complicated by a high degree of overlap in the initial presenting symptoms across dementia subtypes. For this reason, reliable markers are of considerable diagnostic value. Communication disorders have proven to be among the strongest predictors for discriminating among dementia subtypes. As such, Speech-Language Pathologists may be poised to make an increasingly visible contribution to dementia diagnosis and its ongoing management. The value and durability of this potential contribution, however, demands an improved discipline-wide knowledge base about the unique features associated with different dementia variants. To this end we provide an overview of cognition, language, and clinical pathological features of four of the most common non-Alzheimer’s dementias: Frontotemporal Dementia, Vascular Dementia, Lewy Body Disease Dementia, and Parkinson’s Disease Dementia. PMID:20493496

  13. Clinical and epidemiological features of coryneform skin infections at a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Malcolm; Hundi, Ganesh Kamath; Bhat, Ramesh Marne; Bala, Nanda Kishore; Dandekeri, Sukumar; Martis, Jacintha; Kambil, Srinath M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skin infections caused by coryneform bacteria are common dermatological conditions. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies are available on the clinical characteristics and epidemiological features of this group of disorders as one entity from India and abroad. Aims: To study the clinical and epidemiological features of coryneform skin infections Methods: A total of 75 patients presenting with clinically distinctive lesions of pitted keratolysis, erythrasma and trichobacteriosis to our hospital were included in the study. Cases were interviewed with particular emphasis on epidemiological features and the various clinical findings were recorded. Investigations like Gram's stain, Wood's light examination, 10% KOH scrapings, were done in selected cases to ascertain the diagnosis. Results: Pitted keratolysis was more common in the age group of 31-40 years (40%) with a male preponderance (76.7%), most commonly affecting pressure bearing areas of the soles with malodour (86.7%) and frequent contact with water (58.3%) constituting the most important presenting symptom and provocating factor respectively. Erythrasma affected both male and female patients equally and was more commonly detected in patients with a BMI > 23kg/m2 (62.5%) and in diabetics (50%). All patients with trichobacteriosis presented with yellow coloured concretions in the axillae. Bromhidrosis (71.4%) and failure to regularly use an axillary deodorant (71.4%) were the most common presenting symptom and predisposing factor respectively. Conclusion: Coryneform skin infections are common dermatological conditions, though epidemiological data are fragmentary. Hyperhidrosis is a common predisposing factor to all three coryneform skin infections. Asymmetrical distribution of pits has been reported in our study. Diabetic status needs to be evaluated in all patients with erythrasma. Woods lamp examination forms an indispensible tool to diagnose erythrasma and trichobacteriosis. PMID

  14. Clinical and Pathological Features of Lipoleiomyoma of the Uterine Corpus: A Review of 76 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Metin; Gündoğan, Mehmet; Yörükoğlu, Aygün

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uterine lipoleiomyoma is a rare and specific type of leiomyoma with a considerable amount of adipocytes. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical features of lipoleiomyoma of the uterine corpus, and review its histogenesis and differential diagnosis from other neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions in order to obtain a detailed profile of this somewhat uncommon lesion. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of 70 consecutive women with 76 lipoleiomyomas, who underwent surgery mainly for uterine leiomyoma and gynecological carcinomas between January 2000 and April 2013. Clinical and pathological information was obtained from medical records. Immunohistochemistry was applied in selected cases. Parametric methods were used to compare clinical and pathologic features. Results: The patients ranged in age from 34 to 77 years (mean 55.49 years). Lipoleiomyomas ranged from 0.5 to 55 cm in diameter (mean 5.50 cm). Typical macroscopic and microscopic features were noted. Sixty-nine (90.7%) tumors were in the uterine corpus and five (6.5%) were in the cervix. One broad ligament tumor and one retroperitoneal tumor were also studied. No tumors displayed cytologic atypia, mitosis, necrosis, calcification, or other degenerative changes. Immunohistochemically, the adipose tissue element was positive for vimentin, desmin, S100 protein, estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and Ki-67. Among patients with lipoleiomyomas, 53 cases (75.7%) had different types of lesions associated with hyperestrogenic status, such as adenomyosis, endometriosis, endometrial hyperplasia, and polyps, complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and gynecologic carcinomas. The follow-up period ranged from one to eight years (mean 4.6 years). There were no recurrences or tumor-related fatalities. Conclusion: In the present study, the lipoleiomyomas were seen more frequently in patients with adenomyosis

  15. Robust condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings using improved EEMD and statistical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fan; Zhu, Zhencai; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoan; Zhou, Gongbo

    2014-02-01

    Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis play an important role in the health management of mechanical equipment. However, the robust performance of data-driven-based methods with unknown fault inputs remains to be further improved. In this paper, a novel approach of condition monitoring and fault diagnosis is proposed for rolling element bearings based on an improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (IEEMD), which is able to solve the non-intrinsic mode function problem of EEMD. In this method, IEEMD is applied to process the primordial vibration signals collected from rolling element bearings at first. Then the correlation analysis and data fusion technology are introduced to extract statistical features from these decomposition results of IEEMD. Finally, a complete self-zero space model is constructed for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings. Experiments are implemented on a mechanical fault simulator to demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of the proposed method. The experimental results show that the proposed method can not only diagnose known faults but also monitor unknown faults with strong robust performance.

  16. Multi-Modal Neuroimaging Feature Learning for Multi-Class Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siqi; Liu, Sidong; Cai, Weidong; Che, Hangyu; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimers disease (AD) is essential for patient care and will be increasingly important as disease modifying agents become available, early in the course of the disease. Although studies have applied machine learning methods for the computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of AD, a bottleneck in the diagnostic performance was shown in previous methods, due to the lacking of efficient strategies for representing neuroimaging biomarkers. In this study, we designed a novel diagnostic framework with deep learning architecture to aid the diagnosis of AD. This framework uses a zero-masking strategy for data fusion to extract complementary information from multiple data modalities. Compared to the previous state-of-the-art workflows, our method is capable of fusing multi-modal neuroimaging features in one setting and has the potential to require less labelled data. A performance gain was achieved in both binary classification and multi-class classification of AD. The advantages and limitations of the proposed framework are discussed. PMID:25423647

  17. The role of neuroimaging in the diagnosis of the atypical parkinsonian syndromes in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Magda; Schinwelski, Michał; Sitek, Emilia J; Muraszko-Klaudel, Anna; Brockhuis, Bogna; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Sławek, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonian disorders (APD) are a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative diseases such as: progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), cortico-basal degeneration (CBD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). In all of them core symptoms of parkinsonian syndrome are accompanied by many additional clinical features not typical for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) like rapid progression, gaze palsy, apraxia, ataxia, early cognitive decline, dysautonomia and usually poor response to levodopa therapy. In the absence of reliably validated biomarkers the diagnosis is still challenging and mainly based on clinical criteria. However, robust data emerging from routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as from many advanced MRI techniques such as: diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) may help in differential diagnosis. The main aim of this review is to summarize briefly the most important and acknowledged radiological findings of conventional MRI due to its availability in standard clinical settings. Nevertheless, we present shortly other methods of structural (like TCS - transcranial sonography) and functional imaging (like SPECT - single photon emission computed tomography or PET - positron emission tomography) as well as some selected advanced MRI techniques and their potential future applications in supportive role in distinguishing APD. PMID:26652877

  18. Diagnosis of disc herniation based on classifiers and features generated from spine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Jaehan; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2010-03-01

    In recent years the demand for an automated method for diagnosis of disc abnormalities has grown as more patients suffer from lumbar disorders and radiologists have to treat more patients reliably in a limited amount of time. In this paper, we propose and compare several classifiers that diagnose disc herniation, one of the common problems of the lumbar spine, based on lumbar MR images. Experimental results on a limited data set of 68 clinical cases with 340 lumbar discs show that our classifiers can diagnose disc herniation with 97% accuracy.

  19. Inherent Structure-Based Multiview Learning With Multitemplate Feature Representation for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Daoqiang; Adeli, Ehsan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-07-01

    Multitemplate-based brain morphometric pattern analysis using magnetic resonance imaging has been recently proposed for automatic diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage (i.e., mild cognitive impairment or MCI). In such methods, multiview morphological patterns generated from multiple templates are used as feature representation for brain images. However, existing multitemplate-based methods often simply assume that each class is represented by a specific type of data distribution (i.e., a single cluster), while in reality, the underlying data distribution is actually not preknown. In this paper, we propose an inherent structure-based multiview leaning method using multiple templates for AD/MCI classification. Specifically, we first extract multiview feature representations for subjects using multiple selected templates and then cluster subjects within a specific class into several subclasses (i.e., clusters) in each view space. Then, we encode those subclasses with unique codes by considering both their original class information and their own distribution information, followed by a multitask feature selection model. Finally, we learn an ensemble of view-specific support vector machine classifiers based on their, respectively, selected features in each view and fuse their results to draw the final decision. Experimental results on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database demonstrate that our method achieves promising results for AD/MCI classification, compared to the state-of-the-art multitemplate-based methods.

  20. Inherent Structure-Based Multiview Learning With Multitemplate Feature Representation for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Daoqiang; Adeli, Ehsan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-07-01

    Multitemplate-based brain morphometric pattern analysis using magnetic resonance imaging has been recently proposed for automatic diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage (i.e., mild cognitive impairment or MCI). In such methods, multiview morphological patterns generated from multiple templates are used as feature representation for brain images. However, existing multitemplate-based methods often simply assume that each class is represented by a specific type of data distribution (i.e., a single cluster), while in reality, the underlying data distribution is actually not preknown. In this paper, we propose an inherent structure-based multiview leaning method using multiple templates for AD/MCI classification. Specifically, we first extract multiview feature representations for subjects using multiple selected templates and then cluster subjects within a specific class into several subclasses (i.e., clusters) in each view space. Then, we encode those subclasses with unique codes by considering both their original class information and their own distribution information, followed by a multitask feature selection model. Finally, we learn an ensemble of view-specific support vector machine classifiers based on their, respectively, selected features in each view and fuse their results to draw the final decision. Experimental results on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database demonstrate that our method achieves promising results for AD/MCI classification, compared to the state-of-the-art multitemplate-based methods. PMID:26540666

  1. Hierarchical feature representation and multimodal fusion with deep learning for AD/MCI diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-11-01

    For the last decade, it has been shown that neuroimaging can be a potential tool for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and also fusion of different modalities can further provide the complementary information to enhance diagnostic accuracy. Here, we focus on the problems of both feature representation and fusion of multimodal information from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). To our best knowledge, the previous methods in the literature mostly used hand-crafted features such as cortical thickness, gray matter densities from MRI, or voxel intensities from PET, and then combined these multimodal features by simply concatenating into a long vector or transforming into a higher-dimensional kernel space. In this paper, we propose a novel method for a high-level latent and shared feature representation from neuroimaging modalities via deep learning. Specifically, we use Deep Boltzmann Machine (DBM)(2), a deep network with a restricted Boltzmann machine as a building block, to find a latent hierarchical feature representation from a 3D patch, and then devise a systematic method for a joint feature representation from the paired patches of MRI and PET with a multimodal DBM. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we performed experiments on ADNI dataset and compared with the state-of-the-art methods. In three binary classification problems of AD vs. healthy Normal Control (NC), MCI vs. NC, and MCI converter vs. MCI non-converter, we obtained the maximal accuracies of 95.35%, 85.67%, and 74.58%, respectively, outperforming the competing methods. By visual inspection of the trained model, we observed that the proposed method could hierarchically discover the complex latent patterns inherent in both MRI and PET.

  2. Hierarchical Feature Representation and Multimodal Fusion with Deep Learning for AD/MCI Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    For the last decade, it has been shown that neuroimaging can be a potential tool for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and also fusion of different modalities can further provide the complementary information to enhance diagnostic accuracy. Here, we focus on the problems of both feature representation and fusion of multimodal information from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). To our best knowledge, the previous methods in the literature mostly used hand-crafted features such as cortical thickness, gray matter densities from MRI, or voxel intensities from PET, and then combined these multimodal features by simply concatenating into a long vector or transforming into a higher-dimensional kernel space. In this paper, we propose a novel method for a high-level latent and shared feature representation from neuroimaging modalities via deep learning. Specifically, we use Deep Boltzmann Machine (DBM)1, a deep network with a restricted Boltzmann machine as a building block, to find a latent hierarchical feature representation from a 3D patch, and then devise a systematic method for a joint feature representation from the paired patches of MRI and PET with a multimodal DBM. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we performed experiments on ADNI dataset and compared with the state-of-the-art methods. In three binary classification problems of AD vs. healthy Normal Control (NC), MCI vs. NC, and MCI converter vs. MCI non-converter, we obtained the maximal accuracies of 95.35%, 85.67%, and 74.58%, respectively, outperforming the competing methods. By visual inspection of the trained model, we observed that the proposed method could hierarchically discover the complex latent patterns inherent in both MRI and PET. PMID:25042445

  3. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Pasteurella multocida Infection

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Dincman, Toros; Clyburn, Benjamin E.; Steed, Lisa L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic infectious organism, has most often been described in patients after an animal bite. Here, we characterize the clinical features and outcomes of P multocida infection in a large cohort of patients according to the presence or absence of an animal bite. We retrospectively searched MUSC's laboratory information system for all patients with positive P multocida cultures from 2000 to 2014. Extensive data were abstracted, including clinical and outcome data. The Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used to assess comorbidities among patients. We identified 44 patients with P multocida infections, including 25 with an animal bite. The average age was 64 years and the majority of patients were women (N = 30). There was no difference in age and sex distribution among those with and without a bite (P = 0.38 and 0.75, respectively). A CCI ≥1 was significantly associated with the absence of a bite (P = 0.006). Patients presenting without a bite were more frequently bacteremic (37% vs 4%, respectively, P = 0.001), and were hospitalized more often (84% vs 44%, respectively, P = 0.012). Of the 8 patients who required intensive care unit (ICU)-based care, 7 were non-bite-related. There were 4 deaths, all occurring in patients not bitten. P multocida infections not associated with an animal bite were often associated with bacteremia, severe comorbidity(ies), immune-incompetent states, the need for ICU management, and were associated with substantial mortality. PMID:26356688

  4. Tentative clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome--A conglomeration of different genetic entities?

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Karl; Rump, Andreas; Haas, Stefan A; Lemke, Johannes R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Tzschach, Andreas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Albrecht, Beate; Kuechler, Alma; Ripperger, Tim; Kobelt, Albrecht; Oexle, Konrad; Tinschert, Sigrid; Schrock, Evelin; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome (LFS) comprises X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with marfanoid habitus, distinct combination of minor facial anomalies and nasal speech. However the definition of syndrome was significantly broadened since the original report and implies ID with marfanoid habitus. Mutations of three genes (MED12, UPF3B, and ZDHHC9) have been reported in "broadly defined" LFS. We examined these genes in 28 individuals with a tentative clinical diagnosis of LFS but we did not identify any causative mutation. By molecular karyotyping we detected other disorders, i.e., Phelan-McDermid syndrome and 16p11.2 microduplication, each in one patient. One affected individual was carrier of a different recurrent duplication on 16p11.2 that has been reported several times to the DECIPHER and ISCA databases in individuals with autism, intellectual disability (ID), and developmental delay. It may represent a new duplication syndrome. We also identified previously unreported de novo duplication on chromosome 12p13.31 which we considered to be disease-causing. X-exome sequencing of four individuals revealed private or non-recurrent mutations in NKAP and LAS1L in one patient each. While LFS is defined as a form of XLID, there seem to be various conditions that have rather similar phenotypes. Therefore, the combination of ID and marfanoid habitus in a male patient is not sufficient for the diagnosis of LFS. We suggest that the diagnosis of LFS in patients with ID and marfanoid habitus should be made only in presence of specific facial features, nasal speech and obvious X-linked segregation of the disorder or an unambiguously pathogenic mutation in the MED12. PMID:26358559

  5. Tentative clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome--A conglomeration of different genetic entities?

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Karl; Rump, Andreas; Haas, Stefan A; Lemke, Johannes R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Tzschach, Andreas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Albrecht, Beate; Kuechler, Alma; Ripperger, Tim; Kobelt, Albrecht; Oexle, Konrad; Tinschert, Sigrid; Schrock, Evelin; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome (LFS) comprises X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with marfanoid habitus, distinct combination of minor facial anomalies and nasal speech. However the definition of syndrome was significantly broadened since the original report and implies ID with marfanoid habitus. Mutations of three genes (MED12, UPF3B, and ZDHHC9) have been reported in "broadly defined" LFS. We examined these genes in 28 individuals with a tentative clinical diagnosis of LFS but we did not identify any causative mutation. By molecular karyotyping we detected other disorders, i.e., Phelan-McDermid syndrome and 16p11.2 microduplication, each in one patient. One affected individual was carrier of a different recurrent duplication on 16p11.2 that has been reported several times to the DECIPHER and ISCA databases in individuals with autism, intellectual disability (ID), and developmental delay. It may represent a new duplication syndrome. We also identified previously unreported de novo duplication on chromosome 12p13.31 which we considered to be disease-causing. X-exome sequencing of four individuals revealed private or non-recurrent mutations in NKAP and LAS1L in one patient each. While LFS is defined as a form of XLID, there seem to be various conditions that have rather similar phenotypes. Therefore, the combination of ID and marfanoid habitus in a male patient is not sufficient for the diagnosis of LFS. We suggest that the diagnosis of LFS in patients with ID and marfanoid habitus should be made only in presence of specific facial features, nasal speech and obvious X-linked segregation of the disorder or an unambiguously pathogenic mutation in the MED12.

  6. [Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: clinical, anatomopathologic, and therapeutic features. Report ot 9 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Aboutaieb, R; Sarf, I; Elattar, H; Azzouzi, S; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-11-01

    Diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a rare chronic pyelonephritis. This study permitted us to notice the various histological, clinical, radiological, and the different means diagnoses of this affection. Retrospectively series of nine patients is reported. The median age was 43 years. The commonest clinical presentation was urinary tract infection, and lumbar pain. Urine culture identified a bacteria in seven cases (77%). Intravenous urography recovers silent kidney (five cases), hydronephrosis (two cases), chronic pyelonephritis (one case) and renal stones in six cases (67%). Treatment consisted of nephrectomy. No specific biological or radiological signs of this affection can be identifying this lesion in preoperative. The diagnosis was revealed by the histological examination of the removed kidney. The outcome is favorable after a follow-up of six months to four years. The clinical features of the pyelonephritis xanthogranulomatous is not specific. Magnetic resonance imaging can give a specificity to this affection. Only histological examination is able to established the definitive diagnosis.

  7. Clinical features of idiopathic megarectum and idiopathic megacolon.

    PubMed Central

    Gattuso, J M; Kamm, M A

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dilatation of the rectum and/or colon, in the absence of demonstrable organic disease, is an uncommon and poorly characterised condition. AIMS: To characterise the clinical and diagnostic features, and response to treatment, of patients with idiopathic megarectum (IMR) and idiopathic megacolon (IMC). METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of all patients operated on for these conditions over a 23 year period. In addition all patients treated over a three year period were prospectively studied by means of a questionnaire, contrast studies of the upper and lower intestine, spine x rays to exclude spinal dysraphism, anorectal physiological studies, and assessment of clinical outcome. Patients with Hirschsprung's disease and other known causes of gut dilatation were excluded. RESULTS: (i) Retrospective study: Of 63 operated patients, 22 had IMR, 23 had IMR and IMC, and 18 had IMC only. Five patients with IMC had previous sigmoid volvulus, and three had associated non-gastrointestinal congenital abnormalities. Faecal incontinence was always associated with rectal impaction and 14 patients (82%) with IMR alone had had manual disimpaction. (ii) Prospective study: Twenty two patients had IMR, with a median rectal diameter of 10 cm (normal < 6.5 cm). Six patients had IMC and one patient had IMR and IMC. Patients with IMR were significantly (p = 0.0007) younger than patients with IMC. All patients with IMR became symptomatic in childhood, compared with half the patients with IMC who developed symptoms as adults. Patients with IMR all presented with soiling and impaction, compared with patients with IMC whose symptoms were variable and included constipation or increased bowel frequency, pain, and variable need for laxatives. No upper gut dilatation was seen in either group of patients. Spinal dysraphism was seen in two of 18 patients with IMR and two of four with IMC, suggesting extrinsic denervation as a possible cause in a minority. Twelve of 22 patients

  8. Clinical, Epidemiologic, Histopathologic and Molecular Features of an Unexplained Dermopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Michele L.; Selby, Joseph V.; Katz, Kenneth A.; Cantrell, Virginia; Braden, Christopher R.; Parise, Monica E.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Lewin-Smith, Michael R.; Kalasinsky, Victor F.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Hightower, Allen W.; Papier, Arthur; Lewis, Brian; Motipara, Sarita; Eberhard, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. Methods A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) during 2006–2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. Results We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40) cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113). Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17–93) and were primarily female (77%) and Caucasian (77%). Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9) and 35.45 (SD = 12.89), respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies); skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. Conclusions This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health-related quality of

  9. Etiological and Clinical Features of Childhood Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Polanczyk, Guilherme; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Cannon, Mary; Ambler, Antony; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Houts, Renate; Odgers, Candice L.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Context It has been reported that childhood psychotic symptoms are common in the general population and may signal neurodevelopmental processes that lead to schizophrenia. However, it is not clear whether these symptoms are associated with the same extensive risk factors established for adult schizophrenia. Objective To examine the construct validity of children’s self-reported psychotic symptoms by testing whether these symptoms share the risk factors and clinical features of adult schizophrenia. Design Prospective, longitudinal cohort study of a nationally representative birth cohort in Great Britain. Participants A total of 2232 twelve-year-old children followed up since age 5 years (retention, 96%). Main Outcome Measure Children’s self-reported hallucinations and delusions. Results Children’s psychotic symptoms are familial and heritable and are associated with social risk factors (eg, urbanicity); cognitive impairments at age 5; home-rearing risk factors (eg, maternal expressed emotion); behavioral, emotional, and educational problems at age 5; and comorbid conditions, including self-harm. Conclusions The results provide a comprehensive picture of the construct validity of children’s self-reported psychotic symptoms. For researchers, the findings indicate that children who have psychotic symptoms can be recruited for neuroscience research to determine the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. For clinicians, the findings indicate that psychotic symptoms in childhood are often a marker of an impaired developmental process and should be actively assessed. PMID:20368509

  10. Clinical features of patients with novel Yersinia species.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Conor G; Harewood, Gavin C; Cockerill, Franklin R; Murray, Joseph A

    2002-12-01

    Our purpose was to describe the clinical features of patients with novel Yersinia species. Between 1985 and 1999; 194 patients had yersinia species isolated from stool specimens, 38 (20%) had non-Yersinia enterocolitica species; 12 (32%) had Yersinia intermedia, 7 (18%) Yersinia fredericksenii, 3 (8%) Yersinia kristensenii, and the remaining 16 (42%) were unclassified non-Yersinia enterocolitica species. The most common presenting symptom was diarrhea alone in 10 (26.3%) patients. Symptoms persisted for >1 month in 54% of cases; 21% had symptoms for <1 week; 18 (47%) patients were taking corticosteroids, acid suppressants, and/or antibiotics when Yersinia was isolated. An immunocompromised state was present in 11 (29%) patients. An immunocompromised host and administration of acid suppressants predicted persistence of symptoms for >1 month. Most [27 (71%)] patients received no treatment; 5 (13%) received antibiotics. In conclusion, novel non-Yersinia enterocolitica species, including Yersinia intermedia, Y. fredericksenii, and Y. kristensenii may represent up to 20% of all Yersinia isolates. Diarrhea is the most common symptom.

  11. Congenital Aural Stenosis: Clinical Features and Long-term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-long; Chen, Ying; Chen, Yong-zheng; Fu, Yao-yao; Zhang, Tian-yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to comprehensively evaluate the clinical features and long-term outcomes of congenital aural stenosis (CAS). This study presents a retrospective review of patients who underwent meatoplasty for CAS at a tertiary referral hospital from 2008 to 2015. A total of 246 meatoplasty procedures were performed on 232 patients in the present study. We performed multivariate regression analysis. Except in the age < 6 years group, no significant difference was observed among different age groups for cholesteatoma formation, p > 0.05. Except for the stenosis of the external auditory canal (EAC) (>4 mm) group, the other stenosis of EAC groups were not associated with cholesteatoma formation, p > 0.05. Postoperative air-bone gaps (ABG) less than 30 dB occurred in 77.3% (99/128) of the patients, and the Jahrsdoerfer score was associated with postoperative ABG, p < 0.001. The complication rate of CAS was 13.8% (20/144), and males showed a higher risk for postoperative complications (OR, 6.563; 95% CI, 1.268–33.966, p = 0.025). These results indicate that meatoplasty was an effective surgical intervention for CAS, showing a stable hearing outcome with prolonged follow-up. There was no significant difference between the cholesteatoma and no cholesteatoma groups for hearing outcomes, p > 0.05. PMID:27257165

  12. Diabetic ketoacidosis in adults: clinical and laboratory features.

    PubMed

    Gómez Díaz, R A; Rivera Moscoso, R; Ramos Rodríguez, R; Reza Albarrán, A; Gómez-Pérez, F J; Rull, J

    1996-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we report the clinical and biochemical features of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adult patients who were managed at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición during a 6.5 year period. There were 98 episodes in 46 patients: 22 females (48%) and 24 males (52%). Six patients (13%) had four or more episodes of DKA. Thirty five percent of the events occurred in patients with IDDM; 48% in "late onset" NIDDM: 9% in "early onset" and 9% in classical NIDDM. Infections as the precipitating factor in 41% of episodes of DKA were the initial manifestation of diabetes. We compared our results with those from other reported series, finding no differences among them. The mean anion gap in our series was 30.4. Main complications identified were hypokalemia in five cases, hypoglycemia in four cases, hypernatremia in four cases, and acute pulmonary edema, ventricular fibrillation, neurological deficit and coma in one case each. There were three deaths (6.5%) in the whole group. To our knowledge, this is the largest series on adult patients with DKA reported in our country in the last decade. The obtained results may help evaluate prospectively the impact of different diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in the management of DKA.

  13. Delta hepatitis: molecular biology and clinical and epidemiological features.

    PubMed Central

    Polish, L B; Gallagher, M; Fields, H A; Hadler, S C

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus, discovered in 1977, requires the help of hepatitis B virus to replicate in hepatocytes and is an important cause of acute, fulminant, and chronic liver disease in many regions of the world. Because of the helper function of hepatitis delta virus, infection with it occurs either as a coinfection with hepatitis B or as a superinfection of a carrier of hepatitis B surface antigen. Although the mechanisms of transmission are similar to those of hepatitis B virus, the patterns of transmission of delta virus vary widely around the world. In regions of the world in which hepatitis delta virus infection is not endemic, the disease is confined to groups at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection and high-risk hepatitis B carriers. Because of the propensity of this viral infection to cause fulminant as well as chronic liver disease, continued incursion of hepatitis delta virus into areas of the world where persistent hepatitis B infection is endemic will have serious implications. Prevention depends on the widespread use of hepatitis B vaccine. This review focuses on the molecular biology and the clinical and epidemiologic features of this important viral infection. PMID:8358704

  14. Clinical features of serum sickness after Australian snake antivenom.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicole M; Downes, Michael A; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2015-12-15

    Serum sickness is a delayed immune reaction in which the immune system responds to a protein in antiserum as a potentially harmful substance and mounts an IgG-mediated antibody response. A 32 year-old female patient had systemic envenoming following a bite by a red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus). She was treated with Tiger snake antivenom and recovered over 24 h and did not develop myotoxicity. She then presented with local pain, itching and swelling, which was partially treated with antihistamines. Eleven days after the bite she presented again with symptoms of worsening serum sickness including rash on the upper legs, joint and muscle pain in arms, ankles and knees, and nausea. The patient was prescribed five days of prednisone 50 mg/day, antihistamine 10 mg/day and analgesia 1000 mg/day and improved over 2 days. She had no further problems on follow up at 4 months. This case highlights that serum sickness can cause significant effects after the treatment of snake envenoming. It develops 5-14 days after antivenom administration and has characteristic clinical and laboratory features. Severe cases of serum sickness can result in morbidity but it appears to respond well to corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26525657

  15. Acquired hemophilia a: diagnosis, aetiology, clinical spectrum and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shrimati; Bhave, Manali; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-04-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per million/year with a high mortality rate of more than 20%. The disease occurs due to autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) which neutralize its procoagulant function and result in severe, often life-threatening bleeding. The antibodies arise in individuals with no prior history of hemophilia A. AHA may be associated with pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, malignancy, infections or medication and occurs most commonly in the elderly. Approximately 50% of the patients remain idiopathic with no known underlying pathological condition. Clinical manifestations include spontaneous hemorrhages into the skin, muscles or soft tissues or excessive bleeding during surgery. Hemarthrosis which is the hallmark of congenital severe hemophilia A seldom occurs in AHA. The diagnosis of AHA is based on the isolated prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) which does not normalize after the addition of normal plasma along with reduced FVIII levels. The treatment involves two aspects-eradication of antibodies and maintaining effective hemostasis during a bleeding episode. The protocols for eradication of antibodies include immunoadsorption, immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction (ITI). The treatment of acute bleeding episodes involves use of different bypassing agents like recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa, NovoSeven®) and activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC, (FEIBA®) in case of patients with high titer inhibitors or with antifibrinolytics,1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) or FVIII concentrates in low titer inhibitor patients. The anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, has shown very good results either singly or in combination with immunosuppressive regimens in patients who do not respond to standard immunosuppressors. The present review summarizes the diagnostic, aetiological, clinical and treatment aspects of AHA focusing

  16. Spinal Cord Hemangioblastoma : Diagnosis and Clinical Outcome after Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Na, Joon Ho; Kim, Hyeong Soo; Eoh, Whan; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jong Soo

    2007-01-01

    Objective Spinal cord hemangioblastoma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm with a benign nature and is associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease in 20-30% of patients. Total removal of these tumors without significant neurological deficit remains a great challenge. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of VHL mutation analysis and to evaluate surgical outcome of patients with spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Methods This study included nine patients treated for spinal cord hemangioblastomas at our institute between December 1994 and March 2006. There were four male and five female patients. Mean age was 37.8 years. The mean follow-up period was 22.4 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the complete neuraxis was done in all cases and VHL mutation analysis was performed in three cases for a definite diagnosis. Results Six patients had intramedullary tumor, and the remaining patients had intradural extramedullary lesions. Five patients were associated with VHL disease. The von Hippel-Lindau mutation analysis was done in three patients and two of them showed VHL gene abnormality. Tumors were located in the cervical cord in five cases and in the thoracic cord in four cases. All patients underwent surgical intervention, and total removal was achieved in six cases. All patients showed improvement or, at least, clinically stationary state. Surgical complications did not develop in any cases. Conclusion Spinal hemangioblastoma in this series has been safely and effectively removed via a posterior approach. Postoperatively, clinical outcome was excellent in the majority of cases. The VHL mutation analysis was useful in patients with family history and in those with multiple hemangioblastomas. PMID:19096585

  17. Methods for diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-10-01

    Altered concentrations of bile acid (BA) in the colon can cause diarrhea or constipation. More than 25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea or chronic diarrhea in Western countries have BA malabsorption (BAM). As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are needed to help direct the most effective course of treatment for the chronic bowel dysfunction. We review the methodologies, advantages, and disadvantages of tools that directly measure BAM: the (14)C-glycocholate breath and stool test, the (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test (SeHCAT), and measurements of 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. The (14)C-glycocholate test is laborious and no longer widely used. The (75)SeHCAT has been validated but is not available in the United States. Measurement of serum C4 is a simple and accurate method that can be used for most patients but requires further clinical validation. Assays to quantify fecal BA (total and individual levels) are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the United States; assessment of the therapeutic effects of a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data indicate the advantages to studying fecal excretion of individual BAs and their role in BAM; these could support the use of the fecal BA assay, compared with other tests. Measurement of fecal BA levels could become a routine addition to the measurement of fecal fat in patients with unexplained diarrhea. Availability ultimately determines whether the C4, SeHCAT, or fecal BA test is used; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients.

  18. Langerhans cells and melanocytes share similar morphologic features under in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy: a challenge for melanoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Pantea; Pulitzer, Melissa P.; Scope, Alon; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Halpern, Allan C.; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intraepidermal Langerhans cells (ILC) are difficult to differentiate from melanocytes under reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and their presence may simulate pagetoid spread of melanocytes on RCM images. Objective To correlate bright round and dendritic cells in a pagetoid pattern identified on RCM with findings of conventional histopathology and immunohistochemistry for lesions that were falsely diagnosed as melanoma by RCM. Methods This retrospective study included histopathologically proven nevi, imaged by RCM, which displayed bright cells in a pagetoid pattern (BCPP) under RCM, resulting in the incorrect RCM diagnosis of melanoma. Morphological comparisons were histopathologically proven melanomas displaying BCPP on RCM and biopsy-proven nevi without such cells on RCM. Results We identified 24 nevi that were falsely diagnosed as melanoma by RCM due to the presence of BCPP. These pagetoid cells on RCM corresponded on histopathology to ILC with a high density in 23 of the 24 nevi (95%) and to melanocytes in 7 of the 24 nevi (29%). Among 6 melanomas displaying BCPP on RCM, ILC with high density were observed histopathologically in 5 of the 6 cases (83%) and pagetoid melanocytes were seen in all 6 cases (100%). Limitations The results cannot be generalized to clinically banal-appearing nevi. Conclusions Although the finding of BCPP is a useful RCM feature for the diagnosis of melanoma it does not always imply the presence of pagetoid melanocytes but may at times, represent ILC. PMID:21798622

  19. Clinical Presentation, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ralf J.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune skin blistering disease. The pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies targeting type VII collagen (COL7) has been well-documented. Therefore, EBA is a prototypical autoimmune disease with a well-characterized pathogenic relevance of autoantibody binding to the target antigen. EBA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.2 new cases per million and per year. The current treatment of EBA relies on general immunosuppressive therapy, which does not lead to remission in all cases. Therefore, there is a high, so far unmet medical need for the development of novel therapeutic options. During the last 10 years, several novel in vitro and in vivo models of EBA have been established. These models demonstrated a critical role of the genetic background, T cells, and cytokines for mediating the loss of tolerance towards COL7. Neutrophils, complement activation, Fc gamma receptor engagement, cytokines, several molecules involved in cell signaling, release of reactive oxygen species, and matrix metalloproteinases are crucial for autoantibody-induced tissue injury in EBA. Based on this growing understanding of the diseases' pathogenesis, several potential novel therapeutic targets have emerged. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options for EBA are discussed in detail. PMID:23956869

  20. [Reestablishment of the clinical diagnosis in vascular acrosyndromes].

    PubMed

    Vayssairat, M; Baudot, N; Priollet, P

    1988-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is very frequent with a prevalence of 4% in a general population. Its evaluation has to be simple noninvasive and cheap. The only difficulty is to differentiate early primary RP from secondary RP that may evolve principally to a connective tissue disorder. Two questions have to be solved 1--Is it a primary or a secondary RP? 2--In case of secondary RP how to obtain a more precise diagnosis? Clinical examination alone is able to give a response for question 1 with 76% of reliability. Information has to be collected about sex, age at onset, occupation, uni or bilaterality of the disability, thumb involvement and drug consumption. Physician has to examine skin carefully, pulses, arterial bruits, heart, lungs, the time of return of color of digits after squeezing the blood out of the hand by clenching with and without compression of the radial and/or the cubital artery. Inquiries should be made about visceral involvement: oesophageal dysfunction, dyspnea, sicca syndrome, thyroiditis or polyneuritis that rule out a primary form of Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:3346618

  1. Clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf J

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune skin blistering disease. The pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies targeting type VII collagen (COL7) has been well-documented. Therefore, EBA is a prototypical autoimmune disease with a well-characterized pathogenic relevance of autoantibody binding to the target antigen. EBA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.2 new cases per million and per year. The current treatment of EBA relies on general immunosuppressive therapy, which does not lead to remission in all cases. Therefore, there is a high, so far unmet medical need for the development of novel therapeutic options. During the last 10 years, several novel in vitro and in vivo models of EBA have been established. These models demonstrated a critical role of the genetic background, T cells, and cytokines for mediating the loss of tolerance towards COL7. Neutrophils, complement activation, Fc gamma receptor engagement, cytokines, several molecules involved in cell signaling, release of reactive oxygen species, and matrix metalloproteinases are crucial for autoantibody-induced tissue injury in EBA. Based on this growing understanding of the diseases' pathogenesis, several potential novel therapeutic targets have emerged. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options for EBA are discussed in detail.

  2. Gummy smile: clinical parameters useful for diagnosis and therapeutical approach.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Annalisa; Streni, Oriana; Marci, Maria Chiara; Marzo, Giuseppe; Gatto, Roberto; Giannoni, Mario

    2004-01-01

    In the analysis of the characteristics of a pleasant smile, a gummy smile has negative components, which most affect the esthetics of non-verbal communication. For this purpose a proposed classification based upon etiopathogenetic criteria as useful indications for a therapeutical approach is given. The nature of a high smile line can be: dento-gingival, connected to an abnormal dental eruption, which is revealed by a short clinic crown; muscular, caused by an hyperactivity of the elevator muscle of the upper lip; dento-alveolar (skeletal), due to an excessive protuberance or vertical growth of the jawbone (maxillary); lastly, a mixed nature, in the presence of more than one of the above described factors The diagnosis of gummy smile must be precocious and based, with reference to specific parameters, upon a careful analysis of the etiopathogenetic factors and the degree of seriousness of the alteration. A correct treatment plan must contemplate the possibility of an orthognatodontic, orthopedic and/or surgical therapeutic resolution considering the seriousness and complexity of the gums exposures (high smile line) in connection with the age of the subject.

  3. Demographic and Clinical Features of Pediatric Uveitis at a Tertiary Referral Center in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mansour; Oustad, Marjan; Ashrafi, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical features and distribution of uveitis in the pediatric age group at a referral eye care center in Shiraz, South Iran. Materials and Methods: All new cases of uveitis in patients 18-year-old or younger referred from January 2007 to December 2013 were enrolled in this study. The patient underwent a complete history of systemic and ocular diseases, comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Patients were classified according to the International Uveitis Study Group definitions. The definitive diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations. Results: Seventy-seven eyes (54 patients) comprised the study sample. The mean age at the onset of uveitis was 12.5 years. The female-to-male ratio was 1.25. Anterior uveitis was the most frequent anatomical location (40.7%), followed by intermediate uveitis (33.3%), posterior uveitis (18.5%), and panuveitis (7.5%). Seventy-four percent of patients presented with chronic uveitis. Noninfectious uveitis (81.5%) was the most frequent etiology. Thirty-seven percent of patients had a specific diagnosis for uveitis, and 63% were classified as idiopathic cases. Toxocariasis was the most common infectious cause. Associated systemic diseases were present in 14.8% of patients. The most frequent systemic disease was juvenile idiopathic arthritis in 9.2% of patients. Complications occurred in 66 (85.5%) of affected eyes. The most common complications were posterior synechia (20.7%), cataract (18.8%), and cystoid macular edema (12.9%). Conclusions: Uveitis in the majority of children had an insidious onset and was chronic. Over half the patients had a specific diagnosis. Idiopathic cases were more common in the intermediate uveitis group. PMID:27555706

  4. Computer-aided diagnosis based on quantitative elastographic features with supersonic shear wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Zeng, Jie; Niu, Lili; Zeng, Qingjing; Wu, Tao; Wang, Congzhi; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-02-01

    Supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI) has recently been explored as a technique to evaluate tissue elasticity modulus and has become a valuable tool for tumor characterization. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that can acquire quantitative elastographic information from color SSI elastography images automatically and objectively for the purpose of classifying benign and malignant breast tumors. Conventional ultrasonography (US) and SSI elastography images of 125 breast tumors (81 benign, 44 malignant), in 93 consecutive patients (mean age: 40 y, age range: 16-75 y), were obtained. After reconstruction of tissue elasticity data and automatic segmentation of each breast tumor, 10 quantitative elastographic features of the tumor and peri-tumoral areas, respectively (elasticity modulus mean, maximum and standard deviation, hardness degree and elasticity ratio), were computed and evaluated. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for optimum classification via combination of these features. The B-mode Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used to compare gray-scale US and SSI elastography with respect to diagnostic performance. Histopathologic examination was used as the reference standard. Student's t-test, the Mann-Whitney U-test, the point biserial correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. As a result, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of benign/malignant classification were 95.2% (119/125), 90.9% (40/44), 97.5% (79/81), 95.2% (40/42) and 95.2% (79/83) for the CAD scheme, respectively, and 79.2% (99/125), 90.9% (40/44), 72.8% (59/81), 64.5% (40/62) and 93.7% (59/63) for BI-RADS assessment, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az value) for the proposed CAD system using the combination of elastographic features was

  5. Nodding syndrome in Ugandan children—clinical features, brain imaging and complications: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert Opika; Aanyu, Hellen T; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Piloya-Were, Theresa; Namusoke, Hanifa; Musoke, Sarah Bonita; Nalugya, Joyce; Bangirana, Paul; Mwaka, Amos Deogratius; White, Steven; Chong, Kling; Atai-Omoruto, Anne D; Mworozi, Edison; Nankunda, Jolly; Kiguli, Sarah; Aceng, Jane Ruth; Tumwine, James K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder of uncertain aetiology affecting children in Africa. There is no diagnostic test, and risk factors and symptoms that would allow early diagnosis are poorly documented. This study aimed to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging (MRI) features and complications of nodding syndrome in Ugandan children. Design Case series. Participants 22 children with nodding syndrome brought to Mulago National Referral Hospital for assessment. Outcome measures Clinical features, physical and functional disabilities, EEG and brain MRI findings and a staging system with a progressive development of symptoms and complications. Results The median age of symptom onset was 6 (range 4–10) years and median duration of symptoms was 8.5 (range 2–11) years. 16 of 22 families reported multiple affected children. Physical manifestations and complications included stunting, wasting, lip changes and gross physical deformities. The bone age was delayed by 2 (range 1–6) years. There was peripheral muscle wasting and progressive generalised wasting. Four children had nodding as the only seizure type; 18 in addition had myoclonic, absence and/or generalised tonic–clonic seizures developing 1–3 years after the onset of illness. Psychiatric manifestations included wandering, aggression, depression and disordered perception. Cognitive assessment in three children demonstrated profound impairment. The EEG was abnormal in all, suggesting symptomatic generalised epilepsy in the majority. There were different degrees of cortical and cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI, but no hippocampal changes. Five stages with worsening physical, EEG and brain imaging features were identified: a prodrome, the development of head nodding and cognitive decline, other seizure types, multiple complications and severe disability. Conclusions Nodding syndrome is a neurological disorder that may be characterised as probably

  6. Pediatric-onset Takayasu's arteritis: clinical features and short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Aggarwal, Amita; Lawrence, Able; Agarwal, Vikas; Misra, Ramnath

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this was to assess clinical features and outcome in pediatric-onset Takayasu's arteritis (TA). Retrospective data analysis of patients diagnosed with TA over last 13 years with onset before 18 years of age was done. Their presenting features, activity (by NIH criteria, ITAS2010, ITAS-A), disease extent (by DEI.Tak) and angiographic findings were retrieved from clinic files. Treatment received and follow-up data on disease activity and damage by TA damage score (TADS) were also analyzed. Wherever repeated angiography data were available, the same was analyzed. Values are expressed as median with interquartile range in brackets. There were 29 patients (19 females) with median age at diagnosis of 14 (13-16) years and delay to diagnosis of 1 (0.4-2) year. Common presenting symptoms were pulse loss (23/29) and hypertension (22/29). Patients had extensive disease at presentation with median DEI.Tak of 12 (9.5-15); 23/29 had elevated acute-phase reactants, and 28/29 were active at presentation [median ITAS2010 13 (8-15.5), ITAS-A 14 (10-17)]. Numano's type V was the commonest angiographic type (22/29). At a median follow-up of 2.4 (1.5-5.1) years, 2/20 were active whereas all had sustained damage despite a majority (17/20) being on immunosuppression. The median TADS was 8 (6.3-9.8) with pulse loss, claudication and hypertension being the commonest damage item. Two needed renal artery stenting to control hypertension. Angiographic assessment at least 2 years apart demonstrated disease progression in 5 of 6 patients despite immunosuppression. Significant damage accrued on follow-up despite immunosuppression and control of disease activity. Hypertension remains the major long-term morbidity. PMID:25903354

  7. Clinical features of patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms complicated by portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Matthew; Geyer, Holly; Mesa, Ruben; Atallah, Ehab; Callum, Jeannie; Bartoszko, Justyna; Yee, Karen; Maganti, Manjula; Wong, Florence; Gupta, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Backgroud Portal hypertension (PHTN) has been reported to afflict 7-18% of patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), with complications of variceal bleeding and ascites. The clinical features and outcomes of these patients are unclear. Patients and Methods In this multi-centre retrospective study, we evaluated the clinical features of 51 patients with MPNs complicated by PHTN. Results The diagnosis of underlying MPN was most frequently polycythemia vera (PV) (39%) and primary myelofibrosis (MF) (35%), followed by post-PV myelofibrosis (18%), essential thrombocythemia (ET) (4%) and post-ET myelofibrosis (4%). Frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation appears as expected in the underlying MPN. Thrombosis within the splanchnic circulation was prevalent in patients with polycythemia compared to other MPNs (76% vs. 26%, p=0.0007). Conclusions PV and MF patients have a higher incidence of PHTN in our population, with thrombosis contributing to PHTN development in PV patients. Patients with splanchnic circulation thrombosis are potential candidates for screening for portal hypertension. These data may be useful for developing screening strategies for early detection of PHTN in patients with MPN. PMID:25027569

  8. Three-dimensional shape construction of pulsatile tissue from ultrasonic movies for assistance of clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Hikari; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional shape of pulsatile tissue due to blood flow, which is one of key diagnostic features in ischemia, has been constructed from 2D ultrasonic movies for assisting clinical diagnosis. The 2D ultrasonic movies (640x480pixels/frame, 8bits/pixel, 33ms/frame) were taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus and an ultrasonic probe, while measuring the probe orientations with a compact tilt-sensor. The 2D images of pulsatile strength were obtained from each 2D ultrasonic movie by evaluating a heartbeat-frequency component calculated by Fourier transform of a series of pixel values sampled at each pixel. The 2D pulsatile images were projected into a 3D domain to obtain a 3D grid of pulsatile strength according to the probe orientations. The 3D shape of pulsatile tissue was constructed by determining the iso-surfaces of appropriate strength in the 3D grid. The shapes of pulsatile tissue examined in neonatal crania clearly represented the 3D structures of several arteries such as middle cerebral artery, which is useful for diagnosis of ischemic diseases. Since our technique is based on feature extraction in tissue dynamics, it is also useful for homogeneous tissue, for which conventional 3D ultrasonogram is unsuitable due to unclear tissue boundary.

  9. Light-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in clinical diagnosis of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Pavlova, E.; Kundurjiev, T.; Troyanova, P.; Genova, Ts.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated more than 500 clinical cases to receive the spectral properties of basal cell (136 patients) and squamous cell carcinoma (28), malignant melanoma (41) and different cutaneous dysplastic and benign cutaneous lesions. Excitation at 365, 385 and 405 nm using LEDs sources is applied to obtain autofluorescence spectra, and broad-band illumination in the region of 400-900 nm is used to detect diffuse reflectance spectra of all pathologies investigated. USB4000 microspectrometer (Ocean Optics Inc, USA) is applied as a detector and fiber-optic probe is used for delivery of the light. In the case of in vivo tumor measurements spectral shape and intensity changes are observed that are specific for a given type of lesion. Autofluorescence origins of the signals coming from skin tissues are mainly due to proteins, such as collagen, elastin, keratin, their cross-links, co-enzimes - NADH and flavins and endogenous porphyrins. Spectral features significant into diffuse spectroscopy diagnosis are related to the effects of re-absorption of hemoglobin and its forms, as well as melanin and its concentration in different pathologies. We developed significant database and revealed specific features for a large class of cutaneous neoplasia, using about 30 different spectral peculiarities to differentiate cutaneous tumors. Sensitivity and specificity obtained exceed 90%, which make optical biopsy very useful tool for clinical practice. These results are obtained in the frames of clinical investigations for development of significant "spectral features" database for the most common cutaneous malignant, dysplastic and benign lesions. In the forthcoming plans, our group tries to optimize the existing experimental system for optical biopsy of skin, and to introduce it and the diagnostic algorithms developed into clinical practice, based on the high diagnostic accuracy achieved.

  10. Clinical Features of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai; Liu, Shi-Meng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Liu, Ya-Ou; Li, Si-Zhao; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Hui-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) was long believed to be an aggressive form of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study aimed to describe the clinical features of patients with MS and NMOSD to assist in differential diagnoses in clinical practice. Methods: Data including the patients’ serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, image findings, and clinical information from 175 patients with MS or NMOSD at Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University from November 2012 to May 2014 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to detect the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) autoantibodies in CSF and serum. Cell-based assays were used to detect aquaporin-4-antibody (AQP4-Ab). The Chi-square test was used to compare the categorical variables. Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to analyze the continuous variables. Results: Totally 85 MS patients (49%) and 90 NMOSD patients (51%) were enrolled, including 124 (71%) women and 51 (29%) men. Fewer MS patients (6%) had autoimmune diseases compared to NMOSD (19%) (χ2 = 6.9, P < 0.01). Patients with NMOSD had higher Expanded Disability Status Scale scores (3.5 [3]) than MS group (2 [2]) (Z = −3.69, P < 0.01). The CSF levels of white cell count and protein in both two groups were slightly elevated than the normal range, without significant difference between each other. Positivity of serum AQP4-Ab in NMOSD patients was higher than that in MS patients (MS: 0, NMOSD: 67%; χ2 = 63.9, P < 0.01). Oligoclonal bands in CSF among NMOSD patients were remarkably lower than that among MS (MS: 59%, NMOSD: 20%; χ2 = 25.7, P < 0.01). No significant difference of MOG autoantibodies was found between the two groups. Conclusion: The different CSF features combined with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and serum characteristics between Chinese patients with MS and NMOSD could assist in the differential diagnosis. PMID:27569235

  11. Comparison between type-2 and type-1 myocardial infarction: clinical features, treatment strategies and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    López-Cuenca, Angel; Gómez-Molina, Miriam; Flores-Blanco, Pedro J; Sánchez-Martínez, Marianela; García-Narbon, Andrea; De Las Heras-Gómez, Ignacio; Sánchez-Galian, María J; Guerrero-Pérez, Esther; Valdés, Mariano; Manzano-Fernández, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the differences in incidence, clinical features, current treatment strategies and outcome in patients with type-2 vs. type-1 acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods We included 824 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of type-1 or type-2 AMI. During index hospitalization, clinical features and treatment strategies were collected in detail. At 1-year follow-up, mortality, stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction and major bleeding were recorded. Results Type-1 AMI was present in 707 (86%) of the cases while 117 (14%) were classified as type-2. Patients with type-2 AMI were more frequently female and had higher co-morbidities such as diabetes, previous non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, impaired renal function, anaemia, atrial fibrillation and malignancy. However, preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and normal coronary arteries were more frequently seen, an invasive treatment was less common, and anti-platelet medications, statins and beta-blockers were less prescribed in patients with type-2 AMI. At 1-year follow-up, type-2 AMI was associated with a higher crude mortality risk (HR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.14–2.68; P = 0.001), but this association did not remain significant after multivariable adjustment (P = 0.785). Furthermore, we did not find type-2 AMI to be associated with other clinical outcomes. Conclusions In this real-life population, compared with type-1, type-2 AMI were predominantly women and had more co-morbidities. Invasive treatment strategies and cardioprotective medications were less used in type-2, while the 1-year clinical outcomes were similar. PMID:26918008

  12. Pathogenesis, clinical features and pathology of chronic arsenicosis.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sujit Ranjan; Das, Nilay Kanti; Datta, Pijush Kanti

    2008-01-01

    Arsenicosis is a multisystem disorder, with virtually no system spared from its vicious claw; though its predominant manifestations are linked to cutaneous involvement. Cutaneous effects take the form of pigmentary changes, hyperkeratosis, and skin cancers (Bowen's disease, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell epithelioma). Peripheral vascular disease (blackfoot disease), hypertension, ischemic heart disease, noncirrhotic portal hypertension, hepatomegaly, peripheral neuropathy, respiratory and renal involvement, bad obstetrical outcome, hematological disturbances, and diabetes mellitus are among the other clinical features linked to arsenic toxicity. The effects are mediated principally by the trivalent form of arsenic (arsenite), which by its ability to bind with sulfhydryl groups present in various essential compounds leads to inactivation and derangement of body function. Though the toxicities are mostly linked to the trivalent state, arsenic is consumed mainly in its pentavalent form (arsenate), and reduction of arsenate to arsenite is mediated through glutathione. Body attempts to detoxify the agent via repeated oxidative methylation and reduction reaction, leading to the generation of methylated metabolites, which are excreted in the urine. Understandably the detoxification/bio-inactivation process is not a complete defense against the vicious metalloid, and it can cause chromosomal aberration, impairment of DNA repair process, alteration in the activity of tumor suppressor gene, etc., leading to genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Arsenic causes apoptosis via free radical generation, and the cutaneous toxicity is linked to its effect on various cytokines (e.g., IL-8, TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF), growth factors, and transcription factors. Increased expression of cytokeratins, keratin-16 (marker for hyperproliferation) and keratin-8 and -18 (marker for less differentiated epithelial cells), can be related to the histopathological findings of hyperkeratosis

  13. Bilateral Vitreous Hemorrhage in Children: Clinical Features and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sudhalkar, Aditya; Chhablani, Jay; Rani, Padmaja Kumari; Jalali, Subhadra; Balakrishnan, Divya; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the etiology, clinical features and outcomes of bilateral vitreous hemorrhage (VH) in children. Methods: This retrospective chart review was performed on patients with bilateral VH under the age of 18 at a tertiary eye care center in India. Data included demographics, details of history and ocular examination, reports of investigations, surgeries or other interventions performed, and final anatomical and visual outcomes. Patients were divided into two groups i.e., traumatic and non-traumatic (spontaneous). Results: The traumatic group was comprised of 37 patients including 27 male and 10 female subjects with mean age of 13.47 ± 5.31 years, the most common complaint was decreased vision (96.45%) and the most prevalent etiology was firecracker injury in 16 (43.2%) patients. Mean baseline visual acuity (VA) was 2.34 ± 1.31 logMAR which was significantly improved to 1.08 ± 0.23 logMAR (P = 0.042). The mean number of surgeries was 2.72 ± 1.43 in the traumatic VH and mean follow up period was 23.14 ± 6.54 months. The spontaneous group included 48 subjects comprised of 27 male and 21 female cases with mean age of 14.48 ± 2.03 years. The most common cause was vasculitis in 21 (43.75%) subjects including four patients with tuberculosis. Mean baseline VA was 1.97 ± 1.13 logMAR which showed a significant improvement to 0.82 ± 0.24 logMAR (P = 0.012) after mean follow up of 34.2 ± 11.2 months. Eleven patients required at least one major surgery. Conclusion: Vasculitis was the most common cause of spontaneous bilateral VH; traumatic VH most prevalently occurred due to firecracker injury. Final VA was better in the spontaneous group. PMID:26425315

  14. Graft rejection in pediatric penetrating keratoplasty: Clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kusumesh, Rakhi; Vanathi, Murugesan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Early presentation of rejection facilitates early initiation of treatment which can favor a reversible rejection and better outcome. We analyzed the incidence, clinical features including rejection-treatment period and outcomes following graft rejection in our series of pediatric corneal graft. Materials and Methods: Case records of pediatric penetrating keratoplasty (PK) were reviewed retrospectively, and parameters noted demographic profile, indication of surgery, surgery-rejection period, rejection-treatment interval, graft outcome, and complications. Results: PK was performed in 66 eyes of 66 children <12 years, with an average follow-up of 21.12 ± 11.36 months (range 4-48 month). The median age at the time of surgery was 4.0 years (range 2 months to 12 years). Most of the children belonged to rural background. Scarring after keratitis (22, 33.4%) was the most common indication. Graft rejection occurred in eight eyes (12.12%) (acquired nontraumatic - 3, congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy [CHED] - 2, nonCHED - 1, congenital glaucoma - 1, regraft - 1). The mean surgery-rejection period was 10.5 ± 7.3 months and mean rejection-treatment interval was 10.9 ± 7.02 days. Conclusion: This study showed irreversible graft rejection was the leading cause of graft failure of pediatric PK. Though, the incidence (12.1%) of graft rejection in current study was not high, but the percentage of reversal (25%) was one of the lowest in literature because of delayed presentation and longer interval between corneal graft rejection and treatment. In addition, categorization of the type of graft rejection was very difficult and cumbersome in pediatric patients. PMID:25709272

  15. Fecal incontinence in men: Causes and clinical and manometric features

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Yagüe, Teresa; Solís-Muñoz, Pablo; Ciriza de los Ríos, Constanza; Muñoz-Garrido, Francisco; Vara, Jesús; Solís-Herruzo, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the causes and characteristics of fecal incontinence in men and to compare these features with those presented by a group of women with the same problem. METHODS: We analyzed the medical history, clinical and manometric data from 119 men with fecal incontinence studied in our unit and compared these data with those obtained from 645 women studied for the same problem. Response to treatment was evaluated after 6 mo of follow-up. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of patients studied in our unit for fecal incontinence were male. Men took longer than women before asking for medical help. Ano-rectal surgery was the most common risk factor for men related to fecal incontinence. Chronic diarrhea was present in more than 40% of patients in both groups. Decreased resting and external anal sphincter pressures were more frequent in women. No significant differences existed between the sexes regarding rectal sensitivity and recto-anal inhibitory reflex. In 17.8% of men, all presenting soiling, manometric findings did not justify fecal incontinence. Response to treatment was good in both groups, as 80.4% of patients improved and fecal incontinence disappeared in 13.2% of them. CONCLUSION: In our series, it was common that men waited longer in seeking medical help for fecal incontinence. Ano-rectal surgery was the major cause of this problem. Chronic diarrhea was a predisposing factor in both sexes. Manometric differences between groups were limited to an increased frequency of hypotony of the external anal sphincter in women. Fecal incontinence was controllable in most patients. PMID:24976729

  16. Oral Lichen Planus: An Update on Etiology, Pathogenesis, Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The mouth is a mirror of health or disease, a sentinel or early warning system. The oral cavity might well be thought as a window to the body because oral manifestations accompany many systemic diseases. In many instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disorder of stratified squamous epithelium of uncertain etiology that affects oral and genital mucous membranes, skin, nails, and scalp. LP is estimated to affect 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. This disease has most often been reported in middle-aged patients with 30-60 years of age and is more common in females than in males. The disease seems to be mediated by an antigen-specific mechanism, activating cytotoxic T cells, and non-specific mechanisms like mast cell degranulation and matrix metalloproteinase activation. A proper understanding of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis of the disease becomes important for providing the right treatment. This article discusses the prevalence, etiology, clinical features, oral manifestations, diagnosis, complications and treatment of oral LP. PMID:26120146

  17. The use of laboratory biomarkers for surveillance, diagnosis and prediction of clinical outcomes in neonatal sepsis and necrotising enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pak Cheung; Ma, Terence Ping Yuen; Lam, Hugh Simon

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers have been used to differentiate systemic neonatal infection and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) from other non-infective neonatal conditions that share similar clinical features. With increasing understanding in biochemical characteristics of different categories of biomarkers, a specific mediator or a panel of mediators have been used in different aspects of clinical management in neonatal sepsis/NEC. This review focuses on how these biomarkers can be used in real-life clinical settings for daily surveillance, bedside point-of-care testing, early diagnosis and predicting the severity and prognosis of neonatal sepsis/NEC. In addition, with recent development of 'multi-omic' approaches and rapid advancement in knowledge of bioinformatics, more novel biomarkers and unique signatures of mediators would be discovered for diagnosis of specific diseases and organ injuries.

  18. Influenza diagnosis and treatment: a view from clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, D M

    2001-01-01

    Influenza is a descriptive term for respiratory epidemic disease presenting with cough and fever. Influenza viruses are probably the most important of the pathogens that cause this condition. Clinical influenza occurs almost every winter in England and Wales and the outbreaks last 8-10 weeks. In recent years, influenza B virus outbreaks have occurred in January and February, whereas influenza H3N2 virus outbreaks have generally started long before Christmas. Influenza H3N2 virus outbreaks pressurize health service resources in winter more than influenza B viruses, that do not have the same impact in elderly people. Infections with influenza H1N1 viruses are also usually less severe in their impact than those with influenza H3N2 viruses, but, unlike influenza B viruses, influenza H1N1 viruses have a pandemic potential along with influenza H3N2 viruses. A diagnosis of respiratory infection in primary care is based on the presenting symptoms set within the context of the current pattern of consultations of patients with similar illness. Measurement of temperature, inspection of the throat and examination of the chest or ears add a little to the diagnostic process, but in general these procedures do not help in identifying the organism. However, if it is known that influenza viruses are circulating in the community, the probability of influenza as the cause is greatly increased, as was shown in clinical trials of neuraminidase antivirals. Maximum confusion occurs when respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza cocirculate. Although RSV infection can occur throughout the winter in young children, it assumes more of an epidemic character just before Christmas in children and possibly in adults just after. During seven of the last 20 winters, influenza has been prevalent around Christmas/New Year. In routine virological surveillance of influenza-like illness in the community during the winters of 1997, 1998 and 1999, ca. 30% of swab specimens yielded influenza

  19. Influenza diagnosis and treatment: a view from clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fleming, D M

    2001-12-29

    Influenza is a descriptive term for respiratory epidemic disease presenting with cough and fever. Influenza viruses are probably the most important of the pathogens that cause this condition. Clinical influenza occurs almost every winter in England and Wales and the outbreaks last 8-10 weeks. In recent years, influenza B virus outbreaks have occurred in January and February, whereas influenza H3N2 virus outbreaks have generally started long before Christmas. Influenza H3N2 virus outbreaks pressurize health service resources in winter more than influenza B viruses, that do not have the same impact in elderly people. Infections with influenza H1N1 viruses are also usually less severe in their impact than those with influenza H3N2 viruses, but, unlike influenza B viruses, influenza H1N1 viruses have a pandemic potential along with influenza H3N2 viruses. A diagnosis of respiratory infection in primary care is based on the presenting symptoms set within the context of the current pattern of consultations of patients with similar illness. Measurement of temperature, inspection of the throat and examination of the chest or ears add a little to the diagnostic process, but in general these procedures do not help in identifying the organism. However, if it is known that influenza viruses are circulating in the community, the probability of influenza as the cause is greatly increased, as was shown in clinical trials of neuraminidase antivirals. Maximum confusion occurs when respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza cocirculate. Although RSV infection can occur throughout the winter in young children, it assumes more of an epidemic character just before Christmas in children and possibly in adults just after. During seven of the last 20 winters, influenza has been prevalent around Christmas/New Year. In routine virological surveillance of influenza-like illness in the community during the winters of 1997, 1998 and 1999, ca. 30% of swab specimens yielded influenza

  20. Coccidioidomycosis and tuberculosis coinfection at a tuberculosis hospital: clinical features and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Jose; Hartzler, Anthony; Hsue, Gunther; Longfield, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and coccidioidomycosis can have similar clinical and radiologic presentations but require different treatments. Coinfection with TB and Coccidioides immitis is uncommonly reported and may be underdiagnosed in endemic areas.We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of all patients admitted to a TB referral hospital between 1995 and 2007, and selected all cases of TB and coccidioidomycosis coinfection in patients aged 18 years or older. All admitted patients had a diagnosis of TB and had sputum cultures for both pathogens. We reviewed clinical, laboratory, and radiologic features of the cases, and noted antimicrobial treatments received and outcomes.We identified 9 patients, of whom 7 (78%) were Hispanic. Most patients were male (8/9, 89%), and all were diagnosed with coccidioidomycosis after TB. Three (33%) patients had drug-resistant TB. Six patients had culture-positive TB at the time of the double diagnosis, and 2 patients developed active coccidioidomycosis during their hospital stay. Only 1 had human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV-AIDS) (CD4 count, 20 cells/mm). All but 2 patients were treated with antifungal agents. Two patients died, 1 of whom had AIDS. Radiologic studies were unable to distinguish between TB and coccidioidomycosis, except for a patient who developed a new air-fluid level in a previously stable cavity.TB and coccidioidomycosis coinfection should be suspected in coccidioidomycosis-endemic regions among patients with TB who fail to improve clinically or radiologically despite adequate, culture-directed therapy. PMID:19352301

  1. Clinical Significance of Auditory Target P300 Subcomponents in Psychosis: Differential Diagnosis, Symptom Profiles, and Course

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Greg; Foti, Dan; Jackson, Felicia; Kotov, Roman; Constantino, Eduardo; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced auditory target P300 amplitude is a leading biomarker for psychotic disorders, although its relevance for differential diagnosis and link to specific clinical features (symptom profiles, functional impairment, and course) is unclear. This study aims to clarify the clinical significance of auditory target P300 using concurrent and retrospective clinical data from a longitudinal cohort with psychosis. Methods 92 cases from an epidemiological study of first-admission psychosis were assessed using an auditory oddball paradigm at 15-year follow-up along with 44 never-psychotic adults. Subcomponents of auditory target P300 amplitude (i.e., a central positive P3a, a parietal positive P3b, and a frontal negative slow wave) were isolated using temporal-spatial principal components analysis. Results P3a amplitude was blunted across psychotic disorders relative to non-psychotic adults. P3b amplitude was reduced in schizophrenia specifically, including cases initially misclassified at baseline. The frontal negative slow wave did not distinguish among groups. P3b amplitude reduction was associated with several clinical features at the concurrent assessment, as well as previous time points, including recovery from psychosis even 5 years earlier and functioning even 15 years earlier. Conclusions Auditory target P300 amplitude yields both a schizophrenia-specific component (i.e., P3b) and a transdiagnostic psychosis component (i.e., P3a). The P3b component may also shed light on prognosis, real-world functioning, and course, as well as help to reduce misdiagnosis of psychotic disorders. Prospective studies are needed to test whether P3b tracks or predicts clinical status. PMID:25934167

  2. The clinical characteristics of Werner syndrome: molecular and biochemical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Oshima, Junko; von Kobbe, Cayetano; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Leistritz, Dru F.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an adult onset segmental progeroid syndrome caused by mutations in the WRN gene. The WRN gene encodes a 180 kDa nuclear protein that possesses helicase and exonuclease activities. The absence of WRN protein leads to abnormalities in various DNA metabolic pathways such as DNA repair, replication and telomere maintenance. Individuals with WS generally develop normally until the third decade of life, when premature aging phenotypes and a series of age-related disorders begin to manifest. In Japan, where a founder effect has been described, the frequency of Werner heterozygotes appears to be as high as 1/180 in the general population. Due to the relatively non-specific nature of the symptoms and the lack of awareness of the condition, this disease may be under-diagnosed in other parts of the world. Genetic counseling of WS patients follows the path of other autosomal recessive disorders, with special attention needed for cancer surveillance in relatives. Molecular diagnosis of WS is made by nucleotide sequencing and, in some cases, protein analysis. It is also of potential interest to measure WRN activities in WS patients. More than 50 different disease-causing mutations in the WRN gene have been identified in WS patients from all over the world. All but one of these cases has mutations that result in the premature termination of the protein. Here we describe the clinical, molecular and biochemical characteristics of WS for use by medical professionals in a health care setting. Additional information is available through the International Registry of WS (http://www.wernersyndrome.org). PMID:18810497

  3. Clinical Features and Drug-Resistance Profile of Urinary Tuberculosis in South-Western China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yuanxin; Hu, Xuejiao; Shi, Yunying; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Yi; Song, Xingbo; Xie, Yi; Lu, Xiaojun; Wang, Lanlan; Ying, Binwu; Chen, Xuerong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the epidemiology, clinical features, and drug-resistance profile of urinary tuberculosis (UTB) in south-western China to improve UTB diagnostics. After the screening of 1036 cases of suspected UTB, 193 patients with UTB were enrolled during 2009 to 2014. Urine samples were collected for routine urinalysis, smear, tuberculosis DNA (TB-DNA) detection, and drug-resistant analysis, whereas blood samples were collected for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and renal function evaluation. Clinical features (such as symptoms and outcome) and imageology results (such as B ultrasonic, computerized tomography, intravenous pyelography, and renography) were also collected and analyzed to investigate the epidemiology, clinical features, and drug-resistance profile. The most common presenting symptoms were urinary irritation (61.1%) and lumbago (49.2%). High proportions of microscopic hematuria (63.2%) and microscopic proteinuria (45.6%) were also observed. The positive rate for TB-DNA was 66.3%. The positive rate for culture was 13.1% and for smear it was 9.8%. The abnormal outcome rates of the computerized tomography, ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography, and the nephrogram were 76.9%, 70.1%, 29.8%, and 37.0%, respectively. The total rate of drug-resistant TB (resistant to at least 1 drug) was 39.7%, of which 20.7% was multidrug-resistance TB. The most prevalent mutation sites were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, and gyrA D94G. We observed a serious epidemic of drug-resistant UTB and a substantial number of new UTB cases with multidrug resistance TB. Molecular diagnostics is crucial in the definite diagnosis of UTB, and our finding is a supplement and further confirmation of polymerase chain reaction usage for TB diagnosis. We recommend real-time polymerase chain reaction for TB-DNA identification instead of culture, and GenoType tests (MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl assay) for drug resistance as routine assays for patients with

  4. Clinical features of patients with dystrophinopathy sharing the 45-55 exon deletion of DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Taglia, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; D'Ambrosio, Paola; Picillo, Esther; Torella, Annalaura; Orsini, Chiara; Ergoli, Manuela; Scutifero, Marianna; Passamano, Luigia; Palladino, Alberto; Nigro, Gerardo; Politano, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1953 by Emile Becker as a benign variant of Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Compared with DMD, BMD is clinically more heterogeneous, with initial presentation in the teenage years and loss of ambulation beyond the age of 16 and a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from only myalgias and muscle cramps to exercise intolerance and myoglobinuria, asymptomatic elevation of serum creatin-kinase, or mild limb-girdle weakness and quadriceps myopathy. About 50% of patients become symptomatic by the age of 10 and the most part by the age of 20 years. However few patients can be free of symptoms till their fifties and cases of late-onset Becker Muscular Dystrophy have also been described. In this report we describe the clinical features of patients with dystrophinopathy sharing a deletion of exons 45-55, occasionally or retrospectively diagnosed. These data are important for both the prognostic aspects of children presenting this dystrophin gene mutation, and for the genetic counseling in these families (reassuring them on the benign course of the disease), and last but not least to keep in mind a diagnosis of BMD in asymptomatic adults with mild hyperckemia. PMID:26155064

  5. Inflammatory myopathy: diagnosis and clinical course, specific clinical scenarios and new complementary tools.

    PubMed

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Martínez, Maria Angeles; Labrador-Horrillo, Moises; Pinal-Fernández, Iago; Grau-Junyent, Josep Maria; Juárez, Candido

    2015-06-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of rare autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetric proximal muscle weakness and inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy. A meticulously collected combination of clinical, serological, and pathological data is essential to correctly diagnose and classify myositis patients, often a considerable challenge for clinicians. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the most useful tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with myositis. Capillaroscopy, serological biomarkers (particularly the autoantibody profile) and imaging techniques, such as muscle magnetic resonance and chest ultrasound, are of great aid in diagnosing, classifying and managing these patients. Relevant clinical scenarios, such as interstitial lung disease, associated cancer and pregnancy are also addressed in this review. Myositis registries, identification of new autoantibodies, and genetic studies will enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of these conditions and help to define new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  6. Clinical features of hypoadrenocorticism in soft-coated wheaten terrier dogs: 82 cases (1979–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Haviland, Rebecca L.; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel L.; Reeves, Matthew P.; Littman, Meryl P.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective case series, which included 82 client-owned soft-coated wheaten terriers, was to characterize clinical features of hypoadrenocorticism in this breed. Median age at diagnosis was 3.5 years. There was no gender predilection. Clinicopathologic findings included sodium/potassium ratio < 27 (85%), hyperkalemia (76%), hyponatremia (63%), elevated blood urea nitrogen (83%) or creatinine (71%), and hypercalcemia (36%). Nine dogs with normal sodium and potassium (11%) were older and less often azotemic, hyperphosphatemic, or hypercalcemic. Twenty-one dogs (26%) developed protein-losing nephropathy (n = 18) and/or end-stage renal disease (n = 3). Overall median survival time was 5.4 years, but was shorter in dogs with normal sodium and potassium at diagnosis (4.2 years), or those with subsequent protein-losing nephropathy (4.2 years). This population showed no gender predilection, unlike that reported in the general canine population with hypoadrenocorticism, and more comorbid protein-losing nephropathy than in the general soft-coated wheaten terrier population. PMID:27041756

  7. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  8. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-09-18

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%.

  9. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada, Mariela; Sánchez, René Vinicio; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  10. Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Stability and Change in Clinical Diagnosis and Symptom Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Whitney; Swineford, Lauren B.; Nottke, Charly; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appears to be stable in children as young as age three, few studies have explored stability of a diagnosis in younger children. Predictive value of diagnostic tools for toddlers and patterns of symptom change are important considerations for clinicians making early diagnoses. Most…

  11. Analysis of the histologic features in the differential diagnosis of intrahepatic neonatal cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo-Brandao, Maria Angela; Escanhoela, Cecilia AF; Meirelles, Luciana R; Porta, Gilda; Hessel, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To compare the histologic features of the liver in intrahepatic neonatal cholestasis (IHNC) with infectious, genetic-endocrine-metabolic, and idiopathic etiologies. METHODS: Liver biopsies from 86 infants with IHNC were evaluated. The inclusion criteria consisted of jaundice beginning at 3 mo of age and a hepatic biopsy during the 1st year of life. The following histologic features were evaluated: cholestasis, eosinophilia, giant cells, erythropoiesis, siderosis, portal fibrosis, and the presence of a septum. RESULTS: Based on the diagnosis, patients were classified into three groups: group 1 (infectious; n = 18), group 2 (genetic-endocrine-metabolic; n = 18), and group 3 (idiopathic; n = 50). There were no significant differences with respect to the following variables: cholestasis, eosinophilia, giant cells, siderosis, portal fibrosis, and presence of a septum. A significant difference was observed with respect to erythropoiesis, which was more severe in group 1 (Fisher’s exact test, P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: A significant difference was observed in IHNC of infectious etiology, in which erythropoiesis was more severe than that in genetic-endocrine-metabolic and idiopathic etiologies, whereas there were no significant differences among cholestasis, eosinophilia, giant cells, siderosis, portal fibrosis, and the presence of a septum. PMID:19152454

  12. Clinical cancer diagnosis using optical fiber-delivered coherent anti-stokes ramon scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    This thesis describes the development of a combined label-free imaging and analytical strategy for intraoperative characterization of cancer lesions using the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging (CARS) technique. A cell morphology-based analytical platform is developed to characterize CARS images and, hence, provide diagnostic information using disease-related pathology features. This strategy is validated for three different applications, including margin detection for radical prostatectomy, differential diagnosis of lung cancer, as well as detection and differentiation of breast cancer subtypes for in situ analysis of margin status during lumpectomy. As the major contribution of this thesis, the developed analytical strategy shows high accuracy and specificity for all three diseases and thus has introduced the CARS imaging technique into the field of human cancer diagnosis, which holds substantial potential for clinical translations. In addition, I have contributed a project aimed at miniaturizing the CARS imaging device into a microendoscope setup through a fiber-delivery strategy. A four-wave-mixing (FWM) background signal, which is caused by simultaneous delivery of the two CARS-generating excitation laser beams, is initially identified. A polarization-based strategy is then introduced and tested for suppression of this FWM noise. The approach shows effective suppression of the FWM signal, both on microscopic and prototype endoscopic setups, indicating the potential of developing a novel microendoscope with a compatible size for clinical use. These positive results show promise for the development of an all-fiber-based, label-free imaging and analytical platform for minimally invasive detection and diagnosis of cancers during surgery or surgical-biopsy, thus improving surgical outcomes and reducing patients' suffering.

  13. Pathogenesis, clinical features and management of recurrent corneal erosions.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthi, S; Rahman, M Q; Dutton, G N; Ramaesh, K

    2006-06-01

    now a well-established treatment modality for RCE and is being used both safely and effectively. Partial ablation of Bowman's layer with PTK gives a smooth surface for the newly generating epithelium to migrate and form adhesion complexes. The pathogenesis, clinical features, and management options of this common disorder are discussed in this review article.

  14. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case–control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0–252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years

  15. A case with oto-spondylo-mega-epiphyseal-dysplasia (OSMED): the clinical recognition and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Karaer, Kadri; Rosti, Rasim Ozgür; Torun, Deniz; Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bahçe, Muhterem; Güran, Sefik

    2011-01-01

    The oto-spondylo-mega-epiphyseal-dysplasia (OSMED) phenotype is an autosomal recessive trait that is a skeletal dysplasia with the hallmark findings of limb shortening, multiple skeletal and radiological abnormalities, mid-face hypoplasia with a flat nasal bridge, small upturned nasal tip, and sensorineural hearing loss. A 3.5-year-old girl born to consanguineous Turkish parents had characteristic facial features at birth: mid-face hypoplasia, mild hypertelorism, upslanting palpebral fissures, prominent supraorbital ridges, depressed nasal bridge, small upturned nasal tip, long philtrum, and micrognathia. Radiological examination at three years of age revealed large flaring metaphyses and wide flat epiphyses. The humerus and femur showed the characteristic dumbbell shape. She had bilateral hearing loss with no ophthalmologic findings. There is continuing debate over the clinical overlap and differential diagnosis of OSMED syndrome. The patient was examined considering Weissenbacher-Zweymuller, Stickler type 3, Marshall syndrome, and Kniest dysplasia as possible differential diagnoses. We believe that the presented patient clinically manifested features of OSMED syndrome. We would like to point out that the management of OSMED calls for a coordinated multidisciplinary approach. PMID:21980822

  16. Machine-learning-based diagnosis of schizophrenia using combined sensor-level and source-level EEG features.

    PubMed

    Shim, Miseon; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Kim, Do-Won; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Recently, an increasing number of researchers have endeavored to develop practical tools for diagnosing patients with schizophrenia using machine learning techniques applied to EEG biomarkers. Although a number of studies showed that source-level EEG features can potentially be applied to the differential diagnosis of schizophrenia, most studies have used only sensor-level EEG features such as ERP peak amplitude and power spectrum for machine learning-based diagnosis of schizophrenia. In this study, we used both sensor-level and source-level features extracted from EEG signals recorded during an auditory oddball task for the classification of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. EEG signals were recorded from 34 patients with schizophrenia and 34 healthy controls while each subject was asked to attend to oddball tones. Our results demonstrated higher classification accuracy when source-level features were used together with sensor-level features, compared to when only sensor-level features were used. In addition, the selected sensor-level features were mostly found in the frontal area, and the selected source-level features were mostly extracted from the temporal area, which coincide well with the well-known pathological region of cognitive processing in patients with schizophrenia. Our results suggest that our approach would be a promising tool for the computer-aided diagnosis of schizophrenia.

  17. Machine-learning-based diagnosis of schizophrenia using combined sensor-level and source-level EEG features.

    PubMed

    Shim, Miseon; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Kim, Do-Won; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Recently, an increasing number of researchers have endeavored to develop practical tools for diagnosing patients with schizophrenia using machine learning techniques applied to EEG biomarkers. Although a number of studies showed that source-level EEG features can potentially be applied to the differential diagnosis of schizophrenia, most studies have used only sensor-level EEG features such as ERP peak amplitude and power spectrum for machine learning-based diagnosis of schizophrenia. In this study, we used both sensor-level and source-level features extracted from EEG signals recorded during an auditory oddball task for the classification of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. EEG signals were recorded from 34 patients with schizophrenia and 34 healthy controls while each subject was asked to attend to oddball tones. Our results demonstrated higher classification accuracy when source-level features were used together with sensor-level features, compared to when only sensor-level features were used. In addition, the selected sensor-level features were mostly found in the frontal area, and the selected source-level features were mostly extracted from the temporal area, which coincide well with the well-known pathological region of cognitive processing in patients with schizophrenia. Our results suggest that our approach would be a promising tool for the computer-aided diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:27427557

  18. [Achondrogenesis. Ultrasonic diagnosis and clinical and anatomopathologic comparison].

    PubMed

    Mandjee, D; Clément, F; Belin, M; Harter, S; Clamaran, E

    1991-05-01

    The authors report two cases of achondrogenesis, the first of which was diagnosed in utero. Ultrasonographic abnormalities suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed radiographically. The diagnosis of achondrogenesis in utero made it possible to avoid a Cesarian. It is always difficult to extract the malformed fetus. The histopathology findings make it possible to codify this rare type of congenital and lethal chondrodysplasia. Achondrogenesis is probably inherited in a recessive and autosomic fashion. PMID:1871502

  19. Clinical features associated with medically unexplained stroke-like symptoms presenting to an acute stroke unit.

    PubMed

    Nazir, F S; Lees, K R; Bone, I

    2005-02-01

    In many areas of secondary care, symptoms unexplained by disease account for around one-third of all patients seen. We sought to investigate patients presenting with medically unexplained stroke-like symptoms to identify distinguishing features which may help to identify a non-organic aetiology. Patients given a discharge diagnosis of medically unexplained stroke-like symptoms over the preceding 11 years were identified retrospectively from a prospectively completed stroke unit database. Age- and sex-matched controls with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke or transient ischaemic attack were also identified. Clinical features on presentation, ischaemic risk factors, alcohol history, marital status and history of depression or anxiety were examined. Previous or subsequent admissions with medically unexplained syndromes were also examined via record linkage with hospital discharge records. A medically unexplained syndrome was assumed to be present if an International Classification of Diseases 9 discharge code for one or more of the thirteen conditions forming recognized functional syndromes was given. Logistic regression was applied to determine predictors of non-organicity. One hundred and five patients and controls, 1.6% of all stroke unit admissions were identified, 62% (65 patients) were females. Mean age was 50.3 +/- 14.9. Compared with age- and sex-matched controls patients with medically unexplained stroke-like symptoms were significantly more probable to have a headache at presentation (47% vs. 26%, P = 0.0004), have a diagnosis of one or more additional medically unexplained syndromes (24% vs. 11%, P = 0.007) but significantly less probable to present with symptoms of vertebrobasilar dysfunction (32% vs. 61%, P < 0.0001). A history of anxiety or depression, as recorded in the notes, was not found to be associated with a medically unexplained presentation. Medically unexplained stroke-like presentations are common (1.6% of all stroke presentations), they are

  20. Immune thrombocytopenia in adults: a prospective cohort study of clinical features and predictors of outcome

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Nordon, Clémentine; Michel, Marc; Viallard, Jean-François; Adoue, Daniel; Magy-Bertrand, Nadine; Durand, Jean-Marc; Quittet, Philippe; Fain, Olivier; Bonnotte, Bernard; Morin, Anne-Sophie; Morel, Nathalie; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Khellaf, Mehdi; Perlat, Antoinette; Sacre, Karim; Lefrere, François; Abenhaim, Lucien; Godeau, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This prospective observational cohort study aimed to explore the clinical features of incident immune thrombocytopenia in adults and predictors of outcome, while determining if a family history of autoimmune disorder is a risk factor for immune thrombocytopenia. All adults, 18 years of age or older, recently diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia were consecutively recruited across 21 hospital centers in France. Data were collected at diagnosis and after 12 months. Predictors of chronicity at 12 months were explored using logistic regression models. The association between family history of autoimmune disorder and the risk of developing immune thrombocytopenia was explored using a conditional logistic regression model after matching each case to 10 controls. One hundred and forty-three patients were included: 63% female, mean age 48 years old (Standard Deviation=19), and 84% presented with bleeding symptoms. Median platelet count was 10×109/L. Initial treatment was required in 82% of patients. After 12 months, only 37% of patients not subject to disease-modifying interventions achieved cure. The sole possible predictor of chronicity at 12 months was a higher platelet count at baseline [Odds Ratio 1.03; 95%CI: 1.00, 1.06]. No association was found between outcome and any of the following features: age, sex, presence of either bleeding symptoms or antinuclear antibodies at diagnosis. Likewise, family history of autoimmune disorder was not associated with incident immune thrombocytopenia. Immune thrombocytopenia in adults has been shown to progress to a chronic form in the majority of patients. A lower platelet count could be indicative of a more favorable outcome. PMID:27229715

  1. A gearbox fault diagnosis scheme based on near-field acoustic holography and spatial distribution features of sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbo; Jiang, Weikang; Yuan, Guoqing; Yan, Li

    2013-05-01

    Vibration signal analysis is the main technique in machine condition monitoring or fault diagnosis, whereas in some cases vibration-based diagnosis is restrained because of its contact measurement. Acoustic-based diagnosis (ABD) with non-contact measurement has received little attention, although sound field may contain abundant information related to fault pattern. A new scheme of ABD for gearbox based on near-field acoustic holography (NAH) and spatial distribution features of sound field is presented in this paper. It focuses on applying distribution information of sound field to gearbox fault diagnosis. A two-stage industrial helical gearbox is experimentally studied in a semi-anechoic chamber and a lab workshop, respectively. Firstly, multi-class faults (mild pitting, moderate pitting, severe pitting and tooth breakage) are simulated, respectively. Secondly, sound fields and corresponding acoustic images in different gearbox running conditions are obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT) based NAH. Thirdly, by introducing texture analysis to fault diagnosis, spatial distribution features are extracted from acoustic images for capturing fault patterns underlying the sound field. Finally, the features are fed into multi-class support vector machine for fault pattern identification. The feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed scheme is demonstrated on the good experimental results and the comparison with traditional ABD method. Even with strong noise interference, spatial distribution features of sound field can reliably reveal the fault patterns of gearbox, and thus the satisfactory accuracy can be obtained. The combination of histogram features and gray level gradient co-occurrence matrix features is suggested for good diagnosis accuracy and low time cost.

  2. An exploration of the communication patterns and language used between clinical geneticists and parents of children with dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Steel, Emma J; Hodgson, Jan; Stirling, Lesley; White, Susan M

    2014-11-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the interactions between clinical geneticists and parents of children with dysmorphic features during syndrome assessment. Seven families attending a dysmorphology clinic for syndrome assessment consented to have their consultation recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content and discourse analyses were used to study the language and communication patterns of problematic and challenging sections of the consultations, primarily sections concerning the child's appearance and diagnosis which were marked by dysfluency and hesitation, indicators of problematic communication. Findings revealed that the clinical geneticists used a range of communicative strategies when discussing a child's appearance, such as comparing the child's features with those of parents or other individuals and minimizing differences. In doing so they displayed an orientation to the "face-threatening" nature of this communicative task. While geneticists discussed the child's appearance in an extremely sensitive manner, parents tended to describe their child's appearance using direct and objective language. These findings provide novel insight into the complexity of syndrome assessment consultations in a dysmorphology clinic. We suggest that parents may be seeking a more open discussion of their child's appearance, and clinician engagement with this may prove a more effective communication strategy than those currently employed, while remaining sensitive to parents' responses to such a discussion. At the start of the consultation it is important to give parents the opportunity to voice their concerns and expectations, and to explain to parents that a diagnosis may not be reached. PMID:25250868

  3. Clinical features and surgical outcomes following closed reduction of arytenoid dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Park, Ki Nam; Welham, Nathan V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Arytenoid dislocation is a rare condition characterized by vocal fold immobility and is easily mistaken as recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objective To describe presenting features, multimodal diagnostic evaluation, and surgical outcomes following closed reduction (CR) of arytenoid dislocation. Design, Setting and Participants Prospective case series at a single academic medical center. Evaluation and treatment data were obtained from 22 consecutive patients with arytenoid dislocation over a 7-year period. Interventions Patients underwent direct laryngoscopy and CR of the dislocated arytenoid, with adjunct injection laryngoplasty or botulinum toxin administration in select cases. Main outcomes and measures Initial diagnosis was confirmed using flexible laryngeal endoscopy with stroboscopy, computed tomography, electromyography, and interoperative palpation. Arytenoid motion (primary outcome measure) and vocal function data (secondary outcome measures) were collected before treatment and up to 6 months after treatment. Results Key history features included emergent intubation, elective intubation and external laryngeal trauma. Sixteen patients (73%) had anterior and 6 patients (27%) had posterior dislocation. One patient experienced spontaneous recovery. Following CR, with or without adjunct therapy, 18 of the remaining patients (86%) exhibited arytenoid motion recovery with concomitant voice improvement. Recovery was sustained at 6 months after CR. Closed Reduction performed within 21 days of the presumed dislocation event was associated with a superior arytenoid motion recovery rate. Conclusions and Relevance These data represent the largest clinical series on arytenoid dislocation with complete vocal function data and follow-up at 6 months after CR. These findings also corroborate existing evidence for early surgical intervention. PMID:25257336

  4. Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech: Clinical Features and Acoustic and Neurologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Edythe A.; Clark, Heather; Machulda, Mary; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes. Method Two individuals with primary progressive AOS underwent speech-language and neurologic evaluations on 2 occasions, ranging from 2.0 to 7.5 years postonset. Performance on several tests, tasks, and rating scales, as well as several acoustic measures, were compared over time within and between cases. Acoustic measures were compared with performance of control speakers. Results Both patients initially presented with AOS as the only or predominant sign of disease and without aphasia or dysarthria. The presenting features and temporal progression were captured in an AOS Rating Scale, an Articulation Error Score, and temporal acoustic measures of utterance duration, syllable rates per second, rates of speechlike alternating motion and sequential motion, and a pairwise variability index measure. Conclusions AOS can be the predominant manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. Clinical ratings of its attributes and acoustic measures of some of its temporal characteristics can support its diagnosis and help quantify its salient characteristics and progression over time. PMID:25654422

  5. Infantile hepatic hemangiomas. Clinical features, radiologic investigations, and treatment of 20 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, P.; Geer, G.D.; Miller, J.H.; Gilsanz, V.; Landing, B.H.; Boechat, I.M. )

    1989-08-15

    The clinical features, radiologic investigation, and treatment of 20 infants with hepatic hemangiomas are presented. Palpable abdominal mass (n = 18) and cardiac failure (n = 11) were the common presenting features. Nine patients had hyperconsumptive coagulopathy. Seven patients had other hemangiomas. Ultrasound (n = 15) showed the number and distribution of the hemangiomas within the liver. Hypoechoic and hyperechoic elements were present in addition to prominent vascular channels and diminished caliber of the distal aorta. Radionuclide sulfur colloid (n = 12) and labeled red blood cell (n = 7) studies showed the distribution and vascularity of the hemangiomas. Computed tomography (n = 8) revealed central hypointensity with marked peripheral enhancement after contrast. Arteriography now performed only as a prelude to therapeutic embolization demonstrated hypervascularity in each patient, contrast pooling in six and early draining veins in five. Magnetic resonance scanning (n = 3) showed decreased signal intensity on T1 images and high intensity signal on T2. In two patients, there was resolution or improvement of the hemangiomas without therapy. Four patients had surgery (lobectomy (2), trisegmentectomy (1), and surgical evacuation of a central hematoma (1)). Steroids and radiation were given to seven patients, and one patient also required therapeutic embolization. Steroids were the initial therapy in five patients, one of whom later required therapeutic embolization and another cyclophosphamide. Two patients were treated initially with radiation therapy, one of whom also needed emergency hepatic artery ligation. Seventeen of the 20 patients are alive and well from 6 months to 14 years after diagnosis.

  6. Women with TSC: Relationship between Clinical, Lung Function and Radiological Features in a Genotyped Population Investigated for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Imeri, Gianluca; Palumbo, Giuseppina; La Briola, Francesca; Tresoldi, Silvia; Volpi, Angela; Gualandri, Lorenzo; Ghelma, Filippo; Alfano, Rosa Maria; Montanari, Emanuele; Gorio, Alfredo; Lesma, Elena; Peron, Angela; Canevini, Maria Paola; Centanni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The advent of pharmacological therapies for lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has made early diagnosis important in women with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), although the lifelong cumulative radiation exposure caused by chest computer tomography (CT) should not be underestimated. We retrospectively investigated, in a cohort of TSC outpatients of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) 1) the role of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for LAM diagnosis, 2) the association between LAM and other features of TSC (e.g. demography, extrapulmonary manifestations, genetic mutations, etc.), and 3) the characteristics of patients with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH). Eighty-six women underwent chest CT scan; pulmonary involvement was found in 66 patients (77%; 49% LAM with or without MMPH, and 28% MMPH alone). LAM patients were older, with a higher rate of pneumothorax, presented more frequently with renal and hepatic angiomyolipomas, and tended to have a TSC2 mutation profile. PFTs, assessed in 64% of women unaffected by cognitive impairments, revealed a lower lung diffusion capacity in LAM patients. In multivariate analysis, age, but not PFTs, resulted independently associated with LAM diagnosis. Patients with MMPH alone did not show specific clinical, functional or genetic features. A mild respiratory impairment was most common in LAM-TSC patients: In conclusions, PFTs, even if indicated to assess impairment in lung function, are feasible in a limited number of patients, and are not significantly useful for LAM diagnosis in women with TSC. PMID:27171001

  7. [Monoclonal gammopathies of indetermined significance: diagnosis and clinical follow-up guidelines].

    PubMed

    Parreira, Joana; Lúcio, Paulo; João, Cristina; Macedo, Ana; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Geraldes, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cristina; Esteves, Graça

    2014-01-01

    The Portuguese group of multiple myeloma of the Portuguese Society of Hematology proposes a national protocol for diagnosis and clinical follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. The proposed protocol aims to standardize clinical management of monoclonal gammopathies. Furthermore, it would also define the major risk factors for progression to Multiple Myeloma that require a precocious close articulation between general practitioners and a Hematology Clinic.

  8. The Role of Biomedical Knowledge in Diagnosis of Difficult Clinical Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Nicole N.; Brooks, Lee R.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Although biomedical knowledge is believed to be of little value in diagnosis of routine clinical cases, studies of clinical reasoning have found that physicians revert to use of basic biomedical knowledge when faced with challenging clinical problems. The current paper presents two experiments that empirically examine the role of biomedical…

  9. [Neuromuscular dynamic scapular winging: Clinical, electromyographic and magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christelle; Guérini, Henri; Roren, Alexandra; Zauderer, Jennifer; Vuillemin, Valérie; Seror, Paul; Ouaknine, Michaël; Palazzo, Clémence; Bourdet, Christopher; Pluot, Étienne; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine

    2015-12-01

    Dyskinesia of the scapula is a clinical diagnosis and includes all disorders affecting scapula positioning and movement whatever its etiology. Scapular winging is a subtype of scapular dyskinesia due to a dynamic prominence of the medial border of the scapula (DSW) secondary to neuromuscular imbalance in the scapulothoracic stabilizer muscles. The two most common causes of DSW are microtraumatic or idiopathic lesions of the long thoracic nerve (that innerves the serratus anterior) or the accessory nerve (that innerves the trapezius). Diagnosis of DSW is clinical and electromyographic. Use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be of interest to distinguish lesion secondary to a long thoracic nerve from accessory nerve and to rule out scapular dyskinesia related to other shoulder disorders. Causal neuromuscular lesion diagnosis in DSW is challenging. Clinical examinations, combined with scapular MRI, could help to their specific diagnosis, determining their stage, ruling out differential diagnosis and thus give raise to more targeted treatment. PMID:26433832

  10. [Neuromuscular dynamic scapular winging: Clinical, electromyographic and magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christelle; Guérini, Henri; Roren, Alexandra; Zauderer, Jennifer; Vuillemin, Valérie; Seror, Paul; Ouaknine, Michaël; Palazzo, Clémence; Bourdet, Christopher; Pluot, Étienne; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine

    2015-12-01

    Dyskinesia of the scapula is a clinical diagnosis and includes all disorders affecting scapula positioning and movement whatever its etiology. Scapular winging is a subtype of scapular dyskinesia due to a dynamic prominence of the medial border of the scapula (DSW) secondary to neuromuscular imbalance in the scapulothoracic stabilizer muscles. The two most common causes of DSW are microtraumatic or idiopathic lesions of the long thoracic nerve (that innerves the serratus anterior) or the accessory nerve (that innerves the trapezius). Diagnosis of DSW is clinical and electromyographic. Use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be of interest to distinguish lesion secondary to a long thoracic nerve from accessory nerve and to rule out scapular dyskinesia related to other shoulder disorders. Causal neuromuscular lesion diagnosis in DSW is challenging. Clinical examinations, combined with scapular MRI, could help to their specific diagnosis, determining their stage, ruling out differential diagnosis and thus give raise to more targeted treatment.

  11. Clinical and pathological features of common gill diseases of cultured salmonids in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Speare, David J.; Ferguson, Hugh W.

    1989-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentations and histopathology of 118 diagnostic submissions of trout with infectious gill diseases from commercial trout farms within Ontario. Bacterial gill disease (BGD) (56%) and nodular gill disease (NGD) (26.2%) together accounted for 82.2% of these submissions. Submissions of fish with BGD occurred in every month of the year, but were proportionally more frequent in late winter and spring than in late summer and fall. Chemotherapy of groups of fish with gill diseases was common prior to submission, but the success rate of such treatment was low (29% for BGD; 21% for NGD). Specific therapeutic protocols implemented following etiological diagnosis of BGD were successful in 80% of the previously unresponsive cases and in 88.8% of previously untreated cases. The gills of trout collected within 48-96 h of treatment and apparent clinical recovery lacked bacteria and necrotic epithelial cells, but features such as lamellar fusion and epithelial hyperplasia were similar between recovered and affected fish. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:17423456

  12. Metabolic disorders with clinical and radiologic features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Michael H.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Forner, Sven A.; Wong, Katherine K.; Kuo, Amy; Johnson, David Y.; Colacurcio, Valerie; Andrews, Bret D.; Miller, Bruce L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two patients with metabolic disorders presented with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Case 1 was a 50-year-old man with rapid decline in cognitive, behavioral, and motor function following new-onset seizures. MRI was read as consistent with CJD, and he was referred for a treatment trial, but it was determined that he recently experienced rapid correction of hyponatremia resulting in extrapontine myelinolysis. Case 2 was a 66-year-old woman with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus who was found unconscious after a suspected insulin overdose. Examination showed altered mental status and neuroimaging was remarkable for cortical/striatal hyperintensities suggestive of sCJD. On autopsy, she had hypoglycemic/hypoxic nerve cell loss. Although characteristic MRI findings have high sensitivity and specificity for sCJD, potentially reversible metabolic disorders sometimes present rapidly and can resemble sCJD both clinically and radiologically. These cases highlight the importance of establishing a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with suspected sCJD. PMID:26137419

  13. Strongyloidiasis: prevalence, risk factors, clinical and laboratory features among diarrhea patients in Ibadan Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Dada-Adegbola, H O; Oluwatoba, O A; Bakare, R A

    2010-12-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infection caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. The infection is usually mild or asymptomatic in normal immunocompetent individuals, but could be very severe or even fatal due to hyper infection in individuals who are immunosuppressed. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors and features of strongyloidiasis among diarrhea patients in Ibadan. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of diarrhea patients from a teaching hospital, three major government hospitals and one mission hospital in Ibadan. Self administered questionnaire, clinical assessment and laboratory investigations were used to confirm health status and presence of S. stercoralis. Diagnosis was made by microscopic examination of stool in saline preparation and formol-ether concentration. One thousand and ninety patients, (562 (51.6%) males and 528 (48.4%) females) consisting 380 (34.9%) children and 710 (65.1%) adults who had diarrhea were studied. The prevalence rate for the parasite among diarrhea patients was 3.0%. While the risk factor for infection remains contact with contaminated soil, malnutrition, steroid therapy, HIV/AIDS, lymphomas, tuberculosis, and chronic renal failure. Others are maleness, institutionalism and alcoholism. Predominant clinical presentations are abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, and bloating and weight loss, Strongyloides stercoralis should be considered in diarrhea patients who are either malnourished or immunosuppressed.

  14. Clinical features of the stomatognathic involvement in fibromyalgia syndrome: a comparison with temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Daniele; Bazzichi, Laura; Bosco, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Several studies have reported an involvement of the stomatognathic system in the course of fibromyalgia (FM) similar to that which characterizes temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical features of stomatognathic dysfunction in patients with FM and TMD. Ninety-three FM patients underwent an assessment according to the RDC/TMD guidelines. Prevalence of the different RDC/TMD diagnoses and some clinical parameters of FM patients were compared with those of 181 patients affected by TMD. Seventy-four (79.6%) FM patients presented at least one RDC/TMD diagnosis and showed lower mean maximum voluntary and passive mouth opening values than TMD patients. Moreover, 34 FM patients presented with trigger and/or tender points. Results of the present study confirm the high rate of involvement of the stomatognathic system in the course of FM and support the need for a careful multidisciplinary approach to patients with TMD, including the rheumatologist.

  15. [Paraffinomas: history, clinical features and treatment. A case report].

    PubMed

    Mounios-Perchenet, A S; Le Fourn, B; Hepner-Lavergne, D; Pannier, M

    1997-02-01

    One case of paraffinoma is reported on a 60 years old man following injections of paraffin fourty years ago. The authors recalled with this observation history of paraffin, clinical aspect and surgical treatment of the paraffinoma.

  16. APOE4 carriers and non-carriers with the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s dementia and minimal amyloid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Monsell, Sarah E.; Kukull, Walter A.; Roher, Alex E.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G.; Caselli, Richard J.; Montine, Thomas J.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques are a cardinal neuropathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet over a third of apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4) non-carriers with the clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia may not meet positron emission tomography (PET) criteria for significant cerebral amyloidosis. Objective This study sought to clarify the percentage of APOE4 carriers and non-carriers with the primary clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia near the end of life and minimal Aβ plaques at autopsy—and the extent to which these cases are associated with appreciable neurofibrillary degeneration or a primary neuropathologic diagnosis other than AD. Design Participants in this study were obtained from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set (UDS). Setting The UDS comprises longitudinal clinical assessments performed at the Alzheimer's Disease Centers funded by the National Institute on Aging. Neuropathology data is available for the subset of expired participants. Participants Exactly 100 APOE4 non-carriers and 100 carriers had the primary clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia at their last visit, known APOE4 genotype, died within the ensuing 24 months, and underwent neuropathologic evaluation. Main Outcomes and Measures Standardized histopathologic assessments of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathologic changes were the primary measures of interest in this study, specifically CERAD neuritic plaque density score, diffuse plaque density score, and Braak stage for neurofibrillary degeneration. Results 37% of APOE4 non-carriers and 13% of carriers with the primary clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia had nonexistent or sparse neuritic plaques. 44% of the carriers and non-carriers with minimal neuritic plaques had Braak stage III–VI ratings and 38% met neuropathological criteria for other dementia-related diseases. Conclusions and relevance

  17. Clinical, Laboratory and Radiographic Features of Patients with Pneumonia and Parapneumonic Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Petrusevska-Marinkovic, Sanja; Kondova-Topuzovska, Irena; Milenkovic, Zvonko; Kondov, Goran; Anastasovska, Ankica

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parapneumonic effusions complicating pneumonia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. AIM: To determine the role of the clinical, laboratory and radiographic features to the differential diagnosis of patients with community- acquired pneumonia (CAP) without effusion, uncomplicated parapneumonic effusion (UCPPE) and complicated parapneumonic effusion (CPPE). MATERIAL AND METHODS: We analysed 148 patients with CAP without effusion, 50 with UCPPE and 44 with CPPE. In three groups of patients, the majority was male patients (58.11%, 58%, 61.36%) consequently. RESULTS: The chronic heart failure was the most common comorbidity in a group with CAP (28; 18.92%) and UCPPE (7; 14%), alcoholism (12;12.77%) in a group with CPPE. Patients with CPPE had significantly longer fever compared to patients with CAP without effusion (p = 0.003). Pleuritic chest pain (86.36%) and dyspnea (88.64%) were the most common symptoms in CPPE, then to group with UCPPE (60%; 52%), and in CAP without effusion (25.68%; 47,97%). Diffuse pulmonary changes were detected more frequently in the group with CAP without effusion compared with the group with CPPE (64.86 % vs. 27.27 %), while the segment lung changes were more common in patients with CPPE (50% vs. 20.27%). Patients with CPPE were significant with higher erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cells (WBC) and serum C- reactive protein (CRP) than it the other two groups (p = 0.00090, p = 0.01, p= 0.000065). CONCLUSION: Proper analysis of clinical, laboratory and radiographic features of patients with CAP and parapneumonic effusion can prevent mismanagement in these patients and will reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27703568

  18. Etiological, clinical, and radiological features of longitudinally extensive myelopathy in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihe; Jiao, Yujuan; Cui, Lei; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Linwei; Jiao, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Longitudinally extensive myelopathy (LEM) is a rare spinal syndrome, and was mostly assessed in western populations. In order to investigate the etiological, clinical, and radiological features of LEM in Chinese patients, we retrospectively analyzed eighty-nine (40 men and 49 women, median age 45.9±15.7years) patients with LEM hospitalized in China-Japan Friendship Hospital. LEM comprised autoimmune inflammatory myelitis (n=53), metabolic and compressive disorders (n=13), vascular diseases (n=10), neoplastic diseases (n=7), infectious diseases (n=4), and syringomyelia (n=2). Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) was the most common cause of transverse myelopathy identified in LEM (38/89 [42.7%]) characterized by intractable vomiting and hiccups and painful tonic spasms. Subacute combined degeneration and anterior spinal artery syndrome accounted for the largest non-transverse LEM, which selectively affected the spinal dorsal and/or lateral columns and the spinal anterior region, respectively. Radicular pain was common in anterior spinal artery syndrome. Postrema (n=15, 39.5%) and cervical (n=31, 81.6%) lesions were significantly increased in NMOSD versus non-NMOSD (n=7, 13.7% and n=34, 66.7%, respectively, p<0.05]. Axial T2-weighted MRI indicated that 46 (51.7%) patients exhibited complete lesions; 43 (48.3%) patients exhibited non-transverse lesions, mainly unilateral or symmetrical tract lesions. Twenty-four (51.1%) LEM patients exhibited distinct gadolinium contrast enhancement. In this Chinese cohort, LEM was primarily attributed to NMOSD. While the etiological distribution in the non-NMOSD group was different from western populations, clinical and imaging features may facilitate a differential diagnosis. PMID:27526974

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (P<0.200), a logistic multiple regression model was derived for identifying a MLM rotator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  20. Vascular malformations and hemangiolymphangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract: morphological features and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Montgomery, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to describe the morphological features of gastrointestinal vascular malformations (VM) and of hemangiolymphangiomas (HLA) and to establish correlations with clinical characteristics. Significant findings: Fifteen VMs and 12 HLAs that were encountered over a period of 22 years, were retrospectively analyzed. The VMs often involved the colon, small intestine, but also the stomach, whereas none of the HLAs arose in the stomach. VMs were more frequently associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcer and were larger than HLAs (p<0.01 for all comparisons). Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis were associated with VM (p=0.02 and p=0.05). Surgical resection was performed for 1 HLA and 14 VMs. Vessel abnormalities such as shunt vessels, wall tufts (excrescences) and arterialized veins were more frequent in VMs (p=0.01, p=0.04 and <0.01, respectively) whereas aneurysm-like cavities were observed in both lesion types. Mucosal abnormal vessels were observed only in VMs, whereas HLAs were associated with mucosal lymphatic clusters (p<0.01). Most HLAs contained a D2-40 hetero-geneously positive lymphatic component, were Glut-1 negative and CD31 reactive. There was no statistical difference in occurrence of associated autoimmune, tumoral and cardiovascular conditions between the two patient groups. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that morphological features such as increased size, ulcer, thrombosis, hemorrhage and presence of aberrant mucosal vessels favor the diagnosis of VM. Co-existence of other clinical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, encountered in association with both lesion types, might exacerbate a tendency towards hemorrhage. PMID:21738815

  1. Cushing's syndrome: from physiological principles to diagnosis and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Carroll, Ty

    2015-01-01

    The physiological control of cortisol synthesis in the adrenal cortex involves stimulation of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) by hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and then stimulation of the adrenal by ACTH. The control loop of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is closed by negative feedback of cortisol on the hypothalamus and pituitary. Understanding this system is required to master the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of endogenous hypercortisolism – Cushing's syndrome. Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is caused either by excess ACTH secretion or by autonomous cortisol release from the adrenal cortex. Diagnosis of cortisol excess exploits three physiological principles: failure to achieve the normal nadir in the cortisol diurnal rhythm, loss of sensitivity of ACTH-secreting tumours to cortisol negative feedback, and increased excretion of free cortisol in the urine. Differentiating a pituitary source of excess ACTH (Cushing's disease) from an ectopic source is accomplished by imaging the pituitary and sampling for ACTH in the venous drainage of the pituitary. With surgical removal of ACTH or cortisol-secreting tumours, secondary adrenal insufficiency ensues because of the prior suppression of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid negative feedback. Medical therapy is targeted to the anatomical location of the dysregulated component of the HPA axis. Future research will focus on new diagnostics and treatments of Cushing's syndrome. These are elegant examples of translational research: understanding basic physiology informs the development of new approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Appreciating pathophysiology generates new areas for inquiry of basic physiological and biochemical mechanisms. PMID:25480800

  2. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed. PMID:27067212

  3. Cushing's syndrome: from physiological principles to diagnosis and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Raff, Hershel; Carroll, Ty

    2015-02-01

    The physiological control of cortisol synthesis in the adrenal cortex involves stimulation of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) by hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and then stimulation of the adrenal by ACTH. The control loop of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is closed by negative feedback of cortisol on the hypothalamus and pituitary. Understanding this system is required to master the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of endogenous hypercortisolism--Cushing's syndrome. Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is caused either by excess ACTH secretion or by autonomous cortisol release from the adrenal cortex. Diagnosis of cortisol excess exploits three physiological principles: failure to achieve the normal nadir in the cortisol diurnal rhythm, loss of sensitivity of ACTH-secreting tumours to cortisol negative feedback, and increased excretion of free cortisol in the urine. Differentiating a pituitary source of excess ACTH (Cushing's disease) from an ectopic source is accomplished by imaging the pituitary and sampling for ACTH in the venous drainage of the pituitary. With surgical removal of ACTH or cortisol-secreting tumours, secondary adrenal insufficiency ensues because of the prior suppression of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid negative feedback. Medical therapy is targeted to the anatomical location of the dysregulated component of the HPA axis. Future research will focus on new diagnostics and treatments of Cushing's syndrome. These are elegant examples of translational research: understanding basic physiology informs the development of new approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Appreciating pathophysiology generates new areas for inquiry of basic physiological and biochemical mechanisms.

  4. Early-Onset Psychoses: Comparison of Clinical Features and Adult Outcome in 3 Diagnostic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledda, Maria Giuseppina; Fratta, Anna Lisa; Pintor, Manuela; Zuddas, Alessandro; Cianchetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of clinical features and adult outcome in adolescents with three types of psychotic disorders: schizophrenic (SPh), schizoaffective (SA) and bipolar with psychotic features (BPP). Subjects (n = 41) were finally diagnosed (DSM-IV criteria) with SPh (n = 17), SA (n = 11) or BPP (n = 13). Clinical evaluation took place at onset and at a…

  5. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the United Arab Emirates: Clinical Features and Factors Related to Insulin-Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Maddaloni, Ernesto; Lessan, Nader; Al Tikriti, Alia; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Pozzilli, Paolo; Barakat, Maha T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To describe and to characterize clinical features of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the UAE. Methods In this cross-sectional study a dataset including 18,101 subjects with adult-onset (>30 years) diabetes was accessed. 17,072 subjects fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data about anthropometrics, demographics, autoantibodies to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GADA) and to Islet Antigen 2 (anti-IA2), HbA1c, cholesterol and blood pressure were extracted. LADA was diagnosed according to GADA and/or anti-IA2 positivity and time to insulin therapy. Results 437 (2.6%) patients were identified as LADA and 34 (0.2%) as classical type 1 diabetes in adults. Mean age at diagnosis, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and HbA1c significantly differed between, LADA, type 2 and type 1 diabetes, LADA showing halfway features between type 2 and type 1 diabetes. A decreasing trend for age at diagnosis and waist circumference was found among LADA subjects when subdivided by positivity for anti-IA2, GADA or for both antibodies (p=0.013 and p=0.011 for trend, respectively). There was a gradual downward trend in autoantibody titre in LADA subjects requiring insulin within the first year from diagnosis to subjects not requiring insulin after 10 years of follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions This is the first study describing the clinical features of LADA in the UAE, which appear to be different from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we showed that the clinical phenotype of LADA is dependent on different patterns of antibody positivity, influencing the time to insulin requirement. PMID:26252955

  6. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    PubMed

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP level<10 mg/L. To determine if diagnosis of septic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRP<10 mg/L (K. kingae, n=5/63 ; S. aureus, n=4/26). Initial temperature and fibrinogen were significantly lower in the CRP<10 mg/L group than in the other (37.3°C vs. 37.9°C, P=0.039 and 4.19 vs. 5.72 g/L, P=0.003, respectively). Age, symptom duration before diagnosis, as well as leukocyte and platelet counts were similar in both groups. Two children (2/89=2.2%) with S. aureus septic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRP<10 mg/L needed a second surgical drainage because of relapse of arthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP<10 mg/L experienced complications, while six of those with initial CRP≥10 mg/L needed a second surgical act

  7. A Comparison Between Clinical Diagnosis of Death and Autopsy Diagnosis. A Retrospective Study of 131 Newborns, Stillborns and Aborted Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    COSTACHE, Mariana; CIRSTOIU, Monica; CONTOLENCO, Andreea; LAZAROIU, Anca Mihaela; GEORGE, Simion; SAJIN, Maria; PATRASCU, Oana Maria

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the autopsy was considered necessary only in medico-legal cases, or when the clinician requires it to better understand the pathology and cause of death (with the deceased family's consent). Although it has been shown in numerous studies that the autopsy and the postmortem histopathological examination are the only ones that can diagnose correctly and completely, the autopsy rate is declining. The primary motive of the family in consenting to a perinatal necropsy, may be to determine the cause of death of their child and to be aware of possible complications of their future pregnancy. This study shows the rate of concordance between clinical diagnosis and autopsy diagnosis, and the rate of concordance between macroscopic diagnosis and microscopic findings, pointing out once again the importance and the utility of the autopsy in medical practice. PMID:25705276

  8. Multiple myeloma: clinical features and indications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma-cell proliferative disease with an expected 15,270 new cases and 11,070 deaths in the USA in 2004 alone. This accounts for 1% of all malignancies and slightly more than 10% of all hematologic malignancies in Caucasians and 20% in African Americans. The diagnosis is based on the presence of bone pain, anemia, and plasma-cell infiltrate in the bone marrow or within bone lesions. It is essential that the spectrum of plasma-cell proliferative disorders be recognized: monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM), and active (symptomatic) MM. These distinctions affect important management decisions. Other related disorders include primary systemic amyloidosis, POEMS syndrome, and acquired Fanconi syndrome. PMID:16026737

  9. Incidence, clinical features and para-clinical findings of achalasia in Algeria: Experience of 25 years

    PubMed Central

    Tebaibia, Amar; Boudjella, Mohammed Amine; Boutarene, Djamel; Benmediouni, Farouk; Brahimi, Hakim; Oumnia, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence of achalasia in Algeria and to determine its clinical and para-clinical profile. To evaluate the impact of continuing medical education (CME) on the incidence of this disease. METHODS From 1990 to 2014, 1256 patients with achalasia were enrolled in this prospective study. A campaign of CME on diagnosis involving different regions of the country was conducted between 1999 and 2003. Annual incidence and prevalence were calculated by relating the number of diagnosed cases to 105 inhabitants. Each patient completed a standardized questionnaire, and underwent upper endoscopy, barium swallow and esophageal manometry. We systematically looked for Allgrove syndrome and familial achalasia. RESULTS The mean annual incidence raised from 0.04 (95%CI: 0.028-0.052) during the 1990s to 0.27/105 inhabitants/year (95%CI: 0.215-0.321) during the 2000s. The incidence of the disease was two and half times higher in the north and the center compared to the south of the country. One-hundred-and-twenty-nine (10%) were children and 97 (7.7%) had Allgrove syndrome. Familial achalasia was noted in 18 different families. Patients had dysphagia (99%), regurgitation (83%), chest pain (51%), heartburn 24.5% and weight loss (70%). The lower esophageal sphincter was hypertensive in 53% and hypotensive in 0.6%. CONCLUSION The mean incidence of achalasia in Algeria is at least 0.27/105 inhabitants. A good impact on the incidence of CME was noted. A gradient of incidence between different regions of the country was found. This variability is probably related to genetic and environmental factors. The discovery of an infantile achalasia must lead to looking for Allgrove syndrome and similar cases in the family. PMID:27784974

  10. Pine nut allergy: clinical features and major allergens characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pine nuts, the seeds of pine trees, are widely used for human consumption in Europe, America, and Asia. The aims of this study were to evaluate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to pine nut in a large number of patients with details of clinical reactions, and to characterize major pine nut allergens. Th...

  11. The ritual abuse of children: clinical features and diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Nurcombe, B; Unützer, J

    1991-03-01

    A case of alleged ritual sexual abuse is presented. Clinical recognition and diagnostic reasoning are discussed. After a brief account of modern satanism, it is concluded that, although the evidence for the occurrence of ritual abuse is sketchy, a high index of suspicion is appropriate.

  12. Meibomian gland dysfunction: a clinical scheme for description, diagnosis, classification, and grading.

    PubMed

    Foulks, Gary N; Bron, Anthony J

    2003-07-01

    Although meibomian gland disease (MGD) is one of the most common disorders encountered in ophthalmic practice, there has been no descriptive system consistently accepted to clinically characterize the anatomical and correlative biochemical alterations that occur in this condition. The purpose of this review is to synthesize a clinical description of meibomian gland disease and to provide a scheme for diagnosis, classification, and quantification that will be of value in the clinical setting and in the conduct of clinical trials.

  13. BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia: a new entity? Analysis of clinical and molecular features.

    PubMed

    Neuendorff, Nina Rosa; Burmeister, Thomas; Dörken, Bernd; Westermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare subtype of AML that is now included as a provisional entity in the 2016 revised WHO classification of myeloid malignancies. Since a clear distinction between de novo BCR-ABL+ AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) blast crisis is challenging in many cases, the existence of de novo BCR-ABL+ AML has been a matter of debate for a long time. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that BCR-ABL+ AML is in fact a distinct subgroup of AML. In this study, we analyzed all published cases since 1975 as well as cases from our institution in order to present common clinical and molecular features of this rare disease. Our analysis shows that BCR-ABL predominantly occurs in AML-NOS, CBF leukemia, and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. The most common BCR-ABL transcripts (p190 and p210) are nearly equally distributed. Based on the analysis of published data, we provide a clinical algorithm for the initial differential diagnosis of BCR-ABL+ AML. The prognosis of BCR-ABL+ AML seems to depend on the cytogenetic and/or molecular background rather than on BCR-ABL itself. A therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib is reasonable, but-due to a lack of systematic clinical data-their use cannot be routinely recommended in first-line therapy. Beyond first-line treatment of AML, the use of TKI remains an individual decision, both in combination with intensive chemotherapy and/or as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each single case, potential benefits have to be weighed against potential risks. PMID:27297971

  14. Acute pancreatitis: etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Mitchell S

    2008-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common disease that affects about 300,000 patients per annum in America with a mortality of about 7%. About 75% of pancreatitis is caused by gallstones or alcohol. Other important causes include hypertriglyceridemia, medication toxicity, trauma from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, hypercalcemia, abdominal trauma, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown after thorough investigation. This article discusses the causes, diagnosis, imaging findings, therapy, and complications of acute pancreatitis.

  15. Clinical features and in vivo confocal microscopy assessment in 12 patients with ocular cicatricial pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qin; Zuo, Ya-Gang; Yang, Xue; Gao, Ting-Ting; Liu, Jie; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the clinical features and microstructural characteristics assessed by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) in patients with ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP). METHODS A descriptive, uncontrolled case series study. Patients diagnosed with OCP were examined by clinical history, slit-lamp biomicroscopy features and IVCM images. The results of direct immunofluorescence (DIF) biopsies and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) were also recorded. Local and systemic immunosuppressive therapy were administered and adjusted according to response. RESULTS A total of 12 consecutive OCP patients (7 male, 5 female; mean age 60.42±10.39y) were recruited. All patients exhibited bilateral progressive conjunctival scarring and recurrent chronic conjunctivitis was the most frequent clinical pattern. The mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis of OCP was 2.95±2.85y (range: 5mo to 10y). The Foster classification varied from stage I to IV and 20 eyes (83%) were within or greater than Foster stage III on presentation. Two of the 12 patients (17%) demonstrated positive DIF; 3 of the 12 (25%) patients reported positive IIF. The mean duration of the follow-up period was 20.17±11.88mo (range: 6 to 48mo). IVCM showed variable degrees of abnormality in the conjuctiva-cornea and conjuctival scarring was detected in all the involved eyes. Corneal stromal cell activation and dendritic cell infiltration presented as ocular surface inflammation, ocular surface keratinization along with the destroyed Vogt palisades was noted in eyes with potential limbal stem cell deficiency. After treatment, remission of ocular surface inflammation was achieved in all the patients, 18 eyes (75%) remained stable, 6 eyes (25%) had recurrent conjunctivitis and cicatrization in 2 eyes (8%) was progressing. CONCLUSION As an autoimmune disease, OCP manifests as variable degrees of clinical and laboratory abnormalities with both local and systemic immunosuppressive treatment playing important roles

  16. The Clinical Features of Sarcoidosis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Judson, Marc A

    2015-08-01

    Sarcoidosis has innumerable clinical manifestations, as the disease may affect every body organ. Furthermore, the severity of sarcoidosis involvement may range from an asymptomatic state to a life-threatening condition. This manuscript reviews a wide variety of common and less common clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis. These manifestations are presented organ by organ, although additional sections describe systemic and multiorgan presentations of sarcoidosis. The lung is the organ most commonly involved with sarcoidosis with at least 90 % of sarcoidosis patients demonstrating lung involvement in most series. The skin, eye, liver, and peripheral lymph node are the next most commonly clinically involved organs in most series, with the frequency of involvement ranging from 10 to 30 %. The actual frequency of sarcoidosis organ involvement is probably much higher as it is frequently asymptomatic and may avoid detection. This is particularly common with lung, liver, cardiac, and bone involvement. Cardiac sarcoidosis is present in 25 % of all sarcoidosis but only causes clinical problems in 5 % of them. Nevertheless, unlike sarcoidosis involvement of most other organs, it may be suddenly fatal. Therefore, it is important to screen for cardiac sarcoidosis in all sarcoidosis patients. All sarcoidosis patients should also be screened for eye involvement as asymptomatic patients may have eye involvement that may cause permanent vision impairment. Pulmonary fibrosis from sarcoidosis is usually slowly progressive but may be life-threatening because of the development of respiratory failure, pulmonary hypertension, or hemoptysis related to a mycetoma or bronchiectasis. Some manifestations of sarcoidosis are not organ-specific and probably are the result of a release of mediators from the sarcoid granuloma. Two such manifestations include small fiber neuropathy and fatigue syndromes, and they are observed in a large percentage of patients.

  17. The Clinical Features of Sarcoidosis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Judson, Marc A

    2015-08-01

    Sarcoidosis has innumerable clinical manifestations, as the disease may affect every body organ. Furthermore, the severity of sarcoidosis involvement may range from an asymptomatic state to a life-threatening condition. This manuscript reviews a wide variety of common and less common clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis. These manifestations are presented organ by organ, although additional sections describe systemic and multiorgan presentations of sarcoidosis. The lung is the organ most commonly involved with sarcoidosis with at least 90 % of sarcoidosis patients demonstrating lung involvement in most series. The skin, eye, liver, and peripheral lymph node are the next most commonly clinically involved organs in most series, with the frequency of involvement ranging from 10 to 30 %. The actual frequency of sarcoidosis organ involvement is probably much higher as it is frequently asymptomatic and may avoid detection. This is particularly common with lung, liver, cardiac, and bone involvement. Cardiac sarcoidosis is present in 25 % of all sarcoidosis but only causes clinical problems in 5 % of them. Nevertheless, unlike sarcoidosis involvement of most other organs, it may be suddenly fatal. Therefore, it is important to screen for cardiac sarcoidosis in all sarcoidosis patients. All sarcoidosis patients should also be screened for eye involvement as asymptomatic patients may have eye involvement that may cause permanent vision impairment. Pulmonary fibrosis from sarcoidosis is usually slowly progressive but may be life-threatening because of the development of respiratory failure, pulmonary hypertension, or hemoptysis related to a mycetoma or bronchiectasis. Some manifestations of sarcoidosis are not organ-specific and probably are the result of a release of mediators from the sarcoid granuloma. Two such manifestations include small fiber neuropathy and fatigue syndromes, and they are observed in a large percentage of patients. PMID:25274450

  18. Genetic and clinical features of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bressman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) is defined as a syndrome in which dystonia is the only clinical sign (except for tremor), and there is no evidence of neuronal degeneration or an acquired cause by history or routine laboratory assessment. Seven different loci have been recognized for PTD but only two of the genes have been identified. In this review we will described the phenotypes associated with these loci and discuss the responsible gene. PMID:21168499

  19. Clinical features of 80 cases of tinea faciei treated at a rural clinic in Japan.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiromitsu; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Hiruma, Masataro; Ihn, Hironobu

    2014-12-01

    From March 2008 through February 2014, 80 patients aged 1-95 years (43 men and 37 women) were diagnosed with tinea faciei by a rural Japanese clinic. The affected sites were the cheek in 42 patients (52.5%), the auricles and area surrounding the auricles in 16 (20.0%), and the mandible in 12 (15.0%); 33 patients (41.2%) had concurrent ringworm in areas other than the face. Twenty-one patients (26.3%) had applied topical steroids to treat a rash. The pathogen responsible for tinea faciei was Trichophyton rubrum in 35 patients (43.7%), T. tonsurans in 19 (23.8%), T. mentagrophytes in 3 (3.8%), T. verrucosum in 2 (2.5%), T. violaceum in 2 (2.5%), Microsporum canis in 17 (21.3%), and M. gypseum in 2 (2.5%). Clinical symptoms were divided into three groups based on the severity of inflammation and the extent of lesions and scored in points. Anthropophilic dermatophytes resulted in a score of 1.82 points for the severity of inflammation and a score of 1.84 points for the extent of lesions while zoophilic dermatophytes resulted in a score of 2.14 points for the severity of inflammation and a score of 1.50 points for the extent of lesions. This indicates that anthropophilic fungi resulted in less inflammation and broader lesions, whereas zoophilic fungi resulted in more intense inflammation and smaller lesions. Patients who had applied topical steroids had a mean score of 1.90 points for the severity of inflammation and a mean score of 2.10 points for the extent of lesions. Patients who had not applied topical steroids had a mean score of 1.95 points for the severity of inflammation and a mean score of 1.59 points for the extent of lesions. The severity of inflammation did not differ significantly. However, lesions were significantly broader in patients who had applied topical steroids than in those who had not applied topical steroids (p < 0.04). The severity of tinea faciei is a useful index for the clinical diagnosis of tinea faciei.

  20. Spontaneous primary intraventricular hemorrhage: clinical features and early outcome.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; García-Eroles, Luis; Vicens, Adela; Oliveres, Montserrat; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Primary hemorrhage in the ventricular system without a recognizable parenchymal component is very rare. This single-center retrospective study aimed to further characterize the clinical characteristics and early outcome of this stroke subtype. Methods. All patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 19-year period were assessed. A standardized protocol with 161 items, including demographics, risk factors, clinical data, neuroimaging findings, and outcome, was used for data collection. A comparison was made between the groups of primary intraventricular hemorrhage and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage. Predictors of primary intraventricular hemorrhage were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results. There were 12 patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage (0.31% of all cases of stroke included in the database) and 133 in the cohort of subcortical hemorrhage. Very old age (≥85 years) (odds ratio (OR) 9.89), atrial fibrillation (OR 8.92), headache (OR 6.89), and altered consciousness (OR 4.36) were independent predictors of intraventricular hemorrhage. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.7% (5/12) but increased to 60% (3/5) in patients aged 85 years or older. Conclusion. Although primary intraventricular hemorrhage is uncommon, it is a severe clinical condition with a high early mortality. The prognosis is particularly poor in very old patients.

  1. Spontaneous Primary Intraventricular Hemorrhage: Clinical Features and Early Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; García-Eroles, Luis; Vicens, Adela; Oliveres, Montserrat; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Primary hemorrhage in the ventricular system without a recognizable parenchymal component is very rare. This single-center retrospective study aimed to further characterize the clinical characteristics and early outcome of this stroke subtype. Methods. All patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 19-year period were assessed. A standardized protocol with 161 items, including demographics, risk factors, clinical data, neuroimaging findings, and outcome, was used for data collection. A comparison was made between the groups of primary intraventricular hemorrhage and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage. Predictors of primary intraventricular hemorrhage were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results. There were 12 patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage (0.31% of all cases of stroke included in the database) and 133 in the cohort of subcortical hemorrhage. Very old age (≥85 years) (odds ratio (OR) 9.89), atrial fibrillation (OR 8.92), headache (OR 6.89), and altered consciousness (OR 4.36) were independent predictors of intraventricular hemorrhage. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.7% (5/12) but increased to 60% (3/5) in patients aged 85 years or older. Conclusion. Although primary intraventricular hemorrhage is uncommon, it is a severe clinical condition with a high early mortality. The prognosis is particularly poor in very old patients. PMID:22966468

  2. Clinical features, comorbidity, and cognitive impairment in elderly bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Ida Vikan; Haro, Josep Maria; Gjervan, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data specific to late-life bipolar disorder (BD) are limited. Current research is sparse and present guidelines are not adapted to this group of patients. Objectives We present a literature review on clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and cognitive impairment in patients with late-life BD. This review discusses common comorbidities that affect BD elders and how aging might affect cognition and treatment. Methods Eligible studies were identified in MedLine by the Medical Subject Headings terms “bipolar disorder” and “aged”. We only included original research reports published in English between 2012 and 2015. Results From 414 articles extracted, 16 studies were included in the review. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, type II diabetes, and endocrinological abnormalities were observed as highly prevalent. BD is associated with a high suicide risk. Bipolar elderly had an increased risk of dementia and performed worse on cognitive screening tests compared to age-matched controls across different levels of cognition. Despite high rates of medical comorbidity among bipolar elderly, a systematic under-recognition and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease have been suggested. Conclusion There was a high burden of physical comorbidities and cognitive impairment in late-life BD. Bipolar elderly might be under-recorded and undertreated in primary medical care, indicating that this group needs an adapted clinical assessment and specific clinical guidelines need to be established. PMID:27274256

  3. Clinical features of avian influenza in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Maamoun Mohamad; Khatab, Adel Mahmoud; El-Folly, Runia Fouad; Amer, Wegdan Ahmad Fouad